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Sample records for 99mtc-tetrofosmin myocardial spect

  1. [Effect of wall thickness of left ventricle on 201Tl myocardial SPECT images: myocardial phantom study].

    PubMed

    Koto, M; Namura, H; Kawase, O; Yamasaki, K; Kono, M

    1996-07-01

    201Tl myocardial SPECT is known for better sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than planar images in detecting coronary artery disease and diagnosing myocardial viability. SPECT images are also superior to planar images in diagnostic sensitivity and anatomical orientation. However, as limitation of the spatial resolution of the machine, we often encounter poor SPECT plower image quality in patients with decreased wall thickness. To test the accuracy of SPECT images in patients with marked thinning of the left ventricular wall, as occurs in dilated cardiomyopathy, we performed a experimental study using myocardial phantom with 7 mm wall thickness. Tomographic image of the phantom images were rather heterogeneous, though no artificial defect was located. Dilated cardiomyopathy is thought to be characterized by patchy defects in the left ventricle. Careful attention should be given to elucidating myocardial perfusion in patients with a thin left ventricle wall, as there are technical limitations in addition to clinical features.

  2. [Usefulness of attenuation correction with transmission source in myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Keizo; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Sago, Masayoshi; Oka, Hisashi

    2006-01-20

    Attenuation correction in SPECT has been used for uniformly absorptive objects like the head. On the other hand, it has seldom been applied to nonuniform absorptive objects like the heart and surrounding lungs because of the difficulty and inaccuracy of data processing. However, since attenuation correction using a transmission source recently became practical, we were able to apply this method to a nonuniform absorptive object. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of this attenuation correction system with a transmission source in myocardial SPECT. The dose linearity, defect/normal ratio using a myocardial phantom, and myocardial count distribution in clinical cases was examined with and without the attenuation correction system. We found that all data processed with attenuation correction were better than those without attenuation correction. For example, in myocardial count distribution, while there was a difference between men and women without attenuation correction, which was considered to be caused by differences in body shape, after processing with attenuation correction, myocardial count distribution was almost the same in all cases. In conclusion, these results suggested that attenuation correction with a transmission source was useful in myocardial SPECT.

  3. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents. PMID:20652774

  4. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf .

  5. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf . PMID:26290421

  6. Quantification of myocardial salvage by myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac magnetic resonance--reference standards for ECG development.

    PubMed

    Engblom, Henrik; Aletras, Anthony H; Heiberg, Einar; Arheden, Håkan; Carlsson, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the cardioprotective efficacy of acute reperfusion therapy, assessed as myocardial salvage, in patients with acute coronary occlusion, the final myocardial infarct (MI) size needs to be related to the amount of ischemic myocardium during coronary occlusion, referred to as the myocardium at risk (MaR). There are currently several imaging approaches available for quantification of both MI size and MaR in vivo of which some have been validated both in pre-clinical and clinical settings. These methods often involve the use of either myocardial perfusion SPECT or cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). These imaging methods could potentially be used to further develop and validate ECG methods for determination of MI size and MaR. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of myocardial perfusion SPECT and CMR methods available for assessment of myocardial salvage by determination of MI size and MaR.

  7. SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67 in myocardial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Sakata, K.; Taguchi, T.; Fukumoto, Y.; Miyata, H.; Aoshima, S.; Yamazaki, N. )

    1990-06-01

    Two patients with myocardial sarcoidosis are presented, both of whom underwent SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67. The first had Ga-67 myocardial uptake with a Tl-201 defect, which disappeared with corticosteroid therapy. The second had multiple Tl-201 defects without Ga-67 uptake, which persisted despite corticosteroid therapy. Therefore, the combination of Tl-201 and Ga-67 imaging may be useful for recognizing myocardial sarcoidosis and for predicting the response to corticosteroid therapy.

  8. Visualization of an Incidental Ectopic Gallbladder Location on 99mTc-MIBI Myocardial Perfusion Imaging With SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Hou, Po-Nien; Huang, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Jay

    2016-03-01

    An ectopically located gallbladder is rare and unusual. In this study, we described a case of a 52-year-old woman who underwent SPECT-myocardial perfusion imaging because of exertional dyspnea and chest tightness. The rest sinograms reveal 2 substantially increased tracer uptakes in the right chest. Subsequently, a SPECT/CT scan was performed to clarify the indeterminate findings on the SPECT-myocardial perfusion imaging. The coregistered SPECT/CT images depict intense focal activity in the right chest, which corresponds to the gallbladder on the CT scan, thus explaining the peculiar ectopic gallbladder finding.

  9. Incidental Liver Findings in 99mTc-Sestamibi Myocardial Perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Andrea; da Cruz Netto, Pedro Gomes; Pedras, Paulo de Sa Villela

    2016-03-01

    In cardiac nuclear imaging, the liver is mostly remembered as a source of artifact in the left ventricular inferior wall. However, the liver may eventually display unexpected findings, which draw attention to significant noncardiac disease. In a patient referred for myocardial perfusion SPECT to investigate atypical chest pain, focal areas of increased tracer uptake revealed intrahepatic biliary dilatation.

  10. [Clinical value of rapid clearance in resting sestamibi cardiac SPECT in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Itagane, H; Yamagishi, H; Otsuka, M; Minami, S; Suto, Y; Hato, K; Tojo, O; Okumachi, F; Haze, K

    1995-07-01

    Resting 99mTc sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT and exercise-reinjection thallium-201 (T1) SPECT were performed in fourteen patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MIBI SPECT were obtained 90 min (MIBI-90) and 300 min (MIBI-300) after injection of 370 MBq of MIBI at rest. MIBI-90 and MIBI-300 were compared with exercise T1 imaging (T1-EX) and T1 reinjection imaging (REINJ). Each SPECT image was divided into 22 segments and myocardial uptake was scored visually. Abnormal perfusion defects were observed in 94 myocardial regions. Worsening of the score was observed in 79 segments (84%) on MIBI-300 compared with MIBI-90. Total MIBI-300 uptake score per person was significantly greater than that at MIBI-90 (14.8 +/- 8.6 vs. 7.7 +/- 7.9, p = 0.001). The concordance rate of defect score between MIBI-90 and REINJ was significantly higher than that between MIBI-300 and REINJ (55% vs. 17%, p = 0.001). In nine patients without recanalization of an infarct-related artery, perfusion defects were seen in 74 segments. The concordance rate of defect scores between MIBI-300 and T1-EX was significantly higher than that between MIBI-90 and T1-EX (45% vs. 16%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, rapid clearance of MIBI was observed frequently in patients with AMI. MIBI-90 and MIBI-300 may reflect myocardial viability and areas at risk for AMI, respectively.

  11. [Diagnosis of myocardial infarction by cine MR imaging--a comparative study with thallium-201 myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, H

    1993-01-25

    The usefulness of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated in 41 patients with acute (4 cases), subacute (21 cases) and chronic (16 cases) myocardial infarctions on the basis of the findings of thallium-201 myocardial SPECT. The overall rate of diagnostic accordance between cine MR imaging and SPECT was 85.0% (408/480). It was highest at the middle of the left ventricle (89.0%, 146/164) and lowest at the base (82.7%, 129/156). Measurement of wall thickness using the images printed on films was possible in 87.1% of segments (418/480). There was a significant difference in end-diastolic wall thickness and %-thickening between the infarcted and non-infarcted sites except for the base of the left ventricle. However, diastolic wall thinning was not remarkable in acute cases of less than one week after onset. In these cases %-thickening may be useful. Partial volume averaging on MR imaging and the inaccuracy of SPECT findings at the base also made meaningful comparison difficult. The most important diagnostic findings of myocardial infarction on cine MR imaging were end-diastolic wall thinning and abnormal motion such as akinesis and dyskinesis. It is concluded that cine MR imaging is a useful noninvasive examination method for evaluating the status of cardiac function in myocardial infarction.

  12. Variable Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathways in Patients Undergoing SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijun; Liang, Grace; Ong, Sang-Ging; Han, Leng; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Lee, Andrew S.; Vasanawala, Minal; Segall, George; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, it remains a primary source of low dose radiation exposure for cardiac patients. To determine the biological effects of low dose radiation from SPECT MPI, we measured the activation of the DNA damage response pathways using quantitative flow cytometry and single cell gene expression profiling. Methods and Results Blood samples were collected from patients before and after SPECT MPI (n=63). Overall, analysis of all recruited patients showed no marked differences in the phosphorylation of proteins (H2AX, p53, and ATM) following SPECT. The majority of patients also had either down-regulated or unchanged expression in DNA damage response genes at both 24 and 48 hours post-SPECT. Interestingly, a small subset of patients with increased phosphorylation also had significant up-regulation of genes associated with DNA damage, whereas those with no changes in phosphorylation had significant down-regulation or no difference, suggesting that some patients may potentially be more sensitive to low dose radiation exposure. Conclusions Our findings showed that SPECT MPI resulted in a variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways. Although only a small subset of patients had increased protein phosphorylation and elevated gene expression post-imaging, continued care should be taken to reduce radiation exposure to both patients and operators. PMID:25609688

  13. Myocardial perfusion imaging with technetium-99m sestamibi SPECT in the evaluation of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maddahi, J.; Kiat, H.; Van Train, K.F.; Prigent, F.; Friedman, J.; Garcia, E.V.; Alazraki, N.; DePuey, E.G.; Nichols, K.; Berman, D.S. )

    1990-10-16

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi is a new myocardial perfusion imaging agent that offers significant advantages over thallium-201 (Tl-201) for myocardial perfusion imaging. The results of the current clinical trials using acquisition and processing parameters similar to those for Tl-201 and a separate (2-day) injection protocol suggest that Tc-99m sestamibi and Tl-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provide similar information with respect to detection of myocardial perfusion defects, assessment of the pattern of defect reversibility, overall detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and detection of disease in individual coronary arteries. Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT appears to be superior to Tc-99m sestamibi planar imaging because the former provides a higher defect contrast and is more accurate for detection of disease in individual coronary arteries. Research is currently under way addressing optimization of acquisition and processing of Tc-99m sestamibi studies and development of quantitative algorithms for detection and localization of CAD and sizing of transmural and nontransmural myocardial perfusion defects. It is expected that with the implementation of the final results of these new developments, further significant improvement in image quality will be attained, which in turn will further increase the confidence in image interpretation. Development of algorithms for analysis of end-diastolic myocardial images may allow better evaluation of small and nontransmural myocardial defects. Furthermore, gated studies may provide valuable information with respect to regional myocardial wall motion and wall thickening. With the implementation of algorithms for attenuation and scatter correction, the overall specificity of Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT should improve significantly. 32 references.

  14. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; Mejia, Jorge; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Hélio Cesar; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Simões, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    Background Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. Objective To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Methods Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. Results The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. Conclusion The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents. PMID:23917507

  15. [Artifactual defect of inferior myocardium on 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial SPECT: characteristic findings and preventive method on phantom study].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Terada, S; Kanaya, S; Kashikura, K; Momose, M; Hosoda, S; Kusakabe, K

    1994-04-01

    Discordance between planar and SPECT image of inferior myocardial defect on 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy (MIBG) was occasionally observed in the clinical studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the existence of artifactual myocardial defect on MIBG SPECT image. Phantom study was performed in various kinds of situation using triple gamma camera. Artifactual defect adjacent to the liver was significantly observed in the case of increased liver/heart uptake ratio more than 2:1. Artifactual defect was markedly observed in the 180 degrees than that in the 360 degrees SPECT acquisition. To avoid artifactual defect during SPECT acquisition, liver phantom was moved down to the foot direction (vanishing liver position). In this phantom position, artifactual defect adjacent to the liver was not observed on reconstructed myocardial SPECT image. The vanishing liver position was also applicable to human study. Human body was inclined to right side at an angle of 15 degrees, artifactual defect could be avoided. Further study is needed to analyze the cause of this artifactual defect and to conform the preventive method with vanishing liver position in the routine myocardial SPECT examination.

  16. Identification of Angiogenesis Rich-Viable Myocardium using RGD Dimer based SPECT after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Su; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Byung Chul; Jung, Jae Ho; Yoo, Jung Sun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac healing after myocardial ischemia is a complex biological process. Advances in understanding of wound healing response have paved the way for clinical testing of novel molecular imaging to improve clinical outcomes. A key factor for assessing myocardial viability after ischemic injury is the evaluation of angiogenesis accompanying increased expression of integrin αvβ3. Here, we describe the capability of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting SPECT agent, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for identification of ischemic but viable myocardium, i.e., hibernating myocardium which is crucial to predict functional recovery after revascularization, the standard care of cardiovascular medicine. In vivo SPECT imaging of rat models with transient coronary occlusion showed significantly high uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 in the ischemic region. Comparative measurements with 201Tl SPECT and 18F-FDG PET, then, proved that such prominent uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 exactly matched the hallmark of hibernation, i.e., the perfusion-metabolism mismatch pattern. The uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was non-inferior to that of 18F-FDG, confirmed by time-course variation analysis. Immunohistochemical characterization revealed that an intense signal of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the vibrant angiogenic events with elevated expression of αvβ3 integrin. Together, these results establish that 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT can serve as a sensitive clinical measure for myocardial salvage to identify the patients who might benefit most from revascularization. PMID:27283041

  17. Identification of Angiogenesis Rich-Viable Myocardium using RGD Dimer based SPECT after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Su; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Byung Chul; Jung, Jae Ho; Yoo, Jung Sun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-06-10

    Cardiac healing after myocardial ischemia is a complex biological process. Advances in understanding of wound healing response have paved the way for clinical testing of novel molecular imaging to improve clinical outcomes. A key factor for assessing myocardial viability after ischemic injury is the evaluation of angiogenesis accompanying increased expression of integrin αvβ3. Here, we describe the capability of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting SPECT agent, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for identification of ischemic but viable myocardium, i.e., hibernating myocardium which is crucial to predict functional recovery after revascularization, the standard care of cardiovascular medicine. In vivo SPECT imaging of rat models with transient coronary occlusion showed significantly high uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 in the ischemic region. Comparative measurements with (201)Tl SPECT and (18)F-FDG PET, then, proved that such prominent uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 exactly matched the hallmark of hibernation, i.e., the perfusion-metabolism mismatch pattern. The uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was non-inferior to that of (18)F-FDG, confirmed by time-course variation analysis. Immunohistochemical characterization revealed that an intense signal of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the vibrant angiogenic events with elevated expression of αvβ3 integrin. Together, these results establish that (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT can serve as a sensitive clinical measure for myocardial salvage to identify the patients who might benefit most from revascularization.

  18. Identification of Angiogenesis Rich-Viable Myocardium using RGD Dimer based SPECT after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Su; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Byung Chul; Jung, Jae Ho; Yoo, Jung Sun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac healing after myocardial ischemia is a complex biological process. Advances in understanding of wound healing response have paved the way for clinical testing of novel molecular imaging to improve clinical outcomes. A key factor for assessing myocardial viability after ischemic injury is the evaluation of angiogenesis accompanying increased expression of integrin αvβ3. Here, we describe the capability of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting SPECT agent, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for identification of ischemic but viable myocardium, i.e., hibernating myocardium which is crucial to predict functional recovery after revascularization, the standard care of cardiovascular medicine. In vivo SPECT imaging of rat models with transient coronary occlusion showed significantly high uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 in the ischemic region. Comparative measurements with (201)Tl SPECT and (18)F-FDG PET, then, proved that such prominent uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 exactly matched the hallmark of hibernation, i.e., the perfusion-metabolism mismatch pattern. The uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was non-inferior to that of (18)F-FDG, confirmed by time-course variation analysis. Immunohistochemical characterization revealed that an intense signal of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the vibrant angiogenic events with elevated expression of αvβ3 integrin. Together, these results establish that (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT can serve as a sensitive clinical measure for myocardial salvage to identify the patients who might benefit most from revascularization. PMID:27283041

  19. A new dynamic myocardial phantom for evaluation of SPECT and PET quantitation in systolic and diastolic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dreuille, O. de; Bendriem, B.; Riddell, C.

    1996-12-31

    We present a new dynamic myocardial phantom designed to evaluate SPECT and PET imaging in systolic and diastolic conditions. The phantom includes a thoracic attenuating media and the myocardial wall thickness varying during the scan can be performed. In this study the phantom was used with three different wall thickness characteristic of a systolic, end-diastolic and pathologic end-diastolic condition. The myocardium was filled with {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and Gd and imaged by SPECT, PET and MRI. SPECT attenuation correction was performed using a modified PET transmission. A bull`s eyes image was obtained for all data and wall ROI were then drawn for analysis. Using MRI as a reference, error from PET, SPECT and attenuation corrected SPECT were calculated. Systolic PET performances agree with MRI. Quantitation loss due to wall thickness reduction compared to the systole. Attenuation correction in SPECT leads to significant decrease of the error both in systole (from 29% to 14%) and diastole (35% to 22%). This is particularly sensitive for septum and inferior walls. SPECT residual errors (14% in systole and 22% in pathologic end-diastole) are likely caused by scatter, noise and depth dependent resolution effect. The results obtained with this dynamical phantom demonstrate the quantitation improvement achieved in SPECT with attenuation correction and also reinforce the need for variable resolution correction in addition to attenuation correction.

  20. Measurement of myocardial wall thickening from PET/SPECT images: Comparison of two methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, M.L.; Mok, D.; Dilsizian, V.

    1996-05-01

    We compared two methods for measuring myocardial wall thickening from nuclear medicine perfusion scans. The first method uses the percent change in peak activity, and the second method models a profile measured across the myocardium. Mathematical simulations of the myocardium were used. In addition, images with PET or SPECT resolution were created from real MR images. Known amounts of noise were then added. The percent peak thickening (%PT) is nonlinear with true percent thickening, especially for PET resolutions [7 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM)]. For the peak method, low levels of noise (10%) introduced an error of 8%PT for PET and of 16%PT for SPECT. Additional smoothing reduced these errors. For the fitted model, at 10% noise, the error in thickening was large: 2.3 mm for PET and 7.8 mm for SPECT. The fitted model works well only with good resolution and low noise (e.g., 7 mm FWHM and 10%). The peak method is also sensitive to noise, especially for poorer resolutions. Additional smoothing gives more reliable results for the peak method but not the fitted method. The peak method is therefore the more generally reliable, but even this method may only allow classification of myocardial thickening into broad categories. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Tests of scanning model observers for myocardial SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, H. C.; Pretorius, P. H.; Brankov, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    Many researchers have tested and applied human-model observers as part of their evaluations of reconstruction methods for SPECT perfusion imaging. However, these model observers have generally been limited to signal-known- exactly (SKE) detection tasks. Our objective is to formulate and test scanning model observers that emulate humans in detection-localization tasks involving perfusion defects. Herein, we compare several models based on the channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) observer. Simulated Tc-99m images of the heart with and without defects were created using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom. Reconstructions were performed with an iterative algorithm and postsmoothed with a 3D Gaussian filter. Human and model-observer studies were conducted to assess the optimal number of iterations and the smoothing level of the filter. The human-observer study was a multiple-alternative forced-choice (MAFC) study with five defects. The CNPW observer performed the MAFC study, but also performed an SKE-but-variable (SKEV) study and a localization ROC (LROC) study. A separate LROC study applied an observer based on models of human search in mammograms. The amount of prior knowledge about the possible defects differed for these four model-observer studies. The trend was towards improved agreement with the human observers as prior knowledge decreased.

  2. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  3. Performance evaluation of a pinhole SPECT system for myocardial perfusion imaging of mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Max C; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Dae, Michael W

    2002-12-01

    The increasing use of transgenic mice as models of human physiology and disease has motivated the development of dedicated in vivo imaging systems for anatomic and functional characterization of mice as an adjunct to or a replacement for established ex vivo techniques. We have developed a pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for high resolution imaging of mice with cardiovascular imaging as the primary application. In this work, we characterize the system performance through phantom studies. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured from images of a line source and point source, respectively, and were reported for a range of object-to-pinhole distances and pinhole diameters. Tomographic images of a uniform cylindrical phantom, Defrise phantom, and grid phantom were used to characterize the image uniformity and spatial linearity. The uniform phantom image did not contain any ring or reconstruction artifacts, but blurring in the axial direction was evident in the Defrise phantom images. The grid phantom images demonstrated excellent spatial linearity. A novel phantom modeling perfusion of the left ventricle of a mouse was designed and built with perfusion defects of varying sizes to evaluate the system performance for myocardial perfusion imaging of mice. The defect volumes were measured from the pinhole SPECT images and correlated to the actual defect volumes calculated according to geometric formulas. Linear regression analysis produced a correlation coefficient of r = 0.995 (p < 0.001), demonstrating the feasibility for measurement of perfusion defect size in mice using pinhole SPECT. We have performed phantom studies to characterize the spatial resolution, sensitivity, image uniformity, and spatial linearity of the pinhole SPECT system. Measurement of the perfusion defect size is a valuable phenotypic assessment and will be useful for hypothesis testing in murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Tl-201 myocardial SPECT in patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy: A long-term follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamachi, S.; Jinnouchi, S.; Ono, S.; Hoshi, H.; Inoue, K.; Watanabe, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Tl-201 SPECT was used to evaluate myocardial involvement in 13 patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Serial studies of 9 patients were done at two-year intervals. The hypoperfused areas of the left ventricle became more prominent with age and severity.

  5. Evaluation of Respiratory Motion Effect on Defect Detection in Myocardial Perfusion SPECT: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; He, Xin; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of respiratory motion (RM) on defect detection in Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) using a phantom population that includes patient variability. Three RM patterns are included, namely breath-hold, slightly enhanced normal breathing, and deep breathing. For each RM pattern, six 4-D NCAT phantoms were generated, each with anatomical variations. Anterior, lateral and inferior myocardial defects with different sizes and contrasts were inserted. Noise-free SPECT projections were simulated using an analytical projector. Poisson noise was then added to generate noisy realizations. The projection data were reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with 1 and 4 subsets/iteration and at 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 iterations. Short-axis images centered at the centroid of the myocardial defect were extracted, and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was applied for the detection of the defect. The CHO results show that the value of the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) is affected by the RM amplitude. For all the defect sizes and contrasts studied, the highest or optimal AUC values indicate maximum detectability decrease with the increase of the RM amplitude. With no respiration, the ranking of the optimal AUC value in decreasing order is anterior then lateral, and finally inferior defects. The AUC value of the lateral defect drops more severely as the RM amplitude increases compared to other defect locations. Furthermore, as the RM amplitude increases, the AUC values of the smaller defects drop more quickly than the larger ones. We demonstrated that RM affects defect detectability of MPS imaging. The results indicate that developments of optimal data acquisition methods and RM correction methods are needed to improve the defect detectability in MPS.

  6. Evaluation of Respiratory Motion Effect on Defect Detection in Myocardial Perfusion SPECT: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; He, Xin; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of respiratory motion (RM) on defect detection in Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) using a phantom population that includes patient variability. Three RM patterns are included, namely breath-hold, slightly enhanced normal breathing, and deep breathing. For each RM pattern, six 4-D NCAT phantoms were generated, each with anatomical variations. Anterior, lateral and inferior myocardial defects with different sizes and contrasts were inserted. Noise-free SPECT projections were simulated using an analytical projector. Poisson noise was then added to generate noisy realizations. The projection data were reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with 1 and 4 subsets/iteration and at 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 iterations. Short-axis images centered at the centroid of the myocardial defect were extracted, and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was applied for the detection of the defect. The CHO results show that the value of the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) is affected by the RM amplitude. For all the defect sizes and contrasts studied, the highest or optimal AUC values indicate maximum detectability decrease with the increase of the RM amplitude. With no respiration, the ranking of the optimal AUC value in decreasing order is anterior then lateral, and finally inferior defects. The AUC value of the lateral defect drops more severely as the RM amplitude increases compared to other defect locations. Furthermore, as the RM amplitude increases, the AUC values of the smaller defects drop more quickly than the larger ones. We demonstrated that RM affects defect detectability of MPS imaging. The results indicate that developments of optimal data acquisition methods and RM correction methods are needed to improve the defect detectability in MPS. PMID:21731107

  7. Reverse perfusion pattern in myocardial spect with 99mTc-SestaMIBI

    PubMed Central

    Schillaci, O; Tavolozza, M; Di Biagio, D; Lacanfora, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Palombo, E; Catalano, R; Simonetti, G

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. The aim of our study was to investigate the myocardial perfusion deficit in rest images as compared to stress images in myocardial scintigraphy (MS). Objectives. The aim of this study is to investigate the reverse perfusion (RP) pattern in MS. Methods and Results. 263 patients were enrolled in the study (72 females and 191 males; mean age 65.7 ± 9.5 years old). Mean body mass index (BMI) was of 27.6 ± 3.8 Kg/m2. 115 patients were positive for a previous history of myocardial infarction (MI). 142 patients reported a revascularization treatment (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, PTCA, cardiac stent placement, coronary artery bypass grafting, CABG). All the patients underwent MS following standard single day Stress/Rest protocol. In our series, 27 patients presented a RP pattern. We did not find statistically significant differences when considering age (p = 0.7988), sex (p = 0.0657), BMI (p = 0.8611), diabetes (p = 0.8259), dyslipidemia (p = 0.1464) or smoking status (p = 0.6829) in RP patients vs. non-RP patients. A history of MI is related to a RP pattern (p < 0.0001). A history of previous revascularization was not related with RP (p = 0.6868). Discussion. The result of our study suggested that RP is probably related to artifacts of various origins. Further studies are necessary especially in microvascular dysfunction or a long history of disease. Abbreviations: MS: myocardial scintigraphy, RR: reverse redistribution, RP: reverse perfusion, MI: myocardial infarction, CAD: coronary artery disease, CABG: coronary artery bypass grafting; PTCA: percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; PCI: percutaneous coronary intervention, SPECT: single-photon emission computed tomogram. PMID:24146698

  8. Comparison of 18F SPECT with PET in myocardial imaging: A realistic thorax-cardiac phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Knešaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 (18F) Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and flow tracer such as Rubidium-82 (82Rb) is an established method for evaluating an ischemic but viable myocardium. However, the high cost of PET imaging restricts its wider clinical use. Therefore, less expensive 18F FDG single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has been considered as an alternative to 18F FDG PET imaging. The purpose of the work is to compare SPECT with PET in myocardial perfusion/viability imaging. Methods A nonuniform RH-2 thorax-heart phantom was used in the SPECT and PET acquisitions. Three inserts, 3 cm, 2 cm and 1 cm in diameter, were placed in the left ventricular (LV) wall to simulate infarcts. The phantom acquisition was performed sequentially with 7.4 MBq of 18F and 22.2 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) in the SPECT study and with 7.4 MBq of 18F and 370 MBq of 82Rb in the PET study. SPECT and PET data were processed using standard reconstruction software provided by vendors. Circumferential profiles of the short-axis slices, the contrast and viability of the inserts were used to evaluate the SPECT and PET images. Results The contrast for 3 cm, 2 cm and 1 cm inserts were for 18F PET data, 1.0 ± 0.01, 0.67 ± 0.02 and 0.25 ± 0.01, respectively. For 82Rb PET data, the corresponding contrast values were 0.61 ± 0.02, 0.37 ± 0.02 and 0.19 ± 0.01, respectively. For 18F SPECT the contrast values were, 0.31 ± 0.03 and 0.20 ± 0.05 for 3 cm and 2 cm inserts, respectively. For 99mTc SPECT the contrast values were, 0.63 ± 0.04 and 0.24 ± 0.05 for 3 cm and 2 cm inserts respectively. In SPECT, the 1 cm insert was not detectable. In the SPECT study, all three inserts were falsely diagnosed as "viable", while in the PET study, only the 1 cm insert was diagnosed falsely "viable". Conclusion For smaller defects the 99mTc/18F SPECT imaging cannot entirely replace the more expensive 82Rb/18F PET for myocardial perfusion

  9. Technical aspects of myocardial SPECT imaging with technetium-99m sestamibi

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.V.; Cooke, C.D.; Van Train, K.F.; Folks, R.; Peifer, J.; DePuey, E.G.; Maddahi, J.; Alazraki, N.; Galt, J.; Ezquerra, N. )

    1990-10-16

    Most reports to date using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi have used acquisition parameters that were optimized for thallium-201. To fully utilize the superior imaging characteristics of Tc-99m sestamibi, there is a need to optimize the technical aspects of SPECT imaging for this agent. Performance can be enhanced through the careful selection of optimal radiopharmaceutical doses, imaging sequences, acquisition parameters, reconstruction filters, perfusion quantification methods and multidimensional methods for visualizing perfusion distribution. The current report describes theoretical considerations, phantom studies and preliminary patient results that have led to optimized protocols, developed at Emory University and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, for same-day rest-stress studies, given existing instrumentation and recommended dose limits. The optimizations were designed to fit a low-dose-high-dose rest-stress same-day imaging protocol. A principal change in the acquisition parameters compared with previous Tc-99m sestamibi protocols is the use of a high-resolution collimator. The approach is being developed in both prone and supine positions. A new method for extracting a 3-dimensional myocardial count distribution has been developed that uses spherical coordinates to sample the apical region and cylindrical coordinates to sample the rest of the myocardium. New methods for visualizing the myocardial distribution in multiple dimensions are also described, with improved 2-dimensional, as well as 3- and 4-dimensional (3 dimensions plus time) displays. In the improved 2-dimensional display, distance-weighted and volume-weighted polar maps are used that appear to significantly improve the representation of defect location and defect extent, respectively.

  10. Optimization of the filter parameters in (99m)Tc myocardial perfusion SPECT studies: the formulation of flowchart.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Yamada, Tomoki; Kamida, Hiroki; Kunishita, Kohei; Hayashi, Yuuki; Nakajima, Tadashi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is typically subject to a variation in image quality due to the use of different acquisition protocols, image reconstruction parameters and image display settings by each institution. One of the principal image reconstruction parameters is the Butterworth filter cut-off frequency, a parameter strongly affecting the quality of myocardial images. The objective of this study was to formulate a flowchart for the determination of the optimal parameters of the Butterworth filter for filtered back projection (FBP), ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and collimator-detector response compensation OSEM (CDR-OSEM) methods using the evaluation system of the myocardial image based on technical grounds phantom. SPECT studies were acquired for seven simulated defects where the average counts of the normal myocardial components of 45° left anterior oblique projections were approximately 10-120 counts/pixel. These SPECT images were then reconstructed by FBP, OSEM and CDR-OSEM methods. Visual and quantitative assessment of short axis images were performed for the defect and normal parts. Finally, we formulated a flowchart indicating the optimal image processing procedure for SPECT images. Correlation between normal myocardial counts and the optimal cut-off frequency could be represented as a regression expression, which had high or medium coefficient of determination. We formulated the flowchart in order to optimize the image reconstruction parameters based on a comprehensive assessment, which enabled us to perform objectively processing. Furthermore, the usefulness of image reconstruction using the flowchart was demonstrated by a clinical case.

  11. Evaluating image denoising methods in myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiadopoulos, S.; Karatrantou, A.; Korfiatis, P.; Costaridou, L.; Vassilakos, P.; Apostolopoulos, D.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-10-01

    The statistical nature of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, due to the Poisson noise effect, results in the degradation of image quality, especially in the case of lesions of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A variety of well-established single-scale denoising methods applied on projection raw images have been incorporated in SPECT imaging applications, while multi-scale denoising methods with promising performance have been proposed. In this paper, a comparative evaluation study is performed between a multi-scale platelet denoising method and the well-established Butterworth filter applied as a pre- and post-processing step on images reconstructed without and/or with attenuation correction. Quantitative evaluation was carried out employing (i) a cardiac phantom containing two different size cold defects, utilized in two experiments conducted to simulate conditions without and with photon attenuation from myocardial surrounding tissue and (ii) a pilot-verified clinical dataset of 15 patients with ischemic defects. Image noise, defect contrast, SNR and defect contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) metrics were computed for both phantom and patient defects. In addition, an observer preference study was carried out for the clinical dataset, based on rankings from two nuclear medicine clinicians. Without photon attenuation conditions, denoising by platelet and Butterworth post-processing methods outperformed Butterworth pre-processing for large size defects, while for small size defects, as well as with photon attenuation conditions, all methods have demonstrated similar denoising performance. Under both attenuation conditions, the platelet method showed improved performance with respect to defect contrast, SNR and defect CNR in the case of images reconstructed without attenuation correction, however not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Quantitative as well as preference results obtained from clinical data showed similar performance of the

  12. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Dextrocardia with Situs Inversus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olusegun Akinwale; Malan, Nico; Hammond, Emmanuel Niiboye; Vangu, Mboyo-Di-Tamba Heben

    2016-01-01

    Dextrocardia is a cardiac positional anomaly in which the heart is located in the right hemithorax with its base-to-apex axis directed to the right and caudad. Situs inversus is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes organs in the chest and abdomen to be positioned in a mirror image from their normal position. Dextrocardia may occur in isolation or as part of situs inversus. Similarly, situs inversus may occur with or without dextrocardia. Situs inversus accompanied with dextrocardia (situs inversus totalis) is a rare congenital abnormality occurring in 0.01% of live births. Herein, we present the case of a 35-year-old man with previously diagnosed situs inversus totalis with mirror-image dextrocardia, referred to our facility for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The incidence and presentation of CAD in patients with dextrocardia are similar to the normal population. However, considerable attention should be paid to the acquisition of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and data processing/analysis in this group of patients. The present case highlights the distinctive applications and potential pitfalls of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in patients with dextrocardia.

  13. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Dextrocardia with Situs Inversus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Olusegun Akinwale; Malan, Nico; Hammond, Emmanuel Niiboye; Vangu, Mboyo-Di-Tamba Heben

    2016-01-01

    Dextrocardia is a cardiac positional anomaly in which the heart is located in the right hemithorax with its base-to-apex axis directed to the right and caudad. Situs inversus is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes organs in the chest and abdomen to be positioned in a mirror image from their normal position. Dextrocardia may occur in isolation or as part of situs inversus. Similarly, situs inversus may occur with or without dextrocardia. Situs inversus accompanied with dextrocardia (situs inversus totalis) is a rare congenital abnormality occurring in 0.01% of live births. Herein, we present the case of a 35-year-old man with previously diagnosed situs inversus totalis with mirror-image dextrocardia, referred to our facility for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The incidence and presentation of CAD in patients with dextrocardia are similar to the normal population. However, considerable attention should be paid to the acquisition of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and data processing/analysis in this group of patients. The present case highlights the distinctive applications and potential pitfalls of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in patients with dextrocardia. PMID:27408900

  14. Numerical surrogates for human observers in myocardial motion evaluation from SPECT image

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayehis, Mahdi M.; Parages, Felipe M.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    In medical imaging, the gold standard for image-quality assessment is a task-based approach in which one evaluates human observer performance for a given diagnostic task (e.g., detection of a myocardial perfusion or motion defect). To facilitate practical task-based image-quality assessment, model observers are needed as approximate surrogates for human observers. In cardiac-gated SPECT imaging, diagnosis relies on evaluation of the myocardial motion as well as perfusion. Model observers for the perfusion-defect detection task have been studied previously, but little effort has been devoted toward development of a model observer for cardiac-motion defect detection. In this work describe two model observers for predicting human observer performance in detection of cardiac-motion defects. Both proposed methods rely on motion features extracted using previously reported deformable mesh model for myocardium motion estimation. The first method is based on a Hotelling linear discriminant that is similar in concept to that used commonly for perfusion-defect detection. In the second method, based on relevance vector machines (RVM) for regression, we compute average human observer performance by first directly predicting individual human observer scores, and then using multi reader receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Our results suggest that the proposed RVM model observer can predict human observer performance accurately, while the new Hotelling motion-defect detector is somewhat less effective. PMID:23981533

  15. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging for the noninvasive diagnosis of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in a child with Kawasaki disease--a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Hausdorf, G.; Nienaber, C.A.; Spielman, R.P.

    1988-02-01

    The mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is of increasing importance for the pediatric cardiologist, for coronary aneurysms with the potential of thrombosis and subsequent stenosis can develop in the course of the disease. The authors report a 2 1/2-year-old female child in whom, fourteen months after the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, myocardial infarction occurred. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging using dipyridamole depicted anterior wall ischemia and inferolateral infarction. This case demonstrates that noninvasive vasodilation-redistribution thallium 201 SPECT-imaging has the potential to predict reversible myocardial perfusion defects and myocardial necrosis, even in small infants with Kawasaki disease.

  16. [Reduction of the influence of the liver uptake to the myocardial uptake on technetium-99m myocardial SPECT; usefulness and problems of a mask processing method].

    PubMed

    Takaki, A; Okada, K; Urata, J; Matsuda, H; Takao, Y

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a mask processing method for obtaining the true myocardial tracer distribution by eliminating the influence of the liver uptake to the myocardial uptake on myocardial SPECT images by using technetium-99m (99mTc) blood flow agents. A SPECT imaging was performed with a two-head SPECT system (GCA-7200A/DI) in both phantom and clinical studies. The mask processing method was applied to the reconstructed and projection images. The phantom consisted of heart, lung, liver and spine. A defect was located in the inferior wall of the left ventricle and other parts of the heart and liver were filled with 99mTc solution. For clinical study 10 patients with difficulty in the interpretation of the inferior wall were selected for the evaluation of usefulness of the mask method. In the phantom study, the mask processing method applied to the reconstructed images was able to remove the overlapped liver from the heart, but was not able to remove the influence of the liver uptake to the myocardial uptake. Nevertheless, the mask processing method applied to the projection images successfully eliminated not only the overlapped liver but also the influence of the liver uptake to the myocardial uptake. In the clinical study, the liver uptake could be removed from the uptake in the inferior wall in 8 of 10 patients with the mask processing methods. In 2 patients, the overlapped liver uptake could not be eliminated from the uptake in the inferior wall because the distance between the liver and heart was too short. The mask processing method applied to the projection images was thought to be superior to that applied to the reconstruction images in both phantom and clinical studies. The mask processing method, especially applied to the projection images, seems to be useful for the elimination of the liver uptake from the inferior wall of the myocardium on myocardial SPECT images using 99mTc blood flow agents.

  17. A single CT for attenuation correction of both rest and stress SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: a retrospective feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ahlman, Mark A; Nietert, Paul J; Wahlquist, Amy E; Serguson, Jill M; Berry, Max W; Suranyi, Pal; Liu, Songtao; Spicer, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the effort to reduce radiation exposure to patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with SPECT/CT, we evaluate the feasibility of a single CT for attenuation correction (AC) of single-day rest (R)/stress (S) perfusion. Methods: Processing of 20 single isotope and 20 dual isotope MPI with perfusion defects were retrospectively repeated in three steps: (1) the standard method using a concurrent R-CT for AC of R-SPECT and S-CT for S-SPECT; (2) the standard method repeated; and (3) with the R-CT used for AC of S-SPECT, and the S-CT used for AC of R-SPECT. Intra-Class Correlation Coefficients (ICC) and Choen’s kappa were used to measure intra-operator variability in sum scoring. Results: The highest level of intra-operator reliability was seen with the reproduction of the sum rest score (SRS) and sum stress score (SSS) (ICC > 95%). ICCs were > 85% for SRS and SSS when alternate CTs were used for AC, but when sum difference scores were calculated, ICC values were much lower (~22% to 27%), which may imply that neither CT substitution resulted in a reproducible difference score. Similar results were seen when evaluating dichotomous outcomes (sum scores difference of ≥ 4) when comparing different processing techniques (kappas ~0.32 to 0.43). Conclusions: When a single CT is used for AC of both rest and stress SPECT, there is disproportionately high variability in sum scoring that is independent of user error. This information can be used to direct further investigation in radiation reduction for common imaging exams in nuclear medicine. PMID:24482701

  18. Dobutamine stress-redistribution-reinjection versus rest-redistribution thallium-201 SPECT in the assessment of myocardial viability.

    PubMed

    Cornel, J H; Bax, J J; Elhendy, A; Reijs, A E; Fioretti, P M

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thallium-201 chloride (201Tl) reinjection imaging following dobutamine stress (DRi) to identify viable myocardium in comparison with a rest-redistribution 201Tl protocol (RR). The identification of viable myocardium bears important consequences for adequate selection of patients with poor left ventricular function, often unable to exercise, who are considered for revascularization. Twenty-six patients with chronic coronary artery disease and depressed left ventricular function (ejection fraction 36 +/- 10%) were studied by both DRi and RR single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Semi-quantitative analysis of regional 201Tl activity (5-point score) and wall motion by echocardiography using a 16-segment model was performed. Regions were classified as viable (normal/reversible/fixed moderate defects) or non-viable (fixed severe defects) and related to regional wall motion. Target heart rate was reached in 25 patients. Myocardial viability was demonstrated in 353/416 (85%) by DRi SPECT and in 346/416 (83%) by RR SPECT. The agreement between the 2 protocols was 98% with a K-value of 0.94; similar results were obtained when the analysis was limited to dyscontractile segments. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the feasibility and diagnostic value of DRi SPECT to identify viable myocardium.

  19. Effect of maintenance oral theophylline on dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging using SPECT and dipyridamole-induced hemodynamic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, P.J.; Mahn, T.H.; Zielonka, J.S.; Krubsack, A.J.; Akhtar, R.; Bamrah, V.S.

    1988-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of maintenance oral theophylline therapy on the diagnostic efficacy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for coronary artery disease, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging was performed in eight men with documented coronary artery disease before initiation of theophylline treatment and repeated while these patients were receiving therapeutic doses of oral theophylline. Before theophylline treatment, intravenous dipyridamole caused a significant increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, angina in seven of eight patients, and ST segment depression in four of eight patients. While they were being treated with theophylline, none of the patients had angina or ST segment depression, and there were no hemodynamic changes with intravenous dipyridamole. Before theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging showed reversible perfusion defects in myocardial segments supplied by stenotic coronary arteries. With theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT showed total absence of reversible perfusion defects. Treatment with theophylline markedly reduced the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 imaging for coronary artery disease.

  20. Use of the cavity-to-myocardial count ratio with Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT to predict reduced left ventricular function

    SciTech Connect

    Heerden, B.B. van; Heerden, P.D.R. van; Wasserman, H.J.

    1994-05-01

    In patients with left ventricular dysfunction, the left ventricular cavity appears abnormally photopenic on SPECT images, both with T1-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi showed a linear correlation between the cavity-to-myocardial count ratio (C/M ratio) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with T1-201 SPECT. Using an exercise ratio of 0.4 as the lower limit of normal, they could predict a reduced LVEF with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 78%. The purpose of our study was to ascertain whether the C/M ratio could also be used as an indicator of LVEF when using Tc-99m sestamibi as imaging agent.

  1. Applying the J-optimal channelized quadratic observer to SPECT myocardial perfusion defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupinski, Meredith K.; Clarkson, Eric; Ghaly, Michael; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate performance on a perfusion defect detection task from 540 image pairs of myocardial perfusion SPECT image data we apply the J-optimal channelized quadratic observer (J-CQO). We compare AUC values of the linear Hotelling observer and J-CQO when the defect location is fixed and when it occurs in one of two locations. As expected, when the location is fixed a single channels maximizes AUC; location variability requires multiple channels to maximize the AUC. The AUC is estimated from both the projection data and reconstructed images. J-CQO is quadratic since it uses the first- and second- order statistics of the image data from both classes. The linear data reduction by the channels is described by an L x M channel matrix and in prior work we introduced an iterative gradient-based method for calculating the channel matrix. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels yields better estimates of these sample statistics from smaller sample sizes, and since the channelized covariance matrix is L x L instead of M x M, the matrix inverse is easier to compute. The novelty of our approach is the use of Jeffrey's divergence (J) as the figure of merit (FOM) for optimizing the channel matrix. We previously showed that the J-optimal channels are also the optimum channels for the AUC and the Bhattacharyya distance when the channel outputs are Gaussian distributed with equal means. This work evaluates the use of J as a surrogate FOM (SFOM) for AUC when these statistical conditions are not satisfied.

  2. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk in

  3. Optimal left ventricular lead position assessed with phase analysis on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Boogers, Mark J.; Chen, Ji; van Bommel, Rutger J.; Borleffs, C. Jan Willem; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; van der Hiel, Bernies; Al Younis, Imad; Schalij, Martin J.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the site of latest mechanical activation as assessed with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS), left ventricular (LV) lead position and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods The patient population consisted of consecutive patients with advanced heart failure in whom CRT was currently indicated. Before implantation, 2-D echocardiography and GMPS were performed. The echocardiography was performed to assess LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). The site of latest mechanical activation was assessed by phase analysis of GMPS studies and related to LV lead position on fluoroscopy. Echocardiography was repeated after 6 months of CRT. CRT response was defined as a decrease of ≥15% in LVESV. Results Enrolled in the study were 90 patients (72% men, 67±10 years) with advanced heart failure. In 52 patients (58%), the LV lead was positioned at the site of latest mechanical activation (concordant), and in 38 patients (42%) the LV lead was positioned outside the site of latest mechanical activation (discordant). CRT response was significantly more often documented in patients with a concordant LV lead position than in patients with a discordant LV lead position (79% vs. 26%, p<0.01). After 6 months, patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LVEF, LVESV and LVEDV (p<0.05), whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvement in these variables. Conclusion Patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LV volumes and LV systolic function, whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvements. PMID:20953608

  4. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S.K.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the 3D XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included 3 variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET Monte Carlo code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk in the

  5. Performance of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using Multi-focus Fan Beam Collimator with Resolution Recovery Reconstruction in a Comparison with Conventional SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Matsutomo, Norikazu; Nagaki, Akio; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): IQ-SPECT is an advanced high-speed SPECT modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), which uses a multi-focus fan beam collimator with resolution recovery reconstruction. The aim of this study was to compare IQ-SPECT with conventional SPECT in terms of performance, based on standard clinical protocols. In addition, we examined the concordance between conventional and IQ_SPECT in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Fifty-three patients, undergoing rest-gated MPI for the evaluation of known or suspected CAD, were enrolled in this study. In each patient, conventional SPECT (99mTc-tetrofosmin, 9.6 min and 201Tl, 12.9 min) was performed, immediately followed by IQ-SPECT, using a short acquisition time (4.3 min for 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 6.2 min for 201Tl). A quantitative analysis was performed on an MPI polar map, using a 20-segment model of the left ventricle. An automated analysis by gated SPECT was carried out to determine the left ventricular volume and function including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The degree of concordance between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT images was evaluated according to linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Results: The segmental percent uptake exhibited a significant correlation between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT (P<0.05). The mean differences in 99mTc-tetrofosmin studies were 1.1±6.6% (apex), 2.8±5.7% (anterior wall), 2.9±6.2% (septal wall), 4.9±6.7% (lateral wall), and 1.8±5.6% (inferior wall). Meanwhile, regarding the 201Tl-SPECT studies, these values were 1.6±6.9%, 2.0±6.6%, 2.1±5.9%, 3.3±7.2%, and 2.4±5.8%, respectively. Although the mean LVEF in IQ-SPECT tended to be higher than that observed in conventional SPECT (conventional SPECT=64.8±11.8% and IQ-SPECT=68.3±12.1% for 99mTc-tetrofosmin; conventional SPECT= 56.0±11.7% and IQ-SPECT=61.5±12.2% for 201Tl), quantitative parameters were not

  6. [Rest delayed images on 99mTc-MIBI myocardial SPECT as a noninvasive screen for the diagnosis of vasospastic angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Ono, Soichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Shin; Kurabe, Atsushi; Heito, Takayuki

    2002-05-01

    Diagnostic usefulness of 99mTc-MIBI myocardial SPECT at rest was examined in 39 cases of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris who were diagnosed by a positive reaction to ergonovine provocation. SPECT was performed 45 minutes (early image) and 3 hours (delayed image) after the intravenous injection of approximately 600 MBq of MIBI. Decrease in accumulation was ranked by four defect scores (0: normal; 1: slight decrease; 2: moderate decrease; 3: severe decrease) and the total defect score was evaluated semiquantitatively. The washout rate between the normal area and the spasm area was also evaluated quantitatively using bull's eye. As a result, 15 cases (15/39; 38.4%) showed decreased accumulation in the early image and 27 cases (27/39; 69.2%) showed decreased accumulation in the delayed image. All of the cases which showed decreased accumulation in the early image had decreased accumulation in the delayed image as well. In 6 cases (6/34; 17.6%) showed ST wave changes during exercise ECG and 16 cases (16/34: 47%) showed decreased accumulation in the exercise myocardial SPECT. The washout rate of MIBI in the decreased accumulation area was significantly higher than that of the normal area. Of 32 ergonovine induced vasospastic area, 23 areas (72%) exhibited decreased accumulation in the delayed image for the same area. Decreased accumulation in the delayed image in MIBI was due to the enhanced washout, which, in turn, indicated declined retention of MIBI by mitochondrial membrane. In coronary vasospastic angina pectoris, spasm induced ischemia was thought to have an effect on the mitochondria. This study suggested that even with a normal exercise ECG and exercise myocardial SPECT, there's a strong possibility of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris if a decreased accumulation was found in the delayed image in the MIBI myocardial SPECT at rest. Hence, in diagnosing coronary vasospastic angina pectoris, the delayed image in the MIBI myocardial SPECT at rest was believed

  7. [Use of SPECT-scanning of the heart in estimating of influence of drugs of the background therapy of ischemic heart disease on myocardial perfusion].

    PubMed

    Svistov, A S; Sukhov, V Iu; Makiev, R G; Alanichev, A E

    2012-10-01

    Some new facts about the influence of different groups of drugs on myocardial perfusion were educed during the research. Educed facts conduce representation extension by matching the optimal therapy of ischemic heart disease. With the help of SPECT-scanning were educed myocardial blood flow, areas of maximal hypoperfusion and its influence on time pattern and redistribution of myocardial blood flow in patients receiving disease-modifying agents and statins. Some regularities of change of myocardial blood flow depending on applied group of drugs and peculiarities of influence of myocardial perfusion in certain time interval were revealed. Criteria with prognostic significance in prospective individual effectiveness of anti-ischemic drugs were pointed out. New approach, based on choice of anti-ischemic therapy depending on extent of influence on myocardial perfusion and also individual clinical and functional traits of patients, was applied. PMID:23213770

  8. Optimization and comparison of simultaneous and separate acquisition protocols for dual isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2015-07-01

    Dual-isotope simultaneous-acquisition (DISA) rest-stress myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) protocols offer a number of advantages over separate acquisition. However, crosstalk contamination due to scatter in the patient and interactions in the collimator degrade image quality. Compensation can reduce the effects of crosstalk, but does not entirely eliminate image degradations. Optimizing acquisition parameters could further reduce the impact of crosstalk. In this paper we investigate the optimization of the rest Tl-201 energy window width and relative injected activities using the ideal observer (IO), a realistic digital phantom population and Monte Carlo (MC) simulated Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections as a means to improve image quality. We compared performance on a perfusion defect detection task for Tl-201 acquisition energy window widths varying from 4 to 40 keV centered at 72 keV for a camera with a 9% energy resolution. We also investigated 7 different relative injected activities, defined as the ratio of Tc-99m and Tl-201 activities, while keeping the total effective dose constant at 13.5 mSv. For each energy window and relative injected activity, we computed the IO test statistics using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 1,620 triplets of fixed and reversible defect-present, and defect-absent noisy images modeling realistic background variations. The volume under the 3-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) surface (VUS) was estimated and served as the figure of merit. For simultaneous acquisition, the IO suggested that relative Tc-to-Tl injected activity ratios of 2.6-5 and acquisition energy window widths of 16-22% were optimal. For separate acquisition, we observed a broad range of optimal relative injected activities from 2.6 to 12.1 and acquisition energy window of widths 16-22%. A negative correlation between Tl-201 injected activity and the width of the Tl-201 energy window was observed in these ranges. The results

  9. Optimization and comparison of simultaneous and separate acquisition protocols for dual isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Dual-isotope simultaneous-acquisition (DISA) rest-stress myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) protocols offer a number of advantages over separate acquisition. However, crosstalk contamination due to scatter in the patient and interactions in the collimator degrade image quality. Compensation can reduce the effects of crosstalk, but does not entirely eliminate image degradations. Optimizing acquisition parameters could further reduce the impact of crosstalk. In this paper we investigate the optimization of the rest Tl-201 energy window width and relative injected activities using the ideal observer (IO), a realistic digital phantom population and Monte Carlo (MC) simulated Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections as a means to improve image quality. We compared performance on a perfusion defect detection task for Tl-201 acquisition energy window widths varying from 4 to 40 keV centered at 72 keV for a camera with a 9% energy resolution. We also investigated 7 different relative injected activities, defined as the ratio of Tc-99m and Tl-201 activities, while keeping the total effective dose constant at 13.5 mSv. For each energy window and relative injected activity, we computed the IO test statistics using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 1,620 triplets of fixed and reversible defect-present, and defect-absent noisy images modeling realistic background variations. The volume under the 3-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) surface (VUS) was estimated and served as the figure of merit. For simultaneous acquisition, the IO suggested that relative Tc-to-Tl injected activity ratios of 2.6–5 and acquisition energy window widths of 16–22% were optimal. For separate acquisition, we observed a broad range of optimal relative injected activities from 2.6 to 12.1 and acquisition energy window of widths 16–22%. A negative correlation between Tl-201 injected activity and the width of the Tl-201 energy window was observed in these ranges. The results

  10. Optimization and comparison of simultaneous and separate acquisition protocols for dual isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-07-01

    Dual-isotope simultaneous-acquisition (DISA) rest-stress myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) protocols offer a number of advantages over separate acquisition. However, crosstalk contamination due to scatter in the patient and interactions in the collimator degrade image quality. Compensation can reduce the effects of crosstalk, but does not entirely eliminate image degradations. Optimizing acquisition parameters could further reduce the impact of crosstalk. In this paper we investigate the optimization of the rest Tl-201 energy window width and relative injected activities using the ideal observer (IO), a realistic digital phantom population and Monte Carlo (MC) simulated Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections as a means to improve image quality. We compared performance on a perfusion defect detection task for Tl-201 acquisition energy window widths varying from 4 to 40 keV centered at 72 keV for a camera with a 9% energy resolution. We also investigated 7 different relative injected activities, defined as the ratio of Tc-99m and Tl-201 activities, while keeping the total effective dose constant at 13.5 mSv. For each energy window and relative injected activity, we computed the IO test statistics using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 1,620 triplets of fixed and reversible defect-present, and defect-absent noisy images modeling realistic background variations. The volume under the 3-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) surface (VUS) was estimated and served as the figure of merit. For simultaneous acquisition, the IO suggested that relative Tc-to-Tl injected activity ratios of 2.6-5 and acquisition energy window widths of 16-22% were optimal. For separate acquisition, we observed a broad range of optimal relative injected activities from 2.6 to 12.1 and acquisition energy window of widths 16-22%. A negative correlation between Tl-201 injected activity and the width of the Tl-201 energy window was observed in these ranges. The results

  11. [Development and clinical application of an expert system for supporting diagnosis of 201Tl stress myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Horino, M; Hosoba, M; Wani, H; Oriuchi, N; Tateno, M; Inoue, T; Sasaki, Y; Igarashi, H; Iizuka, T

    1990-02-01

    A consultation expert system which supports our computer aided reporting system was developed. The system was used for the evaluation of the two dimensional polar (bull's eye) display of 201Tl myocardial SPECT. The system consists of patients management (PM) and consultation expert systems (ES). The former is connected to image processors coupled with scinticameras. The bull's eye display of myocardial SPECT is transferred from image processor to the data base of PM. When inference request is made, the feature extraction program extracts information on localization, extent and severity of focal defects comparing count-rates pixel by pixel with the reference obtained from seven normal controls. The inference engine is activated to determine presence of focal defects utilizing diagnostic rules in the knowledge base. The results are sent back to PM and reported with the probability of assurance. Fifty eight patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI), angina pectoris (AP) and other diseases as well as normal controls were included in the study. The decision for presence or absence of focal defects by ES agreed with that by nuclear physicians (NP) in 301 segments among 330 (91%) in stress images. The presence of redistribution in delayed images agreed in 43 segments among 67 (64%). Image interpretation by ES agreed well with that of NP in patients with OMI (19/20) and AP (9/11). Seven were interpreted as normal by both ES and NP. The system is useful, as it provides NP with complementary and supportive information applicable to decision making and reporting. Further clinical experiences can improve knowledge base for better ES function.

  12. The Role of Routine Whole Volume SPECT Reconstruction in Comparison to Cine Raw Data in the Detection of Extracardiac Uptake on Myocardial Perfusion Scans.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Korowlay, N A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of routine whole volume reconstructed single-photon emission tomography (rSPECT) compared to cine raw data to detect extracardiac uptake of Sestamibi (MIBI). In a retrospective study, the myocardial perfusion studies of 426 patients were inspected separately for extracardiac uptake on cine raw data and rSPECT. The acquisition parameters for all the images were done according to departmental protocol. The whole volume SPECT data was selected and processed by HOSEM iterative reconstruction using the HERMES computer software system. The images were assessed by two observers, a student in training and a senior consultant nuclear medicine physician. The overall mean age and standard deviation of the 426 patients at the time of the study was 60 ± 12 years. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kappa and McNemars tests. The clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was evaluated using hospital folders and /or laboratory results after viewing images. rSPECT detected 25 patients (5.9%) and cine raw data identified 18 patients (4.2%) with extracardiac uptake. All the areas of extracardiac uptake noted on cine raw data were seen on the rSPECT images. Only 21 of the 25 patients had complete 5-year clinical follow-up. The value of the clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was limited due to the study being retrospective. The proportion of positives identified by rSPECT was significantly larger than those identified by cine raw data (P = 0.0082). Although our study demonstrates that rSPECT is more sensitive than cine raw data in detecting extracardiac uptake, it also shows that there is no benefit in routine whole volume rSPECT in daily clinical practice.

  13. A prospective comparison of rubidium-82 PET and thallium-201 SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging utilizing a single dipyridamole stress in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Go, R.T.; Marwick, T.H.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Saha, G.B.; Neumann, D.R.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.C. )

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to prospectively compare myocardial perfusion imaging with rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) by positron emission tomography (PET) with thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) imaging by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) by recording both studies with a single dipyridamole handgrip stress, and reading both sets of images with the same display technique. In a series of 202 patients with previous coronary arteriography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of {sup 82}Rb PET were 93%, 78%, and 90% and for {sup 201}Tl SPECT 76%, 80%, and 77%, respectively. When 70 patients with previous therapeutic interventions were excluded, the remaining 132 patients showed a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 95%, 82% and 92% for {sup 82}Rb PET and 79%, 76%, and 78% for {sup 201}Tl SPECT. The improved contrast resolution of PET resulted in markedly superior images and a more confident identification of defects.

  14. Myocardial blood flow measurement with a conventional dual-head SPECT/CT with spatiotemporal iterative reconstructions - a clinical feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Alhassen, Fares; Nguyen, Nhan; Bains, Sukhkarn; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho; Bacharach, Stephen L; Song, Xiyun; Shao, Lingxiong; Gullberg, Grant T; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras typically rotate too slowly around a patient to capture changes in the blood pool activity distribution and provide accurate kinetic parameters. A spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method to overcome these limitations was investigated. Dynamic rest/stress 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) SPECT/CT was performed along with reference standard rest/stress dynamic positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 13N-NH3 in five patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using conventional and spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction methods. The spatiotemporal reconstruction yielded improved image quality, defined here as a statistically significant (p<0.01) 50% contrast enhancement. We did not observe a statistically significant difference between the correlations of the conventional and spatiotemporal SPECT myocardial uptake K 1 values with PET K 1 values (r=0.25, 0.88, respectively) (p<0.17). These results indicate the clinical feasibility of quantitative, dynamic SPECT/CT using 99mTc-MIBI and warrant further investigation. Spatiotemporal reconstruction clearly provides an advantage over a conventional reconstruction in computing K 1. PMID:24380045

  15. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C.

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  16. Comparison of Channelized Hotelling and Human Observers inDetermining Optimum OS-EM Reconstruction Parameters for MyocardialSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, Karen L.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Qi, Yujin; Gullberg,Grant T.

    2005-07-01

    The performance of the Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO)was compared to that of human observers for determining optimumparameters for the iterative OS-EM image reconstruction method for thetask of defect detection in myocardial SPECT images. The optimumparameters were those that maximized defect detectability in the SPECTimages. Low noise, parallel SPECT projection data, with and without ananterior, inferior or lateral LV wall defect, were simulated using theMonte Carlo method. Poisson noise was added to generate noisyrealizations. Data were reconstructed using OS-EM at 1&4subsets/iteration and at 1, 3, 5, 7&9 iterations. Images wereconverted to 2D short-axis slices with integer pixel values. The CHO used3 radially-symmetric, 2D channels, with varying levels of internalobserver noise. For each parameter setting, 600 defect-present and 600defect-absent image vectors were used to calculate the detectabilityindex (dA). The human observers rated the likelihood that a defect waspresent in a specified location. For each parameter setting, the AUC wasestimated from 48 defect-present and 48 defect-absent images. Thecombined human observer results showed the optimum parameter settingcould be in the range 5-36 updates ([number of subsets]/iteration enumber of iterations). The CHO results showed the optimum parametersetting to be 4-5 updates. The performance of the CHO was much moresensitive to the reconstruction parameter setting than was that of thehuman observers. The rankings of the CHO detectability values did notchange with varying levels of internal noise.

  17. [Rest gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion post (99m)Tc-MIBI injection in a patient with acute chest pain and with no medical history of ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Negre-Busó, M; Muntaner-Muñoz, L; Rubió-Rodríguez, A; Marin-Buriticá, A; Ferran-Sureda, N; Bassaganyas-Vilarrasa, J

    2015-01-01

    Gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging is a widely used technique indicated for assessment of patients with no clear diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Early rest gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion study in patients with acute chest pain has high sensitivity and high negative predictive value for ruling out coronary disease. We report a case of a patient admitted for the study of her chest pain. She underwent a myocardial perfusion stress-rest whose interpretation could have been equivocal due to the clinical status of the patient during the injection of the radiotracer. PMID:25759109

  18. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99mTc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  19. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of (99m)Tc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman's rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  20. [A calculation of an index of the coronary flow reserve using exercise and rest myocardial SPECT with 99mTc-tetrofosmin].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, N; Sugihara, H; Nakamura, T; Ito, K; Azuma, A; Maeda, T; Nakagawa, M

    1997-01-01

    We designed a new method to evaluate the rate of change of myocardial 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TF) uptake between exercise and rest images with a 1-day protocol. Fifteen normal cases were studied. A 370 MBq of TF was injected at peak exercise. Initial (TF1) and delayed (TF2) exercise SPECT images were acquired 30 min and 3 hr after the injection. A 740 MBq of TF was reinjected soon after TF2 acquisition, and rest SPECT images (TF3) were obtained 30 min after the reinjection. Myocardial counts of TF1, TF2 and TF3 were defined C1, C2 and C3 respectively. Then, the rate of change of myocardial TF uptake between exercise and rest (delta MTU: delta myocardial TF uptake) was determined by the following formula. delta MTU = [(C1/(C3-C2)] x R-1] x 100 (%) (R: dose ratio). delta MTU was 57.8 +/- 9.9% in normal cases and roughly correlated with maximal heart rates and double product. If the extraction fraction of TF is not changed under the exercise and resting condition, delta MTU may have some relation with the coronary flow/cardiac output ratio at exercise. In conclusion, delta MTU is a useful index to evaluate coronary flow reserve non-invasively.

  1. Quantitative reconstruction for myocardial perfusion SPECT: an efficient approach by depth-dependent deconvolution and matrix rotation.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Liang, Z; Harrington, D P

    1994-08-01

    An efficient reconstruction method for myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been developed which compensates simultaneously for attenuation, scatter, and resolution variation. The scattered photons in the primary-energy-window measurements are approximately removed by subtracting the weighted scatter-energy-window samples. The resolution variation is corrected by deconvolving the subtracted data with the detector-response kernel in frequency space using the depth-dependent frequency relation. The attenuated photons are compensated by recursively tracing the attenuation factors through the object-specific attenuation map. An experimental chest phantom with defects inside myocardium was used to test the method. The attenuation map of the phantom was reconstructed from transmission scans using a flat external source and a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator of a single-detector system. The detector-response kernel was approximated from measurements of a point source in air at several depths from the collimator surface. The emission data were acquired by the same detector setting. A computer simulation using similar protocols as in the experiment was performed. Both the simulation and experiment showed significant improvement in quantification with the proposed method, as compared to the conventional filtered-backprojection technique. The quantitative gain by the additional deconvolution was demonstrated. The computation time was less than 20 min on a HP/730 desktop computer for reconstruction of a 1282 x 64 array from 128 projections of 128 x 64 samples. PMID:15551566

  2. Comparison of SPECT using technetium-99m agents and thallium-201 and PET for the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.S.; Kiat, H.; Van Train, K.F.; Friedman, J.; Garcia, E.V.; Maddahi, J. )

    1990-10-16

    This report reviews the applications of tomographic imaging with current and new tracers in assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Multiple studies with thallium-201 (TI-201) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated high sensitivity, high rates of normalcy and high reproducibility. In assessing viability, fixed defects are frequently detected in viable zones in 4-hour studies with TI-201 imaging. Redistribution imaging performed 18 to 72 hours after injection or reinjection of TI-201 before 4-hour redistribution imaging has been shown to improve accuracy of viability assessment. TI-201 SPECT studies are limited by the suboptimal physical properties of TI-201, which result in variable image quality. The 2 new technetium-99m (Tc-99m) - labeled myocardial perfusion tracers offer the ability to inject much higher amounts of radioactivity, making it possible to assess ventricular function as well as myocardial perfusion from the same injection of radiotracer. Tc-99m sestamibi has very slow myocardial clearance, which allows for prolonged imaging time and results in image quality superior to that obtained with TI-201 and Tc-99m teboroxime. The combination of minimal redistribution of Tc-99m sestamibi and high count rates makes gated SPECT imaging feasible, and also permits assessment of patients with acute ischemic syndromes by uncoupling the time of injection from the time of imaging. The combination of high image quality and first-pass exercise capabilities may lead to a choice of this agent over TI-201 for assessment of chronic CAD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Myocardial CT Perfusion Imaging and SPECT for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: A Head-to-Head Comparison from the CORE320 Multicenter Diagnostic Performance Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Vishal C.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Miller, Julie M.; Matheson, Matthew B.; Vavere, Andrea L.; Kofoed, Klaus F.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Dewey, Marc; Yaw, Tan S.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Brenner, Winfried; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.; Di Carli, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of myocardial computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) as depicted at invasive coronary angiography. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Sixteen centers enrolled 381 patients from November 2009 to July 2011. Patients underwent rest and adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging and rest and either exercise or pharmacologic stress SPECT before and within 60 days of coronary angiography. Images from CT perfusion imaging, SPECT, and coronary angiography were interpreted at blinded, independent core laboratories. The primary diagnostic parameter was the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with use of prespecified cutoffs. The reference standard was a stenosis of at least 50% at coronary angiography as determined with quantitative methods. Results CAD was diagnosed in 229 of the 381 patients (60%). The per-patient sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CAD (stenosis ≥50%) were 88% (202 of 229 patients) and 55% (83 of 152 patients), respectively, for CT perfusion imaging and 62% (143 of 229 patients) and 67% (102 of 152 patients) for SPECT, with Az values of 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.74, 0.82) and 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.64, 0.74) (P = .001). The sensitivity of CT perfusion imaging for single- and multivessel CAD was higher than that of SPECT, with sensitivities for left main, three-vessel, two-vessel, and one-vessel disease of 92%, 92%, 89%, and 83%, respectively, for CT perfusion imaging and 75%, 79%, 68%, and 41%, respectively, for SPECT. Conclusion The overall performance of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomic CAD (stenosis ≥50%), as demonstrated with the

  4. [A phantom study for the evaluation of the effect of the high uptake in the liver on technetium-99m myocardial perfusion SPECT images].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, H; Masuda, K; Takada, M; Yamamoto, I; Morita, R

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate influences of the high hepatic uptake on parameters such as filtering, attenuation coefficient, and scatter correction at reconstructing of the myocardial SPECT images. Hepatic and cardiac spaces of a myocardial phantom (RH-2, Kyoto Kagaku), were filled with technetium-99m and a three-detector SPECT system (GCA 9300-DI, TOSHIBA) was used. The hepatic activity's influence was estimated from a qualitative percent regional scattering and the effects of attenuation and scatter correction were evaluated by a circumferential profile curve. Percent regional scattering increased in reverse to hepato-cardiac distance (HCD) and in proportion to hepatic to cardiac activity ratio (HCR). This tendency was observed the most significantly in the inferior region, followed by in the lateral, anterior and septal regions, declining in this order. An artifactual defect adjacent to the liver was observed when HCR is three and HCD is zero. However, when the Butterworth filter was used with small filtering-sizes and lower orders in combination with attenuation and scatter correction, the defects were decreased up to 15% at counts in the inferior region. This study showed that the hepatic to cardiac activity ratio, and the hepatocardiac distance should be considered for reconstruction of the SPECT images.

  5. Detection and assessment of unstable angina using myocardial perfusion imaging: Comparison between technetium-99m sestamibi SPECT and 12-lead electrocardiogram

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, J.; Theroux, P. )

    1990-10-16

    Forty-five studies using technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed on patients hospitalized for spontaneous chest pain suggestive of myocardial ischemia. The studies were done after an injection during an episode of chest pain and a repeated injection when the patients were free of pain. All patients were hospitalized with a presumed diagnosis of unstable angina, and none had evidence of a previous myocardial infarction. The presence of a perfusion defect observed with Tc-99m sestamibi injected during chest pain had a 96% sensitivity and a 79% specificity for the detection of significant coronary artery disease (stenosis greater than or equal to 50%) on subsequent angiography. When the criterion of a larger perfusion defect during pain compared to absence of pain was used, the sensitivity was 81% and the specificity was 84%. In contrast, transient electrocardiographic ischemic changes during pain had a sensitivity of 35% and a specificity of 68%; electrocardiographic changes during or outside episodes of chest pain had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 63% for the diagnosis. Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT represents a reliable noninvasive diagnostic tool that could aid in the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia in patients with spontaneous chest pain and provide additional information to that provided by the electrocardiogram.

  6. [The Optimal Reconstruction Parameters by Scatter and Attenuation Corrections Using Multi-focus Collimator System in Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Study].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Funayama, Risa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Konishi, Takahiro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the optimal reconstruction parameters of ordered subset conjugates gradient minimizer (OSCGM) by no correction (NC), attenuation correction (AC), and AC+scatter correction (ACSC) using IQ-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial phantom acquired two patterns, with or without defect. Myocardial images were performed 5-point scale visual score and quantitative evaluations using contrast, uptake, and uniformity about the subset and update (subset×iteration) of OSCGM and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter by three corrections. We decided on optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM by three corrections. The number of subsets to create suitable images were 3 or 5 for NC and AC, 2 or 3 for ACSC. The updates to create suitable images were 30 or 40 for NC, 40 or 60 for AC, and 30 for ACSC. Furthermore, the FWHM of Gaussian filters were 9.6 mm or 12 mm for NC and ACSC, 7.2 mm or 9.6 mm for AC. In conclusion, the following optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM were decided; NC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 9.6 mm, AC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 7.2 mm, ACSC: subset 3, iteration 10 and FWHM 9.6 mm. PMID:26596202

  7. [The Optimal Reconstruction Parameters by Scatter and Attenuation Corrections Using Multi-focus Collimator System in Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Study].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Funayama, Risa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Konishi, Takahiro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the optimal reconstruction parameters of ordered subset conjugates gradient minimizer (OSCGM) by no correction (NC), attenuation correction (AC), and AC+scatter correction (ACSC) using IQ-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial phantom acquired two patterns, with or without defect. Myocardial images were performed 5-point scale visual score and quantitative evaluations using contrast, uptake, and uniformity about the subset and update (subset×iteration) of OSCGM and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter by three corrections. We decided on optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM by three corrections. The number of subsets to create suitable images were 3 or 5 for NC and AC, 2 or 3 for ACSC. The updates to create suitable images were 30 or 40 for NC, 40 or 60 for AC, and 30 for ACSC. Furthermore, the FWHM of Gaussian filters were 9.6 mm or 12 mm for NC and ACSC, 7.2 mm or 9.6 mm for AC. In conclusion, the following optimal reconstruction parameters of OSCGM were decided; NC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 9.6 mm, AC: subset 5, iteration 8 and FWHM 7.2 mm, ACSC: subset 3, iteration 10 and FWHM 9.6 mm.

  8. Two Position Supine/Prone Myocardial Perfusion SPECT (MPS) Imaging Improves Visual Inter-Observer Correlation and Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Arsanjani, Reza; Hayes, Sean W.; Fish, Mathews; Shalev, Aryeh; Nakanishi, Rine; Thomson, Louise EJ; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare the inter-observer agreement between two experienced readers using supine versus combined supine/prone myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in a large population. Methods 1181 consecutive patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing rest 201Tl/stress 99mTc-sestamibi MPS studies were evaluated. Visual reads were performed in 2 consecutive steps, with readers scoring the stress supine perfusion images during step 1 and rescoring the images using both supine/prone data during step 2. Visual summed stress scores (SSS) of 2 readers including regional scores in different vascular territories were compared. Results The specificity for both readers improved using combined supine/prone imaging (Reader 1: 92% vs. 86% [P=0.0002], Reader 2: 88% vs. 72% [P<0.0001]. The inter-observer correlation for SSS (0.90 vs. 0.84, P<0.0001) and inter-observer agreement for combined supine/prone reading (bias = 1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-1.2 vs. 3.1, 95% CI 2.8-3.4, P<0.0001) were significantly better than for supine-only reading. The overall correlation between SSS scores for two readers improved with supine/prone imaging for both genders, as well as in the left anterior descending and right coronary territories. New Knowledge Gained Combined supine/prone imaging improves overall inter-observer agreement as well as based on gender and vascular territories. Conclusion The inter-observer correlation and agreement significantly improves using two-position supine/prone versus supine-only imaging. PMID:24807622

  9. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  10. Prediction of Revascularization after Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Machine Learning in a Large Population

    PubMed Central

    Arsanjani, Reza; Dey, Damini; Khachatryan, Tigran; Shalev, Aryeh; Hayes, Sean W.; Fish, Mathews; Nakanishi, Rine; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate if early revascularization in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) can be effectively predicted by integrating clinical data and quantitative image features derived from perfusion SPECT (MPS) by machine learning (ML) approach. Methods 713 rest 201Thallium/stress 99mTechnetium MPS studies with correlating invasive angiography (372 revascularization events (275 PCI / 97 CABG) within 90 days after MPS (91% within 30 days) were considered. Transient ischemic dilation (TID), stress combined supine/prone total perfusion deficit (TPD), quantitative rest and stress TPD, exercise ejection fraction, and end-systolic volume along with clinical parameters including patient gender, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, ST-depression on baseline ECG, ECG and clinical response during stress, and post-ECG probability by boosted ensemble ML algorithm (LogitBoost) to predict revascularization events. These features were selected using an automated feature selection algorithm from all available clinical and quantitative data (33 parameters). 10-fold cross-validation was utilized to train and test the prediction model. The prediction of revascularization by ML algorithm was compared to standalone measures of perfusion and visual analysis by two experienced readers utilizing all imaging, quantitative, and clinical data. Results The sensitivity of machine learning (73.6±4.3%) for prediction of revascularization was similar to one reader (73.9±4.6%) and standalone measures of perfusion (75.5±4.5%). The specificity of machine learning (74.7±4.2%) was also better than both expert readers (67.2±4.9% and 66.0±5.0%, P < 0.05), but was similar to ischemic TPD (68.3±4.9%, P < 0.05). The Receiver-Operator-Characteristics areas-under-curve for machine learning (0.81±0.02) was similar to reader 1 (0.81±0.02) but superior to reader 2 (0.72±0.02, P < 0.01) and standalone measure of perfusion (0.77±0.02, P < 0.01). Conclusion ML

  11. An observer study methodology for evaluating detection of motion abnormalities in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lalush, David S; Jatko, Megan K; Segars, W Paul

    2005-03-01

    To address the task of detecting nonischemic motion abnormalities from animated displays of gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography data, we performed an observer study to evaluate the difference in detection performance between gating to 8 and 16 frames. Images were created from the NCAT mathematical phantom with a realistic heart simulating hypokinetic motion in the left lateral wall. Realistic noise-free projection data were simulated for both normal and defective hearts to obtain 16 frames for the cardiac cycle. Poisson noise was then simulated for each frame to create 50 realizations of each heart, All datasets were processed in two ways: reconstructed as a 16-frame set, and collapsed to 8 frames and reconstructed. Ten observers viewed the cardiac images animated with a realistic real-time frame rate. Observers trained on 100 images and tested on 100 images, rating their confidence on the presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. None of the observers showed a significant difference in performance between the two gating methods. The 95% confidence interval on the difference in areas under the ROC curve (Az8 - Az16) was -0.029-0.085. Our test did not find a significant difference in detection performance between 8-frame gating and 16-frame gating. We conclude that, for the task of detecting abnormal motion, increasing the number of gated frames from 8 to 16 offers no apparent advantage.

  12. Purification of a Low Molecular Weight Fucoidan for SPECT Molecular Imaging of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Saboural, Pierre; Chaubet, Frédéric; Rouzet, Francois; Al-Shoukr, Faisal; Ben Azzouna, Rana; Bouchemal, Nadia; Picton, Luc; Louedec, Liliane; Maire, Murielle; Rolland, Lydia; Potier, Guy; Le Guludec, Dominique; Letourneur, Didier; Chauvierre, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidans constitute a large family of sulfated polysaccharides with several biochemical properties. A commercial fucoidan from brown algae, containing low molecular weight polysaccharidic species constituted of l-fucose, uronic acids and sulfate groups, was simply treated here with calcium acetate solution. This treatment led to a purified fraction with a yield of 45%. The physicochemical characterizations of the purified fucoidan using colorimetric assay, MALLS, dRI, FT-IR, NMR, exhibited molecular weight distributions and chemical profiles similar for both fucoidans whereas the sulfate and l-fucose contents increased by 16% and 71%, respectively. The biodistribution study in rat of both compounds labeled with 99mTc evidenced a predominant renal elimination of the purified fucoidan, but the crude fucoidan was mainly retained in liver and spleen. In rat myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, we then demonstrated the better efficiency of the purified fucoidan. This purified sulfated polysaccharide appears promising for the development of molecular imaging in acute coronary syndrome. PMID:25251032

  13. Collimator optimization in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer and realistic background variability for lesion detection and joint detection and localization tasks.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2016-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, collimators are a major factor limiting image quality and largely determine the noise and resolution of SPECT images. In this paper, we seek the collimator with the optimal tradeoff between image noise and resolution with respect to performance on two tasks related to myocardial perfusion SPECT: perfusion defect detection and joint detection and localization. We used the Ideal Observer (IO) operating on realistic background-known-statistically (BKS) and signal-known-exactly (SKE) data. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC (LROC) curves (AUCd, AUCd+l), respectively, were used as the figures of merit for both tasks. We used a previously developed population of 54 phantoms based on the eXtended Cardiac Torso Phantom (XCAT) that included variations in gender, body size, heart size and subcutaneous adipose tissue level. For each phantom, organ uptakes were varied randomly based on distributions observed in patient data. We simulated perfusion defects at six different locations with extents and severities of 10% and 25%, respectively, which represented challenging but clinically relevant defects. The extent and severity are, respectively, the perfusion defect's fraction of the myocardial volume and reduction of uptake relative to the normal myocardium. Projection data were generated using an analytical projector that modeled attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response effects, a 9% energy resolution at 140 keV, and a 4 mm full-width at half maximum (FWHM) intrinsic spatial resolution. We investigated a family of eight parallel-hole collimators that spanned a large range of sensitivity-resolution tradeoffs. For each collimator and defect location, the IO test statistics were computed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 540 pairs of defect-present and -absent images that included the aforementioned anatomical and uptake variability. Sets of test statistics were computed

  14. Collimator optimization in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer and realistic background variability for lesion detection and joint detection and localization tasks.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2016-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, collimators are a major factor limiting image quality and largely determine the noise and resolution of SPECT images. In this paper, we seek the collimator with the optimal tradeoff between image noise and resolution with respect to performance on two tasks related to myocardial perfusion SPECT: perfusion defect detection and joint detection and localization. We used the Ideal Observer (IO) operating on realistic background-known-statistically (BKS) and signal-known-exactly (SKE) data. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC (LROC) curves (AUCd, AUCd+l), respectively, were used as the figures of merit for both tasks. We used a previously developed population of 54 phantoms based on the eXtended Cardiac Torso Phantom (XCAT) that included variations in gender, body size, heart size and subcutaneous adipose tissue level. For each phantom, organ uptakes were varied randomly based on distributions observed in patient data. We simulated perfusion defects at six different locations with extents and severities of 10% and 25%, respectively, which represented challenging but clinically relevant defects. The extent and severity are, respectively, the perfusion defect's fraction of the myocardial volume and reduction of uptake relative to the normal myocardium. Projection data were generated using an analytical projector that modeled attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response effects, a 9% energy resolution at 140 keV, and a 4 mm full-width at half maximum (FWHM) intrinsic spatial resolution. We investigated a family of eight parallel-hole collimators that spanned a large range of sensitivity-resolution tradeoffs. For each collimator and defect location, the IO test statistics were computed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 540 pairs of defect-present and -absent images that included the aforementioned anatomical and uptake variability. Sets of test statistics were computed

  15. Collimator optimization in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer and realistic background variability for lesion detection and joint detection and localization tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, collimators are a major factor limiting image quality and largely determine the noise and resolution of SPECT images. In this paper, we seek the collimator with the optimal tradeoff between image noise and resolution with respect to performance on two tasks related to myocardial perfusion SPECT: perfusion defect detection and joint detection and localization. We used the Ideal Observer (IO) operating on realistic background-known-statistically (BKS) and signal-known-exactly (SKE) data. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC (LROC) curves (AUCd, AUCd+l), respectively, were used as the figures of merit for both tasks. We used a previously developed population of 54 phantoms based on the eXtended Cardiac Torso Phantom (XCAT) that included variations in gender, body size, heart size and subcutaneous adipose tissue level. For each phantom, organ uptakes were varied randomly based on distributions observed in patient data. We simulated perfusion defects at six different locations with extents and severities of 10% and 25%, respectively, which represented challenging but clinically relevant defects. The extent and severity are, respectively, the perfusion defect’s fraction of the myocardial volume and reduction of uptake relative to the normal myocardium. Projection data were generated using an analytical projector that modeled attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response effects, a 9% energy resolution at 140 keV, and a 4 mm full-width at half maximum (FWHM) intrinsic spatial resolution. We investigated a family of eight parallel-hole collimators that spanned a large range of sensitivity-resolution tradeoffs. For each collimator and defect location, the IO test statistics were computed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 540 pairs of defect-present and -absent images that included the aforementioned anatomical and uptake variability. Sets of test statistics were

  16. Creation of an ensemble of simulated cardiac cases and a human observer study: tools for the development of numerical observers for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Gifford, Howard C.; Licho, Robert; Joffe, Samuel; McGuiness, Matthew; Mehurg, Shannon; Zacharias, Michael; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2012-02-01

    Our previous Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) research explored the utility of numerical observers. We recently created two hundred and eighty simulated SPECT cardiac cases using Dynamic MCAT (DMCAT) and SIMIND Monte Carlo tools. All simulated cases were then processed with two reconstruction methods: iterative ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and filtered back-projection (FBP). Observer study sets were assembled for both OSEM and FBP methods. Five physicians performed an observer study on one hundred and seventy-nine images from the simulated cases. The observer task was to indicate detection of any myocardial perfusion defect using the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) 17-segment cardiac model and the ASNC five-scale rating guidelines. Human observer Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) studies established the guidelines for the subsequent evaluation of numerical model observer (NO) performance. Several NOs were formulated and their performance was compared with the human observer performance. One type of NO was based on evaluation of a cardiac polar map that had been pre-processed using a gradient-magnitude watershed segmentation algorithm. The second type of NO was also based on analysis of a cardiac polar map but with use of a priori calculated average image derived from an ensemble of normal cases.

  17. Application of task-based measures of image quality to optimization and evaluation of three-dimensional reconstruction-based compensation methods in myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Frey, Eric C; Gilland, Karen L; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we apply the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) using a defect detection task to the optimization and evaluation of three-dimensional iterative reconstruction-based compensation methods for myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We used a population of 24 mathematical cardiac-torso phantoms that realistically model the activity and attenuation distribution in three classes of patients: females, and males with flat diaphragms and raised diaphragms. Projection data were generated and subsequently reconstructed using methods based on the ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm. The methods evaluated included compensation for attenuation, detector response blurring, and scatter in various combinations. We applied the CHO to optimize the number of iterations for OSEM and the cutoff frequency and order of a three-dimensional postreconstruction Butterworth filter. Using the optimal parameters, we then compared the compensation methods. The index of comparison in these studies was the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for the CHO. We found that attenuation compensation with either detector response or scatter compensation gave statistically significant increases in the AUC compared to attenuation compensation alone. The greatest increase in the AUC occurred when all three compensations were applied. These results indicate that compensation for detector response and scatter, in addition to attenuation compensation, will improve defect detectability in myocardial SPECT images.

  18. Comparison of image quality, myocardial perfusion, and LV function between standard imaging and single-injection ultra-low-dose imaging using a high-efficiency SPECT camera: the MILLISIEVERT study

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Blankstein, Ron; Andrews, Howard; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Hayes, Sean W.; Friedman, John D.; Qureshi, Mehreen; Rakotoarivelo, Harivony; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Bokhari, Sabahat; Di Carli, Marcello; Berman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) plays a central role in coronary artery disease diagnosis; but concerns exist regarding its radiation burden. Compared to standard Anger-SPECT (A-SPECT) cameras, new high-efficiency (HE) cameras with specialized collimators and solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors offer potential to maintain image quality (IQ), while reducing administered activity and thus radiation dose to patients. No previous study has compared IQ, interpretation, total perfusion deficit (TPD), or ejection fraction (EF) in patients receiving both ultra-low-dose (ULD) imaging on a HE-SPECT camera and standard low-dose (SLD) A-SPECT imaging. Methods We compared ULD-HE-SPECT to SLD-A-SPECT imaging by dividing the rest dose in 101 patients at 3 sites scheduled to undergo clinical A-SPECT MPI using a same day rest/stress Tc-99m protocol. Patients received HE-SPECT imaging following an initial ~130 MBq (3.5mCi) dose, and SLD-A-SPECT imaging following the remainder of the planned dose. Images were scored visually by 2 blinded readers for IQ and summed rest score (SRS). TPD and EF were assessed quantitatively. Results Mean activity was 134 MBq (3.62 mCi) for ULD-HE-SPECT (effective dose 1.15 mSv) and 278 MBq (7.50 mCi, 2.39 mSv) for SLD-A-SPECT. Overall IQ was superior for ULD-HE-SPECT (p<0.0001), with twice as many studies graded excellent quality. Extracardiac activity and overall perfusion assessment were similar. Between-method correlations were high for SRS (r=0.87), TPD (r=0.91), and EF (r=0.88). Conclusion ULD-HE-SPECT rest imaging correlates highly with SLD-A-SPECT. It has improved image quality, comparable extracardiac activity, and achieves radiation dose reduction to 1 mSv for a single injection. PMID:24982439

  19. High Concordance Between Mental Stress–Induced and Adenosine-Induced Myocardial Ischemia Assessed Using SPECT in Heart Failure Patients: Hemodynamic and Biomarker Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J.; Dilsizian, Vasken; Krantz, David S.; Harris, Kristie M.; Smith, Mark F.; Shankovich, Anthony; Whittaker, Kerry S.; Rodriguez, Gabriel A.; Gottdiener, John; Li, Shuying; Kop, Willem; Gottlieb, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Mental stress can trigger myocardial ischemia, but the prevalence of mental stress–induced ischemia in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients is unknown. We characterized mental stress–induced and adenosine-induced changes in myocardial perfusion and neurohormonal activation in CHF patients with reduced left-ventricular function using SPECT to precisely quantify segment-level myocardial perfusion. Methods Thirty-four coronary artery disease patients (mean age ± SD, 62 ± 10 y) with CHF longer than 3 mo and ejection fraction less than 40% underwent both adenosine and mental stress myocardial perfusion SPECT on consecutive days. Mental stress consisted of anger recall (anger-provoking speech) followed by subtraction of serial sevens. The presence and extent of myocardial ischemia was quantified using the conventional 17-segment model. Results Sixty-eight percent of patients had 1 ischemic segment or more during mental stress and 81% during adenosine. On segment-by-segment analysis, perfusion with mental stress and adenosine were highly correlated. No significant differences were found between any 2 time points for B-type natriuretic peptide, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1b, troponin, vascular endothelin growth factor, IL-17a, matrix metallopeptidase-9, or C-reactive protein. However, endothelin-1 and IL-6 increased, and IL-10 decreased, between the stressor and 30 min after stress. Left-ventricular end diastolic dimension was 179 ± 65 mL at rest and increased to 217 ± 71 after mental stress and 229 ± 86 after adenosine (P < 0.01 for both). Resting end systolic volume was 129 ± 60 mL at rest and increased to 158 ± 66 after mental stress (P < 0.05) and 171 ± 87 after adenosine (P < 0.07), with no significant differences between adenosine and mental stress. Ejection fraction was 30 ± 12 at baseline, 29 ± 11 with mental stress, and 28 ± 10 with adenosine (P = not significant). Conclusion There was high concordance between ischemic perfusion defects induced

  20. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  1. The Development and Initial Evaluation of a Realistic Simulated SPECT Dataset with Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Motion for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modelled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24×48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1,152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into no gating, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion correction

  2. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-02-21

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of (99m)Tc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  3. Real-time cine and myocardial perfusion with treadmill exercise stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients referred for stress SPECT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has relied on pharmacologic agents, and therefore lacked the physiologic information available only with exercise stress. Methods 43 patients age 25 to 81 years underwent a treadmill stress test incorporating both Tc99m SPECT and CMR. After rest Tc99m SPECT imaging, patients underwent resting cine CMR. Patients then underwent in-room exercise stress using a partially modified treadmill. 12-lead ECG monitoring was performed throughout. At peak stress, Tc99m was injected and patients rapidly returned to their prior position in the magnet for post-exercise cine and perfusion imaging. The patient table was pulled out of the magnet for recovery monitoring. The patient was sent back into the magnet for recovery cine and resting perfusion followed by delayed post-gadolinium imaging. Post-CMR, patients went to the adjacent SPECT lab to complete stress nuclear imaging. Each modality's images were reviewed blinded to the other's results. Results Patients completed on average 9.3 ± 2.4 min of the Bruce protocol. Stress cine CMR was completed in 68 ± 14 sec following termination of exercise, and stress perfusion CMR was completed in 88 ± 8 sec. Agreement between SPECT and CMR was moderate (κ = 0.58). Accuracy in eight patients who underwent coronary angiography was 7/8 for CMR and 5/8 for SPECT (p = 0.625). Follow-up at 6 months indicated freedom from cardiovascular events in 29/29 CMR-negative and 33/34 SPECT-negative patients. Conclusions Exercise stress CMR including wall motion and perfusion is feasible in patients with suspected ischemic heart disease. Larger clinical trials are warranted based on the promising results of this pilot study to allow comparative effectiveness studies of this stress imaging system vs. other stress imaging modalities. PMID:20624294

  4. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and to evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects the performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared with those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO was similar; in its absence, the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when MM is significant and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process. PMID:26029730

  5. New method for tuning hyperparameter for the total variation norm in the maximum a posteriori ordered subsets expectation maximization reconstruction in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoxia; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Feiglin, David H.

    2011-03-01

    In order to improve the tradeoff between noise and bias, and to improve uniformity of the reconstructed myocardium while preserving spatial resolution in parallel-beam collimator SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) we investigated the most advantageous approach to provide reliable estimate of the optimal value of hyperparameter for the Total Variation (TV) norm in the iterative Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (MAP-OSEM) one step late tomographic reconstruction with Gibbs prior. Our aim was to find the optimal value of hyperparameter corresponding to the lowest bias at the lowest noise while maximizing uniformity and spatial resolution for the reconstructed myocardium in SPECT MPI. We found that the L-curve method that is by definition a global technique provides good guidance for selection of the optimal value of the hyperparameter. However, for a heterogeneous object such as human thorax the fine-tuning of the hyperparameter's value can be only accomplished by means of a local method such as the proposed bias-noise distance (BND) curve. We established that our BND-curve method provides accurate optimized hyperparameter's value estimation as long as the region of interest volume for which it is defined is sufficiently large and is located sufficiently close to the myocardium.

  6. No evidence of myocardial restoration following transplantation of mononuclear bone marrow cells in coronary bypass grafting surgery patients based upon cardiac SPECT and 18F-PET

    PubMed Central

    Tossios, Paschalis; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Scheid, Christof; Ünal, Nermin; Moka, Detlef; Schwinger, Robert HG; Mehlhorn, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis, that intramyocardial injection of mononuclear bone marrow cells combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery improves tissue viability or function in infarct regions with non-viable myocardium as assessed by nuclear imaging techniques. Methods Thus far, 7 patients (60 ± 10 [SD] years) undergoing elective CABG surgery after a myocardial infarction were included in this study. Prior to sternotomy, bone marrow was harvested by sternal puncture. Mononuclear bone marrow cells were isolated by gradient centrifugation and resuspended in 2 ml volume of Hank's buffered salt solution. At the end of CABG surgery 10 injections of 0.2 ml each were applied to the core area and borderzones of the infarct. Global and regional perfusion and viability were evaluated by ECG-gated 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in all study patients < 6 days before and 3 months after the intervention. Results Non-viable segments indicating transmural defects were identified in 5 patients. Two patients were found to have non-transmural defects before surgery. Concomitant surgical revascularisation and bone marrow cell injection was performed in all patients without major complications. The median total injected mononuclear cell number was 7.0 × 107 (range: 0.8–20.4). At 3 months 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT and 18F-FDG-PET scanning showed in 5 patients (transmural defect n = 4; non-transmural defect n = 1) no change in myocardial viability and in two patients (transmural defect n = 1, non-transmural defect n = 1) enhanced myocardial viability by 75%. Overall, global and regional LV ejection fraction was not significantly increased after surgery compared with the preoperative value. Conclusion In CABG surgery patients with non-viable segments the concurrent use of intramyocardial cell transfer did not show any clear improvement in

  7. Angina Relief by Ranolazine Identifies False-Negative SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Scans in Patients with Coronary Disease Demonstrated by Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) reduces intermediate- or high-risk pretest probability patients to low- or intermediate-risk posttest probability, respectively, for coronary disease (CD). Since ranolazine (RAN) relieves only angina, anginal patients with normal MPI whose angina is relieved by RAN present a significant dilemma. The purpose of this retrospective chart review was to confirm the impression that coronary angiography (CA) is indicated in patients whose class 3 to 4 angina is relieved by RAN, but have normal myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) MPIs. Charts of patients with stable class 3 to 4 angina (typical and atypical) and normal MPIs (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≥50% and segmental score = 0) were reviewed. CA was done on all the patients with complete angina relief taking RAN, as well as nonresponders whose anginal etiology could not be explained. Stenoses were considered flow-restrictive when more than 70% diameter stenosis is observed by quantitative CA, or, when 50 to 70%, fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured ≤0.80. RAN relieved angina in 36 of 54 (67%) patients. Of the known cases, 25 of these 36 (69%) had 43 stenoses ≥50% (mean = 66%): 15 (60%) had 1 vessel disease; 9 (36%) had multivessel disease; 18 (72%) had left anterior descending (LAD) disease; 1 (4%) had left main disease. Twenty one of 43 (49%) stenosis were > 70%; 22 (51%) stenoses were 50 to 70% and required FFR measurement. Twenty nine of 43 stenoses (67%) were considered flow-restrictive in 18 of these 25 (72%) patients. Eight RAN nonresponders with no explanation for angina had no CD at CA. RAN angina relief is invaluable in identifying falsely negative SPECT MPI, and 50% of these patients have flow-restrictive stenoses. PMID:25317027

  8. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Fetal Heart Attenuate Myocardial Injury after Infarction: An In Vivo Serial Pinhole Gated SPECT-CT Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Jadhav, Sachin; Pal, Lily; Prakash, Prem; Dikshit, Madhu; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a potential stem cell type for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). Recently, we isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat fetal heart (fC-MSC), which exhibited potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of intravenously injected fC-MSC in a rat model of MI using multi-pinhole gated SPECT-CT system. fC-MSC were isolated from the hearts of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat fetuses at gestation day 16 and expanded ex vivo. One week after induction of MI, 2×106 fC-MSC labeled with PKH26 dye (n = 6) or saline alone (n = 6) were injected through the tail vein of the rats. Initial in vivo tracking of 99mTc-labeled fC-MSC revealed a focal uptake of cells in the anterior mid-ventricular region of the heart. At 4 weeks of fC-MSC administration, the cells labeled with PKH26 were located in abundance in infarct/peri-infarct region and the fC-MSC treated hearts showed a significant increase in left ventricular ejection fraction and a significant decrease in the end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and left ventricular myo-mass in comparison to the saline treated group. In addition, fC-MSC treated hearts had a significantly better myocardial perfusion and attenuation in the infarct size, in comparison to the saline treated hearts. The engrafted PKH26-fC-MSC expressed cardiac troponin T, endothelial CD31 and smooth muscle sm-MHC, suggesting their differentiation into all major cells of cardiovascular lineage. The fC-MSC treated hearts demonstrated an up-regulation of cardio-protective growth factors, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic molecules, highlighting that the observed left ventricular functional recovery may be due to secretion of paracrine factors by fC-MSC. Taken together, our results suggest that fC-MSC therapy may be a new therapeutic strategy for MI and multi

  10. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  11. Task-Based Evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM Image Reconstruction Method for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT using a Human Observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  12. Myocardial perfusion SPECT in a case of retropulmonary looping of left coronary artery in a baby after arterial switch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is not a routine investigation in an Indian setting due to under referrals and logistic problems. However, MPI is a frequently performed and established modality of investigation in adults for the identification of myocardial ischemia and viability. We report myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in a case of retropulmonary looping of left coronary artery in a baby after arterial switch surgery. Adenosine stress MPI revealed a large infarct involving anterior segment with moderate reversible ischemia of the lateral left ventricular segment. Coronary angiogram later confirmed left main coronary artery ostial occlusion with retrograde collateral supply from dilated right coronary artery. PMID:24761067

  13. Predictors and Diagnostic Significance of the Adenosine Related Side Effects on Myocardial Perfusion SPECT/CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım Poyraz, Nilüfer; Özdemir, Elif; Poyraz, Barış Mustafa; Kandemir, Zuhal; Keskin, Mutlay; Türkölmez, Şeyda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient characteristics and adenosine-related side-effects during stress myocard perfusion imaging (MPI). The effect of presence of adenosine-related side-effects on the diagnostic value of MPI with integrated SPECT/CT system for coronary artery disease (CAD), was also assessed in this study. Methods: Total of 281 patients (109 M, 172 F; mean age:62.6±10) who underwent standard adenosine stress protocol for MPI, were included in this study. All symptoms during adenosine infusion were scored according to the severity and duration. For the estimation of diagnostic value of adenosine MPI with integrated SPECT/CT system, coronary angiography (CAG) or clinical follow-up were used as gold standard. Results: Total of 173 patients (61.6%) experienced adenosine-related side-effects (group 1); flushing, dyspnea, and chest pain were the most common. Other 108 patients completed pharmacologic stress (PS) test without any side-effects (group 2). Test tolerability were similar in the patients with cardiovascular or airway disease to others, however dyspnea were observed significantly more common in patients with mild airway disease. Body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 and age ≤45 years were independent predictors of side-effects. The diagnostic value of MPI was similar in both groups. Sensitivity of adenosine MPI SPECT/CT was calculated to be 86%, specificity was 94% and diagnostic accuracy was 92% for diagnosis of CAD. Conclusion: Adenosine MPI is a feasible and well tolerated method in patients who are not suitable for exercise stress test as well as patients with cardiopulmonary disease. However age ≤45 years and BMI ≥30 kg/m2 are the positive predictors of adenosine-related side-effects, the diagnostic value of adenosine MPI SPECT/CT is not affected by the presence of adenosine related side-effects. PMID:25541932

  14. Effects of CT-based attenuation correction of rat microSPECT images on relative myocardial perfusion and quantitative tracer uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Strydhorst, Jared H. Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Our goal in this work was to investigate the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on measurements of rat myocardial perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and scanned in a small animal pinhole SPECT/CT scanner. Scans were repeated weekly over a period of 5 weeks. Eight additional rats were injected with {sup 201}Tl and also scanned following a similar protocol. The images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction, and the relative perfusion was analyzed with the commercial cardiac analysis software. The absolute uptake of {sup 99m}Tc in the heart was also quantified with and without attenuation correction. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc imaging, relative segmental perfusion changed by up to +2.1%/−1.8% as a result of attenuation correction. Relative changes of +3.6%/−1.0% were observed for the {sup 201}Tl images. Interscan and inter-rat reproducibilities of relative segmental perfusion were 2.7% and 3.9%, respectively, for the uncorrected {sup 99m}Tc scans, and 3.6% and 4.3%, respectively, for the {sup 201}Tl scans, and were not significantly affected by attenuation correction for either tracer. Attenuation correction also significantly increased the measured absolute uptake of tetrofosmin and significantly altered the relationship between the rat weight and tracer uptake. Conclusions: Our results show that attenuation correction has a small but statistically significant impact on the relative perfusion measurements in some segments of the heart and does not adversely affect reproducibility. Attenuation correction had a small but statistically significant impact on measured absolute tracer uptake.

  15. Reproducibility of area at risk assessment in acute myocardial infarction by T1- and T2-mapping sequences in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in comparison to Tc99m-sestamibi SPECT.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Birgit; Nadjiri, Jonathan; Jähnichen, Christin; Kastrati, Adnan; Martinoff, Stefan; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Area at risk (AAR) is an important parameter for the assessment of the salvage area after revascularization in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By combining AAR assessment by T2-weighted imaging and scar quantification by late gadolinium enhancement imaging cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers a promising alternative to the "classical" modality of Tc99m-sestamibi single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Current T2 weighted sequences for edema imaging in CMR are limited by low contrast to noise ratios and motion artifacts. During the last years novel CMR imaging techniques for quantification of acute myocardial injury, particularly the T1-mapping and T2-mapping, have attracted rising attention. But no direct comparison between the different sequences in the setting of AMI or a validation against SPECT has been reported so far. We analyzed 14 patients undergoing primary coronary revascularization in AMI in whom both a pre-intervention Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT and CMR imaging at a median of 3.4 (interquartile range 3.3-3.6) days after the acute event were performed. Size of AAR was measured by three different non-contrast CMR techniques on corresponding short axis slices: T2-weighted, fat-suppressed turbospin echo sequence (TSE), T2-mapping from T2-prepared balanced steady state free precession sequences (T2-MAP) and T1-mapping from modified look locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequences. For each CMR sequence, the AAR was quantified by appropriate methods (absolute values for mapping sequences, comparison with remote myocardium for other sequences) and correlated with Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT. All measurements were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. The size of the AAR assessed by CMR was 28.7 ± 20.9 % of left ventricular myocardial volume (%LV) for TSE, 45.8 ± 16.6 %LV for T2-MAP, and 40.1 ± 14.4 %LV for MOLLI. AAR assessed by SPECT measured 41.6 ± 20.7 %LV. Correlation analysis revealed best correlation with SPECT for T2-MAP at a T2-threshold of 60 ms

  16. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St.; Knapp, F.F.

    1992-03-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-[I-123]iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  17. Diagnosis of myocardial involvement in patients with systemic myopathies with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, J.; Briele, B.; Smekal, A.V.; Hotze, A.L.; Biersack, H.J.; Koehler, U.; Zierz, St. ); Knapp, F.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Involvement of the myocardium in non-infectious myopathies presents in most cases as systolic dysfunction or a disturbed cardiac rhythm. We are interested in exploring how often cardiac involvement can be evaluated with various diagnostic techniques in patients with proven myopathy. We investigated 41 patients with myopathies of various etiology, including mitochondrial and congenital myopathies, Curshmann-Steinert disease, muscular dystrophy, and others. Myopathy was proven by muscular biopsy usually from the bicep. Fatty acid imaging was performed with 15-(p-(I-123)iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IP-PA) and sequential SPECT-scintigraphy with a 180 deg. rotation starting at the 45 deg. RAO position. 190 MBq were injected at the maximal stage of a submaximal exercise. Filtered backprojection and reorientation of the slices were achieved by standard techniques. The quantitative comparison of the oblique slices (bulls-eye technique) of the SPECT-studies revealed turnover-rates as a qualitative measure of {beta}-oxidation. Serum levels of lactate (L), pyruvate (P), glucose (G) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at rest and stress. Ventricular function was investigated by radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) at rest and under stress with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. In addition, ECG, 24 hour-ECG, and echocardiography were also performed with standard techniques.

  18. Examining a hypothetical quantitative model for better approximation of culprit coronary artery and site of stenosis on 99mTc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sushanta; Sen, Srabani; Das, Debasis; Basu, Sandip

    2016-10-01

    A hypothetical quantitative model of analyzing gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is proposed and examined for the feasibility of its use as a predictor of diseased coronary artery and approximating the site of stenosis to determine whether it could serve as a useful noninvasive complement for coronary angiography. The extent and severity of perfusion defects on rest gated myocardial perfusion imaging SPECT-images were assessed on a five-point scale in a standard 17-segment model and total perfusion deficit was quantified by automated software. The first step was to locate the diseased coronary artery using a quantitative method: for this, the score of each segment belonging to a particular coronary artery was determined using a systematic presumptive approach. After determination of specific coronary artery segments, the scores of the contiguous segments in three short axis slices (apical, middle, and basal) were summed for six subdivisions (anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, anteroseptal, and inferoseptal). The site of stenosis was determined from (a) the initial approximation of the involved segments with a defect score of 2-4 and (b) subsequent calculation of the defect score of each of the six subdivisions and allocating the site through a preassigned number for each coronary artery. For each coronary artery, only the subdivision with the highest defect score was considered. Proximal, middle, and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD) were considered to be represented when the summed value of a subdivision within a particular arterial territory was more than or equal to 7, between 5 and 7, 5 and 3, respectively. For the left circumflex and right coronary artery, summed scores (of respective subdivisions) of more than or equal to 5 and between 3 and 5 were preassigned to proximal and distal stenosis, respectively. The results were then correlated with the coronary angiographic data. On coronary angiography, proximal LAD occlusion

  19. [Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT--basic evaluation using phantom].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Y; Nanbu, I; Tohyama, J; Ooba, S

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with 99mTc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p < 0.05). The tracing of the defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated.

  20. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  1. [Clinical usefulness of delayed exercise images on 99mTc-Tetrofosmin myocardial SPECT in the diagnosis of vasospastic angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Sugihara, H; Zen, K; Hikosaka, T; Adachi, Y; Yoneyama, S; Katoh, S; Nakamura, T; Azuma, A

    2000-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of delayed exercise images in 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TF) myocardial SPECT in the diagnosis of vasospastic angina pectoris. We studied 30 patients with vasospastic angina, 10 of 30 patients (group A) had both effort and rest angina, 20 of 30 patients (group B) had rest angina. A 370 MBq of TF was intravenously injected at peak exercise, and initial (EX-I) and delayed exercise (EX-D) images were obtained at 30 min and 180 min after the injection. An additional 740 MBq of TF was intravenously reinjected after EX-D image acquisition, and rest images were obtained 30 min after the reinjection. The left ventricular wall was divided into 9 segments. Regional myocardial uptakes of TF were scored by 4-point defect score (0 = normal, 1 = mildly reduced, 2 = moderately reduced, and 3 = severely reduced). Total defect score (TDS) was calculated from the sum of defect scores in 9 segments. Reverse redistribution (RR) was defined as increase of more than 2 in TDS on EX-D images. In group A, 4 of 10 cases (40%) showed decreased uptake on EX-I images, 6 of 10 cases (60%) revealed RR on EX-D images, and none of the patients showed decreased uptake on rest images. In group B, no one showed decreased uptake on EX-I and rest images, 11 of 20 cases (55%) revealed RR on EX-D images. The mean +/- SD of TDS were 2.9 +/- 3.4, 5.1 +/- 4.5, 0.5 +/- 0.5 on EX-I, EX-D, rest images in group A, and serially 0.4 +/- 0.5, 3.3 +/- 3.6, 0.4 +/- 0.5 in group B. Regional wall motion abnormality was reduced in regions with RR. RR on EX-D images may reflect ischemic damaged but viable myocardium in vasospastic angina. The clinical usefulness of exercise-rest TF imaging in detection of organic coronary artery disease has been well established. Therefore, exercise-rest TF imaging with additional delayed exercise image could evaluate not only organic coronary artery disease but also coronary artery vasospasm.

  2. [Evaluation of reconstruction arc in myocardial SPECT imaging using a cardiac phantom--comparison between 360 degrees and 180 degrees arcs].

    PubMed

    Kashikura, K; Kashikura, A; Terada, S; Kobayashi, H

    1996-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of reconstruction arc on myocardial SPECT images, a series of phantom studies was performed with and without plastic chambers simulating perfusion defects using 201Tl and 99mTc. Coefficient of variations (CV) of the counts among the ROIs and defect contrast were evaluated in 360 degrees and 180 degrees images reconstructed from the same 360 degrees projection data. Reconstruction processes were identical for all images. In the absence of defects, the CV of the counts were approximately the same in 360 degrees and 180 degrees images. The CV of the counts in the 360 degrees 201Tl image, among 4 defects located on the anterior, lateral, inferoposterior, and septal walls, was superior to those in the 180 degrees images. In contrast, in the 99mTc images, the CV of the counts among the 4 defects in the 180 degrees image was superior to those of the 360 degrees image. The defect contrast was changed both by the location of the defect and by the reconstruction arc (201Tl, 99mTc). The defect contrast of the 180 degrees images, in both 201Tl and 99mTc experiments, was closer to the true contrast value as calculated by the count ratio between myocardium and defect. Although the defect contrast in the anterior, lateral and septal walls was more emphasized in the 180 degrees images, the defect contrast in the inferoposterior wall was less emphasized in the 180 degrees images compared to the 360 degrees (201Tl, 99mTc).

  3. Application of three-class ROC analysis to task-based image quality assessment of simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS).

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Song, Xiyun; Frey, Eric C

    2008-11-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac disease using dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) is based on the defect status in both stress and rest images, and can be modeled as a three-class task of classifying patients as having no, reversible, or fixed perfusion defects. Simultaneous acquisition protocols for dual-isotope MPS imaging have gained much interest due to their advantages including perfect registration of the (201)Tl and (99m)Tc images in space and time, increased patient comfort, and higher clinical throughput. As a result of simultaneous acquisition, however, crosstalk contamination, where photons emitted by one isotope contribute to the image of the other isotope, degrades image quality. Minimizing the crosstalk is important in obtaining the best possible image quality. One way to minimize the crosstalk is to optimize the injected activity of the two isotopes by considering the three-class nature of the diagnostic problem. To effectively do so, we have previously developed a three-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis methodology that extends and unifies the decision theoretic, linear discriminant analysis, and psychophysical foundations of binary ROC analysis in a three-class paradigm. In this work, we applied the proposed three-class ROC methodology to the assessment of the image quality of simultaneous dual-isotope MPS imaging techniques and the determination of the optimal injected activity combination. In addition to this application, the rapid development of diagnostic imaging techniques has produced an increasing number of clinical diagnostic tasks that involve not only disease detection, but also disease characterization and are thus multiclass tasks. This paper provides a practical example of the application of the proposed three-class ROC analysis methodology to medical problems.

  4. NOTE: Comparison of correction techniques for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging: a dog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

    2000-11-01

    We compared two correction methods for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Both approaches use the information from the third energy window placed between the photopeak windows of the 201Tl and 99mTc. The first approach, described by Moore et al, corrects only for the contribution of the 99mTc to the 201Tl primary 70 keV window. We developed the three-window transformation dual-isotope correction method, which is a simultaneous cross-talk correction. The two correction methods were compared in a simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc sestamibi cardiac dog study. Three separate acquisitions were performed in this dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope acquisition. The 201Tl single-isotope images were used as references. The total number of counts, and the contrast between the left ventricular cavity (LVC) and the myocardium, were used in 70 keV short-axis slices as parameters for evaluating the results of the dual-isotope correction methods. Three consecutive short-axis slices were used to calculate averaged contrast and the averaged total number of counts. The total number of the counts was 667 000 ± 500 and 414 500 ± 400 counts for the dual-isotope (201Tl + 99mTc) and single-isotope (201Tl-only) 70 keV images, respectively. The corrected dual-isotope images had 514 700 ± 700 and 368 000 ± 600 counts for Moore's correction and our approach, respectively. Moore's method improved contrast in the dual-isotope 70 keV image to 0.14 ± 0.03 from 0.11 ± 0.02, which was the value in the 70 keV non-corrected dual-isotope image. Our method improved the same contrast to 0.22 ± 0.03. The contrast in the 201Tl single-isotope 70 keV image was 0.28 ± 0.02. Both methods improved the 70 keV dual-isotope images. However, our approach provided slightly better images than Moore's correction when compared with 201Tl-only 70 keV images.

  5. Specificity and sensitivity of SPECT myocardial perfusion studies at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumna, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Avraamides, P.; Demetriadou, O.

    2011-09-01

    The aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) performed at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus. Through a retrospective analysis, patient results obtained by MPI were compared to results obtained by Invasive Angiography. We analyzed data from 96 patients that underwent both MPI and Angiography during the years 2009-2010, with a maximum time interval of ± 9 months between the two types of medical exams. For 51 patients, the indication was the detection of CAD. For 45 patients, the indication was to assess viability and/or ischemia after MI, PCI or CABG. Out of 84 patients with CAD confirmed by angiography, 80 patients resulted in abnormal MPI (sensitivity of 95% and positive predictive value of 98%). Out of 12 patients with normal coronaries, 10 patients resulted in normal MPI (specificity of 83% and negative predictive value of 71%).In conclusion, for the patients with abnormal MPI and confirmed CAD, MPI was a useful aid for further therapy management.

  6. The Benefits of Prone SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Reducing Both Artifact Defects and Patient Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the “gold standard” for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. PMID:26559981

  7. Collimator optimization and collimator-detector response compensation in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    The collimator is the primary factor that determines the spatial resolution and noise tradeoff in myocardial perfusion SPECT images. In this paper, the goal was to find the collimator that optimizes the image quality in terms of a perfusion defect detection task. Since the optimal collimator could depend on the level of approximation of the collimator-detector response (CDR) compensation modeled in reconstruction, we performed this optimization for the cases of modeling the full CDR (including geometric, septal penetration and septal scatter responses), the geometric CDR, or no model of the CDR. We evaluated the performance on the detection task using three model observers. Two observers operated on data in the projection domain: the Ideal Observer (IO) and IO with Model-Mismatch (IO-MM). The third observer was an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO), which operated on reconstructed images. The projection-domain observers have the advantage that they are computationally less intensive. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process, i.e. it has a perfect model of the CDR. The IO-MM takes into account the mismatch between the true (complete and accurate) model and an approximate model, e.g. one that might be used in reconstruction. We evaluated the utility of these projection domain observers in optimizing instrumentation parameters. We investigated a family of 8 parallel-hole collimators, spanning a wide range of resolution and sensitivity tradeoffs, using a population of simulated projection (for the IO and IO-MM) and reconstructed (for the CHO) images that included background variability. We simulated anterolateral and inferior perfusion defects with variable extents and severities. The area under the ROC curve was estimated from the IO, IO-MM, and CHO test statistics and served as the figure-of-merit. The optimal collimator for the IO had a resolution of 9-11 mm FWHM at 10 cm, which is poorer resolution than typical collimators

  8. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  9. An investigation of the trade-off between the count level and image quality in myocardial perfusion SPECT using simulated images: the effects of statistical noise and object variability on defect detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-09-01

    Quantum noise as well as anatomic and uptake variability in patient populations limits observer performance on a defect detection task in myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). The goal of this study was to investigate the relative importance of these two effects by varying acquisition time, which determines the count level, and assessing the change in performance on a myocardial perfusion (MP) defect detection task using both mathematical and human observers. We generated ten sets of projections of a simulated patient population with count levels ranging from 1/128 to around 15 times a typical clinical count level to simulate different levels of quantum noise. For the simulated population we modeled variations in patient, heart and defect size, heart orientation and shape, defect location, organ uptake ratio, etc. The projection data were reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with no compensation or with attenuation, detector response and scatter compensation (ADS). The images were then post-filtered and reoriented to generate short-axis slices. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was applied to the short-axis images, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) was computed. For each noise level and reconstruction method, we optimized the number of iterations and cutoff frequencies of the Butterworth filter to maximize the AUC. Using the images obtained with the optimal iteration and cutoff frequency and ADS compensation, we performed human observer studies for four count levels to validate the CHO results. Both CHO and human observer studies demonstrated that observer performance was dependent on the relative magnitude of the quantum noise and the patient variation. When the count level was high, the patient variation dominated, and the AUC increased very slowly with changes in the count level for the same level of anatomic variability. When the count level was low, however, quantum noise dominated, and changes in the count level

  10. Technological Development and Advances in SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    SPECT/CT has emerged over the past decade as a means of correlating anatomical information from CT with functional information from SPECT. The integration of SPECT and CT in a single imaging device facilitates anatomical localization of the radiopharmaceutical to differentiate physiological uptake from that associated with disease and patient-specific attenuation correction to improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of the SPECT image. The first clinically available SPECT/CT systems performed emission-transmission imaging using a dual-headed SPECT camera and a low-power x-ray CT sub-system. Newer SPECT/CT systems are available with high-power CT sub-systems suitable for detailed anatomical diagnosis, including CT coronary angiography and coronary calcification that can be correlated with myocardial perfusion measurements. The high-performance CT capabilities also offer the potential to improve compensation of partial volume errors for more accurate quantitation of radionuclide measurement of myocardial blood flow and other physiological processes and for radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy. In addition, new SPECT technologies are being developed that significantly improve the detection efficiency and spatial resolution for radionuclide imaging of small organs including the heart, brain, and breast, and therefore may provide new capabilities for SPECT/CT imaging in these important clinical applications. PMID:18396178

  11. Enhanced cross-talk correction technique for simultaneous dual-isotope imaging: a TL-201/Tc-99m myocardial perfusion SPECT dog study.

    PubMed

    Knesaurek, K; Machac, J

    1997-12-01

    A newly developed cross-talk correction method for simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT imaging was tested in a canine model. The method is based on the assumption that the transformations, which modify the primary energy window images into the scatter images as viewed in the other energy windows, are known. These transformations were found by measuring the point spread functions (PSFs) in two different energy windows for both isotopes in water. The dual-isotope correction method is described by two convolution equations which were applied in frequency space. The equations take into account the different spatial distributions of the primary and scatter cross-talk photons. The new enhancement of the method was in applying restoration filters to the resulting corrected images. Three separate studies were acquired in our dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope study. The single isotope images were used as references. The contrast between the left ventricle cavity (LVC) and the myocardium was used in transaxial and short-axis slices as a parameter to evaluate results of dual-isotope correction method with restoration. The change in contrast in the dual-isotope corrected images in both energy windows, i.e., Tc-99m primary window (140 keV) and Tl-201 primary window (70 keV), was significant. The only exception was for the short-axis Tc-99m window images. The corrected 140 keV dual-isotope short-axis slice had the contrast of 0.60 vs 0.58, which was the value in the noncorrected dual-isotope short-axis slice. For dual-isotope 140 keV transaxial slice, the contrast changed from 0.72 to 0.82 after correction. In comparison, for single-isotope Tc-99m 140 keV transaxial slice, contrast changed from 0.62 to 0.84 after restoration correction. There was less change in contrast in the short-axis Tc-99m 140 keV slice, i.e., from 0.56 to 0.61. In the Tl-201 primary window for the transaxial slices the improvement of contrast was from 0.38 to 0.64, and for short-axis slices

  12. Quantitative SPECT techniques.

    PubMed

    Watson, D D

    1999-07-01

    Quantitative imaging involves first, a set of measurements that characterize an image. There are several variations of technique, but the basic measurements that are used for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion images are reasonably standardized. Quantification currently provides only relative tracer activity within the myocardial regions defined by an individual SPECT acquisition. Absolute quantification is still a work in progress. Quantitative comparison of absolute changes in tracer uptake comparing a stress and rest study or preintervention and postintervention study would be useful and could be done, but most commercial systems do not maintain the data normalization that is necessary for this. Measurements of regional and global function are now possible with electrocardiography (ECG) gating, and this provides clinically useful adjunctive data. Techniques for measuring ventricular function are evolving and promise to provide clinically useful accuracy. The computer can classify images as normal or abnormal by comparison with a normal database. The criteria for this classification involve more than just checking the normal limits. The images should be analyzed to measure how far they deviate from normal, and this information can be used in conjunction with pretest likelihood to indicate the level of statistical certainty that an individual patient has a true positive or true negative test. The interface between the computer and the clinician interpreter is an important part of the process. Especially when both perfusion and function are being determined, the ability of the interpreter to correctly assimilate the data is essential to the use of the quantitative process. As we become more facile with performing and recording objective measurements, the significance of the measurements in terms of risk evaluation, viability assessment, and outcome should be continually enhanced. PMID:10433336

  13. Cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated by Tl-201 and Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, J.; Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Ga-67 and Tl-201 SPECT was performed to evaluate cardiac sarcoidosis in a 15-year-old boy. Tl-201 SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake in the inferior to lateral wall and Ga-67 accumulation in the area of decreased Tl-201 uptake. These findings suggested cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. After corticosteroid therapy, myocardial uptake of Ga-67 disappeared and myocardial TI-201 uptake became more homogeneous.

  14. Combined SPECT and x-ray CT medical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalki, Kathrin; Brown, J. Keenan; Blankespoor, Stephen C.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Wu, Xiang; Cann, Christopher E.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Chin, Michael; Stillson, Carol A.; Dae, Michael W.; Carver, James M.

    1995-05-01

    We have designed and built a system for correlated x ray CT transmission and SPECT emission imaging with an array of photon counting detectors. The scanner operates in a third generation fan beam geometry by translating a 23 element high purity germanium detector across the fan to image phantoms and small animals. The x ray CT image is used to obtain an object specific, i.e., anatomically accurate, attenuation map for the reconstruction of the SPECT image. SPECT images are reconstructed with an MLEM code and the pixel values are scaled in physical units by determining a scaling factor from a uniform water phantom with homogeneous and known attenuation. Single myocardial slices of several pigs were imaged with a 99mTc sestamibi imaging agent which is taken up in proportion to regional myocardial blood flow. The results show that 99mTc uptake and regional myocardial blood flow, determined in vivo from reconstructed SPECT images, correlate with the measured in vitro data. Furthermore, the correlation is markedly improved by reconstructing the images with an object specific attenuation map obtained from the coregistered x ray CT image. We were also able to restore the 99mTc sestamibi uptake from the reconstructed images to an accuracy between 40% and 90% of the true in vitro value, depending on the selection of maximum or mean pixel values in the regions of interest.

  15. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a

  16. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is affected by photon attenuation and image blurring due to Compton scatter and geometric detector response. Attenuation correction is important to increase diagnostic accuracy of cardiac SPECT. However, in attenuation-corrected scans, scattered photons from radioactivity in the liver could produce a spillover of counts into the inferior myocardial wall. In the clinical setting, blurring effects could be compensated by restoration with Wiener and Metz filters. Inconveniences of these procedures are that the Wiener filter depends upon the power spectra of the object image and noise, which are unknown, while Metz parameters have to be optimized by trial and error. This research develops an alternative restoration procedure based on a multiresolution denoising and regularization algorithm. It was hypothesized that this representation leads to a more straightforward and automatic restoration than conventional filters. The main objective of the research was the development and assessment of the multiresolution algorithm for compensating the liver spillover artifact. The multiresolution algorithm decomposes original SPECT projections into a set of sub-band frequency images. This allows a simple denoising and regularization procedure by discarding high frequency channels and performing inversion only in low and intermediate frequencies. The method was assessed in bull's eye polar maps and short- axis attenuation-corrected reconstructions of a realistic cardiac-chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and different 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios. Inferior myocardial defects were simulated in some experiments. The cardiac phantom in free air was considered as the gold standard reference. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating contrast of short- axis slices and the normalized chi-square measure, defect size and mean and standard deviation of polar map counts. The performance of the multiresolution

  17. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  18. 123I-MIBG SPECT for Evaluation of Patients with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu-Leen, Aukelien C; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Jacobson, Arnold F

    2015-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by activation of the sympathetic cardiac nerves. The condition of cardiac sympathetic nerves can be evaluated by (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging. Most cardiac (123)I-MIBG studies have relied on measurements from anterior planar images of the chest. However, it has become progressively more common to include SPECT imaging in clinical and research protocols. This review examines recent trends in (123)I-MIBG SPECT imaging and evidence that provides the basis for the increased use of the procedure in the clinical management of patients with HF. (123)I-MIBG SPECT has been shown to be complementary to planar imaging in patients with HF in studies of coronary artery disease after an acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, (123)I-MIBG SPECT has been used in numerous studies to document regional denervation for arrhythmic event risk assessment. For better quantification of the size and severity of innervation abnormalities in (123)I-MIBG SPECT, programs and protocols specifically for (123)I have been developed. Also, the introduction of new solid-state cameras has created the potential for more rapid SPECT acquisitions or a reduction in radiopharmaceutical activity. Although PET imaging has superior quantitative capabilities, (123)I-MIBG SPECT is, for the foreseeable future, the only widely available nuclear imaging method for assessing regional myocardial sympathetic innervation.

  19. Comparison of 4D-microSPECT and microCT for murine cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Befera, Nicholas T.; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare a new generation of four-dimensional (4D) microSPECT with microCT for quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function. Procedures 4D isotropic cardiac images were acquired from normal C57BL/6 mice with either microSPECT at 350-micron resolution (n=6) or microCT at 88-micron resolution (n=6). One additional mouse with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either 99mTc -tetrofosmin for microSPECT, or a liposomal blood pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images) software, to derive global and regional function. Results Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and microCT groups were comparable (e.g. ejection fraction=71±6%-microSPECT and 68±4%-microCT). Regional functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities. In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT. Conclusions Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over microCT in the ability to evaluate myocardial perfusion radiotracer distribution and function simultaneously. MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT and MR for preclinical cardiac imaging in the mouse. PMID:24037175

  20. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation. PMID:25824018

  1. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation.

  2. Bayesian learning for cardiac SPECT image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Jarosław P; Goodenday, Lucy S; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for automating the diagnosis of myocardial perfusion from single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of male and female hearts. Initially we had several thousand of SPECT images, other clinical data and physician-interpreter's descriptions of the images. The images were divided into segments based on the Yale system. Each segment was described by the physician as showing one of the following conditions: normal perfusion, reversible perfusion defect, partially reversible perfusion defect, fixed perfusion defect, defect showing reverse redistribution, equivocal defect or artifact. The physician's diagnosis of overall left ventricular (LV) perfusion, based on the above descriptions, categorizes a study as showing one or more of eight possible conditions: normal, ischemia, infarct and ischemia, infarct, reverse redistribution, equivocal, artifact or LV dysfunction. Because of the complexity of the task, we decided to use the knowledge discovery approach, consisting of these steps: problem understanding, data understanding, data preparation, data mining, evaluating the discovered knowledge and its implementation. After going through the data preparation step, in which we constructed normal gender-specific models of the LV and image registration, we ended up with 728 patients for whom we had both SPECT images and corresponding diagnoses. Another major contribution of the paper is the data mining step, in which we used several new Bayesian learning classification methods. The approach we have taken, namely the six-step knowledge discovery process has proven to be very successful in this complex data mining task and as such the process can be extended to other medical data mining projects.

  3. Prognostic Significance of Imaging Myocardial Sympathetic Innervation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Fernandez, Stanley F; Fallavollita, James A; Canty, John M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in understanding whether the presence of inhomogeneity in myocardial sympathetic innervation can predict patients at risk of sudden cardiac arrest from lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The advent of radiolabeled norepinephrine analogs has allowed this to be imaged in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy using single, photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Several observational studies have demonstrated that globally elevated myocardial sympathetic tone (as reflected by reduced myocardial norepinephrine analog uptake) can predict composite cardiac end-points including total cardiovascular mortality. More recent studies have indicated that quantifying the extent of regional denervation can predict the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This review will summarize our current understanding of the prognostic significance of altered myocardial sympathetic innervation. PMID:26087899

  4. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  5. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  6. Comparative study of diverse model building strategies for 3D-ASM segmentation of dynamic gated SPECT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Butakoff, C.; Ordas, S.; Aguade, S.; Frangi, A. F.

    2007-03-01

    Over the course of the last two decades, myocardial perfusion with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has emerged as an established and well-validated method for assessing myocardial ischemia, viability, and function. Gated-SPECT imaging integrates traditional perfusion information along with global left ventricular function. Despite of these advantages, inherent limitations of SPECT imaging yield a challenging segmentation problem, since an error of only one voxel along the chamber surface may generate a huge difference in volume calculation. In previous works we implemented a 3-D statistical model-based algorithm for Left Ventricle (LV) segmentation of in dynamic perfusion SPECT studies. The present work evaluates the relevance of training a different Active Shape Model (ASM) for each frame of the gated SPECT imaging acquisition in terms of their subsequent segmentation accuracy. Models are subsequently employed to segment the LV cavity of gated SPECT studies of a virtual population. The evaluation is accomplished by comparing point-to-surface (P2S) and volume errors, both against a proper Gold Standard. The dataset comprised 40 voxel phantoms (NCAT, Johns Hopkins, University of of North Carolina). Monte-Carlo simulations were generated with SIMIND (Lund University) and reconstructed to tomographic slices with ASPIRE (University of Michigan).

  7. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Slart, R.H.J.A.; Bax, J.J.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Jager, P.L.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy is the assessment of myocardial viability. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischaemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularisation. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy (SPECT), whether using 201thallium, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc- tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic and perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularisation. New techniques in the nuclear cardiology field, such as attenuation corrected SPECT, dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT and gated FDG PET are promising and will further improve the detection of myocardial viability. Also the combination of multislice computed tomography scanners with PET opens possibilities of adding coronary calcium scoring and noninvasive coronary angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging and quantification. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:25696432

  8. Myocardial Bridging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is rare. Myocardial bridges are most commonly localized in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The anatomic features of the bridges vary significantly. Alterations of the endothelial morphology and the vasoactive agents impact on the progression of atherosclerosis of myocardial bridging. Patients may present with chest pain, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia and even sudden death. Patients who respond poorly to the medical treatment with β-blockers warrant a surgical intervention. Myotomy is a preferred surgical procedure for the symptomatic patients. Coronary stent deployment has been in limited use due to the unsatisfactory long-term results. PMID:27074276

  9. Multiplane Transesophageal Echocardiography with Dobutamine in Patients with Biventricular Inferior Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Zavaleta, Nilda; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Romero-Cárdenas, Angel; Bialostozky, David; Alexanderson, Erick; Martinez-Sanchez, Carlos; Peña-Duque, Marco; Keirns, Candace; Rijlaarsdam, María; Lupi-Herrera, Eulo

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the alterations of ventricular wall movement in patients with acute posteroinferior myocardial infarction with extension to right cavities with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), as well as the utility of dobutamine with this technique to analyze myocardial viability. Nine men with a mean age of 51 years fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Myocardial TEE was performed in all the men 72 hours after the acute event with long- and short-axis transgastric images of both ventricles under basal conditions and with dobutamine infusions of 5 and 10 µg/kg per minute. Results were compared with myocardial perfusion findings obtained with Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT. Left ventricular myocardial viability was demonstrated in 28 of 45 altered segments with dobutamine stress myocardial TEE and Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT. Right ventricular myocardial viability was identified in 27 of 30 altered segments with dobutamine stress myocardial TEE in transgastric short and long axes, and with Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT in 23 of 25 segments only in short-axis images. Multiplane TEE provided excellent image resolution and better definition of endocardial and epicardial borders, which facilitated detailed evaluation of ventricular segmental wall movement. Infusion of low doses of dobutamine made it possible to identify viable tissue in both ventricles, and results were comparable to those of nuclear medicine.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  12. Dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom for functional SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Celler, A.; Lyster, D.; Farncombe, T.

    1996-12-31

    We have designed and built a dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom to be used as a primary tool during the experimental verification of the performance of the quantitative dynamic functional imaging method we are developing for standard rotating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras. The phantom consists of two independent parts (i) a dynamic heart model with the possibility of mounting {open_quotes}defects{close_quotes} inside it and (ii) a non-uniform thorax model with lungs and spinal cord, and uses the fact that the washout of a tracer by dilution is governed by a linear first order equation, the same type of equation as is used to model time-activity distribution in myocardial viability studies. Tests of the dynamic performance of the phantom in planar scanning mode have confirmed the validity of these assumptions. Also the preliminary results obtained in SPECT mode show that the values of characteristic times could be experimentally determined and that these values agreed well with the values preset on the phantom. We consider that the phantom is ready for extensive use in studies into development of the dynamic SPECT method.

  13. Prognostic evaluation in obese patients using a dedicated multipinhole cadmium-zinc telluride SPECT camera.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Andrea; Peclat, Thais; Amaral, Ana Carolina; Lima, Ronaldo S L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of myocardial perfusion SPECT obtained in CZT cameras (CZT-SPECT) with multipinhole collimation in obese patients. CZT-SPECT may be technically challenging in the obese, and its prognostic value remains largely unknown. Patients underwent single-day, rest/stress (supine and prone) imaging. Images were visually inspected and graded as poor, fair or good/excellent. Summed stress and difference scores (SSS and SDS, respectively) were converted into percentages of total perfusion defect and of ischemic defect by division by the maximum possible score. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and classified as class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), II (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), or III (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2)). Patients were followed-up by telephone interview for the occurrence of all-cause death, myocardial infarction or revascularization. A Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the independent predictors of death. Among 1396 patients, 365 (26.1 %) were obese (mean BMI 33.9 ± 3.6; 17.5 % class I, 3.4 % class II, and 3.4 % class III). Image quality was good/excellent in 94.5 % of the obese patients. The annualized mortality rates were not significantly different among obese and non-obese patients, being <1 % with normal CZT-SPECT, and increased with the degree of scan abnormality in both obese and non-obese patients. Age, the use of pharmacologic stress and an abnormal CZT-SPECT, but not obesity, were independent predictors of death. In obese patients, single-day rest/stress CZT-SPECT with a multipinhole camera provides prognostic discrimination with high image quality. PMID:26424491

  14. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  15. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  16. Panic attack triggering myocardial ischemia documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chest pain, a key element in the investigation of coronary artery disease is often regarded as a benign prognosis when present in panic attacks. However, panic disorder has been suggested as an independent risk factor for long-term prognosis of cardiovascular diseases and a trigger of acute myocardial infarction. Objective Faced with the extreme importance in differentiate from ischemic to non-ischemic chest pain, we report a case of panic attack induced by inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide triggering myocardial ischemia, documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. Discussion Panic attack is undoubtedly a strong component of mental stress. Patients with coronary artery disease may present myocardial ischemia in mental stress response by two ways: an increase in coronary vasomotor tone or a sympathetic hyperactivity leading to a rise in myocardial oxygen consumption. Coronary artery spasm was presumed to be present in cases of cardiac ischemia linked to panic disorder. Possibly the carbon dioxide challenge test could trigger myocardial ischemia by the same mechanisms. Conclusion The use of mental stress has been suggested as an alternative method for myocardial ischemia investigation. Based on translational medicine objectives the use of CO2 challenge followed by Sestamibi SPECT could be a useful method to allow improved application of research-based knowledge to the medical field, specifically at the interface of PD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22999016

  17. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  18. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wagenaar, D J; Chen, S; Xu, J; Yu, J; Tsui, B M W

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI.

  19. Myocardial Bridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. See also on this site: Ask a Texas Heart Institute Doctor: Search "myocardial bridge" Updated August ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of coronary artery stenosis in children with Kawasaki disease. Usefulness of pharmacologic stress sup 201 Tl myocardial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, C.; Hiroe, M.; Nakanishi, T.; Takao, A. )

    1989-09-01

    This study determined the feasibility and accuracy of quantitative 201Tl myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after dipyridamole infusion to detect coronary obstructive lesions in children with Kawasaki disease. 201Tl distribution after dipyridamole infusion was measured in 23 normal children, and with these normal values, quantitative analysis of SPECT was performed in 49 patients. Thirty-four patients had coronary stenosis 90% or greater on angiograms. Side effects resulting from systemic vasodilation were observed in about 70%. Angina pectoris and ischemic ST changes were observed only in patients with coronary stenosis. These symptoms disappeared after aminophylline infusion. Results of visual and quantitative analysis of SPECT were compared. SPECT data were shown on two-dimensional polar maps, and the extent and severity scores were calculated. The sensitivity of SPECT for detection of overall coronary stenosis was 91% (visual analysis) and 88% (quantitative analysis). The specificity of SPECT was 60% visually and 93% quantitatively. The sensitivity of quantitative analysis to detect individual coronary stenosis was similar to that of visual analysis. However, the specificity of visual analysis to detect individual coronary artery stenosis was significantly less than that of quantitative analysis. From these data, we conclude that quantitative analysis of myocardial SPECT after dipyridamole infusion is a safe and accurate diagnostic method for identifying coronary stenosis in children with Kawasaki disease.

  1. Systolic and diastolic assessment by 3D-ASM segmentation of gated-SPECT Studies: a comparison with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Bijnens, B. H.; Huguet, M.; Sukno, F.; Moragas, G.; Frangi, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    Gated single photon emission tomography (gSPECT) is a well-established technique used routinely in clinical practice. It can be employed to evaluate global left ventricular (LV) function of a patient. The purpose of this study is to assess LV systolic and diastolic function from gSPECT datasets in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) measurements. This is achieved by applying our recently implemented 3D active shape model (3D-ASM) segmentation approach for gSPECT studies. This methodology allows for generation of 3D LV meshes for all cardiac phases, providing volume time curves and filling rate curves. Both systolic and diastolic functional parameters can be derived from these curves for an assessment of patient condition even at early stages of LV dysfunction. Agreement of functional parameters, with respect to CMR measurements, were analyzed by means of Bland-Altman plots. The analysis included subjects presenting either LV hypertrophy, dilation or myocardial infarction.

  2. Evidence for myocardial CT perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This editorial discusses a recent paper published in the August issue of Radiology about the diagnostic value of myocardial computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis when compared to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) imaging based on a secondary analysis of CORE320 study. Three aspects including high diagnostic sensitivity of CT perfusion imaging, moderate specificity of SPECT imaging and lack of use of attenuation correction in SPECT imaging have been discussed with reference to the current literature, and some suggestions have been highlighted for future studies to improve the diagnostic performance of CT perfusion and SPECT imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:25774349

  3. Multimodality Imaging of Myocardial Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sosnovik, David E.; French, Brent A.; Bengel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular molecular imaging have come at a rapid pace over the last several years. Multiple approaches have been taken to better understand the structural, molecular, and cellular events that underlie the progression from myocardial injury to myocardial infarction (MI) and, ultimately, to congestive heart failure. Multimodality molecular imaging including SPECT, PET, cardiac MRI, and optical approaches is offering new insights into the pathophysiology of MI and left ventricular remodeling in small-animal models. Targets that are being probed include, among others, angiotensin receptors, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, apoptosis, macrophages, and sympathetic innervation. It is only a matter of time before these advances are applied in the clinical setting to improve post-MI prognostication and identify appropriate therapies in patients to prevent the onset of congestive heart failure. PMID:20395347

  4. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  5. Quantification of myocardial infarction: a comparison of single photon-emission computed tomography with pyrophosphate to serial plasma MB-creatine kinase measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, D.E.; Corbett, J.R.; Wolfe, C.L.; Lewis, S.E.; Gabliani, G.; Filipchuk, N.; Redish, G.; Parkey, R.W.; Buja, L.M.; Jaffe, A.S.

    1985-08-01

    Single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) with /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (PPi) has been shown to estimate size of myocardial infarction accurately in animals. The authors tested the hypothesis that SPECT with /sup /sup 99m//Tc-PPi and blood pool subtraction can provide prompt and accurate estimates of size of myocardial infarction in patients. SPECT estimates are potentially available early after the onset of infarction and should correlate with estimates of infarct size calculated from serial measurements of plasma MB-creatine kinase (CK) activity. Thirty-three patients with acute myocardial infarction and 16 control patients without acute myocardial infarction were studied. Eleven of the patients had transmural anterior myocardial infarction, 16 had transmural inferior myocardial infarction, and six had nontransmural myocardial infarction. SPECT was performed with a commercially available rotating gamma camera. Identical projection images of the distribution of 99mTc-PPi and the ungated cardiac blood pool were acquired sequentially over 180 degrees. Reconstructed sections were color coded and superimposed for purposes of localization of infarct. Areas of increased PPi uptake within myocardial infarcts were thresholded at 65% of peak activity. The blood pool was thresholded at 50% and subtracted to determine the endocardial border for the left ventricle. Myocardial infarcts ranged in size from 1 to 126 gram equivalents (geq) MB-CK. The correlation of MB-CK estimates of size of infarct with size determined by SPECT (both in geq) was good (r = .89 with a regression line of y = 13.1 + 1.5x).

  6. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-06-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang`s algorithm. The dual window method was used for scatter subtraction. The author used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of (1) fixed thresholding, (2) automatic thresholding, (3) attenuation, (4) scatter, and (5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are performed. The relative error is within 7% for the GLH method combined with attenuation and scatter corrections.

  7. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  8. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  9. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  10. Comparison of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography and thallium-201 SPECT imaging for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Schwaiger, M.; Molina, E.; Popma, J.; Gacioch, G.M.; Kalus, M.; Squicciarini, S.; al-Aouar, Z.R.; Schork, A.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The diagnostic performance of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) positron emission tomography (PET) and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) for detecting coronary artery disease was investigated in 81 patients (52 men, 29 women). PET studies using 60 mCi of Rb-82 were performed at baseline and after intravenous infusion of 0.56 mg/kg dipyridamole in conjunction with handgrip stress. Tl-201 SPECT was performed after dipyridamole-handgrip stress and, in a subset of patients, after treadmill exercise. Sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy were assessed using both visually and quantitatively interpreted coronary angiograms. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET for detection of coronary artery disease (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) were 84, 88 and 85%, respectively. In comparison, the performance of SPECT revealed a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 53% (p less than 0.05 vs PET) and accuracy of 79%. Similar results were obtained using either visual or quantitative angiographic criteria for severity of coronary artery disease. In 43 patients without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity for detection of disease was 71 and 73%, respectively, similar for both PET and SPECT. There was no significant difference in diagnostic performance between imaging modalities when 2 different modes of stress (exercise treadmill vs intravenous dipyridamole plus handgrip) were used with SPECT imaging. Thus, Rb-82 PET provides improved specificity compared with Tl-201 SPECT for identifying coronary artery disease, most likely due to the higher photon energy of Rb-82 and attenuation correction provided by PET. However, post-test referral cannot be entirely excluded as a potential explanation for the lower specificity of Tl-201 SPECT.

  11. C-SPECT - a Clinical Cardiac SPECT/Tct Platform: Design Concepts and Performance Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei; Ordonez, Caesar E.; Liang, Haoning; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Jingai

    2013-01-01

    Because of scarcity of photons emitted from the heart, clinical cardiac SPECT imaging is mainly limited by photon statistics. The sub-optimal detection efficiency of current SPECT systems not only limits the quality of clinical cardiac SPECT imaging but also makes more advanced potential applications difficult to be realized. We propose a high-performance system platform - C-SPECT, which has its sampling geometry optimized for detection of emitted photons in quality and quantity. The C-SPECT has a stationary C-shaped gantry that surrounds the left-front side of a patient’s thorax. The stationary C-shaped collimator and detector systems in the gantry provide effective and efficient detection and sampling of photon emission. For cardiac imaging, the C-SPECT platform could achieve 2 to 4 times the system geometric efficiency of conventional SPECT systems at the same sampling resolution. This platform also includes an integrated transmission CT for attenuation correction. The ability of C-SPECT systems to perform sequential high-quality emission and transmission imaging could bring cost-effective high-performance to clinical imaging. In addition, a C-SPECT system could provide high detection efficiency to accommodate fast acquisition rate for gated and dynamic cardiac imaging. This paper describes the design concepts and performance potential of C-SPECT, and illustrates how these concepts can be implemented in a basic system. PMID:23885129

  12. SPECT in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, J.C.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Yudd, A.P.

    1985-05-01

    Tc99m labeled red blood cell blood flow and delayed static blood pool imaging is widely accepted as a reliable, accurate method for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomata. The purpose of this study is to assess the relative value of SPECT blood pool imaging in the evaluation of hepatic hemangionata. A total of 68 patients, including 21 patients with proven hepatic cavernous hemangiomas, were studied using both planar and SPECT imaging techniques. All patients underwent multi-phase evaluation which included a hepatic flow study, immediate planar images of the liver, followed by a 360/sup 0/ tomographic (SPECT) study and subsequent 60 minute delayed static planar hepatic blood pool images. All 21 patients with proven hepatic hemangiomas had a positive SPECT exam and 17 of the 21 (81%) patients had a positive planar exam. In the 21 patients, there were a total of 36 hemangiomas ranging in size from .7 cm to 13 cm. The SPECT imaging technique correctly identified all 36 lesions (100%) where as planar imaging detected 25 of the 36 lesions (69.4%). In all the remaining patients (10-normal, 17-metastatic disease, 12-hepatocellular disease, 6-hepatoma, 2-liver cysts), both the planar and SPECT imaging techniques were interpreted as showing no evidence of focal sequestration of red blood cells. SPECT hepatic blood pool imaging represents an improvement in the evaluation of hepatic hemangioma as a result of a reduction in imaging time (less than thirty minutes), improved spatial resolution and greater overall accuracy.

  13. Pharmacologic stress dual-isotope myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Matzer, L; Kiat, H; Wang, F P; Van Train, K; Germano, G; Friedman, J; Berman, D S

    1994-12-01

    Separate-acquisition rest thallium-201/exercise technetium-99m sestamibi (sestamibi) dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been shown to be effective for assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability. The present study was designed to validate the dual-isotope approach when used in conjunction with pharmacologic stress. All patients had rest 201TI SPECT followed immediately by adenosine (n = 82) or dipyridamole (n = 50) infusion and sestamibi injection. Sestamibi SPECT was performed 1 hour later. The entire study lasted < 2.5 hours. The patient population was categorized into three groups: 51 consecutive patients with coronary angiography and no previous myocardial infarction (group I), 58 consecutive patients with a low prescintigraphic test likelihood of coronary artery disease (group II), and 23 consecutive catheterized patients with remote Q-wave myocardial infarction (group III). For group I patients, the sensitivity and specificity for dual-isotope SPECT were 92% (35 of 38) and 85% (11 of 13), respectively, when > or = 50% coronary artery narrowing was considered significant and were 97% (34 of 35) and 81% (13 of 16) respectively, when > or = 70% narrowing was considered significant. The normalcy rate among the 58 patients of group II was 96%. Comparisons for pattern of stress-defect reversibility demonstrated that of the 97 stress defects within the infarct zones (group III), 15% were reversible and 85% were nonreversible. In contrast, of the 227 stress defects within the diseased (> or = 50% stenosis) vessel zones of the group I patients, 93% were reversible and 7% were noreversible (p < 0.001 vs group III). In conclusion, separate acquisition rest 201-TI/pharmacologic stress sestamibi dual-isotope SPECT is an efficient myocardial perfusion imaging protocol with high accuracy for detection and assessment of angiographically significant coronary artery disease.

  14. SPECT reconstruction on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Christoph; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing reliance of doctors on imaging procedures, not only visualization needs to be optimized, but the reconstruction of the volumes from the scanner output is another bottleneck. Accelerating the computationally intensive reconstruction process improves the medical work flow, matches the reconstruction speed to the acquisition speed, and allows fast batch processing and interactive or near-interactive parameter tuning. Recently, much effort has been focused on using the computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) for general purpose computations. This paper presents a GPU-accelerated implementation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on an ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm. The algorithm uses models for the point-spread-function (PSF) to improve spatial resolution in the reconstruction images. Instead of computing the PSF directly, it is modeled as efficient blurring of slabs on the GPU in order to accelerate the process. The algorithm for the calculation of accumulated attenuation factors that allows correcting the generated volume according to the attenuation properties of the volume is optimized for processing on the GPU. Since these factors can be reused between different iterations, a cache is used that is adapted to different sizes of the video memory so that only those factors have to be recomputed that do not fit onto graphics memory. These improvements make the reconstruction of typical SPECT volume near interactive.

  15. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  16. SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is widely used as a means of imaging the distribution of administered radiotracers that have single-photon emission. The most widely used SPECT systems are based on the Anger gamma camera, usually involving dual detectors that rotate around the patient. Several factors affect the quality of SPECT images (e.g., resolution and noise) and the ability to perform absolute quantification (e.g., attenuation, scatter, motion, and resolution). There is a trend to introduce dual-modality systems and organ-specific systems, both developments that enhance diagnostic capability.

  17. [Acceptance check and quality control of SPECT].

    PubMed

    Sun, L M; Liu, C B

    2001-05-01

    This paper explains the testing of SPECT, especially the new SPECT with double digital detector and spiral scanning frames that has been introduced to China recently, in the acceptance check, proceeding from the physical functions of the system to its mechanical functions, to the NEMA standard functions, and then to the computer hardware specified in the contract. A brief introduction is also given of the quality control of SPECT in terms of its spatial resolution, energy resolution, spatial linearity, sensitivity, and center of rotation. PMID:12583289

  18. High-Efficiency SPECT MPI: Comparison of Automated Quantification, Visual Interpretation, and Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, W. Lane; Slomka, Piotr J.; Gerlach, Jim R.; Sweeny, Joseph M.; Baber, Usman; Croft, Lori B.; Guma, Krista A.; George, Titus; Henzlova, Milena J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently introduced high-efficiency (HE) SPECT cameras with solid-state CZT detectors have been shown to decrease imaging time and reduce radiation exposure to patients. An automated, computer derived quantification of HE MPI has been shown to correlate well with coronary angiography on one HE SPECT camera system (D-SPECT), but has not been compared to visual interpretation on any of the HE SPECT platforms. Methods Patients undergoing a clinically indicated Tc-99m sestamibi HE SPECT (GE Discovery 530c with supine and prone imaging) study over a one year period followed by a coronary angiogram within 2 months were included. Only patients with a history of CABG surgery were excluded. Both MPI studies and coronary angiograms were reinterpreted by blinded readers. One hundred and twenty two very low (risk of CAD < 5%) or low (risk of CAD < 10%) likelihood subjects with normal myocardial perfusion were used to create normal reference limits. Computer derived quantification of the total perfusion deficit (TPD) at stress and rest was obtained with QPS software. The visual and automated MPI quantification were compared to coronary angiography (≥ 70% luminal stenosis) by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Results Of the 3,111 patients who underwent HE SPECT over a one year period, 160 patients qualified for the correlation study (66% male, 52% with a history of CAD). The ROC area under the curve (AUC) was similar for both the automated and visual interpretations using both supine only and combined supine and prone images (0.69-0.74). Using thresholds determined from sensitivity and specificity curves, the automated reads showed higher specificity (59-67% versus 27-60%) and lower sensitivity (71-72% versus 79-93%) than the visual reads. By including prone images sensitivity decreased slightly but specificity increased for both. By excluding patients with known CAD and cardiomyopathies, AUC and specificity increased for both techniques (0.72-0.82). The use

  19. Myocardial abscess complicating healed myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, S.; Young, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An isolated myocardial abscess due to Bacteroides fragilis developed in the scar of a myocardial infarction. Fever, chills and signs of pericarditis were the main clinical features. Mild enteritis 1 week prior to the onset of symptoms related to the abscess was the most likely cause of the bacteremia. The diagnosis was established at thoracotomy, performed because of cardiac tamponade. Thirteen other cases of isolated bacterial myocardial abscess accompanying myocardial infarction have been reported, but all the infarctions were recent. Surgical resection for a suspected myocardial abscess should be considered in view of the high mortality, largely from cardiac rupture. Images FIG. 1 PMID:861868

  20. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  1. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 ... Persantine) or dobutamine. The tests may take between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. What happens after ...

  2. Cerebral SPECT imaging: Impact on clinical management

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.; Jacobs, S.; Pozniakof, T.

    1994-05-01

    Although cerebral SPECT has been reported to be of value in a variety of neurologic disorders, there is limited data available on the value of SPECT relative to clinical management decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cerebral SPECT imaging on patient management. A total of 94 consecutive patients referred for clinical evaluation with brain SPECT were included in this study. Patients were assigned to one of nine groups depending on the clinical indication for the study. These groups included transient ischemia (16), stroke (20), dementia (18), seizures (5), hemorrhage (13), head trauma (6), arteriovenous malformations (6), encephalopathy (6) and a miscellaneous (4) group. All patients were injected with 99mTc HMPAO in doses ranging from 15 mCi to 22 mCi (555 MBq to 814 MBq) and scanned on a triple headed SPECT gamma camera. Two weeks after completion of the study, a standardized interview was conducted between the nuclear and referring physicians to determine if the SPECT findings contributed to an alteration in patient management. Overall, patient management was significantly altered in 47% of the cases referred. The greatest impact on patient management occurred in the group evaluated for transient ischemia, where a total of 13/16 (81%) of patients had their clinical management altered as a result of the cerebral SPECT findings. Clinical management was altered in 61% of patients referred for evaluation of dementia, 67% of patients evaluated for arteriovenous malformations, and 50% of patients with head trauma. In the remainder of the patients, alteration in clinical management ranged from 17% to 50% of patients. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of cerebral SPECT imaging since in a significant number of cases clinical management was altered as a result of the examination. Long term follow up will be necessary to determine patient outcome.

  3. Brain SPECT quantitation in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    Methods to quantitate SPECT data for clinical diagnosis should be chosen so that they take advantage of the lessons learned from PET data. This is particularly important because current SPECT high-resolution brain imaging systems now produce images that are similar in resolution to those generated by the last generation PET equipment (9 mm FWHM). These high-resolution SPECT systems make quantitation of SPECT more problematic than earlier. Methodology validated on low-resolution SPECT systems may no longer be valid for data obtained with the newer SPECT systems. For example, in patients with dementia, the ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity often was studied. However, with new instruments, the cerebellum appears very different: discrete regions are more apparent. The large cerebellar regions usually used with older instrumentation are of an inappropriate size for the new equipment. The normal range for any method of quantitation determined using older equipment probably changes for data obtained with new equipment. It is not surprising that Kim et al. in their simulations demonstrated that because of the finite resolution of imaging systems, the ability to measure pure function is limited, with {open_quotes}anatomy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}function{close_quotes} coupled in a {open_quotes}complex nonlinear way{close_quotes}. 11 refs.

  4. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  5. Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA. PMID:27286848

  6. [Evaluation of non-uniform attenuation correction using simultaneous transmission and emission computed tomography--basic analysis with myocardial phantom].

    PubMed

    Otake, H; Yukihiro, M; Fukushima, Y; Imai, T; Hosono, K; Hatori, N; Watanabe, N; Hirano, T; Inoue, T; Takahashi, M; Ban, R; Endo, K

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous transmission emission protocol (STEP), developed for the non-uniform attenuation correction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was evaluated using the cardiac phantom prepared with and without a myocardial wall defect. Emission computed tomography (ECT) of the cardiac phantom using 201Tl was acquired. Transmission data (TCT) were taken using a line source of 99mTc. Myocardial images with STEP method were superior in the homogeneity of intramyocardial radioactivity and spatial resolution to the conventional SPECT images. This is an excellent method because of the accurate matching position between TCT and ECT images and shortening the examination time by simultaneous data acquisition. It would be clinically useful for diagnosing various myocardial diseases.

  7. A guide to SPECT equipment for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.; Zubal, G.

    1991-12-31

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was started by Kuhl and Edwards about 30 years ago. Their original instrument consisted of four focused Nal probes mounted on a moving gantry. During the 1980s, clinical SPECT imaging was most frequently performed using single-headed Anger-type cameras which were modified for rotational as well as static imaging. Such instruments are still available and may be useful in settings where there are few patients and SPECT is used only occasionally. More frequently, however, dedicated SPECT devices are purchased which optimize equipment potential while being user-friendly. Modern SPECT instrumentation incorporates improvements in the detector, computers, mathematical formulations, electronics and display systems. A comprehensive discussion of all aspects of SPECT is beyond the scope of this article. The authors, however, discuss general concepts of SPECT, the current state-of-the-art in clinical SPECT instrumentation, and areas of common misunderstanding. 9 refs.

  8. Machine-learning model observer for detection and localization tasks in clinical SPECT-MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parages, Felipe M.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we propose a machine-learning MO based on Naive-Bayes classification (NB-MO) for the diagnostic tasks of detection, localization and assessment of perfusion defects in clinical SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI), with the goal of evaluating several image reconstruction methods used in clinical practice. NB-MO uses image features extracted from polar-maps in order to predict lesion detection, localization and severity scores given by human readers in a series of 3D SPECT-MPI. The population used to tune (i.e. train) the NB-MO consisted of simulated SPECT-MPI cases - divided into normals or with lesions in variable sizes and locations - reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) method. An ensemble of five human specialists (physicians) read a subset of simulated reconstructed images, and assigned a perfusion score for each region of the left-ventricle (LV). Polar-maps generated from the simulated volumes along with their corresponding human scores were used to train five NB-MOs (one per human reader), which are subsequently applied (i.e. tested) on three sets of clinical SPECT-MPI polar maps, in order to predict human detection and localization scores. The clinical "testing" population comprises healthy individuals and patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD) in three possible regions, namely: LAD, LcX and RCA. Each clinical case was reconstructed using three reconstruction strategies, namely: FBP with no SC (i.e. scatter compensation), OSEM with Triple Energy Window (TEW) SC method, and OSEM with Effective Source Scatter Estimation (ESSE) SC. Alternative Free-Response (AFROC) analysis of perfusion scores shows that NB-MO predicts a higher human performance for scatter-compensated reconstructions, in agreement with what has been reported in published literature. These results suggest that NB-MO has good potential to generalize well to reconstruction methods not used during training, even for reasonably dissimilar datasets (i

  9. [Ischemic heart disease (myocardial perfusion and viability): techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2004-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease have made tremendous progress, in particular with the help of the development of non-invasive methodologies for assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Clinically, nuclear medicine techniques (particularly SPECT imaging) have predominated. With the recent technical developments allowing for a combined assessment of perfusion and irreversible damage with late enhancement imaging, MRI will now play a major role in the assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15507837

  10. Investigation of optimal acquisition time of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using cardiac focusing-collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Arisa; Abe, Shinji; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kono, Hidetaka; Odagawa, Tetsuro; Fujita, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Saki; Kato, Katsuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Recently myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging acquired using the cardiac focusing-collimator (CF) has been developed in the field of nuclear cardiology. Previously we have investigated the basic characteristics of CF using physical phantoms. This study was aimed at determining the acquisition time for CF that enables to acquire the SPECT images equivalent to those acquired by the conventional method in 201TlCl myocardial perfusion SPECT. In this study, Siemens Symbia T6 was used by setting the torso phantom equipped with the cardiac, pulmonary, and hepatic components. 201TlCl solution were filled in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium and liver. Each of CF, the low energy high resolution collimator (LEHR), and the low medium energy general purpose collimator (LMEGP) was set on the SPECT equipment. Data acquisitions were made by regarding the center of the phantom as the center of the heart in CF at various acquisition times. Acquired data were reconstructed, and the polar maps were created from the reconstructed images. Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated as the mean counts determined on the polar maps with their standard deviations. When CF was used, CV was lower at longer acquisition times. CV calculated from the polar maps acquired using CF at 2.83 min of acquisition time was equivalent to CV calculated from those acquired using LEHR in a 180°acquisition range at 20 min of acquisition time.

  11. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction in pigs with Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin scintigraphy and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    ten Kate, C.I.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Schipperheyn, J.J.; Doornbos, J.; Hoedemaeker, P.J.; Maes, A.; v.d. Nat, K.H.; Camps, J.A.; Huysmans, H.A.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1990-07-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin F(ab')2 was used in a series of scintigraphic studies on experimentally induced myocardial infarctions in pigs. Antimyosin distribution recorded by planar images of in vivo pigs and by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of excised hearts delineated areas of myocardial necrosis if infarct volume exceeded 3.3 cm3. Scintigraphic images were compared with magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from excised hearts and with photographs of slices of the hearts. Infarct size and localization determined with antimyosin were compared. The MR images, with or without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), of the in vivo pigs were all false-negative; some myocardial wall thinning and high bloodpool signals were visible. Results show that both the antimyosin and the MR technique are specific methods for the visualization of induced myocardial necrosis in this animal model. However, the use of antimyosin is limited to a period ranging from 24 to 72 hours after infarction.

  12. Exploring diagnostic potentials of radioiodinated sennidin A in rat model of reperfused myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cuihua; Gao, Meng; Li, Yue; Huang, Dejian; Yao, Nan; Ji, Yun; Liu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongjian; Wang, Xiaoning; Yin, Zhiqi; Jing, Su; Ni, Yicheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-11-10

    Non-invasive "hot spot imaging" and localization of necrotic tissue may be helpful for definitive diagnosis of myocardial viability, which is essential for clinical management of ischemic heart disease. We labeled Sennidin A (SA), a naturally occurring median dianthrone compound, with (131)I and evaluated (131)I SA as a potential necrosis-avid diagnostic tracer agent in rat model of reperfused myocardial infarction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine the location and dimension of infarction. (131)I-SA was evaluated in rat model of 24-hour old reperfused myocardial infarction using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), biodistribution, triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) histochemical staining, serial sectional autoradiography and microscopy. Gamma counting revealed high uptake and prolonged retention of (131)I SA in necrotic myocardium and fast clearance from non-targeted tissues. On SPECT/CT images, myocardial infarction was persistently visualized as well-defined hotspots over 24h, which was confirmed by perfect matches of images from post-mortem TTC staining and autoradiography. Radioactivity concentration in infarcted myocardium was over 9 times higher than that of the normal myocardium at 24h. With favorable hydrophilicity and stability, radioiodinated SA may serve as a necrosis-avid diagnostic agent for assessment of myocardial viability.

  13. Respiratory Motion Detection and Correction in ECG-Gated SPECT: a New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan, Ahmad; Rajabi, Hossein; Gruy, Bernhard; Rustgou, Feridoon; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Firoozabady, Hasan; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Malek, Hadi; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Objective Gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) has been established as an accurate and reproducible diagnostic and prognostic technique for the assessment of myocardial perfusion and function. Respiratory motion is among the major factors that may affect the quality of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and consequently the accuracy of the examination. In this study, we have proposed a new approach for the tracking of respiratory motion and the correction of unwanted respiratory motion by the use of respiratory-cardiac gated-SPECT (RC-GSPECT). In addition, we have evaluated the use of RC-GSPECT for quantitative and visual assessment of myocardial perfusion and function. Materials and Methods Twenty-six patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD)-underwent two-day stress and rest 99mTc-Tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy using both conventional GSPECT and RC-GSPECT methods. The respiratory signals were induced by use of a CT real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating interface. A PIO-D144 card, which is transistor-transistor logic (TTL) compatible, was used as the input interface for simultaneous detection of both ECG and respiration signals. Results A total of 26 patients with known or suspected CAD were examined in this study. Stress and rest myocardial respiratory motion in the vertical direction was 8.8-16.6 mm (mean, 12.4 ± 2.9 mm) and 7.8-11.8 mm (mean, 9.5 ± 1.6 mm), respectively. The percentages of tracer intensity in the inferior, inferoseptal and septal walls as well as the inferior to lateral (I/L) uptake ratio was significantly higher with the use of RC-GSPECT as compared to the use of GSPECT (p < 0.01). In a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) correlation analysis between the use of rest GSPECT and RC-GSPECT with echocardiography, better correlation was noted between RC-GSPECT and echocardiography as compared with the use of GSPECT (y = 0.9654x + 1.6514; r = 0.93, p < 0

  14. Prognostic Utility of Calcium Scoring as an Adjunct to Stress Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moody, William E.; Lin, Erica L.S.; Stoodley, Matthew; McNulty, David; Thomson, Louise E.; Berman, Daniel S.; Edwards, Nicola C.; Holloway, Benjamin; Ferro, Charles J.; Townend, Jonathan N.; Steeds, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events in the general population. Recent data confirm the prognostic utility of single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in end-stage renal disease, but whether performing CACS as part of hybrid imaging improves risk prediction in this population is unclear. Consecutive patients (n = 284) were identified after referral to a university hospital for cardiovascular risk stratification in assessment for renal transplantation. Participants underwent technetium-99m SPECT imaging after exercise or standard adenosine stress in those unable to achieve 85% maximal heart rate; multislice CACS was also performed (Siemens Symbia T16, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Subjects with known coronary artery disease (n = 88) and those who underwent early revascularization (n = 2) were excluded. The primary outcome was a composite of death or first myocardial infarction. An abnormal SPECT perfusion result was seen in 22% (43 of 194) of subjects, whereas 45% (87 of 194) had at least moderate CACS (>100 U). The frequency of abnormal perfusion (summed stress score ≥4) increased with increasing CACS severity (p = 0.049). There were a total of 15 events (8 deaths, and 7 myocardial infarctions) after a median duration of 18 months (maximum follow-up 3.4 years). Univariate analysis showed diabetes mellitus (Hazard ratio [HR] 3.30, 95% CI 1.14 to 9.54; p = 0.028), abnormal perfusion on SPECT (HR 5.32, 95% CI 1.84 to 15.35; p = 0.002), and moderate-to-severe CACS (HR 3.55, 95% CI 1.11 to 11.35; p = 0.032) were all associated with the primary outcome. In a multivariate model, abnormal perfusion on SPECT (HR 4.18, 95% CI 1.43 to 12.27; p = 0.009), but not moderate-to-severe CACS (HR 2.50, 95% CI 0.76 to 8.20; p = 0.130), independently predicted all-cause death or myocardial infarction. The prognostic value of CACS was not incremental to clinical and SPECT perfusion data (global chi

  15. Prognostic Utility of Calcium Scoring as an Adjunct to Stress Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Lin, Erica L S; Stoodley, Matthew; McNulty, David; Thomson, Louise E; Berman, Daniel S; Edwards, Nicola C; Holloway, Benjamin; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N; Steeds, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events in the general population. Recent data confirm the prognostic utility of single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in end-stage renal disease, but whether performing CACS as part of hybrid imaging improves risk prediction in this population is unclear. Consecutive patients (n = 284) were identified after referral to a university hospital for cardiovascular risk stratification in assessment for renal transplantation. Participants underwent technetium-99m SPECT imaging after exercise or standard adenosine stress in those unable to achieve 85% maximal heart rate; multislice CACS was also performed (Siemens Symbia T16, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Subjects with known coronary artery disease (n = 88) and those who underwent early revascularization (n = 2) were excluded. The primary outcome was a composite of death or first myocardial infarction. An abnormal SPECT perfusion result was seen in 22% (43 of 194) of subjects, whereas 45% (87 of 194) had at least moderate CACS (>100 U). The frequency of abnormal perfusion (summed stress score ≥4) increased with increasing CACS severity (p = 0.049). There were a total of 15 events (8 deaths, and 7 myocardial infarctions) after a median duration of 18 months (maximum follow-up 3.4 years). Univariate analysis showed diabetes mellitus (Hazard ratio [HR] 3.30, 95% CI 1.14 to 9.54; p = 0.028), abnormal perfusion on SPECT (HR 5.32, 95% CI 1.84 to 15.35; p = 0.002), and moderate-to-severe CACS (HR 3.55, 95% CI 1.11 to 11.35; p = 0.032) were all associated with the primary outcome. In a multivariate model, abnormal perfusion on SPECT (HR 4.18, 95% CI 1.43 to 12.27; p = 0.009), but not moderate-to-severe CACS (HR 2.50, 95% CI 0.76 to 8.20; p = 0.130), independently predicted all-cause death or myocardial infarction. The prognostic value of CACS was not incremental to clinical and SPECT perfusion data (global chi-square change

  16. Incidental pathologic extracardiac uptake of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in myocardial perfusion imaging: Importance of patient background evaluation.

    PubMed

    González García, B; García Vicente, A M; Palomar Muñoz, A; Poblete García, V M; Jiménez Londoño, G A; Soriano Castrejón, A M

    2015-01-01

    (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT) has an important role in the assessment of coronary artery disease. Despite being its main indication, this study does not only evaluate myocardial perfusion, but much more. Moreover, during the SPECT acquisition, the field area covered includes many important organs of the thorax and abdomen, so extracardiac abnormalities can be observed. The correct etiologic diagnosis of them is only possible if we understand how (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin works and make a comprehensive investigation of the clinical history of the patient. PMID:25937520

  17. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  18. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  19. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, Dong-Wei; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Dae, Michael W; Franc, Benjamin L

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of 99mTc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with 99mTc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of 99mTc-exametazime. Time activity curve of 99mTc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  20. Postoperative myocardial infarction documented by technetium pyrophosphate scan using single-photon emission computed tomography: Significance of intraoperative myocardial ischemia and hemodynamic control

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, D.C.; Chung, F.; Burns, R.J.; Houston, P.L.; Feindel, C.M. )

    1989-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to document postoperative myocardial infarction (PMI) by technetium pyrophosphate scan using single-photon emission computed tomography (TcPPi-SPECT) in 28 patients undergoing elective coronary bypass grafting (CABG). The relationships of intraoperative electrocardiographic myocardial ischemia, hemodynamic responses, and pharmacological requirements to this incidence of PMI were correlated. Radionuclide cardioangiography and TcPPi-SPECT were performed 24 h preoperatively and 48 h postoperatively. A standard high-dose fentanyl anesthetic protocol was used. Twenty-five percent of elective CABG patients were complicated with PMI, as documented by TcPPi-SPECT with an infarcted mass of 38.0 +/- 5.5 g. No significant difference in demographic, preoperative right and left ventricular function, number of coronary vessels grafted, or aortic cross-clamp time was observed between the PMI and non-PMI groups. The distribution of patients using preoperative beta-adrenergic blocking drugs or calcium channel blocking drugs was found to have no correlation with the outcome of PMI. As well, no significant differences in hemodynamic changes or pharmacological requirements were observed in the PMI and non-PMI groups during prebypass or postbypass periods, indicating careful intraoperative control of hemodynamic indices did not prevent the outcome of PMI in these patients. However, the incidence of prebypass ischemia was 39.3% and significantly correlated with the outcome of positive TcPPi-SPECT, denoting a 3.9-fold increased risk of developing PMI. Prebypass ischemic changes in leads II and V5 were shown to correlate with increased CPK-MB release (P less than 0.05) and tends to occur more frequently with lateral myocardial infarction.

  1. Estimation of dynamic time activity curves from dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Hossain, J; Du, Y; Links, J; Rahmim, A; Karakatsanis, N; Akhbardeh, A; Lyons, J; Frey, E C

    2015-04-21

    Whole-heart coronary flow reserve (CFR) may be useful as an early predictor of cardiovascular disease or heart failure. Here we propose a simple method to extract the time-activity curve, an essential component needed for estimating the CFR, for a small number of compartments in the body, such as normal myocardium, blood pool, and ischemic myocardial regions, from SPECT data acquired with conventional cameras using slow rotation. We evaluated the method using a realistic simulation of (99m)Tc-teboroxime imaging. Uptake of (99m)Tc-teboroxime based on data from the literature were modeled. Data were simulated using the anatomically-realistic 3D NCAT phantom and an analytic projection code that realistically models attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. The proposed method was then applied to estimate time activity curves (TACs) for a set of 3D volumes of interest (VOIs) directly from the projections. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of estimated TACs and studied the effects of the presence of perfusion defects that were and were not modeled in the estimation procedure.The method produced good estimates of the myocardial and blood-pool TACS organ VOIs, with average weighted absolute biases of less than 5% for the myocardium and 10% for the blood pool when the true organ boundaries were known and the activity distributions in the organs were uniform. In the presence of unknown perfusion defects, the myocardial TAC was still estimated well (average weighted absolute bias <10%) when the total reduction in myocardial uptake (product of defect extent and severity) was ≤ 5%. This indicates that the method was robust to modest model mismatch such as the presence of moderate perfusion defects and uptake nonuniformities. With larger defects where the defect VOI was included in the estimation procedure, the estimated normal myocardial and defect TACs were accurate (average weighted absolute bias ≈ 5% for a defect with 25% extent and 100% severity).

  2. Estimation of dynamic time activity curves from dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, J.; Du, Y.; Links, J.; Rahmim, A.; Karakatsanis, N.; Akhbardeh, A.; Lyons, J.; Frey, E. C.

    2015-04-01

    Whole-heart coronary flow reserve (CFR) may be useful as an early predictor of cardiovascular disease or heart failure. Here we propose a simple method to extract the time-activity curve, an essential component needed for estimating the CFR, for a small number of compartments in the body, such as normal myocardium, blood pool, and ischemic myocardial regions, from SPECT data acquired with conventional cameras using slow rotation. We evaluated the method using a realistic simulation of 99mTc-teboroxime imaging. Uptake of 99mTc-teboroxime based on data from the literature were modeled. Data were simulated using the anatomically-realistic 3D NCAT phantom and an analytic projection code that realistically models attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. The proposed method was then applied to estimate time activity curves (TACs) for a set of 3D volumes of interest (VOIs) directly from the projections. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of estimated TACs and studied the effects of the presence of perfusion defects that were and were not modeled in the estimation procedure. The method produced good estimates of the myocardial and blood-pool TACS organ VOIs, with average weighted absolute biases of less than 5% for the myocardium and 10% for the blood pool when the true organ boundaries were known and the activity distributions in the organs were uniform. In the presence of unknown perfusion defects, the myocardial TAC was still estimated well (average weighted absolute bias <10%) when the total reduction in myocardial uptake (product of defect extent and severity) was ≤5%. This indicates that the method was robust to modest model mismatch such as the presence of moderate perfusion defects and uptake nonuniformities. With larger defects where the defect VOI was included in the estimation procedure, the estimated normal myocardial and defect TACs were accurate (average weighted absolute bias ≈5% for a defect with 25% extent and 100% severity).

  3. Dipyridamole stress myocardial perfusion by computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Cabeda, Estêvan Vieira; Falcão, Andréa Maria Gomes; Soares Jr., José; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Nomura, César Higa; Ávila, Luiz Francisco Rodrigues; Parga, José Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Background Functional tests have limited accuracy for identifying myocardial ischemia in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Objective To assess the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) by 320-detector CT in patients with LBBB using invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) (stenosis ≥ 70%) as reference; to investigate the advantage of adding CTP to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare the results with those of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Methods Thirty patients with LBBB who had undergone SPECT for the investigation of coronary artery disease were referred for stress tomography. Independent examiners performed per-patient and per-coronary territory assessments. All patients gave written informed consent to participate in the study that was approved by the institution’s ethics committee. Results The patients’ mean age was 62 ± 10 years. The mean dose of radiation for the tomography protocol was 9.3 ± 4.6 mSv. With regard to CTP, the per-patient values for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were 86%, 81%, 80%, 87%, and 83%, respectively (p = 0.001). The per-territory values were 63%, 86%, 65%, 84%, and 79%, respectively (p < 0.001). In both analyses, the addition of CTP to CTA achieved higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting myocardial ischemia than SPECT (p < 0.001). Conclusion The use of the stress tomography protocol is feasible and has good diagnostic accuracy for assessing myocardial ischemia in patients with LBBB. PMID:26421532

  4. Freehand SPECT in low uptake situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Tobias; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir

    2011-03-01

    3D functional imaging in the operating room can be extremely useful for some procedures like SLN mapping or SLN biopsies. Freehand SPECT is an example of such an imaging modality, combining manually scanned, hand-held 1D gamma detectors with spatial positioning systems in order to reconstruct localized 3D SPECT images, for example in the breast or neck region. Standard series expansion methods are applied together with custom physical models of the acquisition process and custom filtering procedures to perform 3D tomographic reconstruction from sparse, limited-angle and irregularly sampled data. A Freehand SPECT system can easily be assembled on a mobile cart suitable for use in the operating room. This work addresses in particular the problem of objects with low uptake (like sentinel lymph nodes), where reconstruction tends to be difficult due to low signal to noise ratio. In a neck-like phantom study, we show that four simulated nodes of 250 microliter volume with 0.06% respectively 0.03% uptake of a virtual 70MBq injection of Tc99m (the typical activity for SLN procedures at our hospital) in a background of water can be reconstructed successfully using careful filtering procedures in the reconstruction pipeline. Ten independent Freehand SPECT scans of the phantom were performed by several different operators, with an average scan duration of 5.1 minutes. The resulting reconstructions show an average spatial accuracy within voxel dimensions (2.5mm) compared to CT and exhibit correct relative quantification.

  5. Singular Value Decomposition of Pinhole SPECT Systems.

    PubMed

    Palit, Robin; Kupinski, Matthew A; Barrett, Harrison H; Clarkson, Eric W; Aarsvold, John N; Volokh, Lana; Grobshtein, Yariv

    2009-03-12

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system can be modeled by a linear operator H that maps from object space to detector pixels in image space. The singular vectors and singular-value spectra of H provide useful tools for assessing system performance. The number of voxels used to discretize object space and the number of collection angles and pixels used to measure image space make the matrix dimensions H large. As a result, H must be stored sparsely which renders several conventional singular value decomposition (SVD) methods impractical. We used an iterative power methods SVD algorithm (Lanczos) designed to operate on very large sparsely stored matrices to calculate the singular vectors and singular-value spectra for two small animal pinhole SPECT imaging systems: FastSPECT II and M(3)R. The FastSPECT II system consisted of two rings of eight scintillation cameras each. The resulting dimensions of H were 68921 voxels by 97344 detector pixels. The M(3)R system is a four camera system that was reconfigured to measure image space using a single scintillation camera. The resulting dimensions of H were 50864 voxels by 6241 detector pixels. In this paper we present results of the SVD of each system and discuss calculation of the measurement and null space for each system.

  6. Multidivergent-beam stationary cardiac SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Stevens, Andrew M

    2009-07-01

    This article develops a stationary cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using a novel multidivergent-beam collimator. This stationary SPECT system is inexpensive to build, small, and able to acquire true dynamic SPECT data. Stationary cardiac SPECT systems with multipinhole technology already exist. The proposed approach is to replace the multipinhole collimators with the originally designed multidivergent-beam collimators. The motivation for replacing the pinhole technology by divergent-beam technology is based on the following facts. The resolution/sensitivity trade-off for the pinhole is excellent (good resolution and good sensitivity) only in small object (e.g., small animal) imaging when it operates in the image magnifying mode. However, in large object (e.g., human) imaging, the resolution/sensitivity trade-off is poor (poor resolution and poor sensitivity) when the pinhole operates in the image reducing mode. In a stationary system, the number of angular views is limited; thus, image reduction is necessary to obtain more view angles. In this image reducing situation, divergent-beam collimation is able to provide better resolution and detection sensitivity than pinhole collimation. Computer simulations are carried out to verified the claims. PMID:19673185

  7. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  8. Differential impact of multi-focus fan beam collimation with L-mode and conventional systems on the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging: Quantitative evaluation using phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hideo; Matsutomo, Norikazu; Kangai, Yoshiharu; Saho, Tatsunori; Amijima, Hizuru

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): A novel IQ-SPECT™ method has become widely used in clinical studies. The present study compares the quality of myocardial perfusion images (MPI) acquired using the IQ-SPECT™ (IQ-mode), conventional (180° apart: C-mode) and L-mode (90° apart: L-mode) systems. We assessed spatial resolution, image reproducibility and quantifiability using various physical phantoms. Methods: SPECT images were acquired using a dual-headed gamma camera with C-mode, L-mode, and IQ-mode acquisition systems from line source, pai and cardiac phantoms containing solutions of 99mTc. The line source phantom was placed in the center of the orbit and at ± 4.0, ± 8.0, ± 12.0, ± 16.0 and ± 20.0 cm off center. We examined quantifiability using the pai phantom comprising six chambers containing 0.0, 0.016, 0.03, 0.045, 0.062, and 0.074 MBq/mL of 99m-Tc and cross-calibrating the SPECT counts. Image resolution and reproducibility were quantified as myocardial wall thickness (MWT) and %uptake using polar maps. Results: The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the IQ-mode in the center was increased by 11% as compared with C-mode, and FWHM in the periphery was increased 41% compared with FWHM at the center. Calibrated SPECT counts were essentially the same when quantified using IQ-and C-modes. IQ-SPECT images of MWT were significantly improved (P<0.001) over L-mode, and C-mode SPECT imaging with IQ-mode became increasingly inhomogeneous, both visually and quantitatively (C-mode vs. L-mode, ns; C-mode vs. IQ-mode, P<0.05). Conclusion: Myocardial perfusion images acquired by IQ-SPECT were comparable to those acquired by conventional and L-mode SPECT, but with significantly improved resolution and quality. Our results suggest that IQ-SPECT is the optimal technology for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging. PMID:27408847

  9. Murine cardiac images obtained with focusing pinhole SPECT are barely influenced by extra-cardiac activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; van der Have, Frans; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Viergever, Max A.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high-resolution SPECT images can be obtained with focused multipinhole collimators. Here we investigate the influence of unwanted high tracer uptake outside the scan volume on reconstructed tracer distributions inside the scan volume, for 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning in mice. Simulated projections of a digital mouse phantom (MOBY) in a focusing multipinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands) were generated. With this system differently sized user-defined scan volumes can be selected, by translating the animal in 3D through the focusing collimators. Scan volume selections were set to (i) a minimal volume containing just the heart, acquired without translating the animal during scanning, (ii) a slightly larger scan volume as is typically applied for the heart, requiring only small XYZ translations during scanning, (iii) same as (ii), but extended further transaxially, and (iv) same as (ii), but extended transaxially to cover the full thorax width (gold standard). Despite an overall negative bias that is significant for the minimal scan volume, all selected volumes resulted in visually similar images. Quantitative differences in the reconstructed myocardium between gold standard and the results from the smaller scan volume selections were small; the 17 standardized myocardial segments of a bull's eye plot, normalized to the myocardial mean of the gold standard, deviated on average 6.0%, 2.5% and 1.9% for respectively the minimal, the typical and the extended scan volume, while maximum absolute deviations were respectively 18.6%, 9.0% and 5.2%. Averaged over ten low-count noisy simulations, the mean absolute deviations were respectively 7.9%, 3.2% and 1.9%. In low-count noisy simulations, the mean and maximum absolute deviations for the minimal scan volume could be reduced to respectively 4.2% and 12.5% by performing a short survey scan of the exterior activity and focusing the remaining scan time at the organ of interest. We

  10. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  11. Evaluation of myocardial infarction size with three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography: a comparison with single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushuang; Zhang, Chunhong; Huang, Dangsheng; Zhang, Liwei; Yang, Feifei; An, Xiuzhi; Ouyang, Qiaohong; Zhang, Meiqing; Wang, Shuhua; Guo, Jiarui; Ji, Dongdong

    2015-12-01

    To assess whether global and regional myocardial strains from three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) correlate with myocardial infarction size (MIS) detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Fifty-seven patients with a history of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) within 3-6 months were enrolled, alongside 24 healthy volunteers. Left ventricular (LV) global area strain, global longitudinal strain (GLS), global radial strain, global circumferential strain, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and wall motion score index (WMSI) were measured and compared with the corresponding SPECT-detected MISs. Patients were sub-grouped into massive MIS group (MIS ≥ 12%) and small MIS group (MIS < 12%). Myocardial strains of all the LV segments were compared with the corresponding MIS. Global myocardial strain parameters, LVEF and WMSI of the patients were significantly different from the control group (all P < 0.05) and correlated well with MISs, most significantly for GLS (r = 0.728, P < 0.01). Significant differences in myocardial strain parameters were found between the massive and small MIS groups (all P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that GLS had a highest diagnostic value and when the cutoff was -13.8%, the area under the curve was 0.84, with the 70.6% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity. Significant differences of myocardial strain parameters were observed between segments with and without transmural MIs (P < 0.01). 3D-STE myocardial strain parameters evaluated LV global MIS, 3D GLS had the highest diagnostic value. It also preliminarily gauged the degree of ischemia and necrosis of regional myocardial segments.

  12. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Franquiz, J M; Shukla, S

    1998-12-01

    In this study we present a multiresolution based method for restoring cardiac SPECT projections. Original projections were decomposed into a set of sub-band frequency images by using analyzing functions localized in both the space and frequency domain. This representation allows a simple denoising and restoration procedure by discarding high-frequency channels and performing inversion only in low frequencies. The method was evaluated in bull's eye reconstructions of a realistic cardiac chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios (LHAR) of 0:1, 1.5:1, 2.5:1, and 3.5:1. The cardiac phantom in free air was used as the reference standard. Reconstructions were performed by filtered backprojection using (1) no correction; (2) restoration without attenuation correction; (3) attenuation correction without restoration; and (4) restoration and attenuation correction. The attenuation correction was carried out with the Chang's method for one iteration. Results were compared with those obtained using an optimized prereconstruction Metz filter. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating the normalized chi-square measure and mean +/- s.d. of bull's eye counts. In reconstructions with high liver activity (LHAR > 2), attenuation correction without restoration severely distorted the polar maps due to the spill-over of liver activity into the inferior myocardial wall. Both restoration methods when combined with an attenuation correction compensated this artifact and yielded uniform polar maps similar to that of the standard reference. There was no visual or quantitative difference between the performance of Metz filtering and multiresolution restoration. However, the main advantage of the multiresolution method is that it states a more concise and straightforward approach to the restoration problem. Multiresolution based methods does not require information about the object image or optimization processes, such as in conventional

  13. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Methods: Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Results: Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of <1.5 for the water phantom but up to 4.2 in the anthropomorphic phantom. Changes were larger for axial than for transverse translations. These results were supported by SPS changes of up to six seen in the physical anthropomorphic phantom for axial translations. Defect width was also seen to significantly increase. The

  14. Small animal imaging with multi-pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Nuyts, Johan; Vunckx, Kathleen; Defrise, Michel; Vanhove, Christian

    2009-06-01

    With Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), images of minute concentrations of tracer molecules can be acquired, allowing in vivo molecular imaging. For human imaging, the SPECT system has a modest spatial resolution of 5-15 mm, a large field of view and a high sensitivity. Using multi-pinhole SPECT, one can trade in field of view for resolution with preserved sensitivity, which enables the implementation of a small animal SPECT system with an improved resolution, currently ranging from 0.3 to 2 mm, in a much smaller field of view. The unconventional collimation and the more stringent resolution requirements pose problems that are not present in clinical SPECT imaging. This paper discusses how these problems can be solved to implement micro-SPECT imaging on a rotating gamma camera.

  15. Heterogeneity of SPECT bull`s-eyes in normal dogs: Comparison of attenuation compensation algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    DiBella, E.V.R.; Eisner, R.L.; Schmarkey, L.S.; Barclay, A.B.; Patterson, R.E.; Nowak, D.J.; Lalush, D.S.; Tsui, B.M.W. ||

    1995-08-01

    In normal dogs, SPECT {sup 99m}Tc Sestamibi (MIBI) and {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion images reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) show a large decrease of counts in the septal wall (S) compared to the lateral wall (L). The authors evaluated the iterative method of Chang at 0 and 1 iterations (Chang0 and Chang1), and the Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization with attenuation compensation (ML-EM-ATN) algorithm on data acquired from 5 normal dogs and from simulated projection data using a homogeneous count-density model of a normal canine myocardium in the attenuation field measured in one dog. Mean counts in the S and L regions were calculated from maximum-count circumferential profile arrays. Their results demonstrate that ML-EM-ATN and Chang1 result in improved uniformity, as measured by the S/L ratio.

  16. Role of 123I-Iobenguane Myocardial Scintigraphy in Predicting Short-term Left Ventricular Functional Recovery: An Interesting Image

    PubMed Central

    Feola, Mauro; Chauvie, Stephane; Biggi, Alberto; Testa, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    123I-iobenguane myocardial scintigraphy (MIBG) has been shown to be a predictor of sudden cardiac mortality in patients with heart failure. One patient with recent anterior myocardial infarction (MI) treated with coronary angioplasty and having left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 30% underwent early MIBG myocardial scintigraphy/tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in order to help evaluate his eligibility for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The late heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio was calculated to be 1.32% and the washout rate was 1%. At 40-day follow-up after angioplasty, LVEF proved to be 32%, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was still II–III, and an ICD was placed in order to reduce mortality from ventricular arrhythmias. MIBG myocardial scintigraphy might be a promising method for evaluating left ventricular recovery in post-MI patients. PMID:26664773

  17. Relation between QT dispersion and adenosine triphosphate stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging for detecting myocardial ischemia and scar.

    PubMed

    Teragawa, H; Hirao, H; Muraoka, Y; Yamagata, T; Matsuura, H; Kajiyama, G

    1999-04-15

    It is not known if QT dispersion is useful for detecting coronary artery disease. We investigated whether QT dispersion at baseline and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion correlate with the imaging patterns obtained from ATP stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (ATP-SPECT). QT dispersion was determined in 169 patients who underwent ATP-SPECT from 12-lead electrocardiograms obtained at baseline and 3 minutes after the beginning of ATP infusion. Based on the results of ATP-SPECT, patients were divided into 4 groups: normal (n = 55), ischemia (n = 38), ischemia and scar (n = 42), and scar (n = 34). Baseline QT dispersions (mean +/- SD) in the normal, ischemia, ischemia and scar, and scar groups were 48 +/- 15, 50 +/- 17, 69 +/- 25, and 70 +/- 24 ms, respectively. Baseline QT dispersion was significantly greater in the groups with myocardial scar. QT dispersions during ATP infusion were 43 +/- 16, 63 +/- 20, 76 +/- 20, and 62 +/- 25 ms in the normal, ischemia, ischemia and scar, and scar groups, respectively. QT dispersion increased with ATP infusion in patients with myocardial ischemia. QT dispersion at baseline and during ATP infusion correlated with the ATP-SPECT imaging pattern. These findings suggest that baseline QT dispersion and ATP-induced changes in QT dispersion may help detect the presence of myocardial ischemia and scar. PMID:10215275

  18. Computational tools and methods for objective assessment of image quality in x-ray CT and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Robin

    Computational tools of use in the objective assessment of image quality for tomography systems were developed for computer processing units (CPU) and graphics processing units (GPU) in the image quality lab at the University of Arizona. Fast analytic x-ray projection code called IQCT was created to compute the mean projection image for cone beam multi-slice helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. IQCT was optimized to take advantage of the massively parallel architecture of GPUs. CPU code for computing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projection images was written calling upon previous research in the image quality lab. IQCT and the SPECT modeling code were used to simulate data for multi-modality SPECT/CT observer studies. The purpose of these observer studies was to assess the benefit in image quality of using attenuation information from a CT measurement in myocardial SPECT imaging. The observer chosen for these studies was the scanning linear observer. The tasks for the observer were localization of a signal and estimation of the signal radius. For the localization study, area under the localization receiver operating characteristic curve (A LROC) was computed as AMeasLROC = 0.89332 ± 0.00474 and ANoLROC = 0.89408 ± 0.00475, where "Meas" implies the use of attenuation information from the CT measurement, and "No" indicates the absence of attenuation information. For the estimation study, area under the estimation receiver operating characteristic curve (AEROC) was quantified as AMeasEROC = 0.55926 ± 0.00731 and ANoEROC = 0.56167 ± 0.00731. Based on these results, it was concluded that the use of CT information did not improve the scanning linear observer's ability to perform the stated myocardial SPECT tasks. The risk to the patient of the CT measurement was quantified in terms of excess effective dose as 2.37 mSv for males and 3.38 mSv for females. Another image quality tool generated within this body of work was a singular value

  19. Pixel-based subsets for rapid multi-pinhole SPECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Beekman, Freek J.

    2010-04-01

    Block-iterative image reconstruction methods, such as ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), are commonly used to accelerate image reconstruction. In OSEM, the speed-up factor over maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) is approximately equal to the number of subsets in which the projection data are divided. Traditionally, each subset consists of a couple of projection views, and the more subsets are used, the more the solution deviates from MLEM solutions. We found for multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that even moderate acceleration factors in OSEM lead to inaccurate reconstructions. Therefore, we introduce pixel-based ordered subset expectation maximization (POSEM), which is based on an alternative subset choice. Pixels in each subset are spread out regularly over projections and are spatially separated as much as possible. We validated POSEM for data acquired with a focusing multi-pinhole SPECT system. Performance was compared with traditional OSEM and MLEM for a rat total body bone scan, a gated mouse myocardial perfusion scan and a Defrise phantom scan. We found that POSEM can be operated at acceleration factors that are often an order of magnitude higher than in traditional OSEM.

  20. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-10-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging.

  1. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis. PMID:25143053

  2. Imaging Tobacco Smoking with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kelly P; Esterlis, Irina; Sandiego, Christine; Petrulli, Ryan; Morris, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Receptor imaging, including positron emission computed tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), provides a way to measure chemicals of interest, such as receptors, and neurotransmitter fluctuations, in the living human brain. Imaging the neurochemical mechanisms involved in the maintenance and recovery from tobacco smoking has provided insights into critical smoking related brain adaptations. Nicotine, the primary addictive chemical in tobacco smoke, enters the brain, activates beta2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs) and, like most drugs of abuse, elicits dopamine (DA) release in the ventral striatum. Both β2*-nAChRs and DA signaling are critical neurosubstrates underlying tobacco smoking behaviors and dependence and have been studied extensively with PET and SPECT brain imaging. We review the imaging literature on these topics and describe how brain imaging has helped inform the treatment of tobacco smoking.

  3. Dopamine transporter SPECT/CT and perfusion brain SPECT imaging in idiopathic basal ganglia calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Messinis, Lambros; Markaki, Elli; Constantoyannis, Constantine; Ellul, John; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2009-07-01

    A case of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification in a 56-year-old woman with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment is described. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and regional cerebral blood flow were evaluated using dopamine transporter (DAT) brain single photon emission tomography combined with a low-dose x-ray computerized tomography transmission (hybrid SPECT/CT) and Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT study, respectively. DAT SPECT/CT imaging revealed a reduction in DAT binding in both striatum regions coinciding with bilateral calcifications in the basal ganglia. Brain perfusion scan showed hypoperfusion in basal ganglia regions, posterior parietal cortex bilaterally, left frontopolar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left temporal lobe. These findings correlated well with the clinical condition of the patient. Mineralization may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration. Cortical perfusion changes in patients may better explain the patient's altered cognitive and motor functions.

  4. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  5. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Mingwu; Yang Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter.

  6. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  7. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  8. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  9. Clinical experience with technetium-99m teboroxime, a neutral, lipophilic myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W. )

    1990-10-16

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) teboroxime is a new technetium-based myocardial perfusion imaging agent (investigational code = SQ30217 (Cardiotec, Squibb Diagnostics)). A member of a class of neutral, lipophilic, technetium-containing complexes known as boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATO) complexes, this agent is chemically very different from the cationic tracer thallium-201 (Tl-201) and from the cationic technetium complex Tc-99m sestamibi (Cardiolite, Du Pont Imaging Agents). Tc-99m teboroxime has high myocardial extraction, rapid blood clearance, little lung uptake and rapid myocardial washout. A biexponential pattern of myocardial washout is demonstrated in animals and in man. Effective half-lives of the 2 washout components in man are 5.2 minutes and 3.8 hours and represent approximately 66 and 33% of the myocardial activity, respectively. The first half-life for the myocardium is approximately 11 minutes. As the agent washes out of the heart, hepatic uptake occurs, peaking at about 5 minutes after injection. The liver is the major organ of excretion and receives, along with the large bowel, the largest radiation dose. Rapid imaging protocols using standard cameras have achieved good myocardial counts from 3 planar views acquired over a 4- to 5-minute period or for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images acquired over a 10-minute period. An entire stress/rest procedure can be completed in 1 hour. Analysis of data from 155 patients from 4 centers using planar or SPECT imaging showed a sensitivity and specificity for blinded readings of 82 and 91%, respectively, when compared against overall clinical impression. 13 references.

  10. Assessment of myocardial viability in patients with acute myocardial infarction by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography combined with low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Li, Dongye; Chen, Junhong; Wang, Xiaoping; Xu, Tongda; Li, Wenhua; Ren, Shaoyang; Wang, Cheng

    2013-06-01

    It is clinically important to determine the myocardial viability of regional wall motion abnormality segments in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The purpose of this study was to ascertain the ability and value of a combination of speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDDSE) for the evaluation of viable myocardium in patients with AMI. Forty-two hospitalized patients with AMI and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction <50%) were underwent STE in conjunction with LDDSE and dual isotope simultaneous acquisition single photon emission computed tomography (DISA-SPECT). Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed subsequently in all patients. STE was used to measure radial, circumferential, and longitudinal end-systolic strain and peak systolic strain rate. The movement of each segment was observed by routine echocardiography 1, 3, and 6 months after PCI, and its improvement over time was the criterion of viable myocardium. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DISA-SPECT for the assessment of viable myocardium were 83.6, 74.4, and 80.7%, respectively. Among the radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strain and strain rate parameters, only longitudinal strain (LS) and longitudinal strain rate (LSr) at rest and LDDSE emerged as independent predictors of viable myocardium, When combining LS and LSr at LDDSE, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the assessment of viable myocardium rose to 89.8, 90.2 and 89.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of STE in conjunction with LDDSE was similar to DISA-SPECT for detecting viable myocardium in patients with AMI, but the specificity and accuracy of STE performed with LDDSE were higher than DISA-SPECT.

  11. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  12. SPECT/CT Imaging of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaques using Integrin-Binding RGD Dimer Peptides.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Sun; Lee, Jonghwan; Jung, Jae Ho; Moon, Byung Seok; Kim, Soonhag; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-06-30

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with unique biological signatures are responsible for most major cardiovascular events including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. However, current clinical diagnostic approaches for atherosclerosis focus on anatomical measurements such as the degree of luminal stenosis and wall thickness. An abundance of neovessels with elevated expression of integrin αvβ3 is closely associated with an increased risk of plaque rupture. Herein we evaluated the potential of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting radiotracer, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for SPECT/CT imaging of high-risk plaque in murine atherosclerosis models. In vivo uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was significantly higher in atherosclerotic aortas than in relatively normal aortas. Comparison with the negative-control peptide, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RADfK)]2, proved specific binding of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 for plaque lesions in in vivo SPECT/CT and ex vivo autoradiographic imaging. Histopathological characterization revealed that a prominent SPECT signal of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the presence of high-risk plaques with a large necrotic core, a thin fibrous cap, and vibrant neoangiogenic events. Notably, the RGD dimer based (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 showed better imaging performance in comparison with the common monomeric RGD peptide probe (123)I-c(RGDyV) and fluorescence tissue assay corroborated this. Our preclinical data demonstrated that (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT/CT is a sensitive tool to noninvasively gauge atherosclerosis beyond vascular anatomy by assessing culprit plaque neovascularization.

  13. SPECT/CT Imaging of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaques using Integrin-Binding RGD Dimer Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun Yoo, Jung; Lee, Jonghwan; Ho Jung, Jae; Seok Moon, Byung; Kim, Soonhag; Chul Lee, Byung; Eun Kim, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with unique biological signatures are responsible for most major cardiovascular events including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. However, current clinical diagnostic approaches for atherosclerosis focus on anatomical measurements such as the degree of luminal stenosis and wall thickness. An abundance of neovessels with elevated expression of integrin αvβ3 is closely associated with an increased risk of plaque rupture. Herein we evaluated the potential of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting radiotracer, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for SPECT/CT imaging of high-risk plaque in murine atherosclerosis models. In vivo uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was significantly higher in atherosclerotic aortas than in relatively normal aortas. Comparison with the negative-control peptide, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RADfK)]2, proved specific binding of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 for plaque lesions in in vivo SPECT/CT and ex vivo autoradiographic imaging. Histopathological characterization revealed that a prominent SPECT signal of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the presence of high-risk plaques with a large necrotic core, a thin fibrous cap, and vibrant neoangiogenic events. Notably, the RGD dimer based 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 showed better imaging performance in comparison with the common monomeric RGD peptide probe 123I-c(RGDyV) and fluorescence tissue assay corroborated this. Our preclinical data demonstrated that 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT/CT is a sensitive tool to noninvasively gauge atherosclerosis beyond vascular anatomy by assessing culprit plaque neovascularization. PMID:26123253

  14. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  15. Left ventricular energy model predicts adverse events in women with suspected myocardial ischemia: results from the NHLBI-sponsored women’s ischemia syndrome evaluation (WISE) study

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Nicole; Pohost, Gerald M.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel; Shaw, Leslee J.; Sopko, George; Fuisz, Anthon; Rogers, William J.; Walsh, Edward G.; Johnson, B. Delia; Sharaf, Barry L.; Pepine, Carl J.; Mankad, Sunil; Reis, Steven E.; Rayarao, Geetha; Vido, Diane A.; Bittner, Vera; Tauxe, Lindsey; Olson, Marian B.; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Biederman, Robert WW

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prognostic value of a left ventricular energy-model in women with suspected myocardial ischemia. Background The prognostic value of internal energy utilization (IEU) of the left ventricle in women with suspected myocardial ischemia is unknown. Methods Women [n=227, mean age 59±12 years (range, 31-86 years)], with symptoms of myocardial ischemia, underwent myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) assessment for regional perfusion defects along with measurement of ventricular volumes separately by gated Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) (n=207) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=203). During follow-up (40±17 months), time to first major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE, death, myocardial infarction or hospitalization for congestive heart failure) was analyzed using MRI and gated SPECT variables. Results Adverse events occurred in 31 (14%). Multivariable Cox models were formed for each modality: IEU and wall thickness by MRI (Chi-squared 34, P<0.005) and IEU and systolic blood pressure by gated SEPCT (Chi-squared 34, P<0.005). The models remained predictive after adjustment for age, disease history and Framingham risk score. For each Cox model, patients were categorized as high-risk if the model hazard was positive and not high-risk otherwise. Kaplan-Meier analysis of time to MACE was performed for high-risk vs. not high-risk for MR (log rank 25.3, P<0.001) and gated SEPCT (log rank 18.2, P<0.001) models. Conclusions Among women with suspected myocardial ischemia a high internal energy utilization has higher prognostic value than either a low EF or the presence of a myocardial perfusion defect assessed using two independent modalities of MR or gated SPECT. PMID:24015377

  16. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Effect of reconstruction parameters on defect detection in fan-beam SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoriou, George K.

    2002-05-01

    The effect of reconstruction parameters on the fan-beam filtered backprojection method in myocardial defect detection was investigated using an observer performance study and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A mathematical phantom of the human torso was used to model the anatomy and Thallium-201 (Tl-201) uptake in humans. Half-scan fan-beam realistic projections were simulated using a low-energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator that incorporated the effects of photon attenuation, spatially varying detector response, scatter, and Poison noise. A focal length of 55 cm and a radius of rotation of 25 cm were used, which resulted to a magnification of two at the center of rotation and a maximum magnification of three in the reconstructed region of interest. By changing the reconstruction pixel size, five different projection bin width to reconstruction pixel size (PBWRPS) ratios were obtained which resulted in five classes of reconstructed images. Myocardial defects were simulated as Gaussian-shaped decreases in Tl-201 uptake distribution. The total projection count per 3 mm image slice was 44,000. A total of 96 reconstructed transaxial images from each one of the five classes were shown to eight observers for evaluation. The results indicate that the reconstruction pixel size has a significant effect on the quality of fan-beam SPECT images. Moreover, the study indicated that in order to ensure best image quality the PBWRPS ratio should be at least as large as the maximum possible magnification inside the reconstructed image array.

  18. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT 'D.SPECT' camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of (99m)Tc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a (99m)Tc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  19. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; Haddad, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with 99mTc-SPECT, 82Rb PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (85 versus 67% with SPECT) and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of 82Rb PET is its capacity to accurately quantify MBF. Quite importantly, it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover, coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction, such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners. There is still some debate on the relative advantages of 82Rb PET with regard to 99mTc-SPECT. For the last 10 years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of 82Rb/PET. Currently, the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify MBF and to deliver a low radiation exposure. PMID:26442267

  20. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; Haddad, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with (99m)Tc-SPECT, (82)Rb PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (85 versus 67% with SPECT) and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of (82)Rb PET is its capacity to accurately quantify MBF. Quite importantly, it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover, coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction, such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners. There is still some debate on the relative advantages of (82)Rb PET with regard to (99m)Tc-SPECT. For the last 10 years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of (82)Rb/PET. Currently, the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify MBF and to deliver a low radiation exposure. PMID:26442267

  1. Bone SPECT/CT in skeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide bone scanning in skeletal trauma has been greatly enhanced over the last decade by hybrid technology merging multislice CT with SPECT that can take advantage of CT-based correction of attenuation and scatter. The resulting images have been particularly helpful in giving us new insights into the evaluation of foot and ankle injuries and vertebral pathology both before and after surgery. The physiological information and anatomical detail allow a better understanding of the causes of patients' pain and have proven to be particularly useful in planning surgical intervention.

  2. Complete improvement in a patient with multiple irreversible defects of the left ventricle on 99m technetium-sestamibi SPECT after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Javadi, H; Porpiranfar, M A; Semnani, S; Jallalat, S; Yavari, P; Mogharrabi, M; Hooman, A; Amini, A; Barekat, M; Iranpour, D; Assadi, M; Asli, I N

    2012-10-01

    99mTc-sestamibi has been investigated as a potential viability marker; initial studies have shown good concordance between 201Tl and 99mTc-sestamibi activities in both viable and nonviable myocardium. However, assessment of myocardial viability by 99mTc-sestamibi remains controversial for tissue recovery after revascularization. Here, we present a patient with several regions of severely diminished and irreversible (defect persisting in both early and delay images of each set scanning) defects on initial scan which were dissolved completely on the follow up scan after an intervention. In a 75 year-old Asian woman with acute myocardial infarction who received thrombolytic therapy and subjected to percutaneous coronary angiography (PCI) on day 28 after acute myocardial infarction(MI), resting 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT was applied on day 4 (initial scan) and 138 (follow up scan) after acute MI at 30 and 180 min after injection of tracer (740 MBq); Two-dimensional echocardiography was carried out at the same time. On the initial image set, there was irreversible defects in the apex, anteroapical, inferoapical, anteroseptal, septal and also anterior walls, while the follow up image was normal in all regions.The angiography intervention showed just significant stenosis on left anterior descending (LAD) vessel (95%). This may highlight the failure of 99mTc-sestamibi as a marker of myocardial viability and also mandate further validating of the procedure with follow up scan or other modalities for myocardial viability investigation.

  3. MR-based keyhole SPECT for small animal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keum Sil; Roeck, Werner W; Gullberg, Grant T; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for multi-modality imaging is to integrate the strengths of different imaging technologies while reducing the shortcomings of an individual modality. The work presented here proposes a limited-field-of-view (LFOV) SPECT reconstruction technique that can be implemented on a multi-modality MR/SPECT system that can be used to obtain simultaneous MRI and SPECT images for small animal imaging. The reason for using a combined MR/SPECT system in this work is to eliminate any possible misregistration between the two sets of images when MR images are used as a priori information for SPECT. In nuclear imaging the target area is usually smaller than the entire object; thus, focusing the detector on the LFOV results in various advantages including the use of a smaller nuclear detector (less cost), smaller reconstruction region (faster reconstruction) and higher spatial resolution when used in conjunction with pinhole collimators with magnification. The MR/SPECT system can be used to choose a region of interest (ROI) for SPECT. A priori information obtained by the full field-of-view (FOV) MRI combined with the preliminary SPECT image can be used to reduce the dimensions of the SPECT reconstruction by limiting the computation to the smaller FOV while reducing artifacts resulting from the truncated data. Since the technique is based on SPECT imaging within the LFOV it will be called the keyhole SPECT (K-SPECT) method. At first MRI images of the entire object using a larger FOV are obtained to determine the location of the ROI covering the target organ. Once the ROI is determined, the animal is moved inside the radiofrequency (rf) coil to bring the target area inside the LFOV and then simultaneous MRI and SPECT are performed. The spatial resolution of the SPECT image is improved by employing a pinhole collimator with magnification >1 by having carefully calculated acceptance angles for each pinhole to avoid multiplexing. In our design all the pinholes are focused to

  4. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  5. SPECT/CT Fusion in the Diagnosis of Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Yoshio; Tamura, Akihisa; Okazaki, Hajime; Kurose, Taichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuraoka, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship between the diagnostic ability of fused single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images in localization of parathyroid lesions and the size of adenomas or hyperplastic glands. Methods: Five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 4 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) were imaged 15 and 120 minutes after the intravenous injection of technetium99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI). All patients underwent surgery and 5 parathyroid adenomas and 10 hyperplastic glands were detected. Pathologic findings were correlated with imaging results. Results: The SPECT/CT fusion images were able to detect all parathyroid adenomas even with the greatest axial diameter of 0.6 cm. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT imaging could not detect parathyroid adenomas with an axial diameter of 1.0 to 1.2 cm. Four out of 10 (40%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were diagnosed, using planar and SPECT imaging and 5 out of 10 (50%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were localized, using SPECT/CT fusion images. Conclusion: SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a more useful tool for localization of parathyroid lesions, particularly parathyroid adenomas, in comparison with planar and or SPECT imaging. PMID:27408883

  6. Acute insulin resistance in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in non-diabetic patients is associated with incomplete myocardial reperfusion and impaired coronary microcirculatory function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) assessed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) index in the acute phase of myocardial infarction in non-diabetic patients was recently established as an independent predictor of intrahospital mortality. In this study we postulated that acute IR is a dynamic phenomenon associated with the development of myocardial and microvascular injury and larger final infarct size in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Methods In 104 consecutive patients with the first anterior STEMI without diabetes, the HOMA index was determined on the 2nd and 7th day after pPCI. Worst-lead residual ST-segment elevation (ST-E) on postprocedural ECG, coronary flow reserve (CFR) determined by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography on the 2nd day after pPCI and fixed perfusion defect on single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) determined six weeks after pPCI were analyzed according to HOMA indices. Results IR was present in 55 % and 58 % of patients on day 2 and day 7, respectively. Incomplete post-procedural ST-E resolution was more frequent in patients with IR compared to patients without IR, both on day 2 (p = 0.001) and day 7 (p < 0.001). The HOMA index on day 7 correlated with SPECT-MPI perfusion defect (r = 0.331), whereas both HOMA indices correlated well with CFR (r = -0.331 to -0.386) (p < 0.01 for all). In multivariable backward logistic regression analysis adjusted for significant univariate predictors and potential confounding variables, IR on day 2 was an independent predictor of residual ST-E ≥ 2 mm (OR 11.70, 95% CI 2.46-55.51, p = 0.002) and CFR < 2 (OR = 5.98, 95% CI 1.88-19.03, p = 0.002), whereas IR on day 7 was an independent predictor of SPECT-MPI perfusion defect > 20% (OR 11.37, 95% CI 1.34-96.21, p = 0.026). Conclusion IR assessed by the HOMA index during the

  7. SPECT-US image fusion and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Hoffmann, Rainer; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Beyer, Thomas; Staudenherz, Anton; Figl, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Because scintigraphic images lack anatomical information, single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography systems (PET) are combined physically with CTs to compensate for this drawback. In our work, we present a method where the CT is replaced by a 3D ultrasound device. Because in this case a mechanical linkage is not possible, we use an additional optical tracking system (OTS) for spatial correlation of the SPECT or PET information and the US. To enable image fusion between the functional SPECT and the anatomical US we first calibrate the SPECT by means of the optical tracking system. This is done by imaging a phantom with SPECT and scanning the surface of the phantom using a calibrated stylus of the OTS. Applying an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm results in the transformation between the optical coordinate system and the SPECT coordinate system. When a patient undergoes a SPECT scan, a 3D US image is taken immediately after the scan. Since the scan head of the US is also tracked by the OTS, the transformation between OTS and SPECT can be calculated straight forward. For clinical intervention, the patient is again imaged with the US and a 3D/3D registration between the two US volumes allows to transform the functional information of the SPECT to the current US image in real time. We found a mean distance between the point cloud of the optical stylus and the segmented surface of the phantom of 2.3 mm while the maximum distance was found to be 6.9 mm. The 3D3D registration between the two US images was accomplished with an error of 2.1 mm.

  8. Comparison of electrocardiographic-gated technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging and rest-redistribution thallium-201 in the prediction of myocardial viability.

    PubMed

    Duncan, B H; Ahlberg, A W; Levine, M G; McGill, C C; Mann, A; White, M P; Mather, J F; Waters, D D; Heller, G V

    2000-03-15

    Although the combined assessment of perfusion and function using rest electrocardiographic (ECG)-gated technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging has been shown to improve sensitivity and accuracy over perfusion alone in the prediction of myocardial viability, no data are available comparing this technique with rest-redistribution thallium-201. Thirty patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 40%) underwent rest-redistribution thallium-201 and rest ECG-gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging before revascularization and rest ECG-gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging at 1 or 6 weeks after revascularization. All thallium-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi images were interpreted by a consensus agreement of 3 experienced readers without knowledge of patient identity or time of imaging with Tc-99m sestamibi (before or after revascularization) using a 17-segment model. Concordance between techniques for the prediction of viability was 89% (kappa 0.556 +/- 0.109). With rest-redistribution thallium-201, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and predictive accuracy were 95%, 59%, 88%, 78%, and 86%, respectively. With rest ECG-gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and predictive accuracy were 96%, 55%, 87%, 80%, and 86%, respectively (p = NS vs rest-redistribution thallium-201). Although both techniques are comparable for detecting viable myocardium, rest ECG-gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging allows direct assessment of both myocardial perfusion and ventricular function, which may be clinically useful in patients who require assessment of myocardial viability.

  9. MLEM algorithm adaptation for improved SPECT scintimammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Lee, Wei; Kunniyur, Vikram R.; Gangal, Kedar R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, F. Deaver

    2005-04-01

    Standard MLEM and OSEM algorithms used in SPECT Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography produce hot-spot artifacts (HSA) at the image support peripheries. We investigated a suitable adaptation of MLEM and OSEM algorithms needed to reduce HSA. Patients with suspicious breast lesions were administered 10 mCi of Tc-99m sestamibi and SPECT scans were acquired for patients in prone position with uncompressed breasts. In addition, to simulate breast lesions, some patients were imaged with a number of breast skin markers each containing 1 mCi of Tc-99m. In order to reduce HSA in reconstruction, we removed from the backprojection step the rays that traverse the periphery of the support region on the way to a detector bin, when their path length through this region was shorter than some critical length. Such very short paths result in a very low projection counts contributed to the detector bin, and consequently to overestimation of the activity in the peripheral voxels in the backprojection step-thus creating HSA. We analyzed the breast-lesion contrast and suppression of HSA in the images reconstructed using standard and modified MLEM and OSEM algorithms vs. critical path length (CPL). For CPL >= 0.01 pixel size, we observed improved breast-lesion contrast and lower noise in the reconstructed images, and a very significant reduction of HSA in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images.

  10. Detection models for freehand SPECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Alexander; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Lasser, Tobias; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear imaging modalities are commonly used tools in today’s diagnostics and therapy planning. However for interventional use they suffer from drawbacks which limit their application. Freehand SPECT was developed to provide 3D functional imaging during interventions. It combines a nuclear detector with an optical tracking system to obtain its position and orientation in space and synchronizes this with the detector readings. This information can be used to compute a 3D tomographic reconstruction of an activity distribution of a nuclear tracer. As there is no fixed geometry, the system matrix has to be computed on the fly. This is done with models of the detection process for completely arbitrary freehand acquisitions. The accuracy of the reconstructions is highly dependent on the used models of the detection process. Different models of the detection process were developed and evaluated in this work, in particular two analytical models as well as lookup tables generated from either real measurements or Monte Carlo simulations. We showed that it is possible to perform acceptable reconstructions with a simple but efficient analytical model. The use of lookup tables to generate the system matrix in Freehand SPECT is a fast solution with good accuracy.

  11. Freehand SPECT reconstructions using look up tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Alexander; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Kojchev, Risto; Navab, Nassir; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Lasser, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Nuclear imaging is a commonly used tool in today's diagnostics and therapy planning. For interventional use however it suffers from drawbacks which limit its application. Freehand SPECT was developed to overcome these limitations and to provide 3D functional imaging during an intervention. It combines a nuclear probe with an optical tracking system to obtain its position and orientation in space synchronized with its reading. This information can be used to compute a 3D tomographic reconstruction of an activity distribution. However, as there is no fixed geometry the system matrix has to be computed on-the-fly, using ad-hoc models of the detection process. One solution for such a model is a reference look up table of previously acquired measurements of a single source at different angles and distances. In this work two look up tables with a one and four millimeter step size between the entries were acquired. Twelve datasets of a phantom with two hollow spheres filled with a solution of Tc99wm were acquired with the Freehand SPECT system. Reconstructions with the look up tables and two analytical models currently in use were performed with these datasets and compared with each other. The finely sampled look up table achieved the qualitatively best reconstructions, while one of the analytical models showed the best positional accuracy.

  12. Measuring astatine-211 distributions with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Turkington, T G; Zalutsky, M R; Jaszczak, R J; Garg, P K; Vaidyanathan, G; Coleman, R E

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated standard SPECT techniques (rotating gamma cameras, multi-hole collimators, and filtered backprojection reconstruction) for imaging astatine-211 distributions. Since 211At emits alpha particles, this nuclide has potential for use in radiotherapy. The capability of imaging this nuclide would allow in vivo evaluation of the distribution and stability of potential 211At-labelled radiotherapeutic agents. 211At decay yields x-rays in the 77-92 keV range in addition to 500-900 keV gamma rays. This study evaluates the feasibility of SPECT imaging using the x-ray emissions of 211At. We have evaluated several collimators, with the determination that the medium-energy collimators we used are suitable, with 7% penetration (uncollimated counts versus collimated counts). Several phantoms were imaged and attenuation coefficients were measured (narrow-beam mu = 0.182 cm-1 for 77-80 keV x-rays in water). Reconstructed images demonstrate qualitative capabilities and a simple quantitative study demonstrates good correction for attenuation and scatter (approximately 10% error), at low count densities, at least for the phantom geometries used in this study.

  13. Fabrication of the pinhole aperture for AdaptiSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Kovalsky, Stephen; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical pinhole SPECT imaging system under final construction at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. The system is designed to be able to autonomously change its imaging configuration. The system comprises 16 detectors mounted on translational stages to move radially away and towards the center of the field-of-view. The system also possesses an adaptive pinhole aperture with multiple collimator diameters and pinhole sizes, as well as the possibility to switch between multiplexed and non-multiplexed imaging configurations. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of the AdaptiSPECT pinhole aperture and its controllers. PMID:26146443

  14. Identification of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses by dipyridamole-magnetic resonance imaging and 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile-SPECT.

    PubMed

    Baer, F M; Smolarz, K; Theissen, P; Voth, E; Schicha, H; Sechtem, U

    1993-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in conjunction with dipyridamole induced wall motion abnormalities for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). To assess the clinical usefulness of dipyridamole-MRI for the localization of CAD and to evaluate the relation between dipyridamole induced wall motion abnormalities and myocardial perfusion 33 patients with severe CAD (> 70% diameter reduction) underwent MRI at rest and after dipyridamole infusion (0.75 mg dipyridamole/kg over a period of 10 minutes). All patients performed exercise stress testing and 20 patients of the study group additionally had rest and exercise stress 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile-SPECT (MIBI-SPECT). Two patients (6%) could not be evaluated due to severe motion artifacts during dipyridamole MRI. Segmental wall motion and perfusion of corresponding short axis planes were related to the major coronary arteries using a standardized segmental coronary artery perfusion pattern. Detection of wall motion abnormalities or perfusion defects by 2 blinded observers in consensus was the criterion for grading a segment normal or pathologic. For localization of CAD, segmental gradings were related to the presumed coronary artery territories. Stress-ECG was pathologic in 19/31 patients yielding a sensitivity of 61% and dipyridamole induced angina was present in 68% (21/31) of patients. Dipyridamole-MRI detected coronary artery disease with a sensitivity of 84% (26/31 patients) and all patients with new wall motion abnormalities also had dipyridamole induced angina. For the subgroup of 20 patients with MIBI-SPECT images, CAD was detected by both MIBI-SPECT and Dipyridamole-MRI in 90% (18/20) of patients. Dipyridamole-MRI and MIBI-SPECT gradings agreed in 55/60 (92%) coronary artery perfusion territories. There were no significant differences with respect to the sensitivities of Dipyridamole-MRI/MIBI-SPECT for the localization of individual coronary artery stenoses yielding 81

  15. Design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Hugg, James W.; Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Meier, Dirk; Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a continuing design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals. A first generation prototype SPECT system was designed and constructed to fit inside a MRI system with a gradient bore inner diameter of 12 cm. It consists of 3 angularly offset rings of 8 detectors (1"x1", 16x16 pixels MR-compatible solid-state CZT). A matching 24-pinhole collimator sleeve, made of a tungsten-compound, provides projections from a common FOV of ~25 mm. A birdcage RF coil for MRI data acquisition surrounds the collimator. The SPECT system was tested inside a clinical 3T MRI system. Minimal interference was observed on the simultaneously acquired SPECT and MR images. We developed a sparse-view image reconstruction method based on accurate modeling of the point response function (PRF) of each of the 24 pinholes to provide artifact-free SPECT images. The stationary SPECT system provides relatively low resolution of 3-5 mm but high geometric efficiency of 0.5- 1.2% for fast dynamic acquisition, demonstrated in a SPECT renal kinetics study using Tc-99m DTPA. Based on these results, a second generation prototype MR-compatible SPECT system with an outer diameter of 20 cm that fits inside a mid-sized preclinical MRI system is being developed. It consists of 5 rings of 19 CZT detectors. The larger ring diameter allows the use of optimized multi-pinhole collimator designs, such as high system resolution up to ~1 mm, high geometric efficiency, or lower system resolution without collimator rotation. The anticipated performance of the new system is supported by simulation data.

  16. Breast cancer axillary lymph node metastasis detection by a high-resolution dedicated breast camera: a comparative study with SPECT and pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Angela; Chessa, Francesca; Sanna, Daniela; Cottu, Pierina; Manca, Alessandra; Nuvoli, Susanna; Madeddu, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin planar scintigraphy acquired with a high-resolution (HR) dedicated breast camera in comparison with conventional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and pinhole-SPECT (P-SPECT) in breast cancer (BC) axillary lymph node metastasis detection in a consecutive series of 76 BC patients, 28 of whom had axillary lymph node metastases, including 9 positive at clinical examination. HR planar scintigraphy was true positive in only 7 patients with >3 palpable metastases (sensitivity: 25%), while SPECT was true positive in 23 of 28 cases (sensitivity: 82.1%) and P-SPECT in 25 of 28 (sensitivity: 89.3%). SPECT was false negative in 5 patients with nonpalpable SPECT was false negative in the latter 2 cases, and in another of the cases, false negative at SPECT with one macrometastatic node. Neither planar nor SPECT had false-positive findings (specificity: 100%), while P-SPECT had two (specificity: 95.8%). P-SPECT presented the best resolution in showing the metastatic nodes and was the only procedure able to define the number of involved nodes, thus delivering important prognostic information. HR planar scintigraphy appears an ineffective diagnostic tool in BC axillary lymph node metastasis detection, only succeeding in identifying palpable and >3 metastatic nodes. SPECT should be preferred, significantly improving the sensitivity of planar scintigraphy, especially when using a pinhole collimator.

  17. Prediction of functional recovery and prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction by 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial single photon emission computed tomography: a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Nishimura, S; Kajiya, T; Sugihara, H; Kitahara, K; Imai, K; Muramatsu, T; Takahashi, N; Yoshida, H; Osada, T; Terada, K; Ito, T; Naruse, H; Iwabuchi, M

    1998-10-01

    123I-BMIPP [15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid] was developed for metabolic imaging with SPECT. A multicenter collaborative study was conducted on a large patient series to determine whether 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial SPECT are of use in predicting the prognosis and ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients with uncomplicated first AMI underwent resting 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial SPECT in the subacute phase after the onset of AMI. Of these, 167 patients who had been followed up for an average of 22 months were retrospectively reviewed to predict serious cardiac events and recurrent ischemia. In addition, the association between changes in radionuclide parameters and recurrent ischemia was investigated in Subgroup A (58 patients) who had repeated SPECT in the chronic phase. Furthermore, prediction of the ejection fraction (EF) was investigated in Subgroup B (94 patients) and Subgroup C (76 patients) in whom left ventriculography was performed at the time of discharge and 90 days or more after the onset, respectively. The prognosis was generally favorable, with 4 cases of cardiac death (2%), 3 of heart failure (2%), 4 of nonfatal reMI (2%), and 25 of recurrent ischemia (15%). The results of Cox multivariate regression analysis revealed a high probability of serious cardiac events in patients who were elderly (p = 0.04), who had 90% or more residual stenosis of the infarct-related artery (p = 0.09), and who had a high BMIPP defect score (p = 0.17). There was a high probability of recurrent ischemia in elderly patients (p = 0.10) who had multi-vessel disease (p = 0.03), but no association was found with radionuclide parameters in the subacute phase. In Subgroup A, however, the probability of recurrent ischemia tended to be high in patients with a large mismatch scorebetween 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl in the subacute to chronic phase. An important observation was that the extent of BMIPP defect was more strongly

  18. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors.

  19. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors. PMID:25169132

  20. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual headpinhole SPECT system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-03-29

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation andfunction of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocolinvolves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed tomeasure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later byanother study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fastwash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual headpinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kineticsof 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) andnormotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibratedbased on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-pointsource phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeledwith a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed byinjecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the dataacquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o dataacquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)methodand region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activitycurves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then appliedtwo-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since theinitial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistenttomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we appliedthe FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then thetime active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROIsampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differencesin the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time byreplacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamicacquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and asmaller distribution volume of 123IMIBG near the end of life in the SHRmodel of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heartin late stages of heart failure.

  1. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this review we have attempted a comprehensive compilation of the cardiac morphologic changes that occur in spontaneous and experimental myocardial diseases of animals. Our coverage addresses diseases of mammals and birds and includes these diseases found in both domesticated and wild animals. A similar review of the myocardial diseases in this broad range of animal species has not been attempted previously. We have summarized and illustrated the gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural alterations for these myocardial diseases; and, whenever possible, we have reviewed their biochemical pathogenesis. We have arranged the myocardial diseases for presentation and discussion according to an etiologic classification with seven categories. These include a group of idiopathic or primary cardiomyopathies recognized in man (hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive types) and a large group of secondary cardiomyopathies with known causes, such as inherited tendency; nutritional deficiency; toxicity; physical injury and shock; endocrine disorders, and myocarditides of viral, bacterial, and protozoal causation. Considerable overlap exists between each of the etiologic groups in the spectrum of pathologic alterations seen in the myocardium. These include various degenerative changes, myocyte necrosis, and inflammatory lesions. However, some diseases show rather characteristic myocardial alterations such as vacuolar degeneration in anthracycline cardiotoxicity, myofibrillar lysis in furazolidone cardiotoxicity, calcification in calcinosis of mice, glycogen accumulation in the glycogenoses, lipofuscinosis in cattle, fatty degeneration in erucic acid cardiotoxicity, myofiber disarray in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and lymphocytic inflammation with inclusion bodies in canine parvoviral myocarditis. The myocardial diseases represent the largest group in the spectrum of spontaneous cardiac diseases of animals. Pericardial and endocardial diseases and congential cardiac diseases are

  2. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; Xia, W.

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the project data with Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) methods. After processing of the project data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojections. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  3. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  4. ACR testing of a dedicated head SPECT unit.

    PubMed

    Sensakovic, William F; Hough, Matthew C; Kimbley, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-08

    Physics testing necessary for program accreditation is rigorously defined by the ACR. This testing is easily applied to most conventional SPECT systems based on gamma camera technology. The inSPira HD is a dedicated head SPECT system based on a rotating dual clamshell design that acquires data in a dual-spiral geometry. The unique geometry and configuration force alterations of the standard ACR physics testing protocol. Various tests, such as intrinsic planar uniformity and/or resolution, do not apply. The Data Spectrum Deluxe Phantom used for conventional SPECT testing cannot fit in the inSPira HD scanner bore, making (currently) unapproved use of the Small Deluxe SPECT Phantom necessary. Matrix size, collimator type, scanning time, reconstruction method, and attenuation correction were all varied from the typically prescribed ACR instructions. Visible spheres, sphere contrast, visible rod groups, uniformity, and root mean square (RMS) noise were measured. The acquired SPECT images surpassed the minimum ACR requirements for both spatial resolution (9.5 mm spheres resolved) and contrast (6.4 mm rod groups resolved). Sphere contrast was generally high. Integral uniformity was 4% and RMS noise was 1.7%. Noise appeared more correlated than in images from a conventional SPECT scanner. Attenuation-corrected images produced from direct CT scanning of the phantom and a manufacturer supplied model of the phantom demonstrated negligible differences.

  5. Intracoronary autologous mononucleated bone marrow cell infusion for acute myocardial infarction: results of the randomized multicenter BONAMI trial

    PubMed Central

    Roncalli, Jérôme; Mouquet, Frédéric; Piot, Christophe; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Neuder, Yannick; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Agostini, Denis; Gaxotte, Virginia; Sportouch, Catherine; Galinier, Michel; Crochet, Dominique P.; Teiger, Emmanuel; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Polge, Anne-Sophie; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Manrique, Alain; Carrie, Didier; Susen, Sophie; Klein, Bernard; Parini, Angelo; Lamirault, Guillaume; Croisille, Pierre; Rouard, Hélène; Bourin, Philippe; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Delasalle, Béatrice; Vanzetto, Gérald; Van Belle, Eric; Lemarchand, Patricia F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Intracoronary administration of autologous bone marrow cells (BMCs) leads to a modest improvement in cardiac function, but the effect on myocardial viability is unknown. The aim of this randomized multicenter study was to evaluate the effect of BMC therapy on myocardial viability in patients with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to identify predictive factors for improvement of myocardial viability. Methods and Results One-hundred one patients with AMI and successful reperfusion, LVEF ≤45%, and decreased myocardial viability (resting Tl201-SPECT) were randomized to either a control group (n=49) or a BMC group (n=52). Primary endpoint was improvement of myocardial viability 3 months after AMI. Baseline mean LVEF measured by radionuclide angiography was 36.3 ± 6.9%. BMC infusion was performed 9.3 ± 1.7 days after AMI. Myocardial viability improved in 16/47 (34%) patients in the BMC group compared to 7/43 (16%) in the control group (p = 0.06). The number of non-viable segments becoming viable was 0.8 ± 1.1 in the control group and 1.2 ± 1.5 in the BMC group (p = 0.13). Multivariate analysis including major post-AMI prognostic factors showed a significant improvement of myocardial viability in BMC vs. control group (p=0.03). Moreover, a significant adverse role for active smoking (p=0.04) and a positive trend for microvascular obstruction (p=0.07) were observed. Conclusions Intracoronary autologous BMC administration to patients with decreased LVEF after AMI was associated with improvement of myocardial viability in multivariate –but not in univariate – analysis. A large multicenter international trial is warranted to further document the efficacy of cardiac cell therapy and better define a group of patients that will benefit from this therapy. PMID:21127322

  6. Value of thallium-201 reinjection after delayed SPECT imaging for predicting reversible ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, H.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Mohiuddin, I.H.; Hirata, K.; Ban, T.; Konishi, J. )

    1990-08-15

    The reinjection of a small dose (40 MBq) of thallium-201 after stress and delayed imaging often shows new redistribution in the regions with persistent defect. To assess whether these segments may represent reversible ischemia, reinjection thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed after stress and 3-hour delayed imaging in 24 patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The left ventricular myocardium was divided into 5 myocardial segments and regional wall motion was scored on a scale from 0 (normal) to 4 (dyskinesia). Thallium-201 findings were compared with improvement in regional perfusion and wall motion 1 to 2 months after CABG. The reinjection imaging identified new redistribution in 15 of 32 persistent defects (47%) on the 3-hour delayed images. In the study of stress and delayed SPECT imaging, the improvement in perfusion was observed in 34 of 43 segments (79%) exhibiting redistribution and 15 of 32 (47%) segments without redistribution (p less than 0.01). The reinjection SPECT identified new redistribution in 12 of the 15 improved segments that were not detected on the delayed images. Similarly, the improvement in wall motion was observed in 23 of 31 segments (74%) exhibiting redistribution and 14 of 30 segments (47%) without redistribution on the delayed images (p less than 0.05). The reinjection identified new redistribution in 10 of the 14 improved segments that were undetected on the delayed images. The predictive values for improvement in perfusion and wall motion by the reinjection imaging were significantly higher (92 and 89%) than those by the delayed imaging (69 and 62%, respectively, p less than 0.05 each).

  7. Diminishing the impact of the partial volume effect in cardiac SPECT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, P Hendrik; King, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) significantly restricts the absolute quantification of regional myocardial uptake and thereby limits the accuracy of absolute measurement of blood flow and coronary flow reserve by SPECT. The template-projection-reconstruction method has been previously developed for PVE compensation. This method assumes the availability of coregistered high-spatial resolution anatomical information as is now becoming available with commercial dual-modality imaging systems such as SPECT/CTs. The objective of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the impact of the PVE on cardiac perfusion SPECT imaging can be diminished if coregistered high-spatial resolution anatomical information is available. For this investigation the authors introduced an additional parameter into the template-projection-reconstruction compensation equation called the voxel filling fraction (F). This parameter specifies the extent to which structure edge voxels in the emission reconstruction are filled by the structure in question as determined by the higher spatial-resolution imaging modality and the fractional presence of the structure at different states of physiological motion as in combining phases of cardiac motion. During correction the removal of spillover to the cardiac region from the surrounding structures is performed first by using reconstructed templates of neighboring structures (liver, blood pool, lungs) to calculate spillover fractions. This is followed by determining recovery coefficients for all voxels within the heart wall from the reconstruction of the template projections of the left and right ventricles (LV and RV). The emission data are subsequently divided by these recovery coefficients taking into account the filling fraction F. The mathematical cardiac torso phantom was used for investigation correction of PVE for a normal LV distribution, a defect in the inferior wall, and a defect in the anterior wall. PVE correction resulted in a

  8. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  9. A Naive-Bayes model observer for detection and localization of perfusion defects in cardiac SPECT-MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parages, Felipe M.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers (MO) are widely used in medical imaging to act as surrogates of human observers in task-based image quality evaluation, frequently towards optimization of reconstruction algorithms. In SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), a realistic task-based approach involves detection and localization of perfusion defects, as well as a subsequent assessment of defect severity. In this paper we explore a machine-learning MO based on Naive- Bayes classification (NB-MO). NB-MO uses a set of polar-map image features to predict lesion detection, localization and severity scores given by five human readers for a set of simulated 3D SPECT-MPI patients. The simulated dataset included lesions with different sizes, perfusion-reduction ratios, and locations. Simulated projections were reconstructed using two readily used methods namely: FBP and OSEM. For validation, a multireader multi-case (MRMC) analysis of alternative free-response ROC (AFROC) curve was performed for NB-MO and human observers. For comparison, we also report performances of a statistical Hotelling Observer applied on polar-map images. Results show excellent agreement between NB-MO and humans, as well as model's good generalization between different reconstruction treatments.

  10. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis.

  11. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT ‘D.SPECT’ camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of 99mTc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a 99mTc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  12. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 01: Position-sensitive noise characteristics in multi-pinhole cardiac SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddy-Walsh, SG; Wells, RG

    2014-08-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is invaluable in the diagnosis and management of heart disease. It provides essential information on myocardial blood flow and ischemia. Multi-pinhole dedicated cardiac-SPECT cameras offer improved count sensitivity, and spatial and energy resolutions over parallel-hole camera designs however variable sensitivity across the field-of-view (FOV) can lead to position-dependent noise variations. Since MPI evaluates differences in the signal-to-noise ratio, noise variations in the camera could significantly impact the sensitivity of the test for ischemia. We evaluated the noise characteristics of GE Healthcare's Discovery NM530c camera with a goal of optimizing the accuracy of our patient assessment and thereby improving outcomes. Theoretical sensitivity maps of the camera FOV, including attenuation effects, were estimated analytically based on the distance and angle between the spatial position of a given voxel and each pinhole. The standard deviation in counts, σ was inferred for each voxel position from the square root of the sensitivity mapped at that position. Noise was measured experimentally from repeated (N=16) acquisitions of a uniform spherical Tc-99m-water phantom. The mean (μ) and standard deviation (σ) were calculated for each voxel position in the reconstructed FOV. Noise increased ∼2.1× across a 12 cm sphere. A correlation of 0.53 is seen when experimental noise is compared with theory suggesting that ∼53% of the noise is attributed to the combined effects of attenuation and the multi-pinhole geometry. Further investigations are warranted to determine the clinical impact of the position-dependent noise variation.

  13. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  14. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression.

    PubMed

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  15. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  16. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Zellars, Richard; Bravo, Paco E.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hopfer, Kari; Myers, Lee; Tahari, Abdel; Asrari, Fariba; Ziessman, Harvey; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits.

  17. Quantitative High-Efficiency Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride SPECT with Dedicated Parallel-Hole Collimation System in Obese Patients: Results of a Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Slomka, Piotr J.; Fish, Mathews; Schwartz, Ronald G.; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Lemley, Mark; Mackin, Maria L.; Peterson, Benjamin; Schwartz, Arielle M.; Doran, Jesse A.; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a common source of artifact on conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We evaluated image quality and diagnostic performance of high-efficiency (HE) cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) parallel-hole SPECT-MPI for coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients. Methods and Results 118 consecutive obese patients at 3 centers (BMI 43.6±8.9 kg/m2, range 35–79.7 kg/m2) had upright/supine HE-SPECT and ICA >6 months (n=67) or low-likelihood of CAD (n=51). Stress quantitative total perfusion deficit (TPD) for upright (U-TPD), supine (S-TPD) and combined acquisitions (C-TPD) was assessed. Image quality (IQ; 5=excellent; <3 nondiagnostic) was compared among BMI 35–39.9 (n=58), 40–44.9 (n=24) and ≥45 (n=36) groups. ROC-curve area for CAD detection (≥50% stenosis) for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD were 0.80, 0.80, and 0.87, respectively. Sensitivity/specificity was 82%/57% for U-TPD, 74%/71% for S-TPD, and 80%/82% for C-TPD. C-TPD had highest specificity (P=.02). C-TPD normalcy rate was higher than U-TPD (88% vs. 75%, P=.02). Mean IQ was similar among BMI 35–39.9, 40–44.9 and ≥45 groups [4.6 vs. 4.4 vs. 4.5, respectively (P=.6)]. No patient had a non-diagnostic stress scan. Conclusions In obese patients, HE-SPECT MPI with dedicated parallel-hole collimation demonstrated high image quality, normalcy rate, and diagnostic accuracy for CAD by quantitative analysis of combined upright/supine acquisitions. PMID:25388380

  18. Dynamic Imaging of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Trafficking to Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kraitchman, Dara L.; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Gilson, Wesley D.; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kedziorek, Dorota; Walczak, Piotr; Paul Segars, W.; Chen, Hunter H.; Fritzges, Danielle; Izbudak, Izlem; Young, Randell G.; Marcelino, Michelle; Pittenger, Mark F.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Boston, Raymond C.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Wahl, Richard L.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent results from animal studies suggest that stem cells may be able to home to sites of myocardial injury to assist in tissue regeneration. However, the histological interpretation of postmortem tissue, on which many of these studies are based, has recently been widely debated. Methods and Results With the use of the high sensitivity of a combined single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT scanner, the in vivo trafficking of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) colabeled with a radiotracer and MR contrast agent to acute myocardial infarction was dynamically determined. Redistribution of the labeled MSCs after intravenous injection from initial localization in the lungs to nontarget organs such as the liver, kidney, and spleen was observed within 24 to 48 hours after injection. Focal and diffuse uptake of MSCs in the infarcted myocardium was already visible in SPECT/CT images in the first 24 hours after injection and persisted until 7 days after injection and was validated by tissue counts of radioactivity. In contrast, MRI was unable to demonstrate targeted cardiac localization of MSCs in part because of the lower sensitivity of MRI. Conclusions Noninvasive radionuclide imaging is well suited to dynamically track the biodistribution and trafficking of mesenchymal stem cells to both target and nontarget organs. PMID:16129797

  19. Measurement of acute Q-wave myocardial infarct size with single photon emission computed tomography imaging of indium-111 antimyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, M.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Wall, R.M.; Johnson, L.L.

    1989-04-01

    Myocardial infarct size was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) following injection of indium-111 antimyosin in 27 patients (18 male and 9 female; mean age 57.4 +/- 10.5 years, range 37 to 75) who had acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI). These 27 patients represent 27 of 35 (77%) consecutive patients with acute Q-wave infarctions who were injected with indium-111 antimyosin. In the remaining 8 patients either tracer uptake was too faint or the scans were technically inadequate to permit infarct sizing from SPECT reconstructions. In the 27 patients studied, infarct location by electrocardiogram was anterior in 15 and inferoposterior in 12. Nine patients had a history of prior infarction. Each patient received 2 mCi of indium-111 antimyosin followed by SPECT imaging 48 hours later. Infarct mass was determined from coronal slices using a threshold value obtained from a human torso/cardiac phantom. Infarct size ranged from 11 to 87 g mean (48.5 +/- 24). Anterior infarcts were significantly (p less than 0.01) larger (60 +/- 20 g) than inferoposterior infarcts (34 +/- 21 g). For patients without prior MI, there were significant inverse correlations between infarct size and ejection fraction (r = 0.71, p less than 0.01) and wall motion score (r = 0.58, p less than 0.01) obtained from predischarge gated blood pool scans. Peak creatine kinase-MB correlated significantly with infarct size for patients without either reperfusion or right ventricular infarction (r = 0.66). Seven patients without prior infarcts had additional simultaneous indium-111/thallium-201 SPECT studies using dual energy windows.

  20. Silent myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gutterman, David D

    2009-05-01

    Although much progress has been made in reducing mortality from ischemic cardiovascular disease, this condition remains the leading cause of death throughout the world. This might in part be due to the fact that over half of patients have a catastrophic event (heart attack or sudden death) as their initial manifestation of coronary disease. Contributing to this statistic is the observation that the majority of myocardial ischemic episodes are silent, indicating an inability or failure to sense ischemic damage or stress on the heart. This review examines the clinical characteristics of silent myocardial ischemia, and explores mechanisms involved in the generation of angina pectoris. Possible mechanisms for the more common manifestation of injurious reductions in coronary flow; namely, silent ischemia, are also explored. A new theory for the mechanism of silent ischemia is proposed. Finally, the prognostic importance of silent ischemia and potential future directions for research are discussed.

  1. Myocardial apoptosis and SIDS.

    PubMed

    Grasmeyer, Sarah; Madea, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis mediates cardiac damage in severe forms of myocarditis. In fatal myocarditis, large amounts of cardiomyocytes show apoptotic DNA fragmentation, while in human controls, few apoptotic cardiomyocytes are found. In the present study the frequency of apoptosis in 88 SIDS cases (category 1b according to the San Diego Classification) and 15 control cases was investigated. In every case myocardial samples from 8 standard locations were collected. Detection of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was performed by TUNEL method. Furthermore the myocardial tissue was stained with HE and immunohistochemical methods (LCA, CD68, CD45-R0). More than 90% of the slides did not contain apoptotic cardiomyocytes at all. The detection rate of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was almost equal in control group (26.7%) and SIDS group (23.86%). A quantification of apoptotic cardiomyocytes per mm(2) revealed no significant difference between both groups either. Altogether there is no evidence for a higher rate of apoptosis in SIDS.

  2. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  3. Increased regional epicardial fat volume associated with reversible myocardial ischemia in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Tuba; Greer, Christine; Thadani, Samir R; Kato, Tomoko S; Bhatia, Ketan; Shimbo, Daichi; Kontak, Andrew; Konkak, Andrew; Bokhari, Sabahat; Einstein, Andrew J; Schulze, P Christian

    2015-04-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is a source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and has been linked to the development of coronary artery disease. No study has systematically assessed the relationship between local epicardial fat volume (EFV) and myocardial perfusion defects. We analyzed EFV in patients undergoing SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging combined with computed tomography (CT) for attenuation correction. Low-dose CT without contrast was performed in 396 consecutive patients undergoing SPECT imaging for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Regional thickness, cross-sectional areas, and total EFV were assessed. 295 patients had normal myocardial perfusion scans and 101 had abnormal perfusion scans. Mean EFVs in normal, ischemic, and infarcted hearts were 99.8 ± 82.3 cm(3), 156.4 ± 121.9 cm(3), and 96.3 ± 102.1 cm(3), respectively (P < 0.001). Reversible perfusion defects were associated with increased local EFV compared to normal perfusion in the distribution of the right (69.2 ± 51.5 vs 46.6 ± 32.0 cm(3); P = 0.03) and left anterior descending coronary artery (87.1 ± 76.4 vs 46.7 ± 40.6 cm(3); P = 0.005). Our results demonstrate increased regional epicardial fat in patients with active myocardial ischemia compared to patients with myocardial scar or normal perfusion on nuclear perfusion scans. Our results suggest a potential role for cardiac CT to improve risk stratification in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

  4. Increased Regional Epicardial Fat Volume Associated with Reversible Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Tuba; Greer, Christine; Thadani, Samir R.; Kato, Tomoko S.; Bhatia, Ketan; Shimbo, Daichi; Konkak, Andrew; Bokhari, Sabahat; Einstein, Andrew J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is a source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and has been linked to the development of coronary artery disease. No study has systematically assessed the relationship between local epicardial fat volume (EFV) and myocardial perfusion defects. We analyzed EFV in patients undergoing SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging combined with computed tomography (CT) for attenuation correction. Low-dose CT without contrast was performed in 396 consecutive patients undergoing SPECT imaging for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Regional thickness, cross-sectional areas, and total EFV were assessed. 295 patients had normal myocardial perfusion scans and 101 had abnormal perfusion scans. Mean EFVs in normal, ischemic, and infarcted hearts were 99.8 ± 82.3 cm3, 156.4 ± 121.9 cm3, and 96.3 ± 102.1 cm3, respectively (P < 0.001). Reversible perfusion defects were associated with increased local EFV compared to normal perfusion in the distribution of the right (69.2 ± 51.5 vs 46.6 ± 32.0 cm3; P = 0.03) and left anterior descending coronary artery (87.1 ± 76.4 vs 46.7 ± 40.6 cm3; P = 0.005). Our results demonstrate increased regional epicardial fat in patients with active myocardial ischemia compared to patients with myocardial scar or normal perfusion on nuclear perfusion scans. Our results suggest a potential role for cardiac CT to improve risk stratification in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. PMID:25339129

  5. Dual SPECT/MR imaging in small animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, E.; Choquet, P.; Goetz, C.; Kintz, J.; Erbs, P.; Rooke, R.; Constantinesco, A.

    2007-02-01

    ObjectiveTo demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT/MRI in small animal using a dual device. Material and methodsA small animal pinhole camera (1.5 mm in diameter) coupled together with a dedicated low-field (0.1 T) small MR imager (imaging volume of 10×10×6 cm 3) was used. SPECT consisted of acquiring 48 projections after intra-venous injections of 0.2 ml and 700 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi and was immediately followed by MRI with 3D isotropic T 1 and T 2 weighted imaging sequences. Two adult Swiss nude mice with stereotaxic brain implanted human glioblastoma cells and maintained under isoflurane 1.5% and air 0.3 L min -1 in a warmed-up and non-magnetic imaging cell for both modalities were used in this study. ResultsFusion images of SPECT/low-field MRI were obtained with isotropic voxel resolutions of 1×1×1 mm 3 for SPECT and 0.5×0.5×0.5 mm 3 for MRI. Total acquisition time for both imaging modalities was 2.5 h. ConclusionA low magnetic field strength of 0.1 T is a potential solution for a small animal dual imaging device combining pinhole SPECT and MRI in a single machine.

  6. Multimodality tomographic scintimammography with PET, PECI, and SPECT: initial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Thomas, Frank D.; Hellwig, Bradford J.; Gagne, George M.

    2002-04-01

    We compared tomographic scintimammography performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission coincidence imaging (PECI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A female thorax phantom was used. Activities of the myocardium, thorax and breasts were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. Hollow plastic spheres, imitating hot lesions (1.5-20ml), filled with radioactive saline were inserted in the center of each breast. Specific activities of internal organs were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. SPECT data were acquired with Tc-99m using gamma cameras with NaI(Tl) detectors. A modified FBP (CODE) reconstruction algorithm was used to render SPECT tomographic images. PECI (Siemens E.CAM with NaI(Tl)) and PET (GE Advance with BGO) data were acquired using F-18 FDG. Vendor supplied reconstruction algorithms were used. The reconstructed hot lesions contrast and resolution were investigated. Image quality obtained can be ranked as follows: (1) PET(BGO), (2) PECI(NaI), (3) SPECT(NaI) In conclusion, assuming comparable uptake values of Tc-99m-sestamibi and F-18 FDG, PET seems to be a superior methodology in visualization of breast lesion as compared to SPECT and PECI. All these tomographic methods appear to be promising adjunct to x-ray mammography in difficult to interpret cases.

  7. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pato, Lara R. V.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-01

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems’ performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view (75% of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  8. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  9. Myocardial Tagging With SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Herzka, Daniel A.; Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the first implementation of myocardial tagging with refocused steady-state free precession (SSFP) and magnetization preparation. The combination of myocardial tagging (a noninvasive method for quantitative measurement of regional and global cardiac function) with the high tissue signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained with SSFP is shown to yield improvements in terms of the myocardium–tag contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and tag persistence when compared to the current standard fast gradient-echo (FGRE) tagging protocol. Myocardium–tag CNR and tag persistence were studied using numerical simulations as well as phantom and human experiments. Both quantities were found to decrease with increasing imaging flip angle (α) due to an increased tag decay rate and a decrease in myocardial steady-state signal. However, higher α yielded better blood–myocardium contrast, indicating that optimal α is dependent on the application: higher α for better blood–myocardium boundary visualization, and lower α for better tag persistence. SSFP tagging provided the same myocardium–tag CNR as FGRE tagging when acquired at four times the bandwidth and better tag– and blood–myocardium CNRs than FGRE tagging when acquired at equal or twice the receiver bandwidth (RBW). The increased acquisition efficiency of SSFP allowed decreases in breath-hold duration, or increases in temporal resolution, as compared to FGRE. PMID:12541254

  10. Perioperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Pericles; Martins, Gerez Fernandes; Biscaro, Andressa; Kruczan, Dany David; Jessen, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative myocardial infarction adversely affects the prognosis of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft and its diagnosis was hampered by numerous difficulties, because the pathophysiology is different from the traditional instability atherosclerotic and the clinical difficulty to be characterized. Objective To identify the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction and its outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Retrospective cohort study performed in a tertiary hospital specialized in cardiology, from May 01, 2011 to April 30, 2012, which included all records containing coronary artery bypass graft records. To confirm the diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction criteria, the Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction was used. Results We analyzed 116 cases. Perioperative myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 28 patients (24.1%). Number of grafts and use and cardiopulmonary bypass time were associated with this diagnosis and the mean age was significantly higher in this group. The diagnostic criteria elevated troponin I, which was positive in 99.1% of cases regardless of diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction. No significant difference was found between length of hospital stay and intensive care unit in patients with and without this complication, however patients with perioperative myocardial infarction progressed with worse left ventricular function and more death cases. Conclusion The frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction found in this study was considered high and as a consequence the same observed average higher troponin I, more cases of worsening left ventricular function and death. PMID:25859867

  11. Perturbative refinement of the geometric calibration in pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Defrise, Michel; Vanhove, Christian; Nuyts, Johan

    2008-02-01

    The paper investigates the geometric calibration of a rotating gamma camera for pinhole (PH) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Most calibration methods previously applied in PH-SPECT assume that the motion of the camera around the object belongs to a well-defined class described by a small number of geometric parameters, for instance seven parameters for a circular acquisition with a single pinhole camera. The proposed new method refines an initial parametric calibration by applying to each position of the camera a rigid body transformation that is determined to improve the fit between the measured and calculated projections of the calibration sources. A stable estimate of this transformation can be obtained with only three calibration sources by linearizing the equations around the position estimated by the initial parametric calibration. The performance of the method is illustrated using simulated and measured micro-SPECT data.

  12. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-Morales, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, F.; Arévila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-01

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162±37 g and 169±34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  13. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer (other than skin cancer) among men in the United States. Although prostate cancer is one of the few cancers that grow so slowly that it may never threaten the lives of some patients, it can be lethal once metastasized. Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint, Cytogen Corporation, Princeton, NJ) imaging is indicated for staging and recurrence detection of the disease, and is particularly useful to determine whether or not the disease has spread to distant metastatic sites. However, the interpretation of 111In-capromab pendetide is challenging without correlated structural information mostly because the radiopharmaceutical demonstrates nonspecific uptake in the normal vasculature, bowel, bone marrow, and the prostate gland. We developed an improved method of imaging and localizing 111In-Capromab pendetide using a SPECT/CT imaging system. The specific goals included: i) development and application of a novel iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm that utilizes a priori information from coregistered CT; and ii) assessment of clinical impact of adding SPECT/CT for prostate cancer imaging with capromab pendetide utilizing the standard and novel reconstruction techniques. Patient imaging studies with capromab pendetide were performed from 1999 to 2004 using two different SPECT/CT scanners, a prototype SPECT/CT system and a commercial SPECT/CT system (Discovery VH, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). SPECT projection data from both systems were reconstructed using an experimental iterative algorithm that compensates for both photon attenuation and collimator blurring. In addition, the data obtained from the commercial system were reconstructed with attenuation correction using an OSEM reconstruction supplied by the camera manufacturer for routine clinical interpretation. For 12 sets of patient data, SPECT images reconstructed using the experimental algorithm were interpreted separately and compared with interpretation of

  14. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer (other than skin cancer) among men in the United States. Although prostate cancer is one of the few cancers that grow so slowly that it may never threaten the lives of some patients, it can be lethal once metastasized. Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint, Cytogen Corporation, Princeton, NJ) imaging is indicated for staging and recurrence detection of the disease, and is particularly useful to determine whether or not the disease has spread to distant metastatic sites. However, the interpretation of 111In-capromab pendetide is challenging without correlated structural information mostly because the radiopharmaceutical demonstrates nonspecific uptake in the normal vasculature, bowel, bone marrow, and the prostate gland. We developed an improved method of imaging and localizing 111In-Capromab pendetide using a SPECT/CT imaging system. The specific goals included: i) development and application of a novel iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm that utilizes a priori information from coregistered CT; and ii) assessment of clinical impact of adding SPECT/CT for prostate cancer imaging with capromab pendetide utilizing the standard and novel reconstruction techniques. Patient imaging studies with capromab pendetide were performed from 1999 to 2004 using two different SPECT/CT scanners, a prototype SPECT/CT system and a commercial SPECT/CT system (Discovery VH, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). SPECT projection data from both systems were reconstructed using an experimental iterative algorithm that compensates for both photon attenuation and collimator blurring. In addition, the data obtained from the commercial system were reconstructed with attenuation correction using an OSEM reconstruction supplied by the camera manufacturer for routine clinical interpretation. For 12 sets of patient data, SPECT images reconstructed using the experimental algorithm were interpreted separately and compared with interpretation of

  15. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  16. [Detection of coronary artery disease by adenosine triphosphate stress echocardiography: comparison with adenosine triphosphate stress thallium myocardial scintigraphy and coronary angiography].

    PubMed

    Harada, M; Okura, K; Nishizawa, S; Inoue, T; Sakai, H; Lee, T; Sugiyama, Y; Suzuki, M; Hirai, H; Yamaguchi, T

    1998-09-01

    The clinical feasibility and usefulness of adenosine triphosphate-2Na (ATP) stress echocardiography for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) were assessed. Two-dimensional echocardiography and thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during ATP infusion were performed simultaneously in 58 consecutive patients (41 men and 17 women; mean age 66 +/- 12 years) with suspected CAD. ATP was infused intravenously at 0.16 mg/kg/min for 5 min and thallium was injected at 4 min. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 2 weeks of ATP echocardiography and ATP SPECT. An ischemic response during ATP infusion was detected by echocardiography as the development or worsening of a wall motion abnormality compared with the baseline and by SPECT as a perfusion defect that filled totally or partially during redistribution. Significant coronary artery stenosis was defined as > or = 75% diameter stenosis in a major epicardial vessel. The severity of the stenosis was classified as follows: Group A, lesions with significant coronary artery stenosis (> or = 75%, < 90%); Group B, lesions with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 90%) without collateral circulation; Group C, lesions with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 90%) with collateral circulation. Significant CAD was present in 43 of 58 patients. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ATP echocardiography for detecting significant CAD were 70%, 100% and 78%, respectively, and those of ATP SPECT were 98%, 87% and 95%, respectively. In patients without previous myocardial infarction, the sensitivity of ATP echocardiography was 67%. The sensitivity of ATP echocardiography and ATP SPECT for detecting myocardial ischemia were 59% and 95% in patients with 1-vessel disease, 75% and 100% in those with 2-vessel disease, and 88% and 100% in those with 3-vessel disease, respectively. The induction of wall motion abnormality by ATP echocardiography was highly concordant with ATP

  17. Comparison Between Postprocessing Software and Repeated Scanning to Eliminate Subdiaphragmatic Activity in Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Theerakulpisut, Daris; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful test of evaluation for coronary artery disease, but subdiaphragmatic radiotracer activity often interferes with the interpretation of inferior wall findings. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using software elimination of the subdiaphragmatic activity for the assessment of its efficacy in the correctness of image interpretation and the overall image quality of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). MPS studies from January 2010 to October 2012 at our institution were reviewed. Thirty-two SPECT studies were included, all of which had significant subdiaphragmatic activity in the first scan and needed to be delayed to let the activity clear. Each scan was interpreted by using semiquantitative scoring in 17 segments according to the degree of radiotracer uptake. The first scan, which had interfering activity, was manipulated by masking out the unwanted activity with software native to our image processing software suite. The manipulated images were then compared with delayed images of the same patient, of which the subdiaphragmatic activity was spontaneously cleared with time. The first scan masked by software correlated with the delayed scan for myocardial regions supplied by the left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA), but not the left anterior descending (LAD). However, the quality of the masked scans was perceived by the observer to be better in terms of quality and ease of interpretation. Using software to mask out unwanted subdiaphragmatic activity has no detrimental effect on the interpretation of MPS images when compared with delayed scanning, but it can improve subjective scan quality and ease of interpretation. PMID:27134559

  18. Quantification of infarct size by /sup 201/Tl single-photon emission computed tomography during acute myocardial infarction in humans. Comparison with enzymatic estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmarian, J.J.; Pratt, C.M.; Borges-Neto, S.; Cashion, W.R.; Roberts, R.; Verani, M.S.

    1988-10-01

    We prospectively investigated whether /sup 201/Tl single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could accurately diagnose the presence and quantify the extent of acute myocardial infarction when compared with infarct size assessed by plasma MB-creatine kinase activity. Thirty patients with enzymatic evidence of infarction were imaged within 12-36 hours of chest pain (mean, 23.4 hours). No patient had a previous infarction, and none underwent intervention seeking to restore coronary patency. Infarct size was quantified with computer-generated polar maps of the myocardial radioactivity and expressed as a percentage of the total left ventricular volume. To assess left and right ventricular performance, blood-pool gated radionuclide angiography was performed immediately after SPECT. All 30 patients had perfusion defects consistent with myocardial infarction. Scintigraphic and enzymatic estimates of infarct size correlated well for the group as a whole (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001, SEE = 9.1) but especially for those patients with anterior infarction (r = 0.91, p less than 0.001, SEE = 7.9). The poor correlation observed in patients with inferior infarction (r = 0.50, p less than 0.05, SEE = 10.0) was believed to be related to the frequent occurrence of right ventricular involvement because SPECT assessed only left ventricular damage, whereas the enzymatic method estimated the myocardial injury in both ventricles. A quantitative index of right ventricular infarct size, derived from the relation between the scintigraphic and enzymatic estimates, had a strong inverse correlation with right ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.89, p less than 0.001, SEE = 3.6).

  19. Evaluation of simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope cardiac SPECT imaging with model-based crosstalk compensation using canine studies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y.; Links, J. M.; Becker, L.; DiPaula, A. F.; Frank, T.; Schuleri, K. H.; Lardo, A. C.; Frey, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc-Sestamibi dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can reduce imaging time and produce perfectly registered rest/stress images. However, crosstalk from 99mTc into 201Tl images can significantly reduce 201Tl image quality. We have developed a model-based compensation (MBC) method to compensate for this crosstalk. The method has previously been validated with phantom and simulation studies. In this study, we evaluated the MBC method using a canine model. Methods Left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery stenoses were created in 50 adult mongrel dogs weighing 20–30 kg. The dogs were injected with 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 201Tl at rest, and a SPECT study acquired. Stress was induced by administering adenosine to the dog, followed by injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of 99mTc-Sestamibi at peak stress. A second SPECT study was performed with data acquired in both 201Tl and 99mTc energy windows to provide simultaneous dual-isotope projection data. The images were reconstructed using the ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm with compensation for attenuation, scatter and detector response. For simultaneously acquired 201Tl data, we also applied the MBC method to compensate for crosstalk contamination from 99mTc. Results Without compensation, 99mTc crosstalk increased the estimated 201Tl activity concentration in the rest images and reduced defect contrast. After MBC, the 201Tl images were in good agreement with the registered single isotope images and ex vivo count data. The ischemic (IS) to non-ischemic (NIS) region 201Tl activity concentration ratios were computed for single isotope and dual isotope studies. The correlation with ex vivo IS-NIS ratios was 0.815 after MBC, compared to the 0.495 from data without compensation. In addition, the regression line for the IS-NIS ratios with MBC was almost parallel to the line of identity with a slope of 0.93, compared to a slope of 0

  20. Myocardial fibre calcification.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, J; Pieterse, A S; Pounder, D J; Smith, P S

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of myocardial fibre calcification found at post-mortem examination are described. In one case there was antemortem hypercalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia and the case was clearly an example of metastatic calcification. In the other two cases there was ischaemic myocardial necrosis and calcification was seen in fibres which were not overtly necrotic, but which were both in proximity to (the majority) and remote from the necrotic zones. Since renal failure with hyperphosphataemia was present in both cases, these were considered to be examples of augmented (by the hyperphosphataemia) dystrophic calcification. The histological, histochemical and ultrastructural features were identical in the three cases. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed initially in mitochondria, followed by spillage of crystals into the cytosol and ultimately into the interstitium. It is suggested that the fundamental lesion is a dysfunction of the fibre membrane; the similarity of this reaction with the calcification seen in skeletal muscle fibres in various myopathies is noted and a unifying hypothesis of the mechanism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibre calcification is thereby suggested. Images PMID:7309897

  1. Valsartan after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Sadi

    2014-12-01

    One of the important problems of the patients undergoing acute myocardial infarction (MI) is early development of heart failure. It has been revealed in various studies that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has a significant role in this process. The studies conducted with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have resulted in decreased mortality rate. Another RAAS blocker which was discovered about ten years later than other ACE inhibitors in historical process is angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) inhibiting the efficiency of angiotensin 2 by binding to angiotensin 1 receptor. Valsartan is one of the molecules of this group, which has higher number of large-scale randomized clinical studies. In this review, following presentation of a general overview on heart failure after acute MI, the efficiency of ARBs in this patient group will be discussed. This discussion will mostly emphasize the construction, outcomes and clinical importance of VALIANT (VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion), which is the study on valsartan after acute MI heart failure. PMID:25604205

  2. Trauma induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lolay, Georges A; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed K

    2016-01-15

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction.

  3. The role of SPECT in the evaluation of skeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Murray, I P

    1993-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has, in the last decade, established a critical role in routine diagnosis. Skeletal scintigraphy exemplifies the impact in improving detection of lesions by delineation of their site and size. The advantage of minimizing the superimposed radioactivity from overlying and underlying structures is typified by the readiness with which avascular necrosis of the femoral head can be identified by removal of the surrounding hyperaemia which masks the classical photopaenia. However, the ability to achieve an accurate image at a plane at a prescribed depth is most characteristically shown by the study of a vertebra, a bone of irregular contour and subject to a variety of pathological disorders at different sites within it. The various focal abnormalities resulting from these can be localized exactly, readily distinguishing, for example, those in the body from those in the natural arch. In particular, the alterations resulting from trauma, such as pars interarticularis stress fracture, are readily seen. Consequently SPECT has an indispensable role in the investigation and management of low back pain. However, the ability of SPECT to delineate abnormal accumulation has provided a new approach to the evaluation of knee pain, especially when acute such as that resulting from athletic injury, since the identification of the presence or absence of focal abnormalities can be critical to patient management. The frequency of these various disorders in which SPECT is so useful explains why the procedure has become such a routine high-volume examination is so many departments. PMID:8461235

  4. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  5. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  6. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging.

    PubMed

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded. PMID:27648373

  7. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  8. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  9. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded.

  10. [Radionuclide cisternography: SPECT- and 3D-technique].

    PubMed

    Henkes, H; Huber, G; Hierholzer, J; Cordes, M; Kujat, C; Piepgras, U

    1991-10-01

    Radionuclide cisternography is indicated in the clinical work-up for hydrocephalus, when searching for CSF leaks, and when testing whether or not intracranial cystic lesions are communicating with the adjacent subarachnoid space. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and diagnostic value of SPECT and subsequent 3D surface rendering in addition to conventional rectilinear CSF imaging in eight patients. Planar images allowed the evaluation of CSF circulation and the detection of CSF fistula. They were advantageous in examinations 48 h after application of 111In-DTPA. SPECT scans, generated 4-24 h after tracer application, were superior in the delineation of basal cisterns, especially in early scans; this was helpful in patients with pooling due to CSF fistula and in cystic lesions near the skull base. A major drawback was the limited image quality of delayed scans, when the SPECT data were degraded by a low count rate. 3D surface rendering was easily feasible from SPECT data and yielded high quality images. The presentation of the spatial distribution of nuclide-contaminated CSF proved especially helpful in the area of the basal cisterns. PMID:1956980

  11. A COMPUTER MODEL OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY TO ANALYZE SPECT IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) spatial distribution of aerosol deposition can be performed using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The advantage of using 3-D techniques over planar gamma imaging is that deposition patterns can be related to real lun...

  12. The benefit of personalized hybrid SPECT/CT pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Simanek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid pulmonary imaging in the present day has seen a fusion of various uses of CT scans, including angiography (CTAG), diagnostic CT, low dose CT (LDCT), and perfusion or ventilation scintigraphy in tomographic or planar imaging. Determining the most effective individualized test for the complete diagnostics of patients with pulmonary symptoms for various groups of patients is a major issue. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of hybrid imaging in current methods of nuclear medicine in differential diagnostics of pulmonary embolism (PE). 326 patients were examined for symptomatology of PE. Patients were initially examined with SPECT perfusion scintigraphy. SPECT finding without sub-segmental or segmental defects was considered unproven PE but the finding of more segments or sub-segments in various lung parts was considered nearly proven PE. In the case of unclear findings, LDCT was added and in the case of a higher suspicion of PE, a ventilation examination was applied. It was possible to determine 83% of patients with the occurrence or exclusion of PE only on the basis of the perfusion SPECT examination and an X-ray or LDCT. LDCT was determined with 26% of the patients. With 41% of them, the use of LDCT resulted in an alternative diagnosis, explaining perfusion abnormalities. The research proved that use of SPECT/LDCT for differential diagnosis of lung symptoms brings about improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or the identification of other lung diseases when lung perfusion abnormalities are recorded. PMID:27648373

  13. CALOR87: HETC87, MICAP, EGS4, and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Bishop, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Johnson, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    A brief history of CALOR (HETC, EGS, MICAP, SPECT) is presented to indicate the evolution of this code system. Details concerning the current modifications and additions to the high-energy transport code, HETC, are also presented and new comparisons with experimental data are included to verify the new physics improvements. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  15. Advanced reconstruction of attenuation maps using SPECT emission data only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, André; Goedicke, Andreas; Aach, Til

    2009-02-01

    Today, attenuation corrected SPECT, typically performed using CT or Gadolinium line source based transmission scans, is more and more becoming standard in many medical applications. Moreover, the information about the material density distribution provided by these scans is key for other artifact compensation approaches in advanced SPECT reconstruction. Major drawbacks of these approaches are the additional patient radiation and hardware/maintenance costs as well as the additional workflow effort, e.g. if the CT scans are not performed on a hybrid scanner. It has been investigated in the past, whether it is possible to recover this structural information solely from the SPECT scan data. However, the investigated methods often result in noticeable image artifacts due to cross-dependences between attenuation and activity distribution estimation. With the simultaneous reconstruction method presented in this paper, we aim to effectively prevent these typical cross-talk artifacts using a-priori known atlas information of a human body. At first, an initial 3D shape model is coarsely registered to the SPECT data using anatomical landmarks and each organ structure within the model is identified with its typical attenuation coefficient. During the iterative reconstruction based on a modified ML-EM scheme, the algorithm simultaneously adapts both, the local activity estimation and the 3D shape model in order to improve the overall consistency between measured and estimated sinogram data. By explicitly avoiding topology modifications resulting in a non-anatomical state, we ensure that the estimated attenuation map remains realistic. Several tests with simulated as well as real patient SPECT data were performed to test the proposed algorithm, which demonstrated reliable convergence behaviour in both cases. Comparing the achieved results with available reference data, an overall good agreement for both cold as well as hot activity regions could be observed (mean deviation: -5.98%).

  16. Partial volume correction in SPECT reconstruction with OSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Thomas, Ben; Dickson, John; Hutton, Brian F.

    2011-08-01

    SPECT images suffer from poor spatial resolution, which leads to partial volume effects due to cross-talk between different anatomical regions. By utilising high-resolution structural images (CT or MRI) it is possible to compensate for these effects. Traditional partial volume correction (PVC) methods suffer from various limitations, such as correcting a single region only, returning only regional mean values, or assuming a stationary point spread function (PSF). We recently presented a novel method in which PVC was combined with the reconstruction process in order to take into account the distance dependent PSF in SPECT, which was based on filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction. We now present a new method based on the iterative OSEM algorithm, which has advantageous noise properties compared to FBP. We have applied this method to a series of 10 brain SPECT studies performed on healthy volunteers using the DATSCAN tracer. T1-weighted MRI images were co-registered to the SPECT data and segmented into 33 anatomical regions. The SPECT data were reconstructed using OSEM, and PVC was applied in the projection domain at each iteration. The correction factors were calculated by forward projection of a piece-wise constant image, generated from the segmented MRI. Images were also reconstructed using FBP and standard OSEM with and without resolution recovery (RR) for comparison. The images were evaluated in terms of striatal contrast and regional variability (CoV). The mean striatal contrast obtained with OSEM, OSEM-RR and OSEM-PVC relative to FBP were 1.04, 1.42 and 1.53, respectively, and the mean striatal CoV values are 1.05, 1.53, 1.07. Both OSEM-RR and OSEM-PVC results in images with significantly higher contrast as compared to FBP or OSEM, but OSEM-PVC avoids the increased regional variability of OSEM-RR due to improved structural definition.

  17. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  18. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  19. Anatomical-based Partial Volume Correction for Low-dose Dedicated Cardiac SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect (PVE) has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view (FOV) over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation Geometry Transfer Matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  20. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and (99m)Tc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of (99m)Tc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and (99m)Tc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  1. Activity concentration measurements using a conjugate gradient (Siemens xSPECT) reconstruction algorithm in SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ian S; Hoffmann, Sandra A

    2016-11-01

    The interest in quantitative single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) shows potential in a number of clinical applications and now several vendors are providing software and hardware solutions to allow 'SUV-SPECT' to mirror metrics used in PET imaging. This brief technical report assesses the accuracy of activity concentration measurements using a new algorithm 'xSPECT' from Siemens Healthcare. SPECT/CT data were acquired from a uniform cylinder with 5, 10, 15 and 20 s/projection and NEMA image quality phantom with 25 s/projection. The NEMA phantom had hot spheres filled with an 8 : 1 activity concentration relative to the background compartment. Reconstructions were performed using parameters defined by manufacturer presets available with the algorithm. The accuracy of activity concentration measurements was assessed. A dose calibrator-camera cross-calibration factor (CCF) was derived from the uniform phantom data. In uniform phantom images, a positive bias was observed, ranging from ∼6% in the lower count images to ∼4% in the higher-count images. On the basis of the higher-count data, a CCF of 0.96 was derived. As expected, considerable negative bias was measured in the NEMA spheres using region mean values whereas positive bias was measured in the four largest NEMA spheres. Nonmonotonically increasing recovery curves for the hot spheres suggested the presence of Gibbs edge enhancement from resolution modelling. Sufficiently accurate activity concentration measurements can easily be measured on images reconstructed with the xSPECT algorithm without a CCF. However, the use of a CCF is likely to improve accuracy further. A manual conversion of voxel values into SUV should be possible, provided that the patient weight, injected activity and time between injection and imaging are all known accurately.

  2. Activity concentration measurements using a conjugate gradient (Siemens xSPECT) reconstruction algorithm in SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ian S; Hoffmann, Sandra A

    2016-11-01

    The interest in quantitative single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) shows potential in a number of clinical applications and now several vendors are providing software and hardware solutions to allow 'SUV-SPECT' to mirror metrics used in PET imaging. This brief technical report assesses the accuracy of activity concentration measurements using a new algorithm 'xSPECT' from Siemens Healthcare. SPECT/CT data were acquired from a uniform cylinder with 5, 10, 15 and 20 s/projection and NEMA image quality phantom with 25 s/projection. The NEMA phantom had hot spheres filled with an 8 : 1 activity concentration relative to the background compartment. Reconstructions were performed using parameters defined by manufacturer presets available with the algorithm. The accuracy of activity concentration measurements was assessed. A dose calibrator-camera cross-calibration factor (CCF) was derived from the uniform phantom data. In uniform phantom images, a positive bias was observed, ranging from ∼6% in the lower count images to ∼4% in the higher-count images. On the basis of the higher-count data, a CCF of 0.96 was derived. As expected, considerable negative bias was measured in the NEMA spheres using region mean values whereas positive bias was measured in the four largest NEMA spheres. Nonmonotonically increasing recovery curves for the hot spheres suggested the presence of Gibbs edge enhancement from resolution modelling. Sufficiently accurate activity concentration measurements can easily be measured on images reconstructed with the xSPECT algorithm without a CCF. However, the use of a CCF is likely to improve accuracy further. A manual conversion of voxel values into SUV should be possible, provided that the patient weight, injected activity and time between injection and imaging are all known accurately. PMID:27501436

  3. [Ischemia-reperfusion myocardial injury].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Chávez, Edmundo

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we present some considerations on the myocardial damage due to a deficit of oxygen supply. In fact, this damage properly constitutes a partial diastolic depolarization or injury, i.e., a moderate reduction of the rest transmembrane potential. This phenomenon is characteristic of the acute phase of the myocardial infarction syndrome and is responsible for the main electrical manifestations appearing in this phase: disorders of rhythm and conduction, as well as a reduced contractility of the involved myocardial fibers. All the mentioned phenomena are due to a defect of the myocardial energetic mechanisms, owing to the mitochondrial alterations in myocytes: early reduction of the nicotinamide adenine nucleotides, accumulation of calcium ("calcium overload") into mitochondria, and a drop in oxidative phosphorylation. These changes can present again, more exaggerated, in a following phase of evolution of the myocardial infarction due to myocardial reperfusion. Its severity is related to the duration of the initial ischemia period. Moreover, consequences of the oxidative stress can add producing cellular damage by liberation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidant stress causes also alterations in the mitochondrial DNA, i.e., mutations due to oxidation of nitrogenous bases. During the initial ischemia phase, as well as during reperfusion, metabolic therapy can be very useful as, for example, glucose-insulin-potassium solutions (G-I-K). These could act as scavengers of the free radicals derived from oxygen and avoid or reduce the myocardial damage due to reperfused myocytes. Metabolic drugs, as for example trimetazidine, antioxidants, etc, can also be used in the myocardial reperfusion phase.

  4. Brain SPECT Imaging in Complex Psychiatric Cases: An Evidence-Based, Underutilized Tool

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G; Trujillo, Manuel; Newberg, Andrew; Willeumier, Kristen; Tarzwell, Robert; Wu, Joseph C; Chaitin, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging has developed a substantial, evidence-based foundation and is now recommended by professional societies for numerous indications relevant to psychiatric practice. Unfortunately, SPECT in clinical practice is utilized by only a handful of clinicians. This article presents a rationale for a more widespread use of SPECT in clinical practice for complex cases, and includes seven clinical applications where it may help optimize patient care. PMID:21863144

  5. SPECT and PET serve as molecular imaging techniques and in vivo biomarkers for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-06-03

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed.

  6. SPECT and PET Serve as Molecular Imaging Techniques and in Vivo Biomarkers for Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed. PMID:24897023

  7. 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT for assessment of condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Busch, Jasmin D; Habermann, Christian R

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of condylar hyperplasia diagnosed with 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT. A 21-year-old woman with facial asymmetry was referred for assessment of condylar growth activity. SPECT/CT confirmed condylar hyperactivity, and simultaneous low-dose CT contributed to the diagnosis of hemimandibular hyperplasia. SPECT/CT may become a valuable tool for the diagnosis and comprehensive assessment of condylar hyperplasia, providing both functional and morphological information. PMID:23242067

  8. Design and simulation of a high-resolution stationary SPECT system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Freek J.; Vastenhouw, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Exciting new SPECT systems can be created by combining pinhole imaging with compact high-resolution gamma cameras. These new systems are able to solve the problem of the limited sensitivity-resolution trade-off that hampers contemporary small animal SPECT. The design presented here (U-SPECT-III) uses a set of detectors placed in a polygonal configuration and a cylindrical collimator that contains 135 pinholes arranged in nine rings. Each ring contains 15 gold pinhole apertures that focus on the centre of the cylinder. A non-overlapping projection is acquired via each pinhole. Consequently, when a mouse brain is placed in the central field-of-view, each voxel in the cerebrum can be observed via 130 to 135 different pinholes simultaneously. A method for high-resolution scintillation detection is described that eliminates the depth-of-interaction problem encountered with pinhole cameras, and is expected to provide intrinsic detector resolutions better than 150 µm. By means of simulations U-SPECT-III is compared to a simulated dual pinhole SPECT (DP-SPECT) system with a pixelated array consisting of 2.0 × 2.0 mm NaI crystals. Analytic calculations indicate that the proposed U-SPECT-III system yields an almost four times higher linear and about sixty times higher volumetric system resolution than DP-SPECT, when the systems are compared at matching system sensitivity. In addition, it should be possible to achieve a 15 up to 30 times higher sensitivity with U-SPECT-III when the systems are compared at equal resolution. Simulated images of a digital mouse-brain phantom show much more detail with U-SPECT-III than with DP-SPECT. In a resolution phantom, 0.3 mm diameter cold rods are clearly visible with U-SPECT-III, whereas with DP-SPECT the smallest visible rods are about 0.6-0.8 mm. Furthermore, with U-SPECT-III, the image deformations outside the central plane of reconstruction that hamper conventional pinhole SPECT are strongly suppressed. Simulation results indicate

  9. Potential value of serial cerebral SPECT scanning in the evaluation of psychiatric illness

    SciTech Connect

    Notardonato, H.; Gonzalez-Avilez, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; O'Connell, R.A.; Yudd, A.P.

    1989-05-01

    Cerebral SPECT imaging has the potential to make an important contribution to clinical psychiatry. Cerebral SPECT scanning, stimulated by the work with PET, is readily available and much less expensive than PET. This paper reports a case demonstrating the potential value of cerebral SPECT scanning with I-123 IMP, specifically in the serial evaluation of a schizophrenic patient with auditory hallucinations. The initial scan revealed focal areas of increased uptake in the caudate nuclei of the basal ganglia, and in the right temporal lobe. After pharmacological treatment with clinical improvement, the follow-up SPECT scan demonstrated significant improvement in the distribution of the radiopharmaceutical.

  10. Positron Emission Tomography for the Assessment of Myocardial Viability

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    ventricular (LV) viability is, therefore, critical in deciding whether a patient with coronary artery disease and severe LV dysfunction should undergo revascularization, receive a heart transplant, or remain on medical therapy. Assessment of Left Ventricular Viability Techniques for assessing myocardial viability depend on the measurement of a specific characteristic of viable myocytes such as cell membrane integrity, preserved metabolism, mitochondria integrity, and preserved contractile reserve. In Ontario, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioactive 201thallium is the most commonly used technique followed by dobutamine echocardiography. Newer techniques include SPECT using technetium tracers, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and PET, the subject of this review. Positron Emission Tomography PET is a nuclear imaging technique based on the metabolism of radioactive analogs of normal substrates such as glucose and water. The radiopharmaceutical used most frequently in myocardial viability assessment is F18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a glucose analog. The procedure involves the intravenous administration of FDG under controlled glycemic conditions, and imaging with a PET scanner. The images are reconstructed using computer software and analyzed visually or semi-quantitatively, often in conjunction with perfusion images. Dysfunctional but stunned myocardium is characterized by normal perfusion and normal FDG uptake; hibernating myocardium exhibits reduced perfusion and normal/enhanced FDG uptake (perfusion/metabolism mismatch), whereas scar tissue is characterized by reduction in both perfusion and FDG uptake (perfusion/metabolism match). Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used a search strategy similar to that used in the 2001 ICES review to identify English language reports of health technology assessments and primary studies in selected databases, published from January 1, 2001 to April 20, 2005. Patients of interest were those with

  11. Recent advances in cardiac SPECT instrumentation and system design.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in clinical cardiac SPECT instrumentation are reviewed from a systems perspective. New hardware technologies include pixelated scintillator and semiconductor detector elements; photodetectors such as position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), avalanche photodiodes (APD) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM); and novel cardiac collimation methods. There are new approaches for positioning detectors and controlling their motion during cardiac imaging. Software technology advances include iterative image reconstruction with modeling of Poisson statistics and depth-dependent collimator response. These new technologies enable faster acquisitions, the lowering of administered activity and radiation dose, and improved image resolution. Higher sensitivity collimators are a significant factor enabling faster acquisitions. Several clinical systems incorporating new technologies are discussed and different system designs can achieve similar performance. With detector elements such as APDs, SiPMs and semiconductors that are insensitive to magnetic fields, the potential for cardiac SPECT imagers that are MRI compatible opens up new frontiers in clinical cardiac research and patient care. PMID:23832650

  12. High-order total variation minimization for interior SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiansheng; Yu, Hengyong; Jiang, Ming; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed an approach for solving the computed tomography (CT) interior problem based on the high-order TV (HOT) minimization, assuming that a region-of-interest (ROI) is piecewise polynomial. In this paper, we generalize this finding from the CT field to the single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) field, and prove that if an ROI is piecewise polynomial, then the ROI can be uniquely reconstructed from the SPECT projection data associated with the ROI through the HOT minimization. Also, we propose a new formulation of HOT, which has an explicit formula for any n-order piecewise polynomial function, while the original formulation has no explicit formula for n ≥ 2. Finally, we verify our theoretical results in numerical simulation, and discuss relevant issues. PMID:22215932

  13. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  14. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  15. Bone Scintigraphy SPECT/CT Evaluation of Mandibular Condylar Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyun; Reed, Tameron; Longino, Becky H

    2016-03-01

    Mandibular condylar hyperplasia (CH) is a complex developmental deformity resulting in asymmetries of the hyperplastic condyle. Bone scan SPECT is a sensitive and accurate method of detecting the growth activity of this disorder. This method can be used to quantitate the radionuclide uptake differences between the left and right condyles. Uptake differences of 10% or more between the left and right condyles, with increased uptake ipsilateral to the CH, are considered to be evidence of active growing CH. Quantitative assessment of CH is important to select an appropriate treatment course. Degenerative arthropathies of the temporomandibular joints may result in altered uptake, but this is mostly associated with the side contralateral to the CH. The CT portion of SPECT/CT is useful to assess the condylar dimensions and underlying bony changes. PMID:26111714

  16. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lee, B. Kross, D. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, M.S. Smith

    2012-02-01

    Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  17. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Smith, M F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  18. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency revealed by xenon-133 inhalation SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Delecluse, F.; Voordecker, P.; Raftopoulos, C.

    1989-07-01

    A study of cerebral and cerebellar blood flow reactivity to acetazolamide by xenon-133-inhalation single photon emission computed tomography (/sup 133/Xe SPECT) was carried out in a patient with bouts of transient basilar ischemia, whose neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, and auditory evoked potentials were normal. Though the patient was symptom-free at the time of the study, /sup 133/Xe SPECT demonstrated vertebrobasilar insufficiency by showing an impaired vasodilatory response in both the occipital lobes and the right cerebellar hemisphere. Three weeks later, the patient suffered an extensive stroke in these same areas. We therefore suggest that this method could be of great value in the assessment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

  19. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  20. Comparison of volume study by left ventriculography and gated SPECT in endoventricular circular patchplasty.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiromichi; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Tsutsumi, Yasushi; Kawai, Takahiro; Iino, Kenji; Onaka, Masateru

    2005-01-01

    Although quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) is widely used for left ventricular (LV) volume study, its accuracy is not established for those who have a large myocardial infarction scar or who had endoventricular circular patch plasty (EVCPP). Therefore, we compared LV volumes and LVEF calculated by QGS and those calculated by left ventriculography (LVG) before and after EVCPP. Sixteen patients (13 men and 3 women, mean age 67 +/- 9.5 years) were treated with EVCPP for postinfarction LV dyskinetic and/or akinetic scar. All patients were evaluated with both QGS and LVG before and after surgery. QGS was performed using eight frames per cardiac cycle, 1 hour after 740 MBq (99 m)Tc-tetrofosimin was administered. LVG images were acquired at a frame rate of 30 frames per second in the right anterior oblique 30-degree projection. We compared LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) between QGS and LVG. There was an excellent linear correlation between QGS and LVG in LVEDV (preoperative; r = 0.87, postoperative; r = 0.94), LVESV (preoperative; r = 0.95, postoperative; r = 0.89), and LVEF (preoperative; r = 0.73, postoperative; r = 0.81) before and after EVCPP. However, both preoperative LV volumes and postoperative LVEF calculated from QGS gave a smaller value than those calculated from LVG. Postoperative volume data by QGS was much close to LVG. The present study indicated that volume study by QGS is very useful to evaluate the LV function after EVCPP. However, we should pay attention to those facts. PMID:15985130

  1. Os trigonum syndrome on bone SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianmin; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-08-01

    A 16-year-old female athlete presented with increased pain in the distal left lower extremity. A possible stress fracture or shin splint of the left tibia was first considered. A 3-phase bone scintigraphy showed a very small focus of increased activity in the posterior left foot. A diagnosis of os trigonum syndrome was made after SPECT/CT images pinpointed the activity at the left os trigonum.

  2. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Evaluating low pass filters on SPECT reconstructed cardiac orientation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar

    2009-02-01

    Low pass filters can affect the quality of clinical SPECT images by smoothing. Appropriate filter and parameter selection leads to optimum smoothing that leads to a better quantification followed by correct diagnosis and accurate interpretation by the physician. This study aims at evaluating the low pass filters on SPECT reconstruction algorithms. Criteria for evaluating the filters are estimating the SPECT reconstructed cardiac azimuth and elevation angle. Low pass filters studied are butterworth, gaussian, hamming, hanning and parzen. Experiments are conducted using three reconstruction algorithms, FBP (filtered back projection), MLEM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subsets expectation maximization), on four gated cardiac patient projections (two patients with stress and rest projections). Each filter is applied with varying cutoff and order for each reconstruction algorithm (only butterworth used for MLEM and OSEM). The azimuth and elevation angles are calculated from the reconstructed volume and the variation observed in the angles with varying filter parameters is reported. Our results demonstrate that behavior of hamming, hanning and parzen filter (used with FBP) with varying cutoff is similar for all the datasets. Butterworth filter (cutoff > 0.4) behaves in a similar fashion for all the datasets using all the algorithms whereas with OSEM for a cutoff < 0.4, it fails to generate cardiac orientation due to oversmoothing, and gives an unstable response with FBP and MLEM. This study on evaluating effect of low pass filter cutoff and order on cardiac orientation using three different reconstruction algorithms provides an interesting insight into optimal selection of filter parameters.

  4. Adaptive Autoregressive Model for Reduction of Noise in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Takalo, Reijo; Hytti, Heli; Ihalainen, Heimo; Sohlberg, Antti

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents improved autoregressive modelling (AR) to reduce noise in SPECT images. An AR filter was applied to prefilter projection images and postfilter ordered subset expectation maximisation (OSEM) reconstruction images (AR-OSEM-AR method). The performance of this method was compared with filtered back projection (FBP) preceded by Butterworth filtering (BW-FBP method) and the OSEM reconstruction method followed by Butterworth filtering (OSEM-BW method). A mathematical cylinder phantom was used for the study. It consisted of hot and cold objects. The tests were performed using three simulated SPECT datasets. Image quality was assessed by means of the percentage contrast resolution (CR%) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread functions of the cylinders. The BW-FBP method showed the highest CR% values and the AR-OSEM-AR method gave the lowest CR% values for cold stacks. In the analysis of hot stacks, the BW-FBP method had higher CR% values than the OSEM-BW method. The BW-FBP method exhibited the lowest FWHM values for cold stacks and the AR-OSEM-AR method for hot stacks. In conclusion, the AR-OSEM-AR method is a feasible way to remove noise from SPECT images. It has good spatial resolution for hot objects.

  5. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  6. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  7. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  8. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  9. MYOCARDIAL AKT: THE OMNIPRESENT NEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Mark A.; Völkers, Mirko; Fischer, Kimberlee; Bailey, Brandi; Cottage, Christopher T.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Avitabile, Daniele; Alvarez, Roberto; Sundararaman, Balaji; Quijada, Pearl; Mason, Matt; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Malhowski, Amy; Cheng, Zhaokang; Khan, Mohsin; McGregor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest examples of integrated signal transduction is revealed by examination of effects mediated by AKT kinase in myocardial biology. Positioned at the intersection of multiple afferent and efferent signals, AKT exemplifies a molecular sensing node that coordinates dynamic responses of the cell in literally every aspect of biological responses. The balanced and nuanced nature of homeostatic signaling is particularly essential within the myocardial context, where regulation of survival, energy production, contractility, and response to pathological stress all flow through the nexus of AKT activation or repression. Equally important, the loss of regulated AKT activity is primarily the cause or consequence of pathological conditions leading to remodeling of the heart and eventual decompensation. This review presents an overview compendium of the complex world of myocardial AKT biology gleaned from more than a decade of research. Summarization of the widespread influence that AKT exerts upon myocardial responses leaves no doubt that the participation of AKT in molecular signaling will need to be reckoned with as a seemingly omnipresent regulator of myocardial molecular biological responses. PMID:21742795

  10. A Investigation of Partially Extracted Tracers Used to Determine Myocardial Blood Flow with PET.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Bradley Thomas

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provides the ability to quantitatively measure mass-specific blood flow to myocardial tissue (ml/min/g tissue). The partially extracted tracers ^{62}Cu -PTSM and two single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) agents, teboroxime and sestamibi were studied. The latter two demonstrate the effectiveness of PET as a pharmacological tool for SPECT perfusion tracer development. The characteristics of these tracers were compared to commonly used partially extracted tracers ^{13}rm NH_3 and ^{82} Rb. Positron emitting ^{rm 94m}Tc was used to label ligands originally developed for ^{rm 99m} Tc labeling. ^{rm 94m }Tc can be produced by the bombardment of a natural molybdenum foil with an 11Mev proton beam, via the ^{94}rm Mo(p,n)^ {94m}Tc reaction. The production of ^{rm94m}Tc is accompanied by ^{92}Tc, ^ {94}Tc, ^{95} Tc, ^{rm 95m}Tc, ^{96}Tc, and ^{rm 99m}Tc due to the isotopic mixture of natural Mo. The presence of these radionuclidic impurities increase the radiation dose received by the patient and radio chemist. The elimination of these impurities was achieved by irradiating an isotopically enriched target material, ^{94}rm MoO_3. The ability to reclaim the enriched target is essential due to the high cost of the material. Recovery was accomplished by a solvent extraction technique yielding an activity recovery of 80% and target material recovery of 95%. Preliminary data was measured for the myocardial perfusion tracer ^{62}Cu -PTSM. It was found that the uptake of ^ {62}Cu-PTSM is linear for resting flows but a high degree of variability is observed at stress induced flows. This same result was found in the human studies when compared to ^{13} rm NH_3 measured myocardial perfusion values. The dynamic analysis of multiple tracers in the sequence of protocols: (1) acute canine prep ( ^{11}rm CO, ^{82 }Rb, ^{62}Cu-PTSM, ^{13}rm NH_3, ^{94m,99m}Tc-BATO, H_2 ^{14}rm O, ^{18 }FCH_3), (2) chronic canine prep ( ^{82}rm Rb, ^{13 }NH_3

  11. How reliable is myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Willerson, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial scintigraphic techniques available presently allow a sensitive and relatively specific diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction when they are used correctly, although every technique has definite limitations. Small myocardial infarcts (less than 3 gm.) may be missed, and there are temporal limitations in the usefulness of the scintigraphic techniques. The development of tomographic methodology that may be used with single-photon radionuclide emitters (including technetium and /sup 201/Tl will allow the detection of relatively small abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and regions of myocardial infarction and will help to provide a more objective interpretation of the myocardial scintigrams. The use of overlay techniques allowing simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion, infarct-avid imaging, and radionuclide ventriculograms will provide insight into the relevant aspects of the extent of myocardial damage, the relationship of damage to myocardial perfusion, and the functional impact of myocardial infarction on ventricular performance.

  12. Myocardial contusion caused by a baseball.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, M; Hirose, K; Mori, T; Kusukawa, J; Tomioka, N; Watanabe, Y

    1996-10-01

    Myocardial contusion is a rare type of sports injury. We report a case of myocardial contusion caused by a baseball. In this patient, arrhythmias were induced by an exercise test 1 week after injury. That patients with myocardial contusion but without arrhythmias at rest need to be treated carefully is emphasized.

  13. Dual isotope thallium and indium antimyosin SPECT imaging to identify acute infarct patients at further ischemic risk

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Keller, A.M.; Wall, R.M.; Bhatia, K.; Bingham, C.O. III; Tresgallo, M.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients (28 men and 14 women) with acute myocardial infarction (35 Q, seven non-Q wave) were injected with 2.0 mCi indium 111-labeled antimyosin (AM) monoclonal antibody (111In AM) within 48 hours of the onset of chest pain. Forty-eight hours later (72-96 hours after onset of chest pain), patients were injected with 2.2 mCi thallium 201, and two sets of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained simultaneously using dual energy windows set for the 247 keV indium photopeak and the 70 keV thallium peak. Seventeen patients had repeat scans at 4 hours. 111In AM uptake and 201Tl defects were localized to one or more of 24 coronal and sagittal segments. Scans with only 201Tl defects and corresponding 111In AM uptake were classified as matches; scans with unmatched 201Tl defects in addition to matching regions corresponding to electrocardiographic infarct location were classified as mismatches; and scans with 201Tl and 111In AM uptake in the same segments were classified as overlap. Scan patterns were correlated with clinical evidence for residual ischemia occurring within 6 weeks of infarct and including infarct extension, recurrent angina, and positive predischarge low-level or 6-week symptom-limited stress tests and with coronary anatomy. Fourteen patients had only matching patterns (group 1), 23 had mismatches (group 2), and five had 201Tl-111In overlap as the predominant pattern. None of the patients in group 1 had previous myocardial infarction; in each, the matched area corresponded to the Q wave location on electrocardiogram, and none had further in-hospital ischemic events or positive stress tests.

  14. Use of bio-informatics assessment schema (BIAS) to improve diagnosis and prognosis of myocardial perfusion data: results from the NHLBI-sponsored women’s ischemia syndrome evaluation (WISE)

    PubMed Central

    Pohost, Gerald M.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel; Shaw, Leslee J.; Sopko, George; Rogers, William J.; Sharaf, Barry L.; Pepine, Carl J.; Thompson, Diane V.; Rayarao, Geetha; Tauxe, Lindsey; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background We introduce an algorithmic approach to optimize diagnostic and prognostic value of gated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance (MR) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) modalities in women with suspected myocardial ischemia. The novel approach: bio-informatics assessment schema (BIAS) forms a mathematical model utilizing MPI data and cardiac metrics generated by one modality to predict the MPI status of another modality. The model identifies cardiac features that either enhance or mask the image-based evidence of ischemia. For each patient, the BIAS model value is used to set an appropriate threshold for the detection of ischemia. Methods Women (n=130), with symptoms and signs of suspected myocardial ischemia, underwent MPI assessment for regional perfusion defects using two different modalities: gated SPECT and MR. To determine perfusion status, MR data were evaluated qualitatively (MRIQL) and semi-quantitatively (MRISQ) while SPECT data were evaluated using conventional clinical criteria. Evaluators were masked to results of the alternate modality. These MPI status readings were designated “original”. Two regression models designated “BIAS” models were generated to model MPI status obtained with one modality (e.g., MRI) compared with a second modality (e.g., SPECT), but importantly, the BIAS models did not include the primary Original MPI reading of the predicting modality. Instead, the BIAS models included auxiliary measurements like left ventricular chamber volumes and myocardial wall thickness. For each modality, the BIAS model was used to set a progressive threshold for interpretation of MPI status. Women were then followed for 38±14 months for the development of a first major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE: CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) or hospitalization for heart failure]. Original and BIAS-augmented perfusion status were compared in their ability to detect coronary artery

  15. Morphological aspects of myocardial bridges.

    PubMed

    Lujinović, Almira; Kulenović, Amela; Kapur, Eldan; Gojak, Refet

    2013-11-01

    Although some myocardial bridges can be asymptomatic, their presence often causes coronary disease either through direct compression of the "tunnel" segment or through stimulation and accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the segment proximally to the myocardial bridge. The studied material contained 30 human hearts received from the Department of Anatomy. The hearts were preserved 3 to 5 days in 10% formalin solution. Thereafter, the fatty tissue was removed and arterial blood vessels prepared by careful dissection with special reference to the presence of the myocardial bridges. Length and thickness of the bridges were measured by the precise electronic caliper. The angle between the myocardial bridge fibre axis and other axis of the crossed blood vessel was measured by a goniometer. The presence of the bridges was confirmed in 53.33% of the researched material, most frequently (43.33%) above the anterior interventricular branch. The mean length of the bridges was 14.64 ± 9.03 mm and the mean thickness was 1.23 ± 1.32 mm. Myocardial bridge fibres pass over the descending blood vessel at the angle of 10-90 degrees. The results obtained on a limited sample suggest that the muscular index of myocardial bridge is the highest for bridges located on RIA, but that the difference is not significant in relation to bridges located on other branches. The results obtained suggest that bridges located on other branches, not only those on RIA, could have a great contractive power and, consequently, a great compressive force, which would be exerted on the wall of a crossed blood vessel.

  16. The Proton Spectrum in Neutron Beta Decay: Latest Results with the aSPECT Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Baeßler, S.; Borg, M.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konorov, I.; Leung, K. K. H.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Y.; Soldner, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Zimmer, O.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT is to determine the antineutrino electron angular correlation coefficient a with high precision. Latest measurements with aSPECT were performed during April/May 2008 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. In this paper we give a report on the experiment and the status of the ongoing data analysis.

  17. Distinction between hemangioma of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma: value of labeled RBC-SPECT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, M.; Ikekubo, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Ibuki, Y.; Hino, M.; Tomita, S.; Komori, H.; Orino, A.; Todo, A.

    1989-05-01

    The role of adding single-photon emission CT (SPECT) to /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC imaging of the liver was evaluated by specifically focusing on the differentiation between hepatic hemangioma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Planar RBC imaging followed by blood-pool SPECT scanning was performed in 77 patients with a total of 108 hemangiomas and in 29 patients with a total of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas. All lesions were smaller than 5 cm in diameter. Thirty-six (33%) of 108 hemangiomas were detected by planar delayed RBC imaging, whereas 63 (58%) were detected by the delayed RBC-SPECT scan. The smallest hemangioma shown by delayed RBC-SPECT scanning was 1.4 cm in diameter, compared with 1.7 cm by planar RBC scanning. When confined to nodules larger than 1.4 cm in diameter, 42% of hemangiomas (36/85) were detected by planar delayed RBC imaging, whereas 74% (63/85) were detected by delayed RBC-SPECT. Increase in sensitivity was noted in nodules 2.1-4.0 cm in diameter. No hepatocellular carcinomas were shown by delayed RBC planar or SPECT scans. We concluded that with the addition of SPECT, the sensitivity of delayed RBC scans in the detection of small hemangiomas is considerably improved. Delayed RBC-SPECT scanning can be used to distinguish hemangioma from hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Attenuation Correction by External CT in a Semiconductor SPECT.

    PubMed

    Uchibe, Taku; Miyai, Masahiro; Yata, Nobuhiro; Haramoto, Masuo; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Nakamura, Megumi; Kitagaki, Hajime; Takahashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of NM530c with a cadmium-zinc-telluride detector (CdZnTe-SPECT) is superior to the conventional Anger-type SPECT with a sodium-iodide detector (NaI-SPECT) in terms of sensitivity and spatial resolution. However, in the clinical example, even in CdZnTe-SPECT, a count decrease in myocardium due to the attenuation of the gamma ray is an issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of computed tomography attenuation correction (CTAC) in CdZnTe-SPECT with the help of external CT. We evaluated the revision effect of uniformity, influence by the difference in attenuation distance, contrast ratio, an uptake rate using the heart phantom. As a result of the phantom studies, a good revision effect was obtained. In the clinical study, there was a statistical significant difference between the contrast ratio before and after CTAC in the inferior wall. In addition, the contrast ratio before and after CTAC in CdZnTe-SPECT image was equal to those of NaI-SPECT image. It was suggested that CTAC using external CT in CdZnTe-SPECT was clinically useful for inferior wall. PMID:27440705

  19. Complexity and accuracy of image registration methods in SPECT-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L. S.; Tang, L.; Hamarneh, G.; Gill, B.; Celler, A.; Shcherbinin, S.; Fua, T. F.; Thompson, A.; Liu, M.; Duzenli, C.; Sheehan, F.; Moiseenko, V.

    2010-01-01

    The use of functional imaging in radiotherapy treatment (RT) planning requires accurate co-registration of functional imaging scans to CT scans. We evaluated six methods of image registration for use in SPECT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods varied in complexity from 3D affine transform based on control points to diffeomorphic demons and level set non-rigid registration. Ten lung cancer patients underwent perfusion SPECT-scans prior to their radiotherapy. CT images from a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner were registered to a planning CT, and then the same transformation was applied to the SPECT images. According to registration evaluation measures computed based on the intensity difference between the registered CT images or based on target registration error, non-rigid registrations provided a higher degree of accuracy than rigid methods. However, due to the irregularities in some of the obtained deformation fields, warping the SPECT using these fields may result in unacceptable changes to the SPECT intensity distribution that would preclude use in RT planning. Moreover, the differences between intensity histograms in the original and registered SPECT image sets were the largest for diffeomorphic demons and level set methods. In conclusion, the use of intensity-based validation measures alone is not sufficient for SPECT/CT registration for RTTP. It was also found that the proper evaluation of image registration requires the use of several accuracy metrics.

  20. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  1. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons.

  2. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  3. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  4. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D

    2006-08-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to < or = 22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms

  5. Experimental studies of SPECT scintimammography with combined cone-beam and parallel-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Gangal, K. R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Salgado, Roberto B.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2003-05-01

    Conventional SPECT Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography (STSM) has limited clinical utility due to fairly low radiopharmaceutical uptake in the breast tissue as compared to the heart and the liver. We investigated the use of a cone-beam collimator (CBC) to STSM. Each detector on a multi-headed gamma camera can be equipped with parallel-beam (PBC) or cone-beam collimators (CBC). PBC can provide truncation-free SPECT projection sets, while CBC offers increased sensitivity in a limited field-of-view (FOV). Combined PBC and CBC SPECT ddata acquisition may provide improved lesion contrast and overall better imaging performance within CBC FOV with significantly reduced truncation artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper we evaluate the combined CBC&PBC SPECT method using a limited number of confirmed breast cancer patients and female chest phantoms with simulated breast lesions. We envision the combined CBC&PBC SPECT as a useful clinical tool in scintimammography.

  6. 3D scintigraphic imaging and navigation in radioguided surgery: freehand SPECT technology and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Matthies, Philipp; Herrmann, Ken; Povoski, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) is a technology platform for providing 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for radioguided surgical procedures, such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy (SLNB). In addition to the information provided by conventional handheld gamma detection probes, fhSPECT allows for direct visualization of the distribution of radioactivity in any given region of interest, allowing for improved navigation to radioactive target lesions and providing accurate lesion depth measurements. Herein, we will review the currently available clinical data on the use of fhSPECT: (i) for SLNB of various malignancies, including difficult-to-detect SLNs, and (ii) for radioguided localization of solid tumors. Moreover, the combination of fhSPECT with other technologies (e.g., small field-of-view gamma cameras, and diagnostic ultrasound) is discussed. These technical advances have the potential to greatly expand the clinical application of radioguided surgery in the future. PMID:26878667

  7. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  8. Design and performance evaluation of a 20-aperture multipinhole collimator for myocardial perfusion imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Jason D.; Huang, Qiu; Ellin, Justin R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Shrestha, Uttam; Gullberg, Grant T.; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging remains a critical tool in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, after more than three decades of use, photon detection efficiency remains poor and unchanged. This is due to the continued reliance on parallel-hole collimators first introduced in 1964. These collimators possess poor geometric efficiency. Here we present the performance evaluation results of a newly designed multipinhole collimator with 20 pinhole apertures (PH20) for commercial SPECT systems. Computer simulations and numerical observer studies were used to assess the noise, bias and diagnostic imaging performance of a PH20 collimator in comparison with those of a low energy high resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimator. Ray-driven projector/backprojector pairs were used to model SPECT imaging acquisitions, including simulation of noiseless projection data and performing MLEM/OSEM image reconstructions. Poisson noise was added to noiseless projections for realistic projection data. Noise and bias performance were investigated for five mathematical cardiac and torso (MCAT) phantom anatomies imaged at two gantry orbit positions (19.5 and 25.0 cm). PH20 and LEHR images were reconstructed with 300 MLEM iterations and 30 OSEM iterations (ten subsets), respectively. Diagnostic imaging performance was assessed by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis performed on a single MCAT phantom; however, in this case PH20 images were reconstructed with 75 pixel-based OSEM iterations (four subsets). Four PH20 projection views from two positions of a dual-head camera acquisition and 60 LEHR projections were simulated for all studies. At uniformly-imposed resolution of 12.5 mm, significant improvements in SNR and diagnostic sensitivity (represented by the area under the ROC curve, or AUC) were realized when PH20 collimators are substituted for LEHR parallel-hole collimators. SNR improves by factors of 1

  9. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT-CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Difilippo, Frank P

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  10. Myocardial revascularization in Jehovah Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Seifert, P E; Auer, J E; Hohensee, P

    1989-04-01

    The refusal of certain patients to accept blood transfusions need not be a deterrent to surgery. We report on nine Jehovah's Witnesses who over a one-year period underwent myocardial revascularization without significant blood loss or decrease in hematocrit values. PMID:2786287

  11. [Myocardial infarction in young population].

    PubMed

    Shklovskii, B L; Prokhorchik, A A; Koltunov, A N; Lishchuk, A N; Ryzhman, N N; Ivanov, A V; Navaznov, V V; Baksheev, V I

    2015-03-01

    Description of clinical observation and literature review. Myocardial infarction in patients younger than 45 years is rare, but it is an important clinical, organizational and psychological problem. A case of myocardial infarction in 19-years old patient, who suffered since 6 years from kidney disease, is described. Transmural left-ventricular myocardial infarction has developed on the background of chronic glomerulonephritis, excessive exercise, and traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Coronary venous bypass with the benefit-pleasing outcome is performed. When analysing the literature, the authors emphasize that in comparison with elderly patients, young people have different profiles of risk factors, clinical manfestations and prognosis of myocardial infarction. It is emphasized that kidney chronic disease, regardless the stage, worsen short-term and long-term outcomes of cardiovascular disease. Early stabilization is possible under the condition of risk stratification and-early revascularization, which leads to better clinical outcomes. Particular attention should be given to a comprehensive assessment, it prognostic criteria, risk factor modification, secondary prevention of major and associated diseases, clinical- and -dynamic observation, including patients with asymptomatic course of the disease.

  12. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  13. Myocardial infarction following sternal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, R. K.; Morrison, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of myocardial infarction in a 32-year-old man undergoing sternal surgery. Thrombotic occlusion of the right coronary artery with no underlying atheromatous disease was demonstrated angiographically and successfully treated with intracoronary thrombolysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8796219

  14. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, C. A. J.; Beijst, C.; van Rooij, R.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,-26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated CDR

  15. A new reconstruction strategy for image improvement in pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Kim, Kyeong Min; Teramoto, Noboru; Hayashi, Takuya; Sohlberg, Antti; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2004-08-01

    Pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is able to provide information on the biodistribution of several radioligands in small laboratory animals, but has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. We have hypothesised that this blurring is due to incompleteness of the projection data acquired by a single circular pinhole orbit, and have evaluated a new strategy for accurate image reconstruction with better spatial resolution uniformity. A pinhole SPECT system using two circular orbits and a dedicated three-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximisation (3D-OSEM) reconstruction method were developed. In this system, not the camera but the object rotates, and the two orbits are at 90 degrees and 45 degrees relative to the object's axis. This system satisfies Tuy's condition, and is thus able to provide complete data for 3D pinhole SPECT reconstruction within the whole field of view (FOV). To evaluate this system, a series of experiments was carried out using a multiple-disk phantom filled with 99mTc solution. The feasibility of the proposed method for small animal imaging was tested with a mouse bone study using 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. Feldkamp's filtered back-projection (FBP) method and the 3D-OSEM method were applied to these data sets, and the visual and statistical properties were examined. Axial blurring, which was still visible at the edge of the FOV even after applying the conventional 3D-OSEM instead of FBP for single-orbit data, was not visible after application of 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data. 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data dramatically reduced the resolution non-uniformity and statistical noise, and also demonstrated considerably better image quality in the mouse scan. This system may be of use in quantitative assessment of bio-physiological functions in small animals.

  16. Impact of subcortical white matter lesions on dopamine transporter SPECT.

    PubMed

    Funke, Elisabeth; Kupsch, Andreas; Buchert, Ralph; Brenner, Winfried; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-07-01

    Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) can affect the nigrostriatal system and presumably cause vascular parkinsonism (VP). However, in patients with SAE, the differentiation of VP from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPS) is challenging. The aim of the present study was to examine the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density in patients with parkinsonism and SAE. Fifteen consecutive patients with parkinsonian symptoms displayed SAE, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifteen retrospectively chosen, matched patients with diagnosis of IPS without any abnormalities in MRI served as a reference group. DAT SPECT was performed using the tracer ¹²³I-FP-CIT. Scans were acquired on a triple-head SPECT system (Multispect 3, Siemens) and analysed using the investigator-independent BRASS™ software (HERMES). In the SAE group, a DAT deficit was observed in 9/15 patients. In contrast, all patients from the IPS group showed a reduced DAT binding (p = 0.008). The specific binding ratios (BR) of putamen contralateral to the side of the more affected limb versus occipital lobe were in trend higher in patients with SAE versus patients in the IPS-group (p = 0.053). Indices for putaminal asymmetry (p = 0.036) and asymmetry caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.026) as well as the ratio caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in IPS patients having no SAE. DAT deficit was less pronounced in patients with SAE and parkinsonism than in patients with IPS without any abnormalities in the MRI. A potential role of DAT SPECT in the differential diagnosis of VP and IPS requires more assessments within prospective studies.

  17. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, C. A. J.; Beijst, C.; van Rooij, R.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,‑26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated

  18. Multipinhole collimator with 20 apertures for a brain SPECT application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Ellin, Justin R.; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho; Huang, Qiu; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Several new technologies for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation with parallel-hole collimation have been proposed to improve detector sensitivity and signal collection efficiency. Benefits from improved signal efficiency include shorter acquisition times and lower dose requirements. In this paper, the authors show a possibility of over an order of magnitude enhancement in photon detection efficiency (from 7.6 × 10{sup −5} to 1.6 × 10{sup −3}) for dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging of the striatum over the conventional SPECT parallel-hole collimators by use of custom-designed 20 multipinhole (20-MPH) collimators with apertures of 0.75 cm diameter. Methods: Quantifying specific binding ratio (SBR) of {sup 123}I-ioflupane or {sup 123}I-iometopane’s signal at the striatal region is a common brain imaging method to confirm the diagnosis of the Parkinson’s disease. The authors performed imaging of a striatal phantom filled with aqueous solution of I-123 and compared camera recovery ratios of SBR acquired between low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimators and 20-MPH collimators. Results: With only two-thirds of total acquisition time (20 min against 30 min), a comparable camera recovery ratio of SBR was achieved using 20-MPH collimators in comparison to that from the LEHR collimator study. Conclusions: Their systematic analyses showed that the 20-MPH collimator could be a promising alternative for the DaT SPECT imaging for brain over the traditional LEHR collimator, which could give both shorter scan time and improved diagnostic accuracy.

  19. Design of multipinhole collimators for small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Smith; Steve Meikle; Stanislaw Majewski; Andrew Weisenberger

    2003-10-01

    High resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of small animals with pinhole collimators is hampered by poor sensitivity. For the target application of imaging the brain of an unanesthetized, unrestrained mouse, the design of multipinhole collimators for small, compact gamma cameras was studied using numerical simulations. The collimators were designed to image the mouse at different axial positions inside a tube aligned with the axis of rotation (AOR) of the SPECT system. The proposed system consisted of a 10 cm/spl times/20 cm pixelated detector with 2 cm from the AOR to the collimator mask and a focal length of 7 cm for a magnification of 3.5 on the AOR. A digital mouse phantom was created with a brain:background activity concentration ratio of 8:1. The brain region contained small disks and hot and cool cylinders for contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) quantitation. SPECT projection data were simulated at 120 angles for four pinhole masks having 1, 5 and two arrangements of 13 pinholes. Projections were scaled to model a 30 min study with doses of 0.3, 1 and 3 mCi in the mouse. Images were reconstructed with an iterative ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm. The peak SNR improved with multipinhole collimation compared with single pinhole imaging when there was no increased activity in the liver or bladder. With such activity, peak SNR was about the same for all collimators. For all cases peak SNR occurred at higher contrast values with multipinhole collimation. The extended axial range of multipinhole arrays enabled the mouse brain to be imaged with decreased axial blurring when the mouse was translated axially. These results suggest that mouse brains can be successfully imaged at realistic activity levels with multipinhole arrays and projection data multiplexing.

  20. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  1. Myocardial disarray. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, A E; Caruso, G

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial disarray or disorganisation is at present a contentious topic, not least because its value as a clinical marker for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has changed considerably over the years. Initially observed as one of the features of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, disarray has since been promoted as its pathognomonic histological feature, regarded by some observers as the morphological manifestation of a genetically transmitted myocardial defect. Recently, however, it has become evident that myocardial disarray is not limited to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but is encountered in hearts with both congenital and acquired conditions, and is also observed in normal hearts. The specificity of disarray for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is thus seriously questioned. Latterly, it has been suggested that disarray, judged from through-and-through sections of the ventricular midseptum is a highly specific and sensitive marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when considered in quantitative rather than qualitative fashion. The present study sets out to answer the question whether disarray could be the histological expression of the normal but intricate fibre architecture of the heart, a consideration also initiated by debatable definitions of normality and abnormality of myocardial histology. Gross fibre dissections in five normal hearts showed that many sites occurred in which disarray was a natural phenomenon. In five more hearts it was found that the plane of section of a tissue block might profoundly influence the histology. In fact, tissue cubicles sampled from different faces showed a change in histology in the vast majority. Thus the diagnostic significance of myocardial disarray as a marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the clinical setting almost vanishes; a change in orientation of a tissue section may actually turn "normality" into "disarray". Images PMID:7044398

  2. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Geza S

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  3. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  4. Robin Hood caught in Wonderland: brain SPECT findings.

    PubMed

    Morland, David; Wolff, Valérie; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Marescaux, Christian; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2013-12-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old woman presenting several episodes of body image distortions, ground deformation illusions, and problems assessing distance in the orthostatic position corresponding to the Alice in Wonderland syndrome. No symptoms were reported when sitting or lying down. She had uncontrolled hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and a history of head trauma. Her condition had been diagnosed with left internal carotid artery dissection 2 years earlier. Brain SPECT with 99mTc-ECD performed after i.v. injection of the radiotracer in supine and in standing positions showed hypoperfusion in the healthy contralateral frontoparietal operculum (Robin Hood syndrome), deteriorating when standing up. PMID:24152648

  5. Hybrid SPECT/CT evaluation of Marine-Lenhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan Balasubramanian; Preethi, Govindababu Rajalakshmi; Chungath, Biju Baby

    2013-02-01

    Marine-Lenhart syndrome has been described as a variant of Graves disease with the following criteria: (1) the thyroid scan shows an enlarged gland and 1 or 2 poorly functioning nodules; (2) the nodule is TSH dependent and the paranodular tissue is TSH independent; (3) after endogenous or exogenous TSH stimulation, the return of function in the nodule can be demonstrated; and (4) the nodule is histologically benign. We report a 57-year-old woman with Marine-Lenhart syndrome evaluated with technetium scanning and hybrid SPECT/CT. PMID:23334146

  6. Image presentation and normal SPECT rCBF

    SciTech Connect

    Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1991-12-31

    The appearance of images of normal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is influenced by several factors, including (1) the environmental conditions at the time of administration of the radiotracer, (2) the characteristics of the subject (eg. age, gender, and handedness), (3) the format used for image presentation, (4) the quality of the tomographic device, (5) the choices of image-processing techniques, and (6) the radiopharmaceutical used. The first three of these topics are briefly reviewed here; topics 4, 5 and 6 are reviewed by others in this workshop summary. 27 refs.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  8. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology.

  9. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology. PMID:27237438

  10. Myocardial viability in patients with chronic coronary artery disease and previous myocardial infarction: comparison of myocardial contrast echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S; Kaul, S; Powers, E R; Camarano, G; Gimple, L W; Ragosta, M

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare perfusion patterns on myocardial contrast echocardiography with those on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for the assessment of myocardial viability in patients with previous myocardial infarction. Accordingly, perfusion scores with the two techniques were compared in 91 ventricular regions in 21 patients with previous (>6 weeks old) myocardial infarction. Complete concordance between the two techniques was found in 63 (69%) regions; 25 (27%) regions were discordant by only 1 grade, and complete discordance (2 grades) was found in only 3 (3%) regions. A kappa statistic of 0.65 indicated good concordance between the two techniques. Although the scores on both techniques demonstrated a relation with the wall motion score, the correlation between the myocardial contrast echocardiography and wall motion scores was closer (r = -0.63 vs r = -0.50, p = 0.05). It is concluded that myocardial contrast echocardiography provides similar information regarding myocardial viability as myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with coronary artery disease and previous myocardial infarction.

  11. Structure of the Essential Plasmodium Host Cell Traversal Protein SPECT1

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Ghosh, Partho

    2014-01-01

    Host cell traversal by Plasmodium, the protozoan cause of malaria, is an essential part of this parasite's virulence. In this process, the parasite enters a host cell through a parasite-induced pore, traverses the host cell, and then exits the host cell. Two P. berghei proteins, SPECT1 and SPECT2, are required for host cell traversal by the sporozoite form of the parasite. In the absence of either, no pore formation is observed. While SPECT2 has sequence homology to pore-forming proteins, SPECT1 has no homology to proteins of known structure or function. Here we present the 2.75 Å resolution structure of a slightly truncated version of P. berghei SPECT1. The structure reveals that the protein forms a four-helix bundle, with the rare feature of having all of these helices in parallel or antiparallel alignment. Also notable is the presence of a large, conserved, hydrophobic internal cavity in the protein, which may constitute a ligand-binding site or be indicative of partial instability in SPECT1, or both. The structure of SPECT1 will make possible targeted mutagenesis experiments aimed at understanding its mechanism of action in host cell traversal. PMID:25479287

  12. SPECT with N-isopropyl-p iodoamphetamine in occlusive cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Higa, T; Tanaka, T; Ikekubo, K; Komatsu, T; Torizuka, K

    1986-12-01

    The role of SPECT imaging with N-isopropyl-p iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) in the detection of angiographically documented occlusive cerebrovascular diseases was evaluated in 24 patients, and the results of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were compared with x-ray CT. Twelve patients had internal carotid occlusion, ten had intracranial occlusion beyond the circle of Willis, one had common carotid occlusion, and one had basilar artery occlusion. SPECT images were obtained with a gamma camera, which was rotated 360 degrees around the patient's head 30 minutes after an intravenous injection of 3 mCi of I-123 IMP. CT images in the transverse plane were obtained, and the regions of reduced attenuation were identified for comparison of topographic extension of the lesion with the regions of decreased rCBF seen on SPECT. In six cases, the lesions seen on the SPECT images were distinctly more extensive than those seen on CT. In the remaining 18 cases, the extent of the lesion was identical on both CT and SPECT images. Radiochemical and radionuclide impurities, the distance of the detector from the head, and the nature of the collimator affected the SPECT results. I-123 IMP SPECT imaging complements CT findings in detecting the ischemic zones beyond the regions identified on CT images, and may have a major rule in the management of patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases.

  13. Optimization of detection geometry for industrial SPECT by Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. G.; Kim, C. H.; Han, M. C.; Jung, S. H.; Kim, J. B.; Moon, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed an industrial SPECT to investigate the fluid flow and mixing patterns in columns. It has been found that the industrial SPECT is indeed a very powerful tool to study the hydrodynamics in multiphase reactors. One of the practical issues in the development of industrial SPECTs is to achieve a required imaging resolution of an industrial SPECT with a minimum number of component detectors, the number of which is frequently limited by both the size of the detectors and the total cost of the imaging system. In the present study, a set of different geometries of industrial SPECTs were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX to determine the minimum number of detectors that will provide a spatial resolution that corresponds to 10% of the cylindrical column diameter. Our results show that 11 and 12 detectors will satisfy the 10% resolution requirement for the 40 cm and 60 cm diameter columns, respectively, for the industrial SPECT and radioisotopes considered in the present study. The conclusion of this result is valid only for the case considered in the present study, but we believe that the same procedure can be applied to other industrial SPECTs for this kind of optimization.

  14. Chasing myocardial outcomes: perioperative myocardial infarction and cardiac troponin.

    PubMed

    Royo, Marc B; Fleisher, Lee A

    2016-02-01

    Perioperative myocardial infarction represents the most common cardiovascular complication following non-cardiac surgery, but frequently presents without the usual clinical signs and symptoms consistent with acute coronary syndrome. Given the silent nature of this event, a clinician's reliance on risk stratification tools and cardiac specific biomarkers to assist in the identification of at-risk individuals is heightened in the perioperative setting. Although cardiac troponin elevations following non-cardiac surgery have been consistently linked to increased mortality, uncertainty remains over how to clinically intervene to prevent harm. This decision is further complicated by the increasing sensitivity of the newest generation of cardiac biomarker immunoassays. In this narrative review, the growing body of evidence surrounding cardiac troponin elevations in the perioperative setting, how the evidence has been integrated into recent clinical practice guidelines, and its implications for the detection of perioperative myocardial infarction are discussed. PMID:26634279

  15. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  16. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, James; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  17. Detection of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Gynecologic Tumours by Planar Scintigraphy and SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Otakar; Havel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess the role of planar lymphoscintigraphy and fusion imaging of SPECT/CT in sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in patients with gynecologic tumours. Material and Methods: Planar scintigraphy and hybrid modality SPECT/CT were performed in 64 consecutive women with gynecologic tumours (mean age 53.6 with range 30-77 years): 36 pts with cervical cancer (Group A), 21 pts with endometrial cancer (Group B), 7 pts with vulvar carcinoma (Group C). Planar and SPECT/CT images were interpreted separately by two nuclear medicine physicians. Efficacy of these two techniques to image SLN were compared. Results: Planar scintigraphy did not image SLN in 7 patients (10.9%), SPECT/CT was negative in 4 patients (6.3%). In 35 (54.7%) patients the number of SLNs captured on SPECT/CT was higher than on planar imaging. Differences in detection of SLN between planar and SPECT/CT imaging in the group of all 64 patients are statistically significant (p<0.05). Three foci of uptake (1.7% from totally visible 177 foci on planar images) in 2 patients interpreted on planar images as hot LNs were found to be false positive non-nodal sites of uptake when further assessed on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT showed the exact anatomical location of all visualised sentinel nodes. Conclusion: In some patients with gynecologic cancers SPECT/CT improves detection of sentinel lymph nodes. It can image nodes not visible on planar scintigrams, exclude false positive uptake and exactly localise pelvic and paraaortal SLNs. It improves anatomic localization of SLNs. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23486989

  18. Simultaneous reconstruction and segmentation for dynamic SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Rossmanith, Carolin; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the reconstruction of dynamic images that incorporate characteristic dynamics in certain subregions, as arising for the kinetics of many tracers in emission tomography (SPECT, PET). We make use of a basis function approach for the unknown tracer concentration by assuming that the region of interest can be divided into subregions with spatially constant concentration curves. Applying a regularised variational framework reminiscent of the Chan-Vese model for image segmentation we simultaneously reconstruct both the labelling functions of the subregions as well as the subconcentrations within each region. Our particular focus is on applications in SPECT with the Poisson noise model, resulting in a Kullback-Leibler data fidelity in the variational approach. We present a detailed analysis of the proposed variational model and prove existence of minimisers as well as error estimates. The latter apply to a more general class of problems and generalise existing results in literature since we deal with a nonlinear forward operator and a nonquadratic data fidelity. A computational algorithm based on alternating minimisation and splitting techniques is developed for the solution of the problem and tested on appropriately designed synthetic data sets. For those we compare the results to those of standard EM reconstructions and investigate the effects of Poisson noise in the data.

  19. SPECT reconstruction using DCT-induced tight framelet regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahan; Li, Si; Xu, Yuesheng; Schmidtlein, C. R.; Lipson, Edward D.; Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Wavelet transforms have been successfully applied in many fields of image processing. Yet, to our knowledge, they have never been directly incorporated to the objective function in Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) image reconstruction. Our aim has been to investigate if the ℓ1-norm of non-decimated discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of the estimated radiotracer distribution could be effectively used as the regularization term for the penalized-likelihood (PL) reconstruction, where a regularizer is used to enforce the image smoothness in the reconstruction. In this study, the ℓ1-norm of 2D DCT wavelet decomposition was used as a regularization term. The Preconditioned Alternating Projection Algorithm (PAPA), which we proposed in earlier work to solve penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction with non-differentiable regularizers, was used to solve this optimization problem. The DCT wavelet decompositions were performed on the transaxial reconstructed images. We reconstructed Monte Carlo simulated SPECT data obtained for a numerical phantom with Gaussian blobs as hot lesions and with a warm random lumpy background. Reconstructed images using the proposed method exhibited better noise suppression and improved lesion conspicuity, compared with images reconstructed using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm with Gaussian post filter (GPF). Also, the mean square error (MSE) was smaller, compared with EM-GPF. A critical and challenging aspect of this method was selection of optimal parameters. In summary, our numerical experiments demonstrated that the ℓ1-norm of discrete cosine transform (DCT) wavelet frame transform DCT regularizer shows promise for SPECT image reconstruction using PAPA method.

  20. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  1. Brain perfusion SPECT and MRI in foetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, R; Salonen, I; Partanen, K; Verho, S

    1999-10-01

    Six boys and five girls with a mean age of 8.6 (range 3 to 13) years with foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) were studied by MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to find specific areas of vulnerability. Morphological anomalies shown in six of 11 patients by MRI were situated both cortically and subcortically: cortical atrophy (N = 2), dilated ventricle (N = 1), corpus callosum hypoplasia (N = 1), cerebellar atrophy (N = 2), one of the latter with Arnold-Chiari malformation (N = 1). Delayed myelination of the white matter was seen in two patients. Volumetric studies of the hippocampus showed morphological left-right asymmetry in five of eight patients. However, SPECT showed mild hypoperfusion of the left hemisphere in all 10 subjects. The negative left-right index was located especially in the left parietooccipital region, i.e. in the brain areas implicated in arithmetical and logical-grammatical functions, which are known to be affected in FAS. Normal left-right dominance was also lacking in the frontal area, i.e. the brain area affected in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Detection of these abnormalities, although they are not unique to FAS, may be helpful in the diagnosis and any attempts at rehabilitation. Diverse morphological and functional abnormalities are more frequent than has usually been believed even in less impaired children with FAS.

  2. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  3. First measurements with the neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Borg, M.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konrad, G.; Konorov, I.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Petzoldt, G.; Rich, D.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Yu.; Wirth, H.-F.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-10-01

    The neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT has been built to perform a precise measurement of the proton spectrum shape in the decay of free neutrons. Such a measurement allows a determination of the neutrino electron angular-correlation coefficient a . The present best experiments have an uncertainty of Δ a/ a = 5% and since the seventies there is no substantial improvement. With a SPECT, we aim for an uncertainty which is lower by more than an order of magnitude, thus enabling us to perform several precise tests of the Standard Model. In our first beam time at the particle physics beam MEPHISTO at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, we studied the properties of the spectrometer. The most serious problem turned out to be the situation- and time-dependent behavior of the background. From the data sets from this beam time in which a background problem was not obvious, we could extract a value of a = - 0.1151±0.0040stat , but we could not quantify the background uncertainty. We show ways to deal with the background and other problems for future beam times.

  4. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Simpson, Michael L.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  5. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code. PMID:26190884

  6. Unusual Adrenal and Brain Metastases From Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Revealed by 131I SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Guo-hua; Liu, Bin; Kuang, An-ren

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. Metastatic involvement of both adrenal and brain in the same patient from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. Here, we described an unusual case with iodine-avid lung, bone, adrenal, liver, and brain metastases from follicular thyroid carcinoma confirmed by 131I SPECT/CT. The utilization of SPECT/CT in thyroid cancer patients can detect the presence of metastases and also exclude potential false-positive lesions. Our case demonstrates that SPECT/CT is helpful in localizing and confirming metastatic lesions from differentiated thyroid carcinoma in rare and unusual sites.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography for the Assessment of Myocardial Viability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    waiting lists. The third option, revascularization, is used to restore the flow of blood to the heart via coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or through minimally invasive percutaneous coronary interventions (balloon angioplasty and stenting). Both methods, however, are associated with important perioperative risks including mortality, so it is essential to properly select patients for this procedure. Myocardial Viability Left ventricular dysfunction may be permanent if a myocardial scar is formed, or it may be reversible after revascularization. Reversible LV dysfunction occurs when the myocardium is viable but dysfunctional (reduced contractility). Since only patients with dysfunctional but viable myocardium benefit from revascularization, the identification and quantification of the extent of myocardial viability is an important part of the work-up of patients with heart failure when determining the most appropriate treatment path. Various non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities can be used to assess patients in whom determination of viability is an important clinical issue, specifically: dobutamine echocardiography (echo), stress echo with contrast, SPECT using either technetium or thallium, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cardiac MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Dobutamine Echocardiography Stress echocardiography can be used to detect viable myocardium. During the infusion of low dose dobutamine (5 – 10 μg/kg/min), an improvement of contractility in hypokinetic and akentic segments is indicative of the presence of viable myocardium. Alternatively, a low-high dose dobutamine protocol can be used in which a biphasic response characterized by improved contractile function during the low-dose infusion followed by a deterioration in contractility due to stress induced ischemia during the high dose dobutamine infusion (dobutamine dose up to 40 ug/kg/min) represents viable tissue. Newer techniques including echocardiography using contrast agents

  8. [Myocardial infarction caused by exertion].

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Weber, S

    1997-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the main cause of sudden death during physical exercise, particularly in subjects over 40 and may even occur in high-performance young athletes. Sports and physical activity have a beneficial effect in preventing cardiovascular diseases, but certain rules of prudence must be followed to avoid the risk of a severe coronary event. Myocardial infarction always occurs in particularly susceptible subjects with several risk factors, predominantly smoking, hypercholesterolemia, family history of atherosclerosis. Dietary factors, either before, during or after the exercise, are always found. Distribution of coronary lesions differs with age. Before 40 years, the coronary network is normal in 40% of the cases. The infarction is partially explained by platelet hyperaggregahility and coronary spasms at exercise or in the post-exercise period.

  9. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  10. Pharmacology of myocardial calcium-handling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Disturbed myocardial calcium (Ca(+)) handling is one of the pathophysiologic hallmarks of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy, and certain types of tachyarrhythmias. Pharmacologic treatment of these diseases thus focuses on restoring myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis by interacting with Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. In this article, we review the currently used pharmacologic agents that are able to restore or maintain myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis and their mechanism of action as well as emerging new substances.

  11. Tombstoning ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Bahattin

    2009-01-01

    Tombstoning ST elevation myocardial infarction can be described as a STEMI characterized by tombstoning ST-segment elevation. This myocardial infarction is associated with extensive myocardial damage, reduced left ventricle function, serious hospital complications and poor prognosis. Tombstoning ECG pattern is a notion beyond morphological difference and is associated with more serious clinical results. Despite the presence of a few reports on tombstoning ST elevation, there is no report which reviews STEMI demonstrating this electrocardiographic pattern. PMID:21037844

  12. Prognostic Value of Major Cardiac Event Risk Score Estimated With Gated Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Japanese Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Shunichi; Nakanishi, Kanae; Tano, Ayako; Hori, Yusuke; Hayase, Misa; Mineki, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-07-27

    We published a cardiac event risk score (CERS) predicting the risk of major cardiac events (MCEs) within 3 years. The purpose of this study was to verify the prognostic value of the CERS before and after treatment in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease.We retrospectively investigated 612 patients who underwent rest (201)Tl and stress (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) between October 2004 and March 2013 and who had a significant stenosis with ≥ 75% narrowing of the arterial diameter detected by coronary angiography performed after confirmation of ≥ 5% ischemia with the SPECT. The patients underwent treatment including revascularization and medication, and thereafter, were re-evaluated with SPECT during a chronic phase and followed-up to confirm prognosis for ≥ 1 year. The endpoint was the onset of MCEs during the follow-up.During the follow-up (36.7 ± 14.5 months), 50 patients (8.7%) experienced MCEs comprising cardiac death (n = 16), non-fatal myocardial infarction (n = 4), and unstable angina pectoris (n = 30). The multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis for the actual occurrence of MCEs showed the summed difference score % and MCE risks estimated with the CERS after treatment to be significant independent variables. Ischemic reduction after treatment contributed significantly to a decrease in the MCE risks. The MCE risks estimated with the CERS after treatment were generally consistent with the incidence of the MCEs actually observed.The CERS after treatment is a valuable formula for predicting prognosis in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:27357436

  13. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial strain.

    PubMed

    Gorcsan, John; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-27

    Echocardiographic strain imaging, also known as deformation imaging, has been developed as a means to objectively quantify regional myocardial function. First introduced as post-processing of tissue Doppler imaging velocity converted to strain and strain rate, strain imaging has more recently also been derived from digital speckle tracking analysis. Strain imaging has been used to gain greater understanding into the pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia and infarction, primary diseases of the myocardium, and the effects of valvular disease on myocardial function, and to advance our understanding of diastolic function. Strain imaging has also been used to quantify abnormalities in the timing of mechanical activation for heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization pacing therapy. Further advances, such as 3-dimensional speckle tracking strain imaging, have emerged to provide even greater insight. Strain imaging has become established as a robust research tool and has great potential to play many roles in routine clinical practice to advance the care of the cardiovascular patient. This perspective reviews the physiology of myocardial strain, the technical features of strain imaging using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, their strengths and weaknesses, and the state-of-the-art present and potential future clinical applications.

  14. Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Amelia; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Advances in pharmacological treatment and effective early myocardial revascularization have –in recent years- led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it has been suggested that compared to younger subjects, elderly AMI patients are less likely to receive evidence-based treatment, including myocardial revascularization therapy. Several reasons have been postulated to explain this trend, including uncertainty regarding the true benefits of the interventions commonly used in this setting as well as increased risk mainly associated with comorbidities. The diagnosis, management, and post-hospitalization care of elderly patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome pose many difficulties at present. A complex interplay of variables such as comorbidities, functional and socioeconomic status, side effects associated with multiple drug administration, and individual biologic variability, all contribute to creating a complex clinical scenario. In this complex setting, clinicians are often required to extrapolate evidence-based results obtained in cardiovascular trials from which older patients are often, implicitly or explicitly, excluded. This article reviews current recommendations regarding management of AMI in the elderly. PMID:22396870

  15. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  16. Cocaine, a risk factor for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Galasko, G I

    1997-06-01

    Cocaine usage goes back thousands of years, to the times of the Incas. Over the past 20 years, its use has increased dramatically, especially in America, and adverse cardiovascular reactions to the drug have begun to be reported. The first report of myocardial infarction temporally related to the recreational use of cocaine appeared in 1982. Since then, myocardial infarction has become recognized as the drug's most common cardiovascular consequence, with over 250 cases now documented in the literature. This review discusses the history of cocaine use, its pharmacology, the possible pathological mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of myocardial ischaemia and infarction, and current ideas on the management of cocaine-induced myocardial infarction.

  17. Comparison study of temporal regularization methods for fully 5D reconstruction of cardiac gated dynamic SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    Temporal regularization plays a critical role in cardiac gated dynamic SPECT reconstruction, of which the goal is to obtain an image sequence from a single acquisition which simultaneously shows both cardiac motion and tracer distribution change over the course of imaging (termed 5D). In our recent work, we explored two different approaches for temporal regularization of the dynamic activities in gated dynamic reconstruction without the use of fast camera rotation: one is the dynamic EM (dEM) approach which is imposed on the temporal trend of the time activity of each voxel, and the other is a B-spline modeling approach in which the time activity is regulated by a set of B-spline basis functions. In this work, we extend the B-spline approach to fully 5D reconstruction and conduct a thorough quantitative comparison with the dEM approach. In the evaluation of the reconstruction results, we apply a number of quantitative measures on two major aspects of the reconstructed dynamic images: (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed activity distribution in the myocardium and (2) the ability of the reconstructed dynamic activities to differentiate perfusion defects from normal myocardial wall uptake. These measures include the mean square error (MSE), bias-variance analysis, accuracy of time-activity curves (TAC), contrast-to-noise ratio of a defect, composite kinetic map of the left ventricle wall and perfusion defect detectability with channelized Hotelling observer. In experiments, we simulated cardiac gated imaging with the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom and Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent, where acquisition with the equivalent of only three full camera rotations was used during the imaging period. The results show that both dEM and B-spline 5D could achieve similar overall accuracy in the myocardium in terms of MSE. However, compared to dEM 5D, the B-spline approach could achieve a more accurate reconstruction of the voxel TACs; in particular, B-spline 5D could

  18. Influence of attenuation correction on transient left ventricular dilation in dual isotope myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Brodov, Yafim; Frenkel, Alex; Chouraqui, Pierre; Przewloka, Kinga; Rispler, Shmuel; Abadi, Sobhi; Keidar, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of attenuation correction (AC) on left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV transient ischemic dilatation (TID) during dual-isotope single-photon emission computer tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Ninety-six patients (mean age 58 ± 11 years, 15% women, 38 patients completed exercise and 58 dipyridamole pharmacologic stress tests) assessed for known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dual-isotope thallium-201 rest and technetium-99m sestamibi stress SPECT MPI with computed tomography-based AC. The TID ratio was calculated separately for non-AC and AC SPECT MPI studies as the ratio of the LV endocardial volume at stress divided by LV endocardial volume at rest. The mean and range of the gated LV ejection fraction during exercise and pharmacologic stress was 54 ± 12% (29% to 80%) and 58 ± 12% (27% to 80%), respectively. In the exercise stress group, the same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC stress (76.4 ± 30 and 76.5 ± 28) and rest (66.3 ± 26 and 66.4 ± 24) studies were found (p = 0.90). There was no statistical difference between the mean exercise TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.27 vs 1.31, respectively, p = 0.10). The same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC in pharmacologic stress (79.9 ± 42 and 80 ± 41) and rest (71.4 ± 41 and 72.3 ± 37), respectively, were found (p = 0.50). There was no statistical difference between the mean dipyridamole TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.20 vs 1.17, respectively, p = 0.10). In conclusion, LV volumes and TID indexes obtained on SPECT MPI with exercise or pharmacologic stress using dipyridamole are not affected by AC.

  19. Altered myocardial perfusion in patients with angina pectoris or silent ischemia during exercise as assessed by quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmarian, J.J.; Pratt, C.M.; Cocanougher, M.K.; Verani, M.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The extent of abnormally perfused myocardium was compared in patients with and without chest pain during treadmill exercise from a large, relatively low-risk consecutive patient population (n = 356) referred for quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). All patients had concurrent coronary angiography. Patients were excluded if they had prior coronary angioplasty or bypass surgery. Tomographic images were assessed visually and from computer-generated polar maps. Chest pain during exercise was as frequent in patients with normal coronary arteries (12%) as in those with significant (greater than 50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD) (14%). In the 219 patients with significant CAD, silent ischemia was fivefold more common than symptomatic ischemia (83% versus 17%, p = 0.0001). However, there were no differences in the extent, severity, or distribution of coronary stenoses in patients with silent or symptomatic ischemia. Our major observation was that the extent of quantified SPECT perfusion defects was nearly identical in patients with (20.9 +/- 15.9%) and without (20.5 +/- 15.6%) exertional chest pain. The sensitivity for detecting the presence of CAD was significantly improved with quantitative SPECT compared with stress electrocardiography (87% versus 65%, p = 0.0001). Although scintigraphic and electrocardiographic evidence of exercise-induced ischemia were comparable in patients with chest pain (67% versus 73%, respectively; p = NS), SPECT was superior to stress electrocardiography for detecting silent myocardial ischemia. The majority of patients in this study with CAD who developed ischemia during exercise testing were asymptomatic, although they exhibited an angiographic profile and extent of abnormally perfused myocardium similar to those of patients with symptomatic ischemia.

  20. SPECT imaging evaluation in movement disorders: far beyond visual assessment.

    PubMed

    Badiavas, Kosmas; Molyvda, Elisavet; Iakovou, Ioannis; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Psarrakos, Kyriakos; Karatzas, Nikolaos

    2011-04-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with (123)I-FP-CIT is of great value in differentiating patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) from those suffering from essential tremor (ET). Moreover, SPECT with (123)I-IBZM can differentiate PD from Parkinson's "plus" syndromes. Diagnosis is still mainly based on experienced observers' visual assessment of the resulting images while many quantitative methods have been developed in order to assist diagnosis since the early days of neuroimaging. The aim of this work is to attempt to categorize, briefly present and comment on a number of semi-quantification methods used in nuclear medicine neuroimaging. Various arithmetic indices have been introduced with region of interest (ROI) manual drawing methods giving their place to automated procedures, while advancing computer technology has allowed automated image registration, fusion and segmentation to bring quantification closer to the final diagnosis based on the whole of the patient's examinations results, clinical condition and response to therapy. The search for absolute quantification has passed through neuroreceptor quantification models, which are invasive methods that involve tracer kinetic modelling and arterial blood sampling, a practice that is not commonly used in a clinical environment. On the other hand, semi-quantification methods relying on computers and dedicated software try to elicit numerical information out of SPECT images. The application of semi-quantification methods aims at separating the different patient categories solving the main problem of finding the uptake in the structures of interest. The semi-quantification methods which were studied fall roughly into three categories, which are described as classic methods, advanced automated methods and pixel-based statistical analysis methods. All these methods can be further divided into various subcategories. The plethora of the existing semi-quantitative methods reinforces

  1. Clinical application of SPECT in adrenal imaging with iodine-131 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, J.; Kawanaka, M.; Fukuchi, M.

    1989-04-01

    Forty-one patients with or without adrenocortical disorders were studied to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT in adrenal imaging with I-131 Adosterol. In the SPECT images from this study, all glands with either normally functioning or hyperfunctioning adrenal cortices could be detected, while those glands with hypofunctioning adrenal cortices could not be detected. Particularly in transaxial and sagittal slices, the adrenal gland was identified posteriorly and was clearly distinguished from the gallbladder. In preliminary results using SPECT by a standard method, uptake in 68 detectable glands ranged from 1.7% to 4.9% in four glands with Cushing's syndrome, from 1.1% to 1.3% in seven glands with primary aldosteronism, and were distributed below 1.0% in the remaining glands with normally functioning adrenal cortices. These data show that it is possible to evaluate the adrenocortical functioning status simply by analyzing the SPECT images of the adrenal.

  2. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Comprehensive progress report, September 1989--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  3. Less commonly used and emerging clinical applications of SPECT-CT in benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Yap, Ki S; Patel, Chirag N; Chowdhury, Fahmid U; Scarsbrook, Andrew F

    2012-08-01

    The emergence of hybrid imaging, combining anatomical computed tomography (CT) and functional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), has greatly expanded the armoury available to image disease. Integrated SPECT-CT is a dual-modality technique, which improves the sensitivity and specificity of existing radionuclide studies and enables characterization of equivocal findings detected by conventional imaging. There is a wide range of established and emerging clinical applications for SPECT-CT, which were reviewed in detail at a symposium organized by the British Institute of Radiology in March 2012. A series of articles were commissioned as an adjunct to the symposium and to raise awareness of the clinical utility of this technique. The focus of this article is on less commonly used and emerging clinical applications of hybrid SPECT-CT in a spectrum of benign and malignant conditions. The article will illustrate the incremental value of the technique in a variety of clinical applications.

  4. A SPECT study in internal carotid artery occlusion: Discrepancies between flow image and neurologic deficits

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, H.; Hougaku, H.; Matsuda, I.; Kusunoki, M.; Shirai, J. )

    1989-08-01

    A SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) study in internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion was performed in 6 patients. The validity of iodoamphetamine (IMP) SPECT study in the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or neurologic function is still controversial. In this study, the authors showed several cases in whom SPECT images of brain were not compatible with their neurologic deficits. In 2 typical cases, a large low-density area was observed in the non-dominant hemisphere in computed tomography (CT) scan, but no apparent motor-sensory deficits in left limbs were present. In these patients, SPECT study also revealed flow reduction in the affected side of the brain. So there was a possibility that an IMP brain image could not always reflect CBF, which maintains neurologic function of the brain.

  5. Photon count and contrast-detail detection potential comparison between parallel and fan beam brain SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.I.; Lim, C.B.

    1986-02-01

    Current brain SPECT based on parallel beam projection with round shape Anger cameras suffers from both low sensitivity and poor resolution due to shoulder interference. SPECT using fan beam projection with a wide rectangular camera would significantly improve image quality by increased sensitivity and close brain access. For experimental verification a rectangular camera of 16'' x 8.7'' FOV has been developed with a shoulder edge of 3''. For this geometry sensitivity and resolution improvement have been measured. Fan beam imaging tests verified the analysis results by showing 60% sensitivity increase and resolution improvement to 10 mm from 13-14 mm at image center. In order to assess the imaging improvement level quantitatively, analytical comparison on SPECT contrast-detail detectability has been made. Experimental contrast-detail detectability comparison between parallel and fan beam brain SPECT is presented together with the predicted model result.

  6. [Acute stent thrombosis and reverse transient left ventricular dilatation after performing a single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion].

    PubMed

    Miranda, B; Pizzi, M N; Aguadé-Bruix, S; Domingo, E; Candell-Riera, J

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old male patient with a history of stent implantation in the left anterior descending three months before. Due to the presentation of vegetative symptoms, he was referred for gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion. During acquisition of the resting images he presented chest pain and ST segment elevation, so that urgent cardiac catheterization was performed, showing stent thrombosis. Rest perfusion imaging showed a defect in anterior and apical perfusion, more severe and extensive than in the stress images, with striking left ventricular dilatation and a fall in the ejection fraction related to the acute ischemia phenomenon. Intense exercise is associated with a transient activation of the coagulation system and hemodynamic changes that might induce thrombosis, especially in recently implanted coronary stents that probably still have not become completely endothelialized.

  7. [Neurological diseases and SPECT--analysis using easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS)].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    We developed a method for automated diagnosis of brain perfusion SPECT and designated this method as an easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS). In this software program, voxel-by-voxel Z-score analysis after voxel normalization to global mean or cerebellar values; Z-score = ( [control mean] - [individual value] )/ (control SD) is performed. These Z-score maps are displayed by overlay on tomographic sections and by projection with averaged Z-score of 14mm thickness to surface rendering of the anatomically standardized MRI template. Anatomical standardization of SPECT images into a stereotactic space is performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 2. This program has an advantage of capability of incorporation of SPM results into automated analysis of Z-score values as a volume of interest (VOI). A specific VOI can be determined by group comparison of SPECT images for patients with a neuropsychiatric disease with those for healthy volunteers using SPM. Even if a center can construct a normal database with good quality comprising a large number of healthy volunteers, other centers have not been able to use this normal database because of differences between the used gamma cameras, collimators and physical correction algorithms. Since SPECT exhibits greater variations in image quality among different centers than PET, conversion of SPECT images may be necessary for sharing a normal database. In this eZIS software, we incorporated a newly developed program for making it possible to share a normal database in SPECT studies. A Hoffman 3-dimensional brain phantom experiment was conducted to determine systematic differences between SPECT scanners. SPECT images for the brain phantom were obtained using two different scanners. Dividing these two phantom images after anatomical standardization by SPM created a 3-dimensional conversion map. The use of a conversion map obtained from SPECT images of the same phantom provided very similar SPECT data despite extreme differences

  8. Usefulness of MRI to demonstrate the mechanisms of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Vivien; Botnar, Rene; Croisille, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of symptomatic primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) associated with myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and suspected ischemia that could be related either to LAD artery compression or to microvascular perfusion abnormalities. MRI demonstrated the morphological appearance of myocardial hypertrophy, and coronary MR angiography evidenced the myocardial bridge and its functional consequences with stress MR perfusion. In conclusion, as a non-invasive comprehensive imaging technique, MRI should be considered in identifying the mechanisms of myocardial ischemia in HCM with myocardial bridge. PMID:16888385

  9. A case of acute myocardial infarction due to coronary spasm in the myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Daisuke; Morino, Yoshihiro; Ikari, Yuji

    2008-07-01

    A 68-year-old Japanese man with acute inferior myocardial infarction underwent emergent coronary angiography which showed a myocardial bridge, but no coronary stenosis, at the infarctrelated artery. A spasm provocation test using intracoronary acetylcholine revealed a total occlusion due to severe spasm at the site of the myocardial bridge. Thus, the myocardial ischemia in this case was caused by the coronary spasm, but not by the limited flow due to the myocardial bridge. Although a beta-blocker is usually the appropriate drug, it should be avoided for coronary spasm. The spasm provocation test is useful to determine the type of medication needed for treatment.

  10. Thallium-201-chloride and technetium-99m-MIBI SPECT of primary and metastatic lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kashitani, N; Makihara, S; Maeda, T; Eda, R; Takeyama, H; Hiraki, Y

    1999-01-01

    We compared technetium-99m-MIBI (Tc-99m MIBI) with thallium-201-chloride (Tl-201) SPECT imaging in patients with lung carcinoma. In addition, we compared the imaging characteristics of Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI after radiation therapy. Thirty-seven patients with primary lung carcinoma were evaluated with SPECT imaging for metastasis to the mediastinal lymph nodes and brain. Patients were imaged with Tl-201 chloride images 10 and 180 min after injection. Patients were also imaged 10 min after injection of Tc-99m MIBI. The sensitivity of Tl-201 SPECT for the primary lesion and brain metastasis was 97.1% and 70.0% respectively at 10 min and 97.1% and 60.0% at 180 min. The sensitivity of Tc-99m MIBI SPECT was 97.1% (for the identification of the primary lesion) and 50.0% (for the detection of brain metastasis) at 10 min. The uptake ratios (count in tumor/count in normal lung or brain) at 10 min on the Tl-201 SPECT and on the Tc-99m MIBI SPECT were not significantly different for the primary tumor or for brain metastasis. The uptake ratios were better for Tc-99m MIBI than for Tl-201 [2.82 vs. 1.99 (p<0.05)] for mediastinal lymph nodes. Decreasing uptake ratios and retention index with both agents after radiation therapy are concordant to the follow-up clinical course. Tc-99m MIBI SPECT is more sensitive in the detection of metastasis to mediastinal lymph nodes than Tl-201 SPECT.

  11. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  12. A direct measurement of skull attenuation for quantitative SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Turkington, T.G.; Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology); Smith, M.F. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The attenuation of 140 keV photons was measured in three empty skulls by placing a [sup 99m]Tc line source inside each one and acquiring projection data. These projections were compared to projections of the line source alone to determine the transmission through each point in the skull surrounding the line source. The effective skull thickness was calculated for each point using an assumed dense bone attenuation coefficient. The relative attenuation for this thickness of bone was compared to that of an equivalent amount of soft tissue to evaluate the increased attenuation of photons in brain SPECT relative to a uniform soft tissue approximation. For the skull regions surrounding most of the brain, the effective bone thickness varied considerably, but was generally less than 6 mm, resulting in a relative attenuation increases of less than 6%.

  13. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  14. Attenuation compensation in mesh-domain OSEM SPECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsang, Levon; Lu, Yao; Yu, Bo; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward

    2009-02-01

    A new method for attenuation compensation (AC) in mesh-domain SPECT OSEM reconstruction using strip-area approximation (SAAC) is introduced and compared to single-ray AC (SRAC). SAAC uses the polygonal area of the intersection of a mesh element (ME) and a tube-of-response (TOR) for defining an effective length of photon transit and an effective attenuation coefficient. This approach to AC is compared to SRAC, which defines the effective length of photon transit as the intersection of a single ray and a ME and the effective attenuation coefficient as the mean along the ray path. Comparative quantitative and qualitative analysis demonstrated that SAAC outperformed SRAC in terms of reconstruction image accuracy and quality.

  15. Tomographic mesh generation for OSEM reconstruction of SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Yu, Bo; Vogelsang, Levon; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    To improve quality of OSEM SPECT reconstruction in the mesh domain, we implemented an adaptive mesh generation method that produces tomographic mesh consisting of triangular elements with size and density commensurate with geometric detail of the objects. Node density and element size change smoothly as a function of distance from the edges and edge curvature without creation of 'bad' elements. Tomographic performance of mesh-based OSEM reconstruction is controlled by the tomographic mesh structure, i.e. node density distribution, which in turn is ruled by the number of key points on the boundaries. A greedy algorithm is used to influence the distribution of nodes on the boundaries. The relationship between tomographic mesh properties and OSEM reconstruction quality has been investigated. We conclude that by selecting adequate number of key points, one can produce a tomographic mesh with lowest number of nodes that is sufficient to provide desired quality of reconstructed images, appropriate for the imaging system properties.

  16. Frequency weighted least squares reconstruction of truncated transmission SPECT data

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, C.; Savi, A.; Gilardi, M.C.; Fazio, F.

    1996-08-01

    A least squares technique for reconstructing truncated data is presented. The method involves including the ramp filter into the system matrix. The sinogram is extrapolated with zeros for filtering but extrapolated values are not considered during backward and forward projections.The new matrix leads to a frequency weighted least squares criterion. Tikhonov regularization and a priori information are considered. For the 0-order regularization, the resulting images are biased but it is shown that this bias is recovered by a simple scaling process. First and second order regularizations provide true restoration. The technique is applied to simulated and real transmission SPECT data. Results show that the frequency least squares criterion is a valuable approach for efficiently reconstructing truncated sinograms.

  17. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.

  18. Clinical evaluation of the computed tomography attenuation correction map for myocardial perfusion imaging: the potential for incidental pathology detection.

    PubMed

    Tootell, Andrew; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Elias, Mark; Hogg, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The benefits of hybrid imaging in nuclear medicine have been proven to increase the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of many procedures by localizing or characterizing lesions or by correcting emission data to more accurately represent radiopharmaceutical distribution. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) has a significant role in the diagnosis and follow-up of ischaemic heart disease with attenuation correction data being obtained on an integrated CT scanner. Initially, the CT component of hybrid SPECT/CT systems was what could be described as low specification utilizing fixed output parameters. As technology has progressed, the CT component of newer systems has specifications that are identical to that of stand-alone diagnostic systems. Irrespective of the type of scanner used, the computed tomography attenuation correction (CTAC) for myocardial perfusion imaging produces low-quality, limited-range CT images of the chest that include the mediastinum, lung fields and surrounding soft tissues. The diagnostic potential of this data set is unclear; yet, examples exist whereby significant pathology can be identified and investigated further. Despite guidance from a number of professional bodies suggesting that evaluation of the resulting images for every medical exposure be carried out, there is no indication as to whether this should include the evaluation of CTAC images. This review aims to initiate discussion by examining the ethical, legal, financial and practical issues (e.g. CT specification and image quality) surrounding the clinical evaluation of the CTAC for myocardial perfusion imaging images. Reference to discussions that have taken place, and continue to take place, in other modalities, current European and UK legislations, and guidelines and research in the field will be made.

  19. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  20. SPECT reconstruction with nonuniform attenuation from highly under-sampled projection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuifen; Wen, Junhai; Zhang, Kangping; Shi, Donghao; Dong, Haixiang; Li, Wenxiao; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an important nuclear medicine imaging technique and has been using in clinical diagnoses. The SPECT image can reflect not only organizational structure but also functional activities of human body, therefore diseases can be found much earlier. In SPECT, the reconstruction is based on the measurement of gamma photons emitted by the radiotracer. The number of gamma photons detected is proportional to the dose of radiopharmaceutical, but the dose is limited because of patient safety. There is an upper limit in the number of gamma photons that can be detected per unit time, so it takes a long time to acquire SPECT projection data. Sometimes we just can obtain highly under-sampled projection data because of the limit of the scanning time or imaging hardware. How to reconstruct an image using highly under-sampled projection data is an interesting problem. One method is to minimize the total variation (TV) of the reconstructed image during the iterative reconstruction. In this work, we developed an OSEM-TV SPECT reconstruction algorithm, which could reconstruct the image from highly under-sampled projection data with non-uniform attenuation. Simulation results demonstrate that the OSEM-TV algorithm performs well in SPECT reconstruction with non-uniform attenuation.

  1. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Third yearly progress report, September 1991--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  2. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  3. Frequency-domain approaches to quantitative brain SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jui-Hsi

    1997-12-01

    Quantitative SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) has been limited mainly by (1) inadequate numbers of detected photons which are contaminated by Poisson noise in projections, (2) photon attenuation in the body, (3) inclusion of scattered photons in the projections, and (4) depth-dependent blurring due to the finite size of collimator holes. Various methods to compensate for the above effects via either spatial- domain approaches or frequency-domain approaches have been proposed. However, most of the proposed methods focus only on individual effects. A reconstruction method which can compensate for all of the effects simultaneously is necessary. We have developed an algorithm to compensate for all of the effects simultaneously using frequency-domain approaches. For noise suppression, a method to convert the signal-dependent Poisson noise into signal- independent Gaussian white noise was first applied. Then the Wiener filter with a designed butterfly window was used. For scatter-photon removal, a subtraction technique based on multiple energy-window acquisitions was employed. For collimation deblurring, a direct inverse filter was designed via stationary phase condition (depth-frequency relationship). For attenuation compensation, an exact analytical solution was derived by Fourier analysis. Our algorithm was executed on a HP/730 workstation. An improvement was shown in computing time, noise suppression, recognition of phantom features, and quantification of concentrations of regions of interest (ROI). In addition to simulation, we performed a series of experiments to verify our models and test our algorithm. These include (1) investigation of the characteristics of Poisson noise of SPECT, (2) comparison of the performance of dual-energy window and triple-energy window methods for scatter correction, (3) measurement of a depth- dependent PSF, (4) reconstruction of the attenuation map using scatter-window data, and (5) implementation of a simultaneous

  4. Effect of reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of (99m)Tc sestamibi SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kenneth J; Tronco, Gene G; Palestro, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The superiority of SPECT/CT over SPECT for (99m)Tc-sestamibi parathyroid imaging often is assumed to be due to improved lesion localization provided by the anatomic component (computed tomography) of the examination. It also is possible that this superiority may be related to the algorithms used for SPECT data reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of SPECT reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging. We retrospectively analyzed preoperative MIBI SPECT/CT parathyroid imaging studies performed on 106 patients. SPECT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and by iterative reconstruction with corrections for collimator resolution recovery and attenuation (IRC). Two experienced readers independently graded lesion detection certainty on a 5-point scale without knowledge of each other's readings, reconstruction methods, other test results or final diagnoses. All patients had surgical confirmation of the final diagnosis, including disease limited to the neck, and location and weight of excised lesion(s). There were 135 parathyroid lesions among the 106 patients. For FBP SPECT/CT and IRC SPECT/CT sensitivity was 76% and 90% (p = 0.003), specificity was 87% and 87% (p = 0.90), and accuracy was 83% and 88% (p = 0.04), respectively. Inter-rater agreement was significantly higher for IRC than for FBP (kappa = 0.76, "good agreement", versus kappa = 0.58, "moderate agreement", p < 0.0001). We conclude that the improved accuracy of MIBI SPECT/CT compared to MIBI SPECT for preoperative parathyroid lesion localization is due in part to the use of IRC for SPECT data reconstruction.

  5. Apoptosis in myocardial ischaemia and infarction.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, P A J; Nijmeijer, R; Meijer, C J L M; Visser, C A; Hack, C E; Niessen, H W M

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that, in addition to necrosis, apoptosis also plays a role in the process of tissue damage after myocardial infarction, which has pathological and therapeutic implications. This review article will discuss studies in which the role and mechanisms of apoptosis in myocardial infarction were analysed in vivo and in vitro in humans and in animals.

  6. Influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction in brain SPECT images obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device: evaluation with a 3-dimensional brain phantom

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Mana; Yamashita, Yasuo; Akamatsu, Go; Tsutsui, Yuji; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction on the differences in the radioactivity distributions in 123I brain SPECT obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. Methods: We used the 3-dimensional (3D) brain phantom, which imitates the precise structure of gray matter, white matter and bone regions. It was filled with 123I solution (20.1 kBq/mL) in the gray matter region and with K2HPO4 in the bone region. The SPECT/CT data were acquired by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. SPECT images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection with uniform attenuation correction (FBP-uAC), 3D ordered-subsets expectation-maximization with uniform AC (3D-OSEM-uAC) and 3D OSEM with CT-based non-uniform AC (3D-OSEM-CTAC). We evaluated the differences in the radioactivity distributions among these reconstruction methods using a 3D digital phantom, which was developed from CT images of the 3D brain phantom, as a reference. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) and regional radioactivity were calculated to evaluate the similarity of SPECT images to the 3D digital phantom. Results: The NMSE values were 0.0811 in FBP-uAC, 0.0914 in 3D-OSEM-uAC and 0.0766 in 3D-OSEM-CTAC. The regional radioactivity of FBP-uAC was 11.5% lower in the middle cerebral artery territory, and that of 3D-OSEM-uAC was 5.8% higher in the anterior cerebral artery territory, compared with the digital phantom. On the other hand, that of 3D-OSEM-CTAC was 1.8% lower in all brain areas. Conclusion: By using the hybrid SPECT/CT device, the brain SPECT reconstructed by 3D-OSEM with CT attenuation correction can provide an accurate assessment of the distribution of brain radioactivity. PMID:27408856

  7. Myocardial protection with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Mild hypothermia, 32-35° C, is very potent at reducing myocardial infarct size in rabbits, dogs, sheep, pigs, and rats. The benefit is directly related to reduction in normothermic ischaemic time, supporting the relevance of early and rapid cooling. The cardioprotective effect of mild hypothermia is not limited to its recognized reduction of infarct size, but also results in conservation of post-ischaemic contractile function, prevention of no-reflow or microvascular obstruction, and ultimately attenuation of left ventricular remodelling. The mechanism of the anti-infarct effect does not appear to be related to diminished energy utilization and metabolic preservation, but rather to survival signalling that involves either the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Initial clinical trials of hypothermia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were disappointing, probably because cooling was too slow to shorten normothermic ischaemic time appreciably. New approaches to more rapid cooling have recently been described and may soon be available for clinical use. Alternatively, it may be possible to pharmacologically mimic the protection provided by cooling soon after the onset of ischaemia with an activator of mild hypothermia signalling, e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase activator, that could be given by emergency medical personnel. Finally, the protection afforded by cooling can be added to that of pre- and post-conditioning because their mechanisms differ. Thus, myocardial salvage might be greatly increased by rapidly cooling patients as soon as possible and then giving a pharmacological post-conditioning agent immediately prior to reperfusion. PMID:22131353

  8. [ST myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Uriel, Nir; Moravsky, Gil; Blatt, Alex; Vered, Zvi; Krakover, Ricardo; Kaluski, Edo

    2006-05-01

    ST elevation myocardial infarction continues to be a major medical problem even in the beginning of the 21st century. Treatment guidelines for these patients are based on multiple randomized clinical trials. In order to minimize myocardial damage, early patency of the infarct relating artery must be accomplished. This is the major difference in the treatment strategy between ST elevation myocardial infarction and other acute coronary syndromes. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention and fibrinolysis are the two treatment modalities for achieving myocardial reperfusion. The subgroup of ST elevation myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary artery reperfusion carries a more favorable prognosis. This review addresses the clinical characteristics, natural history, prognosis and treatment strategies for this group, with special emphasis on the optimal timing for revascularization, and the role of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors.

  9. Risk stratification after myocardial infarction. Clinical overview

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction can be stratified into subgroups that are at high risk for morbidity and mortality on the basis of clinical characteristics that indicate recurrent myocardial ischemia, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and/or recurrent cardiac arrhythmias. In patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction the assessment of symptoms, physical findings, and ECG changes during predischarge exercise testing often identifies patients at increased risk for further cardiac events. Because of the suboptimum sensitivity and specificity of the exercise ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia, myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl and/or assessment of global and segmental ventricular function by two-dimensional echocardiography or radionuclide cineangiography during or immediately after exercise are often added to the predischarge risk stratification.

  10. Initial experience with SPECT imaging of the brain using I-123 p-iodoamphetamine in focal epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Sussman, N.M.; Harner, R.N.; Kaplan, L.R.; Hershey, B.L.; Bernstein, D.R.; Goldstein, P.; Parker, J.A.; Wolodzko, J.G.; Popky, G.L.

    1989-06-01

    Nineteen patients with complex partial seizures refractory to medical treatment were examined with routine electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG monitoring, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological tests and interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with I-123 iodoamphetamine (INT). In 18 patients, SPECT identified areas of focal reduction in tracer uptake that correlated with the epileptogenic focus identified on the EEG. In addition, SPECT disclosed other areas of neurologic dysfunction as elicited on neuropsychological tests. Thus, IMP SPECT is a useful tool for localizing epileptogenic foci and their associated dynamic deficits.

  11. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, S; Metzler, S D; Wilson, D W; Peterson, T E

    2009-01-21

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source-collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging.

  12. Macrophage Roles Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jessica M.; Lopez, Elizabeth F.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), circulating blood monocytes respond to chemotactic factors, migrate into the infarcted myocardium, and differentiate into macrophages. At the injury site, macrophages remove necrotic cardiac myocytes and apoptotic neutrophils; secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; and modulate phases of the angiogenic response. As such, the macrophage is a primary responder cell type that is involved in the regulation of post-MI wound healing at multiple levels. This review summarizes what is currently known about macrophage functions post-MI and borrows literature from other injury and inflammatory models to speculate on additional roles. Basic science and clinical avenues that remain to be explored are also discussed. PMID:18656272

  13. Solar activity and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, E; Mergentaler, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M; Kucharczyk, J; Janus, W

    1983-01-01

    The correlation between the incidence of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, the solar activity and geomagnetism in the period 1969-1976 was studied, basing on Wrocław hospitals material registered according to WHO standards; sudden death was assumed when a person died within 24 hours after the onset of the disease. The highest number of infarctions and sudden deaths was detected for 1975, which coincided with the lowest solar activity, and the lowest one for the years 1969-1970 coinciding with the highest solar activity. Such an inverse, statistically significant correlation was not found to exist between the studied biological phenomena and geomagnetism. PMID:6851574

  14. Assessment of prognostic value of semiquantitative parameters on gated single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in a large middle eastern population

    PubMed Central

    Chavoshi, Maryam; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Fallahi, Babak; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The goal of this study is to determine the prognostic value of semiquantitative parameters of electrocardiogram-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in a large Middle Eastern (Iranian) population. Materials and Methods: This study was a prospective study including all patients referred to our center for myocardial perfusion scan. The patients were followed annually up to 24 months and their survival information was collected. Results: From 1148 patients, 473 (41.2%) men and 675 (58.8%) women, 40.6% had normal MPI, 13.3% near normal and 46.1% abnormal MPI. After follow-up of 929 patients, 97.4% of patients were alive, and 2.6% succumbed to cardiac deaths. Abnormal ejection fraction was related with cardiac events (P = 0.001), but neither transient ischemic dilation (TID) (P = 0.09) nor lung/heart ratio (P = 0.92) showed such relationship. Association between summed difference score (SDS) and soft cardiac events (P < 0.001) was significant. Summed motion score (SMS) and summed thickening score (STS) showed a significant relation with hard cardiac events, including myocardial infarction and cardiac death (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Totally, risk of all cardiac events was significantly higher in abnormal MPI group than normal group (P < 0.001, 0.02, and 0.025, respectively). No significant relationship was found between TID and total cardiac events (P = 0.478). Conclusion: Semiquantitative variables derived from gated SPECT MPI have independent prognostic value. Rate of total cardiac events is higher in patients with higher summed stress score and SDS. Total and hard cardiac events are higher in upper scores of functional parameters (SMS and STS). Total cardiac events are higher in patients with lower left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:26170566

  15. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  16. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-12-14

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF.

  17. Compartmental analysis of technetium-99m-teboroxime kinetics employing fast dynamic SPECT at rest and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, P.C.; Ficaro, E.P.; Dayaniki, F.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have examined the feasibility of compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in measuring physiological changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. To evaluate the effect of tracer recirculation on {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in the myocardium, they also compared compartmental analysis with washout analysis (monoexponertial fitting), which does not account for this effect. Eight healthy male volunteers were imaged using fast dynamic SPECT protocols (5 sec per tomographic image) at rest and during adenosine infusion. A two-compartment model was used and compartmental parameters K1 and k2 (characterizing the diffusion of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime from the blood to the myocardium and from the myocardium to the blood, respectively) were fitted from myocardial time-activity curves and left ventricular input functions. Both K1 and washout estimates for the whole left ventricular myocardium changed significantly in response to coronary vasodilation. Mean stress-to-rest (S/R) ratios were almost two times higher for K1 (S/R = 2.7 {plus_minus} 1.1) than for washout estimates (S/R = 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3). Estimation of K1 for all local regions, except the septal wall, is feasible because variations in K1 estimates for all local regions, except the septum during stress, are comparable with those for the global region. The authors conclude that quantitative compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics provides a sensitive indicator for changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. 39 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  19. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack.

  20. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  1. Use of thallium 201 myocardial imaging to exclude myocardial infarction after dissection in congenital coarctation of the aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Halon, D.A.; Weiss, A.T.; Tzivoni, D.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a mobile gamma camera with thallium 201 myocardial imaging is described to exclude myocardial infarction in a patient admitted to the coronary care unit in shock and with clinical, enzyme, and ECG changes consistent with infarction. The patient suffered from acute aortic dissection associated with congenital coarctation of the aorta. The myocardial scan excluded transmural myocardial injury.

  2. Incremental Diagnostic Performance of Combined Parameters in the Detection of Severe Coronary Artery Disease Using Exercise Gated Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Wu, Yen-Wen; Ko, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using gated single-photon emission tomography (gSPECT) may underestimate the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to evaluate the significance of combined parameters derived from gSPECT, as well as treadmill stress test parameters, in the detection of severe CAD. Methods A total of 211 consecutive patients referred for exercise MPI between June 2011 and June 2013 (who received invasive coronary angiography within six months after MPI) were retrospectively reviewed. Exercise MPI was performed with Bruce protocol and 201Tl injected at peak exercise. Gated SPECT was performed using a cadmium-zinc-telluride camera and processed by QPS/QGS software. Perfusion defect abnormalities such as sum stress score (SSS); sum difference score, algorithm-derived total perfusion deficits, transient ischemic dilatation ratios of end-diastolic volumes and end-systolic volumes, post-stress changes in ejection fraction, and lung/heart ratio (LHR) were calculated. Treadmill parameters, including ST depression (STD) at the 1st and 3rd minutes of recovery stage (1’STD and 3’STD), maximal STD corrected by heart rate increment (ST/HR), heart rate decline in 1st and 3rd minutes of recovery stage, recovery heart rate ratio (HR ratio), systolic and mean blood pressure ratios (SBP ratio and MAP ratio) during recovery phase were recorded. Diagnostic performances of these parameters were analyzed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression for detection of left main (≥ 50%) or 3-vessel disease (all ≥ 70% luminal stenosis) on invasive angiography. Results Among various MPI and treadmill parameters used for detection of severe CAD, SSS and ST/HR had the highest AUC (0.78, 0.73, p = NS) and best cut-off values (SSS > 6, ST/HR > 17.39 10-2mV/bpm), respectively. By univariate logistic regression, all parameters except 1’HRR, 3’HRR, SBP and MAP ratios increased the odds ratio of severe CAD

  3. Cardioplegia and myocardial preservation during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Engelman, R M; Levitsky, S; O'Donoghue, M J; Auvil, J

    1978-09-01

    A standard experimental protocol was developed to explore the role of hypothermia and potassium cardioplegia in myocardial preservation during 120 minutes of ischemic arrest followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Seven different experimental groups of six animals each were evaluated using an in-vivo pig heart preparation. Hypothermic arrest without cardioplegia and cardioplegic arrest at normothermia were each compared to hypothermic cardioplegia. In addition, the use of an asanguineous hypothermic coronary perfusate without cardioplegia was compared to both multidose cardioplegia and single-dose cardioplegia followed by the same asanguineous perfusate. The parameters measured included: myocardial contractility and compliance, myocardial blood flow, endocardial/epicardial blood flow ratio, and electron microscopic studies. Myocardial preservation was inadequate with hypothermic arrest alone (without cardioplegia; and with cardioplegia at normothermia. In both experimental groups, myocardial contractility and compliance were so depressed that the) could not be accurately measured following ischemia and reperfusion while coronary blood flow remained significantly elevated. Preservation was improved but still inadequate following myocardial washout with a normokalemic or hypokalemic perfusate and following single dose cardioplegia plus myocardial washout. In the latter four groups, contractility ranged from 42 to 78% of control, and there was a decrease in compliance of 16 to 78%. Adequate preservation was found only after hypothermia and multidose potassium (35 mEq/L) cardioplegia. In this group, contractility was 129 +/- 13% of control and compliance increased by 21 +/- 24% compared to that of the control.

  4. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  5. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.

  6. Serum nickle estimation in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Narang, N K; Goyal, R K; Gupta, A K; Balwani, S

    1989-11-01

    Serum nickle was estimated by atomic absorption spectrometer in 20 healthy controls and in 25 cases of acute myocardial infarction at 12 hourly intervals upto 48 hours, after the onset of chest pain. The mean serum nickel was 0.27 micrograms/dl in healthy controls and 0.40,050,049 and 0.30 micrograms/dl in patients of acute myocardial infarction. The serum nickel values were significantly (P less than 0.001) raised upto 36 hours in acute myocardial infarction when compared with controls.

  7. Nanog expression in heart tissues induced by acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huanhuan; Li, Qiong; Pramanik, Jogen; Luo, Jiankai; Guo, Zhikun

    2014-10-01

    Nanog is a potential stem cell marker and is considered a regeneration factor during tissue repair. In the present study, we investigated expression patterns of nanog in the rat heart after acute myocardial infarction by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Our results show that nanog at both mRNA and protein levels is positively expressed in myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells in different myocardial zones at different stages after myocardial infarction, showing a spatio-temporal and dynamic change. After myocardial infarction, the nanog expression in fibroblasts and small round cells in the infarcted zone (IZ) is much stronger than that in the margin zone (MZ) and remote infarcted zone (RIZ). From day 7 after myocardial infarction, the fibroblasts and small cells strongly expressed nanog protein in the IZ, and a few myocardial cells in the MZ and the RIZ and the numbers of nanog-positive fibroblasts and small cells reached the highest peak at 21 days after myocardial infarction, but in this period the number of nanog-positive myocardial cells decreased gradually. At 28 days after myocardial infarction, the numbers of all nanog-positive cells decreased into a low level. Therefore, our data suggest that all myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells are involved in myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction. The nanog-positive myocardial cells may respond to early myocardial repair, and the nanog-positive fibroblasts and small round cells are the main source for myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction.

  8. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  9. Added-value of SPECT/CT to lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy in gynaecological cancers

    PubMed Central

    Belhocine, Tarik Z; Prefontaine, Michel; Lanvin, Dominique; Bertrand, Monique; Rachinsky, Irina; Ettler, Helen; Zabel, Pamela; Stitt, Larry W; Sugimoto, Akira; Urbain, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy (LM/SL) have been successfully used in pre-treatment nodal staging of gynaecological cancers. We hypothesised the added-value of LM/SL plus SPECT/CT in patients with early stage of cervical cancer and vulvar cancer. A prospective, single-center, diagnostic, open label, active control, non-randomized clinical trial has been conducted in 7 patients with FIGO IA-IB1 cervical cancer and 7 patients with FIGO stage I-II-IIIcN0 vulvar cancer. All patients underwent LM/SL plus SPECT/low-dose CT and complete lymph node dissection (CLND) according to the standard of care. In case of negative hematoxylin-eosin staining, serial sections of the SLNs were analysed by immunohistochemistry and high molecular weight cytokeratin. Primary outcome measures were the detection rate, the sensitivity (SV), the negative predictive value (NPV), the diagnostic accuracy (DA) for anatomic localisation of SLNs, and the impact on management of SPECT/CT guided LM/SL versus CLND. The secondary outcome measure was the patient tolerability and operating time of LM/SL guided SPECT/CT versus CLND. http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00773071 All 14 patients were enrolled into the 1-day research protocol with dual-tracer LM/SL and SPECT/CT. Additional SLNs were detected on SPECT/CT compared to conventional planar imaging. Hot and cold > 1cm SLNs were detected on SPECT/CT. Detection rate, SV, NPV, DA were 100% in both groups; false negative rate was 0%. Rate of SLN metastases was 28.5% in cervical cancer and 42.9% in vulvar cancer. Impact on treatment was 28.5% and 14.3% in cervical cancer and vulvar cancer patients, respectively. SPECT/CT was well tolerated by all patients and operating time for LM/SL was within 30 min. No adverse events were reported with a time frame of 1-to-3 years. In early stage of gynaecological cancers, SPECT/low-dose CT is technically feasible and of clinical added-value for LM/SL. PMID:23526734

  10. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C.J.; Liu Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2006-02-15

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cmx2.7 cmx{approx}0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64x64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using {sup 99m}Tc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3x3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5x10{sup -4} with the energy window of {+-}10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  11. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  12. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  13. First use of mini gamma cameras for intra-operative robotic SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Philipp; Sharma, Kanishka; Okur, Ash; Gardiazabal, José; Vogel, Jakob; Lasserl, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2013-01-01

    Different types of nuclear imaging systems have been used in the past, starting with pre-operative gantry-based SPECT systems and gamma cameras for 2D imaging of radioactive distributions. The main applications are concentrated on diagnostic imaging, since traditional SPECT systems and gamma cameras are bulky and heavy. With the development of compact gamma cameras with good resolution and high sensitivity, it is now possible to use them without a fixed imaging gantry. Mounting the camera onto a robot arm solves the weight issue, while also providing a highly repeatable and reliable acquisition platform. In this work we introduce a novel robotic setup performing scans with a mini gamma camera, along with the required calibration steps, and show the first SPECT reconstructions. The results are extremely promising, both in terms of image quality as well as reproducibility. In our experiments, the novel setup outperformed a commercial fhSPECT system, reaching accuracies comparable to state-of-the-art SPECT systems.

  14. A review of small animal imaging planar and pinhole spect Gamma camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Cornelissen, Bart; Van Den Bossche, Bieke; Audenaert, Kurt; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy (positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques) allows qualitative and quantitative measurement of physiologic processes as well as alterations secondary to various disease states. With the use of specific radioligands, molecular pathways and pharmaco-kinetic processes can be investigated. Radioligand delivery can be (semi)quantified in the region of interest in cross-sectional and longitudinal examinations, which can be performed under the same conditions or after physiologic or pharmacologic interventions. Most preclinical pharmacokinetic studies on physiological and experimentally altered physiological processes are performed in laboratory animals using high-resolution imaging systems. Single photon emission imaging has the disadvantage of decreased spatial and temporal resolution compared with PET. The advantage of SPECT is that equipment is generally more accessible and commonly used radionuclides have a longer physical half-life allowing for investigations over a longer time interval. This review will focus on single photon emission scintigraphy. An overview of contemporary techniques to measure biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in small animal in vivo is presented. Theoretical as well as practical aspects of planar gamma camera and SPECT pinhole (PH) imaging are discussed. Current research is focusing on refining PH SPECT methodology, so specific regarding technical aspects and applications of PH SPECT will be reviewed.

  15. Role of gallium SPECT-CT in the diagnosis of left ventricular assist device infections.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dana T; Minamoto, Grace Y; Da Silva, Raphaella; Puius, Yoram A; Peck, Naomi; Goldstein, Daniel; D'Alessandro, David; Muggia, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    Infection remains a well-established complication after the placement of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Defining the extent of infection is a challenging task as there are few effective imaging modalities and no standardized guidelines regarding imaging in the diagnosis of device-related infections (DRIs). The use of gallium with single photon emission tomography-computed tomography (Ga-SPECT-CT) has not been previously reported in localizing DRIs. We reviewed the charts and images of five patients with LVADs who underwent Ga-SPECT-CT for the diagnosis of various types of DRIs. Gallium SPECT-CT further clarified the extent of infections among LVAD patients, allowing for patient-specific tailored treatments including surgical debridement. Gallium SPECT-CT is a useful tool when diagnosing LVAD infections and could potentially be the imaging modality of choice in the near future. With improved imaging studies, such as Ga-SPECT-CT, allowing for earlier and more accurate diagnoses of DRIs, the outcome of such infections is likely to improve. PMID:25419830

  16. An investigation of inconsistent projections and artefacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with axially aligned pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kench, P. L.; Lin, J.; Gregoire, M. C.; Meikle, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple pinholes are advantageous for maximizing the use of the available field of view (FOV) of compact small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detectors. However, when the pinholes are aligned axially to optimize imaging of extended objects, such as rodents, multiplexing of the pinhole projections can give rise to inconsistent data which leads to 'ghost point' artefacts in the reconstructed volume. A novel four pinhole collimator with a baffle was designed and implemented to eliminate these inconsistent projections. Simulation and physical phantom studies were performed to investigate artefacts from axially aligned pinholes and the efficacy of the baffle in removing inconsistent data and, thus, reducing reconstruction artefacts. SPECT was performed using a Defrise phantom to investigate the impact of collimator design on FOV utilization and axial blurring effects. Multiple pinhole SPECT acquired with a baffle had fewer artefacts and improved quantitative accuracy when compared to SPECT acquired without a baffle. The use of four pinholes positioned in a square maximized the available FOV, increased acquisition sensitivity and reduced axial blurring effects. These findings support the use of a baffle to eliminate inconsistent projection data arising from axially aligned pinholes and improve small animal SPECT reconstructions.

  17. Utility of the SPECT Tc-99m labeled RBC blood pool scan in the detection of hepatic hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Guze, B.H.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1989-11-01

    The sensitivity of SPECT imaging of hepatic blood pool activity using Tc-99m labeled RBCs was contrasted with magnetic resonance and CT imaging in 22 cases. SPECT is a noninvasive technique with a high sensitivity for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. It is helpful for clarifying equivocal magnetic resonance imaging results.

  18. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  19. Myocardial infarction in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Egred, M; Viswanathan, G; Davis, G

    2005-01-01

    Although myocardial infarction (MI) mainly occurs in patients older than 45, young men or women can suffer MI. Fortunately, its incidence is not common in patients younger than 45 years. However, the disease carries a significant morbidity, psychological effects, and financial constraints for the person and the family when it occurs at a young age. The causes of MI among patients aged less than 45 can be divided into four groups: (1) atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) non-atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) hyper-coagulable states; (4) MI related to substance misuse. There is a considerable overlap between all the groups. This article reviews the literature and highlights the practical issues involved in the management of young adults with MI. PMID:16344295

  20. Ranolazine Therapy Reduces Non-ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Unstable Angina in Coronary Disease Patients with Angina.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gary L; Colombo, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    High sympathetic tone and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) are associated with major adverse cardiac events (MACE). We have shown ranolazine (RAN) improves autonomic function. RAN was introduced to 51 successive anginal CD patients (RANCD). A control group of 54 successive nonanginal CD patients (NORANCD) continued baseline therapy. Mean study duration was 6.1 years, which included semi-annual autonomic function measures (ANX 3.0, ANSAR Medical Technologies, Inc., Philadelphia, PA) and yearly myocardial perfusion SPECT studies (MPI). MACE were experienced by 29% RANCD patients versus 46% NORANCD patients (p = 0.0105). The patients from both groups with abnormal parasympathetic and sympathetic (P&S) measures and MACE totaled 52 of those patients with MACE versus 17% of those patients without MACE (p = 0.0274). Abnormal MPI was demonstrated in 35% of those with abnormal (P&S) measures and MACE versus 12% without MACE. Sympathovagal balance (SB) was lower, indicating higher, relative parasympathetic tone (known to be cardioprotective) in the RANCD group. Acute coronary syndromes occurred 4.5 times as often in NORANCD patients. High SB occur more frequently than abnormal MPI in CD patients experiencing MACE. In addition to increased myocardial blood flow as its proposed mechanism of angina relief, RAN improves P&S measures, a potentially new mechanism whereby RAN improves outcomes. PMID:27574382

  1. Ranolazine Therapy Reduces Non-ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Unstable Angina in Coronary Disease Patients with Angina.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gary L; Colombo, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    High sympathetic tone and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) are associated with major adverse cardiac events (MACE). We have shown ranolazine (RAN) improves autonomic function. RAN was introduced to 51 successive anginal CD patients (RANCD). A control group of 54 successive nonanginal CD patients (NORANCD) continued baseline therapy. Mean study duration was 6.1 years, which included semi-annual autonomic function measures (ANX 3.0, ANSAR Medical Technologies, Inc., Philadelphia, PA) and yearly myocardial perfusion SPECT studies (MPI). MACE were experienced by 29% RANCD patients versus 46% NORANCD patients (p = 0.0105). The patients from both groups with abnormal parasympathetic and sympathetic (P&S) measures and MACE totaled 52 of those patients with MACE versus 17% of those patients without MACE (p = 0.0274). Abnormal MPI was demonstrated in 35% of those with abnormal (P&S) measures and MACE versus 12% without MACE. Sympathovagal balance (SB) was lower, indicating higher, relative parasympathetic tone (known to be cardioprotective) in the RANCD group. Acute coronary syndromes occurred 4.5 times as often in NORANCD patients. High SB occur more frequently than abnormal MPI in CD patients experiencing MACE. In addition to increased myocardial blood flow as its proposed mechanism of angina relief, RAN improves P&S measures, a potentially new mechanism whereby RAN improves outcomes.

  2. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Radioiodinated Hypericin Dicarboxylic Acid as a Necrosis Avid Agent in Rat Models of Induced Hepatic, Muscular, and Myocardial Necroses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jindian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Shengwei; Jiang, Cuihua; Zhang, DongJian; Jin, Qiaomei; Wang, Qin; Wang, Cong; Ni, Yicheng; Yin, Zhiqi; Song, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to substantial morbidity and mortality around the world. Accurate assessment of myocardial viability is essential to assist therapies and improve patient outcomes. (131)I-hypericin dicarboxylic acid ((131)I-HDA) was synthesized and evaluated as a potential diagnostic agent for earlier assessment of myocardium viability compared to its preceding counterpart (131)I-hypericin ((131)I-Hyp) with strong hydrophobic property, long plasma half-life, and high uptake in mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). Herein, HDA was synthesized and characterized, and self-aggregation constant Kα was analyzed by spectrophotometry. Plasma half-life was determined in healthy rats by γ-counting. (131)I-HDA and (131)I-Hyp were prepared with iodogen as oxidant. In vitro necrosis avidity of (131)I-HDA and (131)I-Hyp was evaluated in necrotic cells induced by hyperthermia. Biodistribution was determined in rat models of induced necrosis using γ-counting, autoradiography, and histopathology. Earlier imaging of necrotic myocardium to assess myocardial viability was performed in rat models of reperfused myocardium infarction using single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). As a result, the self-aggregation constant Kα of HDA was lower than that of Hyp (105602 vs 194644, p < 0.01). (131)I-HDA displayed a shorter blood half-life compared with (131)I-Hyp (9.21 vs 31.20 h, p < 0.01). The necrotic-viable ratio in cells was higher with (131)I-HDA relative to that with (131)I-Hyp (5.48 vs 4.63, p < 0.05). (131)I-HDA showed a higher necrotic-viable myocardium ratio (7.32 vs 3.20, p < 0.01), necrotic myocardium-blood ratio (3.34 vs 1.74, p < 0.05), and necrotic myocardium-lung ratio (3.09 vs 0.61, p < 0.01) compared with (131)I-Hyp. (131)I-HDA achieved imaging of necrotic myocardium at 6 h postinjection (p.i.) with SPECT/CT, earlier than what (131)I-Hyp did. Therefore, (131)I-HDA may serve as a promising necrosis-avid diagnostic agent for

  3. Consideration of QRS complex in addition to ST-segment abnormalities in the estimation of the "risk region" during acute anterior or inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vervaat, F E; Bouwmeester, S; van Hellemond, I E G; Wagner, G S; Gorgels, A P M

    2014-01-01

    The myocardial area at risk (MaR) is an important aspect in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). It represents the myocardium at the onset of the STEMI that is ischemic and could become infarcted if no reperfusion occurs. The MaR, therefore, has clinical value because it gives an indication of the amount of myocardium that could potentially be salvaged by rapid reperfusion therapy. The most validated method for measuring the MaR is (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT, but this technique is not easily applied in the clinical setting. Another method that can be used for measuring the MaR is the standard ECG-based scoring system, Aldrich ST score, which is more easily applied. This ECG-based scoring system can be used to estimate the extent of acute ischemia for anterior or inferior left ventricular locations, by considering quan