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Sample records for 99mtc labeled gnrh

  1. Evaluating disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis using 99mtc-glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Manolios, Nicholas; Ali, Marina; Camden, Bradley; Aflaky, Elham; Pavic, Katrina; Markewycz, Andrew; De Costa, Robert; Angelides, Socrates

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical utility of a novel radiotracer, 99mTc-glucosamine, in assessing disease activity of both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients with RA (nine males and 16 females) and 12 patients with AS (all male) at various stages of disease were recruited for the study. A clinical history and examination was performed, followed by the measurement of hematological, biochemical, and autoimmune serological parameters to assess disease activity. 99mTc-glucosamine was intravenously administered and scans were compared with other imaging modalities, including plain X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone scans. Results In patients with AS, 99mTc-glucosamine scans were more capable of identifying active disease and differentiating between inflammatory and non-inflammatory causes. In patients with RA, 99mTc-glucosamine accumulated at all known sites of disease involvement. Uptake was most pronounced in patients with active untreated disease. The relative tracer activity in the involved joints increased with time compared with that in the adjoining soft tissue, liver, and cardiac blood pool. Using Spearman’s correlation coefficient, there was a positive correlation among glucosamine scan scores, C-reactive protein (p=0.048), and clinical assessment (p=0.003), which was not noted with bone scans. Conclusion The radiotracer was well tolerated by all patients, with no adverse reactions. 99mTc-glucosamine imaging could detect spinal inflammation in AS. With respect to RA, 99mTc-glucosamine was a viable alternative to 99mTc-labeled methylene diphosphonate nuclear bone scans for imaging inflamed joints and had the added advantage of demonstrating a significant clinical correlation between disease activity and scan findings. PMID:27708974

  2. Colocalization of FM1-43, Bassoon, and GnRH-1: GnRH-1 release from cell bodies and their neuroprocesses.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Lidia C; Keen, Kim L; Terasawa, Ei

    2011-11-01

    Pulsatile release of GnRH-1 is critical for reproductive function. However, the cellular mechanism of GnRH-1 neurosecretion is still elusive. In this study, we examined the neurosecretory process of GnRH-1 neurons using time-lapse image acquisition followed by immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy. To monitor exocytotic processes, cultured GnRH-1 neurons derived from monkey embryos were labeled with the lipophilic dye, FM1-43, or its fixable form FM1-43Fx, in the presence or absence of depolarization signals, and changes in vesicles labeled with FM1-43 were analyzed. The results show FM1-43 was taken up into the cell and labeled puncta in the soma and neuroprocesses in the absence of depolarization signals, indicating that GnRH-1 neurons were spontaneously active. Depolarization of GnRH-1 neurons with high K+ or veratridine challenge increased the intensity and size of puncta in both soma and neuroprocesses, and the veratridine-induced changes in puncta were blocked by tetrodotoxin, indicating that changes in the puncta intensity and size reflect neurosecretory activity. Subsequent double immunocytochemistry for GnRH-1 and the synaptic vesicle marker, vesicle-associated membrane protein, demonstrated that the FM1-43Fx-labeled puncta were synaptic vesicles with the GnRH-1 peptide. Additional double immunocytochemistry for GnRH-1 and the marker of the neurosecretory active zone, Bassoon, indicated that the FM1-43Fx-labeled puncta were located at the sites of neurosecretory active zones in GnRH-1 neurons. These results suggest that GnRH-1 neurons have the capacity to release the peptide from the soma and dendrites. Collectively, we hypothesize that soma-dendritic release of the peptide may be a mechanism of synchronized activity among GnRH-1 neurons.

  3. Redefining gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cell groups in the male Syrian hamster: testosterone regulates GnRH mRNA in the tenia tecta.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Parfitt, David B; Thompson, Robert C; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2002-05-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates the production of testosterone via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and testosterone, in turn, regulates the GnRH system via negative feedback. We compared testosterone regulation of GnRH mRNA expression in four anatomically defined GnRH cell groups in juvenile and adult male Syrian hamsters, including a rostral population of GnRH cells in the tenia tecta. In situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) was used to measure GnRH mRNA in brains from castrated juveniles and adults treated with 0 mg or 2.5 mg testosterone pellets for one week. ISHH was performed on coronal sections using a 35S-cRNA probe generated from Syrian hamster GnRH cDNA. Testosterone treatment resulted in a significant reduction in mean area of GnRH neurones covered by silver grains within the tenia tecta, but only a trend toward decreased GnRH mRNA in the diagonal band of Broca/organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (DBB/OVLT), medial septum (MS), and caudal preoptic area (cPOA). The effects of testosterone were independent of age. Frequency distribution analyses unveiled a significant reduction in the number of heavily labelled cells following testosterone treatment within the tenia tecta and MS. Simple regression analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between plasma luteinizing hormone concentrations and GnRH mRNA only in the tenia tecta. These data indicate that, overall, GnRH mRNA is modestly reduced by testosterone, and the most robust attenuation of GnRH mRNA occurs within the tenia tecta. This is the first report to link mechanisms of steroid negative feedback with tenia tecta GnRH neurones, providing a new focus for investigating brain region-specific steroidal regulation of GnRH synthesis.

  4. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram inhibits GnRH synthesis and spermatogenesis in the male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants for the treatment of depression. However, SSRIs cause sexual side effects such as anorgasmia, erectile dysfunction, and diminished libido that are thought to be mediated through the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play an important role in the control of reproduction. To elucidate the neuroendocrine mechanisms of SSRI-induced reproductive failure, we examined the neuronal association between 5-HT and GnRH (GnRH2 and GnRH3) systems in the male zebrafish. Double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy followed by three-dimensional construction analysis showed close associations between 5-HT fibers with GnRH3 fibers and preoptic-GnRH3 cell bodies, but there was no association with GnRH2 cell bodies and fibers. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that short-term treatment (2 wk) with low to medium doses (4 and 40 μg/L, respectively) of citalopram significantly decreased mRNA levels of gnrh3, gonadotropins (lhb and fshb) and 5-HT-related genes (tph2 and sert) in the male zebrafish. In addition, short-term citalopram treatment significantly decreased the fluorescence density of 5-HT and GnRH3 fibers compared with controls. Short-term treatment with low, medium, and high (100 μg/L) citalopram doses had no effects on the profiles of different stages of spermatogenesis, while long-term (1 mo) citalopram treatment with medium and high doses significantly inhibited the different stages of spermatogenesis. These results show morphological and functional associations between the 5-HT and the hypophysiotropic GnHR3 system, which involve SSRI-induced reproductive failures. PMID:26157069

  5. GnRH analogs in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Hodgen, G D

    1991-03-01

    The uses of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs in in vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) or related assisted reproductive technologies has advanced rapidly since initial efforts in the early 1980's. By making selective amino acid substitutions, often including the 6 and 10 position, the peptide chemists designed the compounds that we call the GnRH agonists of today. GnRH antagonists possess amino substitutions usually involving positions 1,2,3, 6 and 10, although others may be used. Moreover, recent versions are chemically very sophisticated, often having up to 5 D-amino acids (only L-amino acids occur naturally) and a variety of blocking groups that confer metabolic stability and reduced allergic side-effects. The first available formulation of a GnRH agonist product in the USA was an aqueous preparation for sc injection (usually once or twice daily). It has been studied for several years both in the treatment of prostatic carcinoma and for treatment of children presenting with true precocious puberty. More recently, a depo (monthly) preparation, which microencapulates the GnRH agonist in biodegradable microspheres, received registry approval for treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Also, an implant formulation aimed at chronic treatment indications, as well as nasal delivery products (usually applied multiple times daily) are in development. I will leave specific predictions of the future to those bearing higher powers, except to anticipate that when a safe and effective GnRH antagonist product is developed, it is likely to offer special advantages for IVF/GIFT treatment because of three apparent advantages over GnRH agonist products.

  6. GnRH neurons of young and aged female rhesus monkeys co-express GPER but are unaffected by long-term hormone replacement.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Michelle M; Gore, Andrea C

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is caused by changes in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that controls reproduction. Hypophysiotropic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus orchestrate the activity of this axis and are regulated by hormonal feedback loops. The mechanisms by which GnRH responds to the primary regulatory sex steroid hormone, estradiol (E2), are still poorly understood in the context of menopause. Our goal was to determine whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is co-expressed in adult primate GnRH neurons and whether this changes with aging and/or E2 treatment. We used immunofluorescence double-labeling to characterize the co-expression of GPER in GnRH perikarya and terminals in the hypothalamus. Young and aged rhesus macaques were ovariectomized and given long-term (~2-year) hormone treatments (E2, E2 + progesterone, or vehicle) selected to mimic currently prescribed hormone replacement therapies used for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms in women. We found that about half of GnRH perikarya co-expressed GPER, while only about 12% of GnRH processes and terminals in the median eminence (ME) were double-labeled. Additionally, many GPER-labeled processes were in direct contact with GnRH neurons, often wrapped around the perikarya and processes and in close proximity in the ME. These results extend prior work by showing robust co-localization of GPER in GnRH in a clinically relevant model, and they support the possibility that GPER-mediated E2 regulation of GnRH occurs both in the soma and terminals in nonhuman primates.

  7. GnRH neurons of young and aged female rhesus monkeys co-express GPER but are unaffected by long-term hormone replacement.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Michelle M; Gore, Andrea C

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is caused by changes in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that controls reproduction. Hypophysiotropic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus orchestrate the activity of this axis and are regulated by hormonal feedback loops. The mechanisms by which GnRH responds to the primary regulatory sex steroid hormone, estradiol (E2), are still poorly understood in the context of menopause. Our goal was to determine whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is co-expressed in adult primate GnRH neurons and whether this changes with aging and/or E2 treatment. We used immunofluorescence double-labeling to characterize the co-expression of GPER in GnRH perikarya and terminals in the hypothalamus. Young and aged rhesus macaques were ovariectomized and given long-term (~2-year) hormone treatments (E2, E2 + progesterone, or vehicle) selected to mimic currently prescribed hormone replacement therapies used for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms in women. We found that about half of GnRH perikarya co-expressed GPER, while only about 12% of GnRH processes and terminals in the median eminence (ME) were double-labeled. Additionally, many GPER-labeled processes were in direct contact with GnRH neurons, often wrapped around the perikarya and processes and in close proximity in the ME. These results extend prior work by showing robust co-localization of GPER in GnRH in a clinically relevant model, and they support the possibility that GPER-mediated E2 regulation of GnRH occurs both in the soma and terminals in nonhuman primates. PMID:25428637

  8. The study of GnRH control of reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Filicori, M; Crowley, W F

    1984-01-01

    The activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). GnRH, gonadotropins, and gonadal sex steroids are secreted in a pulsatile fashion. As the peripheral plasma concentrations of GnRH are too low for the existing assay systems, the pattern of pulsatile release of gonadotropins is often utilized for the indirect estimation of hypothalamic GnRH activity. In addition, the long-term pulsatile administration of exogenous GnRH in selected states of GnRH deficiency provides important information on the regulation of the HPG axis. Because of the limits of each approach, both investigational tools should be used complementary for the study of GnRH role in the control of pituitary and gonadal function. This article reviews recent information on GnRH physiology acquired with the use of these methods.

  9. LH response to GnRH blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone ... GnRH is a hormone made by the hypothalamus gland. LH is made by the pituitary gland. GnRH causes (stimulates) the pituitary gland to ...

  10. Kisspeptin is a component of the pulse generator for GnRH secretion in female sheep but not the pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Ahmed; Pereira, Alda; Clarke, Iain J

    2015-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that kisspeptin cells constitute the "pulse generator" for GnRH secretion. In ewes, we determined whether iv administered kisspeptin elicits a secretory pulse of LH in anaesthetized, sex-steroid suppressed ovariectomized ewes. A response was seen in both anaesthetized and conscious animals, which was not associated with induction of c-Fos labeling in GnRH cells, supporting the notion that kisspeptin acts on the neurosecretory GnRH terminals. Response was lower in the anaesthetized animals, suggesting that some nonkisspeptin elements may be involved in GnRH responses. Microinjection of kisspeptin (100 nmol) into the median eminence of conscious ewes elicited a pulse of LH, indicating that kisspeptin acts at this level to cause GnRH secretion. To determine which cells are activated at the time of GnRH secretion, we blood sampled 18 ewes during the luteal phase of the estrous cycle and harvested brains after 3 hours. Three of these ewes displayed a pulse of LH within 30 minutes of euthanasia. An increase in c-Fos labeling was seen in kisspeptin and glutamate cells of the arcuate nucleus but not in GnRH neurons, preoptic kisspeptin neurons, or preoptic glutamate neurons. Immunohistochemistry in 4 hypothalami showed that 72% of arcuate kisspeptin cells receive glutamatergic input. These data support the concept that the kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus drive pulsatile secretion of GnRH at the level of the median eminence, but this may involve "upstream" input from glutamate cells. We conclude that the pulse generator for GnRH secretion involves more than 1 element.

  11. Kisspeptin is a component of the pulse generator for GnRH secretion in female sheep but not the pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Ahmed; Pereira, Alda; Clarke, Iain J

    2015-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that kisspeptin cells constitute the "pulse generator" for GnRH secretion. In ewes, we determined whether iv administered kisspeptin elicits a secretory pulse of LH in anaesthetized, sex-steroid suppressed ovariectomized ewes. A response was seen in both anaesthetized and conscious animals, which was not associated with induction of c-Fos labeling in GnRH cells, supporting the notion that kisspeptin acts on the neurosecretory GnRH terminals. Response was lower in the anaesthetized animals, suggesting that some nonkisspeptin elements may be involved in GnRH responses. Microinjection of kisspeptin (100 nmol) into the median eminence of conscious ewes elicited a pulse of LH, indicating that kisspeptin acts at this level to cause GnRH secretion. To determine which cells are activated at the time of GnRH secretion, we blood sampled 18 ewes during the luteal phase of the estrous cycle and harvested brains after 3 hours. Three of these ewes displayed a pulse of LH within 30 minutes of euthanasia. An increase in c-Fos labeling was seen in kisspeptin and glutamate cells of the arcuate nucleus but not in GnRH neurons, preoptic kisspeptin neurons, or preoptic glutamate neurons. Immunohistochemistry in 4 hypothalami showed that 72% of arcuate kisspeptin cells receive glutamatergic input. These data support the concept that the kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus drive pulsatile secretion of GnRH at the level of the median eminence, but this may involve "upstream" input from glutamate cells. We conclude that the pulse generator for GnRH secretion involves more than 1 element. PMID:25710282

  12. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Polly P; Brusman, Liza E; Iyer, Anita K; Webster, Nicholas J G; Mellon, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5' start sites, are 3' polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons.

  13. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Polly P.; Brusman, Liza E.; Iyer, Anita K.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5’ start sites, are 3’ polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  14. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Polly P; Brusman, Liza E; Iyer, Anita K; Webster, Nicholas J G; Mellon, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5' start sites, are 3' polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  15. Courtship interactions stimulate rapid changes in GnRH synthesis in male ring doves

    PubMed Central

    Mantei, Kristen E.; Ramakrishnan, Selvakumar; Sharp, Peter J.; Buntin, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Many birds and mammals show changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in response to social or sexual interactions between breeding partners. While alterations in GnRH neuronal activity play an important role in stimulating these changes, it remains unclear if acute behaviorally-induced alterations in GnRH release are accompanied by parallel changes in GnRH synthesis. To investigate this relationship, we examined changes in the activity of GnRH neurons in the brains of male ring doves following brief periods of courtship interactions with females. Such interactions have been previously shown to increase plasma LH in courting male doves at 24 h, but not at 1 h, after pairing with females. In the first study, males allowed to court females for 2 h had 60% more cells that showed immunocytochemical labeling for GnRH-I in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus than did control males that remained isolated from females. To determine whether an increase in GnRH gene expression preceded this increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the POA, changes in the number of cells with detectable GnRH-I mRNA in the POA were measured by in situ hybridization following a 1 h period of courtship interactions with females. In this second study, courting males exhibited 40% more cells with GnRH-I in this region than did isolated control males. GnRH-immunoreactive neurons in two other diencephalic regions failed to show these courtship-induced changes. Plasma LH was not elevated after 1 or 2 h of courtship. These results demonstrate that the release of GnRH-I in the POA that is presumably responsible for courtship-induced pituitary and gonadal activation is accompanied by a rapid increase in GnRH synthesis that occurs before plasma LH levels increase. We suggest that this increase in GnRH synthesis is necessary to support the extended period of HPG axis activation that is seen in this species during the 5–10 day period of courtship and nest building activity. PMID

  16. [GnRH analogs in gynecology. Possibilities for therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Niesert, S

    1990-09-10

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are synthetic peptide analogues of the natural gonadotropin releasing hormone with a stronger and more prolonged effect than the natural GnRH. Repeated administration of GnRH agonists induces pituitary desensitization followed by a decrease in gonadotropin secretion and estradiol synthesis. Thus reversible hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is produced. Consequently, estrogen-dependent diseases can be treated successfully with GnRH analogues. The therapeutic results obtained in patients with endometriosis, leiomyoma, pubertas praecox, and metastatic breast cancer are discussed. Furthermore the contraceptive properties of GnRH analogues, and combination treatment with HMG to induce ovulation is reviewed. PMID:2262188

  17. GnRH Pulsatility, the Pituitary Response and Reproductive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Webster, Nicholas J.G.

    2015-01-01

    GnRH plays an essential role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive function. In mammals, the pattern of gonadotropin secretion includes both pulse and surge phases, which are regulated independently. The pulsatile release of GnRH and LH plays an important role in the development of sexual function and in the normal regulation of the menstrual cycle. The importance of GnRH pulsatility was established in a series of classic studies. Fertility is impaired when GnRH pulsatility is inhibited by chronic malnutrition, excessive caloric expenditure, or aging. A number of reproductive disorders in women with including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypothlamic amenorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are also associated with disruption of the normal pulsatile GnRH secretion. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms of this pulsatile GnRH regulation are not well understood. Here, we review recent studies about GnRH pulsatility, signaling and transcriptional response, and its implications for disease. PMID:19609045

  18. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  19. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons.

    PubMed

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP-GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP-GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP-GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  20. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin–GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  1. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET).

    PubMed

    Depalo, Raffaella; Jayakrishan, K; Garruti, Gabriella; Totaro, Ilaria; Panzarino, Mariantonietta; Giorgino, Francesco; Selvaggi, Luigi E

    2012-04-13

    Several protocols are actually available for in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer. The review summarizes the main differences and the clinic characteristics of the protocols in use with GnRH agonists and GnRH antagonists by emphasizing the major outcomes and hormonal changes associated with each protocol. The majority of randomized clinical trials clearly shows that in "in Vitro" Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, the combination of exogenous Gonadotropin plus a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist, which is able to suppress pituitary FSH and LH secretion, is associated with increased pregnancy rate as compared with the use of gonadotropins without a GnRH agonist. Protocols with GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a premature rise of LH and induce a shorter and more cost-effective ovarian stimulation compared to the long agonist protocol. However, a different synchronization of follicular recruitment and growth occurs with GnRH agonists than with GnRH antagonists. Future developments have to be focused on timing of the administration of GnRH antagonists, by giving a great attention to new strategies of stimulation in patients in which radio-chemotherapy cycles are needed.

  2. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Several protocols are actually available for in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer. The review summarizes the main differences and the clinic characteristics of the protocols in use with GnRH agonists and GnRH antagonists by emphasizing the major outcomes and hormonal changes associated with each protocol. The majority of randomized clinical trials clearly shows that in “in Vitro” Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, the combination of exogenous Gonadotropin plus a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist, which is able to suppress pituitary FSH and LH secretion, is associated with increased pregnancy rate as compared with the use of gonadotropins without a GnRH agonist. Protocols with GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a premature rise of LH and induce a shorter and more cost-effective ovarian stimulation compared to the long agonist protocol. However, a different synchronization of follicular recruitment and growth occurs with GnRH agonists than with GnRH antagonists. Future developments have to be focused on timing of the administration of GnRH antagonists, by giving a great attention to new strategies of stimulation in patients in which radio-chemotherapy cycles are needed. PMID:22500852

  3. Cloning and functional analysis of promoters of three GnRH genes in a cichlid

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahashi, Takashi; Sato, Hideki; Sakuma, Yasuo; Parhar, Ishwar S. . E-mail: ishwar@nms.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) types, a key molecule for reproductive physiology, remain unclear. In the present study, we cloned the promoters of GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 genes in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus; and found putative binding sites for glucocorticoid receptors, Sp1, C/EBP, GATA, and Oct-1, but not for androgen receptors in all three GnRH promoters using computer analysis. The presence of binding sites for progesterone receptors in GnRH1, estrogen receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH2, and thyroid hormone receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH3 suggests direct action of steroid hormones on GnRH types. Our observation of SOX and LINE-like sequences exclusively in GnRH1, COUP in GnRH2, and retinoid X receptors in GnRH3 suggests their role in sexual differentiation, midbrain segmentation, and visual cue integration, respectively. Thus, the characteristic binding sites for nuclear receptors and transcription factors support the notion that each GnRH type is regulated differently and has distinct physiological roles.

  4. GnRH Analogues in the Prevention of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alama, Pilar; Bellver, Jose; Vidal, Carmen; Giles, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The GnRH analogue (agonist and antagonist GnRH) changed ovarian stimulation. On the one hand, it improved chances of pregnancy to obtain more oocytes and better embryos. This leads to an ovarian hyper-response, which can be complicated by the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). On the other hand, the GnRH analogue can prevent the incidence of OHSS: GnRH antagonist protocols, GnRH agonist for triggering final oocyte maturation, either together or separately, coasting, and the GnRH analogue may prove useful for avoiding OHSS in high-risk patients. We review these topics in this article. PMID:23825982

  5. Deletion of Vax1 from Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons Abolishes GnRH Expression and Leads to Hypogonadism and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Hanne M.; Trang, Crystal; Gong, Ping; Kimura, Ikuo; Pandolfi, Erica C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are at the apex of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that regulates mammalian fertility. Herein we demonstrate a critical role for the homeodomain transcription factor ventral anterior homeobox 1 (VAX1) in GnRH neuron maturation and show that Vax1 deletion from GnRH neurons leads to complete infertility in males and females. Specifically, global Vax1 knock-out embryos had normal numbers of GnRH neurons at 13 d of gestation, but no GnRH staining was detected by embryonic day 17. To identify the role of VAX1 specifically in GnRH neuron development, Vax1flox mice were generated and lineage tracing performed in Vax1flox/flox:GnRHcre:RosaLacZ mice. This identified VAX1 as essential for maintaining expression of Gnrh1. The absence of GnRH staining in adult Vax1flox/flox:GnRHcre mice led to delayed puberty, hypogonadism, and infertility. To address the mechanism by which VAX1 maintains Gnrh1 transcription, the capacity of VAX1 to regulate Gnrh1 transcription was evaluated in the GnRH cell lines GN11 and GT1-7. As determined by luciferase and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we found VAX1 to be a direct activator of the GnRH promoter through binding to four ATTA sites in the GnRH enhancer (E1) and proximal promoter (P), and able to compete with the homeoprotein SIX6 for occupation of the identified ATTA sites in the GnRH promoter. We conclude that VAX1 is expressed in GnRH neurons where it is required for GnRH neuron expression of GnRH and maintenance of fertility in mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Infertility classified as idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is characterized by delayed or absent sexual maturation and low sex steroid levels due to alterations in neuroendocrine control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The incidence of IHH is 1–10 cases per 100,000 births. Although extensive efforts have been invested in identifying genes giving rise to IHH, >50% of cases have unknown

  6. GnRH, anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism - where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Paolo E.; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate the nasal placode and migrate into the brain during prenatal development. Once within the brain, these cells become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, essential for reproductive function. Disruption of this system causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). HH associated with anosmia is clinically defined as Kallman syndrome (KS). Recent work examining the developing nasal region has shed new light on cellular composition, cell interactions and molecular cues responsible for the development of this system in different species. This review discusses some developmental aspects, animal models and current advancements in our understanding of pathologies affecting GnRH. In addition we discuss how development of neural crest derivatives such as the glia of the olfactory system and craniofacial structures control GnRH development and reproductive function. PMID:25306902

  7. The GnRH promoter: target of transcription factors, hormones, and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S B; Eraly, S A; Mellon, P L

    1998-05-25

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for normal reproductive maturation and function. We present a review of the known mechanisms of hypothalamic GnRH transcriptional control through the conserved GnRH promoter. Understanding this promoter region will allow us to comprehend better the complexities of the hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis.

  8. A modified gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol failed to increase clinical pregnancy rates in comparison with the long GnRH protocol.

    PubMed

    Loutradis, Dimitris; Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Drakakis, Peter; Milingos, Spyridon; Antsaklis, Aris; Michalas, Stylianos

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized study was to compare stimulation characteristics and IVF outcomes of the standard long GnRH agonist protocol for ovarian stimulation with a modified GnRH antagonist protocol. Starting GnRH antagonist in a flexible protocol according to the size of the leading follicle, with simultaneous augmentation of 75 IU recombinant FSH, failed to increase clinical pregnancy rates.

  9. R31C GNRH1 Mutation and Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Luigi; Albarel, Frederique; Bouchard, Philippe; Gallant, Megan; Flanagan, Colleen A.; Bobe, Regis; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joelle; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Brue, Thierry; Millar, Robert P.; Lombes, Marc; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Bouligand, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) is a rare reproductive disease leading to lack of puberty and infertility. Loss-of-function mutations of GNRH1 gene are a very rare cause of autosomal recessive nCHH. R31C GNRH1 is the only missense mutation that affects the conserved GnRH decapeptide sequence. This mutation was identified in a CpG islet in nine nCHH subjects from four unrelated families, giving evidence for a putative “hot spot”. Interestingly, all the nCHH patients carry this mutation in heterozygosis that strikingly contrasts with the recessive inheritance associated with frame shift and non-sense mutations. Therefore, after exclusion of a second genetic event, a comprehensive functional characterization of the mutant R31C GnRH was undertaken. Using different cellular models, we clearly demonstrate a dramatic reduction of the mutant decapeptide capacity to bind GnRH-receptor, to activate MAPK pathway and to trigger inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular calcium mobilization. In addition it is less able than wild type to induce lh-beta transcription and LH secretion in gonadotrope cells. Finally, the absence of a negative dominance in vitro offers a unique opportunity to discuss the complex in vivo patho-physiology of this form of nCHH. PMID:23936060

  10. LH-independent testosterone secretion is mediated by the interaction between GNRH2 and its receptor within porcine testes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH1), the second mammalian isoform (GNRH2) is an ineffective stimulant of gonadotropin release. Species that produce GNRH2 may not maintain a functional GNRH2 receptor (GNRHR2) due to coding errors. A full length GNRHR2 gene has been identified ...

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in ancient teleosts, the bonytongue fishes: putative origin of salmon GnRH.

    PubMed

    O'neill, D F; Powell, J F; Standen, E M; Youson, J H; Warby, C M; Sherwood, N M

    1998-12-01

    The molecular forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were examined in the bonytongue fishes (Osteoglossomorpha), one of the most ancient living teleost groups. These fish represent a phylogenetic link between the early ray-finned fishes and the modern teleosts. Five representative species from four of six bonytongue families were examined for GnRH using high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay techniques with antisera raised against salmon (s), chicken-II (c-II), and mammalian (m) forms of GnRH. Salmon GnRH and cGnRH-II were identified in four of the species (arawana, elephantnose, false featherfin, Asiatic featherfin) whereas in the butterfly fish, mGnRH and cGnRH-II were identified. Our data suggest that teleosts such as eels and butterfly fish, which have mGnRH like that of even earlier ray-finned fishes, may have evolved before fish with sGnRH. We also suggest that sGnRH first appeared in the Osteoglossomorpha. The phylogenetic relationship of the eels (Anguillidae), butterfly fish (Pantodontidae), and bonytongue fish among other teleosts needs to be reexamined using additional characteristics.

  12. Early-life stress changes expression of GnRH and kisspeptin genes and DNA methylation of GnRH3 promoter in the adult zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yee Min; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-02-01

    Early-life stress can cause long-term effects in the adulthood such as alterations in behaviour, brain functions and reproduction. DNA methylation is a mechanism of epigenetic change caused by early-life stress. Dexamethasone (DEX) was administered to zebrafish larvae to study its effect on reproductive dysfunction. The level of GnRH2, GnRH3, Kiss1 and Kiss2 mRNAs were measured between different doses of DEX treatment groups in adult zebrafish. Kiss1 and GnRH2 expression were increased in the 200mg/L DEX treated while Kiss2 and GnRH3 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the 2mg/L DEX-treated zebrafish. The up-regulation may be related to programming effect of DEX in the zebrafish larvae, causing overcompensation mechanism to increase the mRNA levels. Furthermore, DEX treatment caused negative impact on the development and maturation of the testes, in particular spermatogenesis. Therefore, immature gonadal development may cause positive feedback by increasing GnRH and Kiss. This indicates that DEX can alter the regulation of GnRH2, GnRH3, Kiss1 and Kiss2 in adult zebrafish, which affects maturation of gonads. Computer analysis of 1.5 kb region upstream of the 5' UTR of Kiss1, Kiss2, GnRH2 and GnRH3 promoter showed that there are putative binding sites of glucocorticoid response element and transcription factors involved in stress response. GnRH3 promoter analysed from pre-optic area, ventral telencephalon and ventral olfactory bulb showed higher methylation at CpG residues located on -1410, -1377 and -1355 between control and 2mg/L DEX-treated groups. Hence, early-life DEX treatment can alter methylation of GnRH3 gene promoter, which subsequently affects gene regulation and reproductive functions.

  13. Neuronal Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Astrocytic Gonadotrophin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) Immunoreactivity in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J K; Tse, M T; Hamson, D K; Taves, M D; Ma, C; McGuire, N; Arckens, L; Bentley, G E; Galea, L A M; Floresco, S B; Soma, K K

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are not only present in the anterior pituitary, but also are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituitary gonadotrophin secretion and is also expressed in the hippocampus of a songbird; its role outside of the reproductive axis is not well established. In the present study, we employed immunohistochemistry to examine three forms of GnRH [mammalian GnRH-I (mGnRH-I), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and lamprey GnRH-III (lGnRH-III)] and GnIH in the adult rat hippocampus. No mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ cell bodies were present in the hippocampus. Sparse mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ fibres were present within the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus, along the hippocampal fissure, and within the hilus of the dentate gyrus. No lGnRH-III was present in the rodent hippocampus. GnIH-immunoreactivity was present in the hippocampus in cell bodies that resembled astrocytes. Males had more GnIH+ cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus than females. To confirm the GnIH+ cell body phenotype, we performed double-label immunofluorescence against GnIH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN. Immunofluorescence revealed that all GnIH+ cell bodies in the hippocampus also contained GFAP, a marker of astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that GnRH does not reach GnRH receptors in the rat hippocampus primarily via synaptic release. By contrast, GnIH might be synthesised locally in the rat hippocampus by astrocytes. These data shed light on the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  14. Identification and molecular characterization of three GnRH ligands and five GnRH receptors in the spotted green pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, T; Park, M K

    2005-10-20

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is thought to have diverse physiological functions. Understanding regulatory mechanisms of GnRH functions requires detailed knowledge of gene expressions of both GnRH ligands and receptors in a single species. This report concerns identification and molecular characterization of GnRH ligands and receptors in the spotted green pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis. It was identified that the pufferfish possessed three types of GnRH ligands and five types of GnRH receptors. All types of ligands and receptors showed different expression patterns, and were widely expressed both inside and outside the brain. Gonads expressed all the ligand and receptor subtypes. Two of five receptor subtypes could not be detected in the pituitary gland of reproductively active individuals, suggesting the existence of novel GnRH systems independent of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Alternative splicing was also observed for some receptor subtypes. The present results indicate that diversified gene expressions combined with molecular diversity contribute to the functional diversity of GnRH.

  15. GnRH increases glucose transporter-1 expression and stimulates glucose uptake in the gonadotroph.

    PubMed

    Harris, Valerie M; Bendre, Sachin V; Gonzalez De Los Santos, Francina; Fite, Alemu; El-Yaman El-Dandachli, Ahmad; Kurenbekova, Lyazat; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Buggs-Saxton, Colleen

    2012-02-01

    GnRH is the main regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (H-P-G) axis. GnRH stimulates the pituitary gonadotroph to synthesize and secrete gonadotrophins (LH and FSH), and this effect of GnRH is dependent on the availability of glucose and other nutrients. Little is known about whether GnRH regulates glucose metabolism in the gonadotroph. This study examined the regulation of glucose transporters (Gluts) by GnRH in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line. Using real-time PCR analysis, the expression of Glut1, -2, -4, and -8 was detected, but Glut1 mRNA expression level was more abundant than the mRNA expression levels of Glut2, -4, and -8. After the treatment of LβT2 cells with GnRH, Glut1 mRNA expression was markedly induced, but there was no GnRH-induction of Glut2, -4, or -8 mRNA expression in LβT2 cells. The effect of GnRH on Glut1 mRNA expression is partly mediated by ERK activation. GnRH increased GLUT1 protein and stimulated GLUT1 translocation to the cell surface of LβT2 cells. Glucose uptake assays were performed in LβT2 cells and showed that GnRH stimulates glucose uptake in the gonadotroph. Finally, exogenous treatment of mice with GnRH increased the expression of Glut1 but not the expression of Glut2, -4, or -8 in the pituitary. Therefore, regulation of glucose metabolism by GnRH via changes in Gluts expression and subcellular location in the pituitary gonadotroph reveals a novel response of the gonadotroph to GnRH.

  16. A role for FE65 in controlling GnRH-1 neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Forni, Paolo E; Fornaro, Michele; Guénette, Suzanne; Wray, Susan

    2011-01-12

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH-1) neurons migrate from the nasal placode to the forebrain where they control gonadal function via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The birth of GnRH-1-expressing neurons is one of the first neurogenic events in the developing nasal placode. By gene expression screening on single GnRH-1 neurons, amyloid precursor binding protein-1 (FE65) was identified in migratory GnRH-1 neurons. FE65 has been shown to modulate β1-integrin dynamics, actin cytoskeleton, cell motility, and FE65/amyloid precursor protein signaling has been described in neuro/glial cell fate determination as well as in modulating neurogenesis. Analysis of two mouse lines, one deficient for the 97 kDa FE65 isoform and a second deficient for the 97 and 60 kDa forms of FE65, showed overlapping phenotypes. In both lines, no migratory defects of the GnRH-1 neurons were observed, but a 25% increase in GnRH-1 neuronal number during embryonic development was found. Bromodeoxyuridine birth tracing and spatiotemporal tracking of GnRH-1 cell precursors demonstrated that the lack of the N-terminal portion of FE65, which includes part of the functional nuclear translocation/gene transcription domain of FE65 (WW domain), extends the timing of GnRH-1 neurogenesis in the developing nasal placode without affecting proliferation of GnRH-1 neuronal progenitors or cell death. The observed changes in the dynamics of GnRH-1 neurogenesis highlight a unique role for the 97 kDa isoform of FE65 and suggest that GnRH-1 cells, which have a short neurogenic window, originate from multipotent progenitors able to generate distinct cell types as GnRH-1 neurogenesis declines in response to environmental changes.

  17. Comprehensive Analysis of GnRH2 Neuronal Projections in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Smith, Olivia; Zmora, Nilli; Xu, Shan; Zohar, Yonathan

    2014-01-01

    The presence and conservation of GnRH2 across vertebrate species suggest important biological roles. However, the function of GnRH2 remains unclear. A good research model for GnRH2 functional studies is still lacking largely due to the absence of GnRH2 in the widely used mouse model. Hence, we used the zebrafish, for which powerful genetic tools are available, and developed a transgenic (Tg) line expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). The high sensitivity of eGFP, which can diffuse throughout the neuron, enables us to document the complete projectome of GnRH2 neurons at different developmental stages. Fine projection structures were observed without sacrificing the fish. Crossed with the GnRH3:tdTomato Tg line, the GnRH2:eGFP Tg line provides us with an opportunity to visualize the entire GnRH system simultaneously in one organism. This work will provide a framework to understand the function of the highly-conserved GnRH2 system.

  18. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  19. Targeted Mutagenesis of the Hypophysiotropic Gnrh3 in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Reveals No Effects on Reproductive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Olivia Smith; Wong, Ten-Tsao; Zmora, Nilli; Zohar, Yonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gnrh is the major neuropeptide regulator of vertebrate reproduction, triggering a cascade of events in the pituitary-gonadal axis that result in reproductive competence. Previous research in mice and humans has demonstrated that Gnrh/GNRH null mutations result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. The goal of this study was to eliminate gnrh3 (the hypophysiotropic Gnrh form) function in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to determine how ontogeny and reproductive performance are affected, as well as factors downstream of Gnrh3 along the reproductive axis. Using the TALEN technology, we developed a gnrh3-/- zebrafish line that harbors a 62 bp deletion in the gnrh3 gene. Our gnrh3-/- zebrafish line represents the first targeted and heritable mutation of a Gnrh isoform in any organism. Using immunohistochemistry, we verified that gnrh3-/- fish do not possess Gnrh3 peptide in any regions of the brain. However, other than changes in mRNA levels of pituitary gonadotropin genes (fshb, lhb, and cga) during early development, which are corrected by adulthood, there were no changes in ontogeny and reproduction in gnrh3-/- fish. The gnrh3-/- zebrafish are fertile, displaying normal gametogenesis and reproductive performance in males and females. Together with our previous results that Gnrh3 cell ablation causes infertility, these results indicate that a compensatory mechanism is being activated, which is probably primed early on upon Gnrh3 neuron differentiation and possibly confined to Gnrh3 neurons. Potential compensation factors and sensitive windows of time for compensation during development and puberty should be explored. PMID:27355207

  20. Dexamethasone suppresses gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and has direct pituitary effects in male rats: differential regulation of GnRH receptor and gonadotropin responses to GnRH.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H; Jameel, M L; Barkan, A L

    1988-06-01

    Endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoid excess leads to the development of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, but the site(s) and mechanisms of glucocorticoid action are uncertain. We studied the effects of various doses of dexamethasone (Dex) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in intact and castrate testosterone-replaced (cast + T) male rats and attempted to determine possible sites of Dex effects. A dose-dependent suppression of basal gonadotropin secretion was induced by 5 days of Dex treatment (20, 100, 500, or 2,500 micrograms/kg.day), and the highest dose completely abolished the postcastration rise in pituitary GnRH receptor number (GnRH-R) and serum gonadotropin levels. Administration of exogenous GnRH (0.02-200 micrograms/day over 2 days) resulted in a dose-dependent induction in GnRH-R in both intact and cast + T rats, but the effect was significantly (P less than 0.01) augmented in Dex-treated animals. In contrast, acute LH and FSH responses to GnRH (10, 25, 50, 100, or 250 ng, iv) were significantly blunted in Dex-treated rats. The data suggest that 1) Dex suppresses hypothalamic GnRH secretion, thereby preventing the postcastration rises in GnRH-R and gonadotropins; 2) at the pituitary level, Dex dissociates GnRH-R and gonadotropin responses to GnRH, augmenting GnRH-R induction by GnRH and suppressing gonadotropin responses to GnRH at a postreceptor site; and 3) the model of Dex-treated rats may be useful to study differential GnRH regulation of GnRH-R and gonadotropin secretion.

  1. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons. PMID:26934298

  2. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons.

  3. A microRNA switch regulates the rise in hypothalamic GnRH production before puberty.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Chachlaki, Konstantina; Roa, Juan; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Jouy, Nathalie; Gallet, Sarah; Gaytan, Francisco; Parkash, Jyoti; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Giacobini, Paolo; Prevot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    A sparse population of a few hundred primarily hypothalamic neurons forms the hub of a complex neuroglial network that controls reproduction in mammals by secreting the 'master molecule' gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely postnatal changes in GnRH expression are essential for puberty and adult fertility. Here we report that a multilayered microRNA-operated switch with built-in feedback governs increased GnRH expression during the infantile-to-juvenile transition and that impairing microRNA synthesis in GnRH neurons leads to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility in mice. Two essential components of this switch, miR-200 and miR-155, respectively regulate Zeb1, a repressor of Gnrh transcriptional activators and Gnrh itself, and Cebpb, a nitric oxide-mediated repressor of Gnrh that acts both directly and through Zeb1, in GnRH neurons. This alteration in the delicate balance between inductive and repressive signals induces the normal GnRH-fuelled run-up to correct puberty initiation, and interfering with this process disrupts the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. PMID:27135215

  4. GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization: where we are now.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D B; Mitchell-Leef, D

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on the recent literature concerning the use of GnRH antagonists in ovulation induction for in vitro fertilization (IVF). The GnRH antagonists, ganirelix acetate (Orgalutran/Antagon) and cetrorelix (Cetrotide), have come into increasingly common use since their release in the last 3 years. This class of GnRH analogue has several potential advantages over GnRH agonists. Among these advantages are: 1) shorter duration of injectable drug treatment, 2) decreased gonadotropin requirement per cycle, 3) improved patient convenience and 4) lower overall treatment cost. As clinicians gain experience with these drugs, optimal treatment paradigms will likely emerge. This review will discuss current strategies and potential applications for the GnRH antagonists.

  5. To pill or not to pill in GnRH antagonist cycles: that is the question!

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velasco, Juan A; Fatemi, Human M

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists are gaining ground, and the number of patients being treated for IVF with a GnRH antagonist is increasing. Cycle planning in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles has been a challenge. During the past 2 years, debate has been ongoing about the possible disadvantages of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) pre-treatment in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles. A recent meta-analysis clearly showed a significant decrease in ongoing pregnancy rates between patients who received OCP pre-treatment and those who did not. In this review, the published meta-analysis are is evaluated. It is argued that caution must be exercised in drawing conclusions too quckly on whether or not OCP pre-treatment might have a negative effect on outcome in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles. PMID:25447926

  6. [Can fertility in cattle be improved by administration of Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)?].

    PubMed

    Mijten, P; de Kruif, A

    1993-04-15

    In this article a review is given of the results obtained with gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) in the treatment of repeat breeder cows, cows used for embryo transfer and of cows in the early post partum period. It is concluded that the results of GnRh administration to repeat breeders is very variable. It is quite sure that the positive effect of GnRH, if any is so low that from an economic point of view, treatment, can not be advised. The usefulness of administration of GnRH to embryo-transfer cows is very doubtful. There are as many publications with positive as with negative results. The administration of GnRH in the early post partum period can not be recommended. With this 'therapy' conflicting results have been obtained and occasionally negative side effects have emerged. PMID:8484178

  7. Signaling of Cytokines is Important in Regulation of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines encompass a broad class of peptides that mediate signals in a broad range of physiological situations including inflammation, infection, and obesity. The cytokine receptor-associated tyrosine kinase, Jak2, is one of the most important proteins mediating cytokine signaling pathway activation. Recently, our group has demonstrated that Jak2 signaling in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron plays a critical role in fertility in males and females, implicating cytokine activation of the neuron in GnRH neuronal development and function. To date, the specific cytokine(s) essential for activating Jak2 during neuroendocrine development are not known. In this article, we review the evidence for the role of several class 1 cytokines in regulating GnRH neuronal development, GnRH secretion, and GnRH expression. PMID:22161498

  8. Cumulus Cells Gene Expression Profiling in Terms of Oocyte Maturity in Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation Using GnRH Agonist or GnRH Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Devjak, Rok; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Juvan, Peter; Virant Klun, Irma; Rozman, Damjana; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) is established by gonadotropins in combination with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, to prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of our study was to improve the understanding of gene expression profile of cumulus cells (CC) in terms of ovarian stimulation protocol and oocyte maturity. We applied Affymetrix gene expression profiling in CC of oocytes at different maturation stages using either GnRH agonists or GnRH antagonists. Two analyses were performed: the first involved CC of immature metaphase I (MI) and mature metaphase II (MII) oocytes where 359 genes were differentially expressed, and the second involved the two GnRH analogues where no differentially expressed genes were observed at the entire transcriptome level. A further analysis of 359 differentially genes was performed, focusing on anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2 (AMHR2), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and serine protease inhibitor E2 (SERPINE2). Among other differentially expressed genes we observed a marked number of new genes connected to cell adhesion and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, glycine and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). No differential expression in CC between the two GnRH analogues supports the findings of clinical studies where no significant difference in live birth rates between both GnRH analogues has been proven. PMID:23082142

  9. Comparison of assisted reproductive technology outcomes in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome: In vitro maturation, GnRH agonist, and GnRH antagonist cycles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Hye; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Hye Ok; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Jin Young; Yang, Kwang Moon; Song, In Ok; Koong, Mi Kyoung; Kang, Inn Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We compared the assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) treated with IVM, conventional IVF, GnRH agonist, and GnRH antagonist cycles. Methods The prospective study included a total of 67 cycles in 61 infertile women with PCOS. The women with PCOS were randomized into three IVF protocols: IVM/IVF with FSH and hCG priming with immature oocyte retrieval 38 hours later (group A, 14 cycles), GnRH agonist long protocol (group B, 14 cycles), and GnRH antagonist multi-dose flexible protocol (group C, 39 cycles). IVF outcomes, such as clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), implantation rate (IR), miscarriage rate (MR), and live birth rate (LBR), were compared among the three groups. Results Age, BMI, and basal FSH and LH levels did not differ among the three groups. The number of retrieved oocytes and 2 pronucleus embryos was significantly lower in group A compared with groups B and C. The CPR, IR, MR, and LBR per embryo transfer showed no differences among the three groups. There was no incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in group A. Conclusion The IR, MR, and LBR in the IVM cycles were comparable to those of the GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist cycles. The IVM protocol, FSH and hCG priming with oocyte retrieval 38 hours later, is an effective ART option that is comparable with conventional IVF for infertile women with PCOS. PMID:23346527

  10. Progesterone directly and rapidly inhibits GnRH neuronal activity via progesterone receptor membrane component 1.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael; Wray, Susan

    2012-09-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (G(i/o)), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity.

  11. Social status, breeding state, and GnRH soma size in convict cichlids (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus).

    PubMed

    Chee, San-San Amy; Espinoza, Walter A S; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Pakan, Janelle M P; Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristian; Wylie, Douglas R; Hurd, Peter L

    2013-01-15

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) expressing neurons in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus plays a key role in regulating reproductive function through the control of gonadotropin release. Several studies have illustrated the importance of the social environment in modulating the size of GnRH expressing neurons. In the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, the size of the soma of GnRH expressing neurons in the POA varies with social status in males, and with breeding state in females. Territorial males have larger GnRH+ cells than non-territorial males, while brooder females have smaller GnRH+ cells than control females. The lek-like breeding system of A. burtoni is, however, only one type of social system within the diverse assemblage of cichlids. To gain a better understanding of GnRH neuronal plasticity in response to the changes in the social environment, we tested whether similar effects occur in the monogamous New World cichlid, the convict cichlid (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus), a model species for the study of social behaviour. Our results indicate that, indeed GnRH expressing neuron soma size, and not cell number, varies with both male territorial status, and manipulations of female breeding state in this monogamous, biparental, New World cichlid.

  12. Gliotransmission by Prostaglandin E2: A Prerequisite for GnRH Neuronal Function?

    PubMed Central

    Clasadonte, Jerome; Sharif, Ariane; Baroncini, Marc; Prevot, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades it has become clear that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a phospholipid-derived signaling molecule, plays a fundamental role in modulating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuroendocrine system and in shaping the hypothalamus. In this review, after a brief historical overview, we highlight studies revealing that PGE2 released by glial cells such as astrocytes and tanycytes is intimately involved in the active control of GnRH neuronal activity and neurosecretion. Recent evidence suggests that hypothalamic astrocytes surrounding GnRH neuronal cell bodies may respond to neuronal activity with an activation of the erbB receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, triggering the release of PGE2 as a chemical transmitter from the glia themselves, and, in turn, leading to the feedback regulation of GnRH neuronal activity. At the GnRH neurohemal junction, in the median eminence of the hypothalamus, PGE2 is released by tanycytes in response to cell–cell signaling initiated by glial cells and vascular endothelial cells. Upon its release, PGE2 causes the retraction of the tanycyte end-feet enwrapping the GnRH nerve terminals, enabling them to approach the adjacent pericapillary space and thus likely facilitating neurohormone diffusion from these nerve terminals into the pituitary portal blood. In view of these new insights, we suggest that synaptically associated astrocytes and perijunctional tanycytes are integral modulatory elements of GnRH neuronal function at the cell soma/dendrite and nerve terminal levels, respectively. PMID:22649391

  13. Development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron regulation in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Becú-Villalobos, D; Libertun, C

    1995-02-01

    1. After reaching its final destination the GnRH neuronal network develops under the influence of both excitatory and inhibitory inputs. 2. In the first 2 weeks of life, the immaturity of the GnRH neuronal system is reflected in sporadic unsynchronized bursts of the decapeptide, which determine the pattern of serum gonadotropin levels observed in female rats: high FSH levels and transient bursts of LH. The main inhibitory neuronal systems that operate in this period are the opioid and dopaminergic systems. A decrease in their inhibitory effectiveness may not be sufficient correctly to activate and synchronize the GnRH neuronal system. 3. There is a concomitant increase in excitatory inputs, mainly noradrenaline, excitatory amino acids, and NPY, which increase the synthesis and release of GnRH at the beginning of the juvenile period and participate in the coupling of GnRH neural activity to the ongoing rhythmic activity of a hypothalamic circadian oscillator. 4. The morphological changes of GnRH neurons which take place during the third and fourth weeks of life, and which are probably related to increasing estradiol levels, reflects the increasing complexity of the GnRH neuronal network, which establishes synaptic contacts to enable the expression of pulsatility and of the positive feedback of estradiol, both necessary components for the occurrence of puberty.

  14. Changes in peripheral blood levels and pulse frequencies of GnRH in patients with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Takanashi, N; Yaoi, Y

    1998-09-01

    Pituitary dysfunction occasionally results from brain tumors or the surgical resection of brain tumors. The authors examined two patients with hypogonadotropic secondary amenorrhea, who had undergone surgical removal of brain tumors. Changes in immunoreactive gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion are of interest in patients with a gonadotropin and gonadal steroid deficit, because both steroid and pituitary feedback systems are altered by tumors or tumor resection. The authors thus measured GnRH, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels every 15 minutes for 4 hours by radioimmunoassay and investigated qualitative and quantitative changes in the pulsatile patterns of these hormones in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients. They also performed similar multiple measurements of GnRH in two normal cycle women in follicular phase and two postmenopausal women. The concentration of plasma GnRH in two hypopituitarism patients was compared with that in two normal cycle women and two postmenopausal women. The study showed that the peripheral blood level of GnRH was significantly lower in two hypopituitarism patients than in both normal cycle and postmenopausal women, and that the pulsatile frequency was not different among these three groups. These findings suggest that alteration of feedback systems results in a decrease in the blood level of GnRH, and that pulses of GnRH maintain normal fluctuation despite the alteration of the hormonal circumstances in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients. PMID:9749566

  15. Origins of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in vertebrates: identification of a novel GnRH in a basal vertebrate, the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Scott I; Nozaki, Masumi; Sower, Stacia A

    2008-08-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding a novel (GnRH), named lamprey GnRH-II, from the sea lamprey, a basal vertebrate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the newly identified lamprey GnRH-II is QHWSHGWFPG. The architecture of the precursor is similar to that reported for other GnRH precursors consisting of a signal peptide, decapeptide, a downstream processing site, and a GnRH-associated peptide; however, the gene for lamprey GnRH-II does not have introns in comparison with the gene organization for all other vertebrate GnRHs. Lamprey GnRH-II precursor transcript was widely expressed in a variety of tissues. In situ hybridization of the brain showed expression and localization of the transcript in the hypothalamus, medulla, and olfactory regions, whereas immunohistochemistry using a specific antiserum showed only GnRH-II cell bodies and processes in the preoptic nucleus/hypothalamus areas. Lamprey GnRH-II was shown to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary axis using in vivo and in vitro studies. Lamprey GnRH-II was also shown to activate the inositol phosphate signaling system in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the lamprey GnRH receptor. These studies provide evidence for a novel lamprey GnRH that has a role as a third hypothalamic GnRH. In summary, the newly discovered lamprey GnRH-II offers a new paradigm of the origin of the vertebrate GnRH family. We hypothesize that due to a genome/gene duplication event, an ancestral gene gave rise to two lineages of GnRHs: the gnathostome GnRH and lamprey GnRH-II.

  16. Microdose Flare-up Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) Agonist Versus GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders Undergoing Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Aysen; Cakar, Erbil; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat; Kayatas, Semra; Sofuoglu, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Microdose flare-up GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist have become more popular in the management of poor ovarian responders (POR) in recent years; however, the optimal protocol for POR patients undergoing in vitro fertilization has still been a challenge. Methods: In this observational study design, two hundred forty four poor ovarian responders were retrospectively evaluated for their response to GnRH agonist protocol (group-1, n=135) or GnRH antagonist protocol (group-2, n=109). Clinical pregnancy rate was the primary end point and was compared between the groups. Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test and χ2-test were used to compare the groups. The p<0.05 was considered to show a statistically significant result. Results: The mean total gonadotropin doses were 3814±891 IU in group 1 and 3539±877 IU in group 2 (p=0.02). The number of metaphase-II oocytes (3.6±2.4 vs. 2.8±1.9, p=0.005) and implantation rates (27.8% vs. 18.8%, p=0.04) in group 1 and group 2, respectively were significantly different. The fertilization rate in group 1 and group 2 was 73% vs. 68%, respectively (p=0.5) and clinical pregnancy rate was 19.8% vs. 14.4%, respectively (p=0.13). Conclusion: The GnRH agonist microdose flare-up protocol has favorable outcomes with respect to the number of oocytes retrieved and implantation rate; nevertheless, the clinical pregnancy rate was found to be similar in comparison to GnRH antagonist protocol in poor ovarian responders. GnRH antagonist protocol appears to be promising with significantly lower gonadotropin requirement and lower treatment cost in poor ovarian responders. PMID:27478770

  17. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Excites GnRH Neurons in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Piet, Richard; Dunckley, Henry; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-09-01

    A variety of external and internal factors modulate the activity of GnRH neurons to control fertility in mammals. A direct, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated input to GnRH neurons originating from the suprachiasmatic nucleus is thought to relay circadian information within this network. In the present study, we examined the effects of VIP on GnRH neuron activity in male and female mice at different stages of the estrous cycle. We carried out cell-attached recordings in slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice and calcium imaging in slices from a mouse line expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 selectively in GnRH neurons. We show that 50%-80% of GnRH neurons increase their firing rate in response to bath-applied VIP (1nM-1000nM) in both male and female mice and that this is accompanied by a robust increase in intracellular calcium concentrations. This effect is mediated directly at the GnRH neuron likely through activation of high-affinity VIP receptors. Because suprachiasmatic nucleus-derived timing cues trigger the preovulatory surge only on the afternoon of proestrus in female mice, we examined the effects of VIP during the estrous cycle at different times of day. VIP responsiveness in GnRH neurons did not vary significantly in diestrous and proestrous mice before or around the time of the expected preovulatory surge. These results indicate that the majority of GnRH neurons in male and female mice express functional VIP receptors and that the effects of VIP on GnRH neurons do not alter across the estrous cycle. PMID:27501185

  18. Opposite-sex housing reactivates the declining GnRH system in aged transgenic male mice with FGF signaling deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wilson C. J.; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2012-01-01

    The continued presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons is required for a healthy reproductive lifespan, but factors that maintain postnatal GnRH neurons have not been identified. To begin to understand these factors, we investigated whether 1) fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling and 2) interactions with the opposite sex are involved in the maintenance of the postnatal GnRH system. A transgenic mouse model (dnFGFR mouse) with the targeted expression of a dominant-negative FGF receptor (dnFGFR) in GnRH neurons was used to examine the consequence of FGF signaling deficiency on postnatal GnRH neurons. Male dnFGFR mice suffered a significant loss of postnatal GnRH neurons within the first 100 days of life. Interestingly, this loss was reversed after cohabitation with female, but not male, mice for 300–550 days. Along with a rescue in GnRH neuron numbers, opposite-sex housing in dnFGFR males also increased hypothalamic GnRH peptide levels, promoted a more mature GnRH neuronal morphology, facilitated litter production, and enhanced testicular morphology. Last, mice hypomorphic for FGFR3 exhibited a similar pattern of postnatal GnRH neuronal loss as dnFGFR males, suggesting FGF signaling acts, in part, through FGFR3 to enhance the maintenance of the postnatal GnRH system. In summary, we have shown that FGF signaling is required for the continued presence of postnatal GnRH neurons. However, this requirement is not absolute, since sexual interactions can compensate for defects in FGFR signaling, thereby rescuing the declining GnRH system. This suggests the postnatal GnRH system is highly plastic and capable of responding to environmental stimuli throughout adult life. PMID:23047985

  19. Evidence for changes in numbers of synaptic inpcuts onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the preovulatory LH surge in the ewe

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Coolen, Lique M.; Goodman, Robert L.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin neurones located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and preoptic area (POA) are critical mediators of gonadal steroid feedback onto GnRH neurones. ARC kisspeptin cells that co-localize neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn), are collectively referred to as KNDy (Kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn) neurones, and have been shown to also co-express the glutamatergic marker, vGlut2, in mice. The ARC in rodents has long been known as a site of hormone-induced neuroplasticity, and changes in synaptic inputs to ARC neurones in rodents occur over the oestrous cycle. Based on this evidence, the goal of this study was to examine possible changes across the ovine oestrous cycle in synaptic inputs onto kisspeptin cells in the ARC (KNDy) and POA, and inputs onto GnRH neurones. Gonadal-intact breeding season ewes were perfused using 4% paraformaldehyde during either the luteal or follicular phase of the oestrous cycle, the latter group sacrificed at the time of the luteinising (LH) surge. Hypothalamic sections were processed for triple-label immunodetection of kisspeptin/vGlut2/synaptophysin or kisspeptin/vGlut2/GnRH. The total numbers of synaptophysin- and vGlut2-positive inputs to ARC KNDy neurones were significantly increased at the time of the LH surge compared to luteal phase; as these did not contain kisspeptin they do not arise from KNDy neurons. In contrast to the ARC, the total number of synaptophysin-positive inputs onto POA kisspeptin neurones did not differ between luteal phase and surge animals. The total number of kisspeptin and vGlut2 inputs onto GnRH neurones in both the POA and mediobasal hypothalamus was also increased during the LH surge. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence of synaptic plasticity at the level of inputs onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the ovine oestrous cycle, changes which may contribute to the generation of the preovulatory GnRH/LH surge. PMID:25976424

  20. Clinical use of deslorelin (GnRH agonist) in companion animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lucas, X

    2014-10-01

    Over the years, many contraceptive medications have been developed for companion animals, but many secondary adverse effects have limited their use. A major advancement was achieved with the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, mainly GnRH agonists, which mimic the effects of native GnRH. The development of effective low-dose, slow-release implants with potent agonists such as deslorelin (Suprelorin®, Virbac) have allowed their use to become widespread in recent years, with many potential benefits in companion animals. While the major application of deslorelin was initially male contraception, due to its two differing actions, either the stimulation of oestrus or the sterilization of fertility, its use has been increasing in the bitch as well. The aim of this study is to review the applications of deslorelin GnRH agonist implants in companion animal, such as dogs, cats and some exotic pets.

  1. Optimal usage of the GnRH antagonists: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists, which became commercially available from 1999, have been used for the prevention of premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges in controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. This review focuses on the recent literature on the use of GnRH antagonists and provides guidelines for optimal use in light of increasing evidence showing that GnRH antagonists are safe and effective, allowing flexibility of treatment in a wide range of patient populations. This includes patients undergoing first-line controlled ovarian stimulation, poor responders, and women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome. The GnRH antagonist offers a viable alternative to the long agonists, providing a shorter duration of treatment with fewer injections and with no adverse effects on assisted reproductive technology outcome. This results in a significantly lower amount of gonadotropins required, which is likely to lead to improved patient compliance. PMID:23496864

  2. Fgf8-Deficient Mice Compensate for Reduced GnRH Neuronal Population and Exhibit Normal Testicular Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Johnson, Joshua I; Tsai, Pei-San

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is critical for the onset and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. The development of GnRH neurons is highly dependent on fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Mice with a hypomorphic Fgf8 allele (Fgf8 Het) exhibited a ~50% reduction in GnRH neuron number at birth. Female Fgf8 Het mice were fertile but showed significantly delayed puberty. However, it was unclear if these mice suffered additional loss of GnRH neurons after birth, and if male Fgf8 Het mice had normal pubertal transition and testicular function. In this study, we examined postnatal GnRH neuron number and hypothalamic GnRH content in Fgf8 Het mice from birth to 120 days of age. Further, we examined seminal vesicle and testicular growth, testicular histology, and circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) around and after pubertal transition. Our results showed that GnRH neuron numbers were significantly and consistently reduced in Fgf8 Het mice of both sexes in all ages examined, suggesting these animals were born with an inherently defective GnRH system, and no further postnatal loss of GnRH neurons had occurred. Despite an innately compromised GnRH system, male and female Fgf8 mice exhibited normal levels of immunoassayable hypothalamic GnRH peptide at all ages examined except on 60 days of age, suggesting increased GnRH synthesis or reduced turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Fgf8 Het males also had normal seminal vesicle and testicular mass/body mass ratios, testicular histology, and circulating LH. Overall, our data speak to the extraordinary ability of a GnRH system permanently compromised by developmental defect to overcome pre-existing deficiencies to ensure pubertal progression and reproduction. PMID:26441841

  3. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout.

  4. Fgf8-Deficient Mice Compensate for Reduced GnRH Neuronal Population and Exhibit Normal Testicular Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnson, Joshua I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is critical for the onset and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. The development of GnRH neurons is highly dependent on fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Mice with a hypomorphic Fgf8 allele (Fgf8 Het) exhibited a ~50% reduction in GnRH neuron number at birth. Female Fgf8 Het mice were fertile but showed significantly delayed puberty. However, it was unclear if these mice suffered additional loss of GnRH neurons after birth, and if male Fgf8 Het mice had normal pubertal transition and testicular function. In this study, we examined postnatal GnRH neuron number and hypothalamic GnRH content in Fgf8 Het mice from birth to 120 days of age. Further, we examined seminal vesicle and testicular growth, testicular histology, and circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) around and after pubertal transition. Our results showed that GnRH neuron numbers were significantly and consistently reduced in Fgf8 Het mice of both sexes in all ages examined, suggesting these animals were born with an inherently defective GnRH system, and no further postnatal loss of GnRH neurons had occurred. Despite an innately compromised GnRH system, male and female Fgf8 mice exhibited normal levels of immunoassayable hypothalamic GnRH peptide at all ages examined except on 60 days of age, suggesting increased GnRH synthesis or reduced turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Fgf8 Het males also had normal seminal vesicle and testicular mass/body mass ratios, testicular histology, and circulating LH. Overall, our data speak to the extraordinary ability of a GnRH system permanently compromised by developmental defect to overcome pre-existing deficiencies to ensure pubertal progression and reproduction. PMID:26441841

  5. Kisspeptin and GnRH Neuronal Excitability: Molecular Mechanisms Driven by 17β-Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin is a neuropeptide that signals via a Gαq-coupled receptor, GPR54, in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and is essential for pubertal maturation and fertility. Kisspeptin depolarizes and excites GnRH neurons primarily through the activation of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels and inhibition of K+ channels. The gonadal steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) up-regulates not only kisspeptin (Kiss1) mRNA, but also increases the excitability of the rostral forebrain Kiss1 neurons. In addition, a primary postsynaptic action of E2 on GnRH neurons is to up-regulate the expression of channel transcripts that orchestrate the downstream signaling of kisspeptin in GnRH neurons. These include not only TRPC4 channels, but also low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels and high voltage-activated L-, N- and R-type calcium channel transcripts. Moreover, E2 has direct membrane-initiated actions to alter the excitability of GnRH neurons by enhancing ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel activity, which is critical for maintaining GnRH neurons in a hyperpolarized state for recruitment of T-type calcium channels that are important for burst firing. Therefore, E2 modulates the excitability of GnRH neurons as well as Kiss1 neurons by altering the expression and/or function of ion channels; and kisspeptin provides critical excitatory input to GnRH neurons to facilitate burst firing activity and peptide release. PMID:25612870

  6. Effects of ovariectomy on GnRH neuronal morphology in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Witkin, J W

    1996-08-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are typically simple, fusiform cells; however, over the course of prepubertal development increasing numbers take on a 'spiny' appearance. Following gonadectomy there is a decrease in the frequency of these spiny GnRH neurons. These observations which were made in the rat suggest that GnRH neurons are directly affected by the gonadal steroid milieu, though they do not themselves contain receptors for these steroidal hormones. In that there are important species differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis between rats and primates, the present study was undertaken to determine whether a reduction in ovarian hormones would produce similar changes in the morphology of GnRH neurons in the monkey. A further aim was to determine whether such changes were localized to a specific brain region. Immunocytochemically defined GnRH neurons were compared in adult rhesus macaques which had been ovariectomized for 6 weeks to 2 years (n = 7) and intact, cycling animals (n = 8). Within the intact group, there were significantly more spiny GnRH neurons in the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) than in the preoptic area (POA) (about 50% of the total in the MBH compared to 33% in the POA). Following ovariectomy the frequency of spiny cells in the MBH dropped to less than 30%, but was not significantly reduced in the POA. These results suggest that changes in systemic gonadal steroid levels result in changes in the morphology of GnRH neurons preferentially in the MBH, a region that is considered critical in the generation of GnRH pulsatile release in the monkey.

  7. Differential expression of Gnrh2, Gthbeta, and Gthr genes in sterile triploids and fertile tetraploids.

    PubMed

    Long, Yu; Tao, Min; Liu, Shaojun; Zhong, Huan; Chen, Lin; Tao, Suifei; Liu, Yun

    2009-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), gonadotropin hormone (GTH), and gonadotropin hormone receptor (GTHR) are the pivotal signal molecules of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis, which plays a crucial role in regulating gonadal development in vertebrate. In this study, we comparatively analyze the expression characteristics of Gnrh2, Gthbeta, and Gthr in red crucian carp diploids, triploids, and allotetraploids. The expression patterns of these genes are similar in the three fish ploidy types: the Gnrh2 gene is expressed in midbrains, pituitaries, and gonads; the Gthbeta gene is expressed in pituitaries; the Gthr gene is mainly expressed in gonads. These results indicate that the three genes participate in the regulation of gonadal development. By real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization, we find that, among these three fish ploidy types, the expression level of Gthr in the gonads of triploids is lower than those of diploids and tetraploids; this weakens the combination of GTHR with GTH released from the pituitary and leads to the sterility of triploids, since the gonad cannot produce enough sex steroids. In addition, the low expression of Gthr in triploids may affect the down-regulation of Gthbeta, which then affects the down-regulation of Gnrh2; hence, the expression levels of Gnrh2 and Gthbeta genes in triploids are the highest after the breeding season. In conclusion, the differential expression of Gnrh2, Gthbeta, and Gthr in triploids and tetraploids is related to their sterility and bisexual fertility, respectively.

  8. The origin of the mammalian form of GnRH in primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, N M; Lovejoy, D A

    1989-06-01

    The presence of neuroendocrine hormones in extant agnathan fishes suggests that a method of control involving these hormones was operating 500-600 million years ago in emerging vertebrates. Data on a limited number of species show that several members of the GnRH family of peptides may have arisen in non-teleost fishes. Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) GnRH has a unique composition and has not been detected in other vertebrates. It is not yet clear whether the chicken II GnRH-like molecule arose in cartilaginous fishes, but a chromatographically and immunologically similar molecule is found in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei). Finally, a mammalian GnRH-like molecule is detected in three primitive bony fish: sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), reed fish (Calamoichthys calabaricus), and alligator gar (Lepidosteus spatula). Minor forms are also present, but are not yet characterized. Clearly, the basic structure of GnRH peptides was established in primitive fish. In contrast, at least three other identified forms of GnRH have been detected in teleosts or tetrapods: Salmon I, catfish I, and chicken I GnRH. Evidence for the presence of members of the GnRH family and the neurohypophysial hormone family in primitive fishes argues for the importance of neuroendocrine control throughout the history of vertebrates. PMID:24221758

  9. The origin of the mammalian form of GnRH in primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, N M; Lovejoy, D A

    1989-06-01

    The presence of neuroendocrine hormones in extant agnathan fishes suggests that a method of control involving these hormones was operating 500-600 million years ago in emerging vertebrates. Data on a limited number of species show that several members of the GnRH family of peptides may have arisen in non-teleost fishes. Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) GnRH has a unique composition and has not been detected in other vertebrates. It is not yet clear whether the chicken II GnRH-like molecule arose in cartilaginous fishes, but a chromatographically and immunologically similar molecule is found in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and ratfish (Hydrolagus colliei). Finally, a mammalian GnRH-like molecule is detected in three primitive bony fish: sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), reed fish (Calamoichthys calabaricus), and alligator gar (Lepidosteus spatula). Minor forms are also present, but are not yet characterized. Clearly, the basic structure of GnRH peptides was established in primitive fish. In contrast, at least three other identified forms of GnRH have been detected in teleosts or tetrapods: Salmon I, catfish I, and chicken I GnRH. Evidence for the presence of members of the GnRH family and the neurohypophysial hormone family in primitive fishes argues for the importance of neuroendocrine control throughout the history of vertebrates.

  10. Comparisons of GnRH Antagonist versus GnRH Agonist Protocol in Supposed Normal Ovarian Responders Undergoing IVF: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin-song; Su, Cun-mei; Zeng, Xian-tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist in supposed normal ovarian responders undergoing IVF. Methods Data from 6 databases were retrieved for this study. The RCTs of GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist use during IVF-EF therapy for patients with supposed normal ovarian response were included. A meta-analysis was performed with Revman 5.1software. Results Twenty-three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The number of stimulation days (mean difference (MD): −0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): −1.04∼−0.27), Gn amount (MD: −2.92, 95% CI: −5.0∼−0.85), E2 values on the day of HCG (MD: −330.39, 95% CI: −510.51∼−150.26), Number of oocytes retrieved (MD: −1.33, 95% CI: −2.02∼−0.64), clinical pregnancy rate (odds ratio (OR): 0.87, 95% CI: 0.75−1.0), and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) incidence (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.42∼0.82) were significantly lower in GnRH antagonist protocol than GnRH agonist protocol. However, the endometrial thickness on the day of HCG (MD: −0.04, 95% CI: −0.23∼0.14), the ongoing pregnancy rate (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.74∼1.03), live birth rate (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.64∼1.24), miscarriage rate (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.85∼1.61), and cycle cancellation rate (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.90∼1.37) did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Conclusions During IVF treatment for patients with supposed normal responses, the incidence of OHSS were significantly lower, whereas the ongoing pregnancy and live birth rates were similar in the GnRH antagonist compared with the standard long GnRH agonist protocols. PMID:25216031

  11. [GnRH analogues for the treatment of fibroids].

    PubMed

    Murillo, Ester Ortiz; Cano, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that are very common in women and may present significant symptoms in 20%-50% of cases. When they require action, their traditional management has been surgery (hysterectomy or fibroidectomy); however medical alternatives have been proposed, given that surgery is associated with a certain morbidity and mortality and involves healthcare costs. Within the pharmacological management of uterine fibroids, GnRH analogues are the best known and most commonly used drugs, although their indications are limited by the side effects associated with long-term treatment. Their primary indication is based on preoperative treatment (to hysterectomy or fibroidectomy) and in selected cases of patients close to menopause or who want more conservative management. These analogues are able to significantly reduce the uterine volume, the size of the fibroid and their accompanying symptoms. Their main disadvantage, however, lies in the reversibility of their effect when treatment is discontinued, along with the side effects associated with hypoestrogenism, such as climacteric symptoms and loss of bone mass. "Add-back" therapies, which associate low-dose estrogens to aGnRH, allow for extended use thanks to decreased side effects without affecting the benefits.

  12. Local duplication of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor before two rounds of whole genome duplication and origin of the mammalian GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Sefideh, Fatemeh Ameri; Moon, Mi Jin; Yun, Seongsik; Hong, Sung In; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Seong, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) play an important role in vertebrate reproduction. Although many GnRHR genes have been identified in a large variety of vertebrate species, the evolutionary history of GnRHR in vertebrates is unclear. To trace the evolutionary origin of GnRHR we examined the conserved synteny of chromosomes harboring GnRHR genes and matched the genes to linkage groups of reconstructed vertebrate ancestor chromosomes. Consistent with the phylogenetic tree, three pairs of GnRHR subtypes were identified in three paralogous linkage groups, indicating that an ancestral pair emerged through local duplication before two rounds of whole genome duplication (2R). The 2R then led to the generation of six subtypes of GnRHR. Some subtypes were lost during vertebrate evolution after the divergence of teleosts and tetrapods. One subtype includes mammalian GnRHR and a coelacanth GnRHR that showed the greatest response to GnRH1 among the three types of GnRH. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of vertebrate GnRHRs.

  13. [Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in selecting patients for varicocelectomy].

    PubMed

    Segenreich, E; Israilov, S; Shmueli, J; Niv, E; Servadio, C

    1997-03-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) test was performed on 182 patients with various degrees of varicocele before and after low, inguinal, spermatic vein ligation, and on 18 controls. The levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone, a synthetic GnRH (LH), were evaluated before and 45 minutes after intravenous injection of 100 mcg relisorm L. FSH levels increased more than 2-fold in 118 patients [64.8%] and LH levels increased more than 5-fold in 135 patients [74.1%]). In the control group the increase was less in all cases. Therefore, whenever FSH increased more than 2-fold and LH more than 5-fold, we considered the test positive (pathologic); On this basis the GnRH test was positive in 126 (69.2%) and negative (normal) in 56 (30.7%). Of the 126 with positive tests, only 32 (27.3%) still had a positive result 5-6 months after operation. There was correlation between a positive GnRH test and significant improvement in sperm parameters after varicocelectomy: of the 126 with positive tests before operation, sperm parameters improved in 87 patients (69%), while in the 56 patients with negative tests before operation, in only 7 (12.5%) was there improvement after correction. We conclude that a positive GnRH test indicates impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis caused by varicocele and could serve as a marker for surgical intervention with good prediction of outcome.

  14. NELF is a nuclear protein involved in hypothalamic GnRH neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Bhagavath, Balasubramanian; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Halvorson, Lisa; Podolsky, Robert S; Chorich, Lynn P; Prasad, Puttur; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Cameron, Richard S; Layman, Lawrence C

    2010-05-01

    Nasal embryonic LHRH factor (NELF) has been hypothesized to participate in the migration of GnRH and olfactory neurons into the forebrain, a prerequisite for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in puberty and reproduction. However, the biological functions of NELF, which has no homology to any human protein, remain largely elusive. Although mRNA expression did not differ, NELF protein expression was greater in migratory than postmigratory GnRH neurons. Pituitary Nelf mRNA expression was also observed and increased 3-fold after exogenous GnRH administration. Contrary to a previous report, NELF displayed predominant nuclear localization in GnRH neurons, confirmed by mutagenesis of a putative nuclear localization signal resulting in impaired nuclear expression. NELF knockdown impaired GnRH neuronal migration of NLT cells in vitro. These findings and the identification of two putative zinc fingers suggest that NELF could be a transcription factor. Collectively, our findings implicate NELF as a nuclear protein involved in the developmental function of the reproductive axis.

  15. Effects of GnRH immunization on the reproductive axis and thymulin.

    PubMed

    Su, Shiping; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Xiuhong; Fang, Fuigui; Li, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    The bidirectional regulation of thymulin in the reproductive-endocrine function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis of rats immunized against GnRH remains largely unclear. We explored the alterations in hormones in the HPG axis in immunized rats to dissect the repressive effect of immunization on thymulin, and to clarify the interrelation of reproductive hormones and thymulin in vivo. The results showed that, in the first 2 weeks of booster immunization, thymulin was repressed when reproductive hormones were severely reduced. The self-feedback regulation of thymulin was then stimulated in later immune stages: the rising circulating thymulin upregulated LH and FSH, including GnRH in the hypothalamus, although the levels of those hormones were still significantly lower than in the control groups. In astrocytes, thymulin produced a feedback effect in regulated GnRH neurons. However, in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and the median eminence (ME), the mediator of astrocytes and other glial cells were also directly affected by reproductive hormones. Thus, in immunized rats, the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein was distinctly stimulated in the Arc and ME. This study demonstrated that thymulin was downregulated by immunization against GnRH in early stage. Subsequently, the self-feedback regulation was provoked by low circulating thymulin. Thereafter, rising thymulin levels promoted pituitary gonadotropins levels, while acting directly on GnRH neurons, which was mediated by astrocytes in a region-dependent manner in the hypothalamus.

  16. Disrupted Kisspeptin Signaling in GnRH Neurons Leads to Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Sonko, Momodou L.; Hoffman, Gloria; Koo, Yongbum; Ko, Chemyong; Wolfe, Andrew; Radovick, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Landmark studies have shown that mutations in kisspeptin and the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r) result in reproductive dysfunction in humans and genetically altered mouse models. However, because kisspeptin and its receptor are present in target cells of the central and peripheral reproductive axis, the precise location(s) for the pathogenic signal is unknown. The study described herein shows that the kisspeptin-Kiss1r signaling pathway in the GnRH neuron is singularly critical for both the onset of puberty as well as the attainment of normal reproductive function. In this study, we directly test the hypothesis that kisspeptin neurons regulate GnRH secretion through the activation of Kiss1r on the plasma membrane of GnRH neurons. A GnRH neuron–specific Kiss1r knockout mouse model (GKirKO) was generated, and reproductive development and phenotype were assessed. Both female and male GKirKO mice were infertile, having low serum LH and FSH levels. External abnormalities such as microphallus and decreased anogenital distance associated with failure of preputial gland separation were present in GKirKO males. A delay in pubertal onset and abnormal estrous cyclicity were observed in female GKirKO mice. Taken together, these data provide in vivo evidence that Kiss1r in GnRH neurons is critical for reproductive development and fertility. PMID:24422632

  17. A Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist versus a Microdose Flare-Up GnRH Agonist Combined with a Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist Protocol in Poor Responders to IVF

    PubMed Central

    Turgay Çelik, Gayem İnayet; Sütçü, Havva Kömür; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effectiveness of a flexible multidose gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist against the effectiveness of a microdose flare-up GnRH agonist combined with a flexible multidose GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders to in vitro fertilization (IVF). Study Design. A retrospective study in Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IVF Center, for 131 poor responders in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) program between January 2006 and November 2012. The groups were compared to the patients' characteristics, controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) results, and laboratory results. Results. Combination protocol was applied to 46 patients (group 1), and a single protocol was applied to 85 patients (group 2). In group 1, the duration of the treatment was longer and the dose of FSH was higher. The cycle cancellation rate was significantly higher in group 2 (26.1% versus 38.8%). A significant difference was not observed with respect to the number and quality of oocytes and embryos or to the number of embryos transferred. There were no statistically significant differences in the hCG positivity (9.5% versus 9.4%) or the clinical pregnancy rates (7.1% versus 10.6%). Conclusion. The combination protocol does not provide additional efficacy. PMID:26161425

  18. GnRH, anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism--where are we?

    PubMed

    Forni, Paolo E; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate the nasal placode and migrate into the brain during prenatal development. Once within the brain, these cells become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, essential for reproductive function. Disruption of this system causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). HH associated with anosmia is clinically defined as Kallman syndrome (KS). Recent work examining the developing nasal region has shed new light on cellular composition, cell interactions and molecular cues responsible for the development of this system in different species. This review discusses some developmental aspects, animal models and current advancements in our understanding of pathologies affecting GnRH. In addition we discuss how development of neural crest derivatives such as the glia of the olfactory system and craniofacial structures control GnRH development and reproductive function.

  19. GnRH antagonists in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pommerville, Peter J; de Boer, Johan G

    2010-04-01

    Analogues of the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This has provided treatment modalities for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. The latest group of analogues, the GnRH antagonists, make promising treatments available that avoid the transient surge in testosterone that occurs with the use of GnRH agonists. Such surges may stimulate tumor growth, causing patients to experience new or worsening cancer symptoms and potential serious adverse effects, including increased bone pain, urinary retention, and spinal cord compression and consequently delay the therapeutic benefits of agonist therapy. Degarelix, an antagonist, recently approved in the United States and Europe, achieves faster, more profound and sustained testosterone suppression and with fewer adverse effects when compared with agonists and other antagonists. This review discusses and compares the compounds degarelix, abarelix, and cetrorelix.

  20. Effect of epinephrine, norepinephrine and(or) GnRH on serum LH in prepuberal beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Hardin, D R; Randel, R D

    1983-09-01

    Forty prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers were utilized to determine the effects of epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or combinations of GnRH + E and GnRH + NE on serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations. Animals were assigned randomly to one of five treatments with four replicates/treatment. Treatments consisted of I) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0 (n = 8); II) 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); III) 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); IV) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8) and V) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8). All treatment compounds were administered im in 2 ml physiological saline and blood samples were collected via tail vessel puncture at -30, -15, 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min from GnRH injection. Treatment with NE or E alone had no effect (P greater than .10) on serum LH during the sampling period. The initial LH release to GnRH was altered (P less than .05) by concomitant treatment with NE (treatment IV) or E (treatment V). Magnitude of the LH release was reduced (P less than .01) by treatment V. Area under the LH surge was reduced (P less than .05) by treatment IV (NE) and V (E). PMID:6355042

  1. Effect of epinephrine, norepinephrine and(or) GnRH on serum LH in prepuberal beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Hardin, D R; Randel, R D

    1983-09-01

    Forty prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers were utilized to determine the effects of epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or combinations of GnRH + E and GnRH + NE on serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations. Animals were assigned randomly to one of five treatments with four replicates/treatment. Treatments consisted of I) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0 (n = 8); II) 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); III) 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); IV) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8) and V) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8). All treatment compounds were administered im in 2 ml physiological saline and blood samples were collected via tail vessel puncture at -30, -15, 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min from GnRH injection. Treatment with NE or E alone had no effect (P greater than .10) on serum LH during the sampling period. The initial LH release to GnRH was altered (P less than .05) by concomitant treatment with NE (treatment IV) or E (treatment V). Magnitude of the LH release was reduced (P less than .01) by treatment V. Area under the LH surge was reduced (P less than .05) by treatment IV (NE) and V (E).

  2. Female-Specific Induction of Rat Pituitary Dentin Matrix Protein-1 by GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Kucka, Marek; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Clokie, Samuel J. H.; Klein, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic GnRH is the primary regulator of reproduction in vertebrates, acting via the G protein-coupled GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in pituitary gonadotrophs to control synthesis and release of gonadotropins. To identify elements of the GnRHR-coupled gene network, GnRH was applied in a pulsatile manner for 6 hours to a mixed population of perifused pituitary cells from cycling females, mRNA was extracted, and RNA sequencing analysis was performed. This revealed 83 candidate-regulated genes, including a large number coding for secreted proteins. Most notably, GnRH induces a greater than 600-fold increase in expression of dentin matrix protein-1 (Dmp1), one of five members of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein gene family. The Dmp1 response is mediated by the GnRHR, not elicited by other hypothalamic releasing factors, and is approximately 20-fold smaller in adult male pituitary cells. The sex-dependent Dmp1 response is established during the peripubertal period and independent of the developmental pattern of Gnrhr expression. In vitro, GnRH-induced expression of this gene is coupled with release of DMP1 in extracellular medium through the regulated secretory pathway. In vivo, pituitary Dmp1 expression in identified gonadotrophs is elevated after ovulation. Cell signaling studies revealed that the GnRH induction of Dmp1 is mediated by the protein kinase C signaling pathway and reflects opposing roles of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK; in addition, the response is facilitated by progesterone. These results establish that DMP1 is a novel secretory protein of female rat gonadotrophs, the synthesis and release of which are controlled by the hypothalamus through the GnRHR signaling pathway. This advance raises intriguing questions about the intrapituitary and downstream effects of this new player in GnRH signaling. PMID:24085820

  3. Recurrence after robotic myomectomy: is it associated with use of GnRH agonist?

    PubMed

    Sangha, Roopina; Katukuri, Vivek; Palmer, Matthew; Khangura, Raminder Kaur

    2016-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist therapy is used before myomectomy to decrease the size of the fibroids, but its association with fibroid recurrence postoperatively remains unsettled. We undertook a retrospective study of robotic-assisted myomectomy (RM) patients at our academic medical center to determine symptomatic recurrence and reoperation rates in those who did versus did not receive preoperative GnRH therapy. Only patients, who had their index myomectomy at least 2 years prior to the chart review, were included in this study. Of 118 RM patients identified between January 2005 and December 2009, 17 patients (14.4 %) had symptomatic recurrence as early as 5 months to as late as 30 months postoperatively. The symptomatic recurrence group had significantly higher preoperative GnRH use (35 vs 9 % non-recurrence; p = 0.009). A total of 7.6 % of all patients underwent reoperation. GnRH agonist use was significantly higher in the reoperation group (56 vs 9 % no reoperation; p = 0.002). Cavity entry during the initial surgery was also more frequent in the reoperation group (56 vs 20 %; p = 0.030), whereas the presence of multiple fibroids, size of the largest leiomyoma, and uterine volume were not statistically different between groups. Our study is among the earliest to report RM reoperation rates in patients receiving preoperative GnRH therapy, showing that the role of GnRH agonist therapy to shrink myomas may not be beneficial when measured against risk of disease recurrence. PMID:27072151

  4. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2), glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6), cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4) and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4), adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c), adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b), glycinergic (Glra), purinergic (P2rx7), and serotonergic (Htr1b) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas), adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5), protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb) protein kinase C (Prkca) and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation. PMID:27774052

  5. Melatonin receptor activation regulates GnRH gene expression and secretion in GT1-7 GnRH neurons. Signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roy, Deboleena; Belsham, Denise D

    2002-01-01

    Melatonin plays a significant role in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Using the GT1-7 cell line, an in vitro model of GnRH-secreting neurons of the hypothalamus, we examined the potential signal transduction pathways activated by melatonin directly at the level of the GT1-7 neuron. We found that melatonin inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenosine 3'-, 5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in GT1-7 cells through an inhibitory G protein. Melatonin induced protein kinase C activity by 1.65-fold over basal levels, increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 proteins, and activated c-fos and junB mRNA expression in GT1-7 cells. Using the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89, the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059, we found that the melatonin-mediated cyclical regulation of GnRH mRNA expression may involve the protein kinase C and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 pathways, but not the protein kinase A pathway. We found that melatonin suppresses GnRH secretion by approximately 45% in the GT1-7 neurons. However, in the presence of the inhibitors H-89, bisindolylmaleimide, and PD98059 melatonin was unable to suppress GnRH secretion. These results provide insights into the potential signal transduction mechanisms involved in the control of GnRH gene expression and secretion by melatonin.

  6. Loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor: a new cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Young, J; Misrahi, M; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-04-01

    The association of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia defines Kallmann's syndrome. The gene of the X-linked form of this syndrome has been cloned and several mutations described. However, the relatively small number of hypogonadotropic hypogonadic patients with Kallmann's gene defects supports the hypothesis that other genes may be involved. Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is not associated with anosmia. The GnRH gene was excluded as a candidate gene in IHH since no abnormality was found in several patients. The action of the GnRH is mediated through a G-protein coupled receptor present in the cell membrane of gonadotropes. The GnRH receptor was thus another candidate gene. Recently, we described the first patient with partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without anosmia caused by loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor. We compare this first family with a new family presenting complete hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a variable degree of gonadotrope deficiency in the affected kindred, and discuss genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:10698591

  7. Hypothalamic Programming of Systemic Aging Involving IKKβ/NF-κB and GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo; Li, Juxue; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Tang, Yizhe; Zhang, Hai; Yin, Ye; Li, Bo; Liu, Gang; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aging is a result of gradual and overall functional deteriorations across the body; however, it is unknown if an individual tissue works to primarily mediate aging progress and lifespan control. Here we found that the hypothalamus is important for the development of whole-body aging in mice, and the underlying basis involves hypothalamic immunity mediated by IKKβ/NF-κB and related microglia-neuron immune crosstalk. Several interventional models were developed showing that aging retardation and lifespan extension are achieved in mice through preventing against aging-related hypothalamic or brain IKKβ/NF-κB activation. Mechanistic studies further revealed that IKKβ/NF-κB inhibits GnRH to mediate aging-related hypothalamic GnRH decline, and GnRH treatment amends aging-impaired neurogenesis and decelerates aging. In conclusion, the hypothalamus has a programmatic role in aging development via immune-neuroendocrine integration, and immune inhibition or GnRH restoration in the hypothalamus/brain represent two potential strategies for optimizing lifespan and combating aging-related health problems. PMID:23636330

  8. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion: insights from GT1 immortal GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Clapp, C

    2001-01-01

    The study of the mammalian GnRH system has been greatly advanced by the development of immortalized cell lines. Of particular relevance are the so-called GT1 cells. Not only do they exhibit many of the known physiologic characteristics of GnRH neurons in situ, but in approximately one decade have yielded new insights regarding the intrinsic physiology of individual cells and networks of GnRH neurons, as well as the nature of central and peripheral signals that directly modulate their function. For instance, valuable information has been generated concerning intrinsic properties of the system such as the inherent pulsatile pattern of secretion displayed by networks of GT1 cells. Concepts regarding feedback regulation and autocrine feedback of GnRH neurons have been dramatically expanded. Likewise, the nature of the receptors and of the proximal and distal signal transduction mechanisms involved in the actions of multiple afferent signals has been identified. Understanding this neuronal system allows a better comprehension of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and of the regulatory influences that ultimately control reproductive competence.

  9. Social Crowding during Development Causes Changes in GnRH1 DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Blake; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational and developmental cues have important consequences for long-term health, behavior and adaptation to the environment. In addition, social stressors cause plastic molecular changes in the brain that underlie unique behavioral phenotypes that also modulate fitness. In the adult African cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni, growth and social status of males are both directly regulated by social interactions in a dynamic social environment, which causes a suite of plastic changes in circuits, cells and gene transcription in the brain. We hypothesized that a possible mechanism underlying some molecular changes might be DNA methylation, a reversible modification made to cytosine nucleotides that is known to regulate gene function. Here we asked whether changes in DNA methylation of the GnRH1 gene, the central regulator of the reproductive axis, were altered during development of A. burtoni. We measured changes in methylation state of the GnRH1 gene during normal development and following the gestational and developmental stress of social crowding. We found differential DNA methylation within developing juveniles between 14-, 28- and 42-day-old. Following gestational crowding of mouth brooding mothers, we saw differential methylation and transcription of GnRH1 in their offspring. Taken together, our data provides evidence for social control of GnRH1 developmental responses to gestational cues through DNA methylation. PMID:26517121

  10. Beta 1-adrenergic regulation of the GT1 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal cell lines: stimulation of GnRH release via receptors positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Choi, A L; Weiner, R I

    1992-09-01

    The release of GnRH evoked by norepinephrine (NE) was studied in GT1 GnRH neuronal cell lines in superfusion and static cultures. GnRH release from static cultured GT1-7 cells was stimulated by NE in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mimicked by the nonsubtype-selective beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and blocked by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and the beta 1-adrenergic subtype-specific antagonist CGP 20712A. However, the stimulation of GnRH release by NE was not affected by the beta 2-, alpha-, alpha 1-, or alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists ICI 118.551, phentolamine, prazosin, or yohimbine, respectively. Superfusion of GT1-1 cells with NE for 60-100 min resulted in rapid and sustained increases in GnRH secretion. The NE-stimulated GnRH release showed a higher amplitude and longer duration than the spontaneous GnRH pulses characteristic of GT1-1 cells. In parallel to the stimulation of GnRH release, NE also rapidly increased (first observed at 60 sec) the intracellular concentration of cAMP in isobutylmethylxanthine-pretreated GT1-1 and GT1-7 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. The stimulation of intracellular cAMP concentration was also mimicked by isoproterenol and blocked by propranolol and CGP 20712A. In addition, GT1 cells express beta 1- but not beta 2-adrenergic receptor mRNA, as probed by Northern blot analysis. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of NE on GnRH neurons. The pharmacological evidence and the mRNA analysis are consistent with NE acting through a beta 1-adrenergic receptor positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

  11. Detection and effects on serum and urine steroid and LH of repeated GnRH analog (leuprolide) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, David J; Idan, Amanda; Grainger, Janelle; Goebel, Catrin; Turner, Leo; Conway, Ann J

    2014-05-01

    Non-steroidal drugs that increase endogenous testosterone (T) may be used to exploit ergogenic effects of androgens in power sports. While superactive GnRH analog use is suspected, neither screening nor detection tests are developed. This study aimed to determine if (a) stimulation for 5 days by leuprolide (a superactive GnRH analog) of serum and urine steroids and urine LH is reproducible at a 2 week interval, (b) nandrolone decanoate (ND) co-administration masks responses to leuprolide administration, (c) performance of urine measurement of leuprolide and M1, its major metabolite, as a detection test. Healthy men were randomized into a 4 week parallel group, open label clinical study in which all men had daily sc injections of leuprolide (1mg) for 4 days in the 1st and 3rd weeks with hormone-free 2nd and 4th weeks. In the 3rd week, men were randomized to either ND injections or no extra treatment. Serum steroids were determined by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS), urine steroids by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry (GC-MS), urine leuprolide and M1 by high resolution LC-MS and urine LH by immunoassay. Leuprolide stimulated striking, reproducible increases in serum and urine LH and steroids (serum T, dihydroT (DHT), 3α diol; urine T, epitestosterone (E) and androsterone (A). ND suppressed basal serum T, E2, 3α diol, and urinary E but did not mask or change the magnitude of responses to leuprolide. Urine leuprolide and M1 measurement had 100% sensitivity and specificity in detecting leuprolide administration up to one day after cessation of injections with the detection window between 1 and 3 days after last dose. Screening using urine steroid and LH measurements, optimally by urinary log10(LHxT), correctly classified 82% of urine samples. It is concluded that leuprolide stimulation of endogenous testosterone is reproducible after a 10-day interval, is not masked by ND and is reliably detected by urine leuprolide or M1 measurement for at

  12. Minimal stimulation using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist and recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone versus GnRH antagonist multiple-dose protocol in low responders undergoing in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kim, So-Ra; Cheon, Yong-Pil; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2009-12-01

    This prospective randomized study was performed to investigate the effectiveness of minimal stimulation using recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) and GnRH antagonist compared with GnRH antagonist multiple-dose protocol (MDP) in low responders undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Our study demonstrated that minimal stimulation in natural cycles provides similar pregnancy rates to the GnRH antagonist MDP with fewer dose and days of rhFSH used and thus can be a cost-effective alternative as a last chance before oocyte donation in low responders.

  13. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  14. VEGF signalling controls GnRH neuron survival via NRP1 independently of KDR and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Cariboni, Anna; Davidson, Kathryn; Dozio, Elena; Memi, Fani; Schwarz, Quenten; Stossi, Fabio; Parnavelas, John G; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2011-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are neuroendocrine cells that are born in the nasal placode during embryonic development and migrate through the nose and forebrain to the hypothalamus, where they regulate reproduction. Many molecular pathways that guide their migration have been identified, but little is known about the factors that control the survival of the migrating GnRH neurons as they negotiate different environments. We previously reported that the class 3 semaphorin SEMA3A signals through its neuropilin receptors, NRP1 and NRP2, to organise the axons that guide migrating GnRH neurons from their birthplace into the brain. By combining analysis of genetically altered mice with in vitro models, we show here that the alternative neuropilin ligand VEGF164 promotes the survival of migrating GnRH neurons by co-activating the ERK and AKT signalling pathways through NRP1. We also demonstrate that survival signalling relies on neuronal, but not endothelial, NRP1 expression and that it occurs independently of KDR, the main VEGF receptor in blood vessels. Therefore, VEGF164 provides survival signals directly to developing GnRH neurons, independently of its role in blood vessels. Finally, we show that the VEGF164-mediated neuronal survival and SEMA3A-mediated axon guidance cooperate to ensure that migrating GnRH neurons reach the brain. Thus, the loss of both neuropilin ligands leads to an almost complete failure to establish the GnRH neuron system.

  15. 99mtc-Ubiquicidin [29–41], a Promising Radiopharmaceutical to Differentiate Orthopedic Implant Infections from Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Beiki, Davood; Yousefi, Gholamali; Fallahi, Babak; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Erfani, Mostafa; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquicidin (UBI) [29-41] is a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide that preferentially binds to bacterial cell membrane at the site of infection. We aimed to assess diagnostic value of 99mTc-UBI [29-41] as a radiopharmaceutical in differentiation of bacterial infection from sterile inflammation in suspected orthopedic implants. Nine patients suspected for orthopedic implant infection, all males with the mean age of 41.6 ± 20.9 years, were studied. A dose of 10 MBq/Kg (range : 555-740 MBq) 99mTc-UBI [29-41] was injected intravenously. A dynamic study followed by static whole body imaging at 30, 60 and 120 min post-radiotracer injection was acquired. Periprosthetic tissue culture was considered the closest test to a gold standard for diagnosing infections and scintigraphic scans were categorized as true- or false-positive and true- or false-negative, considering the bacterial culture as the gold standard. No adverse reaction was observed during or after the radiotracer injection days. There were five true positive, four true negative and no false positive and false negative scans. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were all calculated as 100%. We found a high diagnostic accuracy for 99mTc-UBI [29-41] scintigraphy in differentiation of bacterial infection from sterile inflammation in suspected orthopedic implants. Therefore, 99mTc-UBI [29-41] scintigraphy might be potentially recommended as a safe and promising imaging modality in these settings. However, further studies on a larger number of patients and different pathologies are still needed. PMID:24250609

  16. Endosulfan affects GnRH cells in sexually differentiated juveniles of the perciform Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Yanina; Pandolfi, Matías; Da Cuña, Rodrigo; Genovese, Griselda; Lo Nostro, Fabiana

    2015-06-01

    Endosulfan (ES) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in agriculture despite its high toxicity towards non-target organisms such as fish. It has been demonstrated that ES can cause negative effects on aquatic animals, including disruption of hormonal systems. However, the alterations produced by this pesticide on the reproductive axis of fish prior to sexual maturity, as well as possible modes of action have hardly been studied. This study aimed at assessing the effect of waterborne exposure to the pesticide ES on the reproductive axis during sexual differentiation of juveniles of the South American freshwater cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus. No mortality was observed due to ES subchronic exposure (90 days post-fertilization). Exposure to ES did not affect body weight nor morphometric parameters, indicating that larvae nutritional state was not affected. Timing of sexual differentiation, gonadal morphology and sex ratio were likewise not altered by ES. However, ES acted as an endocrine disrupting chemical in this species as the morphometry of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) producing cells was altered. Exposure to ES altered nuclear area, cell area and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of GnRH II neurons, and cell and nuclear area and diameter of GnRH III neurons. Interestingly, in our previous study, exposure before sex differentiation (30 day exposure) caused no alteration to GnRH II and III, and did alter GnRH I and FSH cells. These alterations could lead to changes in circulating hormone levels, especially when fish are exposed for prolonged periods, ultimately impairing reproductive fitness. C. dimerus juveniles can be an interesting biological model to perform toxicological studies with the intent to assess early disruption endpoints in the reproductive axis during development. PMID:25800987

  17. Endosulfan affects GnRH cells in sexually differentiated juveniles of the perciform Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Yanina; Pandolfi, Matías; Da Cuña, Rodrigo; Genovese, Griselda; Lo Nostro, Fabiana

    2015-06-01

    Endosulfan (ES) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in agriculture despite its high toxicity towards non-target organisms such as fish. It has been demonstrated that ES can cause negative effects on aquatic animals, including disruption of hormonal systems. However, the alterations produced by this pesticide on the reproductive axis of fish prior to sexual maturity, as well as possible modes of action have hardly been studied. This study aimed at assessing the effect of waterborne exposure to the pesticide ES on the reproductive axis during sexual differentiation of juveniles of the South American freshwater cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus. No mortality was observed due to ES subchronic exposure (90 days post-fertilization). Exposure to ES did not affect body weight nor morphometric parameters, indicating that larvae nutritional state was not affected. Timing of sexual differentiation, gonadal morphology and sex ratio were likewise not altered by ES. However, ES acted as an endocrine disrupting chemical in this species as the morphometry of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) producing cells was altered. Exposure to ES altered nuclear area, cell area and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of GnRH II neurons, and cell and nuclear area and diameter of GnRH III neurons. Interestingly, in our previous study, exposure before sex differentiation (30 day exposure) caused no alteration to GnRH II and III, and did alter GnRH I and FSH cells. These alterations could lead to changes in circulating hormone levels, especially when fish are exposed for prolonged periods, ultimately impairing reproductive fitness. C. dimerus juveniles can be an interesting biological model to perform toxicological studies with the intent to assess early disruption endpoints in the reproductive axis during development.

  18. The medio-basal hypothalamus as a dynamic and plastic reproduction-related kisspeptin-gnrh-pituitary center in fish.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Nilli; Stubblefield, John; Golan, Matan; Servili, Arianna; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Zohar, Yonathan

    2014-05-01

    Kisspeptin regulates reproductive events, including puberty and ovulation, primarily via GnRH neurons. Prolonged treatment of prepubertal striped bass females with kisspeptin (Kiss) 1 or Kiss2 peptides failed to enhance puberty but suggested a gnrh-independent pituitary control pathway. Kiss2 inhibited, but Kiss1 stimulated, FShβ expression and gonadal development, although hypophysiotropic gnrh1 and gnrh receptor expression remained unchanged. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on brains and pituitaries revealed a differential plasticity between the 2 kisspeptin neurons. The differences were most pronounced at the prespawning phase in 2 regions along the path of gnrh1 axons: the nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) and the neurohypophysis. Kiss1 neurons appeared in the NLT and innervated the neurohypophysis of prespawning males and females, reaching Lh gonadotropes in the proximal pars distalis. Males, at all reproductive stages, had Kiss2 innervations in the NLT and the neurohypophysis, forming large axonal bundles in the former and intermingling with gnrh1 axons. Unlike in males, only preovulatory females had massive NLT-neurohypophysis staining of kiss2. Kiss2 neurons showed a distinct appearance in the NLT pars ventralis-equivalent region only in spawning zebrafish, indicating that this phenomenon is widespread. These results underscore the NLT as important nuclei for kisspeptin action in 2 facets: 1) kisspeptin-gnrh interaction, both kisspeptins are involved in the regulation of gnrh release, in a stage- and sex-dependent manner, especially at the prespawning phase; and 2) gnrh-independent effect of Kiss peptides on the pituitary, which together with the plastic nature of their neuronal projections to the pituitary implies that a direct gonadotropic regulation is plausible. PMID:24484170

  19. Morphological Characterization of the Action Potential Initiation Segment in GnRH Neuron Dendrites and Axons of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Herde, Michel K; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-11-01

    GnRH neurons are the final output neurons of the hypothalamic network controlling fertility in mammals. In the present study, we used ankyrin G immunohistochemistry and neurobiotin filling of live GnRH neurons in brain slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic male mice to examine in detail the location of action potential initiation in GnRH neurons with somata residing at different locations in the basal forebrain. We found that the vast majority of GnRH neurons are bipolar in morphology, elaborating a thick (primary) and thinner (secondary) dendrite from opposite poles of the soma. In addition, an axon-like process arising predominantly from a proximal dendrite was observed in a subpopulation of GnRH neurons. Ankyrin G immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a single action potential initiation zone ∼27 μm in length primarily in the secondary dendrite of GnRH neurons and located 30 to 140 μm distant from the cell soma, depending on the type of process and location of the cell body. In addition to dendrites, the GnRH neurons with cell bodies located close to hypothalamic circumventricular organs often elaborated ankyrin G-positive axon-like structures. Almost all GnRH neurons (>90%) had their action potential initiation site in a process that initially, or ultimately after a hairpin loop, was coursing in the direction of the median eminence. These studies indicate that action potentials are initiated in different dendritic and axonal compartments of the GnRH neuron in a manner that is dependent partly on the neuroanatomical location of the cell body.

  20. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  1. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer.

  2. Pregnancy following combined growth hormone--pulsatile GnRH treatment in a patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Volpe, A; Coukos, G; Artini, P G; Silferi, M; Petraglia, F; Boghen, M; D'Ambrogio, G D; Genazzani, A R

    1990-04-01

    A patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea and a poor response in terms of pituitary growth hormone (GH) to acute administration of growth hormone-releasing factor has been treated with pulsatile gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) combined with GH to induce ovulation. GH was administered daily until signs of ovulation were detected. The luteal phase was supported by pulsatile GnRH only. Combined treatment gave an improved follicular recruitment, higher plasma levels of 17 beta-oestradiol and an earlier ovulation, compared to the previous cycle with pulsatile GnRH only. The result was a twin pregnancy which ended with the birth of two healthy male babies. The role of GH in potentiating the ovarian response to gonadotrophins, as well as the GH secretion abnormalities associated with dysfunctions of the hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal axis, might provide a rationale for combined GH and pulsatile GnRH treatment in such patients.

  3. Cloning, expression, and polymorphism at the 5'-flanking region of the GnRH gene and their association with laying traits in Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Wan, X P; Lan, J J; Yan, M J; Lian, S Y; Rijal, M; Huang, Z B; Li, A

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide, plays a vital role in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In vertebrates, GnRH is crucial for the onset of sexual development and the entire reproductive process. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic factors associated with egg-laying traits of Muscovy ducks. The full-length cDNA (474 bp) of Muscovy duck GnRH was obtained and characterised. It encodes 92 amino acids containing a 1-amino acid signal peptide cleavage site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Muscovy duck GnRH has a close relationship with Anas platyrhynchos GnRH. GnRH showed significantly different expression profiles between 4 developmental periods in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. The expression of GnRH in the laying period (36 weeks) was higher than at other periods in the three tissues. GnRH was widely expressed in 12 examined tissues of nesting and laying Muscovy ducks. In the hypothalamus, pituitary and gonads, the expression of GnRH was higher than in other tissues. In laying Muscovy ducks, the expression of GnRH in the hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, muscular stomach, pancreas, heart, duodenum and spleen was significantly higher than in nesting dusks. Differences were detected in the liver and glandular stomach between laying ducks and nesting ducks. Differences between the kidney and lung were not significant. In the pituitary, the GnRH and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) genes shared the same expression profiles during 4 time points. Both genes had the highest expression at 36 weeks of age. A mutation (g.206G > A) in the 5'-flanking region was associated with egg-laying performance. Individuals with genotype GG had better egg-laying performance than the individuals with genotype AA. GnRH may be used as a marker gene for laying performance in the Muscovy duck.

  4. Cloning, expression, and polymorphism at the 5'-flanking region of the GnRH gene and their association with laying traits in Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Wan, X P; Lan, J J; Yan, M J; Lian, S Y; Rijal, M; Huang, Z B; Li, A

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide, plays a vital role in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In vertebrates, GnRH is crucial for the onset of sexual development and the entire reproductive process. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic factors associated with egg-laying traits of Muscovy ducks. The full-length cDNA (474 bp) of Muscovy duck GnRH was obtained and characterised. It encodes 92 amino acids containing a 1-amino acid signal peptide cleavage site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Muscovy duck GnRH has a close relationship with Anas platyrhynchos GnRH. GnRH showed significantly different expression profiles between 4 developmental periods in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. The expression of GnRH in the laying period (36 weeks) was higher than at other periods in the three tissues. GnRH was widely expressed in 12 examined tissues of nesting and laying Muscovy ducks. In the hypothalamus, pituitary and gonads, the expression of GnRH was higher than in other tissues. In laying Muscovy ducks, the expression of GnRH in the hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, muscular stomach, pancreas, heart, duodenum and spleen was significantly higher than in nesting dusks. Differences were detected in the liver and glandular stomach between laying ducks and nesting ducks. Differences between the kidney and lung were not significant. In the pituitary, the GnRH and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) genes shared the same expression profiles during 4 time points. Both genes had the highest expression at 36 weeks of age. A mutation (g.206G > A) in the 5'-flanking region was associated with egg-laying performance. Individuals with genotype GG had better egg-laying performance than the individuals with genotype AA. GnRH may be used as a marker gene for laying performance in the Muscovy duck. PMID:26218061

  5. Direct regulation of GnRH neuron excitability by arcuate nucleus POMC and NPY neuron neuropeptides in female mice.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons act to sense and coordinate the brain's responses to metabolic cues. One neuronal network that is very sensitive to metabolic status is that controlling fertility. In this study, we investigated the impact of neuropeptides released by NPY and POMC neurons on the cellular excitability of GnRH neurons, the final output cells of the brain controlling fertility. The majority (∼70%) of GnRH neurons were activated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and this resulted from the direct postsynaptic activation of melanocortin receptor 3 and melanocortin receptor 4. A small population of GnRH neurons (∼15%) was excited by cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript or inhibited by β-endorphin. Agouti-related peptide, released by NPY neurons, was found to have variable inhibitory (∼10%) and stimulatory (∼25%) effects upon subpopulations of GnRH neurons. A variety of NPY and pancreatic polypeptide analogs was used to examine potential NPY interactions with GnRH neurons. Although porcine NPY (Y1/Y2/Y5 agonist) directly inhibited the firing of approximately 45% of GnRH neurons, [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY (Y1/Y4/Y5 agonist) could excite (56%) or inhibit (19%). Experiments with further agonists indicated that Y1 receptors were responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity, whereas postsynaptic Y4 receptors were stimulatory. These results show that the activity of GnRH neurons is regulated in a complex manner by neuropeptides released by POMC and NPY neurons. This provides a direct route through which different metabolic cues can regulate fertility.

  6. Expression and transcriptional regulation of the GnRH receptor gene in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chung-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Cheng, Chi Keung; Chow, Billy K C; Leung, Peter C K

    2005-11-01

    GnRH, acts via the GnRH receptor (GnRHR), plays a pivotal role in human reproduction by stimulating the synthesis and secretion of gonadotropins from pituitary gonadotropes. Studies have also suggested that it has other extra-pituitary functions. To date, the transcriptional regulation of human GnRHR gene in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, the human cerebellar medulloblastoma cell line TE-671 is found to express GnRH. We report here for the first time that GnRHR is also expressed in this neuronal cell line. Treatment with GnRHR agonist stimulated the phosphorylation of both ERK1/2 and JNK in the cells. Moreover, transient transfection of various human GnRHR promoter-luciferase constructs into the cells identified an upstream promoter region located between -2197 and -1018. Important cis-acting regulatory elements were found at -1300/-1018 and -2197/- 1900, as deletion of either region caused a dramatic decrease in the promoter activity. An upstream GnRHR promoter element was identified to be important for basal transcription in the human neuronal TE-671 cells, in contrast to the previous finding that a downstream promoter is responsible for the gonadotrope-specific expression. Furthermore, we showed that antide (GnRHR antagonist) significantly stimulated the GnRHR promoter activity and inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by staurosporine could also up-regulate the promoter activity in dose- and time-dependent manners. Taken together, these data suggest that activation of the GnRHR by interacting with GnRH may transcriptionally down-regulate itself via the PKC pathway in human neuronal cells.

  7. Potential regulation of GnRH gene by a steroidogenic factor-1-like protein.

    PubMed

    Corley, D R; Li, X; Lei, Z M; Rao, C V

    2000-08-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) is a member of an orphan nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. It plays a critical role in the development and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and adrenal axis. However, whether SF-1 can regulate transcription of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene is not known. To examine this possibility, we first over-expressed SF-1 and found that it not only decreased steady state GnRH messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels but also reduced its promoter activity in GT1-7 neurons. The inhibitory effect of SF-1 was lost when the 5'-flanking region of GnRH gene containing two distal (-1479 to -1474 bp and -1059 to -1054 bp) hexamers was deleted. Gel mobility shift assays showed that GT1-7 cell nuclear extracts contained a protein that formed a specific complex with synthetic oligonucleotides containing the two distal hexamers or a consensus SF-1 binding sequence. The migration of this complex was, however, slower than the complex formed with MA-10 cell nuclear extracts which were shown to contain a 53 kDa SF-1 protein. The addition of anti-SF-1 antibody supershifted the complex formed with MA-10, but not with GT1-7 cell nuclear extracts. The same antibody, however, detected a 60 kDa protein and immunostained nuclei of GT1-7 neurons. These results are consistent with GT1-7 neurons containing an SF-1-like protein that can bind to the distal hexamer sequences in the 5'-flanking region of rat GnRH gene to inhibit its transcription.

  8. GnRH decreases adiponectin expression in pituitary gonadotropes via the calcium and PKA pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonathan; Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance; Mann, Merry Lynn; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    As endocrinologically active cells, adipocytes are capable of secreting various adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin to impact metabolic function. Although adipocytes remain to be the primary site of synthesis and secretion, there is now growing evidence that supports the presence of adiponectin and its receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, providing a possible link between obesity and abnormal reproductive physiology. It has been demonstrated that adiponectin may reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus as well as modulate gonadal steroid hormone production. Furthermore, prior data indicate that adiponectin may play a role in decreasing luteinizing hormone secretion from pituitary gonadotropes. We aimed to identify the hormonal regulators of adiponectin and its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in pituitary gonadotropes using immortalized gonadotropic LβT2 cells and primary rat pituitary cells. Our study shows significant alterations in adiponectin expression across the estrous cycle. In addition, we present a novel finding that GnRH suppresses pituitary adiponectin expression via the calcium and protein kinase A intracellular pathways in both cultured rat primary pituitary cells and the LβT2 gonadotrope cell line. The GnRH did not alter expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in cultured gonadotropes. Expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, was not altered by GnRH in cell culture but in vivo or in vitro. Our data suggest that gonadotrope function may be modulated by GnRH-mediated changes in adiponectin expression.

  9. GnRH agonist trigger versus hCG trigger in GnRH antagonist in IVF/ICSI cycles: A review article

    PubMed Central

    Alyasin, Ashraf; Mehdinejadiani, Shayesteh; Ghasemi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Routinely, a bolus of 5.000-10.000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is used for the final follicular maturation and ovulation as a standard method. HCG has the same effect of luteinizing hormone (LH) with long half-life. It has the long lutheotrophic effect which increases the risk of ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS). Recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) trigger has been used for the induction of final follicular maturation and ovulation with the aim of reducing the OHSS risk. Several studies have shown that the releases of endogenous follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and LH after administration of GnRH agonist in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles are able to precede the final follicular maturation leading to removal of fertile oocyte with normal development of the embryo and ultimately pregnancy. But based on the results of some studies, using GnRH-a trigger leads to defect luteal-phase resulting to reduce the implantation and clinical pregnancy rates and also increase abortion in fresh embryo transfer cycles compared to routine IVF cycle with hCG triggering . Also, in recent years, studies have continued to modify the luteal phase support, so that the fresh embryo transfer is possible too. In this review, we examined the benefits, problems, and also ways to reform GnRH agonist triggering complications. PMID:27738657

  10. Dose dependent effect of GnRH analogue on pregnancy rate of repeat breeder crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Kharche, S D; Srivastava, S K

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treating repeat breeder dairy crossbred cows with different doses of GnRH analogue through i.m. at the time of artificial insemination, on pregnancy rates from their first service after treatment and overall pregnancy rates. One hundred and thirty seven crossbred dairy cows with a history of repeat breeding and eligible after 6-8 infertile services but clinically free of diseases were selected for the study. The animals were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 55) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 20 microg Buserelin-acetate (Receptal, Hoechst Roussel Vet GmbH) at the time of artificial insemination. Group 2 (n = 40) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 10 microg Buserelin-acetate at the time of artificial insemination. Group 3 (n = 42) cows were treated intramuscularly with saline as control at the time of artificial insemination. The first service pregnancy rates in Groups 1-3 were 45, 25 and 17%, respectively. Similarly, the overall conception rates in Groups 1-3 were 87, 58 and 48%, respectively. The results indicated that the pregnancy rate in crossbred cows could be improved by the GnRH treatment. The higher dose of GnRH significantly increased (P < 0.05) the first service as well as overall pregnancy rate in a dose dependent manner in repeat breeder crossbred cow bred previously 6-8 times unsuccessfully. PMID:16787717

  11. The lack of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells is not due to GnRH receptor reserve or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate pool size.

    PubMed

    Forrest-Owen, W; Willars, G B; Nahorski, S R; Assefa, D; Davidson, J S; Hislop, J; McArdle, C A

    1999-01-25

    The phospholipase C (PLC)-activating gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor is thought not to rapidly desensitise in alphaT3-1 cells. This extremely unusual characteristic raises the concern that it might be a feature of the cell type, rather than the receptor per se. Here we have used video imaging to establish whether the effects of endogenous PLC-activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) on Ca2+ ion concentration [Ca2+]i desensitise in these cells. Oxytocin, endothelin-1, methacholine, and UTP all caused [Ca2+]i increases which underwent rapid homologous desensitisation in that they were transient and responses to repeat stimuli were attenuated whereas subsequent responses to GnRH were not. To test whether receptor reserve obscures functional desensitisation of GnRH receptors, a photoaffinity antagonist (Pant-1), was used to effect a partial and irreversible receptor blockade. UV crosslinking in medium with 1000 nM Pant-1 reduced GnRH receptor number to 20 +/- 5% and reduced maximal buserelin-stimulated [3H]IP(X) accumulation to 57 +/- 5%, demonstrating removal of receptor reserve. In control alphaT3-1 cells the initial rate of GnRH-stimulated [3H]IP(X) accumulation was maintained for at least 5 min and GnRH caused a sustained increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass (confirming the resistance of GnRH receptors to desensitisation) and Pant-1 pre-treatment reduced the magnitude of these responses without altering their temporal profiles. In alphaT3-1 cells stably transfected with recombinant human muscarinic receptors (alphaT3-1/M3), responses to methacholine were characteristic of desensitising GPCRs (transient Ins(1,4,5)P3 and curvilinear [3H]IP(X) responses) and were unaltered by Pant-1. To test the relevance of phospholipid pool size, alphaT3-1/M3 cells were pre-treated with GnRH or methacholine in medium with LiCl (to deplete PtdIns(4,5)P2 pools). These pre-treatments reduced subsequent responses to methacholine and GnRH comparably, indicating access to a

  12. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Burds, Carol; Cheng, Paul; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A developmental "switch" in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH) neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs) are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s) underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1) expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2) responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3) function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons. PMID:26110920

  13. Effect of estrogen on the expression of GnRH and kisspeptin in the hypothalamus of rats during puberty.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pei; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Kaifa; Gao, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Lei; Tian, Yuan; Song, Min; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Yunsheng; Zhang, Xiaorong; Su, Shiping; Fang, Fugui; Ding, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in kisspeptin and GnRH levels could be attributed to sex steroids at puberty onset. We used the ovariectomy (OVX) model in rats treated with 17β-estradiol (E2; OVX + E2), or oil (OVX + oil), and in intact rats treated with E2 (intact + E2) or oil only (intact + oil) to determine gene expression changes of Kiss1 and Gnrh1 in the hypothalamus and protein expression of kisspeptin and GnRH in the different areas of the hypothalamus. In the intact + E2 and OVX + E2 rats on the day of the onset of puberty, GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) cell numbers decreased (P < 0.05) in the arcuate nucleus but were increased in the preoptic area; Kisspeptin-ir cells increased (P < 0.05) in the arcuate nucleus, periventricular nucleus, and preoptic area; no difference (P > 0.05) was found in the paraventricularis nucleus for GnRH-ir or kisspeptin-ir cells. Additionally, levels of Kiss1 and Gnrh1 messenger RNA in the hypothalamus were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the OVX + E2 or intact + E2 rats than in the OVX + oil or intact + oil animals, respectively. In the OVX + oil rats, OVX significantly increased (P < 0.05) levels of Gnrh1 and Kiss1 messenger RNA and the expression of GnRH and kisspeptin in the hypothalamus compared to intact + oil animals. These results suggest that kisspeptin and GnRH play major roles in modulating the activity of estrogen circuits at the onset of puberty.

  14. [Use of gonadoliberin (GnRH) or analogs in veterinary medicine. Pharmacologic and therapeutic evaluation in cattle].

    PubMed

    Thibier, M

    1988-01-01

    The author reports here the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of GnRH or analogues in cattle, species to which claims are both the most clearly identified and diverse. A single challenge of GnRH (doses between 100 and 1,500 micrograms) results in an enhanced and simultaneous release of both LH and FSH in a log dose-response manner. Clearance of GnRH injected intramuscularly is parallel to the LH and FSH release patterns ie maximum concentrations in 15-30 minutes and return back to basal levels in 6 hours approximately. This gonadotropin release in turns stimulates the release of gonadal steroids. The magnitude of the gonadotropins release in response to GnRH is dependent upon both the gonadal and adrenal steroids. Advantage of these properties has been taken in the bovine females to treat those that are 1) in true anoestrus after calving, 2) so-called "Repeat-Breeders", 3) so-called subfertile and treated then at the time of insemination, 4) with an ovarian cyst syndrome and 5) to improve the superovulation treatments. The most difficult problem to solve remains that of inducing cyclicity during the post-partum period especially in suckled beef cows. Several attempts have been made, injecting GnRH with intermittent, pulsatile or even infusion regimes. Results are still inconsistent. The most striking result is that observed in Repeat Breeders when GnRH is injected at mid luteal phase prior to insemination. Such a regime results in an enhanced conception rate compared to controls and it has been shown that it improves dramatically both the recovery rate and the rate of good quality embryos when experimentally collected 11 days after artificial insemination. Although encouraging results have been recorded, quite a few points are still controversial or unclear. More work is needed to help in improving the efficacy of GnRH therapy. Emphasis should be given on slow release devices. PMID:3142332

  15. Effects of a GnRH administration on testosterone profile, libido and semen parameters of dromedary camel bulls.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Davide; Fatnassi, Meriem; Padalino, Barbara; Aubé, Lydiane; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2015-10-01

    GnRH treatment has been suggested to increase testosterone levels temporarily and to stimulate libido in stallions, but its use has not fully ascertained in dromedary camels. The aim of this work was to study the effects of administering 100 μg of GnRH on testosterone profile, libido and semen parameters in dromedary camels. The same bulls were used as self-controls and experimental group. Blood samples were collected every 20 min (T0-T12) for 4h, and semen collections were performed over a 2-hour period after T12. GnRH was administered immediately after T0. In GnRH-treated bulls, testosterone levels showed an upward trend, peaking after 140 min, and then slowly decreasing. GnRH administration also led to a decrease in mating time and an increase in spermatozoa concentration. Overall, it seems that administration of 100 μg GnRH might increase testosterone levels temporarily and enhance camel reproduction performance. PMID:26412546

  16. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches.

  17. Rapid photoperiod-induced increase in detectable GnRH mRNA-containing cells in Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T; Khoshaba, N; Scarbrough, K; Urban, J H; Vitaterna, M H; Levine, J E; Turek, F W; Horton, T H

    1997-12-01

    To determine whether changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are early indicators of photostimulation, Siberian hamsters were placed in short days (6:18-h light-dark) at 3 (experiment 1) or 6 (experiment 2) wk of age where they were held for 3 (experiment 1) or 4 (experiment 2) wk. Hamsters were then moved to long photoperiod (16:8-h light-dark). In experiment 1, brains were collected 1-21 days after transfer from short to long days. In experiment 2, brains were collected only on the second morning of long day exposure. Long and short day controls were included in both experiments. Cells containing GnRH mRNA, as visualized by in situ hybridization, were counted. As expected, there were no differences in the number of detectable GnRH mRNA-containing cells among animals chronically exposed to long or short photoperiods. However, on the second morning after transfer from short to long photoperiod, a positive shift in the distribution of GnRH mRNA-containing cells occurred relative to the respective controls in the two experiments. Increases in follicle-stimulating hormone secretion and gonadal growth occurred days later. In conclusion, a rapid but transient increase in the distribution of detectable GnRH mRNA-containing cells is an early step in the photostimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  18. The requirement of GnRH at the beginning of the five-day CO-Synch + controlled internal drug release protocol in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Cruppe, L H; Day, M L; Abreu, F M; Kruse, S; Lake, S L; Biehl, M V; Cipriano, R S; Mussard, M L; Bridges, G A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the omission of GnRH at controlled internal drug release device (CIDR) insertion would impact pregnancy rates to timed AI (TAI) in beef heifers enrolled in a 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol that used 1 PGF2α dose given at CIDR removal. Yearling beef heifers in Ohio in 2 consecutive breeding seasons (2011, n = 151, and 2012, n = 143; Angus × Simmental), Utah (2012, n = 265; Angus × Hereford), Idaho (2012, n = 127; Charolais), and Wyoming (2012, n = 137; Angus) were enrolled in the 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol. At CIDR insertion (d -5), heifers were randomly assigned either to receive 100 μg GnRH (GnRH+; n = 408) or not to receive GnRH (GnRH-; n = 415). At CIDR removal (d 0 of the experiment), 25 mg PGF2α was administered to all heifers. All heifers were inseminated by TAI and given 100 μg GnRH 72 h after PGF2α (d 3). In heifers at the Ohio locations (n = 294), presence of a corpus luteum (CL) at CIDR insertion (d -5) was determined via assessment of progesterone concentrations (2011) and ovarian ultrasonography (2012). Subsequently, in both years, ovarian ultrasound was conducted on d 0 to determine the presence of a new CL. In this same subgroup of heifers, blood samples for progesterone analysis were collected on d 3 to assess luteal regression. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed between 32 and 38 d after TAI. At CIDR withdrawal, presence of a new CL was greater (P < 0.05) in the GnRH+ (55.8%, 82/147) than GnRH- (26.5%, 39/147) treatment. Incidence of failed luteal regression did not differ between the GnRH+ (3.4%) and GnRH- (0.7%) treatments. Pregnancy rate to TAI did not differ between the GnRH+ (50.5%) and GnRH- (54.9%) treatments. In conclusion, although the incidence of a new CL at CIDR removal was increased in the GnRH+ treatment, omission of the initial GnRH treatment in the 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol did not influence TAI pregnancy rate in yearling beef heifers. In addition, a single dose of PGF2α at

  19. The Methylcytosine Dioxygenase Ten-Eleven Translocase-2 (tet2) Enables Elevated GnRH Gene Expression and Maintenance of Male Reproductive Function.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Joseph R; Louis, Somaja; Keen, Kim L; Wolfe, Andrew; Terasawa, Ei; Levine, Jon E

    2016-09-01

    Reproduction depends on the establishment and maintenance of elevated GnRH neurosecretion. The elevation of primate GnRH release is accompanied by epigenetic changes. Specifically, cytosine residues within the GnRH gene promoter are actively demethylated, whereas GnRH mRNA levels and peptide release rise. Whether active DNA demethylation has an impact on GnRH neuron development and consequently reproductive function remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether ten-eleven translocation (tet) enzymes, which initiate the process of active DNA demethylation, influence neuronal function and reproduction. We found that tet2 expression increases with age in the developing mouse preoptic area-hypothalamus and is substantially higher in a mature (GT1-7) than an immature (GN11) GnRH cell line. GnRH mRNA levels and mean GnRH peptide release elevated after overexpression of tet2 in GN11 cells, whereas CRISPR/cas9-mediated knockdown of tet2 in GT1-7 cells led to a significant decline in GnRH expression. Manipulations of tet2 expression altered tet2 genome binding and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation abundance at the GnRH promoter. Mice with selective disruption of tet2 in GnRH neurons (GnRH-specific tet2 knockout mice) exhibited no sign of altered pubertal timing in either sex, although plasma LH levels were significantly lower, and fecundity was altered specifically in adult male GnRH-specific tet2 knockout animals, indicating that tet2 may participate in the maintenance GnRH neuronal function. Exposure to bisphenol A, an environmental contaminant that alters GnRH neuron activity, caused a shift in tet2 subcellular localization and a decrease in histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation abundance at the GnRH promoter. Finally, evaluation of tet2 protein interactions in GT1-7 cells suggests that the influence of tet2 on neuronal function are not limited to nuclear mechanisms but could depend on mitochondrial function, and RNA metabolism. Together, these studies implicate

  20. Steroid-induced changes in the morphology of GnRH neurons in the male leopard frog, Rana pipiens: correlation with plasma gonadotropin and gonadal size.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-San; Jones, Jeremy T

    2005-04-01

    Previously, we reported that hypothalamic explants isolated from male leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) implanted with 17beta-estradiol (E2), but not 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), released significantly higher levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in response to a veratridine challenge. In this study, we measured changes in GnRH soma size, circulating luteinizing hormone (LH), and gonadosomatic index (GSI) in response to these two steroid hormones to further assess the impact of these hormones on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Sexually mature male R. pipiens were implanted with silastic capsules containing cholesterol (Ch; control), E2, or DHT for 20 days. GnRH immunocytochemistry (ICC) revealed that both E2 and DHT significantly enlarged GnRH soma size without affecting the total number of GnRH neurons in the forebrain. The effects of E2 and DHT were specific, since neither hormone altered the soma size of tyrosine hydroxylase neurons in the dorsomedial posterior tuberculum. Circulating LH levels were significantly reduced in animals treated with both steroid hormones, with E2 exerting the most potent inhibitory effect. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the GSI and GnRH soma size in Ch controls, suggesting animals with larger GnRH neurons tended to have smaller gonads. Overall, our results showed that both steroid hormones induced the accumulation of GnRH and ultimately the swelling of the GnRH soma. Further, larger GnRH neurons were associated with smaller gonads and lower circulating levels of LH, suggesting a link between enlarged GnRH neurons and an overall decrease in the reproductive activity of R. pipiens.

  1. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Miguel A; Brassesco, Mario; Sastre, Margalida; Gómez, Manuel; Herrero, Julio; Marque, Laura; Brassesco, Arturo; Espinós, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332) was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B) or on day 20 (protocol C) of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A). The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation). The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase) and C (stimulation on luteal phase) were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation). GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency fertility preservation in cancer patients. PMID:25709506

  2. Native recombinant kisspeptin can induce gnrh1 and kissr2 expression in Paralichthys olivaceus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Huayu; Wang, Mengxun; Qi, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2016-10-01

    Kisspeptins have been described as one of the most potent activators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Kisspeptins control the onset of reproductive functions during puberty by directly stimulating the neuronal activity and release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The function of kisspeptins has been investigated in vivo and in vitro. In our study, three kinds of recombinant kisspeptin proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Kisspeptin fragments Kp54, Kp44, and Kp10 translated from Paralichthys olivaceus kiss2 gene were then obtained. Kp44 contained 44 amide acids (aa) which are the same as the N-terminal of Kp54; Kp10 shares the same 10 aa with the C-terminal of Kp54 but Kp10 also contains some other amide acids. In the dose course of treatments with prokaryotically expressed peptides, Kp54 and Kp10 could induce the expression of kissr2 and gnrh1; by contrast, Kp44 could not induce a similar expression. These results provided direct evidence that the core decapeptide of kisspeptin is necessary to ensure its biological functions. In the time course of the Kp54 treatments on two kinds of cultured brain cells, different patterns of kissr2 and gnrh1 mRNA suggested that the responses of these cells to kisspeptins depends on cell type and treatment duration. Thus, our research provided alternative methods to investigate the functions of kisspeptin in vitro and to detect biological activities; this research also established basis for kisspeptin applications in production processes.

  3. Native recombinant kisspeptin can induce gnrh1 and kissr2 expression in Paralichthys olivaceus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Huayu; Wang, Mengxun; Qi, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2016-10-01

    Kisspeptins have been described as one of the most potent activators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Kisspeptins control the onset of reproductive functions during puberty by directly stimulating the neuronal activity and release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The function of kisspeptins has been investigated in vivo and in vitro. In our study, three kinds of recombinant kisspeptin proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Kisspeptin fragments Kp54, Kp44, and Kp10 translated from Paralichthys olivaceus kiss2 gene were then obtained. Kp44 contained 44 amide acids (aa) which are the same as the N-terminal of Kp54; Kp10 shares the same 10 aa with the C-terminal of Kp54 but Kp10 also contains some other amide acids. In the dose course of treatments with prokaryotically expressed peptides, Kp54 and Kp10 could induce the expression of kissr2 and gnrh1; by contrast, Kp44 could not induce a similar expression. These results provided direct evidence that the core decapeptide of kisspeptin is necessary to ensure its biological functions. In the time course of the Kp54 treatments on two kinds of cultured brain cells, different patterns of kissr2 and gnrh1 mRNA suggested that the responses of these cells to kisspeptins depends on cell type and treatment duration. Thus, our research provided alternative methods to investigate the functions of kisspeptin in vitro and to detect biological activities; this research also established basis for kisspeptin applications in production processes. PMID:27260091

  4. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to GnRH receptor mutation in a sibling.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Piotr; Fichna, Marta; Zurawek, Magdalena; Nowak, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is characterised by delayed puberty and infertility. Congenital HH comprises Kallmann syndrome with hypo-/anosmia and idiopathic HH (IHH). The genetic origin remains unknown in most cases, but the defective GnRH receptor gene (GNRHR) accounts for a considerable proportion of IHH. Here we describe a pair of siblings diagnosed with IHH. Aged 17 years, the boy was referred because of short stature (162 cm) and overweight (62.5 kg). He presented no signs of puberty, bone age of 14.5 years and insulin resistance. His sister, aged 16 years, also displayed delayed puberty. She was 166 cm tall and weighed 52 kg; her bone age was 12.5 years. Pelvic ultrasonography showed an infantile uterus and fibrous ovaries. In both siblings, serum gonadotropins were extremely low, and non-responsive to GnRH. Testosterone (1.38 nmol/l) and IGF1 (273 ng/ml) were decreased in the boy, although the girl did not present IFG1 deficiency. Her serum oestradiol was 10 pg/ml. MRIs of the hypothalamo-pituitary region and olfactory bulbs revealed them to be normal. The patients' sense of smell was unaltered. Their parents appeared to be first degree cousins. Considering the clinical data and potentially autosomal recessive HH transmission, the GNRHR gene was screened. The siblings turned out to be homozygous for the G416A transition, which had previously been identified in other HH individuals. The parents were heterozygous mutation carriers. The proband, moderately responding to LH, was started on low dose testosterone replacement, and his sister on transdermal oestradiol. Molecular data indicative of GnRH resistance could guide their future therapy should they desire fertility restoration. Further observations of the male patient may provide insights into androgen's influence on body mass, growth and insulin sensitivity. PMID:21717411

  5. Melatonin elicits protein kinase C-mediated calcium response in immortalized GT1-7 GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Ozcan, Mete; Kacar, Emine; Alcin, Ergul; Yılmaz, Bayram; Ayar, Ahmet

    2012-01-30

    Melatonin is suggested to have effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The pulsatile pattern of GnRH release, which results in the intermittent release of gonadotropic hormones from the pituitary, has a critical importance for reproductive function but the factors responsible from this release pattern are not known. Calcium is a second messenger involved in hormone release. Therefore, investigation of the effects of melatonin on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)](i)) would provide critical information on hormone release in immortalized GnRH neurons. The pattern of melatonin-induced intracellular calcium signaling was investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging using the immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. Melatonin caused a significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i,) which was greatly blocked by luzindole, a melatonin antagonist, or attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. This study suggests that melatonin seems to have a direct effect on GnRH neurons.

  6. Vernal changes in the behavioral and endocrine responses to GnRH application in male European ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Millesi, Eva; Hoffmann, Ilse E; Steurer, Sabine; Metwaly, Mohammed; Dittami, John P

    2002-02-01

    This field study was aimed at examining hypothalamic involvement in the behavioral changes of male European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) before, during, and after the mating season. The effects of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) application on androgen secretion and behavioral patterns were investigated. Animals were captured, bled, and injected intramuscularly with 40 ng/100 g of GnRH. A second plasma sample was collected 40 min after the treatment to document changes in testosterone secretion. Behavioral parameters such as intra-sexual aggression, scent marking, and home range size were compared on the days before and after the stimulation. In the first two phases, before female emergence and during mating, GnRH-injection caused increases in plasma testosterone. In the post-mating phase, initial plasma testosterone levels had decreased and no elevation could be induced. Sham treatment of controls had no effect in any phase. Conditional parameters like emergence body mass and testicular size covaried with androgen increases only in the pre-mating period. Behavioral changes after GnRH administration occurred during the pre-mating period. Intra-sexual aggression, scent marking, and home range size increased significantly in experimental individuals. Later, during mating and post-mating, we found no behavioral changes associated with the GnRH treatment or the testosterone increase. The results demonstrate changes in the endocrine and behavioral sensitivity to GnRH application, according to the phases of the active season. An exogenous pulse of GnRH can apparently release behavior in male European ground squirrels, which is normally context dependent with the emergence of females. PMID:11863383

  7. Passive transfer of maternal GnRH antibodies does not affect reproductive development in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) calves.

    PubMed

    Powers, J G; Baker, D L; Ackerman, M G; Bruemmer, J E; Spraker, T R; Conner, M M; Nett, T M

    2012-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is intermittently released from the hypothalamus in consistent patterns from before birth to final maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at puberty. Disruption of this signaling via GnRH vaccination during the neonatal period can alter reproduction at maturity. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of GnRH-antibody exposure on reproductive maturation and function in elk calves passively exposed to high concentrations of GnRH antibodies immediately after birth. Fifteen elk calves (eight males and seven females) born to females treated with GnRH vaccine or sham vaccine during midgestation were divided into two groups based on the concentration of serum GnRH antibodies measured during the neonatal period. Those with robust (>15 pmol (125)I-GnRH bound per mL of serum) titers (N = 10; four females and six males) were designated as the exposed group, whereas those with undetectable titers (N = 5; three females and two males) were the unexposed group. Onset of puberty, reproductive development, and endocrine function in antibody-exposed and unexposed male and female elk calves were compared. Neonatal exposure to high concentrations of GnRH antibodies had no effect on body weight (P = 0.968), endocrine profiles (P > 0.05), or gametogenesis in either sex. Likewise, there were no differences between groups in gross or histologic structure of the hypothalamus, pituitary, testes, or ovaries. Pituitary stimulation with a GnRH analog before the second potential reproductive season induced substantial LH secretion in all experimental elk. All females became pregnant during their second reproductive season and all males exhibited similar mature secondary sexual characteristics. There were no differences between exposure groups in hypothalamic GnRH content (P = 0.979), pituitary gonadotropin content (P > 0.05) or gonadal structure. We concluded that suppressing GnRH signaling through immunoneutralization

  8. Time-of-day-dependent changes in GnRH1 neuronal activities and gonadotropin mRNA expression in a daily spawning fish, medaka.

    PubMed

    Karigo, Tomomi; Kanda, Shinji; Takahashi, Akiko; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2012-07-01

    GnRH neurons in the preoptic area and hypothalamus control the secretion of GnRH and form the final common pathway for hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation in vertebrates. Temporal regulation of reproduction by coordinating endogenous physiological conditions and behaviors is important for successful reproduction. Here, we examined the temporal regulation of reproduction by measuring time-of-day-dependent changes in the electrical activity of GnRH1 neurons and in levels of expression of pituitary gonadotropin mRNA using a daily spawning teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes). First, we performed on-cell patch-clamp recordings from GnRH1 neurons that directly project to the pituitary, using gnrh1-green fluorescent protein transgenic medaka. The spontaneous firing activity of GnRH1 neurons showed time-of-day-dependent changes: overall, the firing activity in the afternoon was higher than in the morning. Next, we examined the daily changes in the pituitary gonadotropin transcription level. The expression levels of lhb and fshb mRNA also showed changes related to time of day, peaking during the lights-off period. Finally, we analyzed effects of GnRH on the pituitary. We demonstrated that incubation of isolated pituitary with GnRH increases lhb mRNA transcription several hours after GnRH stimulation, unlike the well-known immediate LH releasing effect of GnRH. From these results, we propose a working hypothesis concerning the temporal regulation of the ovulatory cycle in the brain and pituitary of female medaka.

  9. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: tissue distributions, early ontogeny and effects of fasting.

    PubMed

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is classically known for its role in regulating teleost fish skin color change for environmental adaptation. Recent evidence suggests that MCH also has appetite-stimulating properties. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide family has dual roles in endocrine control of reproduction and energy status in fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are a commercially important aquaculture species inhabiting the shores of Atlantic Canada. In this study, we examine MCH and GnRH transcript expression profiles during early development as well as in central and peripheral tissues and quantify juvenile Atlantic cod MCH and GnRH hypothalamic mRNA expressions following food deprivation. MCH and GnRH3 cDNAs are maternally deposited into cod eggs, while MCH has variable expression throughout early development. GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNAs "turn-on" during mid-segmentation once the brain is fully developed. For both MCH and GnRH, highest expression appears during the exogenous feeding stages, perhaps supporting their functions as appetite regulators during early development. MCH and GnRH transcripts are found in brain regions related to appetite regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus, hypothalamus), as well as the pituitary gland and the stomach, suggesting a peripheral function in food intake regulation. Atlantic cod MCH mRNA is upregulated during fasting, while GnRH2 and GnRH3 transcripts do not appear to be influenced by food deprivation. In conclusion, MCH might be involved in stimulating food intake in juvenile Atlantic cod, while GnRHs may play a more significant role in appetite regulation during early development.

  10. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E; Scrivens, James H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates-for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome-the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  11. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates–for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome–the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  12. The effects of a slow release GnRH agonist implant on male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Groeger, Gesa; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Surgical castration is done in male pet rabbits for reproduction control, to reduce inter-male aggression and to control hyper-sexuality, territory marking and aggression against humans. Alternatives to surgical castration are requested because of a relatively great anaesthetic risk in rabbits. Long-term application of a GnRH agonist implant results in a fully reversible "hormonal" castration in male dogs, cats, boars and many other species. Therefore, the present study using New Zealand White hybrid and German Giant rabbits aimed to investigate the effects of a 4.7mg deslorelin implant in peripubertal male rabbits (SG; n=10), as a mean of hormonal castration. Blood samples (for testosterone measurements), body weight and testicular volume were taken on days (D) 0, 14 and 90. Surgical castration was performed on D90 for testicular histology. Age-matched animals following the same protocol without implant administration served as adult controls (n=5, CG), animals castrated on D0 served as juvenile controls (n=7, JG). Following treatment, testosterone concentrations were not reduced compared to CG; basal testosterone concentrations were only measured in JG. Spermatogenesis was not affected in SG and not different from CG. Application of a slow release GnRH agonist implant does not induce hormonal castration in male rabbits over a period of 90 days indicating that it is not a suitable alternative to surgical castration in this species.

  13. Central Effects of Camphor on GnRH and Sexual Hormones in Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Sima; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Aghajanpour, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi Kani, Seyedeh Narges; Pourbagher, Roghieh; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Esmaili, Mohsen; Yoonesi, Ali Asghar; Zarghami, Amin; Alinezhad, Farid

    2012-01-01

    In Persian traditional medicine is believed that camphor (a crystalline ketone obtained from cinnamomum camphora) is a suppressor of sexual behaviors. This study examined the central effects of camphor on sexual hormones (LH, FSH and testosterone) and GnRH plasma levels in male rat. Male Wistar rats weighing 250-260gr were selected and divided into control (no treatment), sham (ICV injection of EtOH 10%) and treatment (ICV injection of camphor in three doses 4, 20, 40 µg/ 10µl in alcohol) groups. The serum samples were used for assaying of GnRH, LH, FSH and testosterone. There were no significant differences in the levels of hormones between the groups of study. Despite the central administration of camphor in hypothalamus - pituitary - gonad (HPG) axis, no significant differences were seen in sex hormone`s levels compared to the control. With this finding, it can be concluded that camphor may not effectively handle the axis via central pathway. These data recommend further studies of camphor on the HPG axis. PMID:24551777

  14. Calcium Influx and DREAM Protein Are Required For GnRH Gene Expression Pulse Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Gilles M.; Boockfor, Fredric R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence using GT1-7 cells indicates that GnRH pulsatility depends on exocytotic-release and gene transcription events. To determine whether calcium or DREAM may play a role in linking these processes, we used an L-type Ca2+-blocker (nimodipine) and found that not only GnRH gene expression (GnRH-GE) pulse activity was abolished but also that binding of proteins to OCT1BS-a (essential site for GnRH-GE pulses) was reduced. We further found that only EF-hand forms of DREAM were expressed in GT1-7 and that DREAM was part of the complex binding to OCT1BS-a. Finally, microinjection of DREAM antibody into cells abolished GnRH-GE pulses demonstrating its importance in pulsatility. These results reveal that calcium and DREAM may bridge cytoplasmic and nuclear events enabling temporal coordination of intermittent activity. Expression of DREAM in various cell types coupled with the universal role of calcium raise the possibility that these factors may play similar role in other secretory cells. PMID:17241740

  15. The effects of a slow release GnRH agonist implant on male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Groeger, Gesa; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Surgical castration is done in male pet rabbits for reproduction control, to reduce inter-male aggression and to control hyper-sexuality, territory marking and aggression against humans. Alternatives to surgical castration are requested because of a relatively great anaesthetic risk in rabbits. Long-term application of a GnRH agonist implant results in a fully reversible "hormonal" castration in male dogs, cats, boars and many other species. Therefore, the present study using New Zealand White hybrid and German Giant rabbits aimed to investigate the effects of a 4.7mg deslorelin implant in peripubertal male rabbits (SG; n=10), as a mean of hormonal castration. Blood samples (for testosterone measurements), body weight and testicular volume were taken on days (D) 0, 14 and 90. Surgical castration was performed on D90 for testicular histology. Age-matched animals following the same protocol without implant administration served as adult controls (n=5, CG), animals castrated on D0 served as juvenile controls (n=7, JG). Following treatment, testosterone concentrations were not reduced compared to CG; basal testosterone concentrations were only measured in JG. Spermatogenesis was not affected in SG and not different from CG. Application of a slow release GnRH agonist implant does not induce hormonal castration in male rabbits over a period of 90 days indicating that it is not a suitable alternative to surgical castration in this species. PMID:25466212

  16. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain.

  17. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain. PMID:25200132

  18. GnRH immunodetection in the brain of the holocephalan fish Chimaera monstrosa L.: correlation to oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Masini, Maria Angela; Prato, Paola; Vacchi, Marino; Uva, Bianca Maria

    2008-05-01

    Chimera monstrosa (rabbit fish) like other holocephalans is a rare, delicate deep sea fish. Owing to the difficulty of sampling individuals in good shape, there is a paucity of information available on the morphology and physiology of this species especially concerning reproduction. In holocephalans, a hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis has been postulated and a GnRH molecule identical to cGnRH II has been identified. The aim of the present study was to correlate the presence of steroidogenic enzymes in the ovarian follicles with the presence of GnRH in the hypothalamus. Estrogens, the steroids that trigger the accumulation of yolk (vitellogenesis) in the oocytes are synthesized by the somatic cells of the follicle in the vitellogenic stages via a cascade of steroid dehydrogenases involving 3 beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD; in the inner thecal layer) and aromatase cytochrome (P450; granulosa layer). Our results showed that 3 beta-HSD is present concomitant with the presence of cGnRH II in the preoptic area and in the ventral hypothalamus. Another form of immunoreactive GnRH, mGnRH is also present in the brain of C. monstrosa. It is localized in the ventral telencephalon and in the midbrain caudal diencephalon (boundary between ventral thalamus and tegmentum of the mesencephalon). This form of GnRH is probably correlated with sexual behaviour.

  19. Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neuron Migration: Initiation, Maintenance and Cessation as Critical Steps to Ensure Normal Reproductive Function

    PubMed Central

    Wierman, Margaret E.; Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Tobet, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    GnRH neurons follow a carefully orchestrated journey from their birth in the olfactory placode area. Initially, they migrate along with the vomeronasal nerve into the brain at the cribriform plate, then progress caudally to sites within the hypothalamus where they halt and send projections to the median eminence to activate pituitary gonadotropes. Many factors controlling this precise journey have been elucidated by the silencing or over expression of candidate genes in mouse models. Importantly, a number of these factors may not only play a role in normal physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis but also be mis-expressed to cause human disorders of GnRH deficiency, presenting as a failure to undergo normal pubertal development. This review outlines the current cadre of candidates thought to modulate GnRH neuronal migration. The further elucidation and characterization of these factors that impact GnRH neuron development may shed new light on human reproductive disorders and provide potential targets to develop new pro-fertility or contraceptive agents. PMID:20650288

  20. Novel role for anti-Müllerian hormone in the regulation of GnRH neuron excitability and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Irene; Casoni, Filippo; Liu, Xinhuai; Messina, Andrea; Parkash, Jyoti; Jamin, Soazik P; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Collier, Francis; Baroncini, Marc; Dewailly, Didier; Pigny, Pascal; Prescott, Mel; Campbell, Rebecca; Herbison, Allan E; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) plays crucial roles in sexual differentiation and gonadal functions. However, the possible extragonadal effects of AMH on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis remain unexplored. Here we demonstrate that a significant subset of GnRH neurons both in mice and humans express the AMH receptor, and that AMH potently activates the GnRH neuron firing in mice. Combining in vivo and in vitro experiments, we show that AMH increases GnRH-dependent LH pulsatility and secretion, supporting a central action of AMH on GnRH neurons. Increased LH pulsatility is an important pathophysiological feature in many cases of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common cause of female infertility, in which circulating AMH levels are also often elevated. However, the origin of this dysregulation remains unknown. Our findings raise the intriguing hypothesis that AMH-dependent regulation of GnRH release could be involved in the pathophysiology of fertility and could hold therapeutic potential for treating PCOS.

  1. Gonadal and pituitary responsiveness of stallions is not down-regulated by prolonged pulsatile administration of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P; Squires, E L; Pickett, B W; Nett, T M

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged pulsatile administration of homologous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) at therapeutic or 5x therapeutic doses would cause down-regulation of the stallion's hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Fifteen stallions were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (n=5/group) and received a 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of saline (group 1), 50 microg GnRH (group 2), or 250 microg GnRH (group 3) every 2 hours for 75 days. Weekly evaluations of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone and monthly evaluations of daily sperm output and spermatozoal motility failed to demonstrate any decreased pituitary or gonadal responsiveness within or among treatment groups (P > 0.1) as a result of treatment with GnRH. Results of this study demonstrate that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicularaxis of the stallion, unlike that of other domestic species, is remarkably refractory to GnRH-induced down-regulation.

  2. Gonadotropin (LH and FSH) response after submaximal GnRH stimulation in depressed premenopausal women and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J D; Maislin, G; Rosenzweig, M; Halbrecht, U

    1995-01-01

    Although hormonal response abnormalities in depression have been demonstrated in several hypothalamic-pituitary-target organ axes after a variety of neuroendocrine challenge tests, studies of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function have been inconsistent in their findings. The use of maximal or supramaximal doses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in early studies (150-600 micrograms) may have masked the presence of more subtle disturbances in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) responsiveness in depression. We hypothesized that submaximal doses of GnRH might reveal a more subtle dysregulation in gonadotropin responsiveness in depression, and therefore measured LH and FSH responses after GnRH 10 micrograms and 90 micrograms doses in nine premenopausal depressed women and six healthy controls. There were no statistically significant differences between subject groups for mean basal LH, FSH, and estradiol concentrations, nor for any of the LH and FSH response values after either GnRH stimulation dose. The present observations of an intact HPG axis in depression contrast with findings of disturbances in most other hypothalamic-pituitary axes, and suggest that neuroendocrine dysregulation in depression might not represent a generalized limbic system-hypothalamic-pituitary abnormality, but rather a more restricted lesion sparing the medial preoptic and/or arcuate region of the hypothalamus which regulates gonadotropin secretion.

  3. Foliation-Based Parameter Tuning in a Model of the GnRH Pulse and Surge Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Frederique; Vidal, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a model of the GnRH pulse and surge generator, with the definite aim of constraining the model GnRH output with respect to a physiologically relevant list of specifications. The alternating pulse and surge pattern of secretion results from the interaction between a GnRH secreting system and a regulating system exhibiting slow-fast dynamics. The mechanisms underlying the behavior of the model are reviewed from the study of the Boundary-Layer System according to the dissection method principle. Using singular perturbation theory, we describe the sequence of bifurcations undergone by the regulating (FitzHugh-Nagumo) system, encompassing the rarely investigated case of homoclinic connection. Based on pure dynamical considerations, we restrict the space of parameter search for the regulating system and describe a foliation of this restricted space, whose leaves define constant duration ratios between the surge and the pulsatility phase in the whole system. We propose an algorithm to fix the parameter values also to meet the other prescribed ratios dealing with amplitude and frequency features of the secretion signal. We finally apply these results to illustrate the dynamics of GnRH secretion in the ovine species and the rhesus monkey.

  4. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo. PMID:26257126

  5. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich; Leinders-Zufall, Trese

    2015-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis.

  6. Physiological interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spleen in rams actively immunized against GnRH.

    PubMed

    Han, Xingfa; Ren, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Yuqin; Song, TianZeng; Cao, Xiaohan; Du, Xiaogang; Meng, Fengyan; Tan, Yao; Liu, Yacheng; Feng, Jing; Chu, Mingxing; Zeng, Xianyin

    2016-09-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is strongly implicated in the regulation of immune system. The objective was to determine the effects of immunocastration on splenic reproduction- and immunity-related gene expressions, and serum cytokine profiles in rams. Forty rams were randomly allocated into three groups: control (n=14); surgically castrated (n=13); or immunized (n=13) against 100μg D-Lys6-GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide conjugated to ovalbumin in Specol adjuvant at 6months of age (with a booster 2months later). Blood samples (for hormone and immune cytokine profiles) were collected at 1-month intervals until rams were slaughtered (10months). Compared to intact controls, anti-GnRH immunization reduced (P<0.05) serum concentrations of LH, FSH, and testosterone. Reduced testosterone abrogated its inhibitor feedback effect on the synthesis of GnRH in spleen, as evidenced by increased (P<0.05) protein content and mRNA expressions of GnRH, and simultaneously decreased (P<0.05) mRNA expressions of androgen receptor in spleen. In parallel with the increased GnRH production in spleen, the mRNA expressions of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as lymphocyte marker CD4, CD8 and CD19 molecules were increased (P<0.05) in spleen. Consistently, serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α were increased (P<0.05) in rams following immunization. Similarly, deprivation of testosterone by surgical castration also increased (P<0.05) GnRH and thus immune cytokine expressions in spleen. Collectively, our data suggested that immunocastration increased GnRH production in spleen by abrogating the inhibitory feedback effects from testosterone, consequently improving the immune markers of spleen and serum immune cytokines in rams.

  7. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo.

  8. Physiological interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spleen in rams actively immunized against GnRH.

    PubMed

    Han, Xingfa; Ren, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Yuqin; Song, TianZeng; Cao, Xiaohan; Du, Xiaogang; Meng, Fengyan; Tan, Yao; Liu, Yacheng; Feng, Jing; Chu, Mingxing; Zeng, Xianyin

    2016-09-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is strongly implicated in the regulation of immune system. The objective was to determine the effects of immunocastration on splenic reproduction- and immunity-related gene expressions, and serum cytokine profiles in rams. Forty rams were randomly allocated into three groups: control (n=14); surgically castrated (n=13); or immunized (n=13) against 100μg D-Lys6-GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide conjugated to ovalbumin in Specol adjuvant at 6months of age (with a booster 2months later). Blood samples (for hormone and immune cytokine profiles) were collected at 1-month intervals until rams were slaughtered (10months). Compared to intact controls, anti-GnRH immunization reduced (P<0.05) serum concentrations of LH, FSH, and testosterone. Reduced testosterone abrogated its inhibitor feedback effect on the synthesis of GnRH in spleen, as evidenced by increased (P<0.05) protein content and mRNA expressions of GnRH, and simultaneously decreased (P<0.05) mRNA expressions of androgen receptor in spleen. In parallel with the increased GnRH production in spleen, the mRNA expressions of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as lymphocyte marker CD4, CD8 and CD19 molecules were increased (P<0.05) in spleen. Consistently, serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α were increased (P<0.05) in rams following immunization. Similarly, deprivation of testosterone by surgical castration also increased (P<0.05) GnRH and thus immune cytokine expressions in spleen. Collectively, our data suggested that immunocastration increased GnRH production in spleen by abrogating the inhibitory feedback effects from testosterone, consequently improving the immune markers of spleen and serum immune cytokines in rams. PMID:27322522

  9. STX, a novel nonsteroidal estrogenic compound, induces rapid action in primate GnRH neuronal calcium dynamics and peptide release.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, B P; Keen, K L; Rønnekleiv, O K; Terasawa, E

    2011-08-01

    Previously, we reported that 1 nM 17ß-estradiol (E(2)) induces a rapid action, which is, in part, mediated through the G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 in primate GnRH neurons. Because it has been reported that the diphenylacrylamide compound, STX, causes estrogenic action in the mouse and guinea pig hypothalamus, the present study examined effects of STX in primate GnRH neurons and whether there is an action independent of GPR30. Results are summarized as follows. STX (10 nM) exposure increased 1) the oscillation frequency of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), 2) the percentage of cells stimulated, and 3) the synchronization frequency of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations. STX (10-100 nM) also stimulated GnRH release. The effects of STX on both [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations and GnRH release were similar to those caused by E(2) (1 nM), although with less magnitude. STX (10 nM)-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations were not altered by GPR30 small interfering RNA transfection, indicating that STX-sensitive receptors differ from GPR30. Finally, a higher dose of E(2) (10 nM) induced a larger change in [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations than that with a smaller dose of E(2) (1 nM), and the effects of 10 nM E(2) were reduced but not completely blocked by GPR30 small interfering RNA transfection, indicating that the effects of 10 nM E(2) in primate GnRH neurons are mediated by multiple membrane receptors, including GPR30 and STX-sensitive receptors. Collectively, the rapid action of E(2) mediated through GPR30 differs from that mediated through STX-sensitive receptors. The molecular structure of the STX-sensitive receptor remains to be identified.

  10. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  11. Dysregulation of Semaphorin7A/β1-integrin signaling leads to defective GnRH-1 cell migration, abnormal gonadal development and altered fertility.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Ferraris, Nicoletta; Wray, Susan; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Donohue, Duncan E; Casoni, Filippo; Kramer, Phillip R; Derijck, Alwin A; Adolfs, Youri; Fasolo, Aldo; Pasterkamp, Ronald J; Giacobini, Paolo

    2011-12-15

    Reproduction in mammals is dependent on the function of specific neurons that secrete gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH-1). These neurons originate prenatally in the nasal placode and migrate into the forebrain along the olfactory-vomeronasal nerves. Alterations in this migratory process lead to defective GnRH-1 secretion, resulting in heterogeneous genetic disorders such as idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), and other reproductive diseases characterized by the reduction or failure of sexual competence. Combining mouse genetics with in vitro models, we demonstrate that Semaphorin 7A (Sema7A) is essential for the development of the GnRH-1 neuronal system. Loss of Sema7A signaling alters the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, resulting in significantly reduced numbers of these neurons in the adult brain as well as in reduced gonadal size and subfertility. We also show that GnRH-1 cells differentially express the Sema7 receptors β1-integrin and Plexin C1 as a function of their migratory stage, whereas the ligand is robustly expressed along developing olfactory/vomeronasal fibers. Disruption of Sema7A function in vitro inhibits β1-integrin-mediated migration. Analysis of Plexin C1(-/-) mice did not reveal any difference in the migratory process of GnRH-1 neurons, indicating that Sema7A mainly signals through β1-integrin to regulate GnRH-1 cell motility. In conclusion, we have identified Sema7A as a gene implicated in the normal development of the GnRH-1 system in mice and as a genetic marker for the elucidation of some forms of GnRH-1 deficiency in humans. PMID:21903667

  12. Photoperiodic Condition Is Associated with Region-Specific Expression of GNRH1 mRNA in the Preoptic Area of the Male Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)1

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Tyler J.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Ball, Gregory F.

    2009-01-01

    Many seasonally breeding avian species exhibit marked changes in hypothalamic content of gonadotropin-releasing vhormone 1 (GNRH1) protein that are reflective of breeding condition. We recently cloned the GNRH1 cDNA in European starlings and demonstrated that changes in GNRH1 mRNA levels occur with a time course similar to what has been observed with GNRH1 protein. However, we did not previously resolve whether these differences were attributable to changes in the number of cells expressing the gene. Herein, we investigated photoperiod-induced changes in the number and distribution of GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cells in the preoptic area of male starlings. GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cell number was significantly greater in breeding birds than in nonbreeding birds. Starlings maintained in short nonstimulatory day length (i.e., prebreeding) showed intermediate cell numbers. Detailed analysis of the rostrocaudal and mediolateral distribution revealed that breeding birds had greater numbers of cells expressing GNRH1 mRNA in the medial intermediate, mediocaudal, and lateral intermediate preoptic area compared with prebreeding and nonbreeding birds. These data demonstrate that photoperiodic changes in reproductive state in starlings are associated with region-specific alterations in the number of cells expressing the GNRH1 gene. It remains to be determined whether these changes reflect quantitative differences in gene expression among an otherwise stable population of cells or a phenotypic switch in which cells gain or lose the ability to make GNRH1 mRNA in response to environmental cues. PMID:19516022

  13. Photoperiodic condition is associated with region-specific expression of GNRH1 mRNA in the preoptic area of the male starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Tyler J; Bernard, Daniel J; Ball, Gregory F

    2009-10-01

    Many seasonally breeding avian species exhibit marked changes in hypothalamic content of gonadotropin-releasing vhormone 1 (GNRH1) protein that are reflective of breeding condition. We recently cloned the GNRH1 cDNA in European starlings and demonstrated that changes in GNRH1 mRNA levels occur with a time course similar to what has been observed with GNRH1 protein. However, we did not previously resolve whether these differences were attributable to changes in the number of cells expressing the gene. Herein, we investigated photoperiod-induced changes in the number and distribution of GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cells in the preoptic area of male starlings. GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cell number was significantly greater in breeding birds than in nonbreeding birds. Starlings maintained in short nonstimulatory day length (i.e., prebreeding) showed intermediate cell numbers. Detailed analysis of the rostrocaudal and mediolateral distribution revealed that breeding birds had greater numbers of cells expressing GNRH1 mRNA in the medial intermediate, mediocaudal, and lateral intermediate preoptic area compared with prebreeding and nonbreeding birds. These data demonstrate that photoperiodic changes in reproductive state in starlings are associated with region-specific alterations in the number of cells expressing the GNRH1 gene. It remains to be determined whether these changes reflect quantitative differences in gene expression among an otherwise stable population of cells or a phenotypic switch in which cells gain or lose the ability to make GNRH1 mRNA in response to environmental cues. PMID:19516022

  14. A comparative therapeutic management of anoestrus in buffaloes using insulin and GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, R. D.; Shukla, S. N.; Shrivastava, O. P.; Kumar, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anoestrus is one of the most common functional disorders of the reproductive cycle in buffaloes. In spite of technical advancement, there is no single cure for the management of anoestrus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH) and metabolic hormone for the management of true anoestrus in buffaloes. Materials and Methods: The experimental animals were selected on the basis of history, gyneco-clinical examinations and progesterone estimation. Deworming was done with Fenbendazole and thereafter mineral mixture was given @ 50 g per animal per day for 10 days in all the selected buffaloes before the start of treatment. The selected buffaloes were randomly divided into four groups (n=25). In Group I, buffaloes were administered 20 µg of buserelin intramuscularly. Buffaloes of Group II were administered long-acting insulin @ 0.25 IU/Kg body weight subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. In Group III, buffaloes were treated with a combination of insulin and buserelin in the above-mentioned doses whereas buffaloes of Group IV were kept as untreated control. Results: The higher oestrus induction (64% vs. 28%) was found in Group III and differed significantly (p<0.05) as compared to control group. The conception rate (69.23% vs. 66.66%) was also found higher in Group III but did not differ significantly among the treated groups. The mean time taken for the onset of oestrus was recorded significantly shorter in insulin (8.80±0.69) and GnRH (7.60±0.92 days) alone and as compared to other (Group III, 14.43±0.83 and Group IV, 20.57±1.69 days) groups. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated better fertility response using Insulin plus Buserelin in true anoestrus buffaloes under field conditions. PMID:27065651

  15. IVF/ICSI outcomes between cycles with luteal estradiol (E2) pre-treatment before GnRH antagonist protocol and standard long GnRH agonist protocol: a prospective and randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-ning; Zeng, Ping-hong; Pei, Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study if luteal E2 pre-treatment before GnRH antagonist protocol improves IVF/ICSI outcomes compared with standard long GnRH agonist protocol. Design A prospective, randomized and controlled study. Setting ART center of a state public hospital Patient(s) Two hundred twenty infertile women underwent IVF/ICSI treatments. Intervention(s) Participants received oral Estradiol Valerate 4 mg/day preceding the IVF cycle from day 21 until day 2 of next cycle before GnRH antagonist protocol (E2 pre-treatment group n = 109) or received standard long GnRH agonist protocol as control group (n = 111). Main outcome measure(s) Number of oocytes collected, MII oocytes, fertilization, implantation, live birth and early pregnancy rate, and hormone profiles. Result(s) E2 pre-treatment exerted a significant suppressive effect on FSH but not LH secretion compared with basal FSH and LH levels. In E2 pre-treatment group serum LH level was significantly higher during COH and serum P was also significantly higher on the day of HCG injection compared with control group. Five patients from E2 pre-treatment group had elevated LH at all time (≥10 IU/L) and also a concomitantly high P (>1 ng/mL). Two of the five women achieved pregnancy but had early pregnancy loss. Overall, IVF/ICSI outcomes such as implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were similar between E2 pre-treatment and control groups. Conclusion(s) Luteal E2 pre-treatment before GnRH antagonist protocol significantly increases serum LH level and incidence rate of premature LH but no significant effect is observed on implantation, clinical pregnancy, live birth and early pregnancy loss rates compared with long GnRH agonist protocol. However, more studies in large numbers of cycles are needed to confirm that increased serum LH level by E2 pre-treatment during COH has no negative effect on the IVF/ICSI outcomes. PMID:19225876

  16. Regulation of FSHbeta and GnRH receptor gene expression in activin receptor II knockout male mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Rajendra; Agno, Julio; Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael; Matzuk, Martin M

    2003-12-30

    To examine in vivo, the local effects of inhibins and activins within the anterior pituitary, independent of their endocrine effects exerted from the gonad, in mediating FSH homeostasis, we used castrated knockout mice lacking either inhibin alpha or activin receptor II (ACVR2) alone or in combination. Compared to castrated wild-type (WT) mice, FSHbeta mRNA levels in the pituitaries of Acvr2 null mice were significantly downregulated in the absence of gonadal feedback. FSHbeta mRNA levels were not significantly higher in the pituitaries of castrated inhibin alpha null mice compared to those in Acvr2 null mice and remained the same in the pituitaries of castrated double mutant mice lacking both inhibin and ACVR2. In contrast to FSHbeta mRNA expression changes, pituitary FSH content was significantly reduced in Acvr2 null mice whereas it was only slightly upregulated in inhibin alpha null mice. Combined absence of both ACVR2 signaling and inhibins caused a decrease in FSH content compared to that in the absence of inhibins alone. These changes in pituitary content were in parallel to those in serum FSH levels in these three groups of castrated mice, suggesting that the unopposed actions of locally produced inhibins are dominant over those effects mediated by ACVR2 signaling to regulate FSH biosynthesis and secretion. Thus, our in vivo results demonstrate that within the pituitary, locally produced activins and inhibins exert their actions at distinct phases of FSH homeostasis. In an independent set of experiments, we tested whether in vivo signaling via ACVR2 is necessary for hypothalamic GnRH biosynthesis and for GnRH receptor expression. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to previous in vitro studies, signaling through ACVR2 is neither required for hypothalamic synthesis of GnRH peptide nor for expression of GnRH receptors in the anterior pituitary. We conclude that within the hypothalamic-pituitary short loop, ACVR2 signaling is critical only for FSH

  17. GnRH and its receptor (GnRH-R) are expressed in the canine placenta and uterus.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Somi, S; Kowalewski, M P; Kanca, H; Bozkurt, M F; Gram, A; Sabitzer, S; Kucukaslan, I; Ay, S S; Aslan, S

    2015-12-01

    In reproductive tissues, GnRH participates in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation by direct binding to the GnRH-R, which is essential for embryo implantation. However, there is no study on the expression and cellular localization of GnRH and GnRH-R in the canine uterus and placenta. Therefore, bitches were ovariohysterectomized 10 to 12 days after mating (vaginal cytology and progesterone measurement), the uteri were flushed, and if embryos were detectable, bitches were allocated to the embryo positive group (E-pos.; preimplantation, n = 5). Other bitches were operated at later stages and, dependent on the gestational age, either allotted to the post-implantation group (Day 18-25 after mating, n = 9), or the mid-gestation group (Day 30-40 after mating, n = 3). Dogs negative in embryo flushing served as controls (E-neg.; controls, n = 5). Samples of the entire uterine wall were taken from the middle of the horn in E-neg. and E-pos. groups, and from placental and interplacental uterine sites in post-implantation and mid-gestation groups. GnRH-R expression was localized at the mRNA and protein levels by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The expression of GnRH and GnRH-R mRNA was assessed by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, both GnRH and GnRH-R mRNA were expressed in all tissues examined until mid-gestation. Relative expression of GnRH was higher than that of GnRH-R (P < 0.05). During the post-implantation stage, GnRH-R expression was significantly higher in uteroplacental than in interplacental tissues. In the uterus, GnRH-R stained strongly in the surface and glandular epithelial cells, and seemed to be weaker in myometrium and stroma. Placental signals were predominantly localized in fetal trophoblast cells and to a lesser extent in maternal decidual cells. These findings suggest a local regulatory function of GnRH during early canine pregnancy.

  18. Developmental programming: reproductive endocrinopathies in the adult female sheep after prenatal testosterone treatment are reflected in altered ontogeny of GnRH afferents.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Heiko T; Hershey, John; Mytinger, Andrea; Foster, Douglas L; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2011-11-01

    The GnRH system represents a useful model of long-term neural plasticity. An unexplored facet of this plasticity relates to the ontogeny of GnRH neural afferents during critical periods when the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is highly susceptible to perturbation by sex steroids. Sheep treated with testosterone (T) in utero exhibit profound reproductive neuroendocrine dysfunctions during their lifespan. The current study tested the hypothesis that these changes are associated with alterations in the normal ontogeny of GnRH afferents and glial associations. Adult pregnant sheep (n=50) were treated with vehicle [control (CONT)] or T daily from gestational day (GD)30 to GD90. CONT and T fetuses (n=4-6/treatment per age group) were removed by cesarean section on GD90 and GD140 and the brains frozen at -80°C. Brains were also collected from CONT and T females at 20-23 wk (prepubertal), 10 months (normal onset of puberty and oligo-anovulation), and 21 months (oligo-anovulation in T females). Tissue was analyzed for GnRH immunoreactivity (ir), total GnRH afferents (Synapsin-I ir), glutamate [vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2)-ir], and γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA, vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-ir] afferents and glial associations (glial fibrillary acidic protein-ir) with GnRH neurons using optical sectioning techniques. The results revealed that: 1) GnRH soma size was slightly reduced by T, 2) the total (Synapsin-I) GnRH afferents onto both somas and dendrites increased significantly with age and was reduced by T, 3) numbers of both VGAT and VGLUT inputs increased significantly with age and were also reduced by T, and 4) glial associations with GnRH neurons were reduced (<10%) by T. Together, these findings reveal a previously unknown developmental plasticity in the GnRH system of the sheep. The altered developmental trajectory of GnRH afferents after T reinforces the notion that prenatal programming plays an important role in the normal development of the

  19. Genetic identification of GnRH receptor neurons: a new model for studying neural circuits underlying reproductive physiology in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuping; Götze, Iris N; Mai, Oliver; Schauer, Christian; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Boehm, Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    GnRH signaling regulates reproductive physiology in vertebrates via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In addition, GnRH signaling has been postulated to act on the brain. However, elucidating its functional role in the central nervous system has been hampered because of the difficulty in identifying direct GnRH signaling targets in live brain tissue. Here we used a binary genetic strategy to visualize GnRH receptor (GnRHR) neurons in the mouse brain and started to characterize these cells. First, we expressed different fluorescent proteins in GnRHR neurons and mapped their precise distribution throughout the brain. Remarkably, neuronal GnRHR expression was only initiated after postnatal day 16, suggesting peri- and postpubertal functions of GnRH signaling in this organ. GnRHR neurons were found in different brain areas. Many GnRHR neurons were identified in areas influencing sexual behaviors. Furthermore, GnRHR neurons were detected in brain areas that process olfactory and pheromonal cues, revealing one efferent pathway by which the neuroendocrine hypothalamus may influence the sensitivity towards chemosensory cues. Using confocal Ca(2+) imaging in brain slices, we show that GnRHR neurons respond reproducibly to extracellular application of GnRH or its analog [D-TRP(6)]-LH-RH, indicating that these neurons express functional GnRHR. Interestingly, the duration and shape of the Ca(2+) responses were similar within and different between brain areas, suggesting that GnRH signaling may differentially influence brain functions to affect reproductive success. Our new mouse model sets the stage to analyze the next level of GnRH signaling in reproductive physiology and behavior.

  20. Sequence analysis, tissue distribution and molecular physiology of the GnRH preprogonadotrophin in the South American plains vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus).

    PubMed

    Charif, Santiago Elías; Inserra, Pablo Ignacio Felipe; Di Giorgio, Noelia Paula; Schmidt, Alejandro Raúl; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel; Dorfman, Verónica Berta

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the regulator of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) axis. GnRH and GAP (GnRH-associated protein) are both encoded by a single preprohormone. Different variants of GnRH have been described. In most mammals, GnRH is secreted in a pulsatile manner that stimulates the release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The South-American plains vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus, is a rodent with peculiar reproductive features including natural poly-ovulation up to 800 oocytes per estrous cycle, pre-ovulatory follicle formation throughout pregnancy and an ovulatory process which takes place at mid-gestation and adds a considerable number of secondary corpora lutea. Such features should occur under a special modulation of the HHG axis, guided by GnRH. The aim of this study was to sequence hypothalamic GnRH preprogonadotrophin mRNA in the vizcacha, to compare it with evolutionarily related species and to identify its expression, distribution and pulsatile pattern of secretion. The GnRH1variant was detected and showed the highest homology with that of chinchilla, its closest evolutionarily related species. Two isoforms of transcripts were identified, carrying the same coding sequence, but different 5' untranslated regions. This suggests a sensitive equilibrium between RNA stability and translational efficiency. A predominant hypothalamic localization and a pulsatile secretion pattern of one pulse of GnRH every hour were found. The lower homology found for GAP, also among evolutionarily related species, depicts a potentially different bioactivity. PMID:26704854

  1. Sequence analysis, tissue distribution and molecular physiology of the GnRH preprogonadotrophin in the South American plains vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus).

    PubMed

    Charif, Santiago Elías; Inserra, Pablo Ignacio Felipe; Di Giorgio, Noelia Paula; Schmidt, Alejandro Raúl; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel; Dorfman, Verónica Berta

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the regulator of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) axis. GnRH and GAP (GnRH-associated protein) are both encoded by a single preprohormone. Different variants of GnRH have been described. In most mammals, GnRH is secreted in a pulsatile manner that stimulates the release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The South-American plains vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus, is a rodent with peculiar reproductive features including natural poly-ovulation up to 800 oocytes per estrous cycle, pre-ovulatory follicle formation throughout pregnancy and an ovulatory process which takes place at mid-gestation and adds a considerable number of secondary corpora lutea. Such features should occur under a special modulation of the HHG axis, guided by GnRH. The aim of this study was to sequence hypothalamic GnRH preprogonadotrophin mRNA in the vizcacha, to compare it with evolutionarily related species and to identify its expression, distribution and pulsatile pattern of secretion. The GnRH1variant was detected and showed the highest homology with that of chinchilla, its closest evolutionarily related species. Two isoforms of transcripts were identified, carrying the same coding sequence, but different 5' untranslated regions. This suggests a sensitive equilibrium between RNA stability and translational efficiency. A predominant hypothalamic localization and a pulsatile secretion pattern of one pulse of GnRH every hour were found. The lower homology found for GAP, also among evolutionarily related species, depicts a potentially different bioactivity.

  2. DISRUPTED FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY FOLLOWING NEONATAL EXPOSURE TO PHYTOESTROGENS OR ESTROGEN SPECIFIC LIGANDS IS ASSOCIATED WITH DECREASED GNRH ACTIVATION AND KISSPEPTIN FIBER DENSITY IN THE HYPOTHALAMUS

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Heather L.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that estrogen administration during neonatal development can advance pubertal onset and prevent the maintenance of regular estrous cycles in female rats. This treatment paradigm also eliminates the preovulatory rise of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). It remains unclear, however, through which of the two primary forms of the estrogen receptor (ERα or ERβ) this effect is mediated. It is also unclear whether endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) can produce similar effects. Here we compared the effect of neonatal exposure to estradiol benzoate (EB), the ERα specific agonist 1,3,5-tris(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT), the ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) and the naturally occurring EDCs genistein (GEN) and equol (EQ) on pubertal onset, estrous cyclicity, GnRH activation, and kisspeptin content in the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei. Vaginal opening was significantly advanced by EB and GEN. By ten weeks post-puberty, irregular estrous cycles were observed in all groups except the control group. GnRH activation, as measured by the percentage of immunopositive GnRH neurons that were also immunopositive for Fos, was significantly lower in all treatment groups except the DPN group compared to the control group. GnRH activation was absent in the PPT group. These data suggest that neonatal exposure to EDCs can suppress GnRH activity in adulthood, and that ERα plays a pivotal role in this process. Kisspeptins (KISS) have recently been characterized to be potent stimulators of GnRH secretion. Therefore we quantified the density of KISS immunolabeled fibers in the AVPV and ARC. In the AVPV, KISS fiber density was significantly lower in the EB and GEN groups compared to the control group but only in the EB and PPT groups in the ARC. The data suggest that decreased stimulation of GnRH neurons by KISS could be a mechanism by which EDCs can impair female reproductive function. PMID:18656497

  3. Episodic hormone secretion: a comparison of the basis of pulsatile secretion of insulin and GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Leslie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms govern many endocrine functions. Examples of such rhythmic systems include the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cell, which regulates blood glucose, and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron, which governs reproductive function. Although serving very different functions within the body, these cell types share many important features. Both GnRH neurons and beta-cells, for instance, are hypothesized to generate at least two rhythms endogenously: (1) a burst firing electrical rhythm and (2) a slower rhythm involving metabolic or other intracellular processes. This review discusses the importance of hormone rhythms to both physiology and disease and compares and contrasts the rhythms generated by each system. PMID:24610206

  4. Leuprolide acetate, a GnRH agonist, improves experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a possible therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Soto, Irene; Salinas, Eva; Hernández-Jasso, Irma; Quintanar, J Luis

    2012-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a well known hypothalamic neuropeptide, has been reported to possess neurotrophic properties. Leuprolide acetate, a synthetic analogue of GnRH is considered to be a very safe and tolerable drug and it has been used for diverse clinical applications, including the treatment of prostate cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, central precocious puberty and in vitro fertilization techniques. The present study was designed to determine whether Leuprolide acetate administration, exerts neurotrophic effects on clinical signs, body weight gain, neurofilaments (NFs) and myelin basic protein (MBP) expression, axonal morphometry and cell infiltration in spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rats. In this work, we have found that Leuprolide acetate treatment decreases the severity of clinical signs of locomotion, induces a significantly greater body weight gain, increases the MBP and NFs expression, axonal area and cell infiltration in EAE animals. These results suggest the use of this agonist as a potential therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis.

  5. Elagolix, a novel, orally bioavailable GnRH antagonist under investigation for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, Mohammad; Carr, Bruce R

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of estrogen production and reduction of menstrual blood flow are the mainstays of medical treatment of endometriosis-related pain and have been traditionally achieved by methods such as combined hormonal contraception, progestins and GnRH analogs, all with comparable efficacies, though different side-effect profiles. Elagolix is the frontrunner among an emerging class of GnRH antagonists, which unlike their peptide predecessors has a nonpeptide structure resulting in its oral bioavailability. Phase I and II clinical trials have demonstrated safety of elagolix and its efficacy in partial and reversible suppression of ovarian estrogen production resulting in improvements in endometriosis-related pain. Phase III clinical trials are currently underway and elagolix may become a valuable addition to the armamentarium of pharmacological agents to treat endometriosis-related pain.

  6. Histidine residues in the peptide D-Lys(6)-GnRH: potential for copolymerization in polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles containing the bioactive d-Lys(6)-GnRH were manufactured by an in situ interfacial polymerization process using a w/o-microemulsion template containing the peptide in the dispersed aqueous pseudophase of the microemulsion. Polymeric nanoparticles were characterized using PCS, RP-HPLC (bulk level) and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry (molecular level). The peptide d-Lys(6)-GnRH was reactive with the alkylcyanoacrylate monomer, resulting in some of the peptide copolymerizing with the monomer. MALDI TOF/TOF (tandem) analysis revealed that the histidine residue in position 2 of d-Lys(6)-GnRH interacts covalently in the polymerization process. A reaction mechanism for this nucleophilic interference is suggested. The copolymerization reaction appeared to occur within seconds after the addition of the monomer to the microemulsion. The surface charge of resulting nanoparticles was less negative (-3 mV) compared with the zeta potential of empty nanoparticles (-27.5 mV). The copolymerization yielded high entrapment rates of 95 +/- 4% of peptide, but showed limited release ( approximately 11%) of free peptide over 5 days. A separate experiment demonstrated that the addition of d-Lys(6)-GnRH to preformed empty PECA nanoparticles (ex situ) also yielded fractions of copolymerized peptide suggesting a certain proportion of polymer remains available for copolymerization possibly through an unzipping depolymerization/repolymerization process. Therefore, the reactivity of histidine residues in bioactives needs to be considered whenever using the bioactive in situ or ex situ with polymeric PECA nanoparticles.

  7. Gonadotropin and kisspeptin gene expression, but not GnRH, are impaired in cFOS deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Changchuan; Jonak, Carrie R; Kauffman, Alexander S; Coss, Djurdjica

    2015-08-15

    cFOS is a pleiotropic transcription factor, which binds to the AP1 site in the promoter of target genes. In the pituitary gonadotropes, cFOS mediates induction of FSHβ and GnRH receptor genes. Herein, we analyzed reproductive function in the cFOS-deficient mice to determine its role in vivo. In the pituitary cFOS is necessary for gonadotropin subunit expression, while TSHβ is unaffected. Additionally, cFOS null animals have the same sex-steroid levels, although gametogenesis is impeded. In the brain, cFOS is not necessary for GnRH neuronal migration, axon targeting, cell number, or mRNA levels. Conversely, cFOS nulls, particularly females, have decreased Kiss1 neuron numbers and lower Kiss1 mRNA levels. Collectively, our novel findings suggest that cFOS plays a cell-specific role at multiple levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, affecting gonadotropes but not thyrotropes in the pituitary, and kisspeptin neurons but not GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus, thereby contributing to the overall control of reproduction.

  8. Polymorphism identification in goat GNRH1 and GDF9 genes and their association analysis with litter size.

    PubMed

    An, X P; Hou, J X; Zhao, H B; Li, G; Bai, L; Peng, J Y; M Yan, Q; Song, Y X; Wang, J G; Cao, B Y

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the polymorphisms of GNRH1 and GDF9 genes in 641 goats of three breeds: Xinong Saanen, Guanzhong and Boer. Two allelic variants were identified in the GNRH1 gene (JN645280:g.3548A>G and JN645281:g.3699G>A) and one allelic variant was found in the GDF9 gene (JN655693:g.4093G>A). Furthermore, g.4093G>A was a missense mutation (p.Val397Ile of GDF9). Results of an association analysis indicated that SNPs g.3548A>G and g.4093G>A had significant effects on litter size (P < 0.05). The combination genotypes of SNPs g.3548A>G, g.3699G>A and g.4093G>A also affected litter size with the C5 genotype having the highest litter size in the first, third, fourth and average parity. Hence, the biochemical and physiological functions, together with the results obtained in our investigation, suggest that the GNRH1 and GDF9 genes could serve as genetic markers for litter size in goat breeding.

  9. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  10. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1(ARH)) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1(ARH) neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1(ARH) neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1(ARH) neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1(ARH) neurons. We propose that Kiss1(ARH) neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. PMID:27549338

  11. Efficiency of oestrous synchronization by GnRH, prostaglandins and socio-sexual cues in the North African Maure goats.

    PubMed

    Rekik, M; Ben Othmane, H; Lassoued, N; Sakly, C

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop at different seasons, for local North African Maure goats, synchronizing protocols simultaneously to the standard 'S' protocol using progestagens in association with prostaglandins and gonadotropin. In late May, 40 goats were assigned to either the 'S' protocol or to a protocol where oestrus and ovulation were induced by the buck effect in single-injection progesterone-treated goats and provoking early luteolysis using prostaglandin 9 days after exposure to bucks 'B'. During the 72 h after the treatments ended, 15 and 5 goats expressed oestrus in the 'S' and 'B' protocols (p < 0.01). Mean time to oestrus was shorter for 'S' than for 'B' goats. Ovulation rate averaged 2.1 ± 0.22 and 1.60 ± 0.35 for, respectively, 'S' and 'B' goats (p > 0.05). During mid-September, 60 goats were assigned to either 'S' treatment, 'PGF' treatment where oestrus and ovulation were synchronized using two injections of prostaglandin 11 days apart or to 'GnRH' treatment where the goats had their oestrus and ovulation synchronized with a GnRH (day 0)-prostaglandin (day 6)-GnRH (day 9) sequence. More 'S' goats were detected in oestrus over the 96-h period after the end of the treatments (88.8, 73.7 and 55% in 'S', 'PGF' and 'GnRH' treatments, respectively; p < 0.05). Mean ovulation rates were 2.3 ± 0.27, 1.33 ± 0.27 and 1.33 ± 0.27 for, respectively, 'S', 'PGF' and 'GnRH' goats (p < 0.001). Despite a similar ovulatory response to 'S' protocol, efficiency of prostaglandin and GnRH-based treatments should be tested in mid-breeding season.

  12. GnRH Neuron-Specific Ablation of Gαq/11 Results in Only Partial Inactivation of the Neuroendocrine-Reproductive Axis in Both Male and Female Mice: In Vivo Evidence for Kiss1r-Coupled Gαq/11-Independent GnRH Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Víctor M.; Ahow, Maryse; Pampillo, Macarena; Nash, Connor; Fayazi, Mehri; Calder, Michele; Elbert, Adrienne; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Carroll, Rona S.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Tobet, Stuart A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master regulator of fertility and kisspeptin (KP) is a potent trigger of GnRH secretion from GnRH neurons. KP signals via KISS1R, a Gαq/11-coupled receptor, and mice bearing a global deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1r−/−) or a GnRH neuron-specific deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1rd/d) display hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. KISS1R also signals via β-arrestin, and in mice lacking β-arrestin-1 or -2, KP-triggered GnRH secretion is significantly diminished. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that ablation of Gαq/11 in GnRH neurons would diminish but not completely block KP-triggered GnRH secretion and that Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion would be sufficient to maintain fertility. To test this, Gnaq (encodes Gαq) was selectively inactivated in the GnRH neurons of global Gna11 (encodes Gα11)-null mice by crossing Gnrh-Cre and Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− mice. Experimental Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/−;Gnrh-Cre (Gnaqd/d) and control Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− (Gnaqfl/fl) littermate mice were generated and subjected to reproductive profiling. This process revealed that testicular development and spermatogenesis, preputial separation, and anogenital distance in males and day of vaginal opening and of first estrus in females were significantly less affected in Gnaqd/d mice than in previously characterized Kiss1r−/− or Kiss1rd/d mice. Additionally, Gnaqd/d males were subfertile, and although Gnaqd/d females did not ovulate spontaneously, they responded efficiently to a single dose of gonadotropins. Finally, KP stimulation triggered a significant increase in gonadotropins and testosterone levels in Gnaqd/d mice. We therefore conclude that the milder reproductive phenotypes and maintained responsiveness to KP and gonadotropins reflect Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion and activation of the neuroendocrine-reproductive axis in Gnaqd/d mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master

  13. Prenatal Testosterone Treatment Leads to Changes in the Morphology of KNDy Neurons, Their Inputs, and Projections to GnRH Cells in Female Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Maria; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Goodman, Robert L.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T)-treated ewes display a constellation of reproductive defects that closely mirror those seen in PCOS women, including altered hormonal feedback control of GnRH. Kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) play a key role in steroid feedback control of GnRH secretion, and prenatal T treatment in sheep causes an imbalance of KNDy peptide expression within the ARC. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal T exposure, in addition to altering KNDy peptides, leads to changes in the morphology and synaptic inputs of this population, kisspeptin cells of the preoptic area (POA), and GnRH cells. Prenatal T treatment significantly increased the size of KNDy cell somas, whereas POA kisspeptin, GnRH, agouti-related peptide, and proopiomelanocortin neurons were each unchanged in size. Prenatal T treatment also significantly reduced the total number of synaptic inputs onto KNDy neurons and POA kisspeptin neurons; for KNDy neurons, the decrease was partly due to a decrease in KNDy-KNDy synapses, whereas KNDy inputs to POA kisspeptin cells were unaltered. Finally, prenatal T reduced the total number of inputs to GnRH cells in both the POA and medial basal hypothalamus, and this change was in part due to a decreased number of inputs from KNDy neurons. The hypertrophy of KNDy cells in prenatal T sheep resembles that seen in ARC kisspeptin cells of postmenopausal women, and together with changes in their synaptic inputs and projections to GnRH neurons, may contribute to defects in steroidal control of GnRH observed in this animal model. PMID:26061725

  14. Intraovarian expression of GnRH-1 and gonadotropin mRNA and protein levels in Siberian hamsters during the estrus cycle and photoperiod induced regression/recrudescence.

    PubMed

    Shahed, Asha; Young, Kelly A

    2011-01-15

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is the key reproductive regulator in vertebrates. While gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating (FSH), and luteinizing (LH) hormones are primarily produced in the hypothalamus and pituitary, they can be synthesized in the gonads, suggesting an intraovarian GnRH-gonadotropin axis. Because these hormones are critical for follicle maturation and steroidogenesis, we hypothesized that this intraovarian axis may be important in photoperiod-induced ovarian regression/recrudescence in seasonal breeders. Thus, we investigated GnRH-1 and gonadotropin mRNA and protein expression in Siberian hamster ovaries during (1) the estrous cycle; where ovaries from cycling long day hamsters (LD;16L:8D) were collected at proestrus, estrus, diestrus I, and diestrus II and (2) during photoperiod induced regression/recrudescence; where ovaries were collected from hamsters exposed to 14 weeks of LD, short days (SD;8L:16D), or 8 weeks post-transfer to LD after 14 weeks SD (PT). GnRH-1, LHβ, FSHβ, and common α subunit mRNA expression was observed in cycling ovaries. GnRH-1 expression peaked at diestrus I compared to other stages (p < 0.05). FSHβ and LHβ mRNA levels peaked at proestrus and diestrus I (p < 0.05), with no change in the α subunit across the cycle (p > 0.05). SD exposure decreased ovarian mass and plasma estradiol concentrations (p<0.05) and increased GnRH-1, LHβ, FSHβ, and α subunit mRNA expression as compared to LD and, except for LH, compared to PT (p < 0.05). GnRH and gonadotropin protein was also dynamically expressed across the estrous cycle and photoperiod exposure. The presence of cycling intraovarian GnRH-1 and gonadotropin mRNA suggests that these hormones may be locally involved in ovarian maintenance during SD regression and/or could potentially serve to prime ovaries for rapid recrudescence.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in bony fish that are phylogenetically ancient: reedfish (Calamoichthys calabaricus), sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), and alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula).

    PubMed

    Sherwood, N M; Doroshov, S; Lance, V

    1991-10-01

    Three species of fish that are phylogenetically older than other members of the bony fish lineage were selected to determine if gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is present in their brains. Brain extracts were prepared from each species and found to contain immunoreactive (ir) GnRH. To further characterize the molecular forms of GnRH in each species, the extracts were injected into a high pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The elution time of each GnRH-like form was compared to those of the synthetic forms of the five known GnRHs. Several antisera were used to detect both the synthetic and unknown GnRHs in the HPLC fractions. All three species of fish had two forms of GnRH: a dominant form that is mammalian GnRH-like (mGnRH), and a minor form of irGnRH material that is similar to chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II). The other known forms of GnRH (salmon, lamprey, and chicken-I) were not detected. The appearance in these ancient bony fish of a mammalian-like form of GnRH, which has not been found in the jawless or cartilaginous fish studied to date, suggests that mGnRH arose in a common phylogenetic ancestor of the bony fish and tetrapods. This mGnRH-like molecule is known to have been conserved in the amphibian and mammalian lineage, but not in the reptilian or avian line. In addition, the presence of a cGnRH-II-like molecule in the bony fish examined here, and in the cartilaginous fish studied earlier, implies that this form of GnRH may have been present in an ancestor common to both of these classes of fish. PMID:1778410

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in bony fish that are phylogenetically ancient: reedfish (Calamoichthys calabaricus), sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), and alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula).

    PubMed

    Sherwood, N M; Doroshov, S; Lance, V

    1991-10-01

    Three species of fish that are phylogenetically older than other members of the bony fish lineage were selected to determine if gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is present in their brains. Brain extracts were prepared from each species and found to contain immunoreactive (ir) GnRH. To further characterize the molecular forms of GnRH in each species, the extracts were injected into a high pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The elution time of each GnRH-like form was compared to those of the synthetic forms of the five known GnRHs. Several antisera were used to detect both the synthetic and unknown GnRHs in the HPLC fractions. All three species of fish had two forms of GnRH: a dominant form that is mammalian GnRH-like (mGnRH), and a minor form of irGnRH material that is similar to chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II). The other known forms of GnRH (salmon, lamprey, and chicken-I) were not detected. The appearance in these ancient bony fish of a mammalian-like form of GnRH, which has not been found in the jawless or cartilaginous fish studied to date, suggests that mGnRH arose in a common phylogenetic ancestor of the bony fish and tetrapods. This mGnRH-like molecule is known to have been conserved in the amphibian and mammalian lineage, but not in the reptilian or avian line. In addition, the presence of a cGnRH-II-like molecule in the bony fish examined here, and in the cartilaginous fish studied earlier, implies that this form of GnRH may have been present in an ancestor common to both of these classes of fish.

  17. Conditional Viral Tract Tracing Delineates the Projections of the Distinct Kisspeptin Neuron Populations to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Yip, Siew Hoong; Boehm, Ulrich; Herbison, Allan E; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-07-01

    Kisspeptin neurons play an essential role in the regulation of fertility through direct regulation of the GnRH neurons. However, the relative contributions of the two functionally distinct kisspeptin neuron subpopulations to this critical regulation are not fully understood. Here we analyzed the specific projection patterns of kisspeptin neurons originating from either the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V) or the arcuate nucleus (ARN) using a cell-specific, viral-mediated tract-tracing approach. We stereotaxically injected a Cre-dependent recombinant adenovirus encoding farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein into the ARN or RP3V of adult male and female mice expressing Cre recombinase in kisspeptin neurons. Fibers from ARN kisspeptin neurons projected widely; however, we did not find any evidence for direct contact with GnRH neuron somata or proximal dendrites in either sex. In contrast, we identified RP3V kisspeptin fibers in close contact with GnRH neuron somata and dendrites in both sexes. Fibers originating from both the RP3V and ARN were observed in close contact with distal GnRH neuron processes in the ARN and in the lateral and internal aspects of the median eminence. Furthermore, GnRH nerve terminals were found in close contact with the proximal dendrites of ARN kisspeptin neurons in the ARN, and ARN kisspeptin fibers were found contacting RP3V kisspeptin neurons in both sexes. Together these data delineate selective zones of kisspeptin neuron inputs to GnRH neurons and demonstrate complex interconnections between the distinct kisspeptin populations and GnRH neurons.

  18. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  19. 99MTc-Hexamethylpropyleneamine Oxime Imaging for Early Detection of Acute Lung Injury in Rats Exposed to Hyperoxia or Lipopolysaccharide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Audi, Said H; Clough, Anne V; Haworth, Steven T; Medhora, Meetha; Ranji, Mahsa; Densmore, John C; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2016-10-01

    Tc-Hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) is a clinical single-photon emission computed tomography biomarker of tissue oxidoreductive state. Our objective was to investigate whether HMPAO lung uptake can serve as a preclinical marker of lung injury in two well-established rat models of human acute lung injury (ALI).Rats were exposed to >95% O2 (hyperoxia) or treated with intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with first endpoints obtained 24 h later. HMPAO was administered intravenously before and after treatment with the glutathione-depleting agent diethyl maleate (DEM), scintigraphy images were acquired, and HMPAO lung uptake was quantified from the images. We also measured breathing rates, heart rates, oxygen saturation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts and protein, lung homogenate glutathione (GSH) content, and pulmonary vascular endothelial filtration coefficient (Kf).For hyperoxia rats, HMPAO lung uptake increased after 24 h (134%) and 48 h (172%) of exposure. For LPS-treated rats, HMPAO lung uptake increased (188%) 24 h after injury and fell with resolution of injury. DEM reduced HMPAO uptake in hyperoxia and LPS rats by a greater fraction than in normoxia rats. Both hyperoxia exposure (18%) and LPS treatment (26%) increased lung homogenate GSH content, which correlated strongly with HMPAO uptake. Neither of the treatments had an effect on Kf at 24 h. LPS-treated rats appeared healthy but exhibited mild tachypnea, BAL, and histological evidence of inflammation, and increased wet and dry lung weights. These results suggest the potential utility of HMPAO as a tool for detecting ALI at a phase likely to exhibit minimal clinical evidence of injury.

  20. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity

    PubMed Central

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J.; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54−/−Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54−/−Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  1. Behavior of feral horses in response to culling and GnRH immunocontraception

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Garbe, Heidi M.; Oehler, Michael W.; Nett, Terry M.; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife management actions can alter fundamental behaviors of individuals and groups,which may directly impact their life history parameters in unforeseen ways. This is especially true for highly social animals because changes in one individual’s behavior can cascade throughout its social network. When resources to support populations of social animals are limited and populations become locally overabundant, managers are faced with the daunting challenge of decreasing population size without disrupting core behavioral processes. Increasingly, managers are turning to fertility control technologies to supplement culling in efforts to suppress population growth, but little is quantitatively known about how either of these management tools affects behavior. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a small neuropeptide that performs an obligatory role in mammalian reproduction and has been formulated into the immunocontraceptive GonaCon-BTM. We investigated the influences of this vaccine on behavior of feral horses (Equus caballus) at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, USA, for a year preceding and a year following nonlethal culling and GnRH-vaccine treatment. We observed horses during the breeding season and found only minimal differences in time budget behaviors of free-ranging female feral horses treated with GnRH and those treated with saline. The differences observed were consistent with the metabolic demands of pregnancy and lactation. We observed similar social behaviors between treatment groups, reflecting limited reproductive behavior among control females due to high rates of pregnancy and suppressed reproductive behavior among treated females due to GnRH-inhibited ovarian activity. In the treatment year, band stallion age was the only supported factor influencing herding behavior (P < 0.001), harem-tending behavior (P < 0.001), and agonistic behavior (P = 0.02). There was no difference between the mean body condition of control females (4

  2. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  3. Expression, structure, function, and evolution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors GnRH-R1SHS and GnRH-R2PEY in the teleost, Astatotilapia burtoni.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Colleen A; Chen, Chun-Chun; Coetsee, Marla; Mamputha, Sipho; Whitlock, Kathleen E; Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Grosenick, Logan; Fernald, Russell D; Illing, Nicola

    2007-10-01

    Multiple GnRH receptors are known to exist in nonmammalian species, but it is uncertain which receptor type regulates reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The teleost fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, is useful for identifying the GnRH receptor responsible for reproduction, because only territorial males reproduce. We have cloned a second GnRH receptor in A. burtoni, GnRH-R1(SHS) (SHS is a peptide motif in extracellular loop 3), which is up-regulated in pituitaries of territorial males. We have shown that GnRH-R1(SHS) is expressed in many tissues and specifically colocalizes with LH in the pituitary. In A. burtoni brain, mRNA levels of both GnRH-R1(SHS) and a previously identified receptor, GnRH-R2(PEY), are highly correlated with mRNA levels of all three GnRH ligands. Despite its likely role in reproduction, we found that GnRH-R1(SHS) has the highest affinity for GnRH2 in vitro and low responsivity to GnRH1. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that GnRH-R1(SHS) is less closely related to mammalian reproductive GnRH receptors than GnRH-R2(PEY). We correlated vertebrate GnRH receptor amino acid sequences with receptor function and tissue distribution in many species and found that GnRH receptor sequences predict ligand responsiveness but not colocalization with pituitary gonadotropes. Based on sequence analysis, tissue localization, and physiological response we propose that the GnRH-R1(SHS) receptor controls reproduction in teleosts, including A. burtoni. We propose a GnRH receptor classification based on gene sequence that correlates with ligand selectivity but not with reproductive control. Our results suggest that different duplicated GnRH receptor genes have been selected to regulate reproduction in different vertebrate lineages.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and systematic comparison of FITC-labelled GnRH-I, -II and -III analogues on various tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Murányi, József; Gyulavári, Pál; Varga, Attila; Bökönyi, Györgyi; Tanai, Henriette; Vántus, Tibor; Pap, Domonkos; Ludányi, Krisztina; Mező, Gábor; Kéri, György

    2016-08-01

    Targeted tumour therapy is the focus of recent cancer research. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues are able to deliver anticancer agents selectively into tumour cells, which highly express GnRH receptors. However, the effectiveness of different analogues as targeting moiety in drug delivery systems is rarely compared, and the investigated types of cancer are also limited. Therefore, we prepared selectively labelled, fluorescent derivatives of GnRH-I, -II and -III analogues, which were successfully used for drug targeting. In this manuscript, we investigated these analogues' solubility, stability and passive membrane permeability and compared their cellular uptake by various cancer cells. We found that these labelled GnRH conjugates provide great detectability, without undesired cytotoxicity and passive membrane permeability. The introduced experiments with these conjugates proved their reliable tracking, quantification and comparison. Cellular uptake efficiency was studied on human breast, colon, pancreas and prostate cancer cells (MCF-7, HT-29, BxPC-3, LNCaP) and on dog kidney cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney). Each of the three conjugates was taken up by GnRH-I receptor-expressing cells, but the different cells preferred different analogues. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time the high cell surface expression of GnRH-I receptors and the effective cellular uptake of GnRH analogues on human pharynx tumour (Detroit-562) cells. In summary, our presented results detail that the introduced conjugates could be innovative tools for the examination of the GnRH-based drug delivery systems on various cells and offer novel information about these peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443981

  5. Dynamin Is Required for GnRH Signaling to L-Type Calcium Channels and Activation of ERK.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian S; Dang, An K; Murtazina, Dilyara A; Dozier, Melissa G; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Khan, Shaihla A; Cherrington, Brian D; Amberg, Gregory C; Clay, Colin M; Navratil, Amy M

    2016-02-01

    We have shown that GnRH-mediated engagement of the cytoskeleton induces cell movement and is necessary for ERK activation. It also has previously been established that a dominant negative form of the mechano-GTPase dynamin (K44A) attenuates GnRH activation of ERK. At present, it is not clear at what level these cellular events might be linked. To explore this, we used live cell imaging in the gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cell line to determine that dynamin-green fluorescent protein accumulated in GnRH-induced lamellipodia and plasma membrane protrusions. Coincident with translocation of dynamin-green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane, we demonstrated that dynamin colocalizes with the actin cytoskeleton and the actin binding protein, cortactin at the leading edge of the plasma membrane. We next wanted to assess the physiological significance of these findings by inhibiting dynamin GTPase activity using dynasore. We find that dynasore suppresses activation of ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, after exposure to GnRH agonist. Furthermore, exposure of αT3-1 cells to dynasore inhibited GnRH-induced cyto-architectural rearrangements. Recently it has been discovered that GnRH induced Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels requires an intact cytoskeleton to mediate ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, not only does dynasore attenuate GnRH-mediated actin reorganization, it also suppresses Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels visualized in living cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Collectively, our data suggest that GnRH-induced membrane remodeling events are mediated in part by the association of dynamin and cortactin engaging the actin cytoskeleton, which then regulates Ca(2+) influx via L-type channels to facilitate ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26696122

  6. Reproductive neuropeptides: prevalence of GnRH and KNDy neural signalling components in a model avian, gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nerine T; Tello, Javier A; Bedecarrats, Gregoy Y; Millar, Robert P

    2013-09-01

    Diverse external and internal environmental factors are integrated in the hypothalamus to regulate the reproductive system. This is mediated through the pulsatile secretion of GnRH into the portal system to stimulate pituitary gonadotrophin secretion, which in turn regulates gonadal function. A single subpopulation of neurones termed 'KNDy neurones' located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus co-localise kisspeptin (Kiss), neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn) and are responsive to negative feedback effects of sex steroids. The co-ordinated secretion from KNDy neurones appears to modulate the pulsatile release of GnRH, acting as a proximate pacemaker. This review briefly describes the neuropeptidergic control of reproduction in the avian class, highlighting the status of reproductive neuropeptide signalling systems homologous to those found in mammalian genomes. Genes encoding the GnRH system are complete in the chicken with similar roles to the mammalian counterparts, whereas genes encoding Kiss signalling components appear missing in the avian lineage, indicating a differing set of hypothalamic signals controlling avian reproduction. Gene sequences encoding both NKB and Dyn signalling components are present in the chicken genome, but expression analysis and functional studies remain to be completed. The focus of this article is to describe the avian complement of neuropeptidergic reproductive hormones and provide insights into the putative mechanisms that regulate reproduction in birds. These postulations highlight differences in reproductive strategies of birds in terms of gonadal steroid feedback systems, integration of metabolic signals and seasonality. Also included are propositions of KNDy neuropeptide gene silencing and plasticity in utilisation of these neuropeptides during avian evolution.

  7. Corpus luteum function and embryonic mortality in buffaloes treated with a GnRH agonist, hCG and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Campanile, G; Di Palo, R; Neglia, G; Vecchio, D; Gasparrini, B; Prandi, A; Galiero, G; D'Occhio, M J

    2007-05-01

    The effect of treatment with a GnRH agonist, hCG or progesterone (P(4)) on corpus luteum function and embryonic mortality was investigated in buffaloes inseminated during mid-winter. Italian Mediterranean buffaloes (n=309) were synchronized using the Ovsynch with timed-AI program and mated by AI at 16 h (Day 0) and 40 h after the second injection of GnRH. On Day 5, buffaloes were randomly assigned to four groups: Control (no treatment, n=69), GnRH agonist (buserelin acetate, 12.6 microg, n=73), hCG (1500 IU, n=75) and P(4) (PRID without E(2) for 10 days, n=77). Progesterone (pg/ml) was determined in milk whey on Days 5, 10, 15 and 20 and pregnancy diagnosis was undertaken on Day 26 by ultrasound and Day 40 by rectal palpation. Treatment with buserelin and hCG increased (p<0.05) P(4) on Day 15 compared with controls (456+/-27, 451+/-24 and 346+/-28 pg/ml, respectively). Buffaloes treated with a PRID had intermediate P(4) concentrations (380+/-23 pg/ml). Embryonic mortality between Days 26 and 40 (22.9%) and pregnancies at Day 40 (48.9%) did not differ between treatments. A higher (p<0.01) P(4) concentration was found on Day 20 in pregnant animals compared with non-pregnant and embryonic mortality buffaloes, which did not differ. In summary, buserelin and hCG increased P(4) concentrations on Day 15 but this was not associated with a reduced incidence of embryonic mortality in buffaloes during mid-winter. PMID:17403533

  8. Estrus synchronization in sheep and goats using combinations of GnRH, progestagen and prostaglandin F2alpha.

    PubMed

    Titi, H H; Kridli, R T; Alnimer, M A

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of GnRH, progestagen and prostaglandin F(2alpha) on estrus synchronization in sheep and goats. Sixty Awassi ewes and 53 Damascus does were used in the study. The experiment started at the beginning of the breeding season (June/July). The same treatments were applied to sheep and goats as follows: no treatment (CON), 14-day progestagen sponges and 600 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (S), gonadotropin releasing hormone followed 5 days later by prostaglandin F(2alpha) (GP) and gonadotropin releasing hormone, progestagen sponges for 5 days and prostaglandin F(2alpha) on the day of sponge removal (GSP). None of the ewes in the S group lambed from mating during the induced cycle. A greater lambing rate (p < 0.05) was observed in the GSP group compared with the CON and S groups while the GP group was intermediate. The number of lambs born per lambed ewe was similar among the CON, GP and GSP groups. However, the number of lambs per exposed ewe was greater (p < 0.05) in the GSP than the remaining groups. The induced cycle kidding rate was 77% for all treatments combined. Similar kidding rate were observed among treatments. The numbers of kids born per kidded and exposed doe from mating during the induced estrus were also similar among treatments. Greater numbers of multiple births were observed in the GP and GSP than in the S group. In conclusion, a combination of GnRH, progestagen sponges and PGF(2alpha) can be effective in synchronizing estrus and improving fecundity in sheep and goats. Although the use of GnRH-PGF(2alpha) was effective, the addition of progestagen sponges at the time of GnRH administration appeared to improve reproductive parameters.

  9. Effects of Gn-RH, TRH, and CRF administration on plasma leptin levels in lean and obese women.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, J; Jankiewicz-Wika, J; Stepień, H

    2000-04-01

    Leptin, a hormone which is produced by adipose tissue, has been shown to inhibit food intake, increase energy expenditure and influence the function of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal, -thyroid, and -adrenal systems. We have examined the association between leptin concentrations (RIA method) and levels of different hormones using standard Gn-RH, TRH and CRF tests (at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min) in regularly menstruating 10 lean and 10 obese premenopausal women in follicular phase. FSH, LH, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) concentrations in Gn-RH test; TSH, PRL, fT3, fT4 in TRH test; ACTH, DHEA-S, cortisol in CRF test were measured by RIA, ELISA or IRMA methods. The obese subjects had thicker four skinfolds, higher fat content in the body, and bigger BMI, compared to the lean females. Gn-RH test: We have noted higher basal leptin values in obese women than in lean subjects, which was stable during the Gn-RH test. In the same blood specimen, basal insulin concentrations did not differ between the tested groups of patients. There were no correlations between E(2), P, or gonadotropins and plasma leptin concentrations between both groups of patients. We have revealed the negative correlation between LH mobilization (maximal incremental values over basal levels; Delta%) and baseline leptin concentrations in all observed subjects. TRH test: In both groups of patients the leptin levels decreased at 120 min of TRH administration. We have noted diminished PRL and TSH mobilisation in obese subjects in comparison to the controls. In all females (n = 20) the correlations between TSH or PRL mobilization and BMI, skinfold thickness and the mass of body fat in kg were negative. In obese subjects only we observed the positive correlations between fT(3)concentrations at 60 and 120 min of the test or Delta% of fT(3)and leptin levels. CRF test: In obese females, we noted higher basal ACTH and cortisol concentrations with decreased mobilization (Delta%) of ACTH or cortisol, as compared to

  10. Use of a GnRH agonist to suppress testosterone in wild male Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi).

    PubMed

    Atkinson, S; Ragen, T J; Gilmartin, W G; Becker, B L; Johanos, T C

    1998-11-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, d-Trp6-LHRH, was evaluated for its effectiveness in reducing circulating testosterone concentrations in wild Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi). Twenty-eight adult male seals were randomly divided into three groups: 10 were captured and treated with 7.5 mg of the GnRH agonist, 9 were captured but did not receive the agonist, and 9 were captured near the end of the study to serve as handling controls. Blood samples were taken from all 28 seals. From 14 to 58 days after initial capture, 8 of the treated seals and 8 of the untreated seals were recaptured and a second sample of blood was taken. For comparison, blood was also collected from 4 captive adult male seals during the same months as the field study. In the treated group, the agonist induced a significant decline in mean circulating testosterone concentrations, from 1.01 ng/ml (first sample) to 0.21 ng/ml (second sample, taken approximately 38 days later). In the untreated group, mean testosterone concentrations of the first and second samples were statistically indistinguishable (1.11 vs 1.16 ng/ml). The mean concentration of the untreated group (second sample) was also indistinguishable from the mean concentration of seals in the control group (1.16 vs 0.82 ng/ml). Also, mean testosterone concentration in the initial samples from the four captive seals was not statistically different from that of untreated wild seals (1.38 vs 1.11 ng/ml). These results suggest that (1) the GnRH agonist suppresses the production of testosterone in wild adult male Hawaiian monk seals, (2) a single handling of adult male seals does not affect their testosterone levels, and (3) testosterone concentrations in captive male seals appear to be consistent with concentrations in wild seals. Further evaluation of this GnRH agonist is necessary before it is used in the management of this endangered species, but these results suggest it may be a useful tool for reducing mortality

  11. GnRH analogue treatment on LH surge day 0 followed by single transvaginal artificial insemination with frozen semen on day 5 in bitches

    PubMed Central

    OHTAKI, Tadatoshi; KOGA, Yasuna; ONO, Mamiko; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi; TSUMAGARI, Shigehisa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reproductive parameters were evaluated in 19 and 14 estrous beagles that received 100 µg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and saline treatment, respectively, on the day of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (Day 0; estimated by serial progesterone assay) and balloon catheter-aided single transvaginal artificial insemination of frozen semen on Day 5. Although the conception rate and litter size were similar between the GnRH and saline groups, the concentration of LH peak was significantly higher in GnRH-treated bitches (P<0.01). In addition, the actual LH surge did not occur on the estimated Day 0 in one saline-treated bitch. In clinical practice that daily progesterone assay is difficult, administration of GnRH on estimated Day 0 would be recommended to induce or enhance the LH surge for timely and successful insemination. PMID:25311914

  12. Variation in progesterone receptors and GnRH expression in the hypothalamus of the pregnant South American plains vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus (Mammalia, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Verónica Berta; Saucedo, Lucía; Di Giorgio, Noelia Paula; Inserra, Pablo Ignacio Felipe; Fraunhoffer, Nicolás; Leopardo, Noelia Paola; Halperín, Julia; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, elevated levels of progesterone (P4) throughout gestation maintain a negative feedback over the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal (H-H-G) axis, avoiding preovulatory follicular growth and preventing ovulation. Recent studies showed that in the South American plains vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus) folliculogenesis progresses to preovulatory stages during gestation, and an ovulatory process seems to occur at midgestation. The aim of this work was to analyze hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and P4 receptors (PR) expression and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and correlate these with the functional state of the ovary in nonovulating and ovulating females and gestating females with special emphasis in the supposedly ovulating females at midgestation. We investigated P4 and LH serum levels as well as the distribution, localization, and expression of PR and GnRH in the hypothalamus of L. maximus at different time points during gestation and in nongestating, ovulating and nonovulating, females. A significant increment in GnRH, P4, and LH was detected in midpregnant vizcachas with respect to early-pregnant and to ovulating females. PR was also significantly increased in midpregnant animals. PR was detected in neurons of the preoptic and hypothalamic areas. Coexistence of both PR and GnRH in neurons of medial preoptic area and supraoptic nucleus was detected. Midpregnant animals showed increased number of PR immunoreactive cells at median eminence, localized adjacently to GnRH immunoreactive fibers. High expression of hypothalamic GnRH and PR, despite an increased level of P4, was correlated with the presence of antral, preovulatory follicles, and luteinized unruptured follicles at midgestation that suggest a possible role of the H-H-G axis in the modulation of ovulation during gestation in L. maximus.

  13. Expression profiles of three types of GnRH during sex-change in the protandrous cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus: Effects of exogenous GnRHs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Na; Shin, Hyun Suk; Habibi, Hamid R; Lee, Jehee; Choi, Cheol Young

    2012-02-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) play pivotal roles in the control of reproduction and gonadal maturation in teleost fish. Fish have multiple GnRH genes that encode structurally distinct peptides. We identified salmon GnRH (sGnRH), seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) by cDNA cloning in cinnamon clownfish (Amphiprion melanopus) using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR). Gene identity was confirmed by sequence alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analyses. We also investigated GnRH mRNA expression in the gonads by quantitative real time-PCR (Q-PCR), and measured plasma estradiol-17β (E(2)) levels in immature fish following treatment with the three molecular forms of GnRHs. The expression levels of sGnRH, sbGnRH, and cGnRH-II mRNA were higher in mature testes and ovaries, as compared to the levels in gonads at earlier stages of maturity. The levels of the three prepro-GnRH mRNA species and the plasma E(2) levels increased after injection of the three GnRH variants. These findings support the hypothesis that GnRH peptides play important roles in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are probably involved in paracrine control of gonadal development and sex change in cinnamon clownfish.

  14. Insight from the lamprey genome: glimpsing early vertebrate development via neuroendocrine-associated genes and shared synteny of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Decatur, Wayne A; Hall, Jeffrey A; Smith, Jeramiah J; Li, Weiming; Sower, Stacia A

    2013-10-01

    Study of the ancient lineage of jawless vertebrates is key to understanding the origins of vertebrate biology. The establishment of the neuroendocrine system with the hypothalamic-pituitary axis at its crux is of particular interest. Key neuroendocrine hormones in this system include the pivotal gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) responsible for controlling reproduction via the pituitary. Previous data incorporating several lines of evidence showed all known vertebrate GnRHs were grouped into four paralogous lineages: GnRH1, 2, 3 and 4; with proposed evolutionary paths. Using the currently available lamprey genome assembly, we searched genes of the neuroendocrine system and summarize here the details representing the state of the current lamprey genome assembly. Additionally, we have analyzed in greater detail the evolutionary history of the GnRHs based on the information of the genomic neighborhood of the paralogs in lamprey as compared to other gnathostomes. Significantly, the current evidence suggests that two genome duplication events (both 1R and 2R) that generated the different fish and tetrapod paralogs took place before the divergence of the ancestral agnathans and gnathostome lineages. Syntenic analysis supports this evidence in that the previously-classified type IV GnRHs in lamprey (lGnRH-I and -III) share a common ancestry with GnRH2 and 3, and thus are no longer considered type IV GnRHs. Given the single amino acid difference between lGnRH-II and GnRH2 we propose that a GnRH2-like gene existed before the lamprey/gnathostome split giving rise to lGnRH-II and GnRH2. Furthermore, paralogous type 3 genes (lGnRH-I/III and GnRH3) evolved divergent structure/function in lamprey and gnathostome lineages.

  15. Developmental Exposure to Ethinylestradiol Affects Reproductive Physiology, the GnRH Neuroendocrine Network and Behaviors in Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, Lyes; Keller, Matthieu; Martini, Mariangela; Duittoz, Anne H.; Pillon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    During development, environmental estrogens are able to induce an estrogen mimetic action that may interfere with endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. The present study investigated the effects on the reproductive function in female mice following developmental exposure to pharmaceutical ethinylestradiol (EE2), the most widespread and potent synthetic steroid present in aquatic environments. EE2 was administrated in drinking water at environmentally relevant (ENVIR) or pharmacological (PHARMACO) doses [0.1 and 1 μg/kg (body weight)/day respectively], from embryonic day 10 until postnatal day 40. Our results show that both groups of EE2-exposed females had advanced vaginal opening and shorter estrus cycles, but a normal fertility rate compared to CONTROL females. The hypothalamic population of GnRH neurons was affected by EE2 exposure with a significant increase in the number of perikarya in the preoptic area of the PHARMACO group and a modification in their distribution in the ENVIR group, both associated with a marked decrease in GnRH fibers immunoreactivity in the median eminence. In EE2-exposed females, behavioral tests highlighted a disturbed maternal behavior, a higher lordosis response, a lack of discrimination between gonad-intact and castrated males in sexually experienced females, and an increased anxiety-related behavior. Altogether, these results put emphasis on the high sensitivity of sexually dimorphic behaviors and neuroendocrine circuits to disruptive effects of EDCs. PMID:26696819

  16. Kisspeptin-10 elicits triphasic cytosolic calcium responses in immortalized GT1-7 GnRH neurones.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Alcin, Ergul; Ayar, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Bayram; Sandal, Suleyman; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2011-03-29

    Kisspeptins, which are alternatively called as metastin since they were originally identified as products of metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1, are the natural ligands for the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54). Kisspeptins are the most potent activators of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis reported to date. The pulsatile pattern of GnRH release, which results in the intermittent release of gonadotropic hormones from the pituitary, has a critical importance for reproductive function but the factors responsible from this release pattern are not known. Therefore, the pattern of kisspeptin-induced intracellular signaling and the role of PKC in the intracellular signaling cascade were investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging using the immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. Kisspeptin-10 caused a triphasic change characterized by an initial small increase followed by a significant decrease and increase in intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)). The changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. The compatibility of appeared mirrored-patterns of kisspeptin-10-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) concentrations in these neurons and GnRH secretion confirm the importance of intracellular calcium flux downstream from GPR54 through PKC signaling pathway.

  17. Specific mesenchymal/epithelial induction of olfactory receptor, vomeronasal, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, N.E; Lischka, F. W.; Yee, K.K.; Peters, A.Z.; Tucker, E.S.; Meechan, D.W.; Zirlinger, M.; Maynard, T.M.; Burd, G.B.; Dulac, C.; Pevny, L.; LaMantia, A-S.

    2013-01-01

    We asked whether specific mesenchymal/epithelial (M/E) induction generates olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), vomeronasal neurons (VRNs) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons—the major neuron classes associated with the olfactory epithelium (OE). To assess specificity of M/E-mediated neurogenesis, we compared the influence of frontonasal mesenchyme on frontonasal epithelium, which becomes the OE, with that of the forelimb bud. Despite differences in position, morphogenetic and cytogenic capacity, both mesenchymal tissues support neurogenesis, expression of several signaling molecules and neurogenic transcription factors in the frontonasal epithelium. Only frontonasal mesenchyme, however, supports OE-specific patterning and activity of a subset of signals and factors associated with OE differentiation. Moreover, only appropriate pairing of frontonasal epithelial and mesenchymal partners yields ORNs, VRNs, and GnRH neurons. Accordingly, the position and molecular identity of specialized frontonasal epithelia and mesenchyme early in gestation and subsequent inductive interactions, specifies the genesis and differentiation of peripheral chemosensory and neuroendocrine neurons. PMID:20503368

  18. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  19. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron migration: initiation, maintenance and cessation as critical steps to ensure normal reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Wierman, Margaret E; Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Tobet, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    GnRH neurons follow a carefully orchestrated journey from their birth in the olfactory placode area. Initially, they migrate along with the vomeronasal nerve into the brain at the cribriform plate, then progress caudally to sites within the hypothalamus where they halt and send projections to the median eminence to activate pituitary gonadotropes. Many factors controlling this precise journey have been elucidated by the silencing or over-expression of candidate genes in mouse models. Importantly, a number of these factors may not only play a role in normal physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis but also be mis-expressed to cause human disorders of GnRH deficiency, presenting as a failure to undergo normal pubertal development. This review outlines the current cadre of candidates thought to modulate GnRH neuronal migration. The further elucidation and characterization of these factors that impact GnRH neuron development may shed new light on human reproductive disorders and provide potential targets to develop new pro-fertility or contraceptive agents.

  1. Effects of Huang Bai (Phellodendri Cortex) and Three Other Herbs on GnRH and GH Levels in GT1–7 and GH3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Haeng; Kwak, Sung Chul; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Sang Woug; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young-Sik; Lee, Donghun; Lee, Ju Won; Lee, Chang Gon; Lee, Hae Kyung; Cho, Sung-Min; Shin, Yu Jeong; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Hocheol; Chang, Gyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate the effects of Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Mai Ya, and Xia Ku Cao on hormone using the GT1–7 and GH3 cells. The GT1–7 and GH3 cell lines were incubated with DW; DMSO; and 30, 100, or 300 μg/mL of one of the four extract solutions in serum-free media for 24 hours. The MTT assay was performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the four herbs. The GT1–7 and GH3 cells were incubated in DW, estradiol (GT1–7 only), or noncytotoxic herb solutions in serum-free medium for 24 hours. A quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were performed to measure the GnRH expression in GT1–7 cells and GH expression in GH3 cells. Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Xia Ku Cao, and Mai Ya inhibited the GnRH mRNA expression in GT1–7 cells, whereas Huang Bai enhanced GH mRNA expression in GH3 cells. Additionally, Xia Ku Cao inhibited GnRH protein expression in GT1–7 cells and Huang Bai promoted GH protein expression in GH3 cells. The findings suggest that Huang Bai can delay puberty by inhibiting GnRH synthesis in the hypothalamus while also accelerating growth by promoting GH synthesis and secretion in the pituitary. PMID:26925153

  2. Identification of members of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) families in the genome of the holocephalan, Callorhinchus milii (elephant shark).

    PubMed

    Nock, Tanya G; Chand, Dhan; Lovejoy, David A

    2011-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and corticotropin-releasing family (CRF) are two neuropeptides families that are strongly conserved throughout evolution. Recently, the genome of the holocephalan, Callorhinchus milii (elephant shark) has been sequenced. The phylogenetic position of C. milii, along with the relatively slow evolution of the cartilaginous fish suggests that neuropeptides in this species may resemble the earliest gnathostome forms. The genome of the elephant shark was screened, in silico, using the various conserved motifs of both the vertebrate CRF paralogs and the insect diuretic hormone sequences to identify the structure of the C. milii CRF/DH-like peptides. A similar approach was taken to identify the GnRH peptides using conserved motifs in both vertebrate and invertebrate forms. Two CRF peptides, a urotensin-1 peptide and a urocortin 3 peptide were found in the genome. There was only about 50% sequence identity between the two CRF peptides suggesting an early divergence. In addition, the urocortin 2 peptide seems to have been lost and was identified as a pseudogene in C. milii. In contrast to the number of CRF family peptides, only a GnRH-II preprohormone with the conserved mature decapeptide was found. This confirms early studies about the identity of GnRH in the Holocephali, and suggests that the Holocephali and Elasmobranchii differ with respect to GnRH structure and function. PMID:21310155

  3. Synchrony of ovulation and follicular dynamics in merino ewes treated with GnRH in the breeding and non-breeding seasons.

    PubMed

    Reyna, J; Thomson, P C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) treatment on the time of ovulation and the occurrence of follicular dominance during the non-breeding and breeding seasons (experiment 1), and on fertility after artificial insemination (AI) in the non-breeding season (experiment 2), was examined in Merino ewes. Oestrus was synchronized in 40 nulliparous ewes (experiment 1; n = 20, in the non-breeding and breeding seasons) and in 79 multiparous ewes (experiment 2) using intravaginal sponges and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin. Thirty six hours after sponge removal (SR), half the ewes were injected (i.m.) with 40 microg of synthetic GnRH and the remainder used as controls. GnRH improved the synchrony of ovulation compared with the controls in the breeding (SD = 2.8 vs 5.7 days, p = 0.04) but not the non-breeding season (SD = 3.8 vs 4.4 days, p = 0.69), with ewes ovulating from 42 to 54 h (mean 50.4 +/- 4.08 h) and 42-60 h (mean 54.4 +/- 5.47 h) after SR for GnRH and control, respectively. For both treated and control ewes, ovulation occurred earlier in the non-breeding than the breeding season (50.1 vs 54.6 h; p = 0.002). GnRH had no effect on follicular dominance, as assessed by divergence (D: the time the ovulatory follicle exceeded the average size of the other non-ovulating follicles) or on the interval from D to ovulation (IDO). However, follicular dynamics differed between seasons. The mean follicle diameter increased at a faster rate up to 36 h after SR in the non-breeding compared with the breeding season and then rapidly declined, compared with a later peak (42 h after SR) in mean follicular size during the breeding season. IDO was shorter in the non-breeding than in the breeding season (26.7 +/- 4.30 h vs 39.6 +/- 4.53 h; p = 0.05). In experiment 2, ewes (n = 38 GnRH-treated, n = 40 controls) were inseminated in the uterus by laparoscopy 42 h or 48 h after SR with frozen-thawed sperm. The fertility of ewes treated with GnRH (nine of 39, 23%) was not

  4. Effect of GnRH antagonists on clinical pregnancy rates in ovulation induction protocols with gonadotropins and intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Dansuk, Ramazan; Gonenc, Ali Ihsan; Sudolmus, Sinem; Yucel, Oguz; Sevket, Osman; Köroğlu, Nadiye

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intrauterine insemination (IUI) after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) was applied to selected infertile patients to determine the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists in IUI cycles, in which recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) had been used for COH. METHODS This study was conducted between April 1, 2009 and June 10, 2009, and involved a total of 108 patients. These patients had primary or secondary infertility, which resulted in an indication for IUI, and they each received two cycles of ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate. The patients were randomised into two groups – patients in group A received rFSH + GnRH antagonist (n = 45), while those in group B received only rFSH (n = 63). RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 31.84 ± 3.73 years and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.40 ± 1.88 kg/m2. The mean age and BMI of the patients in groups A and B were not significantly different. There was no significant difference in the mean total rFSH dose administered (988.33 IU in group A and 871.83 IU in group B). When compared to group B, the mean number of follicles that were > 16 mm on the human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) trigger day was significantly higher in group A (1.58 and 1.86, respectively; p < 0.05). When the two groups were compared, there were no statistically significant differences in the number of cancelled cycles due to premature luteinisation (none in group A vs. two in group B) and the rate of clinical pregnancy (8.9% in group A vs. 7.9% in group B). CONCLUSION No significant improvement in the clinical pregnancy rates was observed when GnRH antagonists were used in COH + IUI cycles, despite the significant increase in the number of follicles that were > 16 mm on HCG trigger day. PMID:25532515

  5. Timing of ovulation and fertility of heifers after synchronization of oestrus with GnRH and prostaglandin F(2alpha).

    PubMed

    Tenhagen, B-A; Kuchenbuch, S; Heuwieser, W

    2005-02-01

    Synchronization of oestrus and/or ovulation can reduce workload in heifer reproductive management. The objective of this study was to compare two protocols to synchronize oestrus and/or ovulation using GnRH and prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) in dairy heifers concerning their effect on follicular dynamics and reproductive performance. Four trials were carried out. In trial 1, 282 heifers were treated with GnRH and PGF(2alpha) 7 days apart (GP protocol). One group was inseminated on detection of oestrus (IDO 1), and the other group received two timed artificial inseminations (AI) 48 and 72 h after PGF(2alpha) administration (TAI 1). In trial 2, 98 heifers were synchronized with the same GP protocol. Heifers in IDO 2 were treated as in IDO 1, heifers in TAI 2 received two TAI 48 and 78 h after PGF(2alpha) administration. In trial 3, heifers in IDO 3 (n = 71) were again treated as in IDO 1. Heifers in TAI 3 (n = 166) received a second dose of GnRH 48 h after PGF(2alpha) (GPG protocol) and TAI together with this treatment and 24 h later. Trial 4 compared the timing of ovulation after the GP and the GPG protocol, using a subgroup of the heifers from trials 1 to 3. The ovaries of the heifers were scanned via ultrasound at 48, 56, 72, 80, 96 and 104 h after PGF(2alpha) administration. Timing of ovulation and size of the ovulatory follicles were compared between the two groups. In trials 1 to 3, conception rates to first service were between 49 and 66%. They did not differ significantly between IDO and TAI groups within or between trials. Pregnancy rates per synchronization were numerically higher in the TAI groups, but the difference was not significant. Conception rates to breeding on spontaneous oestrus in heifers returning to oestrus were higher than that after synchronized oestrus. In trial 4, more heifers ovulated before the end of the observation period in GPG than in GP (96.5% vs 74.7%; p < 0.001). Overall, ovulatory follicles were smaller in GPG (13.1 +/- 1

  6. Hypothalamic KISS1 Expression, GnRH, and Neurotransmitter Innervation Vary with Stress and Sensitivity in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Kim, Aaron; Reddy, Arubala P.; Chin, Andrea; Weraky, Sarah C.; Cameron, Judy L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of short-term psychosocial and metabolic stress in a monkey model of Stress-Induced Amenorrhea on the HPG axis. KISS1 expression was determined with ISH in the infundibular arcuate nucleus (INF ARC). Downstream of KISS1, GnRH axons in lateral areas rostral to the infundibular recess, serum LH and serum oestrogen (E) were measured with IHC and RIA. Upstream of KISS1, norepinephrine (NE) axons in the rostral ARC and serotonin axons in the anterior hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG) were measured with IHC. Female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) characterized as highly stress resilient (HSR) or stress sensitive (SS) were examined. After characterization of stress sensitivity, monkeys were either not stressed, or mildly stressed for 5 days prior to euthanasia in the early follicular phase. Stress consisted of 5 days of 20% food reduction in a novel room with unfamiliar conspecifics. There was a significant increase in KISS1 expression in HSR and SS animals in the presence versus absence of stress (p=0.005). GnRH axon density increased with stress in HSR and SS animals (p=0.015), while LH showed a gradual, but non-significant increase with stress. E trended higher in the HSR animals and there was no effect of stress (p=0.83). NE axon density (marked with dopamine β-hydroxylase, DBH) increased with stress in both HSR and SS groups (p≤0.002), whereas serotonin axon density was higher in HSR compared to SS animals and there was no effect of stress (p=0.03). The ratio of DBH/E correlated with KISS1 (p=0.052), and GnRH correlated with serum LH (p=0.039). In conclusion, E inhibited KISS1 in the absence of stress, but stress increased NE, which may override E inhibition of KISS1 expression. We speculate that neural pathways transduce stress to KISS1 neurones, which changes their sensitivity to E. PMID:24617839

  7. Spanish labeling guide.

    PubMed

    Juliá, A M; García, S V; Breckinridge, M F

    1983-01-01

    A systematic reference of English-Spanish prescription label translations is presented. The purpose of the reference list (which is the most comprehensive published to date) is to enable a pharmacist to write precise, accurate label directions in Spanish for any patient who cannot read English.

  8. Spin-labeled polyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A I; Sukhorukov, B I

    1980-01-01

    Poly (U), poly (C) and poly (A) were spin labeled with N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-carbonylpyrroline-1-oxyl)-imidazole. This spin label interacts selectively with 2' OH ribose groups of polynucleotides and does not modify the nucleic acid bases. The extent of spin labeling is not dependent upon the nature of the base and is entirely determined by rigidity of the secondary structure of the polynucleotide. The extent of modification for poly (U), poly (C) and poly (A) was 4.2, 1.7 and 1.5 per cent, respectively, the secondary structure of the polynucleotides being practically unchanged. Some physico-chemical properties of the spin-labeled polynucleotides were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Rotational correlation times of the spin label and activation energy of its motion were calculated. PMID:6253911

  9. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  10. Histological characterization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the hypothalamus of the South American plains vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus).

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Verónica Berta; Fraunhoffer, Nicolás; Inserra, Pablo Ignacio Felipe; Loidl, César Fabián; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2011-08-01

    In contrast to most mammalian species, females of the South American plains vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus, show an extensive suppression of apoptosis-dependent follicular atresia, continuous folliculogenesis, and massive polyovulation. These unusual reproductive features pinpoint to an eventual peculiar modulation of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal axis through its main regulator, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We explored the hypothalamic histological landscape and cellular and subcellular localization of GnRH in adult non-pregnant L. maximus females. Comparison to brain atlases from mouse, rat, guinea pig and chinchilla enabled us to histologically define and locate the preoptic area (POA), the ventromedial nucleus, the median eminence (ME), and the arcuate nucleus (Arc) of the hypothalamus in vizcacha's brain. Specific immunolocalization of GnRH was detected in soma of neurons at medial POA (MPA), ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, septohypothalamic nucleus (SHy) and Arc, and in beaded fibers of MPA, SHy, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, anterior hypothalamic area and ME. Electron microscopy examination revealed GnRH associated to cytoplasmic vesicles of the ME and POA neurons, organized both in core and non-core vesicles within varicosities, and in neurosecretory vesicles within the myelinated axons of the MPA. Besides the peculiar and unusual features of folliculogenesis and ovulation in the vizcacha, these results show that hypothalamus histology and GnRH immune-detection and localization are comparable to those found in other mammals. This fact leads to the possibility that specific regulatory mechanisms should be in action to maintain continuous folliculogenesis and massive polyovulation. PMID:21660456

  11. Cell death mechanisms in GT1-7 GnRH cells exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls PCB74, PCB118, and PCB153

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Guevara, Esperanza; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes functional deficits in neuroendocrine systems. We used an immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line, which synthesizes the neuroendocrine peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), to examine the neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects of PCBs and their mechanisms of action. Cells were treated for 1, 4, 8, or 24 h with a range of doses of a representative PCB from each of three classes: coplanar (2,4,4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl: PCB74), dioxin-like coplanar (2',3,4,4',5' pentachlorobiphenyl: PCB118), non-coplanar (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl: PCB153), or their combination. GnRH peptide concentrations, cell viability, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and caspase activation were quantified. In general, GnRH peptide levels were suppressed by high doses and longer durations of PCBs, and elevated at low doses and shorter timepoints. The suppression of GnRH peptide levels was partially reversed in cultures co-treated with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. All PCBs reduced viability and increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Although the effects for the three classes of PCBs were often similar, subtle differences in responses, together with evidence that the combination of PCBs acted slightly different from individual PCBs, suggest that the three tested PCB compounds may act via slightly different or more than one mechanism. These results provide evidence that PCB congeners have endocrine disrupting and/or neurotoxic effects on the hypothalamic GnRH cell line, a finding that has implications for environmental endocrine disruption in animals.

  12. Female pheromones stimulate release of luteinizing hormone and testosterone without altering GnRH mRNA in adult male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Nelson, Aaron L A; Ahmed, Eman I; Parfitt, David B; Romeo, Russell D; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2004-09-15

    In many species chemosensory stimuli function as important signals that influence reproductive status. Neurons synthesizing the peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are critical mediators of reproductive function via their regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and they are thought to be responsive to chemosensory information. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the effects of female chemosensory stimuli on the HPG axis in sexually naive adult male Syrian hamsters. In Experiment 1, serial blood samples were collected from catheterized male hamsters following exposure to female pheromones in order to characterize the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to this chemosensory stimulus. In Experiment 2, brains and terminal blood samples were collected from animals 0, 60, and 120 min following pheromone exposure. GnRH mRNA was measured in brain tissue sections using in situ hybridization, and plasma concentrations of LH and testosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Data from Experiment 1 indicated that female pheromones elicited a rapid rise in plasma LH that peaked at 15 min and returned to baseline 45 min after exposure. In Experiment 2, testosterone was elevated in terminal blood samples obtained 60 min, but not 120 min, after exposure to pheromones. LH levels were unaffected at both of these time points. The chemosensory-induced increases in LH and testosterone release were not accompanied by subsequent changes in GnRH mRNA over the time course studied. These data suggest that while activation of the male HPG axis by female pheromones involves release of GnRH, it does not involve increases in GnRH mRNA 1-2 h after pheromonal stimulation as a mechanism for replenishment of released peptide.

  13. Effect of diet and GnRH administration on post-partum ovarian cyclicity in autumn-lambing ewes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, L M; Ranilla, M J; Quintans, G; King, M E; Gebbie, F E; Robinson, J J

    2003-03-20

    Using autumn-lambing ewes, this study investigated (i) the effects of diet on gonadotrophin secretion and responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis to exogenous GnRH during the early post-partum period; and (ii) whether ovulation prior to completion of uterine involution results in an increased incidence of aberrant ovarian cycles. Thirty-two ewes rearing 1.9+/-0.12 lambs were equally allocated to two dietary treatments at lambing (22 October +/-0.2 day). Diets comprised ad libitum hay and 1.5 kg per ewe per day of one of two concentrates (11.5 MJ ME, 195 g CP per kg) containing 300 g kg(-1) cracked maize grain (M) or 300 g kg(-1) sugar beet pellets (S). Half of the ewes on each diet (G) received 25 i.v. injections of 250 ng GnRH in 2 ml 0.9% saline at 2 h intervals from days 12-14 post-partum while remaining ewes (N) were monitored for the resumption of spontaneous ovarian cyclicity. Blood samples were obtained from all ewes throughout the study (lambing to 18 December) for measurement of circulating hormone concentrations and the uteri and ovaries of all ewes were examined via laparoscopy on day 21 post-partum. There were no effects of dietary treatment on ewe daily live weight loss, lamb daily live weight gain or the immediate post-partum increase in circulating FSH concentrations. Diet did not affect insulin concentrations or LH pulse frequency on day 12 post-partum but LH pulse amplitude was lower in ewes fed concentrate M compared to concentrate S (1.4+/-0.10 versus 1.7+/-0.12 ng ml(-1), respectively, P<0.05) and this was associated with an increased interval to the resumption of spontaneous ovarian cycles (35+/-3.1 versus 26+/-2.1 day, respectively, P<0.05). Administration of exogenous GnRH increased (P<0.05) the proportion of ewes on both diets that ovulated within 20 days of parturition and advanced the onset of ovarian cyclicity in ewes fed concentrate M by 9.5 days (significance of interaction, P<0.05). Four ewes, all of which ovulated

  14. Potential roles for GNIH and GNRH-II in reproductive axis regulation of an opportunistically breeding songbird.

    PubMed

    Perfito, Nicole; Zann, Richard; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George; Hau, Michaela

    2011-08-01

    The ability to breed at any time of year enables opportunistically breeding species to respond to good conditions whenever they occur. We investigate the neuroendocrine basis for this relatively unusual reproductive pattern in the avian world. One proposed mechanism for year-round breeding ability is tonic activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) production that is flexibly modified by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) production during unfavorable conditions. GnIH could inhibit GnRH secretion from the hypothalamus and/or inhibit GnRH action on the anterior pituitary gland. We studied neuroendocrine patterns in wild Australian zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) sampled during a breeding period in Southern Australia, a non-breeding period in central Australia, and in juvenile males in the latter location. We asked whether patterns in immunoreactivity of three neuropeptides important for reproductive axis regulation, GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH, during periods of breeding and non-breeding reflect this flexibility. We found that the numbers and sizes of immunoreactive (-ir) GnRH-I cells did not vary between breeding stages and ages. Contrary to our predictions, irGnIH cell number and size, as well as the synthesis of GnIH mRNA were similar in breeding and non-breeding conditions. However, breeding males had more and larger irGnRH-II cells in the midbrain compared to non-breeding males. Hence, while changes in irGnIH cells are not associated with fluctuations in gonadotropin secretion or gonad volume, the regulation of irGnRH-II cells might represent a previously-unidentified mechanism by which reproductive flexibility can be achieved; namely via behavioral neurotransmitter actions of GnRH-II rather than through the typical sensory-CNS integration-GnRH-I route.

  15. In vitro fertility rate of 129 strain is improved by Buserelin (GnRH) administration prior to superovulation

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, K; Sztein, J M

    2012-01-01

    The 129 mice are well recognized for their low fertility and it is speculated that this lack of fertility may be due to oocyte condition. In this study we investigated superovulation regimens for 129S1/SvImJ mouse strain to improve the oocyte quality and fertility rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Female mice were divided into four groups based on hormone and timing of injection. Group 1 received pregnant mare serum gonatotropin (PMSG) and 48 hours later human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG); using the same dose, group 2 received hCG 52 hours post PMSG and group 3, 55 hours post PMSG. Group 4 received Buserelin (gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist [GnRH]) followed 24 hours later by PMSG and then hCG 55 hours post PMSG. IVF was performed using 129S1/SvImJ oocytes and sperm; C57BL/6J sperm with 129S1/SvImJ oocytes was used as fertility control. The IVF fertility rate was 1% (Groups 1 & 2), 17% (Group 3) and 55% (Group 4) for 129 oocytes fertilized with 129 sperm. For 129 oocytes fertilized with C57BL/6J sperm, the fertility rate was 5% (Group 1) 10% (Group 2) 40% (Group 3) and 59% (Group 4).-These results suggest that extending the interval time between PMSG and hCG and giving GnRH in addition to the standard PMSG and hCG treatment can improve IVF fertility rate of 129S1/SvImJ strain mice significantly. PMID:23097563

  16. Serum inhibin A and inhibin B in central precocious puberty before and during treatment with GnRH agonists.

    PubMed

    Sehested, A; Andersson, A M; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    2000-01-01

    Serum levels of the gonadal hormones inhibin A and inhibin B are undetectable or low in prepubertal girls, and rise during puberty. In girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is prematurely activated, if the girl is thereafter treated with GnRH agonists both gonadotropins and estradiol levels become suppressed. We therefore investigated serum levels of inhibin A and inhibin B in girls with CPP at diagnosis and during treatment in order to test the hypothesis that inhibin secretion would increase and decrease in parallel with the activation and suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Serum levels of inhibin A and inhibin B were significantly (p < 0.0005) elevated in 42 girls at diagnosis of CPP (inhibin A: 7 pg/ml (<7--139), inhibin B: 80 pg/ml (<20--294) (median, range)) compared to levels in age-matched healthy schoolgirls (inhibin A: all values <7 pg/ml, inhibin B: 21 pg/ml (<20--122) (median, range)), but were appropriate for Tanner stage. During treatment with GnRH agonist (intranasal buserelin and oral cyproterone acetate, treatment group 1, n = 23, or triptorelin depot injections, treatment group 2, n = 19) levels of both hormones fell significantly (p = 0.002). There was a significantly (p = 0.003) greater fall in inhibin B levels during treatment in group 2 compared to group 1, with inhibin B levels now lying below (group 2: <20 pg/ml (<20--68)) rather than within (group 1: 34.5 pg/ml (<20--93)) the age-appropriate range. It is concluded that levels of inhibin A and inhibin B are elevated and suppressed in concert with activation and suppression of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in girls with CPP, supporting the concept that ovarian inhibin secretion is dynamically regulated by gonadotropin stimulation.

  17. Short term suppression of follicular recruitment and spontaneous ovulation in the cat using levonorgestrel versus a GnRH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Pelican, K M; Brown, J L; Wildt, D E; Ottinger, M A; Howard, J G

    2005-11-01

    Suppression and subsequent rebound of ovarian activity using a progestin (levonorgestrel; Norplant) versus a GnRH antagonist (antide) was assessed in the domestic cat via fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite analyses. Following an initial dose-response trial, queens were assigned to one of four treatments: (1) antide, two 6 mg/kg injections 15 days apart (n = 8 cats); (2) levonorgestrel, six silastic rods (36 mg levonorgestrel/rod) implanted for 30 days (n = 8); (3) control injections (n = 5); and (4) control implants (n = 5). Steroid metabolites were quantified from daily fecal samples for 90 days before, 30 days during, and 90 days after treatment. Antide and levonorgestrel inhibited estrous cyclicity in contrast to continued cyclicity in controls. Cats already at estradiol baseline in antide (n = 7) and levonorgestrel (n = 4) groups remained inhibited during treatment. In females with elevated estradiol levels at treatment onset (Day 0), a normal estradiol surge was completed before concentrations declined to baseline (approximately Days 5-7) and remained suppressed throughout the remaining treatment period. Additionally, 56% of treatment animals exhibited at least one spontaneous ovulation during the pre-treatment period, but no female ovulated during treatment with levonorgestrel or antide. Antide-treated cats exhibited lower (P < 0.05) baseline estradiol concentrations during treatment compared to pre- and post-treatment. In contrast, levonorgestrel induced elevations in baseline estradiol following treatment compared to pre- and during treatment intervals. Control females showed no change (P > 0.05) in baseline estradiol throughout the study period. All levonorgestrel and antide cats returned to estrus after treatment withdrawal. Results demonstrate that: (1) both antide and levonorgestrel are effective for inducing short-term suppression of follicular recruitment and ovulation in the cat; (2) inhibition is reversible; and (3) GnRH antagonists and

  18. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  19. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  20. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  1. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  2. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  3. Molecular characterization and expression of three GnRH forms mRNA during gonad sex-change process, and effect of GnRHa on GTH subunits mRNA in the protandrous black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli).

    PubMed

    An, Kwang Wook; Nelson, Erik R; Habibi, Hamid R; Choi, Cheol Young

    2008-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in control of reproduction and gonadal maturation in teleost fish. To investigate the action GnRH in black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli), we examined the mRNA expression of GTH subunits (GTHalpha, FSHbeta, and LHbeta) in the pituitary as well as plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) level following treatment with a GnRH analog (GnRHa) in immature fish. The expression levels of GTH subunits mRNA and plasma E(2) level were increased after GnRHa injection. We were also able to identify three GnRH forms: salmon GnRH (sGnRH), seabream GnRH (sbGnRH) and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) by cDNA cloning in the ovary of the black porgy. Black porgy gonadal development is divided into seven stages, involving sex change from male to female (immature testis, mature testis, testicular portion of mostly testis, ovarian portion of mostly testis, testicular portion of mostly ovary, ovarian portion of mostly ovary, and mature ovary). In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of three GnRH molecular forms in the black porgy gonads at different stages of gonadal development by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The mRNA expressions of sGnRH, sbGnRH and cGnRH-II were found to be higher in mature testis and ovary, compared to gonads at different stages of maturity. The findings support the hypothesis that the three forms of GnRH play important roles in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and are likely involved also in gonadal development and sex change in black porgy.

  4. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  5. Induction of Gnrh mRNA expression by the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid and the saturated fatty acid palmitate in a GnRH-synthesizing neuronal cell model, mHypoA-GnRH/GFP.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dean Q; Ramos, Ernesto H; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-05-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons coordinate reproduction. However, whether GnRH neurons directly sense free fatty acids (FFAs) is unknown. We investigated the individual effects of the FFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), palmitate, palmitoleate, and oleate (100 μM each) on Gnrh mRNA expression in the mHypoA-GnRH/GFP neuronal cell model. We report that 2 h exposure to palmitate or DHA increases Gnrh transcription. Using the inhibitors AH7614, K252c, U0126, wortmannin, and LY294002, we demonstrate that the effect of DHA is mediated through GPR120 to downstream PKC/MAPK and PI3K signaling. Our results indicate that the effect of palmitate may depend on palmitoyl-coA synthesis and PI3K signaling. Finally, we demonstrate that both DHA and palmitate increase Gnrh enhancer-derived RNA levels. Overall, these studies provide evidence that GnRH neurons directly sense FFAs. This will advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying FFA sensing in the brain and provides insight into the links between nutrition and reproductive function. PMID:26923440

  6. Treatment of High Risk Sertoli–Leydig Cell Tumors of the Ovary Using a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Analog

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, Harsha Prasada; Nash, Ruth; Albanese, Assunta; Okoye, Bruce; Millar, Robert; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli–Leydig cell tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms. We report two unusual cases with bilateral SLCTs suggesting evidence of genetic predisposition and at high risk of recurrence. To reduce this risk, we exploited the use of GnRH analog to lower gondadotropin and potentially directly inhibit the tumors through expressed GnRH receptors. We used it as maintenance antitumor therapy for 2 years after completion of chemotherapy, to cover the period of risk for recurrence. Both patients remain in complete remission at >2 years after completing leuprorelin therapy. Of note, both patients carry DICER1 mutations, frequently found in pleuropulmonary blastoma syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: E16–E18. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23193086

  7. A regulatory loop between miR-132 and miR-125b involved in gonadotrope cells desensitization to GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Lannes, Jérôme; L’hôte, David; Fernandez-Vega, Ambra; Garrel, Ghislaine; Laverrière, Jean-Noël; Joëlle-Cohen-Tannoudji, J -C -T; Quérat, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The GnRH neurohormone is the main activator of the pituitary gonadotropins, LH and FSH. Here we investigated the contribution of microRNAs in mediating GnRH activation. We first established that miR-125b targets several actors of Gαq/11 signalling pathway, without altering Gαs pathway. We then showed that a Gαs-mediated, PKA-dependent phosphorylation of NSun2 methyltransferase leads to miR-125b methylation and thereby induces its down-regulation. We demonstrated that NSun2 mRNA is a target of miR-132 and that NSun2 may be inactivated by the PP1α phosphatase. Time-course analysis of GnRH treatment revealed an initial NSun2-dependent down-regulation of miR-125b with consecutive up-regulation of LH and FSH expression. Increase of miR-132 and of the catalytic subunit of PP1α then contributed to NSun2 inactivation and to the return of miR-125b to its steady-state level. The Gαq/11-dependent pathway was thus again silenced, provoking the down-regulation of LH, FSH and miR-132. Overall, this study reveals that a regulatory loop that tends to maintain or restore high and low levels of miR-125b and miR-132, respectively, is responsible for gonadotrope cells desensitization to sustained GnRH. A dysregulation of this loop might be responsible for the inverted dynamics of these two miRNAs reported in several neuronal and non-neuronal pathologies. PMID:27539363

  8. Serotonin acts through 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors to exert biphasic actions on GnRH neuron excitability in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan P; Roa, Juan; Herbison, Allan E; Han, Seong Kyu

    2014-02-01

    The effect of serotonin (5-HT) on the electrical excitability of GnRH neurons was examined using gramicidin perforated-patch electrophysiology in transgenic GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice. In diestrous female, the predominant effect of 5-HT was inhibition (70%) with 50% of these cells also exhibiting a late-onset excitation. Responses were dose dependent (EC(50) = 1.2μM) and persisted in the presence of amino acid receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin, indicating a predominant postsynaptic action of 5-HT. Studies in neonatal, juvenile, peripubertal, and adult mice revealed that 5-HT exerted less potent responses from GnRH neurons with advancing postnatal age in both sexes. In adult male mice, 5-HT exerted less potent hyperpolarizing responses with more excitations compared with females. In addition, adult proestrous female GnRH neurons exhibited reduced inhibition and a complete absence of biphasic hyperpolarization-excitation responses. Studies using 5-HT receptor antagonists demonstrated that the activation of 5-HT(1A) receptors mediated the inhibitory responses, whereas the excitation was mediated by the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. The 5-HT-mediated hyperpolarization involved both potassium channels and adenylate cyclase activation, whereas the 5-HT excitation was dependent on protein kinase C. The effects of exogenous 5-HT were replicated using fluoxetine, which enhances endogenous 5-HT levels. These studies demonstrate that 5-HT exerts a biphasic action on most GnRH neurons whereby a fast 5HT(1A)-mediated inhibition occurs alongside a slow 5-HT(2A) excitation. The balance of 5-HT-evoked inhibition vs excitation is developmentally regulated, sexually differentiated, and variable across the estrous cycle and may play a role in regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis throughout postnatal development.

  9. Day-night and reproductive cycle profiles of melatonin receptor, kiss, and gnrh expression in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Chai, Ke; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2013-07-01

    It is suggested that the MT1 melatonin receptor mediates the effects of melatonin on reproduction in rodents. Three melatonin receptor types, MT1, MT2, and Mel1c, have been identified in fish. To understand the potential roles of each type of melatonin receptor on reproduction, we explored the day-night and reproductive cycle profiles of melatonin receptor, kiss, and gnrh expression in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). cDNAs encoding melatonin receptors (MT1, MT2, and Mel1c) were first isolated from the brain of the orange-spotted grouper. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of MT1 and MT2 were higher in most of the brain areas and pituitary, while mel1c mRNA was mainly distributed in some peripheral tissues and the pituitary. The expression levels of MT1 were much higher than those of MT2 and mel1c in most of the brain regions, and the day-night expression variations of MT1 were counter to those of kiss2 and gnrh1. Reproductive cycle variations in MT1 daytime expression were different from those for kiss2 and gnrh1, and contrary to ovarian fecundity. Our results suggest that MT1 may modulate gnrh1 expression through kiss2, or may directly influence it. Together, these signal cascades may regulate the seasonal breeding of the orange-spotted grouper. As the day-length variations were consistent with the ovarian fecundity variation observed during the reproductive cycle, we infer that photoperiod affects ovarian development of the orange-spotted grouper through MT1.

  10. Alteration of gonadotrophin and steroid hormone release, and of ovarian function by a GnRH antagonist in gilts.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, K P; Schneider, F; Nürnberg, G

    2001-04-30

    This study examined the impact of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist Antarelix on LH, FSH, ovarian steroid hormone secretion, follicular development and pituitary response to LHRH in cycling gilts. Oestrous cycle of 24 Landrace gilts was synchronised with Regumate (for 15 days) followed by 800 IU PMSG 24h later. In experiment 1, Antarelix (n=6 gilts) was injected i.v. (0.5mg per injection) twice daily on four consecutive days from day 3 to 6 (day 0=last day of Regumate feeding). Control gilts (n=6) received saline. Blood was sampled daily, and every 20 min for 6h on days 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. In experiment 2, gilts (n=12) were assigned to the following treatments: Antarelix; Antarelix + 50 microg LHRH on day 4; Antarelix + 150 microg LHRH on day 4 or control, 50 microg LHRH only on day 4. Blood samples were collected daily and every 20 min for 6h on days 2, 4 and 6 to assess LH pulsatility. Ovarian follicular development was evaluated at slaughter. Antarelix suppressed (P<0.05) serum LH concentrations. The amount of LH released on days 4-9 (experiment 1) was 8.80 versus 36.54 ngml(-1) (S.E.M.=6.54). The pattern of FSH, and the preovulatory oestradiol rise was not affected by GnRH antagonist. Suppression of LH resulted in a failure (P<0.05) of postovulatory progesterone secretion. Exogenous LHRH (experiment 2) induced a preovulatory-like LH peak, however in Antarelix treated gilts the LH surge started earlier and its duration was less compared to controls (P<0.01). Furthermore, the amount of LH released from day 4 to 5 was lower (P<0.01) in Antarelix, Antarelix + 50 and Antarelix + 150 treated animals compared to controls. No differences were estimated in the number of LH pulses between days and treatment. Pulsatile FSH was not affected by treatment. Mean basal LH levels were lower (P<0.05) after antagonist treatment compared to controls. Antarelix blocked the preovulatory LH surge and ovulation, but the effects of Antarelix were reduced by exogenous

  11. Conjugates of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) with carminic acid: Synthesis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lev-Goldman, Vered; Mester, Brenda; Ben-Aroya, Nurit; Hanoch, Tamar; Rupp, Barbara; Stanoeva, Tsvetanka; Gescheidt, Georg; Seger, Rony; Koch, Yitzhak; Weiner, Lev; Fridkin, Mati

    2008-07-15

    We synthesized two carminic acid (7-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-9,10-dihydro-3,5,6,8-tetrahydroxy-1-methyl-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracene carboxlic acid, CA)-GnRH conjugates to be used as a model for potential photoactive targeted compounds. CA was conjugated to the epsilon-amino group of [d-Lys(6)]GnRH through its carboxylic moiety or via a beta-alanine spacer (beta-ala). Redox potentials of CA and its conjugates were determined. We used electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping techniques to study the light-stimulated redox properties of CA and its CA-GnRH conjugates. Upon irradiation, the compounds stimulated the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), that is, singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and oxygen radicals (O(2)(-*) and OH(*)). Both conjugates exhibited higher ROS production than the non-conjugated CA. The bioactivity properties of the CA conjugates and the parent peptide, [d-Lys(6)]GnRH, were tested on primary rat pituitary cells. We found that the conjugates preserved the bioactivity of GnRH as illustrated by their capability to induce ERK phosphorylation and LH release. PMID:18571926

  12. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  13. G protein-coupled receptors of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis: a case for Gnrh, LH, FSH, and GPR54 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Heitman, Laura H; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2008-11-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, important in reproduction and sex hormone-dependent diseases, is regulated by a number of G protein-coupled receptors. The recently "deorphanized" GPR54 receptor activated by the peptide metastin is thought to be the key regulator of the axis, mainly by releasing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. The latter decapeptide, through the activation of the GnRH receptor in the anterior pituitary, causes the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which subsequently activate their respective receptors on the gonadotrope cells. In this review we will discuss the small molecule agonists and antagonists that are currently being developed to intervene with the action of these four receptors. For GnRH receptors, 14 different chemical classes of non-peptidic antagonists have been reported, while for the LH receptor three classes of agonists have been described. Both agonists and antagonists have been introduced for the FSH receptor. Recently, the first non-peptidic agonist for GPR54 was reported.

  14. Regulation of Pituitary MT1 Melatonin Receptor Expression by Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Early Growth Response Factor-1 (Egr-1): In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K.; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G.; Johnston, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30–60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1−/− mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1−/− and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by

  15. Regulation of pituitary MT1 melatonin receptor expression by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30-60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1-/- mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1-/- and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by blockade of

  16. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  17. Reproductive outcome with GnRH inclusion at 24 or 36h following a prostaglandin F2α-based protocol for timed AI in ewes.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Muzante, J; Gil, J; Viñoles, C; Fierro, S

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study the reproductive performance obtained after a short-interval prostaglandin (PG) F2α-based protocol for timed artificial insemination (TAI) in sheep (Synchrovine®: two injections of PG 7 d apart), including a GnRH analogue at 24 or 36h after the second PG injection. The experiment involved 296 Corriedale ewes (206 multiparous and 90 nulliparous) grazing natural pastures during the breeding season (March-April; UTU "La Carolina", Flores Uruguay, 33° S-57° W). Ewes were assigned to three treatment groups: a) Synchrovine® (Control, n=101): two injections of D-Cloprostenol 75μg, 7 d apart, b) Synchrovine®+GnRH24 (n=98): Synchrovine® plus GnRH (busereline acetate 8.4μg) 24h after the second PG injection, and c) Synchrovine®+GnRH36 (n=97): Synchrovine® plus GnRH 36h after the second PG injection. All ewes were subjected to cervical TAI (Day 0), 44 to 47h after second PG injection, with fresh extended semen pool from six rams. Reproductive performance of ewes having ovulations and ovulation rate on Day 10, estrous cycle length in ewes that returned to estrus and non-return rate to estrus up to Day 22, fertility, prolificacy and fecundity on Day 70 were analyzed. Ewes having ovulations, ovulation rate, estrous cycle length and prolificacy did not differ between groups (P>0.05). However, non-return to estrus, fertility and fecundity was decreased in Synchrovine®+GnRH24 (P<0.05) and similar between Synchrovine® and Synchrovine®+GnRH36 (P>0.05). It was concluded that the reproductive performance obtained by Synchovine® TAI protocol was impaired by GnRH at 24h and not improved by GnRH administered at 36h after the second PG injection. PMID:23537480

  18. Anti Mullerian Hormone: Ovarian response indicator in young patients receiving Long GnRH Agonist Protocol for Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Zehra; Fatima, Syeda Sadia; Rehman, Rehana; Alam, Faiza; Arif, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anti Mullerian hormone (AMH) is gaining place as ovarian marker, chiefly in infertility assistance. We explored its correlation with oocytes retrieval after long GnRH agonist protocol for stimulation, in younger and older infertile population. Methods: This retrospective analysis compiled data of 166 females, receiving ICSI treatment from June 2014 to March 2015. Serum FSH, LH, Estadiol, AMH and antral follicle count were assessed. Outcomes were measured as good (5 to 19 oocytes) and bad responders. Results: Higher discriminatory power of AMH (AUROC; 0.771; p < 0.05) was seen in comparison to FSH (0.692; p < 0.05) and AFC (0.690; p < 0.01). AMH reported strongest association with oocyte retrieved (odds ratio of 15.06). Subgroup analysis reported 68.6 % risk of bad response with AMH levels of less than 1.37ng/ml. This association was observed more significant in young infertile patients <35 year of age (r=0.245; p=0.012) versus older population >35 year (r=0.169; p>0.05). Conclusion: Our study reaffirms that serum AMH correlates well with oocytes retrieved, particularly in females younger than 35 years. We suggest incorporation of AMH in baseline assessment of infertile females, who are falsely advised to postpone interventions based on their age and normal FSH levels. PMID:27648045

  19. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959

  20. Comparison Pregnancy Outcomes Between Minimal Stimulation Protocol and Conventional GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders

    PubMed Central

    Pilehvari, Shamim; ShahrokhTehraninejad, Ensieh; Hosseinrashidi, Batool; Keikhah, Fatemeh; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Aziminekoo, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pregnancy outcomes achieved by in vitro fertilization (IVF) between minimal stimulation and conventional antagonist protocols in poor ovarian responders (PORs). Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 77 PORs undergoing IVF were selected and divided into two groups. First group was the minimal stimulation group (n = 42) receiving 100 mg/day clomiphene citrate on day 2of the cycle for 5 day that was followed by150IU/day human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) on day 5 of the cycle. Second group was the conventional group (n = 35) receiving at least 300 IU/daygonadotropin on day 2 of the cycle. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol was applied for both groups according to flexible protocol. Number of retrieved oocytes and chemical pregnancy rate were the main outcomes. Results: There was no difference in number ofretrieved oocyte and pregnancy rate (2.79 ± 1.96 vs. 2.20 ± 1.71 and 5.6% vs. 4.1%; p > 0.05) between both groups. The gonadotropin dose used in the minimal stimulation group was lower than conventional group (1046 ± 596 vs. 2806 ± 583). Conclusion: Minimal stimulation protocol with lower gonadotropin used is likely to be considered as a patient- friendly and cost-effective substitute for PORs. PMID:27385972

  1. Anti Mullerian Hormone: Ovarian response indicator in young patients receiving Long GnRH Agonist Protocol for Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Zehra; Fatima, Syeda Sadia; Rehman, Rehana; Alam, Faiza; Arif, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anti Mullerian hormone (AMH) is gaining place as ovarian marker, chiefly in infertility assistance. We explored its correlation with oocytes retrieval after long GnRH agonist protocol for stimulation, in younger and older infertile population. Methods: This retrospective analysis compiled data of 166 females, receiving ICSI treatment from June 2014 to March 2015. Serum FSH, LH, Estadiol, AMH and antral follicle count were assessed. Outcomes were measured as good (5 to 19 oocytes) and bad responders. Results: Higher discriminatory power of AMH (AUROC; 0.771; p < 0.05) was seen in comparison to FSH (0.692; p < 0.05) and AFC (0.690; p < 0.01). AMH reported strongest association with oocyte retrieved (odds ratio of 15.06). Subgroup analysis reported 68.6 % risk of bad response with AMH levels of less than 1.37ng/ml. This association was observed more significant in young infertile patients <35 year of age (r=0.245; p=0.012) versus older population >35 year (r=0.169; p>0.05). Conclusion: Our study reaffirms that serum AMH correlates well with oocytes retrieved, particularly in females younger than 35 years. We suggest incorporation of AMH in baseline assessment of infertile females, who are falsely advised to postpone interventions based on their age and normal FSH levels.

  2. Effect of Administration of Single Dose GnRH Agonist in Luteal Phase on Outcome of ICSI-ET Cycles in Women with Previous History of IVF/ICSI Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zafardoust, Simin; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koroush; Mokhtar, Sara; Badehnoosh, Bita; Arjmand-Teymouri, Fatemeh; Fatemi, Farnaz; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background GnRH agonist administration in the luteal phase has been suggested to beneficially affect the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and embryo transfer (ET) cycles. This blind randomized controlled study evaluates the effect of GnRH (Gonadotropine Releasing Hormone) agonist administration on ICSI outcome in GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol in women with 2 or more previous IVF/ICSI-ET failures. Methods One hundred IVF failure women who underwent ICSI cycles and stimulated with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol, were included in the study. Women were randomly assigned to intervention (received a single dose injection of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg of Decapeptil) subcutaneously 6 days after oocyte retrieval) and control (did not receive GnRH agonist) groups. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were the primary outcome measures. Results Although the age of women, the number of embryos transferred in the current cycle and the quality of the transferred embryos were similar in the two groups, there was a significantly higher rate of implantation (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.041) and pregnancy (32.6% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.030, OR = 3.3, 95%CI, 1.08 to 10.4) in the intervention group. Conclusion Our results suggested that, in addition to routine luteal phase support using progesterone, administration of 0.1 mg of Decapeptil 6 days after oocyte retrieval in women with previous history of 2 or more IVF/ICSI failures led to a significant improvement in implantation and pregnancy rates after ICSI following ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonist protocol. PMID:25927026

  3. The forebrain-midbrain acts as functional endocrine signaling pathway of Kiss2/Gnrh1 system controlling the gonadotroph activity in the teleost fish European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Espigares, Felipe; Carrillo, Manuel; Gómez, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Some teleost species, including European sea bass, harbor two different kisspeptin coding genes: kiss1 and kiss2. Both genes are expressed in the brain, but their differential roles in the central control of fish reproduction are only beginning to be elucidated. In this study, we have examined the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of the highly active sea bass peptides Kiss1-15 and Kiss2-12 on spermiating male sea bass. Physiological saline, Kiss1-15, or Kiss2-12 was injected into the third ventricle. To establish the gene expression cascade involved in the action of kisspeptins, the expression of the two sea bass kisspeptin receptor genes (kiss1r and kiss2r) and the three sea bass Gnrh genes (gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3) were analyzed in the forebrain-midbrain and the hypothalamus. In addition, the protein levels of hypothalamic and pituitary Gnrh1 were measured. Blood samples were collected at different times after injection to analyze the effects of kisspeptins on the release of gonadotropins (Lh and Fsh) and androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone). The present results provide the first evidence that the effects of Kiss2 on central regulation of reproductive function involve the neuroendocrine areas of the forebrain-midbrain in teleost fish. The marked effect of Kiss2 on kiss2r and gnrh1 expression in the forebrain-midbrain and on Gnrh1 release suggest that this neuronal system is involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotroph activity. This hypothesis was confirmed by a surge of plasma Lh in response to Kiss2, which presumably has a strong stimulatory effect on testosterone release, and thus on sperm quality parameters.

  4. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  5. 99m tc labeled liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.T.; Klipper, R.W.; Timmons, J.H.; Rudolph, A.S.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method of preparing stable gamma-emitting radionuclide-labeled alkyleneamine oxime, the incubating being for a period of time sufficient to form labeled liposome-encapsulated protein.

  6. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  7. Pregnancy rates in angus cross beef cows bred at observed oestrus with or without second GnRH administration in fixed-time progesterone-supplemented Ovsynch and CO-Synch protocols.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, R; Hall, J B; Currin, J F; Inman, B; Rudolph, J S; Whittier, W D

    2010-06-01

    Crossbred cows (n = 1073) from five locations had oestrous cycles synchronized with 100 microg of GnRH IM and insertion of controlled internal drug release device (CIDR) on Day 0 followed by 25 mg of PGF(2alpha) IM and CIDR removal on Day 7. Kamar patches were placed on all cows at CIDR removal. Cows were observed three times daily for oestrus after PGF(2alpha) administration. In the Ovsynch-CIDR group, cows detected in oestrus (n = 193) within 48 h after PGF(2alpha) were inseminated using the AM-PM rule. Among these cows, 80 received and 113 did not receive a second GnRH at 48 h after PGF(2alpha). Cows (n = 345) not detected in oestrus received a second GnRH at 48 h after PGF(2alpha) on Day 9, and fixed-time AI 16 h after the GnRH on Day 10. In the CO-Synch-CIDR group, cows detected in oestrus (n = 224) within 48 h after PGF(2alpha) were inseminated using the AM-PM rule. Among these cows, 79 received and 145 did not receive a second GnRH at 64 h after PGF(2alpha). Cows (n = 311) not detected in oestrus received a second GnRH on Day 10 at the time of AI, 64 h after PGF(2alpha). The AI pregnancy rates were not different between the Ovsynch-CIDR and CO-Synch-CIDR groups (p = 0.48). There were no differences in the AI pregnancy rates for cows inseminated at a fixed time (p = 0.26) or at detected oestrus (p = 0.79) between the treatment groups. Among cows inseminated in oestrus, there were no differences in the AI pregnancy rates between cows that received or did not receive the second GnRH (p = 0.47). In conclusion, acceptable AI pregnancy rates can be achieved with or without inclusion of oestrus detection in the Ovsynch-CIDR and CO-Synch-CIDR protocols. Among cows detected in oestrus, cows that received a second GnRH yielded similar pregnancy rates when compared with cows that did not receive the second GnRH.

  8. Response to GnRH on day 6 of the estrous cycle is diminished as the percentage of Bos indicus breeding increases in Angus, Brangus, and Brahman x Angus heifers.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Germán E; Bridges, G Allen; de Araujo, Jennifer W; Shaw, Mary-Karen V; Schrick, F Neal; Thatcher, William W; Yelich, Joel V

    2008-01-15

    Angus (n=6), Brangus (5/8 Angus x 3/8 Brahman, n=6), and Brahman x Angus (3/8 Angus x 5/8 Brahman, n=6) heifers exhibiting estrous cycles at regular intervals were used to determine if the percentage of Bos indicus breeding influenced the secretory patterns of LH in response to a GnRH treatment on Day 6 of the estrous cycle. Heifers were pre-synchronized with a two-injection PGF(2 alpha) protocol (25 mg i.m. Day -14 and 12.5 mg i.m. Day -3 and -2 of experiment). Heifers received 100 microg GnRH i.m. on Day 6 of the subsequent estrous cycle. Blood samples were collected at -60, -30, and -1 min before GnRH and 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420, and 480 min after GnRH to determine concentrations of serum LH. Estradiol concentrations were determined at -60, -30, and -1 min before GnRH. On Day 6 and 8, ovaries were examined by ultrasonography to determine if ovulation occurred. On Day 13, heifers received 25 mg PGF(2 alpha) i.m. and blood samples were collected daily until either the expression of estrus or Day 20 for heifers not exhibiting estrus to determine progesterone concentrations. There was no effect (P>0.10) of breed on ovulation rate to GnRH as well as size of the largest follicle, mean estradiol, and mean corpus luteum volume at GnRH. Mean LH was greater (P<0.05) for Angus (7.0+/-0.8 ng/mL) compared to Brangus (4.6+/-0.8 ng/mL) and Brahman x Angus (2.9+/-0.8 ng/mL), which were similar (P>0.10). Mean LH peak-height was similar (P>0.10) for Brangus (13.9+/-3.4 ng/mL) compared to Angus (21.9+/-3.4 ng/mL) and Brahman x Angus (8.0+/-3.4 ng/mL), but was greater (P<0.05) for Angus compared to Brahman x Angus. Interval from GnRH to LH peak was similar (P>0.10) between breeds. As the percentage of Bos indicus breeding increased the amount of LH released in response to GnRH on Day 6 of the estrous cycle decreased. PMID:17212980

  9. Seabream GnRH immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of XX and XY Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus during early development.

    PubMed

    Swapna, I; Sudhakumari, C C; Sakai, F; Sreenivasulu, G; Kobayashi, T; Kagawa, H; Nagahama, Y; Senthilkumaran, B

    2008-08-01

    Seabream gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sbGnRH)-the chief preoptic area-hypothalamus (POA-H) form of GnRH in tilapia is involved in sexual maturation. In this study, we investigated the qualitative changes in ontogeny of sbGnRH immunoreactivity (ir-), between sexes to understand its impending role during sex differentiation. For this, the differences in immunocytochemical localization of sbGnRH in genetically male (XY) and female (XX) fish were studied from 1 day after hatching (dah), through the critical period of sex differentiation (7-21 dah) to 40 dah and mature Nile tilapia. Specific antisera against sbGnRH were used for immunolocalization. SbGnRH ir- neurons were observed in POA-H as early as 5 and 15 dah in XY fish and XX fish, respectively. Higher ir- was detected in the POA-H of XY tilapia compared with XX population till 10 dah. There was a qualitative drop in sbGnRH ir- neurons/cell bodies in POA-H around 20 dah till 30 dah in XY population compared with other durations. SbGnRH ir- cells were detected in pituitary of XX fish by 15 dah and in XY fish around 10 dah but seemed to drop down by 20 dah in XY whereas it continued to remain steady in XX fish. The sbGnRH ir- in XY fish showed a rise from 35 dah and thence till 40 dah. This study revealed subtle differences in POA-H and pituitary sbGnRH ir- during early development between genetic male and female fish with possible implications in sex differentiation.

  10. Medical Castration Using the Investigational Oral GnRH Antagonist TAK-385 (Relugolix): Phase 1 Study in Healthy Males

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongliang; Faessel, Hélène M.; Saad, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Context: TAK-385 is a highly selective, oral, nonpeptide GnRH antagonist being investigated as a possible prostate cancer treatment. Objective: The objectives were to evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TAK-385 on LH and testosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a three-part, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 dose-escalation study in 176 healthy male UK volunteers. Interventions: Part 1, single doses of TAK-385 (0 [placebo], 80, 120, 180, or 360 mg). Part 2, 14-day TAK-385 (0, 20, 40, 80, or 180 mg) daily. Part 3, 28-day TAK-385 (40 [with loading dose], 60, 80, or 160 mg) or placebo daily. Parts 2 and 3 included men aged 40–75 years. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures included plasma concentrations of TAK-385, LH, and testosterone. Results: Oral TAK-385 was readily absorbed, and steady state was reached in ≤14 days. Food reduced TAK-385 systemic exposure by 47–52%. Mean serum testosterone levels declined ≤6 hours after TAK-385 administration. Loading doses up to 360 mg on day 1 or 360 mg on day 1 followed by 240 mg on day 2 reduced the time to achieve castrate testosterone levels from ≥7 to <3 days. TAK-385 doses ≥80 mg/d achieved sustained medical castration and trough TAK-385 concentrations >4 ng/mL. After discontinuation of TAK-385 on day 28, testosterone levels normalized in most subjects in ≤ 28 days. Common adverse events included bradycardia, headache, and hot flush (all grade ≤2). Conclusions: Oral TAK-385 (40–180 mg/d) was well tolerated and effectively lowered testosterone in healthy men. Planned phase 2 doses in men with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer are 80 and 120 mg/d. PMID:26502357

  11. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  12. Comparative effects of GnRH and porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraceptive vaccines for controlling reproduction in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Curtis, P D; Pooler, R L; Richmond, M E; Miller, L A; Mattfeld, G F; Quimby, F W

    2002-01-01

    Fawning rates and mating behaviour were compared between white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) treated with GnRH and porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraceptive vaccines from 1997 to 2000. Female deer from a herd of 102 deer at Seneca Army Depot, near Romulus, New York, were treated with prime and booster injections of PZP (n = 22) or GnRH vaccine (n = 32), or remained untreated as controls (n = 34). During the summers after booster treatment, observed fawning rates for adult female deer were similar for both PZP-treated (0.10-0.11 fawns per female) and GnRH-treated (0.13-0.22 fawns per female) female deer, and were significantly lower (t = -8.93 and t = -9.73; P < or = 0.0005, respectively) than those observed for control female deer (1.22-1.38 fawns per female). During the second (0.36 fawns per female) and third summers (0.61 fawns per female) after the last booster injection, GnRH-treated female deer still produced significantly fewer fawns than did the controls (1.38 and 1.31 fawns per female, respectively). In one breeding season after treatment, five of 18 (28%) females vaccinated with PZP produced fawns, similar to the rate for GnRH-treated females (29%). In addition, females treated with GnRH had fewer oestrous cycles per female (0.06, P < or = 0.05) than did either control (0.22 cycles per female) or PZP-treated deer (0.36 cycles per female). Initial PZP treatment followed by a booster dose 5-7 months later reduced fawn production and prolonged the breeding season as females repeatedly returned to oestrus, similar to results reported in other studies.

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and distribution of feline GnRH receptor (GnRHR) and resequencing of canine GnRHR.

    PubMed

    Samoylov, Alexandre M; Napier, India D; Morrison, Nancy E; Martin, Douglas R; Cox, Nancy R; Samoylova, Tatiana I

    2015-01-15

    GnRH receptors play vital roles in mammalian reproduction via regulation of gonadotropin secretion, which is essential for gametogenesis and production of gonadal steroids. GnRH receptors for more than 20 mammalian species have been sequenced, including human, mouse, and dog. This study reports the molecular cloning and sequencing of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) cDNA from the pituitary gland of the domestic cat, an important species in biomedical research. Feline GnRHR cDNA is composed of 981 nucleotides and encodes a 327 amino acid protein. Unlike the majority of mammalian species sequenced so far, but similar to canine GnRHR, feline GnRHR protein lacks asparagine in position three of the extracellular domain of the protein. At the amino acid level, feline GnRHR exhibits 95.1% identity with canine, 93.8% with human, and 88.9% with mouse GnRHR. Comparative sequence analysis of GnRHRs for multiple mammalian species led to resequencing of canine GnRHR, which differed from that previously published by a single base change that translates to a different amino acid in position 193. This single base change was confirmed in dogs of multiple breeds. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of GnRHR messenger RNA in different tissues from four normal cats indicated the presence of amplicons of varying lengths, including full-length as well as shortened GnRHR amplicons, pointing to the existence of truncated GnRHR transcripts in the domestic cat. This study is the first insight into molecular composition and expression of feline GnRHR and promotes better understanding of receptor organization, and distribution in various tissues of this species.

  14. Delayed puberty in spontaneously hypertensive rats involves a primary ovarian failure independent of the hypothalamic KiSS-1/GPR54/GnRH system.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, L; Castellano, J M; Romero, M; Tena-Sempere, M; Gaytán, F; Aguilar, E

    2009-06-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats, extensively used as experimental models of essential human hypertension, display important alterations in the neuroendocrine reproductive axis, which manifest as markedly delayed puberty onset in females but whose basis remains largely unknown. We analyze herein in female SH rats: 1) possible alterations in the expression and function of KiSS-1/GPR54 and GnRH/GnRH-receptor systems, 2) the integrity of feedback mechanisms governing the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and 3) the control of ovarian function by gonadotropins. Our data demonstrate that, despite overtly delayed puberty, no significant decrease in hypothalamic KiSS-1, GPR54, or GnRH mRNA levels was detected in this strain. Likewise, in vivo gonadotropin responses to ovariectomy and systemic kisspeptin-10 or GnRH administration, as well as in vitro gonadotropin responses to GnRH, were fully preserved in SH rats. Moreover, circulating LH levels were grossly conserved during prepubertal maturation, whereas FSH levels were even enhanced from d 20 postpartum onwards. In striking contrast, ovarian weight and hormone (progesterone and testosterone) responses to human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) in vitro were profoundly decreased in SH rats, with impaired follicular development and delayed ovulation at puberty. Such reduced hormonal responses to human CG could not be attributed to changes in LH/CG or FSH-receptor mRNA expression but might be linked to blunted P450scc, 3beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase mRNA levels in ovaries from SH rats. In conclusion, our results indicate that the expression and function of KiSS-1/GPR54 and GnRH/GnRH-receptor systems is normal in SH rats, whereas ovarian development, steroidogenesis, and responsiveness to gonadotropins are strongly compromised.

  15. Corifollitropin alfa followed by hpHMG in GnRH agonist protocols. Two prospective feasibility studies in poor ovarian responders.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Corona, Roberta; Van De Vijver, Arne; Blockeel, Christophe; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Vloeberghs, Veerle; De Vos, Michel; Camus, Michel; Humaidan, Peter; Tournaye, Herman

    2015-01-01

    In two prospective uncontrolled feasibility trials, we examined the effect of corifollitropin alfa (CFA) followed by highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (hpHMG) in a short flare-up gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a long GnRH agonist protocol for women with poor ovarian response. Overall, 45 patients were treated with short flare-up and 47 patients with the long agonist protocol. All patients received a single dose of 150 μg CFA, followed by 300 IU hpHMG 7 days later, triggering with 10 000 IU hCG, CSI and day 3 embryo transfer. Ongoing pregnancy rates (OPRs) did not differ between the short 15.6% and the long 17% agonist protocol (p = 0.85). Among patients treated with the short flare-up protocol, OPRs were 20% for younger patients (<40 years old) and 12% in older women (≥40 years old), p = 0.68. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol younger women had an OPR of 26.7% versus 12.5% in older women, p = 0.23. Among patients treated with the short flare-up, live births rate were 15% and 4.3% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.32. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol, live births rate were 25% and 12.9% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.41. None of the patients reported any serious adverse event related to treatment. According to our results, CFA followed by hpHMG in a short flare-up or long GnRH agonist protocol appears to be a feasible option for poor ovarian responders. Large phase III trials are mandatory prior to introduction in clinical practice. PMID:26172925

  16. Modeling the Male Reproductive Endocrine Axis: Potential Role for a Delay Mechanism in the Inhibitory Action of Gonadal Steroids on GnRH Pulse Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ferasyi, Teuku R; Barrett, P Hugh R; Blache, Dominique; Martin, Graeme B

    2016-05-01

    We developed a compartmental model so we could test mechanistic concepts in the control of the male reproductive endocrine axis. Using SAAM II computer software and a bank of experimental data from male sheep, we began by modeling GnRH-LH feed-forward and LH-T feedback. A key assumption was that the primary control signal comes from a hypothetical neural network (the PULSAR) that emits a digital (pulsatile) signal of variable frequency that drives GnRH secretion in square wave-like pulses. This model produced endocrine profiles that matched experimental observations for the testis-intact animal and for changes in GnRH pulse frequency after castration and T replacement. In the second stage of the model development, we introduced a delay in the negative feedback caused by the aromatization of T to estradiol at the brain level, a concept supported by empirical observations. The simulations showed how changes in the process of aromatization could affect the response of the pulsatile signal to inhibition by steroid feedback. The sensitivity of the PULSAR to estradiol was a critical factor, but the most striking observation was the effect of time delays. With longer delays, there was a reduction in the rate of aromatization and therefore a decrease in local estradiol concentrations, and the outcome was multiple-pulse events in the secretion of GnRH/LH, reflecting experimental observations. In conclusion, our model successfully emulates the GnRH-LH-T-GnRH loop, accommodates a pivotal role for central aromatization in negative feedback, and suggests that time delays in negative feedback are an important aspect of the control of GnRH pulse frequency. PMID:26910309

  17. Effect of time of second GnRH vaccination on feed intake, carcass quality and fatty acid composition of male fatteners compared to entire boars and barrows.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Tatjana; Sauer, Franziska; Schmoll, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of time point of second vaccination with the GnRH analogon Improvac on growth performance, carcass quality and fatty acid composition of male fatteners compared to surgically castrated pigs and entire boars. The pigs (Piétrain-crossbreds) were divided into two vaccination groups with first GnRH vaccination at eleven weeks of age and second vaccination at 21 (group IA, n = 84) or 18 weeks (IB, n = 83) of age, one group with surgically castrated males (C, n = 90) and one with entire males (EM, n = 91). Body weight, feed conversion rate, carcass quality and fatty acid composition in back fat were estimated. Feed conversion rate until second vaccination was better (P < 0.05) in the vaccination groups (1:2.39) and in group EM (1:2.34) than in group C (1:2.55). Carcass weight did not differ between the groups. Vaccination groups had significantly (P < 0.01) leaner meat (IA: 58.9%, IB: 58.3%) and less back fat (IA: 14.6 mm, IB: 15.5 mm) than group C (56.5%, 17.1 mm). Fatty acid composition was shifted to polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in back fat in vaccination groups and EM compared to C. The time lag between second vaccination and slaughter had no influence on growth performance, feed intake and carcass quality. C18:3 and C20:2 were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in group IB than in IA, but PUFA did not differ between vaccination groups. GnRH vaccinated fatteners were economically superior to surgically castrated in this study. PMID:25080821

  18. Use of a GnRH vaccine, GonaCon, for prevention and treatment of adrenocortical disease (ACD) in domestic ferrets.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lowell A; Fagerstone, Kathleen A; Wagner, Robert A; Finkler, Mark

    2013-09-23

    Adrenocortical disease (ACD) is a common problem in surgically sterilized, middle-aged to old ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). The adrenal tissues of these ferrets develop hyperplasia, adenomas, or adenocarcinomas, which produce steroid hormones including estradiol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and androstenedione. Major clinical signs attributable to overproduction of these hormones are alopecia (hair loss) in both sexes and a swollen vulva in females. Pruritus, muscle atrophy, hind limb weakness, and sexual activity or aggression are also observed in both sexes. Males can develop prostatic cysts, prostatitis, and urethral obstruction. ACD is thought to be linked to continuous and increased LH secretion, due to lack of gonadal hormone feedback in neutered ferrets. This continuous elevated LH acts on adrenal cortex LH receptors, resulting in adrenal hyperplasia or adrenal tumor. This study investigated whether the immunocontraceptive vaccine GonaCon, a GnRH vaccine developed to reduce the fertility of wildlife species and the spread of disease, could prevent or delay onset of ACD and treat alopecia in ferrets with existing ACD. Results showed that GonaCon provided relief from ACD by causing production of antibodies to GnRH, probably suppressing production and/or release of LH. Treatment caused many ACD symptoms to disappear, allowing the ferrets to return to a normal life. The study also found that the probability of developing ACD was significantly reduced in ferrets treated with GonaCon when young (1-3 years old) compared to untreated control animals. GonaCon caused injection site reaction in some animals when administered as an intramuscular injection but caused few side effects when administered subcutaneously. Both intramuscular and subcutaneous vaccination resulted in similar levels of GnRH antibody titers. Subcutaneous vaccination with GonaCon is thus recommended to prevent the onset of ACD and as a possible treatment for ACD-signs in domestic ferrets. PMID

  19. Pelvic Ependymoma With Clinical Response to GnRH Analog Therapy: A Case Report With an Overview of Primary Extraneural Ependymomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fang; Song, Joon; Mikolaenko, Irina; Rosenblum, Marc; Shukla, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extraneural ependymomas are rare tumors that occur in sacrococcygeal, pelvic and extra pelvic regions. While sacrococcygeal extraneural ependymomas are equally distributed among males and females, pelvic and extra pelvic ependymomas have been exclusively reported in women, mainly of child bearing age. We present a case of extraneural, pelvic ependymoma that showed clinical response to GnRH therapy with its immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis, and an overview of primary extraneural ependymomas based on a review of all such cases published in English literature. PMID:26107559

  20. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  1. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  2. Is the GnRH Antagonist Protocol Effective at Preventing OHSS for Potentially High Responders Undergoing IVF/ICSI?

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weijie; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Yu; Yang, Dongzi; Wang, Wenjun; Zhang, Qingxue

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if the GnRH antagonist protocol is effective in preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in potentially high responders. Methods A total of 660 IVF-ET/ICSI cycles were retrospectively identified. The inclusion criterion was age ≤ 30 years. Cycles were divided into two groups: a GnRHa group and a GnRHant group. In the GnRHa group, the patients received one single injection of 1.0mg-1.3mg Triptorelin in previous mid-luteal phase. In the GnRHant group, a daily dose of 0.25 mg Cetrotide was initiated when a lead follicle obtained a mean diameter of 14 mm, continued up until the day of hCG administration. The duration of stimulation, total dose of Gn, implantation rate, pregnancy rate, and OHSS rate were compared. Results The duration of stimulation, E2 level on hCG day, numbers of oocytes retrieved, MII oocytes, and high-quality embryos in the GnRHa group were all significantly more than those in the GnRHant group. In the GnRHa group, 83.53% of cancelled fresh-transferred cycles were cancelled because of high risk of OHSS, which was significantly higher than that in the GnRHant group (43.55%, P<0.05). The incidence of OHSS in the GnRHa group was slightly higher than that in the GnRHant group. The implantation and clinical pregnancy rates in the GnRHa group were significantly higher than those in the GnRHant group (37.36% VS 19.25%, 62.78% VS 31.06%; P<0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that for potentially high responders, the GnRHant protocol can, to some extent, lower the cancellation and incidence rates of OHSS. The GnRHa protocol was superior to the GnRHant protocol in terms of implantation and clinical pregnancy rates. PMID:26468951

  3. Control of reproduction and sex related behaviour in exotic wild carnivores with the GnRH analogue deslorelin: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, H J; Asa, C S; Calle, P P; Long, J A; Bauman, K; DeMatteo, K; Jöchle, W; Trigg, T E; Human, A

    2001-01-01

    The GnRH analogue deslorelin, in long-acting implants, was used in an attempt to temporarily control reproduction or aggression in wild carnivores in southern Africa and the USA. In the southern African study, 6 mg deslorelin was administered to cheetahs (eight females, four males), one female leopard and wild dogs (six females, one male) housed in groups, and 12 mg deslorelin was administered to two lionesses. None of the animals became pregnant after deslorelin administration apart from one wild dog that was mated at the initial treatment-induced oestrus. Two wild dogs and one lioness came into oestrus 12 and 18 months after deslorelin administration, respectively, thus demonstrating that the anti-fertility effects of deslorelin are reversible. Two lionesses and four cheetahs underwent oestrus without allowing mating 2-14 days after treatment. Simultaneous administration of progestins to three bitches and one lioness did not suppress oestrus. Male cheetahs had no spermatozoa on day 82 after treatment and did not impregnate two untreated females. Of three untreated female wild dogs housed with treated males, only the first female to enter oestrus (21 days after deslorelin administration) became pregnant. One month after treatment, plasma testosterone concentrations of male dogs were at basal values. In the USA study, three male sea otters that had been treated with 6 mg deslorelin ceased antagonistic behaviour and blood testosterone concentrations and size of the testes were still sharply reduced 24 months after treatment. Male red (n = 7) and grey (n = 5) wolves received 6 mg deslorelin in December 1998 but no effects on seasonal spermatogenesis and behaviour were observed. In a black-footed cat, sperm production, libido and aggressiveness decreased in response to treatment with 3 mg deslorelin and penile spines were not observed within 3 months after treatment, but were observed again 4-6 months later. Treatment of female red (n = 5) and grey (n = 5) wolves with

  4. Msx1 Homeodomain Protein Represses the αGSU and GnRH Receptor Genes During Gonadotrope Development

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huimin; Cherrington, Brian D.; Meadows, Jason D.; Witham, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple homeodomain transcription factors are crucial for pituitary organogenesis and cellular differentiation. A homeodomain repressor, Msx1, is expressed from the ventral aspect of the developing anterior pituitary and implicated in gonadotrope differentiation. Here, we find that Msx1 represses transcription of lineage-specific pituitary genes such as the common α-glycoprotein subunit (αGSU) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) promoters in the mouse gonadotrope-derived cell lines, αT3-1 and LβT2. Repression of the mouse GnRHR promoter by Msx1 is mediated through a consensus-binding motif in the downstream activin regulatory element (DARE). Truncation and mutation analyses of the human αGSU promoter map Msx1 repression to a site at −114, located at the junctional regulatory element (JRE). Dlx activators are closely related to the Msx repressors, acting through the same elements, and Dlx3 and Dlx2 act as transcriptional activators for GnRHR and αGSU, respectively. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Msx1 in αT3-1 cells increases endogenous αGSU and GnRHR mRNA expression. Msx1 gene expression reaches its maximal expression at the rostral edge at e13.5. The subsequent decline in Msx1 expression specifically coincides with the onset of expression of both αGSU and GnRHR. The expression levels of both αGSU and GnRHR in Msx1-null mice at e18.5 are higher compared with wild type, further confirming a role for Msx1 in the repression of αGSU and GnRHR. In summary, Msx1 functions as a negative regulator early in pituitary development by repressing the gonadotrope-specific αGSU and GnRHR genes, but a temporal decline in Msx1 expression alleviates this repression allowing induction of GnRHR and αGSU, thus serving to time the onset of gonadotrope-specific gene program. PMID:23371388

  5. Serotonin stimulates GnRH secretion through the c-Src-PLC gamma1 pathway in GT1-7 hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Soo; Yumkham, Sanatombi; Choi, Jang Hyun; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-09-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To date, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of serotonin in hormone secretion have remained largely unclear. In this study, we report that serotonin activates phospholipase C (PLC) gamma1 in an Src-dependent manner in hypothalamic GT1-7 cells, and that pretreatment with either 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazole [3, 4-d] pyrimidine, an Src-kinase inhibitor, or U73122, a PLC inhibitor, attenuates the serotonin-induced increase in calcium levels. Also, PLC gamma1 binds to c-Src through the Src-homology (SH) 223 domain upon serotonin treatment. Moreover, calcium increase is alleviated in the cells transientlyexpressing SH223 domain-deleted PLC gamma1 or lipase inactive mutant PLC gamma1, as compared with cells transfected with wild-type PLC gamma1. Furthermore, the inhibition of the activities of either PLC or Src results in a significant diminution of the serotonin-induced release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In addition, the results of our small-interfering RNA experiment confirm that endogenous PLC gamma1 is a prerequisite for serotonin-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that serotonin stimulates the release of GnRH through the Src-PLC gamma1 pathway, via the modulation of intracellular calcium levels.

  6. Integrated Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology Model-Based Analyses to Guide GnRH Receptor Modulator Development for Management of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, M M; Bennetts, M; van der Graaf, P H; Martin, S W

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecological condition resulting from proliferation of endometrial-like tissue outside the endometrial cavity. Estrogen suppression therapies, mediated through gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) modulation, decrease endometriotic implants and diminish associated pain albeit at the expense of bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Our goal was to provide model-based guidance for GnRH-modulating clinical programs intended for endometriosis management. This included developing an estrogen suppression target expected to provide symptomatic relief with minimal BMD loss and to evaluate end points and study durations supportive of efficient development decisions. An existing multiscale model of calcium and bone was adapted to include systematic estrogen pharmacologic effects to describe estrogen concentration-related effects on BMD. A logistic regression fit to patient-level data from three clinical GnRH agonist (nafarelin) studies described the relationship of estrogen with endometrial-related pain. Targeting estradiol between 20 and 40 pg/ml was predicted to provide efficacious endometrial pain response while minimizing BMD effects. PMID:23887363

  7. Appliance energy labeling takes effect

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Consumers buying household appliances will be helped by energy-efficiency labels and minimum efficiency standards required for refrigerators and refrigerator/freezers, freezers, dishwashers, water heaters, clothes washers, room air conditioners, and furnaces. The ENERGYGUIDE labels must be displayed in the store and in catalogs. Two voluntary efficiency programs were combined in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) requiring labels by 1980. Shoppers may compare the efficiencies of appliances and compute the actual cost differential over the lifetime of the equipment. Manufacturers have responded with more-efficient models, but the impact of efficient appliances on energy consumption will be small. A sample label with the required information is illustrated. (DCK)

  8. Synchronization of oestrus and ovulation by short time combined FGA, PGF(2α), GnRH, eCG treatments for natural service or AI fixed-time.

    PubMed

    Martemucci, G; D'Alessandro, A G

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in ewes in order to develop an oestrus-ovulation short time synchronization protocol based on combined FGA, PGF(2α), GnRH, eCG treatments, for use in dairy sheep before natural service (Experiment 1) or for fixed-time artificial insemination (Experiment 2), during the breeding season. In Experiment 1 seventy-five non-lactating dairy ewes were subdivided into 5 treatment groups (N=15): (1) Group Fe - control, which received FGA vaginal sponges (14 days)+eCG (Day 14); (2) Group FPe, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5); (3) Group PFe, PGF(2α) (Day 0)+FGA (5 days)+eCG (Day 5); (4) Group PFG, PGF(2α) (Day 0)+FGA (5 days)+GnRH (30h after sponge removal, s.r.); (5) Group GPe, GnRH (Day 0)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5). Ewes were checked for oestrus and hand-mated. Time of ovulation was recorded by laparoscopy for 10 animals from each treatment. The percentages of female in oestrus and the interval to oestrus (h after treatment), fertility and prolificacy rate were recorded. There were no treatment differences in the percentage of females in oestrus. The interval to oestrus was earlier in Fe Group and delayed in FPe Group (P<0.01). Ovulation time was earlier in GPe Group compared to FPe Group (P<0.05). Fertility rates were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PFe and the FPeG Groups compared with the PFG Group. No significant differences were observed in prolificacy among the treatments. In Experiment 2, sixty dry ewes were subdivided (N=20) into the following three experimental treatment groups: (1) Group FP, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5); (2) Group FPG, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+GnRH (30hs.r.); (3) Group FPeG, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5)+GnRH (30hs.r.). These were further subdivided into two groups (N=10) corresponding to 52 and 60hs.r. fixed-time insemination. Laparoscopic intrauterine insemination was performed with frozen semen (80×10(6)spermatozoa/dose) and ovulation time was recorded in a subgroup (N

  9. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  10. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... the Agency (76 FR 75809). FSIS also proposed to combine the regulations that provide for the approval... preamble (76 FR 75814), FSIS wrote: . . . statements on labels that are defined in FSIS's regulations or... ``Product Labeling: Definition of the Term ``Natural'' and related materials (71 FR 70503, Dec. 5, 2006)...

  11. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  12. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  13. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... poultry products will take effect January 1, 2012 (75 FR 82148, Dec. 29, 2010). These mandatory features... limited types of labels (e.g., labels for raw, single ingredient meat and poultry products) (48 FR 11410... Agency. On March 25, 1992, FSIS published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) (57 FR...

  14. Growth Hormone Supplementation in the Luteal Phase Before Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare Protocol for In Vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Caitlin; Seethram, Ken; Roberts, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Objectif : L’hormone de croissance (GH) agit pendant le développement folliculaire tant précoce que tardif pour stimuler la prolifération et la différenciation des cellules de la granulosa, ainsi que pour accroître la production d’estradiol par les ovaires chez l’animal et l’homme. Les chercheurs se sont donc penchés sur le recours à la supplémentation en GH pour améliorer les issues chez les femmes qui font appel à la fécondation in vitro, tout en portant une attention particulière aux femmes qui présentent une réserve ovarienne amoindrie. De récentes méta-analyses indiquent que la supplémentation en GH peut être bénéfique pour les femmes qui réagissent mal à la FIV. Dans la plupart des études, on administre de la GH de façon concomitante avec des gonadotrophines pendant la phase folliculaire; cette façon de faire pourrait ne pas être optimale, puisque le recrutement folliculaire débute au cours de la phase lutéale qui précède. Nous avons donc souhaité examiner l’effet de la supplémentation en GH pendant la phase lutéale, avant la tenue d’une stimulation ovarienne contrôlée (SOC) au moyen d’un « protocole de poussée » faisant appel à une microdose d’agoniste de la GnRH (MDF), chez des femmes qui font l’objet d’une fécondation in vitro. Méthodes : Nous avons mené une étude cas-témoins appariés rétrospective se penchant sur des patientes qui ont fait l’objet d’un traitement au sein d’un établissement privé de FIV entre juin 2012 et juillet 2013. Les patientes identifiées comme réagissant mal à la SOC se sont vu offrir un traitement adjuvant à la GH dans le cadre de leur schéma thérapeutique de stimulation ovarienne. Les patientes du groupe expérimental ont choisi de recevoir de la GH, à raison de 3,33 mg par jour sous forme d’injection sous-cutanée pendant 14 jours, avant le début de la SOC. Toutes les patientes ont fait l’objet d’un protocole de stimulation MDF faisant

  15. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  16. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Standards and Labels: The Facts Labeling and Marketing Information [ Top of Page ] OVEN PREPARED: Product is fully cooked and ready to eat. [ Top of Page ] YOUNG TURKEY: Turkeys of either sex that are less than 8 months of age according to present regulations. [ Top of Page ] Last ...

  17. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  18. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  19. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  20. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a...

  1. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  2. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  3. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  4. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  5. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels...

  6. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  7. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  8. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  9. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... labeling of such final labeling has been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory... Secretary upon request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall permit submission for approval of only sketch... Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department...

  10. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  11. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  12. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  13. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  14. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  15. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  16. Motility, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content of rabbit spermatozoa stored in extender supplemented with GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gogol, P; Trzcińska, M; Bryła, M

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the effect of GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide on the quality of rabbit spermatozoa stored at 17°C for 3 days. Semen from 5 bucks (13 ejaculates) was used in the experiment. Ejaculates were divided and diluted at a 1:10 ratio with rabbit semen extender Galap (IMV, France) (Control) or with Galap extender supplemented with GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide (50 μg/ml) and stored for 3 days. Sperm motility parameters, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP content were as- sessed on each day of the experiment. Motility analysis was performed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. The following sperm motility parameters were recorded: total motile spermatozoa, progressively motile spermatozoa, curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, average path velocity, linearity, straightness and amplitude of lateral head displacement. MMP was evaluated using JC-1 fluorescent dye. ATP content was assessed using a bioluminescence method. The addition of GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide to Galap extender did not affect any of the quality parameters studied. However, in both groups (Control and GnRH), significant changes in motility parameters (except straight-line velocity) and proportion of spermatozoa showing high MMP and ATP content were observed throughout 3 days of storage. PMID:25638968

  17. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  18. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  19. Gene expression analysis of bovine oocytes at optimal coasting time combined with GnRH antagonist during the no-FSH period.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Rémi; Vigneault, Christian; Blondin, Patrick; Sirard, Marc-André

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian stimulation with FSH combined with an appropriate period of FSH withdrawal (coasting) before ovum pick-up now appears to be a successful way to obtain oocytes with high developmental competence in bovine. Recent results showed that extending follicular growth by only 24 hours has a detrimental effect on oocyte quality as shown by the reduced blastocyst formation rate. Although these treatments are initiated during the luteal phase with low LH level, the small LH pulsatility present at that time could potentially impact follicular development as well as oocyte quality. In this study, a GnRH antagonist (Cetrotide) was used to suppress LH secretion during follicular differentiation to get a better insight into the physiological importance of the LH support during that period. Oocytes were collected by ovum pick-up, and quality was assessed by measuring the blastocyst formation rate obtained after IVM-IVF. The oocyte transcriptome from GnRH antagonist-treated animals was also compared with that from a control group (coasting duration of 68 hours) to detect possible alterations at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level. The oocyte quality was not statistically affected by the treatment as shown by the blastocyst formation rate obtained. However, microarray analysis showed that a total of 226 genes had a significant difference (fold change > 2; P < 0.05) at the mRNA level, with the majority being in overabundance in the treated group. Many genes related to RNA posttranscriptional modifications presented different abundance at the mRNA level significant differences in the control group (68 hours), whereas translation function appeared to be affected, with many genes related to structural constituents of the ribosome presenting a overabundance in the GnRH antagonist-treated group. Specific mRNAs with crucial roles in chromosome segregation control also showed significant difference at the mRNA level after Cetrotide treatment. The results presented here indicated that the

  20. Haploinsufficiency of Dmxl2, Encoding a Synaptic Protein, Causes Infertility Associated with a Loss of GnRH Neurons in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier, Sandrine; Csaba, Zsolt; Genin, Emmanuelle; Meyer, Vincent; Leka, Sofia; Dupont, Joelle; Charles, Perrine; Chevenne, Didier; Carel, Jean-Claude; Léger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the genetic defects causing gonadotropic deficiency has made a major contribution to elucidation of the fundamental role of Kisspeptins and Neurokinin B in puberty onset and reproduction. The absence of puberty may also reveal neurodevelopmental disorders caused by molecular defects in various cellular pathways. Investigations of these neurodevelopmental disorders may provide information about the neuronal processes controlling puberty onset and reproductive capacity. We describe here a new syndrome observed in three brothers, which involves gonadotropic axis deficiency, central hypothyroidism, peripheral demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy, mental retardation, and profound hypoglycemia, progressing to nonautoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. High-throughput sequencing revealed a homozygous in-frame deletion of 15 nucleotides in DMXL2 in all three affected patients. This homozygous deletion was associated with lower DMXL2 mRNA levels in the blood lymphocytes of the patients. DMXL2 encodes the synaptic protein rabconnectin-3α, which has been identified as a putative scaffold protein for Rab3-GAP and Rab3-GEP, two regulators of the GTPase Rab3a. We found that rabconnectin-3α was expressed in exocytosis vesicles in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) axonal extremities in the median eminence of the hypothalamus. It was also specifically expressed in cells expressing luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) within the pituitary. The conditional heterozygous deletion of Dmxl2 from mouse neurons delayed puberty and resulted in very low fertility. This reproductive phenotype was associated with a lower number of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus of adult mice. Finally, Dmxl2 knockdown in an insulin-secreting cell line showed that rabconnectin-3α controlled the constitutive and glucose-induced secretion of insulin. In conclusion, this study shows that low levels of DMXL2 expression cause a complex neurological

  1. Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript Is a Potent Stimulator of GnRH and Kisspeptin Cells and May Contribute to Negative Energy Balance-induced Reproductive Inhibition in Females

    PubMed Central

    True, Cadence; Verma, Saurabh; Grove, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide implicated in both metabolic and reproductive regulation, raising the possibility that CART plays a role in reproductive inhibition during negative metabolic conditions. The current study characterized CART's regulatory influence on GnRH and kisspeptin (Kiss1) cells and determined the sensitivity of different CART populations to negative energy balance. CART fibers made close appositions to 60% of GnRH cells, with the majority of the fibers (>80%) originating from the arcuate nucleus (ARH) CART/pro-opiomelanocortin population. Electrophysiological recordings in GnRH-green fluorescent protein rats demonstrated that CART postsynaptically depolarizes GnRH cells. CART fibers from the ARH were also observed in close contact with Kiss1 cells in the ARH and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV). Recordings in Kiss1-GFP mice demonstrated CART also postsynaptically depolarizes ARH Kiss1 cells, suggesting CART may act directly and indirectly, via Kiss1 populations, to stimulate GnRH neurons. CART protein and mRNA levels were analyzed in 2 models of negative energy balance: caloric restriction (CR) and lactation. Both CART mRNA levels and the number of CART-immunoreactive cells were suppressed in the ARH during CR but not during lactation. AVPV CART mRNA was suppressed during CR, but not during lactation when there was a dramatic increase in CART-immunoreactive cells. These data suggest differing regulatory signals of CART between the models. In conclusion, both morphological and electrophysiological methods identify CART as a novel and potent stimulator of Kiss1 and GnRH neurons and suppression of CART expression during negative metabolic conditions could contribute to inhibition of the reproductive axis. PMID:23736294

  2. Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on testicular blood flow measured by color doppler ultrasonography in male Shiba goats.

    PubMed

    Samir, Haney; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Ahmed, Eman; Karen, Aly; Nagaoka, Kentaro; El Sayed, Mohamed; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-05-01

    Although color Doppler ultrasonography has been used to evaluate testicular blood flow in many species, very little has been done in goat. Eight male Shiba goats were exposed to a single intramuscular injection of either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH group; 1 µg/kg BW) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG group; 25 IU/kg BW). Plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and inhibin (INH) were measured just before (0 hr) and at different intervals post injection by radioimmunoassay. Testis volume (TV) and Doppler indices, such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of the supratesticular artery, were measured by B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. The results indicated an increase in testicular blood flow in both groups, as RI and PI decreased significantly (P<0.05), but this increase was significant higher and earlier in hCG group (1 hr) than in the GnRH group (2 hr). A high correlation was found for RI and PI with both T (RI, r= -0.862; PI, r= -0.707) and INH in the GnRH group (RI, r=0.661; PI, r=0.701). However, a significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between E2 and both RI (r= -0.610) and PI (r= -0.763) in hCG group. In addition, TV significantly increased and was highly correlated with RI in both groups (GnRH, r= -0.718; hCG, r= -0.779). In conclusion, hCG and GnRH may improve testicular blood flow and TV in Shiba goats.

  3. Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on testicular blood flow measured by color doppler ultrasonography in male Shiba goats

    PubMed Central

    SAMIR, Haney; SASAKI, Kazuaki; AHMED, Eman; KAREN, Aly; NAGAOKA, Kentaro; EL SAYED, Mohamed; TAYA, Kazuyoshi; WATANABE, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Although color Doppler ultrasonography has been used to evaluate testicular blood flow in many species, very little has been done in goat. Eight male Shiba goats were exposed to a single intramuscular injection of either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH group; 1 µg/kg BW) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG group; 25 IU/kg BW). Plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and inhibin (INH) were measured just before (0 hr) and at different intervals post injection by radioimmunoassay. Testis volume (TV) and Doppler indices, such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of the supratesticular artery, were measured by B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. The results indicated an increase in testicular blood flow in both groups, as RI and PI decreased significantly (P<0.05), but this increase was significant higher and earlier in hCG group (1 hr) than in the GnRH group (2 hr). A high correlation was found for RI and PI with both T (RI, r= −0.862; PI, r= −0.707) and INH in the GnRH group (RI, r=0.661; PI, r=0.701). However, a significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between E2 and both RI (r= −0.610) and PI (r= −0.763) in hCG group. In addition, TV significantly increased and was highly correlated with RI in both groups (GnRH, r= −0.718; hCG, r= −0.779). In conclusion, hCG and GnRH may improve testicular blood flow and TV in Shiba goats. PMID:25715956

  4. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. 1302.04 Section 1302.04 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING... and labeling. The symbol shall be prominently located on the label or the labeling of the...

  5. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. 1302.04 Section 1302.04 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING... and labeling. The symbol shall be prominently located on the label or the labeling of the...

  6. Evidence that neuropeptide Y (NPY) released into the hypophysial-portal circulation participates in priming gonadotropes to the effects of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Sutton, S W; Toyama, T T; Otto, S; Plotsky, P M

    1988-08-01

    NPY exhibits modulatory activity at both the adenohypophysial and the central levels of the rat hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In the present studies, the secretion and physiological activity of endogenous irNPY was examined. We have shown that: (i) irNPY is secreted into the hypophysial-portal circulation, (ii) hypophysial-portal concentration profiles of irNPY and irGnRH are parallel throughout the rat estrous cycle, and (iii) removal of endogenous NPY via immunoneutralization inhibits the steroid-induced LH surge in ovariectomized rats. From these observations, we speculate that NPY secreted into the hypophysial-portal circulation participates in priming of gonadotropes to the actions of GnRH on the afternoon of the preovulatory surge.

  7. Blockade of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis with a GnRH antagonist in the neonatal marmoset monkey: changes in Leydig cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Prince, F P; Mann, D R; Fraser, H M

    1998-12-01

    Little is known of the cell biology of Leydig cells during the neonatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis. The current study examined the effect of blockade of the HPT axis with a GnRH antagonist (antide) on the neonatal population of Leydig cells in the new world primate, the common marmoset. Three sets of twins, age 7 weeks, were studied: in each pair one twin was used as a control, while the other received treatment with GnRH antagonist from the day of birth to suppress pituitary gonadotrophin secretion. Leydig cells of treated animals were dramatically different from those of controls. The cells were atrophic and exhibited very irregular nuclei. The organelles involved in steroid synthesis were reduced to the extent to being barely evident. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was greatly diminished in quantity and distribution. The usual form of the SER (anastomosing tubules) was not evident, but, instead, the SER was relatively unbranched. Peroxisomes, organelles involved in transfer of cholesterol to the mitochondria, were greatly reduced in number. Mitochondria were relatively sparse and exhibited a non-typical morphology, as tubular elements of the cristae were rarely evident. Thus, the central apparatus in steroid production, the SER, mitochondria and peroxisomes, was essentially shut down in the GnRH-antagonist-treated animals. Storage of cholesterol, the precursor of steroid biosynthesis, was also not in evidence, as lipid droplets were extremely rare. Two prominent features of control in neonatal marmoset Leydig cells, the membranofibrillar inclusion (MFI) and basal laminae, remain prominent in the Leydig cells of treated animals. Evidence of apoptosis was not observed. These results provide strong support that the gonadotrophic hormones are the primary regulator of neonatal Leydig cell development in primates, and also suggest cell regression, rather than apoptosis, being the mechanism of this inhibition.

  8. Dopamine agonists, anti-progestins, anti-androgens, long-term-release GnRH agonists and anti-estrogens in canine reproduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C

    2006-10-01

    Over the last 10 years, new drugs have been applied to canine reproduction, widening the spectrum of therapeutic possibilities for diseases that were previously surgically treated, and facilitating better control of the estrous cycle and fertility. Some are not approved for use in dogs; their use is experimental and further clinical trials are necessary. Dopamine agonists such as cabergoline, bromocriptine or metergoline are ergoderivative alkaloids that exert an anti-prolactinergic effect via stimulation of D2 pituitary receptors or inhibition of central serotoninergic ones. Their main indication is suppression of lactation. Anti-prolactinergic compounds have also been successfully used for pregnancy termination and shortening of interestrous intervals. Anti-progestins, (e.g. mifepristone and aglepristone) are synthetic steroids that bind with high affinity to progesterone (P4) receptors, preventing P4 from exerting its biological effects. Anti-progestins have been indicated in P4-dependent conditions, such as pregnancy termination, induction of parturition and the medical treatment of pyometra. Several groups of drugs have been described to have anti-androgenic properties through different mechanisms of action: progestins, receptor binding anti-androgens (e.g. flutamide), competitive enzyme inhibitors (e.g. finasteride), aromatase inhibitors, and GnRH agonists. Their main application is medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Long-term release formulations of GnRH agonists (e.g. leuprolide or deslorelin acetate) postponed puberty and reversibly suppressed reproductive function in male and female dogs for periods exceeding 1 year. Anti-estrogens (e.g. clomiphene and tamoxifen citrate) are synthetic non-steroidal type I anti-estrogenic compounds that competitively block estrogen receptors with a combined antagonist-agonistic effect. In dogs, their action is more agonistic than antagonistic. PMID:16542717

  9. Pharmacologic profiles of investigational kisspeptin/metastin analogues, TAK-448 and TAK-683, in adult male rats in comparison to the GnRH analogue leuprolide.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hisanori; Masaki, Tsuneo; Akinaga, Yumiko; Kiba, Atsushi; Takatsu, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Daisuke; Tanaka, Akira; Ban, Junko; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Kumano, Satoshi; Suzuki, Atsuko; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-07-15

    Kisspeptin/metastin, a hypothalamic peptide, plays a pivotal role in controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, and we have shown that continuous subcutaneous administration of kisspeptin analogues suppresses plasma testosterone in male rats. This study examined pharmacologic profiles of investigational kisspeptin analogues, TAK-448 and TAK-683, in male rats. Both analogues showed high receptor-binding affinity and potent and full agonistic activity for rat KISS1R, which were comparable to natural peptide Kp-10. A daily subcutaneous injection of TAK-448 and TAK-683 (0.008-8μmol/kg) for consecutive 7 days initially induced an increase in plasma luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels; however, after day 7, plasma hormone levels and genital organ weights were reduced. Continuous subcutaneous administrations of TAK-448 (≥10pmol/h, ca. 0.7nmol/kg/day) and TAK-683 (≥30pmol/h, ca. 2.1nmol/kg/day) induced a transient increase in plasma testosterone, followed by abrupt reduction of plasma testosterone to castrate levels within 3-7 days. This profound testosterone-lowering effect was sustained throughout 4-week dosing periods. At those dose levels, the weights of the prostate and seminal vesicles were reduced to castrate levels. These suppressive effects of kisspeptin analogues were more rapid and profound than those induced by the GnRH agonist analogue leuprolide treatment. In addition, TAK-683 reduced plasma prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the JDCaP androgen-dependent prostate cancer rat model. Thus, chronic administration of kisspeptin analogues may hold promise as a novel therapeutic approach for suppressing reproductive functions and hormone-related diseases such as prostate cancer. Further studies are warranted to elucidate clinical significance of TAK-448 and TAK-683.

  10. Homosexual Labeling by University Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyberg, Kenneth L.; Alston, Jon P.

    1977-01-01

    Details the responses of young, urban, college-educated people on their attitudes toward homosexuals, specifically focusing on issues of public identification and negative labeling as it effects homosexual persons and their behaviors. (Author/RK)

  11. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 serving. You should also pay attention to trans fats on any food label. These fats raise "bad" ... foods and desserts. Many fast food restaurants use trans fats for frying. If a food has these fats, ...

  12. Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD database (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...

  13. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The ... Pay close attention to serving sizes. Products labeled "light" or "lite" must have 1/3 fewer calories ...

  14. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  15. Multi-focus cluster labeling.

    PubMed

    Eikvil, Line; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Holden, Marit

    2015-06-01

    Document collections resulting from searches in the biomedical literature, for instance, in PubMed, are often so large that some organization of the returned information is necessary. Clustering is an efficient tool for organizing search results. To help the user to decide how to continue the search for relevant documents, the content of each cluster can be characterized by a set of representative keywords or cluster labels. As different users may have different interests, it can be desirable with solutions that make it possible to produce labels from a selection of different topical categories. We therefore introduce the concept of multi-focus cluster labeling to give users the possibility to get an overview of the contents through labels from multiple viewpoints. The concept for multi-focus cluster labeling has been established and has been demonstrated on three different document collections. We illustrate that multi-focus visualizations can give an overview of clusters along axes that general labels are not able to convey. The approach is generic and should be applicable to any biomedical (or other) domain with any selection of foci where appropriate focus vocabularies can be established. A user evaluation also indicates that such a multi-focus concept is useful.

  16. Effect of estradiol cypionate and GnRH treatment on plasma estradiol-17β concentrations, synchronization of ovulation and on pregnancy rates in suckled beef cows treated with FTAI-based protocols.

    PubMed

    Uslenghi, G; Vater, A; Rodríguez Aguilar, S; Cabodevila, J; Callejas, S

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different ovulation inducers on E-17β plasma concentrations, synchronized ovulations and pregnancy rates. In Experiment 1, cows received a progesterone intravaginal device (PID) with 1 g of progesterone (P4) plus 2 mg of estradiol benzoate (EB) (day 0). At PID removal (day 8), cows received 0.150 mg of D-cloprostenol and were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (n = 10/treatment): Group ECP: 1 mg of estradiol cypionate at PID removal, Group EB: 1 mg of EB 24 hr after PID removal, Group GnRH: 10 μg of GnRH 48 hr after PID removal, Group ECP-GnRH: 1 mg of ECP at PID removal plus 10 μg of GnRH 48 hr later. Ultrasonographic examinations were performed to detect the dominant follicle and ovulation. GnRH-treated cows ovulated later (p < .05) compared to ECP- and ECP+GnRH-treated cows. There were effects of treatment, time and their interaction on E-17β concentrations (p < .05). ECP treatment affected plasma E-17β concentration, which increased earlier and decreased later compared to treatments without ECP. In Experiment 2, cows received (i) ECP: n = 126; (ii) EB: n = 126; (iii) GnRH: n = 136; (iv) ECP+GnRH: n = 139; FTAI was performed 48-50 hr after PID removal. Pregnancy rates did not differ among ovulation inducers (p > .05; ECP: 54.0%, 68/126; EB: 49.2%, 62/126; GnRH: 40.4%, 55/136; ECP+GnRH: 43.9%, 61/139). In conclusion, ECP administration (ECP and ECP+GnRH treatments) affected E-17β concentrations, determining its earlier increase and later decrease compared to treatments without ECP (EB and GnRH treatments). ECP+GnRH-treated cows achieved the best distribution of ovulations without affecting pregnancy rates. PMID:27411960

  17. A novel approach using a minimal number of injections during the IVF/ICSI cycle: Luteal half-dose depot GnRH agonist following corifollitropin alfa versus the corifollitropin alfa with a GnRH-antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Corifollitropin alfa is a good choice for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles because fewer injections are needed than with other agents. In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist. Material and Methods In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot GnRH agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist at the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and IVF Unit, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Başkent University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey, from March 2014 to August 2015. The patient’s baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Forty-five patients underwent the long protocol, in which a half-dose of depot GnRH agonist was administered on day 21 of the preceding cycle. Forty-nine patients underwent the GnRH-antagonist protocol. Corifollitropin alfa was administered on the menstrual cycle day 3. Results The mean ages of the two groups were similar (32.77±5.55 vs. 34.2±4.51 years [“for the long- and antagonist-protocol groups, respectively”]). The total number of retrieved oocytes, the fertilization rate, and the number of transferred embryos were similar between the two groups. The only significant difference between the two protocols was the number of injections during the controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) cycle, which included the depot-agonist injection in the long-protocol group (4.46±1.64 vs. 5.71±2.51, p=0.006). The clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were similar in the two protocols (16/45 [35.6%] vs. 16/49 [32.7%] for the intention to treat and 32.5±6.82% vs. 36.25±8.58%, respectively). Conclusion Our results show that ART cycles could be

  18. A novel approach using a minimal number of injections during the IVF/ICSI cycle: Luteal half-dose depot GnRH agonist following corifollitropin alfa versus the corifollitropin alfa with a GnRH-antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Corifollitropin alfa is a good choice for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles because fewer injections are needed than with other agents. In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist. Material and Methods In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot GnRH agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist at the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and IVF Unit, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Başkent University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey, from March 2014 to August 2015. The patient’s baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Forty-five patients underwent the long protocol, in which a half-dose of depot GnRH agonist was administered on day 21 of the preceding cycle. Forty-nine patients underwent the GnRH-antagonist protocol. Corifollitropin alfa was administered on the menstrual cycle day 3. Results The mean ages of the two groups were similar (32.77±5.55 vs. 34.2±4.51 years [“for the long- and antagonist-protocol groups, respectively”]). The total number of retrieved oocytes, the fertilization rate, and the number of transferred embryos were similar between the two groups. The only significant difference between the two protocols was the number of injections during the controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) cycle, which included the depot-agonist injection in the long-protocol group (4.46±1.64 vs. 5.71±2.51, p=0.006). The clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were similar in the two protocols (16/45 [35.6%] vs. 16/49 [32.7%] for the intention to treat and 32.5±6.82% vs. 36.25±8.58%, respectively). Conclusion Our results show that ART cycles could be

  19. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label....

  20. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  1. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  2. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  3. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  4. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  5. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  6. 9 CFR 381.132 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and... request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall permit submission for approval of only sketch labeling, as... Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of...

  7. 9 CFR 381.132 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... product unless the sketch labeling of such final labeling has been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, and approved by such division... authorized representative of the Secretary upon request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall...

  8. 9 CFR 381.132 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and... request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall permit submission for approval of only sketch labeling, as... Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of...

  9. 9 CFR 381.132 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and... request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall permit submission for approval of only sketch labeling, as... Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of...

  10. 9 CFR 381.132 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... been submitted for approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and... request. (b) The Food Labeling Division shall permit submission for approval of only sketch labeling, as... Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of...

  11. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  12. 21 CFR 895.25 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... eliminated by labeling or a change in labeling, or change in advertising if the device is a restricted device... person(s) responsible for the labeling or advertising of the device specifying: (1) The deception or risk... labeling, or change in advertising if the device is a restricted device, necessary to correct the...

  13. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of this single component label, you must petition... no closer than 3/16″ (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of.... All labels must be capable of withstanding extremes of weather conditions for a period of at least...

  14. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of this single component label, you must petition... no closer than 3/16″ (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of.... All labels must be capable of withstanding extremes of weather conditions for a period of at least...

  15. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of this single component label, you must petition... no closer than 3/16″ (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label. If you wish to change the format of.... All labels must be capable of withstanding extremes of weather conditions for a period of at least...

  16. Optimal policy for labeling training samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsky, Lester; Lopresti, Daniel; Nagy, George

    2013-01-01

    Confirming the labels of automatically classified patterns is generally faster than entering new labels or correcting incorrect labels. Most labels assigned by a classifier, even if trained only on relatively few pre-labeled patterns, are correct. Therefore the overall cost of human labeling can be decreased by interspersing labeling and classification. Given a parameterized model of the error rate as an inverse power law function of the size of the training set, the optimal splits can be computed rapidly. Projected savings in operator time are over 60% for a range of empirical error functions for hand-printed digit classification with ten different classifiers.

  17. The Decline in Pulsatile GnRH Release, as Reflected by Circulating LH Concentrations, During the Infant-Juvenile Transition in the Agonadal Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Is Associated With a Reduction in Kisspeptin Content of KNDy Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus in the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suresh; Dwarki, Karthik; Ali, Barkat; Gibbs, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty in primates is timed by 2 hypothalamic events: during late infancy a decline in pulsatile GnRH release occurs, leading to a hypogonadotropic state that maintains quiescence of the prepubertal gonad; and in late juvenile development, pulsatile GnRH release is reactivated and puberty initiated, a phase of development that is dependent on kisspeptin signaling. In the present study, we determined whether the arrest of GnRH pulsatility in infancy was associated with a change in kisspeptin expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Kisspeptin was determined using immunohistochemistry in coronal hypothalamic sections from agonadal male rhesus monkeys during early infancy when GnRH release as reflected by circulating LH concentrations was robust and compared with that in juveniles in which GnRH pulsatility was arrested. The distribution of immunopositive kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the MBH of infants was similar to that previously reported for adults. Kisspeptin cell body number was greater in infants compared with juveniles, and at the middle to posterior level of the arcuate nucleus, this developmental difference was statistically significant. Neurokinin B in the MBH exhibited a similar distribution to that of kisspeptin and was colocalized with kisspeptin in approximately 60% of kisspeptin perikarya at both developmental stages. Intensity of GnRH fiber staining in the median eminence was robust at both stages. These findings indicate that the switch that shuts off pulsatile GnRH release during infancy and that guarantees the subsequent quiescence of the prepubertal gonad involves a reduction in a stimulatory kisspeptin tone to the GnRH neuronal network. PMID:23525220

  18. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  19. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  20. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  1. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  2. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  3. Nutrition Labeling Using a Computer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act mandated nutritional labeling of most foods. As a result, a large portion of food analysis is performed for nutritional labeling purposes. A food labeling guide and links to the complete nutritional labeling regulations are available online at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/˜dms/flg-toc.html. However, interpretation of these regulations and the appropriate usage of rounding rules, available nutrient content claims, reference amounts, and serving size can be difficult.

  4. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  5. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  6. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  7. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  8. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  9. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  11. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  13. Effects of treatment for anestrus in water buffaloes with PGF2α and GnRH in comparison with vitamin-mineral supplement, and some factors influencing treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Bhuminand; Nakao, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Kosaku; Sato, Hiroshi; Sah, Shyam Kishor; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Dhakal, Ishwori Prasad; Yamagishi, Norio

    2013-12-30

    The effect of treatment for anestrus in buffaloes with a PGF2α or GnRH injection and vitamin-mineral (Vit-M) supplementation for 1 to 2 months and some factors influencing the treatment effect were studied. In anestrus buffaloes with CL, an injection of PGF2α tended to show higher estrus detection and pregnancy rates within 17 days after treatment than Vit-M supplementation (P<0.10). In those with inactive ovaries, effect of GnRH and Vit-M did not differ. Body condition score of the animals before treatment affected pregnancy rate within 17 days after treatment (P<0.05). Pregnancy rate within 4 months after treatment was adversely influenced by low serum concentrations of calcium (P<0.01) and gastrointestinal parasitic infection before treatment (P<0.05).

  14. Effects of Treatment for Anestrus in Water Buffaloes with PGF2α and GnRH in Comparison with Vitamin-Mineral Supplement, and Some Factors Influencing Treatment Effects

    PubMed Central

    DEVKOTA, Bhuminand; NAKAO, Toshihiko; KOBAYASHI, Kosaku; SATO, Hiroshi; SAH, Shyam Kishor; SINGH, Dinesh Kumar; DHAKAL, Ishwori Prasad; YAMAGISHI, Norio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of treatment for anestrus in buffaloes with a PGF2α or GnRH injection and vitamin-mineral (Vit-M) supplementation for 1 to 2 months and some factors influencing the treatment effect were studied. In anestrus buffaloes with CL, an injection of PGF2α tended to show higher estrus detection and pregnancy rates within 17 days after treatment than Vit-M supplementation (P<0.10). In those with inactive ovaries, effect of GnRH and Vit-M did not differ. Body condition score of the animals before treatment affected pregnancy rate within 17 days after treatment (P<0.05). Pregnancy rate within 4 months after treatment was adversely influenced by low serum concentrations of calcium (P<0.01) and gastrointestinal parasitic infection before treatment (P<0.05). PMID:23884020

  15. Split-time artificial insemination in beef cattle: I-Using estrous response to determine the optimal time(s) at which to administer GnRH in beef heifers and postpartum cows.

    PubMed

    Bishop, B E; Thomas, J M; Abel, J M; Poock, S E; Ellersieck, M R; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments evaluated timing of GnRH administration in beef heifers and cows on the basis of estrous status during split-time artificial insemination (AI) after controlled internal drug release (CIDR) based protocols. In experiment 1, estrus was synchronized for 816 pubertal and prepubertal or peripubertal heifers using the 14-day CIDR-PGF2α (PG) protocol, and in experiment 2, estrus was synchronized for 622 lactating cows using the 7-day CO-Synch + CIDR protocol. For both experiments, estrus detection aids (Estrotect) were applied at PG, with estrus recorded at 66 and 90 hours after PG. Treatments were balanced across locations for heifers using reproductive tract score and weight; whereas for cows, treatments were assigned and balanced to treatment according to age, body condition score, and days postpartum. Timing of AI for heifers and cows was on the basis of estrus expression 66 hours after PG. Females in each treatment that exhibited estrus before 66 hours were inseminated at 66 hours, whereas AI was delayed 24 hours until 90 hours after PG for females failing to exhibit estrus before 66 hours. Females in treatment one received GnRH 66 hours after PG irrespective of estrus expression; however, in treatment 2, GnRH was administered coincident with delayed AI only to females not detected in estrus at 66 hours after PG. Among heifers, there was no effect of treatment on overall estrous response (P = 0.49) or AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.54). Pregnancy rate for heifers inseminated at 66 hours was not influenced by GnRH (P = 0.65), and there were no differences between treatments in estrous response during the 24 hours delay period (P = 0.22). Cows in treatment 2 had a greater (P = 0.04) estrous response during the 24-hour delay period resulting in a greater overall estrous response (P = 0.04), but this did not affect AI pregnancy rate at 90 hours (P = 0.51) or total AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.89). Pregnancy rate resulting from AI for

  16. Denture labeling: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Pardeep K; Sharma, Akshey; Bhanot, Rajesh

    2011-04-01

    The need for denture labeling is important for forensic and social reasons in case patients need to be identified individually. The importance of denture marking has long been acknowledged by the dental profession. Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature, but none till date fulfills all the prescribed ADA specifications. A simple, easy, inexpensive procedure for marking accurate identification marks on dentures with a lead foil is described here. The label caring the patient information is incorporated in the acrylic resin during the denture processing.

  17. Continuous administration of low-dose GnRH in mares II. Pituitary and ovarian responses to uninterrupted treatment beginning near the autumnal equinox and continuing throughout the anovulatory season.

    PubMed

    Collins, S M; Zieba, D A; Williams, G L

    2007-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that continuous subcutaneous treatment with low-dose GnRH, administered to mares from late September/early October through March, would prevent the development of seasonal anovulation. Quarter Horse mares (n=20) were stratified by age and body condition score and assigned randomly to either a saline control (n=9) or a GnRH (n=11) treatment group. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone was delivered continuously via osmotic minipumps, with sham pumps placed in control mares. Initial pumps were inserted on Day 3 following ovulation or during the follicular phase if the next anticipated ovulation did not occur by 9 October. Delivery rate of GnRH was 2.5 microg/h (60 microg/day) for the first 60 days, followed by 5.0 microg/h (120 microg/day) thereafter. Pumps were replaced every 30 days. Eighty and 100% of all mares had become anovulatory by 1 November and 1 December, respectively, and remained anovulatory through the end of February. Neither serum concentrations of LH throughout the study nor total releasable pools of LH in March differed between groups. Although control mares that exhibited ovulatory cycles after study onset had greater (P<0.05) mean concentrations of LH during the follicular phase and metestrus compared to GnRH-treated mares, neither size of ovulatory follicles nor interovulatory intervals differed between groups. Serum concentrations of FSH were not affected by treatment, but were lowest (P<0.05) from November through January. Continuous infusion of low-dose GnRH, beginning soon after autumnal equinox and continuing until just after vernal equinox, failed to prevent the occurrence of or to hasten transition from seasonal anovulation. PMID:17590426

  18. The value of anti-Müllerian hormone measurement in the long GnRH agonist protocol: association with ovarian response and gonadotrophin-dose adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Anckaert, Ellen; Smitz, Johan; Schiettecatte, Johan; Klein, Bjarke M; Arce, Joan-Carles

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study evaluated the predictive value of serum and follicular fluid (FF) concentrations of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) with respect to treatment outcome variables in an IVF cycle. METHODS A retrospective analysis was performed with data from 731 normogonadotrophic women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation after stimulation with highly purified menotrophin (HP-hMG) or rFSH following a long GnRH agonist protocol. RESULTS In both treatment groups, the serum AMH concentration at the start of the stimulation was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated with the serum levels of estradiol (HP-hMG: r = 0.45; rFSH: r = 0.55), androstenedione (HP-hMG: r = 0.50; rFSH: 0.49) and total testosterone (HP-hMG: r = 0.40; rFSH: r = 0.36) at the end of the stimulation as well as the number of oocytes retrieved (HP-hMG: r = 0.48; rFSH: r = 0.62), the AMH concentration in FF (HP-hMG: r = 0.55; rFSH: 0.61) and the serum progesterone concentration (HP-hMG: r = 0.39; rFSH: r = 0.50) at oocyte retrieval. For both treatments, serum AMH at the start of the stimulation was a good predictor of the need to increase or decrease the gonadotrophin dose on stimulation day 6 and of ovarian response below (<7 oocytes) or above (>15 oocytes) the target. No significant relationships were observed between serum AMH and embryo quality or ongoing pregnancy. CONCLUSION The serum AMH concentration at the start of the stimulation in IVF patients down-regulated with GnRH agonist in the long protocol revealed a positive relationship with ovarian response to gonadotrophins in terms of oocytes retrieved and accompanying endocrine response. AMH is a good predictor of the need for gonadotrophin-dose adjustment on stimulation day 6 for patients with a fixed starting dose, but a poor predictor of embryo quality and pregnancy chances in individual patients. PMID:22473395

  19. Effect of continuous infusion of a low dose of GnRH antagonist on serum LH and testosterone concentrations, spermatogenesis and semen quality in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mann, D R; Collins, D C; Smith, M M; Gould, K G

    1987-11-01

    Treatment of 4 adult male rhesus monkeys for 8-12 months with 100-400 micrograms of a GnRH antagonist/day by means of using osmotic minipumps led to suppressed serum concentrations of LH and testosterone followed by various degrees of recovery toward pretreatment values. The serum LH response to a challenge of native GnRH was reduced by 30-75% during antagonist treatment. The serum testosterone response to GnRH was exaggerated above the response in the pretreatment period, suggesting hypersensitivity of the testis to gonadotrophin. Antagonist administration under these conditions did not alter body weight or abolish ejaculatory response. Antagonist infusion caused a 96% decrease in sperm counts. Spermatozoa recovered during the final month of antagonist treatment showed a reduced ability to penetrate denuded hamster ova. Testicular biopsies performed at the end of antagonist treatment revealed persistent spermatogenesis. However, the cellularity of the seminiferous tubules was decreased below that of pretreatment biopsies. The results of this study suggest that the amount of testosterone needed to maintain normal spermatogenesis is greater than that needed to maintain electroejaculatory response in monkeys.

  20. Rock Music Gets a Label.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutietta, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A group called Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) has captured the media spotlight with a proposal to have warning labels placed on music albums containing sexually explicit or violent lyrics. Major record companies have agreed to a version of the PMRC's demands for a one-year trial period, beginning in 1986. (RM)

  1. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition marketing may influence purchasing behavior and thereby be a factor in the obesity epidemic. Very little peer-reviewed research has been published which investigates the relationship between nutrition marketing on food labels and consumer behavior. The purpose of this paper was to give an ...

  2. Revisiting Labels: "Hearing" or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Ellen A.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper briefly presents evidence-based findings pertaining to the language of labels for people with hearing loss that relate to stigma, expectation levels, stereotypes, and self-fulfilling prophecies. These constructs are important for auditory-based practitioners, administrators, policymakers, students, families, and persons with…

  3. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  4. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  5. A randomized comparison of two ovarian stimulation protocols with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist cotreatment for in vitro fertilization commencing recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone on cycle day 2 or 5 with the standard long GnRH agonist protocol.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Femke P; Macklon, Nicholas S; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2003-01-01

    Extending the FSH window for multifollicular development by administering FSH from the midfollicular phase onward constitutes a novel mild protocol for ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) based on the physiology of single dominant follicle selection in normo-ovulatory women. We compared outcomes from this protocol with two other stimulation protocols. One hundred and forty-two normo-ovulatory patients with an indication for IVF (or IVF/ICSI) were randomized to a GnRH agonist long protocol (group A; n = 45) or one of two GnRH antagonist protocols commencing recombinant FSH on cycle d 2 (group B; n = 48) or cycle d 5 (group C; n = 49). A fixed dose (150 IU/d) of rFSH was used for ovarian stimulation, and GnRH antagonist cotreatment was initiated on the day when the leading follicle reached 14 mm diameter. Group C showed a shorter duration of stimulation (median duration, 11, 9, and 8 d for groups A, B, and C, respectively; P < 0.001), reflected in a significantly lower total dose of rFSH used (median amount of rFSH, 1650, 1350, and 1200 IU for groups A, B, and C, respectively; P < 0.001). In group C more cycles were cancelled during the stimulation phase due to insufficient response, resulting in a lower percentage of oocyte retrievals (84%, 73%, and 63% for groups A, B, and C; P = 0.02). However, women in group C obtained better quality embryos (percentage of embryo score of 1 for best embryo, 29%, 37%, and 61% for groups A, B, and C, respectively; P = 0.008), resulting in more transfers per oocyte retrieval (68%, 71%, and 90% for groups A, B, and C, respectively; P = 0.04). After profound ovarian stimulation (groups A and B) only 7% of the patients who retrieved four oocytes or less conceived, whereas after mild stimulation (group C) 67% of these patients conceived (P < 0.01). Overall, no differences were found among the three groups comparing pregnancy rate per started IVF cycle. In conclusion, application of the described mild ovarian stimulation

  6. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements.

  7. Neurokinin B-related Peptide Suppresses the Expression of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 in the Brain of Mature Female Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye Hwa; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Joon Yeong

    2016-03-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and neurokinin B related peptide (NKBRP) belong to tachykinin peptide family. Theyact as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. Mutation of NKB and/or its cognate receptor, NK3R resulted in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mammals, implying a strong involvement of NKB/NK3R system in controlling mammalian reproduction. Teleosts possess NKBRP as well as NKB, but their roles in fish reproduction need to be clarified. In this study, NKB and NKBRP coding gene (tac3) was cloned from Nile tilapia and sequenced. Based on the sequence, Nile tilapia NKB and NKBRP peptide were synthesized and their biological potencies were tested in vitro pituitary culture. The synthetic NKBRP showed direct inhibitory effect on the expression of GTH subunits at the pituitary level. This inhibitory effect was confirmed in vivo by means of intraperitoneal (ip) injection of synthetic NKB and NKBRP to mature female tilapia (20 pmol/g body weight [BW]). Both NKB and NKBRP had no effect on the plasma level of sex steroids, E2 and 11-KT. However, NKBRP caused declines of expression level of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 mRNAs in the brain while NKB seemed to have no distinct effect. These results indicate some inhibitory roles of NKBRP in reproduction of mature female Nile tilapia, although their exact functions are not clear at the moment. PMID:27294210

  8. REST levels affect the functional expression of voltage dependent calcium channels and the migratory activity in immortalized GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Antoniotti, Susanna; Ruffinatti, Federico Alessandro; Torriano, Simona; Luganini, Anna; D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Lovisolo, Davide

    2016-08-26

    The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) has emerged as a key controller of neuronal differentiation and has been shown to play a critical role in the expression of the neuronal phenotype; however, much has still to be learned about its role at specific developmental stages and about the functional targets affected. Among these targets, calcium signaling mechanisms are critically dependent on the developmental stage and their full expression is a hallmark of the mature, functional neuron. We have analyzed the role played by REST in GN11 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons at an early developmental stage, electrically non-excitable and with a strong migratory activity. We show for the first time that functional voltage-dependent calcium channels are expressed in wild type GN11 cells; down-regulation of REST by a silencing approach shifts these cells towards a more differentiated phenotype, increasing the functional expression of P/Q-type channels and reducing their migratory potential. PMID:27349310

  9. Long-term suppression of fertility in female giraffe using the GnRH agonist deslorelin as a long-acting implant.

    PubMed

    Patton, Marilyn L; Bashaw, Meredith J; del Castillo, Susan M; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Lamberski, Nadine; Rieches, Randy; Bercovitch, Fred B

    2006-07-15

    Zoological institutions provide an environment conducive to studying proximate mechanisms influencing reproduction that can provide guidance to both field and captive settings seeking to manage their stock. Both national parks and zoos have space limitations that sometimes require the use of reversible contraception in order to reduce reproductive rate or limit specific individuals from reproducing. We designed a study to test the efficacy of a long-lasting contraceptive in female giraffe by monitoring reproductive endocrinology and behavior. We implanted two animals with the GnRH agonist deslorelin and monitored their endocrine status using fecal steroid analysis. We have previously validated an assay for fecal pregnanes and here we report our validation for fecal estrogens. Both sex steroid concentrations were suppressed in two females, although one female exhibited an immediate post-implantation positive feedback response. Sexual activity nearly disappeared in one animal, whereas the other showed regular sexual behavior. The contraceptive effect lasted for at least 472 d, and successfully suppressed estrous cyclicity in one female for >2 y. We conclude that deslorelin implants provide a minimally invasive means for long-term suppression of reproduction in female giraffe.

  10. The Impact of Pituitary Blockage with GnRH Antagonist and Gonadotrophin Stimulation Length on The Outcome of ICSI Cycles in Women Older than 36 Years

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Rosane; Setti, Amanda Souza; Maldonado, Luiz Guilherme; Valente, Fernanda Montenegro; Iaconelli, Carla; Iaconelli Jr, Assumpto; Jr, Edson Borges

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate whether the length of pituitary blockage with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists or the stimulation period influence intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes in patients older than 36 years of age. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, a total of 138 couples with maternal age >36 years undergoing ICSI with an antagonist protocol were included. The influences of stimulation and suppression length on the response to ovarian stimulation and ICSI outcomes were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the predictive value of the stimulation period for achievement of implantation and pregnancy. Results The gonadotrophin stimulation length negatively influenced the implantation rate (RC: -4.200; p=0.023). The area under ROC curve (AUC) could distinguish between women with positive and negative implantation (AUC: 0.611; CI: 0.546-0.673) and pregnancy (AUC: 0.593; CI: 0.528-0.656). The threshold value demonstrated a high negative predictive value on likelihood of implantation (p=0.0032, 90% sensitivity) and pregnancy (p=0.0147, 87.1% sensitivity) when patients underwent more than 10 days of stimulation. Conclusion The stimulation period negatively influences the implantation rate in women older than 36 years. A stimulation interval greater than 10 days is associated with a negative predictive value for the chance of implantation and pregnancy. PMID:25083177

  11. Effects of lead exposure on GnRH and LH secretion in male rats: response to castration and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) challenge.

    PubMed

    Sokol, R Z; Berman, N; Okuda, H; Raum, W

    1998-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies suggest that lead exposure disrupts the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. To define more precisely the toxic action of lead on the hypothalamic-pituitary unit, a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed. The first experiment was designed to determine whether lead exposure exerts an inhibitory effect on GnRH secretion as reflected by an enhanced inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in response to the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). In the control animals, the AMPT dose had no significant effect on LH secretion, whereas LH fell significantly in the lead-treated animals. In experiments designed to evaluate the effects of lead exposure on the pattern of pulsatile release of gonadotropins castrated control and lead-dosed animals were cannulated, and serial blood sampling was performed. Baseline LH and follicle-stimulating hormone values were not statistically different between the control and lead-treated group. There were no significant differences noted in pulsatile patterns when the data were analyzed as groups. Pituitary cells harvested from lead-treated animals released significantly more LH that did the control animals. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the signals between the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are disrupted by lead exposure in the intact animal. However, the lead-exposed castrated rat's hypothalamic-pituitary unit is able to adapt to the toxic effects of lead.

  12. Comparison of hCG triggering versus hCG in combination with a GnRH agonist: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Seynhave, B.; Kolibianakis, S.; Tarlatzis, B.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two groups of ICSI (intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection) patients with a different form of triggering the final oocyte maturation has been performed. All patients received an ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) using an antagonist protocol using recombinant-FSH (rec-FSH) and Ganirelix. 120 Patients were randomized into two groups with similar clinical parameters. The first group had triggering with hCG, whereas the second group received a combination of hCG + GnRH agonist (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone). As the primary endpoint, the number of metaphase II oocytes were analysed, the secondary endpoints were the number of cumulus oocyte complexes (COC), the number of fertilized oocytes, embryo morphology, pregnancy rate and the number of cryopreserved embryos. The mean number of MII oocytes in the hCG triggered group was 9.2 compared with 10.3 in the hCG-GnRH agonist group. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of COCs or pregnancy rates. However, the number of patients who received at least one embryo of excellent quality was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the group with the combined triggering (45 out of 61 patients or 73.8%) versus the group with hCG triggering alone (28 out of 59 patients or 47.5%). The number of cryopreserved embryos was also higher in this group. PMID:25593695

  13. Oral delivery of oil-based formulation for a novel synthetic cationic peptide of GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) antagonist for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guiying; Wang, Tao; Gao, Lijun; Quan, Dongqin

    2013-06-25

    LXT-101, a cationic peptide is a novel antagonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) for prostate cancer treatment. However, effective delivery of peptide drugs into the body by the oral route remains a major challenge due to their origin properties with high molecular weights, strong polarity and low stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, we have developed a novel oral delivery of oil-based formulation in which therapeutic peptide LXT-101 are solubilized in oils and with this solution as oil phase, an optimum formulation of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was developed. The peptide stability with the SMEDDS formulation in artificial gastric and intestinal fluid was tested in vitro. On the other hand, the testosterone level and plasma concentration of LXT-101 in rats after oral administration of the SMEDDS formulation were investigated in vivo. The data in vitro indicated that LXT-101 in the SMEDDS formulation was stable over 8 h in artificial gastric and intestinal fluid. LXT-101 can be absorbed in vivo and suppression of testosterone maintained in castration level within 12 h can be achieved effectively after SMEDDS formulation administered orally at a dose of 3.5 mg/kg. The approach can provide a potential way for delivery peptides by oral. PMID:23623791

  14. Induction of contraception in some African wild carnivores by downregulation of LH and FSH secretion using the GnRH analogue deslorelin.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, H J; Trigg, T E; Jöchle, W; Human, A

    2002-01-01

    The GnRH analogue deslorelin, in long-acting biocompatible implants, was used as a contraceptive in 31 cheetahs (13 females and 18 males), 21 African wild dogs (15 females and 6 males), 10 lionesses and four leopards (three females and one male). A dose of 12 or 15 mg deslorelin was administered to lions, whereas 6 mg deslorelin was administered to the other species. Monitoring consisted of observations, measurement of plasma progesterone and testosterone concentrations, vaginal cytology and evaluation of semen and sex organs. Deslorelin induced contraception in lionesses for 12-18 months, and in female cheetahs and leopards for a minimum of 12 months after treatment. Two male cheetahs had no viable spermatozoa or detectable plasma testosterone 21 months after treatment with deslorelin. Female wild dogs responded less consistently and one bitch conceived 4 weeks after implantation. However, in nine bitches, mating could be postponed until the next breeding season. Male dogs responded consistently and the contraception was effective for approximately 12 months. Although lionesses and cheetahs may become attractive to males for a few days after treatment, mating was not observed. No side-effects or behavioural changes were noted, indicating that deslorelin is a safe drug to use for the contraception of the species described. Males remain fertile for the first 6 weeks after the insertion of implants and should be separated from cyclic females during this period.

  15. GnRH agonist Lupron (leuprolide acetate) pre-treatments prevent ovulation in response to gonadotropin stimulation in the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa).

    PubMed

    Pelican, Katharine M; Wildt, David E; Howard, Jo Gayle

    2006-10-01

    In many species, controlling the ovary prior to induction of ovulation improves the success of ovarian response and artificial insemination (AI). We assessed the impact of suppression of estrus with the GnRH agonist, Lupron, on ovarian sensitivity to equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the clouded leopard. Seven female clouded leopards were given two injections of Lupron (3.75 mg IM) 23 d apart, followed 44 d later by eCG and hCG. Daily fecal samples were collected from 60 d before Lupron to 60 d after hCG. Fecal metabolites of estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Lupron decreased (P < 0.05) the number of E peaks during Lupron treatment compared to pre-Lupron. All females had baseline E and six of seven (86%) had nadir P on day of eCG. Exogenous gonadotropins induced E elevations in all females. However, mean E in the gonadotropin-provoked estrus was decreased (P < 0.05) compared to pre-Lupron estrous periods. Only one of seven (14%) females ovulated after eCG/hCG. In conclusion, estrous cycle control with Lupron resulted in predictable ovarian suppression prior to gonadotropin stimulation but altered ovarian sensitivity by an as yet unknown mechanism so that ovulation was inhibited, even when using a proven exogenous gonadotropin protocol.

  16. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... identity and conformity to the labeling specified in the master or batch production records. (c) Procedures... discrepancies shall be investigated in accordance with § 211.192. Labeling reconciliation is waived for cut...

  17. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... identity and conformity to the labeling specified in the master or batch production records. (c) Procedures... discrepancies shall be investigated in accordance with § 211.192. Labeling reconciliation is waived for cut...

  18. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identity and conformity to the labeling specified in the master or batch production records. (c) Procedures... discrepancies shall be investigated in accordance with § 211.192. Labeling reconciliation is waived for cut...

  19. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... identity and conformity to the labeling specified in the master or batch production records. (c) Procedures... discrepancies shall be investigated in accordance with § 211.192. Labeling reconciliation is waived for cut...

  20. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... identity and conformity to the labeling specified in the master or batch production records. (c) Procedures... discrepancies shall be investigated in accordance with § 211.192. Labeling reconciliation is waived for cut...

  1. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.158 Labeling requirements. (a)(1) The... information: (i) The label heading: Motorcycle Noise Emission Control Information; (ii) The statement: This ___ (model year) ___ (model specific code) motorcycle, ___ (serial number), meets EPA noise...

  2. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  3. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  4. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  5. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  6. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  7. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  8. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  9. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  10. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  11. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  12. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  13. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  14. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  15. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  16. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  17. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  18. 49 CFR 172.407 - Label specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 172.407, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... the CORROSIVE label. (iii) White may be used for the symbol for the ORGANIC PEROXIDE label. (3)...

  19. 21 CFR 225.80 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... labeling, including placards, upon receipt from the printer shall be proofread against the Master Record... responsible individual, and kept for 1 year after all the labels from that batch have been used. (3) In...

  20. 21 CFR 225.80 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... labeling, including placards, upon receipt from the printer shall be proofread against the Master Record... responsible individual, and kept for 1 year after all the labels from that batch have been used. (3) In...

  1. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    has a focus on coordination and labeling chemistry, but biological results are briefly summarized as well. The last (and shortest) section finally intends to give a (subjective) outlook for the future role of 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals. Critical comments are spread over the whole article but are concentrated in this section. Despite the increasing competition of diagnostic radiopharmacy by other commonly applied methods in medicine such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound, the authors are convinced that 99mTc will play a key role also in future if novel approaches are added and the requirements from chemistry biology and the market considered in research to a stronger extent.

  2. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  3. Homosexual Labeling and the Male Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Rodney G.

    1978-01-01

    In this study, men were perceived to be less masculine and less preferred as fellow participants if they were labeled homosexual. The man responsible for the primary labeling of the homosexual was perceived as more masculine and more sociable when he labeled the homosexual than when he did not. (Author/WI)

  4. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  5. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  6. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  7. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  8. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  9. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  10. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  11. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  12. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Required by U.S. EPA regulation 40 CFR part 211, subpart ___.” EC01FE92.055 ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104... LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on...

  13. 40 CFR 1036.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....135 Labeling. Label your engines as described in 40 CFR 86.007-35(a)(3), with the following additional information: (a) (b) Identify the emission control system. Use terms and abbreviations as described in 40 CFR... labeling requirement to be consistent with the intent of 40 CFR part 1037....

  14. 40 CFR 1036.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....135 Labeling. Label your engines as described in 40 CFR 86.007-35(a)(3), with the following additional information: (a) (b) Identify the emission control system. Use terms and abbreviations as described in 40 CFR... labeling requirement to be consistent with the intent of 40 CFR part 1037....

  15. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... biodiesel, biomass-based diesel, biodiesel blends, and biomass-based diesel blends. The label is 3 inches (7... the black band. Directly underneath the black band, the label shall read “contains biomass-based... the side edges of the label. (5) For biomass-based diesel blends containing more than 5 percent and...

  16. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  17. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  19. 27 CFR 19.604 - Caution label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caution label. 19.604... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Marks § 19.604 Caution label... denaturer may be printed on such label, but no other extraneous matter will be permitted thereon without...

  20. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  1. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  2. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  3. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  4. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  5. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  6. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  7. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  8. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  9. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  10. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  11. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  12. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  13. 10 CFR 61.57 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling. 61.57 Section 61.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.57 Labeling. Each package of waste must be clearly labeled...

  14. 10 CFR 61.57 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling. 61.57 Section 61.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.57 Labeling. Each package of waste must be clearly labeled...

  15. 10 CFR 61.57 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling. 61.57 Section 61.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.57 Labeling. Each package of waste must be clearly labeled...

  16. 10 CFR 61.57 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling. 61.57 Section 61.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.57 Labeling. Each package of waste must be clearly labeled...

  17. 10 CFR 61.57 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling. 61.57 Section 61.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.57 Labeling. Each package of waste must be clearly labeled...

  18. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, and... approval as set forth in § 317.4(a) shall be submitted in duplicate to the Food Labeling Division... deemed deficient in some particular may be granted by the Food Labeling Division. Temporary approvals...

  19. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, and... approval as set forth in § 317.4(a) shall be submitted in duplicate to the Food Labeling Division... deemed deficient in some particular may be granted by the Food Labeling Division. Temporary approvals...

  20. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... approval to the Food Labeling Division, Regulatory Programs, Food Safety and Inspection Service, and... approval as set forth in § 317.4(a) shall be submitted in duplicate to the Food Labeling Division... deemed deficient in some particular may be granted by the Food Labeling Division. Temporary approvals...

  1. 75 FR 81943 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... for its new light bulb labeling requirements (published on July 19, 2010, 75 FR 41696) to January 1... (75 FR 41696), the Commission published amendments to the Appliance Labeling Rule (Rule) creating new... new labeling requirements. \\5\\ 59 FR 25176 (May 13, 1994). \\6\\ Pursuant to the revised rule, after...

  2. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  3. Cigarette Warning Labels as Educational Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.; And Others

    This paper reports an investigation on the educational impact of warning labels on cigarette packages on adolescents. Subjects were asked to identify the locations of warning labels on cigarette packages and advertising and to restate the warning label. Results indicated that official warnings may be well known in general terms but poorly known in…

  4. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity labeling. 701.11 Section 701.11 Food and... COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in package form shall bear as one of its principal features a statement of the identity of the commodity....

  5. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Labeling requirements. 205.158 Section 205.158 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... color that contrasts with the background of the label. (5) The label must contain the...

  6. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  7. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Required by U.S. EPA regulation 40 CFR part 211, subpart ___.” EC01FE92.055 ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104... LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on...

  8. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  9. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  10. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  11. 21 CFR 349.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... labeling. The labeling of any OTC ophthalmic demulcent drug product provided to health professionals (but... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Professional labeling. 349.80 Section 349.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS...

  12. 21 CFR 349.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... labeling. The labeling of any OTC ophthalmic demulcent drug product provided to health professionals (but... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professional labeling. 349.80 Section 349.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS...

  13. 21 CFR 357.280 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Professional labeling. 357.280 Section 357.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Drug Products § 357.280 Professional labeling. The labeling provided to health professionals (but...

  14. Learning Words from Labeling and Directive Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Maureen A.; Akhtar, Nameera; Sussman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the common intuition that labeling may be the best way to teach a new word to a child, systematic testing is needed of the prediction that children learn words better from labeling utterances than from directive utterances. Two experiments compared toddlers' label learning in the context of hearing words used in directive versus labeling…

  15. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  16. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment. The... hazardous substance if furnished with: (a) Complete labeling or proposed labeling, which may be in...

  17. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment. The... hazardous substance if furnished with: (a) Complete labeling or proposed labeling, which may be in...

  18. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment. The... hazardous substance if furnished with: (a) Complete labeling or proposed labeling, which may be in...

  19. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment. The... hazardous substance if furnished with: (a) Complete labeling or proposed labeling, which may be in...

  20. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment. The... hazardous substance if furnished with: (a) Complete labeling or proposed labeling, which may be in...

  1. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be completely... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling....

  2. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be completely... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling....

  3. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... manufacturer or private labeler, pursuant to § 431.36(f), and applicable to that motor. Such CC number must be... EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1) Required information. The permanent nameplate of an electric motor for which standards are prescribed in § 431.25...

  4. Gender, status, and psychiatric labels.

    PubMed

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K; Brown, Ryan P; Thomas, Lauren S

    2015-11-01

    We examine a key modified labeling theory proposition-that a psychiatric label increases vulnerability to competence-based criticism and rejection-within task- and collectively oriented dyads comprised of same-sex individuals with equivalent education. Drawing on empirical work that approximates these conditions, we expect the proposition to hold only among men. We also expect education, operationalized with college class standing, to moderate the effects of gender by reducing men's and increasing women's criticism and rejection. But, we also expect the effect of education to weaken when men work with a psychiatric patient. As predicted, men reject suggestions from teammates with a psychiatric history more frequently than they reject suggestions from other teammates, while women's resistance to influence is unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Men also rate psychiatric patient teammates as less powerful but no lower in status than other teammates, while women's teammate assessments are unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Also as predicted, education reduces men's resistance to influence when their teammate has no psychiatric history. Education also increases men's ratings of their teammate's power, as predicted, but has no effect on women's resistance to influence or teammate ratings. We discuss the implications of these findings for the modified labeling theory of mental illness and status characteristics theory.

  5. 27 CFR 19.642 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meaning given, and be stated in the manner provided in 27 CFR part 5. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.642 Section 19.642 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle and Label Requirements Bottle Label Requirements § 19.642 Statements required...

  6. Abandoning a label doesn’t make it disappear: The perseverance of labeling effects

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Francesco; Rothbart, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Labels exert strong influence on perception and judgment. The present experiment examines the possibility that such effects may persist even when labels are abandoned. Participants judged the similarity of pairs of silhouette drawings of female body types, ordered on a continuum from very thin to very heavy, under conditions where category labels were, and were not, superimposed on the ordered stimuli. Consistent with earlier research, labels had strong effects on perceived similarity, with silhouettes sharing the same label judged as more similar than those having different labels. Moreover, when the labels were removed and no longer present, the effect of the labels, although diminished, persisted. It did not make any difference whether the labels were simply abandoned or, in addition, had their validity challenged. The results are important for our understanding of categorization and labeling processes. The potential theoretical and practical implications of these results for social processes are discussed. PMID:23105148

  7. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations.

  8. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations. PMID:24311756

  9. Use of Symbols in Labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing this final rule revising its medical device and certain biological product labeling regulations to explicitly allow for the optional inclusion of graphical representations of information, or symbols, in labeling (including labels) without adjacent explanatory text (referred to in this document as "stand-alone symbols") if certain requirements are met. The final rule also specifies that the use of symbols, accompanied by adjacent explanatory text continues to be permitted. FDA is also revising its prescription device labeling regulations to allow the use of the symbol statement "Rx only" or "[rx] only" in the labeling for prescription devices.

  10. Use of Symbols in Labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing this final rule revising its medical device and certain biological product labeling regulations to explicitly allow for the optional inclusion of graphical representations of information, or symbols, in labeling (including labels) without adjacent explanatory text (referred to in this document as "stand-alone symbols") if certain requirements are met. The final rule also specifies that the use of symbols, accompanied by adjacent explanatory text continues to be permitted. FDA is also revising its prescription device labeling regulations to allow the use of the symbol statement "Rx only" or "[rx] only" in the labeling for prescription devices. PMID:27311137

  11. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways.

  12. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways. PMID:26287569

  13. 46 CFR 160.133-17 - Marking and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Marking and labeling. (a) Each hook body of a release mechanism must be marked with a plate or label...) The plate or label must be in English, but may also be in other languages. (c) The plate or label...

  14. 27 CFR 4.32 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... October 6, 1984. (d) (e) Declaration of sulfites. There shall be stated on a front label, back label, strip label or neck label, the statement “Contains sulfites” or “Contains (a) sulfiting agent(s)” or...

  15. Folliculogenesis Is Not Fully Inhibited during GnRH Analogues Treatment in Mice Challenging Their Efficiency to Preserve the Ovarian Reserve during Chemotherapy in This Model.

    PubMed

    Horicks, Florence; Van Den Steen, Géraldine; Houben, Sarah; Englert, Yvon; Demeestere, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    As many chemotherapy regimens induce follicular depletion, fertility preservation became a major concern in young cancer patients. By maintaining follicles at the resting stage, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) were proposed as an ovarian-protective option during chemotherapy. However, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Mice were dosed with cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100-500 mg/kg i.p) to quantify follicular depletion and evaluate apoptosis at different times. We observed a dose-dependent depletion of the follicular reserve within 24 hours after Cy injection with a mean follicular loss of 45% at the dose of 200mg/kg. Apoptosis occurs in the granulosa cells of growing follicles within 12 hours after Cy treatment, while no apoptosis was detected in resting follicles suggesting that chemotherapy acutely affects both resting and growing follicles through different mechanisms. We further tested the ability of both GnRH agonist and antagonist to inhibit oestrus cycles, follicular growth and FSH secretion in mice and to protect ovarian reserve against chemotherapy. Although GnRHa were efficient to disrupt oestrus cycles, they failed to inhibit follicular development, irrespective of the doses and injection sites (sc or im). Around 20% of healthy growing follicles were still observed during GnRHa treatment and serum FSH levels were not reduced either by antagonist or agonist. GnRHa had no effect on Cy-induced follicular damages. Thus, we showed that GnRHa were not as efficient at inhibiting the pituitary-gonadal axis in mice as in human. Furthermore, the acute depletion of primordial follicles observed after chemotherapy does not support the hypothesis that the ovary may be protected by gonadotropin suppression. PMID:26325271

  16. Induction of ovarian activity and ovulation in an induced ovulator, the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), using GnRH agonist and recombinant LH.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy E M; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Colgin, Mark; McDonough, Caitlin; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2014-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques, such as ovarian manipulation and artificial insemination, are useful for enhancing genetic management of threatened wildlife maintained ex situ. In this study, we used noninvasive fecal hormone monitoring to investigate (1) the influence of pairing with a male on endocrine responses of female maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) to a GnRH agonist (deslorelin) and (2) the efficiency of recombinant LH (reLH) on ovulation induction in females housed alone. Deslorelin (2.1 mg Ovuplant) was given to females that were either paired with a male (n = 4) or housed alone (n = 7); the implant was removed 7 to 11 days postimplantation. Three of seven singleton females were injected with reLH (0.0375 mg) on the day of implant removal, whereas the remaining females (n = 4) did not receive the additional treatment. Fecal samples were collected 5 to 7 days/wk from all females starting 11 days prior to hormone insertion until at least 70 days post implant removal for a total of 11 hormone treatment cycles. Fecal estrogen and progestagen metabolites were extracted and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Evidence of ovulation, demonstrated by a surge of estrogen followed by a significant rise in progestagen, occurred in all paired females. Three of the four singleton females that did not receive reLH treatment exhibited no rise in progestagen after an estrogen surge. All singleton females treated with reLH exhibited a rise in fecal progestagen after injection, indicating ovulation. In conclusion, deslorelin is effective at inducing ovarian activity and ovulation in paired female maned wolves; however, exogenous reLH is needed to induce ovulation in females housed alone. The findings obtained from this study serve as a foundation for future application of artificial insemination to enhance genetic management of this threatened species ex situ.

  17. Inhibition of cytochrome P-450 C17 enzyme by a GnRH agonist in ovarian follicles from gonadotropin-stimulated rats.

    PubMed

    Irusta, Griselda; Parborell, Fernanda; Tesone, Marta

    2007-05-01

    Our objective was to study the direct action of a GnRH-I agonist, leuprolide acetate (LA), on ovarian steroidogenesis in preovulatory follicles obtained from equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG)-treated rats. Previously, we have demonstrated an inhibitory effect of LA on steroidogenesis and follicular development. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) exerts its negative effect on follicular development by inhibiting thecal cytochrome P-450 C17 (P450C17) alpha-hydroxylase expression and, consequently, androgen synthesis. Studies were carried out in prepubertal female rats injected with either eCG (control) or eCG plus LA (LA) and killed at different time points. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that LA induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression mainly in theca cells of preantral and antral follicles. In addition, serum progesterone levels increased significantly (P < 0.05), whereas those of androsterone decreased (P < 0.05) after 8 h of LA treatment. This inhibition caused by LA seemed to be a consequence of the decreased expression of follicular P450C17 alpha-hydroxylase, as demonstrated by Western blot and RT-PCR techniques. In vitro studies using follicles isolated from 48-h-eCG-treated rats and cultured with LA showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of FSH-induced androsterone follicular content as well as P450C17 alpha-hydroxylase protein levels, as determined by Western analysis. However, LA increased StAR protein expression in these follicles without significant changes in P450scc enzyme levels. Taking all these findings into account, we suggest that GnRH-I exerts a direct inhibitory action on gonadotropin-induced follicular development by decreasing the temporal expression of the P450C17 enzyme and, consequently, androgen production, thus reducing the supply of estrogens available to developing follicles. PMID:17468395

  18. Serum Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulphate Concentration Is Not a Predictive Factor in IVF Outcomes before the First Cycle of GnRH Agonist Administration in Women with Normal Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Kunicki, Michał; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Jakiel, Grzegorz; Liss, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to determine whether serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) concentration and the models incorporating it could help clinicians to predict IVF outcomes in women with normal ovarian reserve undergoing their first long protocol. Study Design We performed a retrospective analysis of 459 women undergoing cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for the first time in a long GnRH agonist protocol. Results Embryo transfer was performed in 407 women (88.7%). The fertilisation rate was 78.6%. The clinical pregnancy rate was 44.8% per started cycle and 50.6% per embryo transfer. Our univariate model revealed that the best predictors of clinical pregnancy were the number of mature oocytes, the number of embryos transferred and the number of good quality embryos, account for the clinical parameters that reflect ovarian reserve the best being AMH level and AFC. DHEAS did not predict clinical pregnancy (OR 1.001, 95% CI, 0.999–1.004). After adjusting for the number of embryos transferred and class of embryos in a multivariate model, the best predictors were age (OR 0.918, 95% CI, 0.867–0.972) and AFC (OR 1.022, 95% CI, 0.992–1.053). Serum DHEAS levels were positively correlated with AFC (r = 0.098, P<0.039) and testosterone levels (r = 0.371, P<0.001), as well as the number of mature oocytes (r = 0.109, P<0.019); serum DHEAS levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.220, P<0.001), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), (r = -0.116, P<0.015) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), (r = -0.193, P<0.001). Conclusions DHEAS concentration (in addition to the known factors of ovarian reserve) does not predict clinical pregnancy in women with normal ovarian reserve who are undergoing ICSI. PMID:25738591

  19. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  20. Label-free cell profiling.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Stojanovic, Ivan; van der Kooi, Alex; van der Schoot, Ellen; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-08-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) array imaging method is outlined for label-free cell profiling. Red blood cells (RBCs) were injected into a flow chamber on top of a spotted sensor surface. Spots contained antibodies to various RBC membrane antigens. A typical sensorgram showed an initial response corresponding to cell sedimentation (S) followed by a specific upward response (T) corresponding to specific binding of cells during a critical wash step. The full analysis cycle for RBC profiling was less than 6 min. The sensor surface could be regenerated at least 100 times, allowing the determination of a cell surface antigen profile of RBCs.

  1. Particle-based labeling: Fast point-feature labeling without obscuring other visual features.

    PubMed

    Luboschik, Martin; Schumann, Heidrun; Cords, Hilko

    2008-01-01

    In many information visualization techniques, labels are an essential part to communicate the visualized data. To preserve the expressiveness of the visual representation, a placed label should neither occlude other labels nor visual representatives (e.g., icons, lines) that communicate crucial information. Optimal, non-overlapping labeling is an NP-hard problem. Thus, only a few approaches achieve a fast non-overlapping labeling in highly interactive scenarios like information visualization. These approaches generally target the point-feature label placement (PFLP) problem, solving only label-label conflicts. This paper presents a new, fast, solid and flexible 2D labeling approach for the PFLP problem that additionally respects other visual elements and the visual extent of labeled features. The results (number of placed labels, processing time) of our particle-based method compare favorably to those of existing techniques. Although the esthetic quality of non-real-time approaches may not be achieved with our method, it complies with practical demands and thus supports the interactive exploration of information spaces. In contrast to the known adjacent techniques, the flexibility of our technique enables labeling of dense point clouds by the use of non-occluding distant labels. Our approach is independent of the underlying visualization technique, which enables us to demonstrate the application of our labeling method within different information visualization scenarios.

  2. Enzyme-gold affinity labelling of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Berg, R H; Erdos, G W; Gritzali, M; Brown, R D

    1988-04-01

    The enzyme-linked colloidal gold affinity labelling technique was tested as a method to localize cellulose on thin sections of plant cell walls and slime mold spores. Commercially available cellulase from cultures of Trichoderma reesei, the main components being cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I, CBH II) and endoglucanase (EG), was linked to colloidal gold by using standard techniques and applied as a dilute, buffered suspension to thin sections. After brief exposure, e.g., 15-30 minutes, cellulose exposed on the surface of sections was labelled with the enzyme-gold complex. Poststaining did not appear to have a deleterious effect on the labelled sections. The specificity of labelling was demonstrated by its complete inhibition when carboxymethylcellulose was incorporated in the labelling mixture, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-mannans or 1,3-beta-xylans in noncellulosic walls of marine algae, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-glucans in chitin, by much lower labelling density when done at 4 degrees C, and by lack of labelling when sections were predigested with cellulase. Labelling with the crude commercial cellulase was compared to labelling with purified CBH I-, CBH II-, and EG-linked colloidal gold, and the labelling pattern was similar. This method was found useful on conventionally fixed material and required no special preparation other than the use of inert (Ni or Au) grids and 0.5% gelatin to reduce nonspecific binding of the gold complex. Labelling was similar in the several embedding resins tested: LR White, Lowicryl K4M, Epon 812, and Spurr's.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Long-term treatment of central precocious puberty with a long-acting analogue of luteinizing hormone release hormone (D-Tryp6-GnRH) in monthly injections. Its possible use in normal puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Abujamra, A C; Minanni, S L; Mendonca, B B; Nery, M; Lerario, A C; Pereira, M A; Abelin, N; Wajchenberg, B L

    1993-02-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-like agonist D-Tryp6-GnRH (GnRHa) has been shown to induce reversible suppression of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in patients with central precocious puberty. We examined the effect of a long-acting preparation of GnRHa in biodegradable microcapsules. D-Tryptophane6-GnRH, administered intramuscularly at 1 month intervals, for 12 consecutive months, on growth and skeletal maturation in 3 girls and 4 boys with neurogenic or idiopathic precocious puberty. Suppression of gonadotropin release after GnRH stimulation and gonadal steroids was maintained in all subjects. Growth velocity fell from a mean rate (+/- SEM) or 8.60 +/- 0.75 cm/year before treatment to 5.81 +/- 0.60 cm/year (p < 0.005) after 1 year. Bone age advanced a mean of 8.0 +/- 0.45 months during treatment, suggesting an increase in predicted height from the ratio delta bone age/delta chronological age. Two subjects, one of them with compensated Bartter's syndrome with normal hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal-axis, received the analogue to delay pubertal growth with the hope to improve final height. In the first one, the growth velocity fell from 9.9 cm/year to 8 cm/year and delta bone age/delta chronological age decreased from 1.28 to 1.0 and in the other subject, the growth velocity fell from 12 cm/year to 6.0 cm/year in the last year of treatment and delta bone age/delta chronological age fell from 3.2 to 0.75, indicating an improvement in predicted height.

  4. Label-free photoacoustic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Winkler, Amy M.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lidai; Chen, Yun; Dorn, Gerald W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Super-resolution microscopy techniques—capable of overcoming the diffraction limit of light—have opened new opportunities to explore subcellular structures and dynamics not resolvable in conventional far-field microscopy. However, relying on staining with exogenous fluorescent markers, these techniques can sometimes introduce undesired artifacts to the image, mainly due to large tagging agent sizes and insufficient or variable labeling densities. By contrast, the use of endogenous pigments allows imaging of the intrinsic structures of biological samples with unaltered molecular constituents. Here, we report label-free photoacoustic (PA) nanoscopy, which is exquisitely sensitive to optical absorption, with an 88 nm resolution. At each scanning position, multiple PA signals are successively excited with increasing laser pulse energy. Because of optical saturation or nonlinear thermal expansion, the PA amplitude depends on the nonlinear incident optical fluence. The high-order dependence, quantified by polynomial fitting, provides super-resolution imaging with optical sectioning. PA nanoscopy is capable of super-resolution imaging of either fluorescent or nonfluorescent molecules. PMID:25104412

  5. Chemical kin label in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-12-23

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  6. Inulin determination for food labeling.

    PubMed

    Zuleta, A; Sambucetti, M E

    2001-10-01

    Inulin and oligofructose exhibit valuable nutritional and functional attributes, so they are used as supplements as soluble fiber or as macronutrient substitutes. As classic analytical methods for dietary fiber measurement are not effective, several specific methods have been proposed. These methods measure total fructans and are based on one or more enzymatic sample treatments and determination of released sugars. To determine inulin for labeling purposes, we developed an easy and rapid anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method following water extraction of inulin. HPLC conditions included an Aminex HPX- 87C column (Bio-Rad), deionized water at 85 degrees C as the mobile phase and a refractive index detector. The tested foods included tailor-made food products containing known amounts of inulin and commercial products (cookies, milk, ice creams, cheese, and cereal bars). The average recovery was 97%, and the coefficient of variation ranged from 1.1 to 5% in the food matrixes. The obtained results showed that this method provides an easier, faster and cheaper alternative than previous techniques for determining inulin with enough accuracy and precision for routine labeling purposes by direct determination of inulin by HPLC with refractive index detection. PMID:11599989

  7. Label-free photoacoustic nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Winkler, Amy M; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lidai; Chen, Yun; Dorn, Gerald W; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy techniques - capable of overcoming the diffraction limit of light - have opened new opportunities to explore subcellular structures and dynamics not resolvable in conventional far-field microscopy. However, relying on staining with exogenous fluorescent markers, these techniques can sometimes introduce undesired artifacts to the image, mainly due to large tagging agent sizes and insufficient or variable labeling densities. By contrast, the use of endogenous pigments allows imaging of the intrinsic structures of biological samples with unaltered molecular constituents. Here, we report label-free photoacoustic (PA) nanoscopy, which is exquisitely sensitive to optical absorption, with an 88 nm resolution. At each scanning position, multiple PA signals are successively excited with increasing laser pulse energy. Because of optical saturation or nonlinear thermal expansion, the PA amplitude depends on the nonlinear incident optical fluence. The high-order dependence, quantified by polynomial fitting, provides super-resolution imaging with optical sectioning. PA nanoscopy is capable of super-resolution imaging of either fluorescent or nonfluorescent molecules.

  8. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accuracy including, where applicable, the correct unique device identifier (UDI) or universal product code... manner that provides proper identification and is designed to prevent mixups. (d) Labeling...

  9. Simultaneous segmentation and statistical label fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asman, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest in medical imaging plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding. Two of the common techniques to obtain these labels are through either fully automated segmentation or through multi-atlas based segmentation and label fusion. Fully automated techniques often result in highly accurate segmentations but lack the robustness to be viable in many cases. On the other hand, label fusion techniques are often extremely robust, but lack the accuracy of automated algorithms for specific classes of problems. Herein, we propose to perform simultaneous automated segmentation and statistical label fusion through the reformulation of a generative model to include a linkage structure that explicitly estimates the complex global relationships between labels and intensities. These relationships are inferred from the atlas labels and intensities and applied to the target using a non-parametric approach. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of previously exclusive techniques and attempts to combine the accuracy benefits of automated segmentation with the robustness of a multi-atlas based approach. The accuracy benefits of this simultaneous approach are assessed using a multi-label multi-atlas whole-brain segmentation experiment and the segmentation of the highly variable thyroid on computed tomography images. The results demonstrate that this technique has major benefits for certain types of problems and has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in which the lines between statistical label fusion and automated segmentation are dramatically blurred.

  10. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on label... substance. The symbol on labels shall be clear and large enough to afford easy identification of...

  11. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  12. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  13. Diagnostic enteral gastrointestinal radiopaque human prescription drugs class labeling guideline for professional labeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, M.Y.

    1982-09-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announces the availability of a class labeling guideline for the professional labeling of diagnostic enteral gastrointestinal radiopaque agents. Class labeling is appropriate for these products because they are all closely related in chemical structure, pharmacology, therapeutic activity, and adverse reactions. The guideline is intended to promote the use of identical professional labeling for each member of the diagnostic enteral gastrointestinal radiopaque drug class.

  14. The reappropriation of stigmatizing labels: the reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Adam D; Wang, Cynthia S; Whitson, Jennifer A; Anicich, Eric M; Hugenberg, Kurt; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical model of reappropriation--taking possession of a slur previously used exclusively by dominant groups to reinforce another group's lesser status. Ten experiments tested this model and established a reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling with a derogatory group term. We first investigated precursors to self-labeling: Group, but not individual, power increased participants' willingness to label themselves with a derogatory term for their group. We then examined the consequences of such self-labeling for both the self and observers. Self-labelers felt more powerful after self-labeling, and observers perceived them and their group as more powerful. Finally, these labels were evaluated less negatively after self-labeling, and this attenuation of stigma was mediated by perceived power. These effects occurred only for derogatory terms (e.g., queer, bitch), and not for descriptive (e.g., woman) or majority-group (e.g., straight) labels. These results suggest that self-labeling with a derogatory label can weaken the label's stigmatizing force.

  15. 76 FR 46671 - Food Labeling; Gluten-Free Labeling of Foods; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... could use to establish a gluten threshold level to define the food labeling term ``gluten-free'' (72 FR... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 101 RIN 0910-ZA26 Food Labeling; Gluten-Free Labeling of Foods; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  16. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  17. GnRH agonist trigger with intensive luteal phase support vs. human chorionic gonadotropin trigger in high responders: an observational study reporting pregnancy outcomes and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Vlismas, Antonios; Carby, Anna; Lavery, Stuart; Trew, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective, cohort study of high-risk patients undergoing IVF treatment was performed to assess if there is a difference in clinical pregnancy rate, live birth rate and the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, when a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger with intensive luteal support is compared to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with standard luteal support. The control group consisted of 382 high-risk patients having a GnRH antagonist protocol with 194 receiving an hCG trigger. All patients had ≥18 follicles ≥11mm or serum oestradiol >18,000pmol/l on the day of trigger. Patients had a single or double embryo transfer at cleavage or blastocyst stage. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences between the groups. An intention-to-treat analysis of all cycles was performed. No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of positive pregnancy test, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Only one patient (0.3%) was hospitalized with severe OHSS in the GnRHa group, compared to 26 patients (13%) in the hCG group. In conclusion, GnRHa trigger is associated with similar pregnancy rates with hCG trigger and a significant reduction in hospitalization for severe OHSS after an intention to treat analysis was performed. PMID:27662416

  18. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... antibody or antibodies present as set forth in paragraph (d) of this section. (ii) Name, address (including... antibody designation on the labels of a final container with a capacity of less than 5 milliliters shall be not less than 12 point. The type size for the specificity of the antibody designations on the label...

  19. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1033.135 Labeling. As described in... information: (A) The label heading: “ORIGINAL LOCOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL INFORMATION.”...

  20. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1033.135 Labeling. As described in... information: (A) The label heading: “ORIGINAL LOCOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL INFORMATION.”...