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Sample records for 9g dna chip

  1. Comparison of Analytical and Clinical Performance of HPV 9G DNA Chip, PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip, and Hybrid-Capture II Assay in Cervicovaginal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho Young; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Hyo Bin; Oh, Seo Young; Lee, Sun-Joo; Kim, Wook Youn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can be detected by using several molecular methods, including Hybrid-Capture II (HC2) assay and variable HPV DNA chip tests, although each method has different sensitivities and specificities. Methods: We performed HPV 9G DNA Chip (9G) and PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip (PANArray) tests on 118 cervicovaginal swabs and compared the results with HC2, cytology, histology, and direct sequencing results. Results The overall and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) positivity rates were 62.7% and 44.9% using 9G, and 61.0% and 30.5% using PANArray, respectively. The positivity rates for HR-HPV with these two chips were significantly lower than 55.1% when HC2 was used. The sensitivity of overall HPV positivity in detecting histologically confirmed low-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions or higher was 88.7% for all three tests. The specificity was 58.5% for 9G and 61.5% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 72.3% for HC2. With the HR-HPV+ genotype threshold, the sensitivity decreased to 75.5% for 9G and 52.8% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 88.7% for HC2. Comparison of the two chips showed concordant results in 55.1% of the samples, compatible results in 16.9%, and discordant results in 28.0%, exhibiting poor agreement in detecting  certain HPV genotypes. Compared with direct sequencing, 9G yielded no discordant results, whereas PANArray yielded 31 discordant results (26.7%). Conclusions Compared with HC2, the HPV genotyping tests showed lower sensitivity in histologic correlation. When the two chips were compared, the 9G was more sensitive and accurate for detecting HR-HPV than the PANArray. PMID:26763506

  2. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  3. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  4. Microarrays/DNA Chips for the Detection of Waterborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vale, Filipa F

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays are useful for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms in water samples. Specific probes targeting waterborne pathogens are selected with bioinformatics tools, synthesized and spotted onto a DNA array. Here, the construction of a DNA chip for waterborne pathogen detection is described, including the processes of probe in silico selection, synthesis, validation, and data analysis. PMID:27460375

  5. Sensitivity, Specificity, and the Hybridization Isotherms of DNA Chips

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, A.; Buhot, A.; Zhulina, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Competitive hybridization, at the surface and in the bulk, lowers the sensitivity of DNA chips. Competitive surface hybridization occurs when different targets can hybridize with the same probe. Competitive bulk hybridization takes place when the targets can hybridize with free complementary chains in the solution. The effects of competitive hybridization on the thermodynamically attainable performance of DNA chips are quantified in terms of the hybridization isotherms of the spots. These relate the equilibrium degree of the hybridization to the bulk composition. The hybridization isotherm emerges as a Langmuir isotherm modified for electrostatic interactions within the probe layer. The sensitivity of the assay in equilibrium is directly related to the slope of the isotherm. A simpler description is possible, in terms of c50 values specifying the bulk composition corresponding to 50% hybridization at the surface. The effects of competitive hybridization are important for the quantitative analysis of DNA chip results, especially when used to study point mutations. PMID:14747310

  6. On-chip concentration of bacteria using a 3D dielectrophoretic chip and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-hyeong; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2010-06-01

    We report the on-chip concentration of bacteria using a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with 3D electrodes and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip. The DEP chip has a set of interdigitated Au post electrodes with 50 µm height to generate a network of non-uniform electric fields for the efficient trapping by DEP. The metal post array was fabricated by photolithography and subsequent Ni and Au electroplating. Three model bacteria samples (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans) were tested and over 80-fold concentrations were achieved within 2 min. Subsequently, on-chip DNA extraction from the concentrated bacteria in the 3D DEP chip was performed by laser irradiation using the laser-irradiated magnetic bead system (LIMBS) in the same chip. The extracted DNA was analyzed with silicon chip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total process of on-chip bacteria concentration and the subsequent DNA extraction can be completed within 10 min including the manual operation time.

  7. Opto-electronic DNA chip-based integrated card for clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gilles; Broyer, Patrick; Lanet, Véronique; Delattre, Cyril; Foucault, Frédéric; Menou, Lionel; Calvas, Bernard; Roller, Denis; Ginot, Frédéric; Campagnolo, Raymond; Mallard, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    Clinical diagnostics is one of the most promising applications for microfluidic lab-on-a-chip or lab-on-card systems. DNA chips, which provide multiparametric data, are privileged tools for genomic analysis. However, automation of molecular biology protocol and use of these DNA chips in fully integrated systems remains a great challenge. Simplicity of chip and/or card/instrument interfaces is amongst the most critical issues to be addressed. Indeed, current detection systems for DNA chip reading are often complex, expensive, bulky and even limited in terms of sensitivity or accuracy. Furthermore, for liquid handling in the lab-on-cards, many devices use complex and bulky systems, either to directly manipulate fluids, or to ensure pneumatic or mechanical control of integrated valves. All these drawbacks prevent or limit the use of DNA-chip-based integrated systems, for point-of-care testing or as a routine diagnostics tool. We present here a DNA-chip-based protocol integration on a plastic card for clinical diagnostics applications including: (1) an opto-electronic DNA-chip, (2) fluid handling using electrically activated embedded pyrotechnic microvalves with closing/opening functions. We demonstrate both fluidic and electric packaging of the optoelectronic DNA chip without major alteration of its electronical and biological functionalities, and fluid control using novel electrically activable pyrotechnic microvalves. Finally, we suggest a complete design of a card dedicated to automation of a complex biological protocol with a fully electrical fluid handling and DNA chip reading. PMID:17636395

  8. Avatar DNA Nanohybrid System in Chip-on-a-Phone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae-Hwan; Han, Chang Jo; Shul, Yong-Gun; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Long admired for informational role and recognition function in multidisciplinary science, DNA nanohybrids have been emerging as ideal materials for molecular nanotechnology and genetic information code. Here, we designed an optical machine-readable DNA icon on microarray, Avatar DNA, for automatic identification and data capture such as Quick Response and ColorZip codes. Avatar icon is made of telepathic DNA-DNA hybrids inscribed on chips, which can be identified by camera of smartphone with application software. Information encoded in base-sequences can be accessed by connecting an off-line icon to an on-line web-server network to provide message, index, or URL from database library. Avatar DNA is then converged with nano-bio-info-cogno science: each building block stands for inorganic nanosheets, nucleotides, digits, and pixels. This convergence could address item-level identification that strengthens supply-chain security for drug counterfeits. It can, therefore, provide molecular-level vision through mobile network to coordinate and integrate data management channels for visual detection and recording. PMID:24824876

  9. Avatar DNA Nanohybrid System in Chip-on-a-Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dae-Hwan; Han, Chang Jo; Shul, Yong-Gun; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-01

    Long admired for informational role and recognition function in multidisciplinary science, DNA nanohybrids have been emerging as ideal materials for molecular nanotechnology and genetic information code. Here, we designed an optical machine-readable DNA icon on microarray, Avatar DNA, for automatic identification and data capture such as Quick Response and ColorZip codes. Avatar icon is made of telepathic DNA-DNA hybrids inscribed on chips, which can be identified by camera of smartphone with application software. Information encoded in base-sequences can be accessed by connecting an off-line icon to an on-line web-server network to provide message, index, or URL from database library. Avatar DNA is then converged with nano-bio-info-cogno science: each building block stands for inorganic nanosheets, nucleotides, digits, and pixels. This convergence could address item-level identification that strengthens supply-chain security for drug counterfeits. It can, therefore, provide molecular-level vision through mobile network to coordinate and integrate data management channels for visual detection and recording.

  10. Development of an Automated DNA Detection System Using an Electrochemical DNA Chip Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Sadato; Okada, Jun; Hashimoto, Koji; Tsuji, Koichi; Nikaido, Masaru; Gemma, Nobuhiro

    A new compact automated DNA detection system Genelyzer™ has been developed. After injecting a sample solution into a cassette with a built-in electrochemical DNA chip, processes from hybridization reaction to detection and analysis are all operated fully automatically. In order to detect a sample DNA, electrical currents from electrodes due to an oxidization reaction of electrochemically active intercalator molecules bound to hybridized DNAs are detected. The intercalator is supplied as a reagent solution by a fluid supply unit of the system. The feasibility test proved that the simultaneous typing of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was carried out within two hours and that all the results were consistent with those by conventional typing methods. It is expected that this system opens a new way to a DNA testing such as a test for infectious diseases, a personalized medicine, a food inspection, a forensic application and any other applications.

  11. Kinetic characterization of on-chip DNA ligation on dendron-coated surfaces with nanoscaled lateral spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Namgyu; Park, Joon Won; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed the enzymatic profiles of on-chip DNA ligation as we controlled the lateral spacing of surface-immobilized DNA substrates using dendron molecules with different sizes at the nanoscale. Enzymatic on-chip DNA ligation was performed on the dendron-coated surface within 20 min with no need for post-ligation gel electrophoresis. The enzymatic DNA repair was assessed by the fluorescence intensity at the repaired DNA duplex after thermally dissociating the unligated Cy3-labeled DNA from the DNA duplex, in which the Cy3-labeled DNA was hybridized prior to the on-chip DNA ligation. The rate of the nick-sealing reaction on the 27-acid dendron surface was 3-fold higher than that on the 9-acid dendron surface, suggesting that the wider lateral spacing determined by the larger dendron molecule could facilitate the access of DNA ligase to the nick site. The performance of on-chip DNA ligation was dropped to 10% and 3% when the nick was replaced by one- and two-nucleotide-long gaps, respectively. The 5‧ terminal phosphorylation of DNA strands by polynucleotide kinase and the on-chip DNA cleavage by endonucleases were also quantitatively monitored throughout the on-chip DNA ligation on the dendron-coated surface. A better understanding of the enzymatic kinetics of on-chip DNA ligation will contribute to a more reliable performance of various on-chip DNA ligation-based assays.

  12. Blocking oligo--a novel approach for improving chip-based DNA hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tao, Sheng-ce; Gao, Hua-fang; Cao, Fei; Ma, Xue-mei; Cheng, Jing

    2003-08-01

    For most of the commonly used DNA chips, the probes are usually single-stranded oligonucleotides and the targets are double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs). Only one strand of the DNA serves as the target while the other competes with the probes immobilized on the chip for the target and therefore is regarded as the interfering strand. In this report, a novel technique was developed for improving the hybridization efficiency on DNA chips by using blocking oligos, which is complimentary to the target interfering strand to reduce the influence of the interfering strand. The hybridization efficiency of dsDNA was much lower than that of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) when synthesized DNA targets were tested on the DNA chip. Blocking oligos can improve the hybridization efficiency of dsDNA to about 2/3 that of ssDNA. Blocking oligos have also been applied to PCR products of different lengths for hybridization. The hybridization efficiency with blocking oligos is about three times higher than that without blocking oligos. We have tested PCR products of 1054 and 435 bp using our blocking procedure, and the results are consistent. PMID:12944123

  13. Detection of Alicyclobacillus species in fruit juice using a random genomic DNA microarray chip.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Hyeong; Kim, Sun-Joong; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Gu, Man Bock; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2011-06-01

    This study describes a method using a DNA microarray chip to rapidly and simultaneously detect Alicyclobacillus species in orange juice based on the hybridization of genomic DNA with random probes. Three food spoilage bacteria were used in this study: Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, and Alicyclobacillus cycloheptanicus. The three Alicyclobacillus species were adjusted to 2 × 10(3) CFU/ml and inoculated into pasteurized 100% pure orange juice. Cy5-dCTP labeling was used for reference signals, and Cy3-dCTP was labeled for target genomic DNA. The molar ratio of 1:1 of Cy3-dCTP and Cy5-dCTP was used. DNA microarray chips were fabricated using randomly fragmented DNA of Alicyclobacillus spp. and were hybridized with genomic DNA extracted from Bacillus spp. Genomic DNA extracted from Alicyclobacillus spp. showed a significantly higher hybridization rate compared with DNA of Bacillus spp., thereby distinguishing Alicyclobacillus spp. from Bacillus spp. The results showed that the microarray DNA chip containing randomly fragmented genomic DNA was specific and clearly identified specific food spoilage bacteria. This microarray system is a good tool for rapid and specific detection of thermophilic spoilage bacteria, mainly Alicyclobacillus spp., and is useful and applicable to the fruit juice industry. PMID:21669070

  14. DNA-affinity-purified Chip (DAP-chip) Method to Determine Gene Targets for Bacterial Two component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. PMID:25079303

  15. A gene-specific DNA sequencing chip for exploring molecular evolutionary change.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Olivier; Naylor, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) approaches to DNA sequencing face two conflicting constraints. First, in order to ensure that the target DNA binds reliably, the oligonucleotide probes that are attached to the chip array must be >15 bp in length. Secondly, the total number of possible 15 bp oligonucleotides is too large (>4(15)) to fit on a chip with current technology. To circumvent the conflict between these two opposing constraints, we present a novel gene-specific DNA chip design. Our design is based on the idea that not all conceivable oligonucleotides need to be placed on a chip--only those that capture sequence combinations occurring in nature. Our approach uses a training set of aligned sequences that code for the gene in question. We compute the minimum number of oligonucleotides (generally 15-30 bp in length) that need to be placed on a DNA chip to capture the variation implied by the training set using a graph search algorithm. We tested the approach in silico using cytochrome-b sequences. Results indicate that on average, 98% of the sequence of an unknown target can be determined using the approach. PMID:14973200

  16. Analytical study of a microfludic DNA amplification chip using water cooling effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Shen, Chia Ming; Ko, Yu Wei

    2013-04-01

    A novel continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip has been analyzed in our work. Two temperature zones are controlled by two external controllers and the other temperature zone at the chip center is controlled by the flow rate of the fluid inside a channel under the glass chip. By employing a water cooling channel at the chip center, the sequence of denaturation, annealing, and extension can be created due to the forced convection effect. The required annealing temperature of PCR less than 313 K can also be demonstrated in this chip. The Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cooling channel with the thin aluminum cover is utilized to enhance the temperature uniformity. The size of this chip is 76 mm × 26 mm × 3 mm. This device represents the first demonstration of water cooling thermocycling within continuous-flow PCR microfluidics. The commercial software CFD-ACE+(TM) is utilized to determine the distances between the heating assemblies within the chip. We investigate the influences of various chip materials, operational parameters of the cooling channel and geometric parameters of the chip on the temperature uniformity on the chip surface. Concerning the temperature uniformity of the working zones and the lowest temperature at the annealing zone, the air gap spacing of 1 mm and the cooling channel thicknesses of 1 mm of the PMMA channel with an aluminum cover are recommended in our design. The hydrophobic surface of the PDMS channel was modified by filling it with 20 % Tween 20 solution and then adding bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution to the PCR mixture. DNA fragments with different lengths (372 bp and 478 bp) are successfully amplified with the device. PMID:23179465

  17. Accelerating genetic improvement with SNP chips and DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays is expected to have a profound impact on genetic progress in the U.S. dairy industry. In the 16 months since its initial availability, the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip has been used to genotype nearly 20,000 Holsteins. Thes...

  18. A multistage volumetric bar chart chip for visualized quantification of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yujun; Wang, Yuanchen; Qin, Lidong

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid detection is critical in disease diagnosis as well as in the environmental assays of harmful bacteria or viruses and forensic applications. Current methods for visualized quantification of DNA require costly and sophisticated instruments. Here, we report a multistage propelled volumetric bar chart chip (MV-Chip) for multiplexing and quantitative detection of DNA. Owing to its ‘rocket-like’ propelling reaction, the pre-deposited platinum films could perform cascade amplification and detect as low as 20 pM DNA targets after three stages platinum catalyzed propulsion. The resulting ink bar charts can be directly read out by the naked eye and the signal shows little interference from serum. Single-nucleotide polymorphism and multiplex DNA detection were carried out to demonstrate this powerful application. PMID:24160770

  19. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  20. Automatic on-chip RNA-DNA hybridization assay with integrated phase change microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Xuan; Jiang, Hai; Wang, Junsheng; Chen, Shu; Cao, Honghe; Li, Dongqing

    2012-07-01

    An RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip integrated with electrothermally actuated phase change microvalves for detecting pathogenic bacteria is presented in this paper. In order to realize the sequential loading and washing processes required in such an assay, gravity-based pressure-driven flow and phase-change microvalves were used in the microfluidic chip. Paraffin wax was used as the phase change material in the valves and thin film heaters were used to electrothermally actuate microvalves. Light absorption measured by a photodetector to determine the concentrations of the samples. The automatic control of the complete assay was implemented by a self-coded LabVIEW program. To examine the performance of this chip, Salmonella was used as a sample pathogen. Significantly, reduction in reagent/sample consumption (up to 20 folds) was achieved by this on-chip assay, compared with using the commercial test kit following the same protocol in conventional labs. The experimental results show that the quantitative detection can be obtained in approximately 26 min, and the detection limit is as low as 103 CFU ml-1. This RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip shows an excellent potential in the development of a portable device for point-of-testing applications.

  1. Series DNA Amplification Using the Continuous-Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Seung-Ryong; Kang, Chi Jung; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2008-02-01

    We proposed a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip that can be used for series DNA amplification. The continuous-flow PCR chip has several advantages such as fast thermal cycling, series of amplifications, cost-effective fabrication, portability, and fluorescence detection. The continuous-flow PCR chip is composed of two parts namely poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannel for sample injection and indium-tin-oxide (ITO) heater/glass chip for thermal cycling. The fabricated microchannel width and depth are 250 and 200 µm, respectively. Also, the total working length of the PDMS microchannel is 1340 mm which is equivalent for 20 cycles of amplification. A 2:2:3 microchannel length ratio for three different temperature zones namely denaturation, annealing, and extension was assigned, respectively. Upon the operation of the fabricated continuous-flow PCR chip, the amplification of plasmid DNA pKS-GFP with 720 base pairs and PG-noswsi with 300 base pairs were found successfully with a total reaction time of 15 min.

  2. Purification and preconcentration of genomic DNA from whole cell lysates using photoactivated polycarbonate (PPC) microfluidic chips

    PubMed Central

    Witek, Małgorzata A.; Llopis, Shawn D.; Wheatley, Abigail; McCarley, Robin L.; Soper, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the use of a photoactivated polycarbonate (PPC) microfluidic chip for the solid-phase, reversible immobilization (SPRI) and purification of genomic DNA (gDNA) from whole cell lysates. The surface of polycarbonate was activated by UV radiation resulting in a photo-oxidation reaction, which produced a channel surface containing carboxylate groups. The gDNA was selectively captured on this photoactivated surface in an immobilization buffer, which consisted of 3% polyethylene glycol, 0.4 M NaCl and 70% ethanol. The methodology reported herein is similar to conventional SPRI in that surface-confined carboxylate groups are used for the selective immobilization of DNA; however, no magnetic beads or a magnetic field are required. As observed by UV spectroscopy, a load of ∼7.6 ± 1.6 µg/ml of gDNA was immobilized onto the PPC bed. The recovery of DNA following purification was estimated to be 85 ± 5%. The immobilization and purification assay using this PPC microchip could be performed within ∼25 min as follows: (i) DNA immobilization ∼6 min, (ii) chip washout with ethanol 10 min, and (iii) drying and gDNA desorption ∼6 min. The PPC microchip could also be used for subsequent assays with no substantial loss in recovery, no observable carryover and no need for ‘reactivation’ of the PC surface with UV light. PMID:16757572

  3. Quantum Dot-Bead-DNA Probe-Based Hybridization Fluorescence Assays on Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-10-01

    The development of chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-DNA conjugate probes for hybridization detection is a prime research focus in the field of microfluidics. QD-Bead-DNA probe-based hybridization detection methods are often called "bead-based assays," and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capabilities of microfluidic technology. Met was identified as a prognostic marker in different cancers including lung, renal, liver, head and neck, stomach, and breast. In this report, the cancer causing Met gene was detected with QDs attached to polystyrene microbeads. We constructed a microfluidic platform using a flexible PDMS polymer. The chip consists of two channels, with two inlets and two outlets. The two channels were integrated with QD-bead-DNA probes for simultaneous detection of wild type target DNA and mutant DNA, containing three nucleotide changes compared to the wild type sequence. The fluorescence quenching ability of QDs within the channels of microfluidic chips were compared for both DNAs. PMID:26726440

  4. Disposable on-chip microfluidic system for buccal cell lysis, DNA purification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Woong; Maeng, Joon-Ho; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a disposable, integrated biochip for DNA sample preparation and PCR. The hybrid biochip (25 × 45 mm) is composed of a disposable PDMS layer with a microchannel chamber and reusable glass substrate integrated with a microheater and thermal microsensor. Lysis, purification, and PCR can be performed sequentially on this microfluidic device. Cell lysis is achieved by heat and purification is performed by mechanical filtration. Passive check valves are integrated to enable sample preparation and PCR in a fixed sequence. Reactor temperature is needed to lysis and PCR reaction is controlled within ±1°C by PID controller of LabVIEW software. Buccal epithelial cell lysis, DNA purification, and SY158 gene PCR amplification were successfully performed on this novel chip. Our experiments confirm that the entire process, except the off-chip gel electrophoresis, requires only approximately 1 h for completion. This disposable microfluidic chip for sample preparation and PCR can be easily united with other technologies to realize a fully integrated DNA chip. PMID:23784986

  5. Analysis of DNA-chip and antigen-chip data: studies of cancer, stem cells and autoimmune diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domany, Eytan

    2005-07-01

    Biology has undergone a revolution during the past decade. Deciphering the human genome has opened new horizons, among which the advent of DNA microarrays has been perhaps the most significant. These miniature measuring devices report the levels at which tens of thousands of genes are expressed in a collection of cells of interest (such as tissue from a tumor). I describe here briefly this technology and present an example of how analysis of data obtained from such high throughput experiments provides insights of possible clinical and therapeutic relevance for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Next, I describe how gene expression data is used to deduce a new design principle, " Just In Case", used by stem cells. Finally I briefly review a different novel technology, of antigen chips, which provide a fingerprint of a subject's immune system and may become a predictive clinical tool. The work reviewed here was done in collaboration with numerous colleagues and students.

  6. Fenton fragmentation for faster electrophoretic on chip purification of amplifiable genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Hakenberg, S; Hügle, M; Meyer, P; Behrmann, O; Dame, G; Urban, G A

    2015-05-15

    With a rapid and simple actuation protocol electrophoretic nucleic acid extraction is easy automatable, requires no moving parts, is easy to miniaturize and furthermore possesses a size dependent cut-off filter adjustable by the pore size of the hydrogel. However electrophoretic nucleic acid extraction from bacteria has so far been applied mainly for short RNA targets. One of the reasons is that electrophoretic processing of unfragmented genomic DNA strands is time-consuming, because of the length. Here DNA fragmentation would accelerate extraction and isolation. We introduce on-chip lysis and non-enzymatic DNA cleavage directly followed by a purifying step for receiving amplifiable DNA fragments from bacteria in less than 25 min. In contrast to restriction enzymes the Fenton reaction is known to cleave DNA without nucleotide specificity. The reaction mix contains iron(II) EDTA, sodium ascorbate, hydrogen peroxide and lysozyme. The degree of fragmentation can be adjusted by the concentration of reagents. The results enable electrophoretic extraction methods to unspecifically process long genomic DNA in a short time frame, e.g. for pathogen detection in a lab-on-a-chip format. PMID:24970713

  7. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  8. Magnetoresistive DNA chips based on ac field focusing of magnetic labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, H. A.; Cardoso, F. A.; Ferreira, R.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2006-04-01

    A study was made on the sensitivity of a magnetoresistive DNA-chip platform being developed for cystic fibrosis diagnostics. The chip, comprised of an array of 2.5×80 μm2 U-shaped spin-valve sensors integrated within current line structures for magnetic label manipulation, enabled the detection at 30 Hz of 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles from 100 pM down to the pM range (or a target DNA concentration of 500 pM). It was observed that the sensor response increased linearly with label concentration. Noise spectra obtained for these sensors showed a thermal noise of 10-17 V2/Hz with a 1/f knee at 50 kHz at a 1 mA sense current, showing that lower detection limits are possible.

  9. DNA-library assembly programmed by on-demand nano-liter droplets from a custom microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Uwe; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Sharma, Abhishek; Wagler, Patrick F; Cohen, Rafael; Raz, Ofir; Marx, Tzipy; Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; McCaskill, John S

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale synthetic biology can benefit from programmable nanoliter-scale processing of DNA in microfluidic chips if they are interfaced effectively to biochemical arrays such as microwell plates. Whereas active microvalve chips require complex fabrication and operation, we show here how a passive and readily fabricated microchip can be employed for customizable nanoliter scale pipetting and reaction control involving DNA. This recently developed passive microfluidic device, supporting nanoliter scale combinatorial droplet generation and mixing, is here used to generate a DNA test library with one member per droplet exported to addressed locations on microwell plates. Standard DNA assembly techniques, such as Gibson assembly, compatible with isothermal on-chip operation, are employed and checked using off-chip PCR and assembly PCR. The control of output droplet sequences and mixing performance was verified using dyes and fluorescently labeled DNA solutions, both on-chip and in external capillary channels. Gel electrophoresis of products and DNA sequencing were employed to further verify controlled combination and functional enzymatic assembly. The scalability of the results to larger DNA libraries is also addressed by combinatorial input expansion using sequential injection plugs from a multiwell plate. Hence, the paper establishes a proof of principle of the production of functional combinatorial mixtures at the nanoliter scale for one sequence per well DNA libraries. PMID:26221198

  10. DNA-library assembly programmed by on-demand nano-liter droplets from a custom microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Tangen, Uwe; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S.; Sharma, Abhishek; Wagler, Patrick F.; Cohen, Rafael; Raz, Ofir; Marx, Tzipy; Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; McCaskill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale synthetic biology can benefit from programmable nanoliter-scale processing of DNA in microfluidic chips if they are interfaced effectively to biochemical arrays such as microwell plates. Whereas active microvalve chips require complex fabrication and operation, we show here how a passive and readily fabricated microchip can be employed for customizable nanoliter scale pipetting and reaction control involving DNA. This recently developed passive microfluidic device, supporting nanoliter scale combinatorial droplet generation and mixing, is here used to generate a DNA test library with one member per droplet exported to addressed locations on microwell plates. Standard DNA assembly techniques, such as Gibson assembly, compatible with isothermal on-chip operation, are employed and checked using off-chip PCR and assembly PCR. The control of output droplet sequences and mixing performance was verified using dyes and fluorescently labeled DNA solutions, both on-chip and in external capillary channels. Gel electrophoresis of products and DNA sequencing were employed to further verify controlled combination and functional enzymatic assembly. The scalability of the results to larger DNA libraries is also addressed by combinatorial input expansion using sequential injection plugs from a multiwell plate. Hence, the paper establishes a proof of principle of the production of functional combinatorial mixtures at the nanoliter scale for one sequence per well DNA libraries. PMID:26221198

  11. Label-free DNA Biosensor Based on SERS Molecular Sentinel on Nanowave Chip

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Hoan Thanh; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Fales, Andrew M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Development of a rapid, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for DNA detection is important for many applications in clinical diagnosis, homeland defense, and environment monitoring. A unique label-free DNA biosensor based on Molecular Sentinel (MS) immobilized on a plasmonic ‘Nanowave’ chip, which is also referred to as a metal film over nanosphere (MFON), is presented. Its sensing mechanism is based upon the decrease of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity when Raman label tagged at one end of MS is physically separated from the MFON's surface upon DNA hybridization. This method is label-free as the target does not have to be labeled. The MFON fabrication is relatively simple and low-cost with high reproducibility based on depositing a thin shell of gold over close-packed arrays of nanospheres. The sensing process involves a single hybridization step between the DNA target sequences and the complementary MS probes on the Nanowave chip without requiring secondary hybridization or post-hybridization washing, thus resulting in rapid assay time and low reagent usage. The usefulness and potential application of the biosensor for medical diagnostics is demonstrated by detecting the human radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (RSAD2) gene, a common inflammation biomarker. PMID:23718777

  12. Electrochemical chip-based genomagnetic assay for detection of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Bartosik, Martin; Durikova, Helena; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Anton, Milan; Jandakova, Eva; Hrstka, Roman

    2016-09-15

    Cervical cancer, being the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide, predominantly originates from a persistent infection with a high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Detection of DNA sequences from these high-risk strains, mostly HPV-16 and HPV-18, represents promising strategy for early screening, which would help to identify women with higher risk of cervical cancer. In developing countries, inadequate screening options lead to disproportionately high mortality rates, making a fast and inexpensive detection schemes highly important. Electrochemical sensors and assays offer an alternative to current methods of detection. We developed an electrochemical-chip based assay, in which target HPV DNA is captured via magnetic bead-modified DNA probes, followed by an antidigoxigenin-peroxidase detection system at screen-printed carbon electrode chips, enabling parallel measurements of eight samples simultaneously. We show sensitive detection in attomoles of HPV DNA, selective discrimination between HPV-16 and HPV-18 and good reproducibility. Most importantly, we show application of the assay into both cancer cell lines and cervical smears from patients. The electrochemical results correlated well with standard methods, making this assay potentially applicable in clinical practice. PMID:27132004

  13. DNA separation and fluorescent detection in an optofluidic chip with sub-base-pair resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollnau, Markus; Hammer, Manfred; Dongre, Chaitanya; Hoekstra, Hugo J.

    2015-03-01

    DNA sequencing in a lab-on-a-chip aims at providing cheap, high-speed analysis of low reagent volumes to, e.g., identify genomic deletions or insertions associated with genetic illnesses. Detecting single base-pair insertions/deletions from DNA fragments in the diagnostically relevant range of 150-1000 base-pairs requires a sizing accuracy of S < 10-3. Here we demonstrate S = 4×10-4. A microfluidic chip was post-processed by femtosecond-laser writing of an optical waveguide. 12 blue-labeled and 23 red-labeled DNA fragments were separated in size by capillary electrophoresis, each set excited by either of two lasers power-modulated at different frequencies, their fluorescence detected by a photomultiplier, and blue/red signals distinguished by Fourier analysis. Different calibration strategies were tested: a) use either set of DNA molecules as reference to calibrate the set-up and identify the base-pair sizes of the other set in the same flow experiment, thereby eliminating variations in temperature, wall-coating and sieving-gel conditions, and actuation voltages; b) use the same molecular set as reference and sample with the same fluorescence label, flown in consecutive experiments; c) perform cross-experiments based on different molecular sets with different labels, flown in consecutive experiments. From the results we conclude: Applying quadratic instead of linear fit functions improves the calibration accuracy. Blue-labeled molecules are separated with higher accuracy. The influence of dye label is higher than fluctuations between two experiments. Choosing a single, suitable dye label combined with reference calibration and sample investigation in consecutive experiments results in S = 4×10-4, enabling detection of single base-pair insertion/deletion in a lab-on-a-chip.

  14. 3D-DIP-Chip: a microarray-based method to measure genomic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Powell, James Rees; Bennett, Mark Richard; Evans, Katie Ellen; Yu, Shirong; Webster, Richard Michael; Waters, Raymond; Skinner, Nigel; Reed, Simon Huw

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxins cause DNA damage, which can result in genomic instability. The genetic changes induced have far-reaching consequences, often leading to diseases such as cancer. A wide range of genotoxins exists, including radiations and chemicals found naturally in the environment, and in man-made forms created by human activity across a variety of industries. Genomic technologies offer the possibility of unravelling the mechanisms of genotoxicity, including the repair of genetic damage, enhancing our ability to develop, test and safely use existing and novel materials. We have developed 3D-DIP-Chip, a microarray-based method to measure the prevalence of genomic genotoxin-induced DNA damage. We demonstrate the measurement of both physical and chemical induced DNA damage spectra, integrating the analysis of these with the associated changes in histone acetylation induced in the epigenome. We discuss the application of the method in the context of basic and translational sciences. PMID:25609656

  15. Microfabricated plastic chips by hot embossing methods and their applications for DNA separation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hui; Huang, Guan-Ruey; Lin, Yen-Heng; Sung, Wang-Chou

    2000-08-01

    Design and fabrication of microfluidic devices on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates using novel microfabrication methods are described. The image of microfluidic devices is transferred from quartz master templates possessing inverse image of the devices to plastic plates by using hot embossing method. The micro channels on master templates are formed by the combination of metal etch mask and wet chemical etching. The micromachined quartz templates can be used repeatedly to fabricate cheap and disposable plastic devices. The reproducibility of the hot embossing method is evaluated after using 10 channels on different plastics. The relative standard deviation of the plastic channel profile from ones on quartz templates is less than 1%. In this study, the PMMA chips have been demonstrated as a micro capillary electrophoresis ((mu) -CE) device for DNA separation and detection. The capability of the fabricated chip for electrophoretic injection and separation is characterized via the analysis of DNA fragments (phi) X174. Results indicate that all of the 11 DNA fragments of the size marker could be identified in less than 3 minutes with relative standard deviations less than 0.4% and 8% for migration time and peak area, respectively. Moreover, with the use of near IR dye, fluorescence signals of the higher molecular weight fragments ($GTR 603 bp in length) could be detected at total DNA concentrations as low as 0.1 (mu) g/mL. In addition to DNA fragments (phi) X174, DNA sizing of hepatitis C viral (HCV) amplicon is also achieved using microchip electrophoresis fabricated on PMMA substrate.

  16. On-chip DNA preconcentration in different media conductivities by electrodeless dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunbo; Ye, Ziran; Hui, Yu Sanna; Gao, Yibo; Jiang, Yusheng; Wen, Weijia

    2015-09-01

    Electrodeless dielectrophoresis is the best choice to achieve preconcentration of nanoparticles and biomolecules due to its simple, robust, and easy implementation. We designed a simple chip with microchannels and nano-slits in between and then studied the trapping of DNA in high conductive medium and low conductive medium, corresponding to positive and negative dielectrophoresis (DEP), respectively. It is very important to investigate the trapping in media with different conductivities since one always has to deal with the sample solutions with different conductivities. The trapping process was analyzed by the fluorescent intensity changes. The results showed that DNA could be trapped at the nano-slit in both high and low conductive media in a lower electric field strength (10 V/cm) compared to the existing methods. This is a significant improvement to suppress the Joule heating effect in DEP related experiments. Our work may give insight to researchers for DNA trapping by a simple and low cost device in the Lab-on-a-Chip system. PMID:26487901

  17. Miniaturized devices towards an integrated lab-on-a-chip platform for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaprou, G.; Papadakis, G.; Kokkoris, G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Kefala, I.; Papageorgiou, D.; Gizeli, E.; Tserepi, A.

    2015-06-01

    Microfluidics is an emerging technology enabling the development of Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and screening, food safety and environmental analysis. LOC systems integrate and scale down one or several laboratory functions on a single chip of a few mm2 to cm2 in size, and account for many advantages on biochemical analyses, such as low sample and reagent consumption, low cost, reduced analysis time, portability and point-of-need compatibility. Currently, available nucleic acid diagnostic tests take advantage of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) that allows exponential amplification of portions of nucleic acid sequences that can be used as indicators for the identification of various diseases. Here, we present a comparison between static chamber and continuous flow miniaturized PCR devices, in terms of energy consumption for devices fabricated on the same material stack, with identical sample volume and channel dimensions. The comparison is implemented by a computational study coupling heat transfer in both solid and fluid, mass conservation of species, and joule heating. Based on the conclusions of this study, we develop low-cost and fast DNA amplification devices for both PCR and isothermal amplification, and we implement them in the detection of mutations related to breast cancer. The devices are fabricated by mass production amenable technologies on printed circuit board (PCB) substrates, where copper facilitates the incorporation of on-chip microheaters, defining the thermal zones necessary for PCR or isothermal amplification methods.

  18. In silico evaluation of a novel DNA chip based fingerprinting technology for viral identification.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Flores-Cortés, Perla; Guerra-Trejo, Armando; Jaimes-Díaz, Hueman; Reyes-Rosales, Emma; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Arcadio; Espinosa-Lara, Mercedes; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Rogelio; Kenneth, Loren Beattie

    2006-01-01

    The identification of microorganisms by whole genome DNA fingerprinting was tested "in silico". 94 HPV genome sequences were submitted to virtual hybridization analysis on a DNA chip with 342 probes. This Universal Fingerprinting Chip (UFC) constitutes a representative set of probes of all the possible 8-mer sequences having at least two internal and non contiguous sequence differences between all them. A virtual hybridization analysis was performed in order to find the fingerprinting pattern that represents the signals produced for the hybridization of the probes allowing at most a single mismatch. All the fingerprints for each virus were compared against each other in order to obtain all the pairwise distances measures. A match-extension strategy was applied to identify only the shared signals corresponding to the hybridization of the probes with homologous sequences between two HPV genomes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from the fingerprint distances using the Neighbor-Joining algorithm implemented in the program Phylip 3.61. This tree was compared with that produced from the alignment of whole genome HPV sequences calculated with the program Clustal_X 1.83. The similarities between both trees are suggesting that the UFC-8 is able to discriminate accurately between viral genomes. A fingerprint comparative analysis suggests that the UFC-8 can differentiate between HPV types and sub-types. PMID:17578073

  19. [The development of reagents set in the format of DNA-chip for genetic typing of strains of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Pudova, E A; Markelov, M L; Dedkov, V G; Tchekanova, T A; Sadjin, A I; Kirdiyashkina, N P; Bekova, M V; Deviyatkin, A A

    2014-05-01

    The necessity of development of methods of genic diagnostic of cholera is conditioned by continuation of the Seventh pandemic of cholera, taxonomic variability of strains of Vibrio cholerae involved into pandemic and also permanent danger of delivery of disease to the territory of the Russian Federation. The methods of genic diagnostic of cholera make it possible in a comparatively short time to maximally minutely characterize strains isolated from patients or their environment. The article presents information about working out reagents set for genetic typing of agents of cholera using DNA-chip. The makeup of DNA-chip included oligonucleotide probes making possible to differentiate strains of V. cholerae on serogroups and biovars and to determine their pathogenicity. The single DNA-chip makes it possible to genetically type up to 12 samples concurrently. At that, duration of analysis without accounting stage of DNA separation makes up to 5 hours. In the progress of work, 23 cholera and non-cholera strains were analyzed. The full compliance of DNA-chip typing results to previously known characteristics of strains. Hence, there is a reason to consider availability of further development of reagents set and possibility of its further application in laboratories of regional level and reference centers. PMID:25338464

  20. Nanofluidic laboratory-on-chip device for mapping of single molecule DNA extracted from single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahshid, Sara; Berard, Daniel; Sladek, Robert; Leslie, Sabrina; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this project is to create a nanofluidic platform to provide comprehensive maps of single-cell genomes at 1 kbp resolution based on the direct analysis of single 1-10 Mbp extended DNA molecules extracted from individual cells on-chip. We have developed a nanodevice in which all biochemical processing of single cells (cell lysis, DNA purification and fragmentation) is performed in situ. The platform has the following three components: (1) a micro-cavity (50 ×20 micron in dimension) for trapping and biochemical processing of single cells; (2) post arrays (1 micron depth) for untangling the released genomic contents and (3) parallel nanochannel arrays (100 nm) for extension of ~ 1-10 Mbp DNA for high-throughput optical mapping. Moreover, we use ``Convex Lense-Induced Nanoconfinement'' (CLIC) technique for trapping of single cell and dragging DNA into nanochannels. The principle is that a convex lens is pushed down to deform a flexible coverslip lid above the aforesaid platform containing nano/micro patterns, creating a locally confined region that pins molecules in the embedded nano/micro features. CLIC is used to lower the device lid over a cell isolated in the microcavity with an adjustable gap for buffer exchange. The released DNA is untangled using 1 micron-deep post arrays and driven into nanochannel array where its genomic content is revealed. In particular, using CLIC we were able to successfully trap 20 micron lymphoblast cells inside microcavity and lyse the trapped cell to drive out DNA.

  1. Rapid detection of specific genes from human genomic DNA using the microbead-quantum dot complexes in microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Ha; Kim, Jong Sung

    2013-08-01

    In the clinic, it is important to prepare for single stranded DNA from genomic DNA to detect the target gene. In this study, we have investigated the detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) obtained by ultrasonication of human genomic DNA via fluorescence quenching on microfluidic chip with pillars at the channel to entrap the microbead-QD complexes (MQCs). The QDs with carboxyl group bind to microbeads with amine group by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The thiolated probe DNA conjugates strongly with the metal ions on the surface of QDs. The MQCs were packed into a chamber on the channel blocked by pillars. ssDNA and TOTO-3 (intercalating dye) were introduced into the microchannel. After hybridization of probe DNA and target DNA, fluorescence quenching was observed at the surface of the MQDs by FRET between QD and TOTO-3. This experiment shows the possibility of rapid detection of genomic DNA from clinical samples via microbead-QD complexs on microfluidic chip. PMID:23882750

  2. Biodetection of DNA and proteins using enhanced UV absorption by structuration of the chip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, K.; Reverchon, J. L.; Mugherli, L.; Fromant, M.; Benisty, H.

    2009-02-01

    DNA and protein absorption at 260 and 280 nm can be used to reveal theses species on a biochip UV image. A first study including the design and fabrication of UV reflective multilayer biochips designed for UV contrast enhancement (factor of 4.0) together with spectrally selective AlGaN detectors demonstrated the control of chip biological coating, or Antigen/Antibody complexation with fairly good signals for typical probe density of 4x1012 molecules/cm2. Detection of fractional monolayer molecular binding requires a higher contrast enhancement which can be obtained with structured chips. Grating structures enable, at resonance, a confinement of light at the biochip surface, and thus a large interaction between the biological molecule and the lightwave field. The highest sensitivity obtained with grating-based biochip usually concerns a resonance shift, in wavelength or diffraction angle. Diffraction efficiency is also affected by UV absorption, due to enhanced light-matter interaction, and this mechanism is equally able to produce biochip images in parallel. By adjusting grating parameters, we will see how a biochip that is highly sensitive to UV absorption at its surface can be obtained. Based on the Ewald construction and diffraction diagram, instrumental resolution and smarter experimental configurations are considered. Notably, in conjunction with the 2D UV-sensitive detectors recently developed in-house, we discuss the obtainment of large contrast and good signals in a diffraction order emerging around the sample normal.

  3. Baseball bats and chocolate chip cookies: the judicial treatment of DNA in the myriad genetics litigation.

    PubMed

    Binnie, Ian; Park-Thompson, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    In June 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a controversial ruling that naturally occurring DNA segments are "products of nature" and therefore not patentable subject matter. At this intersection between science and law, in litigation of crucial importance to patients, science, and multibillion-dollar biotech enterprises, the appellate judges sidestepped genetics and engaged in a war of metaphors from diamonds to chocolate chip cookies. This case is not an outlier. Apprehensive judges and juries in both Canada and the United States find many convenient excuses to avoid coming to grips with the underlying science in patent cases. But this is simply not acceptable. Legal rulings must be, and must seem to be, well grounded, as a matter of both law and science. The legitimacy of court decisions in the eyes of the stakeholders and the broader public depends on it. PMID:25524722

  4. Detection of pathogens using on-chip electrochemical analysis of PCR amplified DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodko, Dalibor; Raymer, Lindsay; Herbst, Stephanie M.; Magnuson, James W.; Gaskin, David

    2001-05-01

    The sensitivity and speed of methods for the detection of microorganisms and/or cells need to be constantly improved to provide timely and accurate analysis in large number of important applications. Such applications range from detection of pathogens in drinking water, biological warfare agents, biomedical diagnostics and food industry. The trends toward miniaturization of sensors using microfluidic and nanofluidic on-chip devices will push current detection limits to lower concentrations than what is offered by the present analytical equipment and/or detection kids. Microfluidic devices have been used to perform DNA analysis, polymerase chain reaction analysis, capillary electrophoresis and hybridization to oligonucleotide probes. This paper describes a new approach for the detection of pathogens on contaminated surfaces, which will integrated sampling, concentration and detection of targeted microorganisms.

  5. Genotyping DNA chip for the simultaneous assessment of antibiotic resistance and pathogenic potential of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Barl, Timo; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Yu, Xiaolei; Katcoff, Don J; Sompolinsky, David; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Hacker, Jörg; Bachmann, Till T

    2008-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most frequently occurring infections and are mostly caused by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli. DNA microarrays are potent molecular diagnostic tools for rapid diagnosis of bacterial infections with high relevance for UTIs. In this study, we present the integration and application of two DNA chip modules for the simultaneous detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gyrA (quinolone resistance) and fimH (increased adhesion to urinary tract epithelium). The performance of the combined diagnostic chip was assessed by genotyping 140 E. coli strains. Resistance-causing mutations could only be identified in UTI isolates. A complete genotyping assay could be performed in <4h after DNA extraction. Together with the excellent genotyping results, this constitutes a competitive alternative as a standard tool for routine clinical diagnostics. PMID:18640014

  6. PMA-PhyloChip DNA Microarray to Elucidate Viable Microbial Community Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Stam, Christina N.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd

    2011-01-01

    in the dark. Thereafter, the sample is exposed to visible light for five minutes, so that the DNA from dead cells will be cross-linked. Following this PMA treatment step, the sample is concentrated by centrifugation and washed (to remove excessive PMA) before DNA is extracted. The 16S rRNA gene fragments will be amplified by PCR to screen the total microbial community using PhyloChip DNA microarray analysis. This approach will detect only the viable microbial community since the PMA intercalated DNA from dead cells would be unavailable for PCR amplification. The total detection time including PCR reaction for low biomass samples will be a few hours. Numerous markets may use this technology. The food industry uses spore detection to validate new alternative food processing technologies, sterility, and quality. Pharmaceutical and medical equipment companies also detect spores as a marker for sterility. This system can be used for validating sterilization processes, water treatment systems, and in various public health and homeland security applications.

  7. Ultrasensitive Label-free Electronic Chip for DNA Analysis Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is a strong need for faster, cheaper, and simpler methods for nucleic acid analysis in today s clinical tests. Nanotechnologies can potentially provide solutions to these requirements by integrating nanomaterials with biofunctionalities. Dramatic improvement in the sensitivity and multiplexing can be achieved through the high-degree miniaturization. Here, we present our study in the development of an ultrasensitive label-free electronic chip for DNA/RNA analysis based on carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays. A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix is fabricated using a bottom-up approach. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed with a low-density MWNT nanoelectrode array in measuring both the bulk and surface immobilized redox species. The open-end of MWNTs are found to present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes, with a wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. A BRCA1 related oligonucleotide probe with 18 bases is covalently functionalized at the open ends of the MWNTs and specifically hybridized with an oligonucleotide target as well as a PCR amplicon. The guanine bases in the target molecules are employed as the signal moieties for the electrochemical measurements. Ru(bpy)3(2+) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. This technique has been employed for direct electrochemical detection of label-free PCR amplicon through specific hybridization with the BRCAl probe. The detection limit is estimated to be less than approximately 1000 DNA molecules, approaching the limit of the sensitivity by laser-based fluorescence techniques in DNA microarray. This system provides a general electronic platform for rapid molecular diagnostics in applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, simple sample preparation, and low- cost operation.

  8. Separation of large DNA molecules by size exclusion chromatography-based microchip with on-chip concentration structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Naoki; Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2016-06-01

    The separation of DNA molecules according to their size represents a fundamental bioanalytical procedure. Here, we report the development of a chip-sized device, consisting of micrometer-sized fence structures fabricated in a microchannel, for the separation of large DNA molecules (over 10 kbp) based on the principle of size exclusion chromatography (SEC). In order to achieve separation, two approaches were utilized: first, the DNA samples were concentrated immediately prior to separation using nanoslit structures, with the aim of improving the resolution. Second, a theoretical model of SEC-based separation was established and applied in order to predict the optimal voltage range for separation. In this study, we achieved separation of λ DNA (48.5 kbp) and T4 DNA (166 kbp) using the present SEC-based microchip.

  9. Application of DNA chip scanning technology for automatic detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae inclusions.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Anita; Endrész, Valeria; Urbán, Szabolcs; Lantos, Ildikó; Deák, Judit; Burián, Katalin; Önder, Kamil; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Balázs, Péter; Virok, Dezso P

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that propagate in the inclusion, a specific niche inside the host cell. The standard method for counting chlamydiae is immunofluorescent staining and manual counting of chlamydial inclusions. High- or medium-throughput estimation of the reduction in chlamydial inclusions should be the basis of testing antichlamydial compounds and other drugs that positively or negatively influence chlamydial growth, yet low-throughput manual counting is the common approach. To overcome the time-consuming and subjective manual counting, we developed an automatic inclusion-counting system based on a commercially available DNA chip scanner. Fluorescently labeled inclusions are detected by the scanner, and the image is processed by ChlamyCount, a custom plug-in of the ImageJ software environment. ChlamyCount was able to measure the inclusion counts over a 1-log-unit dynamic range with a high correlation to the theoretical counts. ChlamyCount was capable of accurately determining the MICs of the novel antimicrobial compound PCC00213 and the already known antichlamydial antibiotics moxifloxacin and tetracycline. ChlamyCount was also able to measure the chlamydial growth-altering effect of drugs that influence host-bacterium interaction, such as gamma interferon, DEAE-dextran, and cycloheximide. ChlamyCount is an easily adaptable system for testing antichlamydial antimicrobials and other compounds that influence Chlamydia-host interactions. PMID:24189259

  10. 9G4 Autoreactivity Is Increased in HIV-Infected Patients and Correlates with HIV Broadly Neutralizing Serum Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kobie, James J.; Alcena, Danielle C.; Zheng, Bo; Bryk, Peter; Mattiacio, Jonelle L.; Brewer, Matthew; LaBranche, Celia; Young, Faith M.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Montefiori, David C.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Feng, Changyong; Jin, Xia; Keefer, Michael C.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb) response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4−IgD− memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD− memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward “IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019) with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL) did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in

  11. A controlled microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip for label-free diffusion-restricted DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-02-15

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for electrochemical analysis of DNA hybridization events offer a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care. Here, we present a microfluidic LOC, with 3 × 3 arrayed electrochemical sensors for the analysis of DNA hybridization events. A new dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system is integrated providing controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis. This feature improves the repeatability, accuracy, and overall sensing performance (Fig. 1). The electrochemical activity of the fabricated microfluidic device is validated and demonstrated repeatable and reversible Nernstian characteristics. System design required detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation as our sensing modeling involves diffusion-related electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of DNA hybridization on the calculated charge transfer resistance and the diffusional resistance components is evaluated. We demonstrate a specific device with an average cross-reactivity value of 27.5%. The device yields semilogarithmic dose response and enables a theoretical detection limit of 1 nM of complementary ssDNA target. This limit is lower than our previously reported non-valved device by 74% due to on-chip valve integration providing controlled and accurate assay capabilities. PMID:25310492

  12. 9G4+ Antibodies Isolated from HIV-Infected Patients Neutralize HIV-1 and Have Distinct Autoreactivity Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Alcéna, Danielle C.; Kobie, James J.; Kaminski, Denise A.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Mattiacio, Jonelle L.; Brewer, Matthew; Dewhurst, Stephen; Dykes, Carrie; Jin, Xia; Keefer, Michael C.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Potent HIV-1 specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNA) are uncommon in HIV infected individuals, and have proven hard to elicit by vaccination. Several, isolated monoclonal BNA are polyreactive and also recognize self-antigens, suggesting a breach of immune tolerance in persons living with HIV (PLWH). Persons with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often have elevated levels of autoreactive antibodies encoded by the VH4-34 heavy chain immunoglobulin gene whose protein product can be detected by the 9G4 rat monoclonal antibody. We have recently found that levels of these “9G4+” antibodies are also elevated in PLWH. However, the putative autoreactive nature of these antibodies and the relationship of such reactivities with HIV neutralization have not been investigated. We therefore examined the autoreactivity and HIV neutralization potential of 9G4+ antibodies from PLWH. Results show that 9G4+ antibodies from PLWH bound to recombinant HIV-1 envelope (Env) and neutralized viral infectivity in vitro, whereas 9G4+ antibodies from persons with SLE did not bind to Env and failed to neutralize viral infectivity. In addition, while 9G4+ antibodies from PLWH retained the canonical anti-i reactivity that mediates B cell binding, they did not display other autoreactivities common to SLE 9G4+ antibodies, such as binding to cardiolipin and DNA and had much lower reactivity with apoptotic cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the autoreactivity of 9G4+ antibodies from PLWH is distinct from that of SLE patients, and therefore, their expansion is not due to a general breakdown of B cell tolerance but is instead determined in a more disease-specific manner by self-antigens that become immunogenic in the context of, and possibly due to HIV infection. Further studies of 9G4+ B cells may shed light on the regulation of B cell tolerance and interface between the generation of specific autoreactivities and the induction of antiviral immunity in persons living with HIV

  13. An on-chip thin film photodetector for the quantification of DNA probes and targets in microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Fixe, F.; Chu, V.; Prazeres, D. M. F.; Conde, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    A flat microdevice which incorporates a thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodetector with an upper layer of functionalized SiO2 is used to quantify the density of both immobilized and hybridized DNA oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. The device is based on the photoconductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon in a coplanar electrode configuration. Excitation, with near UV/blue light, of a single-stranded DNA molecule tagged with the fluorophore 1-(3-(succinimidyloxycarbonyl)benzyl)-4-(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-2-yl) pyridinium bromide (PyMPO), results in the emission of visible light. The emitted light is then converted into an electrical signal in the photodetector, thus allowing the optoelectronic detection of the DNA molecules. The detection limit of the present device is of the order of 1 × 1012 molecules/cm2 and is limited by the efficiency of the filtering of the excitation light. A surface density of 33.5 ± 4.0 pmol/cm2 was measured for DNA covalently immobilized to the functionalized SiO2 thin film and a surface density of 3.7 ± 1.5 pmol/cm2 was measured for the complementary DNA hybridized to the bound DNA. The detection concept explored can enable on-chip electronic data acquisition, improving both the speed and the reliability of DNA microarrays. PMID:15148343

  14. Genomic sequencing and biological characteristics of a novel Escherichia coli bacteriophage 9g, a putative representative of a new Siphoviridae genus.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Eugene E; Golomidova, Alla K; Letarova, Maria A; Kostryukova, Elena S; Zelenin, Alexandr S; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Letarov, Andrey V

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriophage 9 g was isolated from horse feces using Escherichia coli C600 as a host strain. Phage 9 g has a slightly elongated capsid 62 × 76 nm in diameter and a non-contractile tail about 185 nm long. The complete genome sequence of this bacteriophage consists of 56,703 bp encoding 70 predicted open reading frames. The closest relative of phage 9 g is phage PhiJL001 infecting marine alpha-proteobacterium associated with Ircinia strobilina sponge, sharing with phage 9 g 51% of amino acid identity in the main capsid protein sequence. The DNA of 9 g is resistant to most restriction endonucleases tested, indicating the presence of hypermodified bases. The gene cluster encoding a biosynthesis pathway similar to biosynthesis of the unusual nucleoside queuosine was detected in the phage 9 g genome. The genomic map organization is somewhat similar to the typical temperate phage gene layout but no integrase gene was detected. Phage 9 g efficiently forms stable associations with its host that continues to produce the phage over multiple passages, but the phage can be easily eliminated via viricide treatment indicating that no true lysogens are formed. Since the sequence, genomic organization and biological properties of bacteriophage 9 g are clearly distinct from other known Enterobacteriaceae phages, we propose to consider it as the representative of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family. PMID:25533657

  15. A low-cost, label-free DNA detection method in lab-on-chip format based on electrohydrodynamic instabilities, with application to long-range PCR.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mohamed Lemine Youba; Champ, Jerôme; Descroix, Stephanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Amblard, François; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-21

    In order to evolve from a "chip in the lab" to a "lab on a chip" paradigm, there is still a strong demand for low-cost, portable detection technologies, notably for analytes at low concentrations. Here we report a new label-free DNA detection method with direct electronic read, and apply it to long-range PCR. This method uses a nonlinear electrohydrodynamic phenomenon: when subjected to high electric fields (typically above 100 V cm(-1)), suspensions of large polyelectrolytes, such as long DNA molecules, create "giant" dynamic concentration fluctuations. These fluctuations are associated with large conductivity inhomogeneities, and we use here a contact-mode local conductivity detector to detect these fluctuations. In order to decouple the detection electronics from the high voltage excitation one, an original "doubly symmetric" floating mode battery-operated detection scheme was developed. A wavelet analysis was then applied, to unravel from the chaotic character of the electohydrodynamic instabilities a scalar signal robustly reflecting the amplification of DNA. As a first proof of concept, we measured the products of the off-chip amplification of 10 kbp DNA from lambda phage DNA, achieving a sensitivity better than 100 fg DNA in the original 50 μl sample. This corresponds to the amplification products of less than 100 initial copies of target DNA. The companion enabling technologies developed to implement this new concept, i.e. the doubly symmetric contact conductivity detection and wavelet analysis, may also find various other applications in lab-on-chips. PMID:22968438

  16. Characterization and cloning of the human splicing factor 9G8: a novel 35 kDa factor of the serine/arginine protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaloc, Y; Popielarz, M; Fuchs, J P; Gattoni, R; Stévenin, J

    1994-01-01

    By adopting a monoclonal antibody approach, we have identified a novel splicing factor of 35 kDa which we have termed 9G8. The isolation and characterization of cDNA clones indicate that 9G8 is a novel member of the serine/arginine (SR) splicing factor family because it includes an N-terminal RNA binding domain (RBD) and a C-terminal SR domain. The RNA binding domain of 9G8 is highly homologous to those of the SRp20 and RBP1 factors (79-71% identity), but the homology is less pronounced in the cases of SF2/ASF and SC35/PR264 (45-37% identity). Compared with the other SR splicing factors, 9G8 presents some specific sequence features because it contains an RRSRSXSX consensus sequence repeated six times in the SR domain, and a CCHC motif in its median region, similar to the zinc knuckle found in the SLU7 splicing factor in yeast. Complete immunodepletion of 9G8 from a nuclear extract, which is accompanied by a substantial depletion of other SR factors, results in a loss of splicing activity. We show that a recombinant 9G8 protein, expressed using a baculovirus vector and excluding other SR factors, rescues the splicing activity of a 9G8-depleted nuclear extract and an S100 cytoplasmic fraction. This indicates that 9G8 plays a crucial role in splicing, similar to that of the other SR splicing factors. This similarity was confirmed by the fact that purified human SC35 also rescues the 9G8-depleted extract. The identification of the 9G8 factor enlarges the essential family of SR splicing factors, whose members have also been proposed to play key roles in alternative splicing. Images PMID:8013463

  17. Design, fabrication, and packaging of closed-chamber PCR chips for DNA amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabmueller, Christian G. J.; Evans, Alan G. R.; Brunnschweiler, Arthur; Ensell, Graham J.; Leslie, Dario L.; Lee, M. A.

    2000-04-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication and packaging of a micro machined silicon/Pyrex based chip for the polymerase chain reaction. Anodic bonding is used for sealing the chambers of 1 (mu) l volume with a Pyrex glass wafer. Platinum resistors on the back of the wafer are used as heaters and temperature sensors. The chip is externally cooled by forced air to achieve rapid temperature cycling. The transparency of the Pyrex makes it possible for using optical readout methods. The packaging is especially designed for easy handling, filling, power connection, temperature regulation and optical readout. The mass production of such silicon reactors could make single-shot, disposable devices economically viable.

  18. Clinical Significance of an HPV DNA Chip Test with Emphasis on HPV-16 and/or HPV-18 Detection in Korean Gynecological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Min-Kyung; Lee, Ahwon; Hur, Soo Young; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for cervical cancer. Methods: We evaluated the clinical significance of the HPV DNA chip genotyping assay (MyHPV chip, Mygene Co.) compared with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) chemiluminescent nucleic acid hybridization kit (Digene Corp.) in 867 patients. Results: The concordance rate between the MyHPV chip and HC2 was 79.4% (kappa coefficient, κ = 0.55). The sensitivity and specificity of both HPV tests were very similar (approximately 85% and 50%, respectively). The addition of HPV result (either MyHPV chip or HC2) to cytology improved the sensitivity (95%, each) but reduced the specificity (approximately 30%, each) compared with the HPV test or cytology alone. Based on the MyHPV chip results, the odds ratio (OR) for ≥ high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) was 9.9 in the HPV-16/18 (+) group and 3.7 in the non-16/18 high-risk (HR)-HPV (+) group. Based on the HC2 results, the OR for ≥ HSILs was 5.9 in the HR-HPV (+) group. When considering only patients with cytological diagnoses of “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” and “atypical squamous cell or atypical glandular cell,” based on the MyHPV chip results, the ORs for ≥ HSILs were 6.8 and 11.7, respectively, in the HPV-16/18 (+) group. Conclusions: The sensitivity and specificity of the MyHPV chip test are similar to the HC2. Detecting HPV-16/18 with an HPV DNA chip test, which is commonly used in many Asian countries, is useful in assessing the risk of high-grade cervical lesions. PMID:27345180

  19. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Specimens with the HPV Direct Flow CHIP System

    PubMed Central

    Herraez-Hernandez, Elsa; Preda, Ovidiu; Alonso, Sonia; Pardo, Rosario Serrano; Olmo, Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    The novel HPV Direct Flow CHIP commercial system for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping is based on rapid PCR and automatic reverse dot blot hybridization to genotype-specific probes, allowing the detection of 36 HPV genotypes. This study examined the performance of HPV Direct Flow CHIP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (n= 99). Each sample was analyzed both by Direct PCR, using crude cell extracts without DNA purification, and by conventional PCR, using purified DNA. Pair-wise analysis of the results demonstrated strong concordance between the results obtained with the two protocols, although a slightly higher rate of multiple infections was detected by conventional PCR. In summary, HPV Direct Flow CHIP achieves effective HPV detection from FFPE samples with both Direct PCR and Conventional PCR protocols. PMID:24222806

  20. Chip, Chip, Hooray!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science laboratory using different brands of potato chips in which students test their oiliness, size, thickness, saltiness, quality, and cost, then analyze the results to determine the best chip. Gives a brief history of potato chips. (YDS)

  1. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  2. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  3. Microfluidics-Based Lab-on-Chip Systems in DNA-Based Biosensing: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutse, Sabo Wada; Yusof, Nor Azah

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics-based lab-on-chip (LOC) systems are an active research area that is revolutionising high-throughput sequencing for the fast, sensitive and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. LOCs also serve as portable diagnostic tools. The devices provide optimum control of nanolitre volumes of fluids and integrate various bioassay operations that allow the devices to rapidly sense pathogenic threat agents for environmental monitoring. LOC systems, such as microfluidic biochips, offer advantages compared to conventional identification procedures that are tedious, expensive and time consuming. This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the need for devices that are easy to operate, sensitive, fast, portable and sufficiently reliable to be used as complementary tools for the control of pathogenic agents that damage the environment. PMID:22163925

  4. Liquid sensor based bio-chip for DNA analysis of cancer using photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Harshada; Nischitha, R.; Indumathi, T. S.; Sharan, Preeta

    2015-07-01

    Silicon photonics is poised to revolutionize bio-sensing applications, specifically in medical diagnostics. The need for cost effective and reliable bio-sensors in medical applications is an ever growing and everlasting one. In this synopsis we have designed a 2-D hexagonal photonic crystal ring resonator based bio-sensor that is able to detect lung cancer from blood. Simulation and analysis has been done for normal DNA and the cancer affected DNA in blood. The intensity level of transmission spectrum has been observed. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used for analysis. MEEP (MIT Electromagnetic Equation Propagation) tool and RSOFT Photonic Suite CAD tool are used designing the photonic crystal sensor. The results show that for small changes in the refractive index of the input samples there is a significant shift in wavelength and amplitude. Thus the sensor is highly sensitive for change in refractive index and hence differentiating normal and cancer affected DNA.

  5. First all-in-one diagnostic tool for DNA intelligence: genome-wide inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex with the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip.

    PubMed

    Keating, Brendan; Bansal, Aruna T; Walsh, Susan; Millman, Jonathan; Newman, Jonathan; Kidd, Kenneth; Budowle, Bruce; Eisenberg, Arthur; Donfack, Joseph; Gasparini, Paolo; Budimlija, Zoran; Henders, Anjali K; Chandrupatla, Hareesh; Duffy, David L; Gordon, Scott D; Hysi, Pirro; Liu, Fan; Medland, Sarah E; Rubin, Laurence; Martin, Nicholas G; Spector, Timothy D; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-05-01

    When a forensic DNA sample cannot be associated directly with a previously genotyped reference sample by standard short tandem repeat profiling, the investigation required for identifying perpetrators, victims, or missing persons can be both costly and time consuming. Here, we describe the outcome of a collaborative study using the Identitas Version 1 (v1) Forensic Chip, the first commercially available all-in-one tool dedicated to the concept of developing intelligence leads based on DNA. The chip allows parallel interrogation of 201,173 genome-wide autosomal, X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal, and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms for inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex. The first assessment of the chip's performance was carried out on 3,196 blinded DNA samples of varying quantities and qualities, covering a wide range of biogeographic origin and eye/hair coloration as well as variation in relatedness and sex. Overall, 95 % of the samples (N = 3,034) passed quality checks with an overall genotype call rate >90 % on variable numbers of available recorded trait information. Predictions of sex, direct match, and first to third degree relatedness were highly accurate. Chip-based predictions of biparental continental ancestry were on average ~94 % correct (further support provided by separately inferred patrilineal and matrilineal ancestry). Predictions of eye color were 85 % correct for brown and 70 % correct for blue eyes, and predictions of hair color were 72 % for brown, 63 % for blond, 58 % for black, and 48 % for red hair. From the 5 % of samples (N = 162) with <90 % call rate, 56 % yielded correct continental ancestry predictions while 7 % yielded sufficient genotypes to allow hair and eye color prediction. Our results demonstrate that the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip holds great promise for a wide range of applications including criminal investigations, missing person investigations, and for national security

  6. Ternary DNA chip based on a novel thymine spacer group chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Peh, Jaime; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A novel thymine-based surface chemistry suitable for label-free electrochemical DNA detection is described. It involves a simple two-step sequential process: immobilization of 9-mer thymine-terminated probe DNAs followed by backfilling with 9-mer thymine-based spacers (T9). As compared to commonly used organic spacer groups like 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercapto-1-propanol and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol, the 9-mer thymine-based spacers offer a 10-fold improvement in discriminating between complementary and non-complementary target hybridization, which is due mainly to facilitated transport of the redox probes through the probe-DNA/T9 layers. Electrochemical measurements, complemented with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM-D) binding analyses, reveal that optimum selectivity between complementary and non-complementary hybridization is obtained for a sensing surface prepared using probe-DNA and backfiller T9 at equimolar concentration (1:1). At this particular ratio, the probe-DNAs are preferentially oriented and easily accessible to yield a sensing surface with favorable hybridization and electron transfer characteristics. Our findings suggest that oligonucleotide-based spacer groups offer an attractive alternative to short organic thiol spacers in the design of future DNA biochips. PMID:25465760

  7. Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array as an Electronic Chip for Ultrasensitive Label-free DNA Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Fan, Wendy; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in SiO2 is used for ultrasensitive DNA detection. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed using low-density MWNT arrays for measuring both bulk and surface immobilized redox species such as K4Fe(CN)6 and ferrocene derivatives. The open-end of MWNTs are found to present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes with wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. BRCA1 related oligonucleotide probes with 18 bp are selectively functionalized at the open ends of the nanotube array and specifically hybridized with oligonucleotide targets incorporated with a polyG tag. The guanine groups are employed as the signal moieties in the electrochemical measurements. R(bpy)(sup 2+, sub 3) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. The hybridization of sub-attomoles of DNA targets is detected electrochemically by combining the MWNT nanoelectrode array with the R(bpy)(sup 2+, sub 3) amplification mechanism. This technique was employed for direct electrochemical detection of label-free PCR amplicon from a healthy donor through specific hybridization with the BRCA1 probe. The detection limit is estimated to be less than 1000 DNA molecules since abundant guanine bases in the PCR amplicon provides a large signal. This system provides a general platform for rapid molecular diagnostics in applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and simple sample preparation, and low-cost operation.

  8. Ultrafast, efficient separations of large-sized dsDNA in a blended polymer matrix by microfluidic chip electrophoresis: a design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyun; Lin, Jennifer S; Barron, Annelise E

    2011-11-01

    Double-stranded (ds) DNA fragments over a wide size range were successfully separated in blended polymer matrices by microfluidic chip electrophoresis. Novel blended polymer matrices composed of two types of polymers with three different molar masses were developed to provide improved separations of large dsDNA without negatively impacting the separation of small dsDNA. Hydroxyethyl celluloses with average molar masses of ∼27  kDa and ∼1  MDa were blended with a second class of polymer, high-molar mass (∼7  MDa) linear polyacrylamide. Fast and highly efficient separations of commercially available DNA ladders were achieved on a borosilicate glass microchip. A distinct separation of a 1-kb DNA extension ladder (200-40,000  bp) was completed in 2  min. An orthogonal design of experiments was used to optimize experimental parameters for DNA separations over a wide size range. We find that the two dominant factors are the applied electric field strength and the inclusion of a high concentration of low-molar mass polymer in the matrix solution. These two factors exerted different effects on the separations of small dsDNA fragments below 1  kbp, medium dsDNA fragments between 1 and 10  kbp, and large dsDNA fragments above 10  kbp. PMID:22009451

  9. Predominance of genotype P[9]G3 in rotavirus gastroenteritis in Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kacerka, Anna; Majda-Stanisławska, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Barbara; Sidorkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus (RV) infection is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children. This paper identifies the most common genotypes of rotaviruses isolated from children hospitalized with gastroenteritis and attempts to determine any relationship between infection with a certain rotavirus genotype. Material and methods The investigated group consisted of 68 consecutive children with rotavirus gastroenteritis (confirmed by an agglutination test). Rotavirus genotype was determined in stool samples obtained from each child. Results The P[9]VP4 genotype was observed in 41/61 positive samples (over 67.2%) that were permanently associated with the G3 VP7 genotype. Moreover, G3 was determined as the most commonly isolated G type (77.94%). As well as the P[9]G3 type, G3 was also found in the P[4] type (5 cases). Twenty-six out of 61 (42.6%) children in whom rotavirus genotype was determined were co-infected with pathogenic bacteria. No statistical correlation was observed between rotavirus P[9]G3 gastroenteritis and digestive tract co-infection with pathogenic bacteria (p > 0.05). Elevated ALT activity was found in 34/59 (57.6%) cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Elevated ALT serum level was found to correlate with P[9]G3 rotavirus genotype but concomitant infections did not. Conclusions The most common genotype of rotaviruses observed in our group of children, P[9]G3, has rarely been described. Co-infection of the digestive tract with pathogenic bacteria and elevated serum ALT concentrations were found to be the most frequent phenomena. A correlation between P[9]G3 rotavirus genotype and elevated serum ALT level was found, but no significant relationship was identified between concomitant infections and P[9]G3 genotype. PMID:26170851

  10. Protein analysis by time-resolved measurements with an electro-switchable DNA chip

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Andreas; Hampel, Paul A.; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Knezevic, Jelena; Welte, Thomas; Villa, Valentina; Maruyama, Makiko; Svejda, Matej; Jähner, Simone; Fischer, Frank; Strasser, Ralf; Rant, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Measurements in stationary or mobile phases are fundamental principles in protein analysis. Although the immobilization of molecules on solid supports allows for the parallel analysis of interactions, properties like size or shape are usually inferred from the molecular mobility under the influence of external forces. However, as these principles are mutually exclusive, a comprehensive characterization of proteins usually involves a multi-step workflow. Here we show how these measurement modalities can be reconciled by tethering proteins to a surface via dynamically actuated nanolevers. Short DNA strands, which are switched by alternating electric fields, are employed as capture probes to bind target proteins. By swaying the proteins over nanometre amplitudes and comparing their motional dynamics to a theoretical model, the protein diameter can be quantified with Angström accuracy. Alterations in the tertiary protein structure (folding) and conformational changes are readily detected, and even post-translational modifications are revealed by time-resolved molecular dynamics measurements. PMID:23839273

  11. Hepatology in the 21st century. Gene transfer, hepatocyte transplantation, DNA chips, cyberspace and ... a friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P L

    1999-12-01

    What to expect for hepatology in the 21st century? If science is allowed to proceed at its current rate, expectations can hardly be underestimated. Bound by the present day's limitations we are only able to see a glimpse of what could be available 100 years from now. For the next few decades, the global eradication of viral hepatitis will be on the agenda. For the treatment of inherited and acquired metabolic, toxic and immune liver disease, targeted drugs, genes and antisense oligonucleotides will be added to our therapeutic repertoire. The completion of the human genome project in 2003 will have far-reaching consequences: the widespread use of prenatal diagnosis, using DNA chip technology, may be expected to cause a dramatic decrease in the incidence of inherited diseases. Liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and inborn errors of metabolism may be treated by gene transfer or gene repair therapy. Although eventually these developments may decrease the need for organ transplantation, this by no means is the case yet and no solution is available for an increased demand and a decreased supply of organs. In the long run, diseases caused by multi-drug-resistant infectious agents and diseases associated with the abuse of alcohol and drugs are expected to become major problems. The future of university-based research is uncertain. The staggering costs of research and limited career possibilities may force universities to the limited task of higher education, with as a result biotech companies, shareholders and corporate finance ruling the scientific waves in the next century. The 21st century patient will know the way in cyberspace and will go shopping for the best doctor, for the best treatment and for the best, or friendliest, hospital. PMID:10628176

  12. Dynamic chromatin remodelling of ciliate macronuclear DNA as determined by an optimized chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) method for Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Simon, Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the detailed evaluation of crucial parameters for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of macronuclear DNA in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium tetraurelia. Optimized parameters include crosslinking conditions, chromatin sonication and antibody titration thus providing a detailed protocol for successful ChIP in P. tetraurelia. As this ciliate is bacterivorous and RNAi by feeding represents a powerful tool for analysis of gene function, we moreover determined the effects of ingested nucleic acids by food bacteria. Feasibility of our protocol is demonstrated by characterisation of chromatin remodelling at promoters of cytosolic HSP70 isoforms during transcriptional activation under heat shock conditions by analyzing RNA abundance, nucleosome occupancy and levels of H3 lysine 9 acetylation. PMID:23385475

  13. Single-Cell-Arrayed Agarose Chip for in Situ Analysis of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of DNA Cross-Linking Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Wang, Weixing; Ding, Mingyu; Luo, Guoan; Liang, Qionglin

    2016-07-01

    Development of approach or device to allow continuous multiple measurements, such as integrating cytotoxic and genotoxic analysis, is quite appealing for study of the drug's activity and mechanism of action or resistance. In this study, a single-cell-arrayed agarose chip system was developed to combine cell cultivation with subsequent in situ analysis of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent. The modified alkaline comet assay coupled with the Live/Dead assay was used to monitor the interstrand cross-links (ICLs) formation and the cytotoxic effects in different glioma cell lines. In addition, the ICL-induced double strand breaks (DSBs) was measured on the chip to reflect the level of ICLs indirectly. Compared with the traditional methods, the microarray agarose device offers higher throughput, reproducibility, and robustness, exhibiting good potential for high-content drug screening. PMID:27269449

  14. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using (13)C and (15)N labeling.

    PubMed

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA - the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method - has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to (13)C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the (13)C (14)N (-) recombinant ion and the use of the (13)C: (12)C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  15. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation detection by MethylCap-seq and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips: an independent large-scale comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Tim; Bady, Pierre; Trooskens, Geert; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Bloch, Jocelyne; Kros, Johan M.; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Stupp, Roger; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E.; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Two cost-efficient genome-scale methodologies to assess DNA-methylation are MethylCap-seq and Illumina’s Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (HM450). Objective information regarding the best-suited methodology for a specific research question is scant. Therefore, we performed a large-scale evaluation on a set of 70 brain tissue samples, i.e. 65 glioblastoma and 5 non-tumoral tissues. As MethylCap-seq coverages were limited, we focused on the inherent capacity of the methodology to detect methylated loci rather than a quantitative analysis. MethylCap-seq and HM450 data were dichotomized and performances were compared using a gold standard free Bayesian modelling procedure. While conditional specificity was adequate for both approaches, conditional sensitivity was systematically higher for HM450. In addition, genome-wide characteristics were compared, revealing that HM450 probes identified substantially fewer regions compared to MethylCap-seq. Although results indicated that the latter method can detect more potentially relevant DNA-methylation, this did not translate into the discovery of more differentially methylated loci between tumours and controls compared to HM450. Our results therefore indicate that both methodologies are complementary, with a higher sensitivity for HM450 and a far larger genome-wide coverage for MethylCap-seq, but also that a more comprehensive character does not automatically imply more significant results in biomarker studies. PMID:26482909

  17. Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Kosuri, Sriram; Marblestone, Adam H; Conway, Nicholas; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. However, its widespread adoption has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced by using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips. However, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved by using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. This article includes protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500-800 basepair (bp) constructs. PMID:25077042

  18. Performance of a Polymer-Based DNA Chip Platform in Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus in Clinical Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, T.; Brandstetter, T.; zur Hausen, A.; Alt-Mörbe, J.; Huzly, D.; Rühe, J.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a key role in the development of cervical and laryngeal cancers. The aim of our study was to compare the performance of a new hydrogel-based HPV genotyping biochip assay (Biochip) to a commercially available and CE-marked conventional PCR followed by reverse hybridization (GenID-PCR). One hundred twenty-three samples were available for the study. Of these samples, 101/123 were gynecological swabs, 8/123 were swabs or biopsy samples of genital warts, 7/123 were biopsy samples of otorhinolaryngeal lesions, 5/123 were samples of skin warts, and 2/123 were samples of orolabial abnormalities. These molecular methods for HPV genotyping showed comparable sensitivity and specificity. However, 19/123 of the results were discrepant. Specifically, Biochip showed better performance in the detection of multiple infections, especially when more than one high-risk genotype was present. Due to the different probe configurations used in the two assays, GenID-PCR achieves only group-specific detection of many HPV genotypes, whereas Biochip allows for specific identification. Overall, the newly developed HPV chip system (Biochip) proved to be a suitable tool for HPV detection and genotyping; it also proved to be superior for establishing HPV genotyping methods. PMID:19279180

  19. Silver Nanoscale Hexagonal Column Chips for Detecting Cell-free DNA and Circulating Nucleosomes in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuuki; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohba, Motoi; Yao, Hiroshi; Onimaru, Manabu; Inoue, Ituro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests, which are commonly used for cancer screening, generally have low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel rapid and simple method to generate silver nanoscale hexagonal columns (NHCs) for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We reported that the intensity of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from gastrointestinal cancer patients is was significantly higher than that of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from non-cancer patients. We estimated the combined constituents on silver NHCs by using a field emission-type scanning electron microscope, Raman microscopes, and a 3D laser scanning confocal microscope. We obtained the Raman scattering spectra of samples of physically fractured cells and clinical serum. No spectra were obtained for chemically lysed cultured cells and DNA, RNA, and protein extracted from cultured cells. We believe that our method, which uses SERS with silver NHCs to detect circulating nucleosomes bound by methylated cell-free DNA, may be successfully implemented in blood tests for cancer screening. PMID:25994878

  20. Exploring Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles Altered in Kashin-Beck Disease Using Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chips.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Wei; Shi, Bo Hui; Lyu, Ai Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Tian Tian; Guo, Xiong

    2016-07-01

    To understand how differentially methylated genes (DMGs) might affect the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Genome-wide methylation profiling of whole blood from 12 matched KBD and controls pairs was performed using a high-resolution Infinium 450 K methylation array. In total, 97 CpG sites were differentially methylated in KBD compared to the normal controls; of these sites, 36 sites were significantly hypermethylated (covering 22 genes) and 61 sites were significantly hypomethylated (covering 34 genes). Of these genes, 14 significant pathways were identified, the most significant P value pathway was type I diabetes mellitus pathway and pathways associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases were included in this study. Subsequently, 4 CpG sites in HLA-DRB1 were validated using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) in articular cartilage, and the results showed significant differences in the methylation status between KBD and controls, consistent with the results of the high-resolution array. These results suggested that differences in genome-wide DNA methylation exist between KBD and the controls, and the biological pathways support the autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease hypothesis of KBD. PMID:27554126

  1. Lab-on-a-chip-based PCR-RFLP assay for the confirmed detection of short-length feline DNA in food.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Al Amin, Md; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, M A Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-01-01

    Wider availability but lack of legal market trades has given feline meat a high potential for use as an adulterant in common meat and meat products. However, mixing of feline meat or its derivatives in food is a sensitive issue, since it is a taboo in most countries and prohibited in certain religions such as Islam and Judaism. Cat meat also has potential for contamination with of severe acute respiratory syndrome, anthrax and hepatitis, and its consumption might lead to an allergic reaction. We developed a very short-amplicon-length (69 bp) PCR assay, authenticated the amplified PCR products by AluI-restriction digestion followed by its separation and detection on a lab-on-a-chip-based automated electrophoretic system, and proved its superiority over the existing long-amplicon-based assays. Although it has been assumed that longer DNA targets are susceptible to breakdown under compromised states, scientific evidence for this hypothesis has been rarely documented. Strong evidence showed that shorter targets are more stable than the longer ones. We confirmed feline-specificity by cross-challenging the primers against 10 different species of terrestrial, aquatic and plant origins in the presence of a 141-bp site of an 18S rRNA gene as a universal eukaryotic control. RFLP analysis separated 43- and 26-bp fragments of AluI-digest in both the gel-image and electropherograms, confirming the original products. The tested detection limit was 0.01% (w/w) feline meat in binary and ternary admixed as well as meatball matrices. Shorter target, better stability and higher sensitivity mean such an assay would be valid for feline identification even in degraded specimens. PMID:26208950

  2. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to efficient export of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Paunetto, Laurimar; Li Ling; Hernandez, Felicia P.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2010-06-05

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NFX1. HSV-1 multifunctional protein ICP27 interacts with TAP/NXF1, binds viral RNAs, and is required for efficient viral RNA export. In ICP27 mutant infections, viral RNA export is reduced but not ablated, indicating that other export adaptors can aid in viral RNA export. Export adaptor protein Aly/REF is recruited to viral replication compartments, however, Aly/REF knockdown has little effect on viral RNA export. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 interact with TAP/NXF1 and mediate export of some cellular RNAs. We report that siRNA knockdown of SRp20 or 9G8 resulted in about a 10 fold decrease in virus yields and in nuclear accumulation of poly(A+) RNA. In infected cells depleted of SRp20, newly transcribed Bromouridine-labeled RNA also accumulated in the nucleus. We conclude that SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to HSV-1 RNA export.

  3. Chipping In.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1984

    1984-01-01

    International Business Machines is providing hardware and software to the College of Engineering at Pennsylvania State University for a program in which students will design very large scale integration computer chips. (MLF)

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. Characterization of genotype P[9]G12 rotavirus strains from Argentina: high similarity with Japanese and Korean G12 strains.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alejandro A; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Jiang, Baoming; Kang, Jung O; Glass, Roger I; Glikmann, Graciela; Gentsch, Jon R

    2009-02-01

    The circulation of the unusual P[9]G12 strains was previously reported in suburban Buenos Aires, Argentina and in Far Eastern Asian countries. To examine genetic relationships of these strains the genes coding VP7, VP4, and NSP1 from two Argentine, one Japanese and one Korean P[9]G12 isolates were sequenced and their overall genome relatedness was determined by liquid hybridization. In addition, liquid hybridization was used to compare this group of strains to the previous G12 isolates L26 and Se585, and prototype Wa, DS-1, and AU-1 strains. The genomes of the Argentinean, Japanese and Korean strains were virtually indistinguishable by hybridization assays, suggesting very high sequence relatedness for all 11 segments. Hybridization assays also demonstrated that these four strains belong to the AU-1 genogroup and that their genetic relationship with rotaviruses L26 and Se585 is limited to the VP7 gene. The VP7, VP4, and NSP1 genes of the Argentinean, Japanese and Korean strains were highly homologous to each other and to Thai strain T152 ( approximately 99% identity). These results together with the report of a similar strain detected during 2003 in Brazil are consistent with a recent importation and dissemination of the G12 strains from Far Eastern countries into South America. Increasing reports from several regions of the world demonstrating a variety of different G12 reassortant strains suggests that routine surveillance for this serotype should be conducted to determine its potential for global emergence. PMID:19107963

  6. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  7. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP

  8. Chromosome and genetic testing using ChIP assay.

    PubMed

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu; Asano, Maki

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay can be used to easily visualize information about proteins, DNA, and RNA on chromosomes and is widely used for analysis of genomes, epigenomes, mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs. The ChIP assay can detect, not only DNA-binding proteins of various organisms, but also the temporal and spatial regulating mechanisms of RNA-binding proteins. Because of these features, demand for ChIP assay is expected to grow. Here, by using yeast and Drosophila as examples, we describe the superiority of the improved ChIP assay that we have developed. PMID:27100707

  9. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene

    PubMed Central

    Hollywood, Jennifer A.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Scallan, Martina F.; Harrison, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  10. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Jennifer A; Lee, Ciaran M; Scallan, Martina F; Harrison, Patrick T

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  11. The characterization of four gene expression analysis in circulating tumor cells made by Multiplex-PCR from the AdnaTest kit on the lab-on-a-chip Agilent DNA 1000 platform

    PubMed Central

    Škereňová, Markéta; Mikulová, Veronika; Čapoun, Otakar; Zima, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays, on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis is a routine method for the detection of PCR fragments. The Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer was one of the first commercial devices in this field. Our project was designed to study the characteristics of Agilent DNA 1000 kit in PCR fragment analysis as a part of circulating tumour cell (CTC) detection technique. Despite the common use of this kit a complex analysis of the results from a long-term project is still missing. Materials and methods A commercially available Agilent DNA 1000 kit was used as a final step in the CTC detection (AdnaTest) for the determination of the presence of PCR fragments generated by Multiplex PCR. Data from 30 prostate cancer patients obtained during two years of research were analyzed to determine the trueness and precision of the PCR fragment size determination. Additional experiments were performed to demonstrate the precision (repeatability, reproducibility) and robustness of PCR fragment concentration determination. Results The trueness and precision of the size determination was below 3% and 2% respectively. The repeatability of the concentration determination was below 15%. The difference in concentration determination increases when Multiplex-PCR/storage step is added between the two measurements of one sample. Conclusions The characteristics established in our study are in concordance with the manufacturer’s specifications established for a ladder as a sample. However, the concentration determination may vary depending on chip preparation, sample storage and concentration. The 15% variation of concentration determination repeatability was shown to be partly proportional and can be suppressed by proper normalization. PMID:26981024

  12. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B.; Rufo, Joey; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize the unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes on developing lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies. PMID:23670195

  13. Development and application of compact and on-chip electron linear accelerators for dynamic tracking cancer therapy and DNA damage/repair analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Demachi, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Chhatkuli, R. B.; Tsuda, A.; Tanaka, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Kusano, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, N.; Tanabe, E.; Koyama, K.; Yoshida, M.; Fujimori, R.; Yasui, A.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing compact electron linear accelerators (hereafter linac) with high RF (Radio Frequency) frequency (9.3 GHz, wavelength 32.3 mm) of X-band and applying to medicine and non-destructive testing. Especially, potable 950 keV and 3.95 MeV linac X-ray sources have been developed for on-site transmission testing at several industrial plants and civil infrastructures including bridges. 6 MeV linac have been made for pinpoint X-ray dynamic tracking cancer therapy. The length of the accelerating tube is ∼600 mm. The electron beam size at the X-ray target is less than 1 mm and X-ray spot size at the cancer is less than 3 mm. Several hardware and software are under construction for dynamic tracking therapy for moving lung cancer. Moreover, as an ultimate compact linac, we are designing and manufacturing a laser dielectric linac of ∼1 MeV with Yr fiber laser (283 THz, wavelength 1.06 pm). Since the wavelength is 1.06 μm, the length of one accelerating strcture is tens pm and the electron beam size is in sub-micro meter. Since the sizes of cell and nuclear are about 10 and 1 μm, respectively, we plan to use this “On-chip” linac for radiation-induced DNA damage/repair analysis. We are thinking a system where DNA in a nucleus of cell is hit by ∼1 μm electron or X-ray beam and observe its repair by proteins and enzymes in live cells in-situ.

  14. Solvent resistant microfluidic DNA synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyi; Castrataro, Piero; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Quake, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    We fabricated a microfluidic DNA synthesizer out of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), an elastomer with excellent chemical compatibility which makes it possible to perform organic chemical reactions, and synthesized 20-mer oligonucleotides on chip. PMID:17180201

  15. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  16. ChIP analysis unravels an exceptionally wide distribution of DNA binding sites for the NtcA transcription factor in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The CRP-family transcription factor NtcA, universally found in cyanobacteria, was initially discovered as a regulator operating N control. It responds to the N regime signaled by the internal 2-oxoglutarate levels, an indicator of the C to N balance of the cells. Canonical NtcA-activated promoters bear an NtcA-consensus binding site (GTAN8TAC) centered at about 41.5 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start point. In strains of the Anabaena/Nostoc genera NtcA is pivotal for the differentiation of heterocysts in response to N stress. Results In this study, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to identify the whole catalog of NtcA-binding sites in cells of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 three hours after the withdrawal of combined N. NtcA has been found to bind to 2,424 DNA regions in the genome of Anabaena, which have been ascribed to 2,153 genes. Interestingly, only a small proportion of those genes are involved in N assimilation and metabolism, and 65% of the binding regions were located intragenically. Conclusions The distribution of NtcA-binding sites identified here reveals the largest bacterial regulon described to date. Our results show that NtcA has a much wider role in the physiology of the cell than it has been previously thought, acting both as a global transcriptional regulator and possibly also as a factor influencing the superstructure of the chromosome (and plasmids). PMID:24417914

  17. [Progress in research on LiquiChip technology in biomedical engineering].

    PubMed

    Hui, Guohua; Zhao, Zikai

    2010-12-01

    As a novel BioChip technique, LiquiChip technique uses fluorescent polystyrene beads as the carrriers of various probes, thus the related reactions of bio-molecules are in liquid system. LiquiChip technique is of use in the methods to detect bio-macromolecules, e. g. DNA detection, immunoassay, cytokine assay, hormone assay, environmental survey and analysis. In comparison to conventional biochip, LiquiChip presents the advantages of high-throughput, high sensitivity, high accuracy, fine repeatability, wide linear range, etc. Now LiquiChip technique is widely used in biomedical engineering field. PMID:21375005

  18. Test chips and ASIC qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Zamani, N.; Lieneweg, U.

    1991-01-01

    A test chip set being developed to aid in the qualification of spaceborne Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) is described. The chip set consists of a process monitor for process parameter verification, a fault chip for yield analysis, a reliability chip for ASIC failure rate analysis, and total ionizing dose and single event upset chips for radiation effect analysis. The test structures contained in these chips are discussed along with representative test results.

  19. Multichannel arrays on polymer substrates: toward a disposable proteomics chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Pommersheim, Rainer

    1999-03-01

    Miniaturization is dramatically changing the shape of biotechnology. After the first wave of discoveries inventions in the field of analytical methods and DNA-probes on silicon chips, the trend in recent years has been to more complex and integrated systems in terms of microfabrication for production purposes mainly focused on polymer substrates. Additionally, an increased complexity in the biochemical functionality for tasks like cell handling, cell lysis, polymerase chain reaction, DNA-sequencing and recently in the field of proteomics research can be observed. In this paper we describe the practical approach to a polymer substrate based, microfabricated chip-based multichannel array for 2D capillary electrophoresis. This chip can be fabricated by classical mass production techniques like hot embossing or injection modeling, and has the potential for on-chip-integration of electrodes and detection system.

  20. Towards a DNA Nanoprocessor: Reusable Tile-Integrated DNA Circuits.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-08-22

    Modern electronic microprocessors use semiconductor logic gates organized on a silicon chip to enable efficient inter-gate communication. Here, arrays of communicating DNA logic gates integrated on a single DNA tile were designed and used to process nucleic acid inputs in a reusable format. Our results lay the foundation for the development of a DNA nanoprocessor, a small and biocompatible device capable of performing complex analyses of DNA and RNA inputs. PMID:27430161

  1. CHIP, CHIP, ARRAY! THREE CHIPS FOR POST-GENOMIC RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cambridge Healthtech Institute recently held the 4th installment of their popular "Lab-on-a-Chip" series in Zurich, Switzerland. As usual, it was enthusiastically received and over 225 people attended the 2-1/2 day meeting to see and hear about some of the latest developments an...

  2. Gas Sensor Test Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Ryan, M.

    1995-01-01

    A new test chip is being developed to characterize conducting polymers used in gas sensors. The chip, a seven-layer cofired alumina substrate with gold electrodes, contains 11 comb and U- bend test structures. These structures are designed to measure the sheet resistance, conduction anisotropy, and peripheral conduction of spin-coated films that are not subsequently patterned.

  3. Causes of stem end chip defect in chipping potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect (SECD) is a serious tuber quality concern that affects chipping potatoes. This defect is characterized by dark-colored vascular tissues and adjacent cortical tissues at the tuber stem-end of potato chips after frying. Chips with SECD are unappealing to consumers and raw product ...

  4. Digital LAMP in a sample self-digitization (SD) chip

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, Alison M.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Lee, Luke P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the realization of digital loop-mediated DNA amplification (dLAMP) in a sample self-digitization (SD) chip. Digital DNA amplification has become an attractive technique to quantify absolute concentrations of DNA in a sample. While digital polymerase chain reaction is still the most widespread implementation, its use in resource—limited settings is impeded by the need for thermal cycling and robust temperature control. In such situations, isothermal protocols that can amplify DNA or RNA without thermal cycling are of great interest. Here, we showed the successful amplification of single DNA molecules in a stationary droplet array using isothermal digital loop-mediated DNA amplification. Unlike most (if not all) existing methods for sample discretization, our design allows for automated, loss-less digitization of sample volumes on-chip. We demonstrated accurate quantification of relative and absolute DNA concentrations with sample volumes of less than 2 μl. We assessed the homogeneity of droplet size during sample self-digitization in our device, and verified that the size variation was small enough such that straightforward counting of LAMP-active droplets sufficed for data analysis. We anticipate that the simplicity and robustness of our SD chip make it attractive as an inexpensive and easy-to-operate device for DNA amplification, for example in point-of-care settings. PMID:22399016

  5. Novel, rapid DNA-based on-chip bacterial identification system combining dielectrophoresis and amplification-free fluorescent resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Michelle M.; Shusteff, Maxim; Alocilja, Evangelyn

    2011-10-01

    Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR) has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH) species identification. Identification is achieved completely on chip in less than thirty minutes from receipt of sample compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation.

  6. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  7. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2014-07-16

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  8. Progress in ion torrent semiconductor chip based sequencing.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Barry; Rothberg, Jonathan M

    2012-12-01

    In order for next-generation sequencing to become widely used as a diagnostic in the healthcare industry, sequencing instrumentation will need to be mass produced with a high degree of quality and economy. One way to achieve this is to recast DNA sequencing in a format that fully leverages the manufacturing base created for computer chips, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor chip fabrication, which is the current pinnacle of large scale, high quality, low-cost manufacturing of high technology. To achieve this, ideally the entire sensory apparatus of the sequencer would be embodied in a standard semiconductor chip, manufactured in the same fab facilities used for logic and memory chips. Recently, such a sequencing chip, and the associated sequencing platform, has been developed and commercialized by Ion Torrent, a division of Life Technologies, Inc. Here we provide an overview of this semiconductor chip based sequencing technology, and summarize the progress made since its commercial introduction. We described in detail the progress in chip scaling, sequencing throughput, read length, and accuracy. We also summarize the enhancements in the associated platform, including sample preparation, data processing, and engagement of the broader development community through open source and crowdsourcing initiatives. PMID:23208921

  9. Single oral dose toxicity test of polycalcium, a mixed composition of polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (G/G) in SD rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Wan; Choi, Jae-Suk; Ha, Yu-Mi; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Cho, Hyung-rae; Rha, Chae-hun; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2013-11-01

    The object of this study was to obtain acute oral toxicity information of Polycalcium, a mixed composition of Polycan and Calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (g/g), in Sprague-Dawely (SD) rats. In order to investigate the toxicity and identify target organs, Polycalcium were once orally administered to female and male SD rats at dose levels of 2000, 1000, 500 and 0 (control) mg/kg body weights. The mortality, changes on body weight and clinical signs were monitored during 14 days after treatment with gross observation, changes on the organ weights and histopathology of principle organs and treatment sites based on the recommendation of KFDA Guidelines [2009-116, 2009]. As the results of single oral treatment of Polycalcium, no treatment related mortalities were observed within 14 days after end of treatment up to 2000 mg/kg, the limited dosage of rodents in the both genders. In addition, no Polycalcium treatment related changes on the body and organ weights, clinical signs, necropsy and histopathological findings were detected. The results obtained in this study suggest that the Polycalcium is non-toxic in rats. The LD50 and approximate LD in rats after single oral dose of Polycalcium were considered over 2000 mg/kg in both female and male, respectively. PMID:24191319

  10. Pathology-related mutation A7526G (A9G) helps in the understanding of the 3D structural core of human mitochondrial tRNAAsp

    PubMed Central

    Messmer, Marie; Gaudry, Agnès; Sissler, Marie; Florentz, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    More than 130 mutations in human mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes have been correlated with a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Their molecular impacts are of mosaic type, affecting various stages of tRNA biogenesis, structure, and/or functions in mt-translation. Knowledge of mammalian mt-tRNA structures per se remains scarce however. Primary and secondary structures deviate from classical tRNAs, while rules for three-dimensional (3D) folding are almost unknown. Here, we take advantage of a myopathy-related mutation A7526G (A9G) in mt-tRNAAsp to investigate both the primary molecular impact underlying the pathology and the role of nucleotide 9 in the network of 3D tertiary interactions. Experimental evidence is presented for existence of a 9-12-23 triple in human mt-tRNAAsp with a strongly conserved interaction scheme in mammalian mt-tRNAs. Mutation A7526G disrupts the triple interaction and in turn reduces aspartylation efficiency. PMID:19535463

  11. Chipping citrus wood for gasifiction

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Both green and dead citrus trees were used for chipping. Chip moisture content, fuel analysis, drying time, and data on fuel/tonne of chips were obtained. The average moisture contents of green and dead trees when chipped were 25% and 16% (wet basis) respectively. Chips were sized to a minimum of 0.32 squared cm x 0.32 cm thick to a maximum of 5.0 cm squared x 0.32 cm thick and normally required 4 weeks to air dry to 14% (wet basis) moisture content before use. Approximately 50% of the total tree by weight could be made into usable chips. 9 references.

  12. Chip packaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraj, Kumaraswamy (Inventor); Noll, Thomas E. (Inventor); Lockwood, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hermetically sealed package for at least one semiconductor chip is provided which is formed of a substrate having electrical interconnects thereon to which the semiconductor chips are selectively bonded, and a lid which preferably functions as a heat sink, with a hermetic seal being formed around the chips between the substrate and the heat sink. The substrate is either formed of or includes a layer of a thermoplastic material having low moisture permeability which material is preferably a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and is a multiaxially oriented LCP material for preferred embodiments. Where the lid is a heat sink, the heat sink is formed of a material having high thermal conductivity and preferably a coefficient of thermal expansion which substantially matches that of the chip. A hermetic bond is formed between the side of each chip opposite that connected to the substrate and the heat sink. The thermal bond between the substrate and the lid/heat sink may be a pinched seal or may be provided, for example by an LCP frame which is hermetically bonded or sealed on one side to the substrate and on the other side to the lid/heat sink. The chips may operate in the RF or microwave bands with suitable interconnects on the substrate and the chips may also include optical components with optical fibers being sealed into the substrate and aligned with corresponding optical components to transmit light in at least one direction. A plurality of packages may be physically and electrically connected together in a stack to form a 3D array.

  13. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  14. Carbonyl sulfide removal with compost and wood chip biofilters, and in the presence of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Garrepalli, Divya R; Nawal, Chandraprakash S

    2009-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an odor-causing compound and hazardous air pollutant emitted frequently from wastewater treatment facilities and chemical and primary metals industries. This study examined the effectiveness of biofiltration in removing COS. Specific objectives were to compare COS removal efficiency for various biofilter media; to determine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is frequently produced along with COS under anaerobic conditions, adversely impacts COS removal; and to determine the maximum elimination capacity of COS for use in biofilter design. Three laboratory-scale polyvinyl chloride biofilter columns were filled with up to 28 in. of biofilter media (aged compost, fresh compost, wood chips, or a compost/wood chip mixture). Inlet COS ranged from 5 to 46 parts per million (ppm) (0.10-9.0 g/m3 hr). Compost and the compost/wood chip mixture produced higher COS removal efficiencies than wood chips alone. The compost and compost/wood chip mixture had a shorter stabilization times compared with wood chips alone. Fresh versus aged compost did not impact COS removal efficiency. The presence of H2S did not adversely impact COS removal for the concentration ratios tested. The maximum elimination capacity is at least 9 g/m3 hr for COS with compost media. PMID:20066911

  15. Droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhi-Xin; Luo, Rong; Lü, Shu-Hai; Xu, Ai-Dong; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2005-08-01

    Polymerase chain reactions (PCR), thermally activated chemical reactions which are widely used for nucleic acid amplification, have recently received much attention in microelectromechanical systems and micro total analysis systems because a wide variety of DNA/RNA molecules can be enriched by PCR for further analyses. In the present work, a droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip was designed and fabricated by the silicon microfabrication technique. Three different temperature zones, which were stable at denaturation, extension and annealing temperatures and isolated from each other by a thin-wall linkage, were integrated with a single, simple and straight microchannel to form the chip's basic functional structure. The PCR mixture was injected into the chip as a single droplet and flowed through the three temperature zones in the main microchannel in an oscillating manner to achieve the temperature maintenance and transitions. The chip's thermal performance was theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. The results indicated that the time needed for the temperature of the droplet to change to the target value is less than 1 s, and the root mean square error of temperature is less than 0.2 °C. A droplet of 1 µl PCR mixture with standard HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)-DNA sample inside was amplified by the present chip and the results were analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA markers in parallel. The electrophoresis results demonstrated that the micro oscillating-flow PCR chip successfully amplified the HPV-DNA, with a processing time of about 15 min which is significantly reduced compared to that for the conventional PCR instrument.

  16. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  17. World with Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Although we are well advised to look at the future 1 day at a time, we have seen in the chapters of this book, and they necessarily could cover only a selection on the features and applications of those tiny chips, that their potential continues to grow at the exceptional rates of the past. However, the new commitment has to be towards Sustainable Nanoelectronics, guided by creating sensing, computing, memory, and communication functions, which move just a few electrons per operation, each operation consuming energy less than one or a few femtojoule, less than any of the 1014 synapses in our brains. At these energy levels, chips can serve everywhere, making them ubiquitous, pervasive, certainly wireless, and often energy-autonomous. The expected six Billion users of these chips in 2020, through their mobile, intelligent companions, will benefit from global and largely equal access to information, education, knowledge, skills, and care.

  18. Chipping citrus wood for gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Non-productive citrus trees were chipped with a portable fly-wheel-type chipper powered by a 45 kW engine. Chips were air dried under an open shed to 14% (w.b.) moisture content. By weight, approximately 50% of the total tree could be made into usable chips. The root system averaged 36% of the total tree weight.

  19. Benefits of Chipping Almond Brush

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wood chipping of almond (Prunus dulcis) prunings could provide an alternative to burning that would not contribute to air pollution and would add valuable organic matter to soils. The success of wood chipping depends on whether the wood chips interfere with harvest or deplete the soil of critica...

  20. Benefits of Chipping Almond Brush

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wood chipping of almond (Prunus dulcis) prunings could provide an alternative to burning that would not contribute to air pollution and add valuable organic matter to soils. The success of wood chipping depends on whether the wood chips deplete the soil of critical nutrients necessary for tree g...

  1. Smart vision chips: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Christof

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents four working analog VLSI vision chips: (1) time-derivative retina, (2) zero-crossing chip, (3) resistive fuse, and (4) figure-ground chip; work in progress on computing motion and neuromorphic systems; and conceptual and practical lessons learned.

  2. Chip connectivity verification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Josh (Inventor); Patterson, George (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for testing electrical connectivity between conductive structures on a chip that is preferably layered with conductive and nonconductive layers. The method includes determining the layer on which each structure is located and defining the perimeter of each structure. Conductive layer connections between each of the layers are determined, and, for each structure, the points of intersection between the perimeter of that structure and the perimeter of each other structure on the chip are also determined. Finally, electrical connections between the structures are determined using the points of intersection and the conductive layer connections.

  3. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (approximately 50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of one the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the

  4. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (.50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the various species in

  5. Using CisGenome to Analyze ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongkai; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Wenxiu; Wong, Wing Hung

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with genome tiling array hybridization (ChIP-chip) and ChIP followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) are high throughput approaches to profile genome-wide protein-DNA interactions. Both technologies are increasingly used to study transcription factor binding sites and chromatin modifications. CisGenome is an integrated software system for analyzing ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data. This unit describes basic functions of CisGenome and how to use them to find genomic regions with protein-DNA interactions, visualize binding signals, associate binding regions with nearby genes, search for novel transcription factor binding motifs, and map existing DNA sequence motifs to user-supplied genomic regions to define their exact locations. PMID:21400695

  6. Flock on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    We will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal rollers display non-equilibrium transitions toward swarming or swirling motion depending on the system geometry . After characterizing these emergent patterns we will quantitatively describe them by means of an hydrodynamic theory of polar active liquids.

  7. Radiometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  8. Organ-on-a-chip and the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sejoong; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches to pathophysiology are advancing but still have many limitations that arise from real biologic systems and their associated physiological phenomena being too complicated. Microfluidics is a novel technology in the field of engineering, which provides new options that may overcome these hurdles. Microfluidics handles small volumes of fluids and may apply to various applications such as DNA analysis chips, other lab-on-a-chip analyses, micropropulsion, and microthermal technologies. Among them, organ-on-a-chip applications allow the fabrication of minimal functional units of a single organ or multiple organs. Relevant to the field of nephrology, renal tubular cells have been integrated with microfluidic devices for making kidneys-on-a-chip. Although still early in development, kidneys-on-a-chip are showing potential to provide a better understanding of the kidney to replace some traditional animal and human studies, particularly as more cell types are incorporated toward the development of a complete glomeruli-on-a-chip. PMID:26484042

  9. Organ-on-a-chip and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sejoong; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-09-01

    Traditional approaches to pathophysiology are advancing but still have many limitations that arise from real biologic systems and their associated physiological phenomena being too complicated. Microfluidics is a novel technology in the field of engineering, which provides new options that may overcome these hurdles. Microfluidics handles small volumes of fluids and may apply to various applications such as DNA analysis chips, other lab-on-a-chip analyses, micropropulsion, and microthermal technologies. Among them, organ-on-a-chip applications allow the fabrication of minimal functional units of a single organ or multiple organs. Relevant to the field of nephrology, renal tubular cells have been integrated with microfluidic devices for making kidneys-on-a-chip. Although still early in development, kidneys-on-a-chip are showing potential to provide a better understanding of the kidney to replace some traditional animal and human studies, particularly as more cell types are incorporated toward the development of a complete glomeruli-on-a-chip. PMID:26484042

  10. CE chips fabricated by injection molding and polyethylene/thermoplastic elastomer film packaging methods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yih-Far; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-04-01

    This study presents a new packaging method using a polyethylene/thermoplastic elastomer (PE/TPE) film to seal an injection-molded CE chip made of either poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or polycarbonate (PC) materials. The packaging is performed at atmospheric pressure and at room temperature, which is a fast, easy, and reliable bonding method to form a sealed CE chip for chemical analysis and biomedical applications. The fabrication of PMMA and PC microfluidic channels is accomplished by using an injection-molding process, which could be mass-produced for commercial applications. In addition to microfluidic CE channels, 3-D reservoirs for storing biosamples, and CE buffers are also formed during this injection-molding process. With this approach, a commercial CE chip can be of low cost and disposable. Finally, the functionality of the mass-produced CE chip is demonstrated through its successful separation of phiX174 DNA/HaeIII markers. Experimental data show that the S/N for the CE chips using the PE/TPE film has a value of 5.34, when utilizing DNA markers with a concentration of 2 ng/microL and a CE buffer of 2% hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose (HPMC) in Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) with 1% YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dye. Thus, the detection limit of the developed chips is improved. Lastly, the developed CE chips are used for the separation and detection of PCR products. A mixture of an amplified antibiotic gene for Streptococcus pneumoniae and phiX174 DNA/HaeIII markers was successfully separated and detected by using the proposed CE chips. Experimental data show that these DNA samples were separated within 2 min. The study proposed a promising method for the development of mass-produced CE chips. PMID:17311242

  11. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15

    Activated DNA was immobilized in aldehyde-containing polyacrylamide gel for use in manufacturing the MAGIChip (microarrays of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip). First, abasic sites were generated in DNA by partial acidic depurination. Amino groups were then introduced into the abasic sites by reaction with ethylenediamine and reduction of the aldimine bonds formed. It was found that DNA could be fragmented at the site of amino group incorporation or preserved mostly unfragmented. In similar reactions, both amino-DNA and amino-oligonucleotides were attached through their amines to polyacrylamide gel derivatized with aldehyde groups. Single- and double-stranded DNA of 40 to 972 nucleotides or base pairs were immobilized on the gel pads to manufacture a DNA microchip. The microchip was hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. This procedure for immobilization of amino compounds was used to manufacture MAGIChips containing both DNA and oligonucleotides.

  12. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  13. Chips of many colors

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, M.W.; Dorie, L.A.

    1982-07-01

    A large number of available color display tools generally fall into three categories. Intelligent terminals offer a wide range of color grpahics capability but require extensive software for specific applications. Large turn-key graphics systems, with color display consoles controlled by software, were made for electronic design. In color CAD workstations, color graphics is under hardware control and offers specific features for IC design. The authors look at the various colour graphics systems, and their advantages in VLSI chip design.

  14. Functional independence of monomeric CHIP28 water channels revealed by expression of wild-type mutant heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Shi, L B; Skach, W R; Verkman, A S

    1994-04-01

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and kidney which forms tetramers in membranes (Verbavatz, J. M., Brown, D., Sabolic, I., Valenti, G., Ausiello, D. A., Van Hoek, A. N., Ma, T., and Verkman, A. S. (1993) J. Cell Biol. 123, 605-618). To determine whether CHIP28 monomers function independently, chimeric cDNA dimers were constructed which contained wild-type CHIP28 in series with either wild-type CHIP28, a non-water transporting CHIP28 mutant (C189W), or a functional but mercurial-insensitive CHIP28 mutant (C189S). Transcribed cRNAs were injected in Xenopus oocytes and plasma membrane expression was assayed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Water channel function was measured by osmotically induced swelling. CHIP28 homo- and heterodimers were targeted to the oocyte plasma membrane and functioned as water channels. Relative osmotic water permeability (Pf) values (normalized for plasma membrane expression of monomeric subunits) were: 1.0 (CHIP28 monomer), 0.0 (C189W), 1.07 (C189S), 1.10 (CHIP28-CHIP28 dimer) and 0.52 (CHIP28-C189W). The increase in oocyte Pf was linearly related to plasma membrane expression of wild-type CHIP28 and C189S subunits. HgCl2 (0.3 mM) inhibited channel-mediated Pf in oocytes expressing wild-type CHIP28 monomers and dimers by 85-90%, but did not inhibit Pf in oocytes expressing C189S. HgCl2 inhibited Pf in oocytes expressing CHIP28-C189S dimers by 44 +/- 7%, consistent with one mercurial-sensitive and one insensitive subunit in the heterodimer. These results indicate that despite their assembly in tetramers, monomeric CHIP28 subunits function independently as water channels. PMID:7511600

  15. On-Chip Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have been rapidly emerging to pave the way toward ultra-compact, efficient, mass producible and cost-effective biomedical research and diagnostic tools. Although such microfluidic and micro electromechanical systems achieved high levels of integration, and are capable of performing various important tasks on the same chip, such as cell culturing, sorting and staining, they still rely on conventional microscopes for their imaging needs. Recently several alternative on-chip optical imaging techniques have been introduced, which have the potential to substitute conventional microscopes for various lab-on-a-chip applications. Here we present a critical review of these recently emerging on-chip biomedical imaging modalities, including contact shadow imaging, lensfree holographic microscopy, fluorescent on-chip microscopy and lensfree optical tomography. PMID:23558399

  16. Chip-Based Sensors for Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhichao

    Nucleic acid analysis is one of the most important disease diagnostic approaches in medical practice, and has been commonly used in cancer biomarker detection, bacterial speciation and many other fields in laboratory. Currently, the application of powerful research methods for genetic analysis, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and gene expression profiling using fluorescence microarrays, are not widely used in hospitals and extended-care units due to high-cost, long detection times, and extensive sample preparation. Bioassays, especially chip-based electrochemical sensors, may be suitable for the next generation of rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection tools. Herein, we report three different microelectrode platforms with capabilities enabled by nano- and microtechnology: nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs), nanostructured microelectrodes (NMEs), and hierarchical nanostructured microelectrodes (HNMEs), all of which are able to directly detect unpurified RNA in clinical samples without enzymatic amplification. Biomarkers that are cancer and infectious disease relevant to clinical medicine were chosen to be the targets. Markers were successfully detected with clinically-relevant sensitivity. Using peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as probes and an electrocatalytic reporter system, NEEs were able to detect prostate cancer-related gene fusions in tumor tissue samples with 100 ng of RNA. The development of NMEs improved the sensitivity of the assay further to 10 aM of DNA target, and multiplexed detection of RNA sequences of different prostate cancer-related gene fusion types was achieved on the chip-based NMEs platform. An HNMEs chip integrated with a bacterial lysis device was able to detect as few as 25 cfu bacteria in 30 minutes and monitor the detection in real time. Bacterial detection could also be performed in neat urine samples. The development of these versatile clinical diagnostic tools could be extended to the detection of various

  17. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  18. Identification of TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1) associated DNA and its impact on mRNA and protein output using ChIP, mRNA expression arrays and SILAC

    PubMed Central

    Linka, Yvonne; Ginzel, Sebastian; Borkhardt, Arndt; Landgraf, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the most common reciprocal translocation in childhood B-cell precursor leukemia t(12;21)(p13;q22) to leukemia development is still under debate. Direct as well as secondary indirect effects of the TEL-AML1 fusion protein are commonly recorded by using cell lines and patient samples, often bearing the TEL-AML1 fusion protein for decades. To identify direct targets of the fusion protein a short-term induction of TEL-AML1 is needed. We here describe in detail the experimental procedure, quality controls and contents of the ChIP, mRNA expression and SILAC datasets associated with the study published by Linka and colleagues in the Blood Cancer Journal [1] utilizing a short term induction of TEL-AML1 in an inducible precursor B-cell line model. PMID:26484077

  19. CHIP-ping away at tau.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2007-03-01

    Protein accumulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), a hyperphosphorylated form of the protein tau (p-tau) forms intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles. Deposits of p-tau have also been found in the brains of patients with Down's syndrome, supranuclear palsy, and prion disease. Mutations in tau have been causally associated with at least one inherited neurologic disorder, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), implying that tau abnormalities by themselves can be a primary cause of degenerative diseases of the CNS. Removal of these p-tau species may occur by both chaperone-mediated refolding and degradation. In this issue of the JCI, Dickey and colleagues show that a cochaperone protein, carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), in a complex with Hsp90 plays an important role in the removal of p-tau (see the related article beginning on page 648). Pharmacologic manipulation of Hsp90 may be used to alleviate p-tau accumulation in disease. PMID:17332887

  20. Justification of rapid prototyping in the development cycle of thermoplastic-based lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Preywisch, Regina; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Drese, Klaus S; Röser, Tina

    2011-11-01

    During the developmental cycle of lab-on-a-chip devices, various microstructuring techniques are required. While in the designing and assay implementation phase direct structuring or so-called rapid-prototyping methods such as milling or laser ablation are applied, replication methods like hot embossing or injection moulding are favourable for large quantity manufacturing. This work investigated the applicability of rapid-prototyping techniques for thermoplastic chip development in general, and the reproducibility of performances in dependency of the structuring technique. A previously published chip for prenatal diagnosis that preconcentrates DNA via electrokinetic trapping and field-amplified-sample-stacking and afterwards separates it in CGE was chosen as a model. The impact of structuring, sealing, and the integration of membranes on the mobility of the EOF, DNA preconcentration, and DNA separation was studied. Structuring methods were found to significantly change the location where preconcentration of DNA occurs. However, effects on the mobility of the EOF and the separation quality of DNA were not observed. Exchange of the membrane has no effect on the chip performance, whereas the sealing method impairs the separation of DNA within the chip. The overall assay performance is not significantly influenced by different structuring methods; thus, the application of rapid-prototyping methods during a chip development cycle is well justified. PMID:22102495

  1. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  2. High-throughput metabolic genotoxicity screening with a fluidic microwell chip and electrochemiluminescence†

    PubMed Central

    Wasalathanthri, Dhanuka P.; Malla, Spundana; Bist, Itti; Tang, Chi K.; Faria, Ronaldo C.; Rusling, James F.

    2014-01-01

    A high throughput electrochemiluminescent (ECL) chip was fabricated and integrated into a fluidic system for screening toxicity-related chemistry of drug and pollutant metabolites. The chip base is conductive pyrolytic graphite onto which are printed 64 microwells capable of holding one-µL droplets. Films combining DNA, metabolic enzymes and an ECL-generating ruthenium metallopolymer (RuIIPVP) are fabricated in these microwells. The system runs metabolic enzyme reactions, and subsequently detects DNA damage caused by reactive metabolites. The performance of the chip was tested by measuring DNA damage caused by metabolites of the well-known procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Liver microsomes and cytochrome P450 (cyt P450) enzymes were used with and without epoxide hydrolase (EH), a conjugative enzyme required for multi-enzyme bioactivation of B[a]P. DNA adduct formation was confirmed by determining specific DNA-metabolite adducts using similar films of DNA/enzyme on magnetic bead biocolloid reactors, hydrolyzing the DNA, and analyzing by capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (CapLC-MS/MS). The fluidic chip was also used to measure IC50-values of inhibitors of cyt P450s. All results show good correlation with reported enzyme activity and inhibition assays. PMID:24113555

  3. Active microfluidic mixer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xize; Liu, Liyu; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2006-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a chaotic mixer based on the electrorheological (ER) fluid-controlled valves. The flow in the main channel is perturbed by liquid flow in orthogonal side channels, driven by hydrodynamic pulsating pumps. Each pulsating pump consists of a chamber with diaphragm plus two out-of-phase ER valves operating in a push-pull mode. All the valves, pumps, and mixing channels are integrated in one polydimethylsioxane chip. Mixing characteristics in the main channel are controlled by the strength and frequency of external electric fields applied on the ER fluid.

  4. Acoustic micro-vortexing of fluids, particles and cells in disposable microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Ida; Ohlin, Mathias; Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Ye, Simon; Russom, Aman; Wiklund, Martin

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an acoustic platform for micro-vortexing in disposable polymer microfluidic chips with small-volume (20 μl) reaction chambers. The described method is demonstrated for a variety of standard vortexing functions, including mixing of fluids, re-suspension of a pellet of magnetic beads collected by a magnet placed on the chip, and lysis of cells for DNA extraction. The device is based on a modified Langevin-type ultrasonic transducer with an exponential horn for efficient coupling into the microfluidic chip, which is actuated by a low-cost fixed-frequency electronic driver board. The transducer is optimized by numerical modelling, and different demonstrated vortexing functions are realized by actuating the transducer for varying times; from fractions of a second for fluid mixing, to half a minute for cell lysis and DNA extraction. The platform can be operated during 1 min below physiological temperatures with the help of a PC fan, a Peltier element and an aluminum heat sink acting as the chip holder. As a proof of principle for sample preparation applications, we demonstrate on-chip cell lysis and DNA extraction within 25 s. The method is of interest for automating and chip-integrating sample preparation procedures in various biological assays. PMID:27444649

  5. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  6. Comparison of the performance of Ion Torrent chips in noninvasive prenatal trisomy detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlin; Wen, Zujia; Shen, Jiawei; Cheng, Weiwei; Li, Jun; Qin, Xiaolan; Ma, Duan; Shi, Yongyong

    2014-07-01

    Semiconductor high-throughput sequencing, represented by Ion Torrent PGM/Proton, proves to be feasible in the noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies. It is commendable that, with less data and relevant cost also, an accurate result can be achieved owing to the high sensitivity and specificity of such kind of technology. We conducted a comparative analysis of the performance of four different Ion chips in detecting fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. Eight maternal plasma DNA samples, including four pregnancies with normal fetuses and four with trisomy 21 fetuses, were sequenced on Ion Torrent 314/316/318/PI chips, respectively. Results such as read mapped ratio, correlation coefficient and phred quality score were calculated and parallelly compared. All samples were correctly classified even with low-throughput chip, and, among the four chips, the 316 chip had the highest read mapped ratio, correlation coefficient, mean read length and phred quality score. All chips were well consistent with each other. Our results showed that all Ion chips are applicable in noninvasive prenatal fetal aneuploidy diagnosis. We recommend researchers or clinicians to use the appropriate chip with barcoding technology on the basis of the sample number. PMID:24919645

  7. Wavefront image sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiquan; Ren, Jian; Tearney, Guillermo J; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-08-01

    We report the implementation of an image sensor chip, termed wavefront image sensor chip (WIS), that can measure both intensity/amplitude and phase front variations of a light wave separately and quantitatively. By monitoring the tightly confined transmitted light spots through a circular aperture grid in a high Fresnel number regime, we can measure both intensity and phase front variations with a high sampling density (11 microm) and high sensitivity (the sensitivity of normalized phase gradient measurement is 0.1 mrad under the typical working condition). By using WIS in a standard microscope, we can collect both bright-field (transmitted light intensity) and normalized phase gradient images. Our experiments further demonstrate that the normalized phase gradient images of polystyrene microspheres, unstained and stained starfish embryos, and strongly birefringent potato starch granules are improved versions of their corresponding differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope images in that they are artifact-free and quantitative. Besides phase microscopy, WIS can benefit machine recognition, object ranging, and texture assessment for a variety of applications. PMID:20721059

  8. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, M.S.; Lockhart, D.J.; Hubbell, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA chips for genetic analysis, using human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a model. The DNA chips are made up of ordered arrays of DNA oligonucleotide probes, synthesized on a glass substrate using photolithographic techniques. The synthesis site for each different probe is specifically addressed by illumination of the substrate through a photolithographic mask, achieving selective deprotection Nucleoside phosphoramidites bearing photolabile protecting groups are coupled only to exposed sites. Repeated cycles of deprotection and coupling generate all the probes in parallel. The set of 4{sup N} N-mer probes can be synthesized in only 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N or fewer steps. Sequences amplified from the D-loop region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were fluorescently labelled and hybridized to DNA chips containing probes specific for mtDNA. Each nucleotide of a 1.3 kb region spanning the D loop is represented by four probes on the chip. Each probe has a different base at the position of interest: together they comprise a set of A, C, G and T probes which are otherwise identical. In principle, only one probe-target hybrid will be a perfect match. The other three will be single base mismatches. Fluorescence imaging of the hybridized chip allows quantification of hybridization signals. Heterozygous mixtures of sequences can also be characterized. We have developed software to quantitate and interpret the hybridization signals, and to call the sequence automatically. Results of sequence analysis of human mtDNAs will be presented.

  9. A chitosan coated monolith for nucleic acid capture in a thermoplastic microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Eric L.; Wienhold, Erik; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    A technique for microfluidic, pH modulated DNA capture and purification using chitosan functionalized glycidyl methacrylate monoliths is presented. Highly porous polymer monoliths are formed and subsequently functionalized off-chip in a batch process before insertion into thermoplastic microchannels prior to solvent bonding, simplifying the overall fabrication process by eliminating the need for on-chip surface modifications. The monolith anchoring method allows for the use of large cross-section monoliths enabling high flowrates and high DNA capture capacity with a minimum of added design complexity. Using monolith capture elements requiring less than 1 mm2 of chip surface area, loading levels above 100 ng are demonstrated, with DNA capture and elution efficiency of 54.2% ± 14.2% achieved. PMID:25379094

  10. Single chip camera active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Timothy (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Olson, Brita (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Panicacci, Roger A. (Inventor); Mansoorian, Barmak (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A totally digital single chip camera includes communications to operate most of its structure in serial communication mode. The digital single chip camera include a D/A converter for converting an input digital word into an analog reference signal. The chip includes all of the necessary circuitry for operating the chip using a single pin.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip PCR: real time PCR in miniaturized format for HLA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Sewart, René; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In case of transplantation or the identification of special metabolic diseases like coeliac disease, HLA typing has to be done fast and reliably with easy-to-handle devices by using limited amount of sample. Against this background a lab-on-a-chip device was realized enabling a fast HLA typing via miniaturized Real-time PCR. Hereby, two main process steps were combined, namely the extraction of DNA from whole blood and the amplification of the target DNA by Real-time PCR giving rise-to a semi-quantitative analysis. For the implementation of both processes on chip, a sample preparation and a real-time module were used. Sample preparation was carried out by using magnetic beads that were stored directly on chip as dry powder, together with all lysis reagents. After purification of the DNA by applying a special buffer regime, the sample DNA was transferred into the PCR module for amplification and detection. Coping with a massively increased surface-to-volume ratio, which results in a higher amount of unspecific binding on the chip surface, special additives needed to be integrated to compensate for this effect. Finally the overall procedure showed a sensitivity comparable to standard Real-time PCR but reduced the duration of analysis to significantly less than one hour. The presented work demonstrates that the combination of lab-on-a-chip PCR with direct optical read-out in a real-time fashion is an extremely promising tool for molecular diagnostics.

  12. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.; Malba, Vincent; Riddle, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  13. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  14. Programmable lab-on-a-chip system for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalhammer, S.

    2009-05-01

    The collection, selection, amplification and detection of minimum genetic samples became a part of everyday life in medical and biological laboratories, to analyze DNA-fragments of pathogens, patient samples and traces on crime scenes. About a decade ago, a handful of researchers began discussing an intriguing idea. Could the equipment needed for everyday chemistry and biology procedures be shrunk to fit on a chip in the size of a fingernail? Miniature devices for, say, analysing DNA and proteins should be faster and cheaper than conventional versions. Lab-on-a-chip is an advanced technology that integrates a microfluidic system on a microscale chip device. The "laboratory" is created by means of channels, mixers, reservoirs, diffusion chambers, integrated electrodes, pumps, valves and more. With lab-ona- chip technology, complete laboratories on a square centimetre can be created. Here, a multifunctional programmable Lab-on-a-Chip driven by nanofluidics and controlled by surface acoustic waves (SAW) is presented. This system combines serial DNA-isolation-, amplification- and array-detection-process on a modified glass-platform. The fluid actuation is controlled via SAW by interdigital transducers implemented in the chemical modified chip surface. The chemical surface modification allows fluid handling in the sub-microliter range. Minute amount of sample material is extracted by laser-based microdissection out of e.g. histological sections at the single cell level. A few picogram of genetic material are isolated and transferred via a low-pressure transfer system (SPATS) onto the chip. Subsequently the genetic material inside single droplets, which behave like "virtual" beaker, is transported to the reaction and analysis centers on the chip surface via surface acoustic waves, mainly known as noise dumping filters in mobile phones. At these "biological reactors" the genetic material is processed, e.g. amplified via polymerase chain reaction methods, and genetically

  15. CRRES microelectronic test chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-S.; Buehler, M. G.; Ray, K. P.; Sokoloski, M. M.

    1991-12-01

    The JPL CRRES chip was designed and fabricated in 1985 and included in the CRRES MEP. MOSFET Matrix results show the effect of shielding on radiation-induced MOSFET threshold voltage shifts and channel mobility degradation. Shielded (middle board) MOSFETs have a threshold-voltage damage factor that is approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than would be estimated from Co-60 ground tests. Unshielded (outer board) MOSFETs have a threshold-voltage damage factor that would be estimated from Co-60 ground tests. Temperature swings as large as 23 C with a 22.5 orbit periodicity affected the MOSFET data and were removed from the data in order to reveal the radiation effects. This experiment demonstrated the feasibility of characterizing MOSFETs in a matrix, thus reducing the complexity and mass of the experiment.

  16. Packaging commercial CMOS chips for lab on a chip integration.

    PubMed

    Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-05-21

    Combining integrated circuitry with microfluidics enables lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices to perform sensing, freeing them from benchtop equipment. However, this integration is challenging with small chips, as is briefly reviewed with reference to key metrics for package comparison. In this paper we present a simple packaging method for including mm-sized, foundry-fabricated dies containing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits within LOCs. The chip is embedded in an epoxy handle wafer to yield a level, large-area surface, allowing subsequent photolithographic post-processing and microfluidic integration. Electrical connection off-chip is provided by thin film metal traces passivated with parylene-C. The parylene is patterned to selectively expose the active sensing area of the chip, allowing direct interaction with a fluidic environment. The method accommodates any die size and automatically levels the die and handle wafer surfaces. Functionality was demonstrated by packaging two different types of CMOS sensor ICs, a bioamplifier chip with an array of surface electrodes connected to internal amplifiers for recording extracellular electrical signals and a capacitance sensor chip for monitoring cell adhesion and viability. Cells were cultured on the surface of both types of chips, and data were acquired using a PC. Long term culture (weeks) showed the packaging materials to be biocompatible. Package lifetime was demonstrated by exposure to fluids over a longer duration (months), and the package was robust enough to allow repeated sterilization and re-use. The ease of fabrication and good performance of this packaging method should allow wide adoption, thereby spurring advances in miniaturized sensing systems. PMID:24682025

  17. L-nucleotides and 8-methylguanine of d(C1m8G2C3G4C5LG6LC7G8C9G10)2 act cooperatively to promote a left-handed helix under physiological salt conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cherrak, Ilham; Mauffret, Olivier; Santamaria, Fanny; Hocquet, Alexandre; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Rayner, Bernard; Fermandjian, Serge

    2003-01-01

    The structure and thermal stability of a hetero chiral decaoligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex d(C1m8 G2C3G4C5LG6LC7G8C9G10)d(C11m8G12C13G14C15LG16LC17G18C19G20) (O1) with two contiguous pairs of enantiomeric 2′-deoxy-l-ribonucleotides (C5LG6L/C15LG16L) at its centre and an 8-methylguanine at position 2/12 was analysed by circular dichroism, NMR and molecular modelling. O1 resolves in a left-handed helical structure already at low salt concentration (0.1 M NaCl). The central l2-sugar portion assumes a B* left-handed conformation (mirror-image of right-handed B-DNA) while its flanking d4-sugar portions adopt the known Z left-handed conformation. The resulting Z4–B2*–Z4 structure (left-handed helix) is the reverse of that of B4–Z2*–B4 (right-handed helix) displayed by the nearly related decaoligodeoxyribonucleotide d(mC1G2mC3G4C5L G6LmC7G8mC9G10)2, at the same low salt concentration (0.1 M NaCl). In the same experimental conditions, d(C1m8G2C3G4C5G6C7G8C9G10)2 (O2), the stereoregular version of O1, resolves into a right-handed B-DNA helix. Thus, both the 8-methylguanine and the enantiomeric step CLpGL at the centre of the molecule are needed to induce left-handed helicity. Remarkably, in the various heterochiral decaoligodeoxyribonucleotides so far analysed by us, when the central CLpGL adopts the B* (respectively Z*) conformation, then the adjacent steps automatically resolves in the Z (respectively B) conformation. This allows a good optimisation of the base–base stackings and base–sugar van der Waals interactions at the ZB*/B*Z (respectively BZ*/Z*B) junctions so that the Z4–B2*–Z4 (respectively B4–Z2*–B4) helix displays a Tm (∼65°C) that is only 5°C lower than the one of its homochiral counterpart. Here we anticipate that a large variety of DNA helices can be generated at low salt concentration by manipulating internal factors such as sugar configuration, duplex length, nucleotide composition and base methylation. These helices can

  18. DNA transformation via local heat shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Meadow Anderson, L.; Yang, Jui-Ming; Lin, Liwei; Yang, Haw

    2007-07-01

    This work describes transformation of foreign DNA into bacterial host cells by local heat shock using a microfluidic system with on-chip, built-in platinum heaters. Plasmid DNA encoding ampicillin resistance and a fluorescent protein can be effectively transformed into the DH5α chemically competent E. coli using this device. Results further demonstrate that only one-thousandth of volume is required to obtain transformation efficiencies as good as or better than conventional practices. As such, this work complements other lab-on-a-chip technologies for potential gene cloning/therapy and protein expression applications.

  19. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Silvia Emma; Carotenuto, Walter; Giannattasio, Michele

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) (1), which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip) (2-4) of replisome components allows the precise localization of all active DNA replication forks. This analysis can be coupled with the ssDNA-BromodeoxyUridine (ssDNA-BrdU) Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ssDNA-BrdU IP on chip) technique (5-7), which detects the location of newly synthesized DNA. Comparison of binding and BrdU incorporation profiles allows to locate a factor of interest at DNA replication forks genome wide. We present datasets deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE68214, which show how the DNA helicases Rrm3 and Pif1 (8) associate to active and inactive DNA replication forks. PMID:26981397

  20. Rutger's CAM2000 chip architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donald E.; Hall, J. Storrs; Miyake, Keith

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the architecture and instruction set of the Rutgers CAM2000 memory chip. The CAM2000 combines features of Associative Processing (AP), Content Addressable Memory (CAM), and Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) in a single chip package that is not only DRAM compatible but capable of applying simple massively parallel operations to memory. This document reflects the current status of the CAM2000 architecture and is continually updated to reflect the current state of the architecture and instruction set.

  1. HSP90 regulates DNA repair via the interaction between XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qingming; Inanc, Burcu; Schamus, Sandy; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wei, Leizhen; Brown, Ashley R.; Svilar, David; Sugrue, Kelsey F.; Goellner, Eva M.; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Lan, Li; Vens, Conchita; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair processes are crucial to maintain genome stability and integrity. In DNA base excision repair, a tight heterodimer complex formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ) and XRCC1 is thought to facilitate repair by recruiting Polβ to DNA damage sites. Here we show that disruption of the complex does not impact DNA damage response or DNA repair. Instead, the heterodimer formation is required to prevent ubiquitylation and degradation of Polβ. In contrast, the stability of the XRCC1 monomer is protected from CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation by interaction with the binding partner HSP90. In response to cellular proliferation and DNA damage, proteasome and HSP90-mediated regulation of Polβ and XRCC1 alters the DNA repair complex architecture. We propose that protein stability, mediated by DNA repair protein complex formation, functions as a regulatory mechanism for DNA repair pathway choice in the context of cell cycle progression and genome surveillance. PMID:25423885

  2. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique. PMID:26022215

  3. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique. PMID:26029750

  4. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10-20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook. PMID:27527231

  5. Teaching microfluidic diagnostics using Jell-O(®) chips.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng Wei T; Lagally, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics has emerged as a versatile technology that has found many applications, including DNA chips, fuel cells, and diagnostics. As the field of microfluidic diagnostics grows, it is important to introduce the principles of this technology to young students and the general public. The objective of this project was to create a simple and effective method that could be used to teach key microfluidics concepts using easily accessible materials. Similar to the poly(dimethylsiloxane) soft lithography technique, a Jell-O(®) "chip" is produced by pouring a mixture of Jell-O(®) and gelatine solution into a mold, which is constructed using foam plate, coffee stirrers, and double-sided tape. The plate is transferred to a 4°C refrigerator for curing, and then the Jell-O(®) chip is peeled off for experimental demonstrations. Three types of chips have been fabricated with different molds: a JELLO mold, a Y-channel mold, and a pH-sensor mold. Using these devices, the basics of microfluidic diagnostics can be demonstrated in one or two class periods. The method described in this chapter provides teachers with a fast and inexpensive way to introduce this technology, and students with a fun and hands-on way to understand the basics of microfluidic diagnostics. PMID:23329433

  6. Optimization of direct whole blood PCR amplification with applications on a static thermostat chip.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bai-Yan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiao-Xi; Chen, Kun; Fang, Fang

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, direct whole blood PCR amplifications on a static chip thermostat without sample purifications are demonstrated; in these amplifications, problems such as cross-interferences and contaminations could be avoided. The amplification conditions, such as the compositions of reagents and thermal programs, were investigated systematically by a GeneAmp PCR system with a native p53 gene segment (about 543 bp) of human genome and an exterior lambda DNA segment (about 500 bp) as targets. Direct amplifications of p53 and K-ras (about 157 bp) gene segments from 0.5 microL blood samples were successfully demonstrated by a static PCR chip with an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chip thermostat has a typical size of 25 mm x 25 mm, and a polyethylene tube was used as the PCR vial on the glass surface of the chip. Fuzzy proportional integration-differentiation algorithms were adopted in temperature controls of the chip with an aid of a micro-Pt100 sensor. In the direct PCR with the thermostat chip, the whole process only involves automatic thermal programs. This work demonstrated that a chip PCR for field test without desktop facilities is possible either for a point of care test or for forensic analysis. PMID:17849104

  7. A fully sealed plastic chip for multiplex PCR and its application in bacteria identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youchun; Yan, He; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Kewei; Lu, Ying; Ren, Yonghong; Wang, Hui; Wang, Shan; Xing, Wanli

    2015-07-01

    Multiplex PCR is an effective tool for simultaneous multiple target detection but is limited by the intrinsic interference and competition among primer pairs when it is performed in one reaction tube. Dividing a multiplex PCR into many single PCRs is a simple strategy to overcome this issue. Here, we constructed a plastic, easy-to-use, fully sealed multiplex PCR chip based on reversible centrifugation for the simultaneous detection of 63 target DNA sequences. The structure of the chip is quite simple, which contains sine-shaped infusing channels and a number of reaction chambers connecting to one side of these channels. Primer pairs for multiplex PCR were sequentially preloaded in the different reaction chambers, and the chip was enclosed with PCR-compatible adhesive tape. For usage, the PCR master mix containing a DNA template is pipetted into the infusing channels and centrifuged into the reaction chambers, leaving the infusing channels filled with air to avoid cross-contamination of the different chambers. Then, the chip is sealed and placed on a flat thermal cycler for PCR. Finally, amplification products can be detected in situ using a fluorescence scanner or recovered by reverse centrifugation for further analyses. Therefore, our chip possesses two functions: 1) it can be used for multi-target detection based on end-point in situ fluorescence detection; and 2) it can work as a sample preparation unit for analyses that need multiplex PCR such as hybridization and target sequencing. The performance of this chip was carefully examined and further illustrated in the identification of 8 pathogenic bacterial genomic DNA samples and 13 drug-resistance genes. Due to simplicity of its structure and operation, accuracy and generality, high-throughput capacity, and versatile functions (i.e., for in situ detection and sample preparation), our multiplex PCR chip has great potential in clinical diagnostics and nucleic acid-based point-of-care testing. PMID:26016439

  8. GeoChips for Analysis of Microbial Functional Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-09-30

    Functional gene arrays (FGA) are microarrays that contain probes for genes encoding proteins or enzymes involved in functions of interest and allow for the study of thousands of genes at one time. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip, which contains ~;;24,000 probes for ~;;10,000 genes involved in the geochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, as well as genes involved in metal resistance and reduction and contaminant degradation. This chapter details the methods necessary for GeoChip analysis. Methods covered include preparation of DNA (whole community genome amplification and labeling), array setup (prehybridization steps), hybridization (sample and hybridization buffers), and post hybridization steps (slide washing and array scanning).

  9. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  10. Stem end chip defect in tubers used for potato chip production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect (SECD) is a serious tuber quality concern that affects chipping potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). SECD defect is characterized by dark-colored vascular tissues and adjacent cortical tissues at the tuber stem-end portion of potato chips after frying. Chips with SECD are unattractive ...

  11. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2003

    In the high northern latitudes NW of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater. The prominent scarp that has formed from the retreat of the mantle lacks the rounded appearance of other ice-rich mantles found in the mid-latitudes. The nature of this mantling layer therefore is more enigmatic.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.9, Longitude 226.2 East (133.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  13. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  14. A highly efficient and effective motif discovery method for ChIP-seq/ChIP-chip data using positional information.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaotu; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Zhang, Zhihua; Xuan, Zhenyu; Serfling, Robert; Zhang, Michael Q

    2012-04-01

    Identification of DNA motifs from ChIP-seq/ChIP-chip [chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)] data is a powerful method for understanding the transcriptional regulatory network. However, most established methods are designed for small sample sizes and are inefficient for ChIP data. Here we propose a new k-mer occurrence model to reflect the fact that functional DNA k-mers often cluster around ChIP peak summits. With this model, we introduced a new measure to discover functional k-mers. Using simulation, we demonstrated that our method is more robust against noises in ChIP data than available methods. A novel word clustering method is also implemented to group similar k-mers into position weight matrices (PWMs). Our method was applied to a diverse set of ChIP experiments to demonstrate its high sensitivity and specificity. Importantly, our method is much faster than several other methods for large sample sizes. Thus, we have developed an efficient and effective motif discovery method for ChIP experiments. PMID:22228832

  15. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  16. Cell lysis and DNA extraction in microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2002-03-01

    We are developing a microfabricated device to lyse single cells and extract the DNA. The chip consists of two parts: a diffuse mixer combined with a dielectrophoretic trap. We are working with E. coli which have been made osmoticaly unstable before loading into the chip. The cells are lysed by osmotic shock in the mixer. The lysate is then passed to the dielectrophoretic trap. Attempts to separate the genomic DNA from the lysate fragments by selectively trapping the DNA using dielectrophoresis have been made. We have encountered cell sticking problems and are investingating surface modifications using Polyethylene glycol to solve this problem.

  17. Stem-end chip defect update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is characterized by dark fried color along the vasculature and adjacent tissues at a position in the chip that corresponds to the tuber stem end. Stem-end chip defect occurs erratically over years and locations. In some years and in some regions, it can be a pervasive and costly...

  18. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  19. Programmable multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-03-02

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  20. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2005-05-24

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  1. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-11-16

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  2. On-Chip Optical Squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Avik; Luke, Kevin; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of all-optical squeezing in an on-chip monolithically integrated CMOS-compatible platform. Our device consists of a low-loss silicon nitride microring optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with a gigahertz cavity linewidth. We measure 1.7 dB (5 dB corrected for losses) of sub-shot-noise quantum correlations between bright twin beams generated in the microring four-wave-mixing OPO pumped above threshold. This experiment demonstrates a compact, robust, and scalable platform for quantum-optics and quantum-information experiments on chip.

  3. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  4. DNA FROM ANCIENT STONE TOOLS AND BONES EXCAVATED AT BUGAS-HOLDING, WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traces of DNA may preserve on ancient stone tools. We examined 24 chipped stone artifacts recovered from the Bugas-Holding site in northwestern Wyoming for the presence of DNA residues, and we compared DNA preservation in bones and stone tools from the same stratigraphic context...

  5. Programmable synaptic chip for electronic neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Langenbacher, H.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    A binary synaptic matrix chip has been developed for electronic neural networks. The matrix chip contains a programmable 32X32 array of 'long channel' NMOSFET binary connection elements implemented in a 3-micron bulk CMOS process. Since the neurons are kept off-chip, the synaptic chip serves as a 'cascadable' building block for a multi-chip synaptic network as large as 512X512 in size. As an alternative to the programmable NMOSFET (long channel) connection elements, tailored thin film resistors are deposited, in series with FET switches, on some CMOS test chips, to obtain the weak synaptic connections. Although deposition and patterning of the resistors require additional processing steps, they promise substantial savings in silicon area. The performance of synaptic chip in a 32-neuron breadboard system in an associative memory test application is discussed.

  6. Protein Chips for Detection of Salmonella spp. from Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Cimaglia, Fabio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Chiesa, Maurizio; Mezzolla, Valeria; Reca, Ida Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Food pathogens are the cause of foodborne epidemics, therefore there is a need to detect the pathogens in food productions rapidly. A pre-enrichment culture followed by selective agar plating are standard detection methods. Molecular methods such as qPCR have provided a first rapid protocol for detection of pathogens within 24 h of enrichment culture. Biosensors also may provide a rapid tool to individuate a source of Salmonella contamination at early times of pre-enrichment culture. Forty mL of Salmonella spp. enrichment culture were processed by immunoseparation using the Pathatrix, as in AFNOR validated qPCR protocols. The Salmonella biosensor combined with immunoseparation showed a limit of detection of 100 bacteria/40 mL, with a 400 fold increase to previous results. qPCR analysis requires processing of bead-bound bacteria with lysis buffer and DNA clean up, with a limit of detection of 2 cfu/50 μL. Finally, a protein chip was developed and tested in screening and identification of 5 common pathogen species, Salmonella spp., E. coli, S. aureus, Campylobacter spp. and Listeria spp. The protein chip, with high specificity in species identification, is proposed to be integrated into a Lab-on-Chip system, for rapid and reproducible screening of Salmonella spp. and other pathogen species contaminating food productions. PMID:27110786

  7. Protein Chips for Detection of Salmonella spp. from Enrichment Culture.

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Cimaglia, Fabio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Chiesa, Maurizio; Mezzolla, Valeria; Reca, Ida Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Food pathogens are the cause of foodborne epidemics, therefore there is a need to detect the pathogens in food productions rapidly. A pre-enrichment culture followed by selective agar plating are standard detection methods. Molecular methods such as qPCR have provided a first rapid protocol for detection of pathogens within 24 h of enrichment culture. Biosensors also may provide a rapid tool to individuate a source of Salmonella contamination at early times of pre-enrichment culture. Forty mL of Salmonella spp. enrichment culture were processed by immunoseparation using the Pathatrix, as in AFNOR validated qPCR protocols. The Salmonella biosensor combined with immunoseparation showed a limit of detection of 100 bacteria/40 mL, with a 400 fold increase to previous results. qPCR analysis requires processing of bead-bound bacteria with lysis buffer and DNA clean up, with a limit of detection of 2 cfu/50 μL. Finally, a protein chip was developed and tested in screening and identification of 5 common pathogen species, Salmonella spp., E. coli, S. aureus, Campylobacter spp. and Listeria spp. The protein chip, with high specificity in species identification, is proposed to be integrated into a Lab-on-Chip system, for rapid and reproducible screening of Salmonella spp. and other pathogen species contaminating food productions. PMID:27110786

  8. Single molecule actuation and detection on a lab-on-a-chip magnetoresistive platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, R. C.; Bensimon, D.; Freitas, P. P.

    2011-03-01

    On-chip magnetic tweezers based on current loops were integrated with magnetoresistive sensors. Magnetic forces up to 1.0±0.3pN are produced to actuate on DNA anchored to the surface of a flow cell and labeled with micrometer-sized magnetic beads. The levitation of the beads stretches the immobilized DNA. The relative position of the magnetic beads is monitored using spin-valve sensors. A bead vertical displacement resolution of 60nm is derived for DNA molecular motor activity in a tweezer steady current regime.

  9. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  10. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  11. On the surface modification of microchannels for microcapillary electrophoresis chips.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Lin, Che-Hsin; Lee, Kuo-Hoong; Lin, Yue-Feng

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents systematic investigation of the microchannel surface properties in microCE chips. Three popular materials for microCE chips, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), quartz, and glass, are used. The zeta potentials of these microchannels are calculated by measuring the EOF velocity to evaluate the surface properties after surface modification. The hydrophobic PDMS is usually plasma-treated for microCE applications. In this study, a new method using a high-throughput atmospheric plasma generator is adopted to treat the PDMS surface under atmospheric conditions. In this approach, the cost and time for surface treatment can be significantly reduced compared with the conventional vacuum plasma generator method. Experimental results indicate that new functional groups could be formed on the PDMS surface after treatment, resulting in a change in the surface property. The time-dependent surface property of the plasma-treated PDMS is then measured in terms of the zeta potential. Results show that the surface property will reach a stable condition after 1 h of plasma treatment. For glass CE chips, two new methods for changing the microchannel surface properties are developed. Instead of using complicated and time-consuming chemical silanization procedures for CE channel surface modification, two simple and reliable methods utilizing organic-based spin-on-glass and water-soluble acrylic resin are reported. The proposed method provides a fast batch process for controlling the surface properties of glass-based CE channels. The proposed methods are evaluated using PhiX-174 DNA maker separation. The experimental data show that the surface property is modified and separation efficiency greatly improved. In addition, the long-term stability of both coatings is verified in this study. The methods proposed in this study show potential as an excellent solution for glass-based microCE chip surface modification. PMID:16358252

  12. Molecular Sentinel-on-Chip for SERS-Based Biosensing†

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Batchelor, Dale; Leonard, Donovan N.; Misra, Veena; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    The development of DNA detection techniques on large-area plasmonics-active platforms is critical for many medical applications such as high-throughput screening, medical diagnosis and systems biology research. Here, we report for the first time a unique “molecular sentinel-on-chip” (MSC) technology for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based DNA detection. This unique approach allows label-free detection of DNA molecules on chips developed on a wafer scale using large area nanofabrication methodologies. To develop plasmonics-active biosensing platforms in a repeatable and reproducible manner, we employed a combination of deep UV lithography, atomic layer deposition, and metal deposition to fabricate triangular-shaped nanowire (TSNW) arrays having controlled sub-10 nm gaps nanostructures over an entire 6-inch wafer. The detection of a DNA sequence of the Ki-67 gene, a critical breast cancer biomarker, on the TSNW substrate illustrates the usefulness and potential of the MSC technology as a novel SERS-based DNA detection method. PMID:23493773

  13. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  14. Cross polarization compatible dialysis chip.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Micha; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Beck, Roy

    2014-10-01

    We visualize birefringence in microliter sample volumes using a microfluidic dialysis chip optimized for cross polarization microscopy. The chip is composed of two overlapping polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels separated by a commercial cellulose ester membrane. Buffer exchange in the sample chamber is achieved within minutes by dialyzing under continuous reservoir flow. Using fd virus as a birefringent model system, we monitor the fd virus isotropic to liquid crystal phase transition as a function of ionic strength. We show that the reorientation of the fd virus spans a few tens of seconds, indicative of fast ion exchange across the membrane. Complete phase separation reorganization takes minutes to hours as it involves diffusive virus mass transport within the storage chamber. PMID:25105977

  15. Optofluidic Tomography on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    Using lensfree holography we demonstrate optofluidic tomography on a chip. A partially coherent light source is utilized to illuminate the objects flowing within a microfluidic channel placed directly on a digital sensor array. The light source is rotated to record lensfree holograms of the objects at different viewing directions. By capturing multiple frames at each illumination angle, pixel super-resolution techniques are utilized to reconstruct high-resolution transmission images at each angle. Tomograms of flowing objects are then computed through filtered back-projection of these reconstructed lensfree images, thereby enabling optical sectioning on-a-chip. The proof-of-concept is demonstrated by lensfree tomographic imaging of C. elegans. PMID:21580801

  16. Localization and functional analysis of CHIP28k water channels in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Frigeri, A; Tsai, S T; Verbavatz, J M; Verkman, A S

    1993-10-25

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and plasma membranes in kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with the coding sequence of cloned rat kidney CHIP28k using expression vectors containing cytomegalovirus or Rous sarcoma virus promoters. Clonal cell populations expressed a 1.3-kilobase mRNA on Northern blot probed by CHIP28k cDNA and a 28-kDa protein on immunoblot probed by a polyclonal CHIP28 antibody. The clone with greatest expression produced approximately 8 x 10(6) copies of CHIP28k protein/cell. Plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf), measured by stopped-flow light scattering, was 0.004 cm/s in control (vector-transfected) cells (10 degrees C) and 0.014 cm/s in the CHIP28k-transfected cells. Pf in CHIP28k-transfected cells had an activation energy of 4.9 kcal/mol and was reversibly inhibited by HgCl2. CHIP28k expression did not affect the transport of protons and the small polar non-electrolytes urea and formamide. CHIP28k immunoreactivity and function was then determined in subcellular fractions. Pf in 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled endocytic vesicles, measured by a stopped-flow fluorescence quenching assay, was 0.002 cm/s (control cells) and 0.011 cm/s (CHIP28k-transfected cells); Pf in transfected cells was inhibited by HgCl2. Immunoblotting of fractionated endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and plasma membranes revealed high densities of CHIP28k (approximately 5000 monomers/microns 2 in plasma membrane) with different glycosylation patterns; functional water transport activity was present only in Golgi and plasma membrane vesicles. Antibody detection of CHIP28k by confocal fluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy revealed localization to plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles. These studies establish a stably transfected somatic cell line that strongly expresses functional CHIP28k water channels. As in the original proximal tubule cells

  17. Cells on chip for multiplex screening.

    PubMed

    Berthuy, Ophélie I; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2016-02-15

    Microarray technology was developed in the early 1990s to measure the transcription levels of thousands of genes in parallel. The basic premise of high-density arraying has since been expanded to create cells microarrays. Cells on chip are powerful experimental tools for high-throughput and multiplex screening of samples or cellular functions. Miniaturization increases assay throughput while reducing both reagent consumption and cell population heterogeneity effect, making these systems attractive for a wide range of assays, from drug discovery to toxicology, stem cell research and therapy. One form of cell microarrays, the transfected cell microarray, wherein plasmid DNA or siRNA, spotted on the surface of a substrate, is reverse-transfected locally into adherent cells, has become a standard tool for parallel cell-based analysis. With the advent of technologies, cells can also be directly spotted onto functionalized surfaces using robotic fluid-dispensing devices, or printed directly in bio-ink material. We are providing herein an overview of the last developments in optical cell microarrays allowing high-throughput and high-content analysis. PMID:25892543

  18. Brush Effects on DNA Chips: Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Design Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, A.; Buhot, A.; Zhulina, E. B.

    2005-01-01

    In biology experiments, oligonucleotide microarrays are contacted with a solution of long nucleic acid targets. The hybridized probes thus carry long tails. When the surface density of the oligonucleotide probes is high enough, the progress of hybridization gives rise to a polyelectrolyte brush due to mutual crowding of the nucleic acid tails. The free-energy penalty associated with the brush modifies both the hybridization isotherms and the rate equations: the attainable hybridization is lowered significantly as is the hybridization rate. When the equilibrium hybridization fraction, xeq, is low, the hybridization follows a Langmuir type isotherm, xeq/(1 − xeq) = ctK where ct is the target concentration and K is the equilibrium constant. K is smaller than its bulk value by a factor (n/N)2/5 due to wall effects where n and N denote the number of bases in the probe and the target. At higher xeq, when the brush is formed, the leading correction is \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}x_{{\\mathrm{eq}}}/(1-x_{{\\mathrm{eq}}})=c_{{\\mathrm{t}}}K\\hspace{.167em}{\\mathrm{exp}}\\hspace{.167em} \\left \\left[-const^{\\prime} \\left \\left(x_{{\\mathrm{eq}}}^{2/3}-x_{{\\mathrm{B}}}^{2/3}\\right) \\right \\right] \\right \\end{equation*}\\end{document} where xB corresponds to the onset of the brush regime. The denaturation rate constant in the two regimes is identical. However, the hybridization rate constant in the brush regime is lower, the leading correction being \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{exp}}\\hspace{.167em} \\left \\left[-const^{\\prime} \\left \\left(x^{2/3}-x_{{\\mathrm{B}}}^{2/3}\\right) \\right \\right] \\right .\\end{equation*}\\end{document} PMID:15908581

  19. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-01

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 μm) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled 87Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  20. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-15

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 {mu}m) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled {sup 87}Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  1. Regulation of autophagic flux by CHIP.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongkai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Hongfeng; Chen, Dong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Wang, Guanghui

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a major degradation system which processes substrates through the steps of autophagosome formation, autophagosome-lysosome fusion, and substrate degradation. Aberrant autophagic flux is present in many pathological conditions including neurodegeneration and tumors. CHIP/STUB1, an E3 ligase, plays an important role in neurodegeneration. In this study, we identified the regulation of autophagic flux by CHIP (carboxy-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein). Knockdown of CHIP induced autophagosome formation through increasing the PTEN protein level and decreasing the AKT/mTOR activity as well as decreasing phosphorylation of ULK1 on Ser757. However, degradation of the autophagic substrate p62 was disturbed by knockdown of CHIP, suggesting an abnormality of autophagic flux. Furthermore, knockdown of CHIP increased the susceptibility of cells to autophagic cell death induced by bafilomycin A1. Thus, our data suggest that CHIP plays roles in the regulation of autophagic flux. PMID:26219223

  2. Highly specific detection of genetic modification events using an enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M Z; Zhang, X F; Chen, X M; Chen, X; Wu, S; Xu, L L

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip utilizes a method based on ligase-hybridizing probe chip technology, with the principle of using thio-primers for protection against enzyme digestion, and using lambda DNA exonuclease to cut multiple PCR products obtained from the sample being tested into single-strand chains for hybridization. The 5'-end amino-labeled probe was fixed onto the aldehyde chip, and hybridized with the single-stranded PCR product, followed by addition of a fluorescent-modified probe that was then enzymatically linked with the adjacent, substrate-bound probe in order to achieve highly specific, parallel, and high-throughput detection. Specificity and sensitivity testing demonstrated that enzyme-linked probe hybridization technology could be applied to the specific detection of eight genetic modification events at the same time, with a sensitivity reaching 0.1% and the achievement of accurate, efficient, and stable results. PMID:26345863

  3. Detecting a single molecule using a micropore-nanopore hybrid chip

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nanopore-based DNA sequencing and biomolecule sensing have attracted more and more attention. In this work, novel sensing devices were built on the basis of the chips containing nanopore arrays in polycarbonate (PC) membranes and micropores in Si3N4 films. Using the integrated chips, the transmembrane ionic current induced by biomolecule's translocation was recorded and analyzed, which suggested that the detected current did not change linearly as commonly expected with increasing biomolecule concentration. On the other hand, detailed translocation information (such as translocation gesture) was also extracted from the discrete current blockages in basic current curves. These results indicated that the nanofluidic device based on the chips integrated by micropores and nanopores possessed comparative potentials in biomolecule sensing. PMID:24261484

  4. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip level modeling techniques, functional fault simulation, simulation software development, a more efficient, high level version of GSP, and a parallel architecture for functional simulation are discussed.

  5. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2010-10-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration. PMID:20689865

  6. Gene Chips: A New Tool for Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botstein, David

    2005-03-01

    The knowledge of many complete genomic sequences has led to a ``grand unification of biology,'' consisting of direct evidence that most of the basic cellular functions of all organisms are carried out by genes and proteins whose primary sequences are directly related by descent (i.e. orthologs). Further, genome sequences have made it possible to study all the genes of a single organism simultaneously. We have been using DNA microarrays (sometime referred to as ``gene chips'') to study patterns of gene expression and genome rearrangement in yeast and human cells under a variety of conditions and in human tumors and normal tissues. These experiments produce huge volumes of data; new computational and statistical methods are required to analyze them properly. Examples from this work will be presented to illustrate how genome-scale experiments and analysis can result in new biological insights not obtainable by traditional analyses of genes and proteins one by one. For lymphomas, breast tumors, lung tumors, liver tumors, gastric tumors, brain tumors and soft tissue tumors we have been able, by the application of clustering algorithms, to subclassify tumors of similar anatomical origin on the basis of their gene expression patterns. These subclassifications appear to be reproducible and clinically as well as biologically meaningful. By studying synchronized cells growing in culture, we have identified many hundreds of yeast and human genes that are expressed periodically, at characteristically different points in the cell division cycle. In humans, it turns out that most of these genes are the same genes that comprise the ``proliferation cluster,'' i.e. the genes whose expression is specifically associated with the proliferativeness of tumors and tumor cell lines. Finally, we have been applying a variant of our DNA microarray technology (which we call ``array comparative hybridization'') to follow the DNA copy number of genes, both in tumors and in yeast cells

  7. Starr: Simple Tiling ARRay analysis of Affymetrix ChIP-chip data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA microarrays (ChIP-chip) is an assay used for investigating DNA-protein-binding or post-translational chromatin/histone modifications. As with all high-throughput technologies, it requires thorough bioinformatic processing of the data for which there is no standard yet. The primary goal is to reliably identify and localize genomic regions that bind a specific protein. Further investigation compares binding profiles of functionally related proteins, or binding profiles of the same proteins in different genetic backgrounds or experimental conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the effects of DNA binding events on gene expression. Results We present a free, open-source R/Bioconductor package Starr that facilitates comparative analysis of ChIP-chip data across experiments and across different microarray platforms. The package provides functions for data import, quality assessment, data visualization and exploration. Starr includes high-level analysis tools such as the alignment of ChIP signals along annotated features, correlation analysis of ChIP signals with complementary genomic data, peak-finding and comparative display of multiple clusters of binding profiles. It uses standard Bioconductor classes for maximum compatibility with other software. Moreover, Starr automatically updates microarray probe annotation files by a highly efficient remapping of microarray probe sequences to an arbitrary genome. Conclusion Starr is an R package that covers the complete ChIP-chip workflow from data processing to binding pattern detection. It focuses on the high-level data analysis, e.g., it provides methods for the integration and combined statistical analysis of binding profiles and complementary functional genomics data. Starr enables systematic assessment of binding behaviour for groups of genes that are alingned along arbitrary genomic features. PMID:20398407

  8. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries.

  9. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries. PMID:26464211

  10. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    PubMed

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens. PMID:26125596

  11. A Rapid Method for Optimizing Running Temperature of Electrophoresis through Repetitive On-Chip CE Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, Shohei; Ono, Koichi; Fukuba, Tatsuhiro; Nojima, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a rapid and simple method to determine the optimal temperature conditions for denaturant electrophoresis using a temperature-controlled on-chip capillary electrophoresis (CE) device is presented. Since on-chip CE operations including sample loading, injection and separation are carried out just by switching the electric field, we can repeat consecutive run-to-run CE operations on a single on-chip CE device by programming the voltage sequences. By utilizing the high-speed separation and the repeatability of the on-chip CE, a series of electrophoretic operations with different running temperatures can be implemented. Using separations of reaction products of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer, the effectiveness of the presented method to determine the optimal temperature conditions required to discriminate a single-base substitution (SBS) between two different ssDNAs is demonstrated. It is shown that a single run for one temperature condition can be executed within 4 min, and the optimal temperature to discriminate the SBS could be successfully found using the present method. PMID:21845077

  12. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a Mbp-long fragment of DNA that is flow-stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field-of-view. Instead we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. Fitted parameters agree well with simplified expressions, where the DNA is modeled as a cylinder in a parallel flow.

  13. Silicon Based System for Single-Nucleotide-Polymorphism Detection: Chip Fabrication and Thermal Characterization of Polymerase Chain Reaction Microchamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Bivragh; Jones, Ben; Tezcan, Deniz S.; Tutunjyan, Nina; Haspeslagh, Luc; Peeters, Sara; Fiorini, Paolo; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Van Hoof, Chris; Hiraoka, Maki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2012-04-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a difference in the DNA sequence of one nucleotide only. We recently proposed a lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system which has the potentiality of fast, sensitive and highly specific SNP detection. Most of the chip components are silicon based and fabricated within a single process. In this paper, the newly developed fabrication method for the silicon chip is presented. The robust and reliable process allows etching structures on the same chip with very different aspect ratios. The characterization of a crucial component to the LoC SNP detector, the microreactor where DNA amplification is performed, is also detailed. Thanks to innovative design and fabrication methodologies, the microreactor has an excellent thermal isolation from the surrounding silicon substrate. This allows for highly localized temperature control. Furthermore, the microreactor is demonstrated to have rapid heating and cooling rates, allowing for rapid amplification of the target DNA fragments. Successful DNA amplification in the microreactor is demonstrated.

  14. Real-time PCR array chip with capillary-driven sample loading and reactor sealing for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Liu, Hao-Bing; Dai, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinghui; M Hui, Kam; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2009-10-01

    A major challenge for the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) community is to develop point-of-care diagnostic chips that do not use instruments. Such instruments include pumping or liquid handling devices for distribution of patient's nucleic-acid test sample among an array of reactors and microvalves or mechanical parts to seal these reactors. In this paper, we report the development of a primer pair pre-loaded PCR array chip, in which the loading of the PCR mixture into an array of reactors and subsequent sealing of the reactors were realized by a novel capillary-based microfluidics with a manual two-step pipetting operations. The chip is capable of performing simultaneous (parallel) analyses of multiple gene targets and its performance was tested by amplifying twelve different gene targets against cDNA template from human hepatocellular carcinoma using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. The versatility and reproducibility of the PCR-array chip are demonstrated by real-time PCR amplification of the BNI-1 fragment of SARS cDNA cloned in a plasmid vector. The reactor-to-reactor diffusion of the pre-loaded primer pairs in the chip is investigated to eliminate the possibility of primer cross-contamination. Key technical issues such as PCR mixture loss in gas-permeable PDMS chip layer and bubble generation due to different PDMS-glass bonding methods are investigated. PMID:19421862

  15. Designing Test Chips for Custom Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Griswold, T. W.; Pina, C. A.; Timoc, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Collection of design and testing procedures partly automates development of built-in test chips for CMOS integrated circuits. Testchip methodology intended especially for users of custom integratedcircuit wafers. Test-Chip Designs and Testing Procedures (including datareduction procedures) generated automatically by computer from programed design and testing rules and from information supplied by user.

  16. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-06-08

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multi chip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  17. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  18. Teaching Quality Control with Chocolate Chip Cookies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ardith

    2014-01-01

    Chocolate chip cookies are used to illustrate the importance and effectiveness of control charts in Statistical Process Control. By counting the number of chocolate chips, creating the spreadsheet, calculating the control limits and graphing the control charts, the student becomes actively engaged in the learning process. In addition, examining…

  19. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  20. Laser scanner for testing semiconductor chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, T. C.

    1973-01-01

    Individual ''fingerprint'' signals are produced when system photoexcites chips. ''Fingerprints'' are analyzed for characteristics associated with defects, including many not visible to the naked eye. Electromagnetic radiation photogenerates free electrons and holes in semiconductor chip. These carriers produce electrical signals at terminals. Signals vary depending on what defects are present.

  1. Microluminometer chip and method to measure bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Paulus, Michael J; Sayler, Gary S; Applegate, Bruce M; Ripp, Steven A

    2008-05-13

    An integrated microluminometer includes an integrated circuit chip having at least one n-well/p-substrate junction photodetector for converting light received into a photocurrent, and a detector on the chip for processing the photocurrent. A distributed electrode configuration including a plurality of spaced apart electrodes disposed on an active region of the photodetector is preferably used to raise efficiency.

  2. Electrothermal modeling of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2001-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip has drawn considerable attention in recent years. Although a microchip can have must fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occurs particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Electrothermal modeling of PCR chips is presented using commercial MEMS software tool IntelliSuiteTM, with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. The computer simulation has confirmed what has been found in experiment the reason of membrane cracks. Improvement in PCR chip design has been proposed.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Amperometric Chips with Pneumatic Micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujita, Yuichi; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Chikae, Miyuki; Torai, Soichiro; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-04-01

    We fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) amperometric chips with pneumatic micropumps by the combination of amperometric biosensors based on CNT-arrayed electrodes and microchannels with pneumatic micropumps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane). On the chip, phosphate buffer solution and potassium ferricyanide, K3[Fe(CN)6], were introduced into the CNT electrodes using each pneumatic micropump and electrochemically measured by differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicate that our chip can automatically exchange reagents on the CNT electrodes and clearly detect molecules. Moreover, by modifying the CNT electrodes with enzyme glucose oxidase, glucose molecules could be detected using our chips by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. We conclude that microfluidic chips with CNT-arrayed electrodes are a promising candidate for the development of hand-held electrochemical biosensors.

  4. Extensible chip of optofluidic variable optical attenuator.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Xue, F L; Wu, L X; Fu, Y J; Hu, J; Zhang, W; Hu, F R

    2016-05-01

    A core chip of optofluidic variable optical attenuator (VOA) is reported. The chip, with a simple structure, utilizes microfluid and compressed air to regulate the optical attenuation, and it can be expanded to form a number of VOAs by using different microfluidic driving technologies. Three VOAs based on this chip and different driving technologies are introduced. The theoretical and experimental results show that the proposed chip possesses the advantages of large optical attenuation range (> 50dB) and low insertion loss (0.55 dB). Moreover it is a broadband optical device which can be operated in visible and near infrared wavelengths. The proposed chip provides a new method for seeking miniaturized VOAs with good performances, and it is promising to develop a number of different VOAs. PMID:27137582

  5. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  6. Bulk-micromachined submicroliter-volume PCR chip with very rapid thermal response and low power consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sik; Park, Se Ho; Yang, Haesik; Chung, Kwang-Hyo; Yoon, Tae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kyuwon; Kim, Youn Tae

    2004-08-01

    The current paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a micromachined submicroliter-volume polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip with a fast thermal response and very low power consumption. The chip consists of a bulk-micromachined Si component and hot-embossed poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) component. The Si component contains an integral microheater and temperature sensor on a thermally well-isolated membrane, while the PMMA component contains a submicroliter-volume PCR chamber, valves, and channels. The micro hot membrane under the submicroliter-volume chamber is a silicon oxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxide (O/N/O) diaphragm with a thickness of 1.9 microm, resulting in a very low thermal mass. In experiments, the proposed chip only required 45 mW to heat the reaction chamber to 92 degrees C, the denaturation temperature of DNA, plus the heating and cooling rates are about 80 degrees C s(-1) and 60 degrees C s(-1), respectively. We validated, from the fluorescence results from DNA stained with SYBR Green I, that the proposed chip amplified the DNA from vector clone, containing tumor suppressor gene BRCA 1 (127 base pairs at 11th exon), after 30 thermal cycles of 3 s, 5 s, and 5 s at 92 degrees C, 55 degrees C, and 72 degrees C, respectively, in a 200 nL-volume chamber. As for specificity of DNA products, owing to difficulty in analyzing the very small volume PCR results from the micro chip, we vicariously employed the larger volume PCR products after cycling with the same sustaining temperatures as with the micro chip but with much slower ramping rates (3.3 degrees C s(-1) when rising, 2.5 degrees C s(-1) when cooling) within circa 20 minutes on a commercial PCR machine and confirmed the specificity to BRCA 1 (127 base pairs) with agarose gel electrophoresis. Accordingly, the fabricated micro chip demonstrated a very low power consumption and rapid thermal response, both of which are crucial to the development of a fully integrated and battery

  7. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  8. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that the 180-bp satellite repeat is the key functional DNA element of Arabidopsis thaliana centromeres.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Talbert, Paul B; Zhong, Cathy Xiaoyan; Dawe, R Kelly; Henikoff, Steven; Jiang, Jiming

    2003-01-01

    The centromeres of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes contain megabases of complex DNA consisting of numerous types of repetitive DNA elements. We developed a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique using an antibody against the centromeric H3 histone, HTR12, in Arabidopsis. ChIP assays showed that the 180-bp centromeric satellite repeat was precipitated with the antibody, suggesting that this repeat is the key component of the centromere/kinetochore complex in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663558

  9. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  10. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  11. Identification of polymorphic and off-target probe binding sites on the Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Daniel L; Walker, Rosie M; Morris, Stewart W; McIntosh, Andrew M; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation has now become a relatively inexpensive technique thanks to array-based methylation profiling technologies. The recently developed Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip interrogates methylation at over 850,000 sites across the human genome, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. This array supersedes the widely used Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, which has permitted insights into the relationship between DNA methylation and a wide range of conditions and traits. Previous research has identified issues with certain probes on both the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its predecessor, the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, which were predicted to affect array performance. These issues concerned probe-binding specificity and the presence of polymorphisms at target sites. Using in silico methods, we have identified probes on the Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip that are predicted to (i) measure methylation at polymorphic sites and (ii) hybridise to multiple genomic regions. We intend these resources to be used for quality control procedures when analysing data derived from this platform. PMID:27330998

  12. Tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 water channels in liposomes and cell membranes: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Verbavatz, J M; Brown, D; Sabolić, I; Valenti, G; Ausiello, D A; Van Hoek, A N; Ma, T; Verkman, A S

    1993-11-01

    Channel forming integral protein of 28 kD (CHIP28) functions as a water channel in erythrocytes, kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. CHIP28 morphology was examined by freeze-fracture EM in proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified CHIP28, CHO cells stably transfected with CHIP28k cDNA, and rat kidney tubules. Liposomes reconstituted with HPLC-purified CHIP28 from human erythrocytes had a high osmotic water permeability (Pf0.04 cm/s) that was inhibited by HgCl2. Freeze-fracture replicas showed a fairly uniform set of intramembrane particles (IMPs); no IMPs were observed in liposomes without incorporated protein. By rotary shadowing, the IMPs had a diameter of 8.5 +/- 1.3 nm (mean +/- SD); many IMPs consisted of a distinct arrangement of four smaller subunits surrounding a central depression. IMPs of similar size and appearance were seen on the P-face of plasma membranes from CHIP28k-transfected (but not mock-transfected) CHO cells, rat thin descending limb (TDL) of Henle, and S3 segment of proximal straight tubules. A distinctive network of complementary IMP imprints was observed on the E-face of CHIP28-containing plasma membranes. The densities of IMPs in the size range of CHIP28 IMPs, determined by non-linear regression, were (in IMPs/microns 2): 2,494 in CHO cells, 5,785 in TDL, and 1,928 in proximal straight tubules; predicted Pf, based on the CHIP28 single channel water permeability of 3.6 x 10(-14) cm3/S (10 degrees C), was in good agreement with measured Pf of 0.027 cm/S, 0.075 cm/S, and 0.031 cm/S, respectively, in these cell types. Assuming that each CHIP28 monomer is a right cylindrical pore of length 5 nm and density 1.3 g/cm3, the monomer diameter would be 3.2 nm; a symmetrical arrangement of four cylinders would have a greatest diameter of 7.2 nm, which after correction for the thickness of platinum deposit, is similar to the measured IMP diameter of approximately 8.5 nm. These results provide a morphological signature for CHIP28

  13. Voltage Regulator Chip: Power Supplies on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is finding ways to save real estate on a computer's motherboard that could be used for other critical functions. Every computer processor today contains a voltage regulator that automatically maintains a constant level of electricity entering the device. These regulators contain bulky components and take up about 30% of a computer's motherboard. CPES at Virginia Tech is developing a voltage regulator that uses semiconductors made of gallium nitride on silicon (GaN-on-Si) and high-frequency soft magnetic material. These materials are integrated on a small, 3D chip that can handle the same amount of power as traditional voltage regulators at 1/10 the size and with improved efficiency. The small size also frees up to 90% of the motherboard space occupied by current voltage regulators.

  14. Beyond the dna: a prototype for functional genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Albala, J

    2000-03-02

    A prototype oligonucleotide ''functional chip'' has been developed to screen novel DNA repair proteins for their ability to bind or alter different forms of DNA. This chip has been developed as a functional genomics screen for analysis of protein-DNA interactions for novel proteins identified from the Human Genome Project The process of novel gene identification that has ensued as a consequence of available sequence information is remarkable. The challenge how lies in determining the function of newly identified gene products in a time-and cost-effective high-throughput manner. The functional chip is generated by the robotic application of DNA spotted in a microarray format onto a glass slide. Individual proteins are then analyzed against the different form of DNA bound to the slide. Several prototype functional chips were designed to contain various DNA fragments tethered to a glass slide for analysis of protein-DNA binding or enzymatic activity of known proteins. The technology has been developed to screen novel, putative DNA repair proteins for their ability to bind various types of DNA alone and in concert with protein partners. An additional scheme has been devised to screen putative repair enzymes for their ability to process different types of DNA molecules. Current methods to analyze gene expression primarily utilize either of two technologies. The oligonucleotide chip, pioneered by Fodor and co-workers and Affymetrix, Inc., consists of greater than 64,000 oligonucleotides attached in situ to a glass support. The oligonucleotide chip has been used primarily to identify specific mutations in a given gene by hybridization against a fluorescently-labeled substrate. The second method is the microarray, whereby DNA targets are systematically arranged on a glass slide and then hybridized with fluorescently-labeled complex targets for gene expression analysis (Jordan, 1998). By this technique, a large amount of information can be obtained examining global

  15. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow dummy chips'' are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  16. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Petersen, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow "dummy chips" are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned o the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  17. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1993-01-01

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  18. Silicon Photonics: The System on Chip Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, Alberto

    This chapter describes possible applications of silicon photonics to the System on Chip (SoC) domain. Systems on Chip (SoCs) are complex systems containing billions of transistors integrated in a unique silicon-chip, implementing even complex functionalities by means of a variety of modules communicating with the system memories and/or between them through a proper communication system. The higher and higher integration density is becoming such that many issues arise when a SoC has to be integrated, and electrical limits of interconnect wires are a limiting factor for performance. According to this scenario, a new technology is required for the on-chip interconnect, in order to overcome current physical and performance issues; one possible solution is the optical interconnect, exploiting the many benefits of light to transport information across the chip. From an industrial point of view it is fundamental that such a new technology be fully CMOS compatible, in order to be able to continue to use current SoC design methodologies as well as present manufacturing equipment for the whole electronic part of the chip. Many semiconductor industries are today investigating such a novel field and a number of projects are currently running in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a revolutionary on-chip communication system relying on both CMOS technology and photonics.

  19. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  20. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  1. A multi-year survey of stem-end chip defect in chipping potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most serious tuber quality concerns of US chip potato growers is stem-end chip defect, which is defined as a localized post-fry discoloration in and adjacent to the vasculature on the stem end portion of potato chips. The incidence and severity of stem-end chip defect vary with growing lo...

  2. Smart sensor chip based on bioMEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Bagga, Ellis; Bajpai, Ram P.; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2004-03-01

    The smart sensor chip for simultaneous detection of a large number of disease markers is the most recent interest in the field of nanobiotechnology. Potential applications include miniaturized sensors to detect biological agents and diseases, biocompatible and improved systems for drug delivery. They are the simplest biomicroelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) devices that offer a very promising future to the development of novel physical, chemical and biological sensors. They can simultaneously detect a large number of antigens, antibodies, DNA molecules, trace metals, hormones, proteins, gases, microorganisms, toxins, chemical warfare agents, explosives etc. in gaseous, vacuum and liquid medium. Smart sensor chips would be of greater use in intensive care units (ICUs) where multiple disease markers are to be assessed precisely in very less time. These sensors employ highly specific biochemical reactions between complementary biomolecules in the same way that nature has used in our body to detect, diagnose and treat various types of diseases. They have aroused considerable interest because of their high specificity, ultra-high sensitivity, simplicity, low cost, less analyte requirement (in μl), less steps involved, non-hazardous procedure, quick response, low power requirement and a unique capability of detecting a large number of analytes simultaneously in a single step.

  3. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis. PMID:23734755

  4. Microfluidic organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    An organ-on-a-chip is a microfluidic cell culture device created with microchip manufacturing methods that contains continuously perfused chambers inhabited by living cells arranged to simulate tissue- and organ-level physiology. By recapitulating the multicellular architectures, tissue-tissue interfaces, physicochemical microenvironments and vascular perfusion of the body, these devices produce levels of tissue and organ functionality not possible with conventional 2D or 3D culture systems. They also enable high-resolution, real-time imaging and in vitro analysis of biochemical, genetic and metabolic activities of living cells in a functional tissue and organ context. This technology has great potential to advance the study of tissue development, organ physiology and disease etiology. In the context of drug discovery and development, it should be especially valuable for the study of molecular mechanisms of action, prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing and biomarker identification. PMID:25093883

  5. Chip Scale Package Implementation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    1998-01-01

    The JPL-led MicrotypeBGA Consortium of enterprises representing government agencies and private companies have jointed together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects. In the process of building the Consortium CSP test vehicles, many challenges were identified regarding various aspects of technology implementation. This paper will present our experience in the areas of technology implementation challenges, including design and building both standard and microvia boards, and assembly of two types of test vehicles. We also discuss the most current package isothermal aging to 2,000 hours at 100 C and 125 C and thermal cycling test results to 1,700 cycles in the range of -30 to 100 C.

  6. BLOOD-ON-A-CHIP

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Mehmet; Irimia, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, fast, and affordable analysis of the cellular component of blood is of prime interest for medicine and research. Yet, most often sample preparation procedures for blood analysis involve handling steps prone to introducing artifacts, whereas analysis methods commonly require skilled technicians and well-equipped, expensive laboratories. Developing more gentle protocols and affordable instruments for specific blood analysis tasks is becoming possible through the recent progress in the area of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip-type devices. Precise control over the cell microenvironment during separation procedures and the ability to scale down the analysis to very small volumes of blood are among the most attractive capabilities of the new approaches. Here we review some of the emerging principles for manipulating blood cells at microscale and promising high-throughput approaches to blood cell separation using microdevices. Examples of specific single-purpose devices are described together with integration strategies for blood cell separation and analysis modules. PMID:16004567

  7. Chip integrated fuel cell accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Erdler, G.; Frerichs, H.-P.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    A unique new design of a chip integrated fuel cell accumulator is presented. The system combines an electrolyser and a self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with integrated palladium hydrogen storage on a silicon substrate. Outstanding advantages of this assembly are the fuel cell with integrated hydrogen storage, the possibility of refuelling it by electrolysis and the opportunity of simply refilling the electrolyte by adding water. By applying an electrical current, wiring the palladium hydrogen storage as cathode and the counter-electrode as anode, the electrolyser produces hydrogen at the palladium surface and oxygen at the electrolyser cell anode. The generated hydrogen is absorbed by the palladium electrode and the hydrogen storage is refilled consequently enabling the fuel cell to function.

  8. CHIP has a protective role against oxidative stress-induced cell death through specific regulation of endonuclease G.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Seo, T W; Yi, J H; Shin, K S; Yoo, S J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in carcinogenesis, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. The E3 ligase C terminus of Hsc-70 interacting protein (CHIP) has a protective role against various stresses by targeting damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation, and thus maintains protein quality control. However, the detailed mechanism by which CHIP protects cells from oxidative stress has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that depletion of CHIP led to elevated Endonuclease G (EndoG) levels and enhanced cell death upon oxidative stress. In contrast, CHIP overexpression reduced EndoG levels, and resulted in reduced or no oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Under normal conditions Hsp70 mediated the interaction between EndoG and CHIP, downregulating EndoG levels in a Hsp70/proteasome-dependent manner. However, under oxidative stress Hsp70 no longer interacted with EndoG, and the stabilized EndoG translocated to the nucleus and degraded chromosomal DNA. Our data suggest that regulation of the level of EndoG by CHIP in normal conditions may determine the sensitivity to cell death upon oxidative stress. Indeed, injection of H2O2 into the rat brain markedly increased cell death in aged mice compared with young mice, which correlated with elevated levels of EndoG and concurrent downregulation of CHIP in aged mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel protective mechanism of CHIP against oxidative stress through regulation of EndoG, and provide an opportunity to modulate oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer and aging. PMID:23764847

  9. Using DNA devices to track anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Kahanda, Dimithree; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Mcwilliams, Marc A; Boothman, David A; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-06-15

    It is beneficial to develop systems that reproduce complex reactions of biological systems while maintaining control over specific factors involved in such processes. We demonstrated a DNA device for following the repair of DNA damage produced by a redox-cycling anticancer drug, beta-lapachone (β-lap). These chips supported ß-lap-induced biological redox cycle and tracked subsequent DNA damage repair activity with redox-modified DNA monolayers on gold. We observed drug-specific changes in square wave voltammetry from these chips at therapeutic ß-lap concentrations of high statistical significance over drug-free control. We also demonstrated a high correlation of this change with the specific ß-lap-induced redox cycle using rational controls. The concentration dependence of ß-lap revealed significant signal changes at levels of high clinical significance as well as sensitivity to sub-lethal levels of ß-lap. Catalase, an enzyme decomposing peroxide, was found to suppress DNA damage at a NQO1/catalase ratio found in healthy cells, but was clearly overcome at a higher NQO1/catalase ratio consistent with cancer cells. We found that it was necessary to reproduce key features of the cellular environment to observe this activity. Thus, this chip-based platform enabled tracking of ß-lap-induced DNA damage repair when biological criteria were met, providing a unique synthetic platform for uncovering activity normally confined to inside cells. PMID:26901461

  10. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    gene expression a prime example of a biological code. We developed a novel method of making DNA micro- arrays, the so-called DNA chip. Using the optical tweezer concept, we were able to pattern biomolecules on a solid substrate, developing a new type of sub-micron laser lithography. A laser beam is focused onto a thin gold film on a glass substrate. Laser ablation of gold results in local aggregation of nanometer scale beads conjugated with small DNA oligonucleotides, with sub-micron resolution. This leads to specific detection of cDNA and RNA molecules. We built a simple micro-array fabrication and detection in the laboratory, based on this method, to probe addressable pools (genes, proteins or antibodies). We have lately used molecular beacons (single stranded DNA with a stem-loop structure containing a fluorophore and quencher), for the direct detection of unlabelled mRNA. As a first step towards a study of the dynamics of the biological code, we have begun to examine the patterns of gene expression during virus (T7 phage) infection of E-coli bacteria.

  11. Computational method and system for modeling, analyzing, and optimizing DNA amplification and synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Vandersall, Jennifer A.; Gardner, Shea N.; Clague, David S.

    2010-05-04

    A computational method and computer-based system of modeling DNA synthesis for the design and interpretation of PCR amplification, parallel DNA synthesis, and microarray chip analysis. The method and system include modules that address the bioinformatics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of DNA amplification and synthesis. Specifically, the steps of DNA selection, as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization and extensions, are addressed, which enable the optimization of the processing and the prediction of the products as a function of DNA sequence, mixing protocol, time, temperature and concentration of species.

  12. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  13. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  14. On-chip positionable photonic waveguides for chip-to-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Tjitte-Jelte; Tichem, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the progress related to a multichannel photonic alignment concept, aiming for sub-micrometer precision in the alignment of the waveguides of two photonic integrated circuits (PICs). The concept consists of two steps: chip-to-chip positioning and chip bonding provide a coarse alignment after which waveguide-to-waveguide positioning and fixing result in a fine alignment. For the waveguide-to-waveguide alignment, an alignment functionality is developed and integrated in one of the PICs, consisting of mechanically flexible waveguides and MEMS actuators. This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a mechanically flexible waveguide array that can be positioned by two out-of-plane actuators. Thermal actuators are integrated with mechanically flexible waveguide beams to enable positioning them with high precision. By adding a poly-Si pattern on top of SiO2 beams, an out-of-plane bimorph actuator can be realized. An analytical model enables estimating the curvature and the deflection of a single bimorph beam. Acquiring a small initial deflection while having a large motion range of the actuator proves to have conflicting demands on the poly-Si/SiO2 thickness ratio. In this paper, we show that suspended waveguide arrays with integrated alignment functionality have an initial deflection- they curl up- due to residual stress in the materials. The actuators can be operated using a driving voltage between 0V to 45V, corresponding to ~50mW. Using higher voltages brings the risk of permanently changing the material properties of the heaters. The actuators can accomplish an out-of-plane crossbar translation up to 6.5 μm at ~50mW as well as a rotation around the propagation direction of the light ranging from -0:1° to 0.1°. At a constant actuation power of ~50mW, the crossbar shows a drift in vertical deflection of 0.16 μm over a time of 30 min.

  15. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  16. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Chip-level modeling techniques in the evaluation of fault tolerant systems were researched. A fault tolerant computer was modeled. An efficient approach to functional fault simulation was developed. Simulation software was also developed.

  17. Accelerator on a Chip: How It Works

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

  18. Accelerator on a Chip: How It Works

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-07-16

    In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

  19. Friction analysis between tool and chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Xu, Binshi; Zhang, Jiaying; Dong, Shiyun

    2010-12-01

    The elastic-plasticity mechanics are applied to analyze the friction between tool and chip. According to the slip-line field theory, a series of theoretical formula and the friction coefficient is derived between the tool and chip. So the cutting process can be investigated. Based on the Orthogonal Cutting Model and the Mohr's circle stress, the cutting mechanism of the cladding and the surface integrity of machining can be studied.

  20. Friction analysis between tool and chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Xu, Binshi; Zhang, Jiaying; Dong, Shiyun

    2011-05-01

    The elastic-plasticity mechanics are applied to analyze the friction between tool and chip. According to the slip-line field theory, a series of theoretical formula and the friction coefficient is derived between the tool and chip. So the cutting process can be investigated. Based on the Orthogonal Cutting Model and the Mohr's circle stress, the cutting mechanism of the cladding and the surface integrity of machining can be studied.

  1. Whatever happened to whole-tree chipping

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, C.F.

    1980-09-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the utilization of chipper units since 1975. Continuing and increased demand for fiber indicates harvesting the maximum fiber per acre. Overall the increased yield is in the range of 25-40% and wood-tree chips are being put to a variety of uses. This article reviews the significant developments in both harvesting and mill site equipment which have allowed increased use of whole-tree chips while reducing grit load to the mill system.

  2. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  3. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  4. Aflatoxin M1 in Tarhana chips.

    PubMed

    Özçam, Mustafa; Obuz, Ersel; Tosun, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Tarhana chips are a popular traditional fermented food consumed widely in the Kahramanmaraş region of Turkey. Tarhana chips are different from many other types of fermented food in that they are produced in the form of tortilla chips. Cereal and yoghurt are the main ingredients in Tarhana chips. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) levels in dairy and dairy-based products are of concern for human health. To investigate AFM1 contamination, a total of 40 samples were collected from Kahramanmaraş region and AFM1 levels were determined by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, physicochemical characteristics of Tarhana chips were investigated and compared with classic fried chips in terms of nutritional value. Based on data obtained from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, 21 (52.5%) out of 40 samples contained AFM1 in the range 0.5-36.6 ng/kg, so AFM1 levels of all samples were below the legal limit. PMID:25029401

  5. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  6. Functional integration of PCR amplification and capillary electrophoresis in a microfabricated DNA analysis device.

    PubMed

    Woolley, A T; Hadley, D; Landre, P; deMello, A J; Mathies, R A; Northrup, M A

    1996-12-01

    Microfabricated silicon PCR reactors and glass capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips have been successfully coupled to form an integrated DNA analysis system. This construct combines the rapid thermal cycling capabilities of microfabricated PCR devices (10 degrees C/s heating, 2.5 degrees C/s cooling) with the high-speed (< 120 s) DNA separations provided by microfabricated CE chips. The PCR chamber and the CE chip were directly linked through a photolithographically fabricated channel filled with hydroxyethylcellulose sieving matrix. Electrophoretic injection directly from the PCR chamber through the cross injection channel was used as an "electrophoretic valve" to couple the PCR and CE devices on-chip. To demonstrate the functionality of this system, a 15 min PCR amplification of a beta-globin target cloned in M13 was immediately followed by high-speed CE chip separation in under 120 s, providing a rapid PCR-CE analysis in under 20 min. A rapid assay for genomic Salmonella DNA was performed in under 45 min, demonstrating that challenging amplifications of diagnostically interesting targets can also be performed. Real-time monitoring of PCR target amplification in these integrated PCR-CE devices is also feasible. Amplification of the beta-globin target as a function of cycle number was directly monitored for two different reactions starting with 4 x 10(7) and 4 x 10(5) copies of DNA template. This work establishes the feasibility of performing high-speed DNA analyses in microfabricated integrated fluidic systems. PMID:8946790

  7. Materials for microfluidic chip fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2013-11-19

    Through manipulating fluids using microfabricated channel and chamber structures, microfluidics is a powerful tool to realize high sensitive, high speed, high throughput, and low cost analysis. In addition, the method can establish a well-controlled microenivroment for manipulating fluids and particles. It also has rapid growing implementations in both sophisticated chemical/biological analysis and low-cost point-of-care assays. Some unique phenomena emerge at the micrometer scale. For example, reactions are completed in a shorter amount of time as the travel distances of mass and heat are relatively small; the flows are usually laminar; and the capillary effect becomes dominant owing to large surface-to-volume ratios. In the meantime, the surface properties of the device material are greatly amplified, which can lead to either unique functions or problems that we would not encounter at the macroscale. Also, each material inherently corresponds with specific microfabrication strategies and certain native properties of the device. Therefore, the material for making the device plays a dominating role in microfluidic technologies. In this Account, we address the evolution of materials used for fabricating microfluidic chips, and discuss the application-oriented pros and cons of different materials. This Account generally follows the order of the materials introduced to microfluidics. Glass and silicon, the first generation microfluidic device materials, are perfect for capillary electrophoresis and solvent-involved applications but expensive for microfabriaction. Elastomers enable low-cost rapid prototyping and high density integration of valves on chip, allowing complicated and parallel fluid manipulation and in-channel cell culture. Plastics, as competitive alternatives to elastomers, are also rapid and inexpensive to microfabricate. Their broad variety provides flexible choices for different needs. For example, some thermosets support in-situ fabrication of

  8. Health hazards caused by fungi in stored wood chips

    SciTech Connect

    Thoernquist, T.; Lundstroem, H.

    1982-11-01

    In connection with using wood chips for fuel in heating buildings, a number of people in Sweden were taken ill with a respiratory allergy similar to wood trimmer's disease and farmer's lung. The disease is presumably caused by airborne fungal particles (spores and hyphae) which are inhaled when working with infected wood chips. The occurrence of fungal particles in the air in wood chip storage rooms, halls, and kitchens was studied in 64 buildings heated by chips. Sampling was carried out by exposing 9-cm petri dishes containing malt agar. In the chip storage rooms of 10 of the 64 buildings examined, more than 500 fungal colonies were recorded before disturbing the chips. After disturbance the number of buildings with more than 500 colonies increased to 28. In the halls in three of the buildings and in the kitchens of two, more than 500 fungal colonies were recorded. The number of fungal particles in wood chip storage is mainly dependent on the condition of the raw material before chipping, tree species, and the final storage period. To reduce the risk of large numbers of fungal particles in stored chips, the trees should be limbed before chipping and the stems preferably dried. Hardwood chips are more easily infected by fungi than chips of coniferous wood. The storage of wood chips for periods longer than 3 months should be avoided and a Class 2B protective mask should always be worn when handling chips feared to be infected by fungi. (Refs. 5).

  9. Temperature Dependent Kinetics DNA Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgamuth, Chris; McWilliams, Marc; Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    Charge transport (CT) through DNA has been extensively studied, and yet the mechanism of this process is still not yet fully understood. Besides the benefits of understanding charge transport through this fundamental molecule, further understanding of this process will elucidate the biological implications of DNA CT and advance sensing technology. Therefore, we have investigated the temperature dependence of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers modified with a redox-active probe. By using multiplexed electrodes on silicon chips, we compare square wave voltammetry of distinct DNA sequences under identical experimental conditions. We vary the probe length within the well matched DNA duplex in order to investigate distance dependent kinetics. This length dependent study is a necessary step to understanding the dominant mechanism behind DNA CT. Using a model put forth by O'Dea and Osteryoung and applying a nonlinear least squares analysis we are able to determine the charge transfer rates (k), transfer coefficients (α), and the total surface concentration (&*circ;) of the DNA monolayer. Arrhenius like behavior is observed for the multiple probe locations, and the results are viewed in light of and compared to the prominent charge transport mechanisms.

  10. Advanced Flip Chips in Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2010-01-01

    The use of underfill materials is necessary with flip-chip interconnect technology to redistribute stresses due to mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) between dissimilar materials in the overall assembly. Underfills are formulated using organic polymers and possibly inorganic filler materials. There are a few ways to apply the underfills with flip-chip technology. Traditional capillary-flow underfill materials now possess high flow speed and reduced time to cure, but they still require additional processing steps beyond the typical surface-mount technology (SMT) assembly process. Studies were conducted using underfills in a temperature range of -190 to 85 C, which resulted in an increase of reliability by one to two orders of magnitude. Thermal shock of the flip-chip test articles was designed to induce failures at the interconnect sites (-40 to 100 C). The study on the reliability of flip chips using underfills in the extreme temperature region is of significant value for space applications. This technology is considered as an enabling technology for future space missions. Flip-chip interconnect technology is an advanced electrical interconnection approach where the silicon die or chip is electrically connected, face down, to the substrate by reflowing solder bumps on area-array metallized terminals on the die to matching footprints of solder-wettable pads on the chosen substrate. This advanced flip-chip interconnect technology will significantly improve the performance of high-speed systems, productivity enhancement over manual wire bonding, self-alignment during die joining, low lead inductances, and reduced need for attachment of precious metals. The use of commercially developed no-flow fluxing underfills provides a means of reducing the processing steps employed in the traditional capillary flow methods to enhance SMT compatibility. Reliability of flip chips may be significantly increased by matching/tailoring the CTEs of the substrate

  11. Suspended Solid-state Membranes on Glass Chips with Sub 1-pF Capacitance for Biomolecule Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chen-Chi; Balan, Adrian; Engelke, Rebecca; Drndic, Marija

    Solid-state membranes are finding use in many applications in nanoelectronics and nanomedicine, from single molecule sensors to water filtration, and yet many of their electronics applications are limited by the current noise and low bandwidth stemming from the relatively high capacitance (more than 10 pF) of the membrane chips. To address this problem, we devised an integrated fabrication process to grow and define circular silicon nitride membranes on glass chips that successfully lower the chip capacitance to below 1 pF. We use these devices to demonstrate low-noise, high-bandwidth DNA translocation measurements. We also make use of this versatile, low-capacitance platform to suspend other thin, two-dimensional membranes such as graphene.

  12. Suspended Solid-state Membranes on Glass Chips with Sub 1-pF Capacitance for Biomolecule Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Adrian; Chien, Chen-Chi; Engelke, Rebecca; Drndić, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state membranes are finding use in many applications in nanoelectronics and nanomedicine, from single molecule sensors to water filtration, and yet many of their electronics applications are limited by the relatively high current noise and low bandwidth stemming from the relatively high capacitance (>10 pF) of the membrane chips. To address this problem, we devised an integrated fabrication process to grow and define circular silicon nitride membranes on glass chips that successfully lower the chip capacitance to below 1 pF. We use these devices to demonstrate low-noise, high-bandwidth DNA translocation measurements. We also make use of this versatile, low-capacitance platform to suspend other thin, two-dimensional membrane such as graphene. PMID:26644307

  13. Suspended Solid-state Membranes on Glass Chips with Sub 1-pF Capacitance for Biomolecule Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Adrian; Chien, Chen-Chi; Engelke, Rebecca; Drndić, Marija

    2015-12-01

    Solid-state membranes are finding use in many applications in nanoelectronics and nanomedicine, from single molecule sensors to water filtration, and yet many of their electronics applications are limited by the relatively high current noise and low bandwidth stemming from the relatively high capacitance (>10 pF) of the membrane chips. To address this problem, we devised an integrated fabrication process to grow and define circular silicon nitride membranes on glass chips that successfully lower the chip capacitance to below 1 pF. We use these devices to demonstrate low-noise, high-bandwidth DNA translocation measurements. We also make use of this versatile, low-capacitance platform to suspend other thin, two-dimensional membrane such as graphene.

  14. Photoelectrochemical synthesis of DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian Y.; Emig, Christopher J.; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Optical addressing of semiconductor electrodes represents a powerful technology that enables the independent and parallel control of a very large number of electrical phenomena at the solid-electrolyte interface. To date, it has been used in a wide range of applications including electrophoretic manipulation, biomolecule sensing, and stimulating networks of neurons. Here, we have adapted this approach for the parallel addressing of redox reactions, and report the construction of a DNA microarray synthesis platform based on semiconductor photoelectrochemistry (PEC). An amorphous silicon photoconductor is activated by an optical projection system to create virtual electrodes capable of electrochemically generating protons; these PEC-generated protons then cleave the acid-labile dimethoxytrityl protecting groups of DNA phosphoramidite synthesis reagents with the requisite spatial selectivity to generate DNA microarrays. Furthermore, a thin-film porous glass dramatically increases the amount of DNA synthesized per chip by over an order of magnitude versus uncoated glass. This platform demonstrates that PEC can be used toward combinatorial bio-polymer and small molecule synthesis. PMID:19706433

  15. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  16. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  17. On-chip magnetic bead microarray using hydrodynamic focusing in a passive magnetic separator.

    PubMed

    Smistrup, K; Kjeldsen, B G; Reimers, J L; Dufva, M; Petersen, J; Hansen, M F

    2005-11-01

    Implementing DNA and protein microarrays into lab-on-a-chip systems can be problematic since these are sensitive to heat and strong chemicals. Here, we describe the functionalization of a microchannel with two types of magnetic beads using hydrodynamic focusing combined with a passive magnetic separator with arrays of soft magnetic elements. The soft magnetic elements placed on both sides of the channel are magnetized by a relatively weak applied external magnetic field (21 mT) and provide magnetic field gradients attracting magnetic beads. Flows with two differently functionalized magnetic beads and a separating barrier flow are introduced simultaneously at the two channel sides and the centre of the microfluidic channel, respectively. On-chip experiments with fluorescence labeled beads demonstrate that the two types of beads are captured at each of the channel sidewalls. On-chip hybridization experiments show that the microfluidic systems can be functionalized with two sets of beads carrying different probes that selectively recognize a single base pair mismatch in target DNA. By switching the places of the two types of beads it is shown that the microsystem can be cleaned and functionalized repeatedly with different beads with no cross-talk between experiments. PMID:16234958

  18. Improvement of Temperature Uniformity for Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip with Heat Spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong-Sheng; Mao, Chao-Yang; Chen, Yung-Shieng

    2007-11-01

    For polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications, a uniform temperature field in the microreactor is crucial. In this paper, we report on the electrothermal and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the aim of optimizing the temperature distribution by heat spreaders for PCR application. Firstly, the equivalent resistivity of the microresistor heater is evaluated, and a conformable result is then verified by comparing with the experimental result using a prototype PCR chip. Secondly, the temperature distribution at 94 °C in the PCR chip is investigated. Furthermore, a heat spreader is inserted into the PCR chip to reduce the temperature difference in the DNA sample and thus improve the temperature uniformity effectively. The results demonstrated that the effective volume percentage and the energy consumption in the chamber are positively related to the thickness of the heat spreader, while the temperature difference is inversely related to the thickness of the heat spreader. Finally, the (b)-design is better than the (a)-design in terms of both the increase in effective volume percentage of the DNA sample and the decrease in energy consumption. In other words, the (b)-design is recognized as having better temperature uniformity.

  19. The processing technology of PMMA micro-fluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lili; Rong, Li; Guo, Shuheng; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    In order to enrich the production method of micro-fluidic chip and simplify its processing technology, the paper discussed the double-sided adhesive layer for channel layer, with PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) for fabrication of microfluidic chip with the cover plate and the bottom plate. Taking 40 mm (long) x 20 mm (wide) x 2.2 mm (thick) liquid drop to separate the microfluidic chip as an example, details the design and machining process of the chip. Experiments show that surface quality is high and processing speed is fast when using this technology to process the chip. Thus, it can realize the mass production of micro fluidic chip.

  20. Methylsorb: a simple method for quantifying DNA methylation using DNA-gold affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Carrascosa, Laura G; Palanisamy, Ramkumar; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-10-21

    The analysis of DNA methylation is becoming increasingly important both in the clinic and also as a research tool to unravel key epigenetic molecular mechanisms in biology. Current methodologies for the quantification of regional DNA methylation (i.e., the average methylation over a region of DNA in the genome) are largely affected by comprehensive DNA sequencing methodologies which tend to be expensive, tedious, and time-consuming for many applications. Herein, we report an alternative DNA methylation detection method referred to as "Methylsorb", which is based on the inherent affinity of DNA bases to the gold surface (i.e., the trend of the affinity interactions is adenine > cytosine ≥ guanine > thymine).1 Since the degree of gold-DNA affinity interaction is highly sequence dependent, it provides a new capability to detect DNA methylation by simply monitoring the relative adsorption of bisulfite treated DNA sequences onto a gold chip. Because the selective physical adsorption of DNA fragments to gold enable a direct read-out of regional DNA methylation, the current requirement for DNA sequencing is obviated. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we present data on the regional methylation status of two CpG clusters located in the EN1 and MIR200B genes in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The methylation status of these regions was obtained from the change in relative mass on gold surface with respect to relative adsorption of an unmethylated DNA source and this was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a label-free and real-time manner. We anticipate that the simplicity of this method, combined with the high level of accuracy for identifying the methylation status of cytosines in DNA, could find broad application in biology and diagnostics. PMID:25226077

  1. Technical considerations in using DNA microarrays to define regulons.

    PubMed

    Rhodius, Virgil A; Wade, Joseph T

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is the major regulatory target of gene expression in bacteria, and is controlled by many regulatory proteins and RNAs. Microarrays are a powerful tool to study the regulation of transcription on a genomic scale. Here we describe the use of transcription profiling and ChIP-chip to study transcriptional regulation in bacteria. Transcription profiling determines the outcome of regulatory events whereas ChIP-chip identifies the protein-DNA interactions that determine these events. Together they can provide detailed information on transcriptional regulatory systems. PMID:18955146

  2. PCR microfluidic devices for DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xu, Jinliang; Ma, Wenli; Zheng, Wenling

    2006-01-01

    The miniaturization of biological and chemical analytical devices by micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology has posed a vital influence on such fields as medical diagnostics, microbial detection and other bio-analysis. Among many miniaturized analytical devices, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microchip/microdevices are studied extensively, and thus great progress has been made on aspects of on-chip micromachining (fabrication, bonding and sealing), choice of substrate materials, surface chemistry and architecture of reaction vessel, handling of necessary sample fluid, controlling of three or two-step temperature thermocycling, detection of amplified nucleic acid products, integration with other analytical functional units such as sample preparation, capillary electrophoresis (CE), DNA microarray hybridization, etc. However, little has been done on the review of above-mentioned facets of the PCR microchips/microdevices including the two formats of flow-through and stationary chamber in spite of several earlier reviews [Zorbas, H. Miniature continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: a breakthrough? Angew Chem Int Ed 1999; 38 (8):1055-1058; Krishnan, M., Namasivayam, V., Lin, R., Pal, R., Burns, M.A. Microfabricated reaction and separation systems. Curr Opin Biotechnol 2001; 12:92-98; Schneegabeta, I., Köhler, J.M. Flow-through polymerase chain reactions in chip themocyclers. Rev Mol Biotechnol 2001; 82:101-121; deMello, A.J. DNA amplification: does 'small' really mean 'efficient'? Lab Chip 2001; 1: 24N-29N; Mariella, Jr. R. MEMS for bio-assays. Biomed Microdevices 2002; 4 (2):77-87; deMello AJ. Microfluidics: DNA amplification moves on. Nature 2003; 422:28-29; Kricka, L.J., Wilding, P. Microchip PCR. Anal BioAnal Chem 2003; 377:820-825]. In this review, we survey the advances of the above aspects among the PCR microfluidic devices in detail. Finally, we also illuminate the potential and practical applications of PCR microfluidics to some fields such

  3. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-08-01

    In patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIP(U) (box) domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53's DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5' UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP-BACE1-p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  4. On-Chip Cellomics: Constructive Understanding of Multicellular Network Using On-Chip Cellomics Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    We have developed methods and systems of analyzing epigenetic information in cells to expand our understanding of how living systems are determined. Because cells are minimum units reflecting epigenetic information, which is considered to map the history of a parallel-processing recurrent network of biochemical reactions, their behaviors cannot be explained by considering only conventional deonucleotide (DNA) information-processing events. The role of epigenetic information on cells, which complements their genetic information, was inferred by comparing predictions from genetic information with cell behaviour observed under conditions chosen to reveal adaptation processes and community effects. A system of analyzing epigenetic information, on-chip cellomics technology, has been developed starting from the twin complementary viewpoints of cell regulation as an “algebraic” system (emphasis on temporal aspects) and as a “geometric” system (emphasis on spatial aspects) exploiting microfabrication technology and a reconstructive approach of cellular systems not only for single cell-based subjects such as Escherichia coli and macrophages but also for cellular networks like the community effect of cardiomyocytes and plasticity in neuronal networks. One of the most important contributions of this study was to be able to reconstruct the concept of a cell regulatory network from the “local” (molecules expressed at certain times and places) to the “global” (the cell as a viable, functioning system). Knowledge of epigenetic information, which we can control and change during cell lives, complements the genetic variety, and these two types of information are indispensable for living organisms. This new knowlege has the potential to be the basis of cell-based biological and medical fields such as those involving cell-based drug screening and the regeneration of organs from stem cells.

  5. Utilisation of chip thickness models in grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Roger

    Grinding is now a well established process utilised for both stock removal and finish applications. Although significant research is performed in this field, grinding still experiences problems with burn and high forces which can lead to poor quality components and damage to equipment. This generally occurs in grinding when the process deviates from its safe working conditions. In milling, chip thickness parameters are utilised to predict and maintain process outputs leading to improved control of the process. This thesis looks to further the knowledge of the relationship between chip thickness and the grinding process outputs to provide an increased predictive and maintenance modelling capability. Machining trials were undertaken using different chip thickness parameters to understand how these affect the process outputs. The chip thickness parameters were maintained at different grinding wheel diameters for a constant productivity process to determine the impact of chip thickness at a constant material removal rate.. Additional testing using a modified pin on disc test rig was performed to provide further information on process variables. The different chip thickness parameters provide control of different process outputs in the grinding process. These relationships can be described using contact layer theory and heat flux partitioning. The contact layer is defined as the immediate layer beneath the contact arc at the wheel workpiece interface. The size of the layer governs the force experienced during the process. The rate of contact layer removal directly impacts the net power required from the system. It was also found that the specific grinding energy of a process is more dependent on the productivity of a grinding process

  6. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  7. Digital PCR using micropatterned superporous absorbent array chips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhen; Southard, Kristopher M; Zeng, Yong

    2016-06-21

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is an emerging technology for genetic analysis and clinical diagnostics. To facilitate the widespread application of dPCR, here we developed a new micropatterned superporous absorbent array chip (μSAAC) which consists of an array of microwells packed with highly porous agarose microbeads. The packed beads construct a hierarchically porous microgel which confers superior water adsorption capacity to enable spontaneous filling of PDMS microwells for fluid compartmentalization without the need of sophisticated microfluidic equipment and operation expertise. Using large λ-DNA as the model template, we validated the μSAAC for stochastic partitioning and quantitative digital detection of DNA molecules. Furthermore, as a proof-of-concept, we conducted dPCR detection and single-molecule sequencing of a mutation prevalent in blood cancer, the chromosomal translocation t(14;18), demonstrating the feasibility of the μSAAC for analysis of disease-associated mutations. These experiments were carried out using the standard molecular biology techniques and instruments. Because of its low cost, ease of fabrication, and equipment-free liquid partitioning, the μSAAC is readily adaptable to general lab settings, which could significantly facilitate the widespread application of dPCR technology in basic research and clinical practice. PMID:27010726

  8. RisaAligner software for aligning fluorescence data between Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer chips: Application to soil microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Elisabeth; Fabrègue, Olivier; Scorretti, Riccardo; Reboulet, Jérémy; Simonet, Pascal; Dawson, Lorna; Demanèche, Sandrine

    2015-12-01

    Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) is a high-resolution and highly reproducible fingerprinting technique for discriminating between microbial communities. The community profiles can be visualized using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. Comparison between fingerprints relies upon precise estimation of all amplified DNA fragment lengths; however, size standard computation can vary between gel runs. For complex samples such as soil microbial communities, discrimination by fragment size is not always sufficient. In such cases, the comparison of whole fluorescence data as a function of time (electrophoregrams) is more appropriate. When electrophoregrams [fluorescence = f (time)] are used, and more than one chip is involved, electrophoregram comparisons are challenging due to experimental variations between chips and the lack of correction by the Agilent software in such situations. Here we present RisaAligner software for analyzing and comparing electrophoregrams from Agilent chips using a nonlinear ladder-alignment algorithm. We demonstrate the robustness and substantial improvement of data analysis by analyzing soil microbial profiles obtained with Agilent DNA 1000 and High Sensitivity chips. PMID:26651514

  9. Imaging Spectrometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Zheng, Xinyu

    2007-01-01

    A proposed visible-light imaging spectrometer on a chip would be based on the concept of a heterostructure comprising multiple layers of silicon-based photodetectors interspersed with long-wavelength-pass optical filters. In a typical application, this heterostructure would be replicated in each pixel of an image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type (see figure). The design of the heterostructure would exploit the fact that within the visible portion of the spectrum, the characteristic depth of penetration of photons increases with wavelength. Proceeding from the front toward the back, each successive long-wavelength-pass filter would have a longer cutoff wavelength, and each successive photodetector would be made thicker to enable it to absorb a greater proportion of incident longer-wavelength photons. Incident light would pass through the first photodetector and encounter the first filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength and pass light of longer wavelengths. A large portion of the incident and reflected shorter-wavelength light would be absorbed in the first photodetector. The light that had passed through the first photodetector/filter pair of layers would pass through the second photodetector and encounter the second filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength while passing light of longer wavelengths. Thus, most of the light reflected by the second filter would lie in the wavelength band between the cutoff wavelengths of the first and second filters. Thus, further, most of the light absorbed in the second photodetector would lie in this wavelength band. In a similar manner, each successive photodetector would detect, predominantly, light in a successively longer wavelength band bounded by the shorter cutoff wavelength of the preceding filter and the longer cutoff wavelength of the following filter.

  10. Bubble-free on-chip continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: concept and application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenming; Kang, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Bubble formation inside a microscale channel is a significant problem in general microfluidic experiments. The problem becomes especially crucial when performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a chip which is subject to repetitive temperature changes. In this paper, we propose a bubble-free sample injection scheme applicable for continuous-flow PCR inside a glass/PDMS hybrid microfluidic chip, and attempt to provide a theoretical basis concerning bubble formation and elimination. Highly viscous paraffin oil plugs are employed in both the anterior and posterior ends of a sample plug, completely encapsulating the sample and eliminating possible nucleation sites for bubbles. In this way, internal channel pressure is increased, and vaporization of the sample is prevented, suppressing bubble formation. Use of an oil plug in the posterior end of the sample plug aids in maintaining a stable flow of a sample at a constant rate inside a heated microchannel throughout the entire reaction, as compared to using an air plug. By adopting the proposed sample injection scheme, we demonstrate various practical applications. On-chip continuous-flow PCR is performed employing genomic DNA extracted from a clinical single hair root sample, and its D1S80 locus is successfully amplified. Also, chip reusability is assessed using a plasmid vector. A single chip is used up to 10 times repeatedly without being destroyed, maintaining almost equal intensities of the resulting amplicons after each run, ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of the proposed sample injection scheme. In addition, the use of a commercially-available and highly cost-effective hot plate as a potential candidate for the heating source is investigated. PMID:21461443

  11. Fabrication of Direct Bonded Copper Atom Chips for Harmonic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Matthew; Kasch, Brian; Crow, Jonathan; Olson, Spencer

    2014-05-01

    Atom chips using direct bonded copper (DBC) have greater power handling than typical lithographically produced atom chips because pure, thick (>100 microns) copper layers are commonly obtained with DBC. We present our current fabrication techniques for DBC atom chips including: laser etching, acid etching, multi-layered chips, etc. The optimized parameters for each of these processes will be presented. Specifically, we will present the fabrication process used in the creation of a tunable harmonic trap. We will also present the design and fabrication of a chip for generating a quadrupole magnetic field for the magneto-optical trap (MOT) chip. The MOT chip is co-aligned with the harmonic trap chip to simplify transfer and optimization.

  12. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  13. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  14. An Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Rapid Identification and Simultaneous Differentiation of Tropical Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L.; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H.; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  15. An integrated lab-on-chip for rapid identification and simultaneous differentiation of tropical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeslin J L; Capozzoli, Monica; Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  16. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  17. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  18. Chip scale integrated microresonator sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Nan; Royal, Matthew; Palit, Sabarni; Luan, Lin; Dhar, Sulochana; Tyler, Talmage

    2009-04-01

    Medicine, environmental monitoring, and security are application areas for miniaturized, portable sensing systems. The emerging integration of sensors with other components (electronic, photonic, fluidic) is moving sensing toward higher levels of portability through the realization of self-contained chip scale sensing systems. Planar optical sensors, and in particular, microresonator sensors, are attractive components for chip scale integrated sensing systems because they are small, have high sensitivity, can be surface customized, and can be integrated singly or in arrays in a planar format with other components using conventional semiconductor fabrication technologies. This paper will focus on the progress and prospects for the integration of microresonator sensors at the chip scale with photonic input/output components and with sample preparation microfluidics, toward self-contained, portable sensing systems. PMID:19367589

  19. Design of highway embankments using tire chips

    SciTech Connect

    Bosscher, P.J.; Edil, T.B.; Kuraoka, S.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes research undertaken to develop design procedures for using shredded scrap tires as a lightweight fill material in highway construction. The benefits of using scrap tires are particularly enhanced if they can be used to replace virgin construction materials made from nonrenewable resources. This paper addresses the use of tire chips as a highway embankment material. Design parameters for embankments constructed using discarded shredded tires are presented based on laboratory model studies, numerical analyses, and field performance of test fills. The conclusions of this report support the use of tire chips as an environmentally acceptable lightweight fill in highway applications if properly confined. Recommendations for design procedures and construction specifications for the use of tire chips in highway fills are provided.

  20. Time of flight system on a chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschalidis, Nicholas P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A CMOS time-of-flight TOF system-on-a-chip SoC for precise time interval measurement with low power consumption and high counting rate has been developed. The analog and digital TOF chip may include two Constant Fraction Discriminators CFDs and a Time-to-Digital Converter TDC. The CFDs can interface to start and stop anodes through two preamplifiers and perform signal processing for time walk compensation (110). The TDC digitizes the time difference with reference to an off-chip precise external clock (114). One TOF output is an 11-bit digital word and a valid event trigger output indicating a valid event on the 11-bit output bus (116).

  1. CHIPS Neutrino Detector Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Ramon; Vahle, Patricia; Chips Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CHIPS R&D project is an effort to develop affordable megaton-scale neutrino detectors. The CHIPS strategy calls for submerging water Cherenkov detectors deep under water. The surrounding water acts as structural support, minimizing large initial investments in costly infrastructure, and serves as an overburden, shielding the detector from cosmic rays and eliminating the need for expensive underground construction. Additional cost savings will be achieved through photodetector development and optimization of readout geometry. In summer 2014 a small prototype of the CHIPS detector was deployed in the flooded Wentworth Mine Pit in Northern Minnesota. The detector has been recording data underwater throughout the fall and winter. In this talk, we will discuss lessons learned from the prototyping experience and the plans for submerging much larger detectors in future years.

  2. A compact PE memory for vision chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Shi; Zhe, Chen; Jie, Yang; Nanjian, Wu; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel compact memory in the processing element (PE) for single-instruction multiple-data (SIMD) vision chips. The PE memory is constructed with 8 × 8 register cells, where one latch in the slave stage is shared by eight latches in the master stage. The memory supports simultaneous read and write on the same address in one clock cycle. Its compact area of 14.33 μm2/bit promises a higher integration level of the processor. A prototype chip with a 64 × 64 PE array is fabricated in a UMC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. Five types of the PE memory cell structure are designed and compared. The testing results demonstrate that the proposed PE memory architecture well satisfies the requirement of the vision chip in high-speed real-time vision applications, such as 1000 fps edge extraction.

  3. Laser bonding of multilayer polymer microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jianjun; Yuan, Hui; Yi, Xin-Jian; Liu, Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Polymer microfluidic chips have stimulated great instrests in the field of biochemical and medical analysis due to their low prices, easy fabrication and biocompatibility. Recently multilayer microfluidic chips have been fabricated by adhesive bonding to form 3-D multilayer laminate. However adhesive bonding may introduce pollution as well as complexity in coating. A bonding system with compact diode laser is introduced and a novel method based on transparent bonding line for multilayer microfluidic chips is developed. This bonding method is based on transmission laser microwelding technique. In this method, a special colorless dye as laser absorber, thus transparent polymer sheets can be stacked and bonded layer by layer. Initial results and bonding performance have demonstrate the feasibility of this method.

  4. Biostability of an implantable glucose sensor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, M.; Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K. E.; Kulse, P.; Fursenko, O.; Katzer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Surface materials of an implantable microelectronic chip intended for medical applications were evaluated with respect to their long-term stability in bio-environments. The sensor chip shall apply in a glucose monitor by operating as a microviscosimeter according to the principle of affinity viscosimetry. A monolithic integration of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) into the sensor chip was successfully performed in a combined 0.25 μm CMOS/BiCMOS technology. In order to study material durability and biostability of the surfaces, sensor chips were exposed to various in vitro and in vivo tests. Corrosional damage of SiON, SiO2 and TiN surfaces was investigated by optical microscopy, ellipsometry and AFM. The results served for optimizing the Back-end-of-Line (BEoL) stack, from which the MEMS was prepared. Corrosion of metal lines could significantly be reduced by improving the topmost passivation layer. The experiments revealed no visible damage of the actuator or other functionally important MEMS elements. Sensor chips were also exposed to human body fluid for three month by implantation into the abdomen of a volunteer. Only small effects were observed for layer thickness and Ra roughness after explantation. In particular, TiN as used for the actuator beam showed no degradation by biocorrosion. The highest degradation rate of about 50 nm per month was revealed for the SiON passivation layer. These results suggest that the sensor chip may safely operate in subcutaneous tissue for a period of several months.

  5. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station (ISS). Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the ISS, the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  6. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  7. Expression and significance of CHIP in canine mammary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Huanan; YANG, Xu; JIN, Yipeng; PEI, Shimin; ZHANG, Di; MA, Wen; HUANG, Jian; QIU, Hengbin; ZHANG, Xinke; JIANG, Qiuyue; SUN, Weidong; ZHANG, Hong; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    CHIP (Carboxy terminus of Hsc70 Interacting Protein) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can induce ubiquitination and degradation of several oncogenic proteins. The expression of CHIP is frequently lower in human breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. However, the expression and role of CHIP in the canine mammary gland tumor (CMGT) remain unclear. We investigated the potential correlation between CHIP expression and mammary gland tumor prognosis in female dogs. CHIP expression was measured in 54 dogs by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the histopathological diagnosis, outcome of disease and tumor classification. The transcriptional level of CHIP was significantly higher in normal tissues (P=0.001) and benign tumors (P=0.009) than it in malignant tumors. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the transcriptional level of CHIP (P=0.0102). The log-rank test survival curves indicated that patients with low expression of CHIP had shorter overall periods of survival than those with higher CHIP protein expression (P=0.050). Our data suggest that CHIP may play an important role in the formation and development of CMGTs and serve as a valuable prognostic marker and potential target for genetic therapy. PMID:26156079

  8. Expression and significance of CHIP in canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanan; Yang, Xu; Jin, Yipeng; Pei, Shimin; Zhang, Di; Ma, Wen; Huang, Jian; Qiu, Hengbin; Zhang, Xinke; Jiang, Qiuyue; Sun, Weidong; Zhang, Hong; Lin, Degui

    2015-11-01

    CHIP (Carboxy terminus of Hsc70 Interacting Protein) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can induce ubiquitination and degradation of several oncogenic proteins. The expression of CHIP is frequently lower in human breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. However, the expression and role of CHIP in the canine mammary gland tumor (CMGT) remain unclear. We investigated the potential correlation between CHIP expression and mammary gland tumor prognosis in female dogs. CHIP expression was measured in 54 dogs by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the histopathological diagnosis, outcome of disease and tumor classification. The transcriptional level of CHIP was significantly higher in normal tissues (P=0.001) and benign tumors (P=0.009) than it in malignant tumors. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the transcriptional level of CHIP (P=0.0102). The log-rank test survival curves indicated that patients with low expression of CHIP had shorter overall periods of survival than those with higher CHIP protein expression (P=0.050). Our data suggest that CHIP may play an important role in the formation and development of CMGTs and serve as a valuable prognostic marker and potential target for genetic therapy. PMID:26156079

  9. 7. VIEW OF THE CHIP ROASTER LOCATED IN BUILDING 447. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF THE CHIP ROASTER LOCATED IN BUILDING 447. THE CHIP ROASTER BURNED URANIUM CHIPS FROM MACHINING AREAS TO AN OXIDE, A MORE STABLE FORM FOR DISPOSAL. (4/27/55) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Miniature integrated-optical wavelength analyzer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R. E.; Dübendorfer, J.

    1995-11-01

    A novel integrated-optical chip suitable for realizing compact miniature wavelength analyzers with high linear dispersion is presented. The chip performs the complete task of converting the spectrum of an input beam into a corresponding spatial irradiance distribution without the need for an imaging function. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally by monitoring the changes in the mode spectrum of a laser diode on varying its case temperature. Comparing the results with simultaneous measurements by a commercial spectrometer yielded a rms wavelength deviation of 0.01 nm.

  11. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month. PMID:26699036

  12. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  13. A versatile snap chip for high-density sub-nanoliter chip-to-chip reagent transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiyan; Munzar, Jeffrey D.; Ng, Andy; Juncker, David

    2015-07-01

    The coordinated delivery of minute amounts of different reagents is important for microfluidics and microarrays, but is dependent on advanced equipment such as microarrayers. Previously, we developed the snap chip for the direct transfer of reagents, thus realizing fluidic operations by only manipulating microscope slides. However, owing to the misalignment between arrays spotted on different slides, millimeter spacing was needed between spots and the array density was limited. In this work, we have developed a novel double transfer method and have transferred 625 spots cm-2, corresponding to >10000 spots for a standard microscope slide. A user-friendly snapping system was manufactured to make liquid handling straightforward. Misalignment, which for direct transfer ranged from 150-250 μm, was reduced to <40 μm for double transfer. The snap chip was used to quantify 50 proteins in 16 samples simultaneously, yielding limits of detection in the pg/mL range for 35 proteins. The versatility of the snap chip is illustrated with a 4-plex homogenous enzyme inhibition assay analyzing 128 conditions with precise timing. The versatility and high density of the snap chip with double transfer allows for the development of high throughput reagent transfer protocols compatible with a variety of applications.

  14. A versatile snap chip for high-density sub-nanoliter chip-to-chip reagent transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiyan; Munzar, Jeffrey D.; Ng, Andy; Juncker, David

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated delivery of minute amounts of different reagents is important for microfluidics and microarrays, but is dependent on advanced equipment such as microarrayers. Previously, we developed the snap chip for the direct transfer of reagents, thus realizing fluidic operations by only manipulating microscope slides. However, owing to the misalignment between arrays spotted on different slides, millimeter spacing was needed between spots and the array density was limited. In this work, we have developed a novel double transfer method and have transferred 625 spots cm−2, corresponding to >10000 spots for a standard microscope slide. A user-friendly snapping system was manufactured to make liquid handling straightforward. Misalignment, which for direct transfer ranged from 150–250 μm, was reduced to <40 μm for double transfer. The snap chip was used to quantify 50 proteins in 16 samples simultaneously, yielding limits of detection in the pg/mL range for 35 proteins. The versatility of the snap chip is illustrated with a 4-plex homogenous enzyme inhibition assay analyzing 128 conditions with precise timing. The versatility and high density of the snap chip with double transfer allows for the development of high throughput reagent transfer protocols compatible with a variety of applications. PMID:26148566

  15. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  16. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:26614075

  17. THE MELTING MECHANISM OF DNA TETHERED TO A SURFACE

    PubMed Central

    QAMHIEH, KHAWLA; WONG, KA-YIU; LYNCH, GILLIAN C.; PETTITT, B. MONTGOMERY

    2009-01-01

    The details of melting of DNA immobilized on a chip or nanoparticle determines the sensitivity and operating characteristics of many analytical and synthetic biotechnological devices. Yet, little is known about the differences in how the DNA melting occurs between a homogeneous solution and that on a chip. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore possible pathways for DNA melting on a chip. Simulation conditions were chosen to ensure that melting occurred in a submicrosecond timescale. The temperature was set to 400 K and the NaCl concentration was set to 0.1 M. We found less symmetry than in the solution case where for oligomeric double-stranded nucleic acids both ends melted with roughly equal probability. On a prepared silica surface we found melting is dominated by fraying from the end away from the surface. Strand separation was hindered by nonspecific surface adsorption at this temperature. At elevated temperatures the melted DNA was attracted to even uncharged organically coated surfaces demonstrating surface fouling. While hybridization is not the simple reverse of melting, this simulation has implications for the kinetics of hybridization. PMID:19802357

  18. Simulating the Effect of Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking On Surface Texture and Chip Length

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; McFarland, J.T.; Tursky, D. A.; Assaid, T. S.; Barkman, W. E.; Babelay, Jr., E. F.

    2010-04-30

    One method for creating broken chips in turning processes involves oscillating the cutting tool in the feed direction utilizing the CNC machine axes. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the Y-12 National Security Complex have developed and are refining a method to reliably control surface finish and chip length based on a particular machine's dynamic performance. Using computer simulations it is possible to combine the motion of the machine axes with the geometry of the cutting tool to predict the surface characteristics and map the surface texture for a wide range of oscillation parameters. These data allow the selection of oscillation parameters to simultaneously ensure broken chips and acceptable surface characteristics. This paper describes the machine dynamic testing and characterization activities as well as the computational method used for evaluating and predicting chip length and surface texture.

  19. MagArray Biochips for Protein and DNA Detection with Magnetic Nanotags: Design, Experiment, and Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Shan X.

    MagArray™ chips contain arrays of magnetic sensors, which can be used to detect surface binding reactions of biological molecules that have been labeled with 10 to 100 nm sized magnetic particles. Although MagArray chips are in some ways similar to fluorescence-based DNA array chips, the use of magnetic labeling tags leads to many distinct advantages, such as better background rejection, no label bleaching, inexpensive chip readers, potentially higher sensitivity, ability to measure multiple binding reactions in homogeneous assays simultaneously and in real-time, and seamless integration with magnetic separation techniques. So far, the technology of MagArray chips has been successfully used to perform quantitative analytic bioassays of both protein and nucleic acid targets. The potential of this technology, especially for point-of-care testing (POCT) and portable molecular diagnostics, appears promising, and it is likely that this technology will see significant further performance gains in the near future.

  20. A versatile quantitation platform based on platinum nanoparticles incorporated volumetric bar-chart chip for highly sensitive assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhen; Zhu, Guixian; Qi, Wenjin; Li, Ying; Song, Yujun

    2016-11-15

    Platinum nanoparticles incorporated volumetric bar-chart chip (PtNPs-V-Chip) is able to be used for point-of-care tests by providing quantitative and visualized readout without any assistance from instruments, data processing, or graphic plotting. To improve the sensitivity of PtNPs-V-Chip, hybridization chain reaction was employed in this quantitation platform for highly sensitive assays that can detect as low as 16 pM Ebola Virus DNA, 0.01ng/mL carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the 10 HER2-expressing cancer cells. Based on this amplified strategy, a 100-fold decrease of detection limit was achieved for DNA by improving the number of platinum nanoparticle catalyst for the captured analyte. This quantitation platform can also distinguish single base mismatch of DNA hybridization and observe the concentration threshold of CEA. The new strategy lays the foundation for this quantitation platform to be applied in forensic analysis, biothreat detection, clinical diagnostics and drug screening. PMID:27285358

  1. A Low-Cost Microfluidic Chip for Rapid Genotyping of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Yan, Guiyun; Bau, Haim H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vector control is one of the most effective measures to prevent the transmission of malaria, a disease that causes over 600,000 deaths annually. Around 30–40 Anopheles mosquito species are natural vectors of malaria parasites. Some of these species cannot be morphologically distinguished, but have behavioral and ecological differences. Emblematic of this is the Anopheles gambiae species complex. The correct identification of vector species is fundamental to the development of control strategies and epidemiological studies of disease transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings An inexpensive, disposable, field-deployable, sample-to-answer, microfluidic chip was designed, constructed, and tested for rapid molecular identification of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis. The chip contains three isothermal amplification reactors. One test reactor operates with specific primers to amplify Anopheles gambiae DNA, another with specific primers for Anopheles arabiensis DNA, and the third serves as a negative control. A mosquito leg was crushed on an isolation membrane. Two discs, laden with mosquito tissue, were punched out of the membrane and inserted into the two test chambers. The isolated, disc-bound DNA served as a template in the amplification processes. The amplification products were detected with intercalating fluorescent dye that was excited with a blue light-emitting diode. The emitted light was observed by eye and recorded with a cell-phone camera. When the target consisted of Anopheles gambiae, the reactor containing primers specific to An. gambiae lit up while the other two reactors remained dark. When the target consisted of Anopheles arabiensis, the reactor containing primers specific to An. arabiensis lit up while the other two reactors remained dark. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic chip provides a means to identify mosquito type through molecular analysis. It is suitable for field work, allowing one to track the geographical

  2. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  3. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  4. On-chip optical lattice for cold atom experiments.

    PubMed

    Straatsma, Cameron J E; Ivory, Megan K; Duggan, Janet; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Anderson, Dana Z; Salim, Evan A

    2015-07-15

    An atom-chip-based integrated optical lattice system for cold and ultracold atom applications is presented. The retroreflection optics necessary for forming the lattice are bonded directly to the atom chip, enabling a compact and robust on-chip optical lattice system. After achieving Bose-Einstein condensation in a magnetic chip trap, we load atoms directly into a vertically oriented 1D optical lattice and demonstrate Landau-Zener tunneling. The atom chip technology presented here can be readily extended to higher dimensional optical lattices. PMID:26176471

  5. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  6. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manu facturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthe-sized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microar-rays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  7. Increasing security in inter-chip communication

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nathan J; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan

    2014-10-28

    An apparatus for increasing security in inter-chip communication includes a sending control module, a communication bus, and a receiving control module. The communication bus is coupled between the sending control module and the receiving control module. The sending control module operates to send data on the communication bus, disable the communication bus when threats are detected, or both.

  8. Programmable Electro Osmotic Lab on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Andreas G.

    2014-11-01

    We propose to use a 2D check-board patterned surface with alternating zeta potential made of semiconductors and individually controllable electrodes surrounding each field to drive by electro osmosis an arbitrary flow along the surface within the cavity of a lab-on-a-chip. In contrast to other fluid mechanic devices the flow is not driven by pressure gradients but rather by a controllable fluid velocity within the Debay boundary layer. Thus fluid is transported like a parcel on a conveyor belt. The use of alternating zeta potential fields and alternating electrode polarities allows to transport flow along multiple fields without the need to increase voltage. Basic functionality of the chip is accomplished by appropriate programming: fluid transport along straight and curved path, merging and splitting flow paths, flow crossing by red light traffic control, and mixing. Implementing sensors for electric resistance on the Lab-On-A-Chip allows to program a diagnosis application using electrophoresis for detection. Transport within the Lab-On-A-Chip can be described by Stokes-flow subject to the boundary conditions given by asymptotic theory in the thin-Debay-layer-limit describing field driven electro kinetic effects.

  9. Update on zebra chip variety screening trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires the identification and development of tolerant or resistant potato varieties. For five years (2010-2014), over 280 potato varieties and advanced breeding lines were screened for ZC under controlled field cage conditions, by infecti...

  10. Writing for a Change, Writing for Chip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    What does it mean to write for change? How do we negotiate the space between hope and critique? Drawing on Dewey's notion of a common faith, this article contemplates what the author learned from Chip Bruce. It suggests that when we compartmentalize the ideal and the everyday, the hopeful and the critical, we reduce the complexity of human…

  11. System-on-Chip Design and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenbury, L. E. M.; Plana, L. A.; Pepper, J.

    2010-01-01

    The system-on-chip module described here builds on a grounding in digital hardware and system architecture. It is thus appropriate for third-year undergraduate computer science and computer engineering students, for post-graduate students, and as a training opportunity for post-graduate research students. The course incorporates significant…

  12. Light-colored, Low Acrylamide Potato Chips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tubers are stored at cold temperatures to prevent sprouting, minimize disease losses and increase the marketing window. Cold storage also causes an accumulation of reducing sugars, a phenomenon referred to as cold-induced sweetening. Unacceptable, dark colored chips and fries are formed durin...

  13. The V-Chip--Victory or Vendetta?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ron

    1997-01-01

    Parents can install the v-chip microchip in their televisions to block out programs high in violence, sex, or other objectional material. Examines the views of supporters, who see it as a coping tool for the information age and of detractors who see it as an affront to the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. (SM)

  14. Sensing systems using chip-based spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkowski, Arthur; Preston, Kyle J.; Sherwood-Droz, Nicolás.; Behr, Bradford B.; Bismilla, Yusuf; Cenko, Andrew T.; DesRoches, Brandon; Meade, Jeffrey T.; Munro, Elizabeth A.; Slaa, Jared; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-06-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems has developed a new chip-based spectrometer called OCTANE, the Optical Coherence Tomography Advanced Nanophotonic Engine, built using a planar lightwave circuit with integrated waveguides fabricated on a silicon wafer. While designed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) systems, the same miniaturized technology can be applied to many other spectroscopic applications. The field of integrated optics enables the design of complex optical systems which are monolithically integrated on silicon chips. The form factors of these systems can be significantly smaller, more robust and less expensive than their equivalent free-space counterparts. Fabrication techniques and material systems developed for microelectronics have previously been adapted for integrated optics in the telecom industry, where millions of chip-based components are used to power the optical backbone of the internet. We have further adapted the photonic technology platform for spectroscopy applications, allowing unheard-of economies of scale for these types of optical devices. Instead of changing lenses and aligning systems, these devices are accurately designed programmatically and are easily customized for specific applications. Spectrometers using integrated optics have large advantages in systems where size, robustness and cost matter: field-deployable devices, UAVs, UUVs, satellites, handheld scanning and more. We will discuss the performance characteristics of our chip-based spectrometers and the type of spectral sensing applications enabled by this technology.

  15. Planar multijunction high voltage solar cell chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Kapoor, V. J.; Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A new innovative planar multijunction solar cell chip for concentrated sunlight applications is proposed. The chip consists of many voltage-generating regions, called unit cells, which are connected in series within a single silicon wafer, thereby providing a high open-circuit voltage at multiple sun illumination levels. The unit cells are fabricated on 75 micron thick p-type single crystal silicon substrate. Each chip consists of 1.42 x 9.63 mm n(+)/p collecting junctions on the back of the wafer, while the illuminated front surface area is divided into 0.3 micron deep n(+) regions. The fabrication sequence includes standard degreasing and cleaning procedures, double-sided alignment photomasking, introduction of boron and phosphorus impurities, and photolithography. The open circuit voltage of the chip increased rapidly with illumination up to about 4 AM1 suns, and then began to saturate at the sum of the individual unit cell voltages of 3.5 above 4 AM1 suns. A short circuit density per unit cell of 300 mA/sq cm at 20 AM1 suns was observed.

  16. An Exemplary High School Literary Magazine: "Chips."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Hilary Taylor, Comp.

    One of a series of 20 literary magazine profiles written to help faculty advisors wishing to start or improve their publication, this profile provides information on staffing and production of "Chips," the magazine published by Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Bethesda, Maryland. The introduction describes the literary magazine contest…

  17. Flip-a-Chip to Build Vocabulary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Lee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a word-game strategy that builds vocabulary and comprehension while motivating students. Concludes that activities like Flip-a-Chip (along with crossword puzzles and other forms of wordplay) have helped the author create a pleasantly literate environment in her classroom. (SG)

  18. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  19. CCSDS Reed Solomon VLSI chip set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, K.; Whitaker, S.; Liu, N.; Liu, K.; Canaris, J.

    1990-01-01

    A highly efficient error correcting code has been selected by NASA as a CCSDS standard: the 16 symbol error correcting Reed Solomon code. A VLSI implementation of this decoder is described in this paper. A total of 4 full custom VLSI chips are needed that correct data in real time at an sustained rate of up to 80 Mbits/second.

  20. Potato zebra chip disease: a phytopathological tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato zebra chip (ZC) disease is a relative newcomer to the world of important potato diseases. First reported in Mexico in the 1990s, by 2004-2005 the disease was causing serious economic damage in parts of Texas. ZC is now widespread in the western United States, Mexico, Central America, and wa...

  1. Hybrid photonic chip interferometer for embedded metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Martin, H.; Maxwell, G.; Jiang, X.

    2014-03-01

    Embedded metrology is the provision of metrology on the manufacturing platform, enabling measurement without the removal of the work piece. Providing closer integration of metrology upon the manufacturing platform can lead to the better control and increased throughput. In this work we present the development of a high precision hybrid optical chip interferometer metrology device. The complete metrology sensor system is structured into two parts; optical chip and optical probe. The hybrid optical chip interferometer is based on a silica-on-silicon etched integrated-optic motherboard containing waveguide structures and evanescent couplers. Upon the motherboard, electro-optic components such as photodiodes and a semiconductor gain block are mounted and bonded to provide the required functionality. The key structure in the device is a tunable laser module based upon an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL). Within the cavity is a multi-layer thin film filter which is rotated to select the longitudinal mode at which the laser operates. An optical probe, which uses a blazed diffracting grating and collimating objective lens, focuses light of different wavelengths laterally over the measurand. Incident laser light is then tuned in wavelength time to effectively sweep an `optical stylus' over the surface. Wavelength scanning and rapid phase shifting can then retrieve the path length change and thus the surface height. We give an overview of the overall design of the final hybrid photonic chip interferometer, constituent components, device integration and packaging as well as experimental test results from the current version now under evaluation.

  2. Hybrid Fiber-Optic/CCD Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low noise and linearity of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) combined with optical waveguide components in hybrid, integrated chip package. Concept used to measure laser flux in fiber-gyro application using sensing fibers that range from several to several tens of kilometers in length. Potential applications include optical delay measurement and linear detector of light flux emanating from fiber-optic waveguides.

  3. Chip level modeling of LSI devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology has rendered the gate level model impractical for many simulation activities critical to the design automation process. As an alternative, an approach to the modeling of VLSI devices at the chip level is described, including the specification of modeling language constructs important to the modeling process. A model structure is presented in which models of the LSI devices are constructed as single entities. The modeling structure is two layered. The functional layer in this structure is used to model the input/output response of the LSI chip. A second layer, the fault mapping layer, is added, if fault simulations are required, in order to map the effects of hardware faults onto the functional layer. Modeling examples for each layer are presented. Fault modeling at the chip level is described. Approaches to realistic functional fault selection and defining fault coverage for functional faults are given. Application of the modeling techniques to single chip and bit slice microprocessors is discussed.

  4. Novel PbS detector chip pattern with extinction function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fengjin; Si, Junjie; Su, Xianjun; Lv, Yanqiu; Shi, Zhengfeng

    2015-10-01

    A novel chip pattern with extinction function in Lead salt detectors is specified. Lead Sulfide (PbS) polycrystalline film is prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CMD) on a transparent substrate, then a special figure and structure is saved by lithography techonology on the substrate. As a quaternion detector chip that made by PbS thin film for example in this paper, whose performance including signal, noise, weak-peaks and the uniformity of the chip are too poor to meet the detecting system at the initial stage of research, and the qualified ratio of chips is only 3% .This paper explains the reason why the performance and qualified ratio of chips were so poor, focuses on a novel chip pattern with extinction which avoided the disadvantages of traditional one. the novel chip pattern has been applied in detectors. The novel chip pattern is prepared with PbS thin film which both "extinction slice" and detector chip are based on a same substrate , which not only had absorbed the jumbled light , improved the uniformity and other performance of photosensitive elements, but also had left out the assembly diffculty and precision demand when a extinction slice assembly in the restricted space of inswept detector chip, omitted the production process of extinction slice and shorten the assembly process of the detectors, and the qualified ratio of chips had been improved from 3% to 98%.

  5. Investigation of formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting of mild steel and the transformation conditions between various morphology chips. It is supposed that the modeling material follows the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. In orthogonal cutting process, both the plastic flow and the instability behaviors of chip materials are caused by the plane strain loadings. Therefore, the general instability behaviors of materials in plane strain state are first analyzed with linear perturbation method and a universal instability criterion is established. Based on the analytical results, the formation mechanisms of chips and the transformation conditions between continuous and serrated chips are further studied by instability phase diagram method. The results show that the chip formation strongly depends on the intensity ratios between shear and normal stresses. The ratios of dissipative rates of plastic work done by compression and shear stresses govern the transformation from continuous to serrated chips. These results are verified by the numerical simulations on the orthogonal cutting process.

  6. Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, K. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System produces user-selectable chip lengths and workpiece finishes and is compatible with any material, workpiece shape, and depth of cut. The MTP chip breaking system consistently creates the desired size of chips regardless of workpiece size, shape, or material, and the machine operator does not need to make any adjustments during the machining operation. The system's programmer configures the part program that commands the machine tool to move in a specific fashion to deliver the desired part size, shape, chip length, and workpiece surface finish. The MTP chip breaking system helps manufacturers avoid the detrimental effects of continuous chips, including expensive repair costs, delivery delays, and hazards to personnel.

  7. Gene-expression profiling of human mononuclear cells from welders using cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Rim, Kyung Taek; Park, Kun Koo; Kim, Yang Ho; Lee, Yong Hwan; Han, Jeong Hee; Chung, Yong Hyun; Yu, Il Je

    2007-08-01

    A toxicogenomic chip developed to detect welding-related diseases was tested and validated for field trials. To verify the suitability of the microarray, white blood cells (WBC) or whole blood was purified and characterized from 20 subjects in the control group (average work experience of 7 yr) and 20 welders in the welding-fume exposed group (welders with an average work experience of 23 yr). Two hundred and fifty-three rat genes homologous to human genes were obtained and spotted on the chip slide. Meanwhile, a human cDNA chip spotted with 8600 human genes was also used to detect any increased or decreased levels of gene expression among the welders. After comparing the levels of gene expression between the control and welder groups using the toxicogenomic chips, 103 genes were identified as likely to be specifically changed by welding-fume exposure. Eighteen of the 253 rat genes were specifically changed in the welders, while 103 genes from the human cDNA chip were specifically changed. The genes specifically expressed by the welders were associated with inflammatory responses, toxic chemical metabolism, stress proteins, transcription factors, and signal transduction. In contrast, there was no significant change in the genes related to short-term welding-fume exposure, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin. In conclusion, if further validation studies are conducted, the present toxicogenomic gene chips could be used for the effective monitoring of welding-fume-exposure-related diseases among welders. PMID:17654244

  8. Lensless Fluorescent Microscopy on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Su, Ting-Wei; Sencan, Ikbal; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    On-chip lensless imaging in general aims to replace bulky lens-based optical microscopes with simpler and more compact designs, especially for high-throughput screening applications. This emerging technology platform has the potential to eliminate the need for bulky and/or costly optical components through the help of novel theories and digital reconstruction algorithms. Along the same lines, here we demonstrate an on-chip fluorescent microscopy modality that can achieve e.g., <4μm spatial resolution over an ultra-wide field-of-view (FOV) of >0.6-8 cm2 without the use of any lenses, mechanical-scanning or thin-film based interference filters. In this technique, fluorescent excitation is achieved through a prism or hemispherical-glass interface illuminated by an incoherent source. After interacting with the entire object volume, this excitation light is rejected by total-internal-reflection (TIR) process that is occurring at the bottom of the sample micro-fluidic chip. The fluorescent emission from the excited objects is then collected by a fiber-optic faceplate or a taper and is delivered to an optoelectronic sensor array such as a charge-coupled-device (CCD). By using a compressive-sampling based decoding algorithm, the acquired lensfree raw fluorescent images of the sample can be rapidly processed to yield e.g., <4μm resolution over an FOV of >0.6-8 cm2. Moreover, vertically stacked micro-channels that are separated by e.g., 50-100 μm can also be successfully imaged using the same lensfree on-chip microscopy platform, which further increases the overall throughput of this modality. This compact on-chip fluorescent imaging platform, with a rapid compressive decoder behind it, could be rather valuable for high-throughput cytometry, rare-cell research and microarray-analysis. PMID:21876522

  9. Standardization of Spore Inactivation Method for PMA-PhyloChip Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In compliance with the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) planetary protection policy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) monitors the total microbial burden of spacecraft as a means for minimizing the inadvertent transfer of viable contaminant microorganisms to extraterrestrial environments (forward contamination). NASA standard assay-based counts are used both as a proxy for relative surface cleanliness and to estimate overall microbial burden as well as to assess whether forward planetary protection risk criteria are met for a given mission, which vary by the planetary body to be explored and whether or not life detection missions are present. Despite efforts to reduce presence of microorganisms from spacecraft prior to launch, microbes have been isolated from spacecraft and associated surfaces within the extreme conditions of clean room facilities using state of the art molecular technologies. Development of a more sensitive method that will better enumerate all viable microorganisms from spacecraft and associated surfaces could support future life detection missions. Current culture-based (NASA standard spore assay) and nucleic-acid-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods have significant shortcomings in this type of analysis. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate and validate a new molecular method based on the use of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) intercalating agent propidium monoazide (PMA). This is used in combination with DNA microarray (PhyloChip) which has been shown to identify very low levels of organisms on spacecraft associated surfaces. PMA can only penetrate the membrane of dead cells. Once penetrated, it intercalates the DNA and, upon photolysis using visible light it produces stable DNA monoadducts. This allows DNA to be unavailable for further PCR analysis. The specific aim of this study is to standardize the spore inactivation method for PMA-PhyloChip analysis. We have used the bacterial spores Bacillus

  10. A novel methyl-binding domain protein enrichment method for identifying genome-wide tissue-specific DNA methylation from nanogram DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that DNA methylation plays a role in tissue-specific differentiation. Current approaches to methylome analysis using enrichment with the methyl-binding domain protein (MBD) are restricted to large (≥1 μg) DNA samples, limiting the analysis of small tissue samples. Here we present a technique that enables characterization of genome-wide tissue-specific methylation patterns from nanogram quantities of DNA. Results We have developed a methodology utilizing MBD2b/MBD3L1 enrichment for methylated DNA, kinase pre-treated ligation-mediated PCR amplification (MeKL) and hybridization to the comprehensive high-throughput array for relative methylation (CHARM) customized tiling arrays, which we termed MeKL-chip. Kinase modification in combination with the addition of PEG has increased ligation-mediated PCR amplification over 20-fold, enabling >400-fold amplification of starting DNA. We have shown that MeKL-chip can be applied to as little as 20 ng of DNA, enabling comprehensive analysis of small DNA samples. Applying MeKL-chip to the mouse retina (a limited tissue source) and brain, 2,498 tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) were characterized. The top five T-DMRs (Rgs20, Hes2, Nfic, Cckbr and Six3os1) were validated by pyrosequencing. Conclusions MeKL-chip enables genome-wide methylation analysis of nanogram quantities of DNA with a wide range of observed-to-expected CpG ratios due to the binding properties of the MBD2b/MBD3L1 protein complex. This methodology enabled the first analysis of genome-wide methylation in the mouse retina, characterizing novel T-DMRs. PMID:23759032

  11. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  12. DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, A; Amos, M; Hodgson, D

    1997-02-01

    DNA computation is a novel and exciting recent development at the interface of computer science and molecular biology. We describe the current activity in this field following the seminal work of Adleman, who recently showed how techniques of molecular biology may be applied to the solution of a computationally intractable problem. PMID:9013647

  13. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  14. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  15. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  16. Integrated Capture, Concentration, PCR, and Capillary Electrophoretic Analysis of Pathogens on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Beyor, Nathaniel; Yi, Lina; Seo, Tae Seok; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip system for pathogen detection is presented that integrates cell preconcentration, purification, PCR, and capillary electrophoretic (CE) analysis. The microdevice is comprised of micropumps and valves, a cell capture structure, a 100 nL PCR reactor, and a 5-cm long CE column for amplicon separation. Sample volumes ranging from 10 to 100 μL are introduced and driven through a fluidized bed of magnetically constrained immunomagnetic beads where the target cells are captured. After cell capture, beads are transferred using the on-chip pumps to the PCR reactor for DNA amplification. The resulting PCR products are electrophoretically injected onto the CE column for separation and detection of E. coli K12 and E. coli O157 targets. A detection limit of 0.2 cfu/μL is achieved using the E. coli O157 target and an input volume of 50 μL. Finally, the sensitive detection of E. coli O157 in the presence of K12 at a ratio of 1:1000 illustrates the capability of our system to identify target cells in a high commensal background. This cell capture-PCR-CE microsystem is a significant advance in the development of rapid, sensitive, and specific lab-on-a-chip devices for pathogen detection. PMID:19341275

  17. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaloki, M.; Vitalyos, G.; Harfalvi, J.; Hegedus, Cs

    2013-12-01

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated.

  18. Radiolabelling diverse positron emission tomography (PET) tracers using a single digital microfluidic reactor chip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad Rashed; Kim, Hee-Kwon; Lei, Jack; Lazari, Mark; Shah, Gaurav J; van Dam, R Michael; Keng, Pei-Yuin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2014-03-01

    Radiotracer synthesis is an ideal application for microfluidics because only nanogram quantities are needed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Thousands of radiotracers have been developed in research settings but only a few are readily available, severely limiting the biological problems that can be studied in vivo via PET. We report the development of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic chip that can synthesize a variety of (18)F-labeled tracers targeting a range of biological processes by confirming complete syntheses of four radiotracers: a sugar, a DNA nucleoside, a protein labelling compound, and a neurotransmitter. The chip employs concentric multifunctional electrodes that are used for heating, temperature sensing, and EWOD actuation. All of the key synthesis steps for each of the four (18)F-labeled tracers are demonstrated and characterized with the chip: concentration of fluoride ion, solvent exchange, and chemical reactions. The obtained fluorination efficiencies of 90-95% are comparable to, or greater than, those achieved by conventional approaches. PMID:24352530

  19. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing. PMID:26210470

  20. Spotting and validation of a genome wide oligonucleotide chip with duplicate measurement of each gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, Mads . E-mail: mads.thomassen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk; Skov, Vibe; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Tan, Qihua; Jochumsen, Kirsten; Fritzner, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Dahlgaard, Jesper; Kruse, Torben A.

    2006-06-16

    The quality of DNA microarray based gene expression data relies on the reproducibility of several steps in a microarray experiment. We have developed a spotted genome wide microarray chip with oligonucleotides printed in duplicate in order to minimise undesirable biases, thereby optimising detection of true differential expression. The validation study design consisted of an assessment of the microarray chip performance using the MessageAmp and FairPlay labelling kits. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to demonstrate that MessageAmp was significantly more reproducible than FairPlay. Further examinations with MessageAmp revealed the applicability of the system. The linear range of the chips was three orders of magnitude, the precision was high, as 95% of measurements deviated less than 1.24-fold from the expected value, and the coefficient of variation for relative expression was 13.6%. Relative quantitation was more reproducible than absolute quantitation and substantial reduction of variance was attained with duplicate spotting. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant day-to-day variation.

  1. On-chip real-time single-copy polymerase chain reaction in picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Hindson, B; Wheeler, E; Hall, S B; Rose, K A; Kennedy, I; Colston, B

    2007-04-20

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection has performed PCR in isolated droplets at volumes 10{sup 6} smaller than commercial real-time PCR systems. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a silicon device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing them to be thermal cycled through the PCR protocol without droplet motion. With this system a 10-pL droplet, encapsulating less than one copy of viral genomic DNA through Poisson statistics, showed real-time PCR amplification curves with a cycle threshold of {approx}18, twenty cycles earlier than commercial instruments. This combination of the established real-time PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy nucleic acids in a complex environment.

  2. The AmpliChip CYP450 test: principles, challenges, and future clinical utility in digestive disease.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Egan, Laurence J; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2006-07-01

    Understanding genetically encoded inherited differences in drug metabolism and targets (ie, receptors, transporters) offers the promise of minimizing adverse drug reactions and improving therapies. Among the enzymes involved in drug metabolism, the cytochromes P450 (CYP450) hold a central position. In fact, CYP450 are involved in the biotransformation of most drugs used in clinical practice. Recent advances in the development of DNA-based diagnostics, coupled with a better understanding of genetic polymorphisms in influencing pharmacologic responses, have provided the foundation for novel in vitro tests that may predict side effects and/or therapeutic responses. The AmpliChip CYP450 test was developed as a clinical test to evaluate an individual's metabolic capacity for certain drugs by identifying polymorphisms of 2 CYP450 enzymes (ie, CYP2D6 and CYP2D19). Even though the AmpliChip CYP450 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, its practical clinical utility has not yet been determined, and there is a paucity of data related to gastrointestinal and liver diseases. An understanding of the principles and opportunities provided by this new category of diagnostic test is key before planning the necessary studies to evaluate the usefulness of AmpliChip CYP450 in gastroenterologic clinical practice. PMID:16797246

  3. GeneChip{sup {trademark}} screening assay for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, M.T.; Miyada, C.G.; Fucini, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    GeneChip{sup {trademark}} assays are based on high density, carefully designed arrays of short oligonucleotide probes (13-16 bases) built directly on derivatized silica substrates. DNA target sequence analysis is achieved by hybridizing fluorescently labeled amplification products to these arrays. Fluorescent hybridization signals located within the probe array are translated into target sequence information using the known probe sequence at each array feature. The mutation screening assay for cystic fibrosis includes sets of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect numerous different mutations that have been described in 14 exons and one intron of the CFTR gene. Each mutation site is addressed by a sub-array of at least 40 probe sequences, half designed to detect the wild type gene sequence and half designed to detect the reported mutant sequence. Hybridization with homozygous mutant, homozygous wild type or heterozygous targets results in distinctive hybridization patterns within a sub-array, permitting specific discrimination of each mutation. The GeneChip probe arrays are very small (approximately 1 cm{sup 2}). There miniature size coupled with their high information content make GeneChip probe arrays a useful and practical means for providing CF mutation analysis in a clinical setting.

  4. Nanobiodevices for fast DNA separation and detection toward nanopore-based DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Noritada; Yasui, Takao; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for using micro- and nanofabricated structures as tools for separation, manipulation, detection and analysis of biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. So far, we have developed fabrication techniques for constructing several types of nanostructures on quartz substrate for biomolecules separation, e.g., nanopillar and nanowall array structures, and demonstrated their analytical performances. Some important findings were that the nanopillar array pattern could control the DNA separation mode and electroosmotic flows in the nanopillar array structures were reduced according to the nanopillar spacing. Since these small confined nanospaces are suitable for manipulating biomolecules at a single molecule level, several approaches have been tried to analyze DNA denaturation and DNA-protein interactions in parallel. However, it is difficult to say that the observed phenomena reflect an intrinsic DNA property or DNA-protein interaction manner because all these approaches requires fluorescently labeled DNA molecules for observation. To address these issues, we are trying to develop a novel nanostructure-based and label-free detection system to integrate a biomolecule separation media and a detection system on a single chip.

  5. On-chip particle trapping and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Kaelyn Danielle

    The ability to control and manipulate the world around us is human nature. Humans and our ancestors have used tools for millions of years. Only in recent years have we been able to control objects at such small levels. In order to understand the world around us it is frequently necessary to interact with the biological world. Optical trapping and manipulation offer a non-invasive way to move, sort and interact with particles and cells to see how they react to the world around them. Optical tweezers are ideal in their abilities but they require large, non-portable, and expensive setups limiting how and where we can use them. A cheap portable platform is required in order to have optical manipulation reach its full potential. On-chip technology offers a great solution to this challenge. We focused on the Liquid-Core Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguide (liquid-core ARROW) for our work. The ARROW is an ideal platform, which has anti-resonant layers which allow light to be guided in liquids, allowing for particles to easily be manipulated. It is manufactured using standard silicon manufacturing techniques making it easy to produce. The planner design makes it easy to integrate with other technologies. Initially I worked to improve the ARROW chip by reducing the intersection losses and by reducing the fluorescence and background on the ARROW chip. The ARROW chip has already been used to trap and push particles along its channel but here I introduce several new methods of particle trapping and manipulation on the ARROW chip. Traditional two beam traps use two counter propagating beams. A trapping scheme that uses two orthogonal beams which counter to first instinct allow for trapping at their intersection is introduced. This scheme is thoroughly predicted and analyzed using realistic conditions. Simulations of this method were done using a program which looks at both the fluidics and optical sources to model complex situations. These simulations were also used to

  6. Some insights on the modelling of chip formation and its morphology during metal cutting operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouki, Tarek; Courbon, Cédric; Zhang, Yancheng; Rech, Joël; Nélias, Daniel; Asad, Muhammad; Hamdi, Hédi; Belhadi, Salim; Salvatore, Ferdinando

    2016-04-01

    The present paper deals with the mechanisms of chip formation during cutting operations. It deals with some experiments characterising the chip morphologies and microstructure chip investigations under high loadings. In this contribution, mechanisms of chip segmentation are presented. The effect of cutting conditions on cutting forces is treated. Consequently, the chip segmentation phenomenon was correlated to cutting forces evolutions. Also, an investigation on chip strain localisation is carried out. Numerical simulations dealing with chip formation and considering thermomechanical phenomena are also presented. Some numerical results related to chip formation based on the theory of strain gradient plasticity are also discussed. Moreover, the effect of machining system stiffness on chip segmentation is analysed.

  7. Flip-chip packaging of piezoresistive barometric pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waber, T.; Pahl, W.; Schmidt, M.; Feiertag, G.; Stufler, S.; Dudek, R.; Leidl, A.

    2013-05-01

    To miniaturize piezoresistive barometric pressure sensors we have developed a package using flip-chip bonding. However, in a standard flip-chip package the different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of chip and substrate and strong mechanical coupling by the solder bumps would lead to stress in the sensor chip which is not acceptable for piezoresistive pressure sensors. To overcome this problem we have developed a new ultra low stress flip-chip packaging technology. In this new packaging technology for pressure sensors first an under bump metallization (UBM) is patterned on the sensor wafer. As the next step solder bumps are deposited. After wafer-dicing the chips are flip-chip bonded on copper springs within a ceramic cavity. As sources of residual stress we identified the copper springs, the UBM and the solder bumps on the sensor chip. Different CTEs of the silicon chip and the UBM/solder lead to creep strain in the aluminum metallization between UBM and chip. As a consequence a temperature hysteresis can be measured.

  8. Microfluidic Chip-Based Detection and Intraspecies Strain Discrimination of Salmonella Serovars Derived from Whole Blood of Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adriana S.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Ferguson, Brian S.; Soh, H. Tom; Mahan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a zoonotic pathogen that poses a considerable public health and economic burden in the United States and worldwide. Resultant human diseases range from enterocolitis to bacteremia to sepsis and are acutely dependent on the particular serovar of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, which comprises over 99% of human-pathogenic S. enterica isolates. Point-of-care methods for detection and strain discrimination of Salmonella serovars would thus have considerable benefit to medical, veterinary, and field applications that safeguard public health and reduce industry-associated losses. Here we describe a single, disposable microfluidic chip that supports isothermal amplification and sequence-specific detection and discrimination of Salmonella serovars derived from whole blood of septic mice. The integrated microfluidic electrochemical DNA (IMED) chip consists of an amplification chamber that supports loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a rapid, single-temperature amplification method as an alternative to PCR that offers advantages in terms of sensitivity, reaction speed, and amplicon yield. The amplification chamber is connected via a microchannel to a detection chamber containing a reagentless, multiplexed (here biplex) sensing array for sequence-specific electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) detection of the LAMP products. Validation of the IMED device was assessed by the detection and discrimination of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Choleraesuis, the causative agents of enterocolitis and sepsis in humans, respectively. IMED chips conferred rapid (under 2 h) detection and discrimination of these strains at clinically relevant levels (<1,000 CFU/ml) from whole, unprocessed blood collected from septic animals. The IMED-based chip assay shows considerable promise as a rapid, inexpensive, and portable point-of-care diagnostic platform for the detection and strain-specific discrimination of microbial pathogens. PMID:23354710

  9. Stem-end chip defect in response to high temperature stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is a serious quality concern for the potato chip industry. Chips with stem-end chip defect are unacceptably dark along the vasculature at the tuber stem end and in adjacent tissues. Tubers that produce stem-end defect chips are undesirable to processors and increase financial ri...

  10. Stem-end chip defect: trial summary from 2009-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is characterized by dark fried color along the vascular and adjacent tissues at the basal (stem) end of potato chips. Stem-end defect chips are unacceptable to chip processors and stem-end defect tubers may be rejected at processing plants. Stem-end chip defect occurs erraticall...

  11. A Nanoscale, Liquid-Phase DNA Separation Device Based on Brownian Ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Joel S.

    1998-03-01

    Realizing the goals of the Human Genome Project depends on the ability to perform size-based separations of DNA molecules. DNA analysis has traditionally required inconvenient gel-based electrophoretic separations. We describe a novel, micromachined, non-electrophoretic device suitable for lab-on-a-chip applications. The device is designed to transport DNA using an asymmetric, periodic potential to rectify Brownian motion. The separation occurs in a homogeneous liquid, avoiding the use of gels or other special media. Experimental results from a working prototype NanoNiagara device validate theoretical predictions of its ability to transport DNA molecules based on size.

  12. Knowledge-based image processing for on-off type DNA microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong D.; Kim, Seo K.; Cho, Jeong S.; Kim, Jongwon

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses the image processing technique for discriminating whether the probes are hybrized with target DNA in the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) DNA Chip designed for genotyping HPV. In addition to the probes, the HPV DNA chip has markers that always react with the sample DNA. The positions of probe-dots in the final scanned image are fixed relative to the marker-dot locations with a small variation according to the accuracy of the dotter and the scanner. The probes are duplicated 4 times for the diagnostic stability. The prior knowledges such as the maker relative distance and the duplication information of probes is integrated into the template matching technique with the normalized correlation measure. Results show that the employment of both of the prior knowledges is to simply average the template matching measures over the positions of the markers and probes. The eventual proposed scheme yields stable marker locating and probe classification.

  13. Improving chip-to-chip precision in disposable microchip capillary electrophoresis devices with internal standards.

    PubMed

    Bidulock, Allison C E; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-03-01

    To realize portable systems for routine measurements in point-of-care settings, MCE methods are required to be robust across many single-use chips. While it is well-known internal standards (ISTDs) improve run-to-run precision, a systematic investigation is necessary to determine the significance of chip-to-chip imprecision in MCE and how ISTDs account for it. This paper addresses this question by exploring the reproducibility of Na quantification across six basic, in-house fabricated microchips. A dataset of 900 electrophoerograms was collected from analyzing five concentrations of NaCl with two ISTDs (CsCl and LiCl). While both improved the peak area reproducibility, the Na/Cs ratio was superior to the Na/Li ratio (improving the RSD by a factor of 2-4, depending on the Na concentration). We attribute this to the significant variation in microchannel surface properties, which was accounted for by cesium but not lithium. Microchip dimension and detector variations were only a few percent, and could be improved through commercial fabrication over in-house made microchips. These results demonstrate that ISTDs not only correct for intrachip imprecision, but are also a viable means to correct for chip-to-chip imprecision inherent in disposable, point-of-care MCE devices. However, as expected, the internal standard must be carefully chosen. PMID:25522336

  14. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  15. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  16. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thorsten L; Beliveau, Brian J; Uca, Yavuz O; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  17. High throughput fabrication of disposable nanofluidic lab-on-chip devices for single molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    van Kan, Jeroen A.; Zhang, Ce; Perumal Malar, Piravi; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.

    2012-01-01

    An easy method is introduced allowing fast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication of nanofluidic lab-on-chip devices using accurately fabricated molds featuring cross-sections down to 60 nm. A high quality master is obtained through proton beam writing and UV lithography. This master can be used more than 200 times to replicate nanofluidic devices capable of handling single DNA molecules. This method allows to fabricate nanofluidic devices through simple PDMS casting. The extensions of YOYO-1 stained bacteriophage T4 and λ−DNA inside these nanochannels have been investigated using fluorescence microscopy and follow the scaling prediction of a large, locally coiled polymer chain confined in nanochannels. PMID:23898358

  18. Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked Views

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Weber, Gunther; Li, Xiao-Yong; Biggin, Mark; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-11-05

    Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of whether genomic regions are bound or not. There is increasing evidence, however, that factors bind in a highly overlapping manner to the same genomic regions and that it is quantitative differences in occupancy on these commonly bound regions that are the critical determinants of the different biological specificity of factors. As a result, it is critical to have a tool to facilitate the quantitative visualization of differences between transcription factors and the genomic regions they bind to understand each factor's unique roles in the network. We have developed a framework which combines several visualizations via brushing-and-linking to allow the user to interactively analyze and explore in vivo DNA binding data of multiple transcription factors. We describe these visualization types and also provide a discussion of biological examples in this paper.

  19. On-chip plasmonic waveguide optical waveplate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Linfei; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Paik, Seonghyun; Chen, Yusi; Harris, James S.; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Polarization manipulation is essential in almost every photonic system ranging from telecommunications to bio-sensing to quantum information. This is traditionally achieved using bulk waveplates. With the developing trend of photonic systems towards integration and miniaturization, the need for an on-chip waveguide type waveplate becomes extremely urgent. However, this is very challenging using conventional dielectric waveguides, which usually require complex 3D geometries to alter the waveguide symmetry and are also difficult to create an arbitrary optical axis. Recently, a waveguide waveplate was realized using femtosecond laser writing, but the device length is in millimeter range. Here, for the first time we propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact, on-chip waveplate using an asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide to create an arbitrary optical axis. The device is only in several microns length and produced in a flexible integratable IC compatible format, thus opening up the potential for integration into a broad range of systems. PMID:26507563

  20. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  1. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  2. The single-chip FASTBUS Slave Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Machen, D.R.; Downing, R.W.

    1990-12-31

    A single-chip implementation of the general-purpose FASTBUS Slave Interface (FSI) has been developed in ECL gate-array technology. The FSI will occupy only 1.6% of the available circuit board space while providing a complete 32-bit interface to the FASTBUS. All mandatory slave-interface requirements of IEEE 960 are supported, in addition to several non-mandatory requirements and the optional, extended MS code features. Geographic, logical, and broadcast addressing are implemented using on-chip registers. An optional multiple-module addressing technique is included that allows participating modules residing on a common crate or cable segment to respond as if individually addressed in sequence. The user interface provided by the FSI allows control of slave status-response and connection timing for both address and data cycles. The BIT1 ECL array technology used for the FSI allows direct connections to the FASTBUS, eliminating the need for external driver/receiver buffers.

  3. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own.

  4. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  5. Casimir Forces On A Silicon Micromechanical Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, J.; Marset, zsolt; Rodriguez, A.W.; Reid, M. T.H.; McCauley, A. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Bao, Y.; Johnson, S. G.; Chan, Ho Bun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations give rise to van der Waals and Casimir forces that dominate the interaction between electrically neutral objects at sub-micron separations. Under the trend of miniaturization, such quantum electrodynamical effects are expected to play an important role in micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Nevertheless, so far the Casimir force has been experimentally observed only in situations involving an external object manually positioned close to a micromechanical element on a silicon chip. Here, we demonstrate the Casimir effect between two silicon components on the same substrate. In addition to providing an integrated and compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens the possibility of tailoring the Casimir force using lithographically defined components of non-conventional shapes on a single micromechanical chip.

  6. Hot Chips and Hot Interconnects for High End Computing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash

    2005-01-01

    I will discuss several processors: 1. The Cray proprietary processor used in the Cray X1; 2. The IBM Power 3 and Power 4 used in an IBM SP 3 and IBM SP 4 systems; 3. The Intel Itanium and Xeon, used in the SGI Altix systems and clusters respectively; 4. IBM System-on-a-Chip used in IBM BlueGene/L; 5. HP Alpha EV68 processor used in DOE ASCI Q cluster; 6. SPARC64 V processor, which is used in the Fujitsu PRIMEPOWER HPC2500; 7. An NEC proprietary processor, which is used in NEC SX-6/7; 8. Power 4+ processor, which is used in Hitachi SR11000; 9. NEC proprietary processor, which is used in Earth Simulator. The IBM POWER5 and Red Storm Computing Systems will also be discussed. The architectures of these processors will first be presented, followed by interconnection networks and a description of high-end computer systems based on these processors and networks. The performance of various hardware/programming model combinations will then be compared, based on latest NAS Parallel Benchmark results (MPI, OpenMP/HPF and hybrid (MPI + OpenMP). The tutorial will conclude with a discussion of general trends in the field of high performance computing, (quantum computing, DNA computing, cellular engineering, and neural networks).

  7. From microfluidic modules to an integrated Lab-on-a-chip system for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Krumbholz, Marco; Prüfer, Anna; Moche, Christian; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) systems translating the whole process of pathogen analysis to an integrated, miniaturized, and automatically functioning microfluidic platform are generally expected to be very promising future diagnostic approaches. The development of such a LoC system for the detection of bacterial pathogens applied to the example pathogen Francisella tularensis is described in this report. To allow functional testing of the whole process cascade before final device integration, various bio-analytical steps such as cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, continuous-flow PCR and analyte detection have been adapted to unique functional microfluidic modules. As a successive step, positively tested modules for pathogen detection have been successfully assembled to an integrated chip. Moreover, technical solutions for a smooth interaction between sample input from the outer world as well as microfluidic chip and chip driving instrument have been developed. In conclusion, a full repertoire of analytical tools have been developed and successfully tested in the concerted manner of a functionally integrated microfluidic device representing a tool for future diagnostic approaches.

  8. Towards a cellular multi-parameter analysis platform: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on microhole-array chips.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Christian M; Moosdijk, Stefan V D; Thielecke, Hagen; Velten, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Highly-sensitive analysis systems based on cellular multi-parameter are needed in the diagnostics. Therefore we improved our previously developed chip platform for another additional analysis method, the fluorescence in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique used in the diagnostics to determine the localization and the presence or absence of specific DNA sequence. To improve this labor- and cost-intensive method, we reduced the assay consumption by a factor of 5 compared to the standard protocol. Microhole chips were used for making the cells well addressable. The chips were fabricated by semiconductor technology on the basis of a Silicon wafer with a thin deposited silicon nitride layer (Si(3)N(4)). Human retina pigment epithelia (ARPE-19) cells were arrayed on 5-μm holes of a 35 × 35 microhole-array by a gently negative differential pressure of around 5 mbar. After 3 hours of incubation the cells were attached to the chip and the FISH protocol was applied to the positioned cells. A LabView software was developed to simplify the analysis. The software automatically counts the number of dots (positive labeled chromosome regions) as well as the distance between adjacent dots. Our developed platform reduces the assay consumption and the labor time. Furthermore, during the 3 hours of incubation non-invasive or minimal-invasive methods like Raman- and impedance-spectroscopy can be applied. PMID:22256298

  9. An integrated system CisGenome for analyzing ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongkai; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Wenxiu; Johnson, David S.; Myers, Richard M.; Wong, Wing H.

    2008-01-01

    CisGenome is a software system for analyzing genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data. It is designed to meet all basic needs of ChIP data analyses, including visualization, data normalization, peak detection, false discovery rate (FDR) computation, gene-peak association, and sequence and motif analysis. In addition to implementing previously published ChIP-chip analysis methods, the software contains new statistical methods designed specifically for ChIP-seq data. CisGenome has a modular design so that it supports interactive analyses through a graphic user interface as well as customized batch-mode computation for advanced data mining. A built-in browser allows visualization of array images, signals, gene structure, conservation, and DNA sequence and motif information. We illustrate the use of these tools by a comparative analysis of ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data for the transcription factor NRSF/REST, a study of ChIP-seq analysis without negative control sample, and an analysis of a novel motif in Nanog- and Sox2-binding regions. PMID:18978777

  10. Single-copy gene based 50 K SNP chip for genetic studies and molecular breeding in rice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jayaswal, Pawan Kumar; Panda, Kabita; Mandal, Paritra; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Balwant; Mishra, Shefali; Singh, Yashi; Singh, Renu; Rai, Vandna; Gupta, Anita; Raj Sharma, Tilak; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the most abundant DNA sequence variation present in plant genomes. Here, we report the design and validation of a unique genic-SNP genotyping chip for genetic and evolutionary studies as well as molecular breeding applications in rice. The chip incorporates 50,051 SNPs from 18,980 different genes spanning 12 rice chromosomes, including 3,710 single-copy (SC) genes conserved between wheat and rice, 14,959 SC genes unique to rice, 194 agronomically important cloned rice genes and 117 multi-copy rice genes. Assays with this chip showed high success rate and reproducibility because of the SC gene based array with no sequence redundancy and cross-hybridisation problems. The usefulness of the chip in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies of cultivated and wild rice germplasm was demonstrated. Furthermore, its efficacy was validated for analysing background recovery in improved mega rice varieties with submergence tolerance developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding. PMID:26111882

  11. Fiber optic to integrated optical chip coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikulski, Joseph I. (Inventor); Ramer, O. Glenn (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Optical fibers are clamped by a block onto a substrate. Thereupon, metal is plated over the fibers to hold them in place upon the substrate. The clamp block is removed and the opening, resulting from the clamp block's presence, is then plated in. The built-up metallic body is a coupling which holds the fibers in position so that the ends can be polished for coupling to an integrated optical chip upon a coupling fixture.

  12. Pyramidal micromirrors for microsystems and atom chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupke, M.; Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Curtis, E. A.; Ashmore, J. P.; Eriksson, S.; Hinds, E. A.; Moktadir, Z.; Gollasch, C.; Kraft, M.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2006-02-01

    Concave pyramids are created in the (100) surface of a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching in potassium hydroxide. High quality micromirrors are then formed by sputtering gold onto the smooth silicon (111) faces of the pyramids. These mirrors show great promise as high quality optical devices suitable for integration into micro-optoelectromechanical systems and atom chips. We have shown that structures of this shape can be used to laser-cool and hold atoms in a magneto-optical trap.

  13. Efficiency optimisation of proteins on a chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-jen; Huang, Hsuan-yu; Hsu, Wei-Yeh; Hsu, Ray-Quen; Chen, Hueih-Min

    2015-10-01

    This study elucidates that the protein reorientation on a chip can be changed by an external electric field (EEF) and optimised for achieving strong effective binding between proteins. Protein A and its binding protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) were used as an example, in addition to an anticancer peptide (CB1a) and its antibody (anti-CB1a). The binding forces (BFs) were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) with EEFs applied at different angles (EEF°). The optimal angle (OA) of the EEF (OAEEF°) corresponding to the maximum binding force (BFmax) was obtained. The results showed that the BFmax values between IgG/Protein A and anti-CB1a/CB1a were 6424.2 ± 195.3 pN (OAEEF° = 45°) and 729.1 ± 33.2 pN (OAEEF° = 22.5°), respectively. Without an EEF, the BF values were only 730.0 ± 113.9 pN and 337.3 ± 35.0 pN, respectively. Based on these observations, we concluded that the efficient optimisation of protein-protein interaction on a chip is essential. This finding is applicable to the industrial fabrication of all protein chips. PMID:26266699

  14. Chip breaking system for automated machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Arehart, Theodore A.; Carey, Donald O.

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a rotary selectively directional valve assembly for use in an automated turret lathe for directing a stream of high pressure liquid machining coolant to the interface of a machine tool and workpiece for breaking up ribbon-shaped chips during the formation thereof so as to inhibit scratching or other marring of the machined surfaces by these ribbon-shaped chips. The valve assembly is provided by a manifold arrangement having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart ports each coupled to a machine tool. The manifold is rotatable with the turret when the turret is positioned for alignment of a machine tool in a machining relationship with the workpiece. The manifold is connected to a non-rotational header having a single passageway therethrough which conveys the high pressure coolant to only the port in the manifold which is in registry with the tool disposed in a working relationship with the workpiece. To position the machine tools the turret is rotated and one of the tools is placed in a material-removing relationship of the workpiece. The passageway in the header and one of the ports in the manifold arrangement are then automatically aligned to supply the machining coolant to the machine tool workpiece interface for breaking up of the chips as well as cooling the tool and workpiece during the machining operation.

  15. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  16. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  17. Designing an EOS chip with SDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Jin, Depeng; Zeng, Lieguang

    2004-05-01

    As is known, Ethernet has gained great popularity in LAN (local area network). Meanwhile, SDH/SONET is the backbone of today"s communication networks. Then, how to exchange information between Ethernets located in different regions over SDH/SONET is becoming a hotspot. This paper provides a single chip solution of Ethernet transmission over SDH/SONET (EOS), which supports up to thirty-two 10/100Mbit/s Ethernet ports or four 1000Mbit/s Ethernet ports over 2.5Gbit/s SDH/SONET. On designing of this EOS chip, we also present a packet loss policy called SDP (Selective Dropping Policy) to perform flow control, which can actively select packets to drop as the packet buffer overflows. Up to now, we have developed two policies of SDP: LPF (Longest Packet First) and LSPF (Least Significant Packet First). Simulation results show that with LPF, the average packet loss rate (PLR) of the overall system can be cut down significantly without increasing the buffer storage, and with LSPF, the packets of the least important group will be discarded discriminately in the case of overflow to lower average PLRs of other groups. Moreover, SDP can cooperate with Ethernet's Backpressure Mechanism fairly well and be implemented easily on chip.

  18. Photocleavage control of nucleated DNA nanosystems--the influence of surface strand sterics.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Morcos; Munshi, Moorsalin; Kedzierski, Nancy A; Chung, Paul N; Huang, Terry; Mok, Allen K; Lukeman, Philip S

    2014-02-21

    We use sterically inaccessible 'seed' strands, released from a surface into solution by photocleavage to initiate a nucleated DNA polymerization reaction. We demonstrate control of the quantity of 'seed' release and that hairpin steric protection of the 'seed' leads to less 'leaky' surfaces. This polymerization is a model system for surface-photocleavage initiation of sub-stoichiometric reaction cascades; these cascades should find use as a component of labs-on-chips capable of bioanalytical and DNA-computing tasks. PMID:24402244

  19. The security implications of VeriChip cloning.

    PubMed

    Halamka, John; Juels, Ari; Stubblefield, Adam; Westhues, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The VeriChip is a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) tag produced commercially for implantation in human beings. Its proposed uses include identification of medical patients, physical access control, contactless retail payment, and even the tracing of kidnapping victims. As the authors explain, the VeriChip is vulnerable to simple, over-the-air spoofing attacks. In particular, an attacker capable of scanning a VeriChip, eavesdropping on its signal, or simply learning its serial number can create a spoof device whose radio appearance is indistinguishable from the original. We explore the practical implications of this security vulnerability. The authors argue that:1 The VeriChip should serve exclusively for identification, and not authentication or access control. 2 Paradoxically, for bearer safety, a VeriChip should be easy to spoof; an attacker then has less incentive to coerce victims or extract VeriChips from victims' bodies. PMID:16929037

  20. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  1. Fiber, fuel and food from whole-tree chips

    SciTech Connect

    Sturos, J.A.; Dickson, R.E.

    1980-11-01

    Future shortages of fiber, fuel, and food are predicted. Because forests are renewable, they have the potential of solving long and short-term shortages if each tree is more completely utilized. The combined vacuum-airlift and steaming-compression debarking process developed by the USDA Forest Service segregates whole-tree chips into foliage, wood chips, bark, and fines at an estimated processing cost of $5.14 per oven-dry debarked metric ton. Several alternatives are available for utilizing the wood chips, bark, and foliage. The value of the bark as a fuel and the folage as an animal feed supplement more than covers the cost of upgrading the whole-tree chips. Beneficiation of whole-tree chips coupled with intergrated utilization should improve chip quality, reduce costs, and help the pulp and paper industry become energy self-sufficient. (Refs. 34).

  2. Neural network chips for trigger purposes in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmeke, H.; Eppler, W.; Fischer, T.

    1996-12-31

    Two novel neural chips SAND (Simple Applicable Neural Device) and SIOP (Serial Input - Operating Parallel) are described. Both are highly usable for hardware triggers in particle physics. The chips are optimized for a high input data rate at a very low cost basis. The performance of a single SAND chip is 200 MOPS due to four parallel 16 bit multipliers and 40 bit adders working in one clock cycle. The chip is able to implement feedforward neural networks, Kohonen feature maps and radial basis function networks. Four chips will be implemented on a PCI-board for simulation and on a VUE board for trigger and on- and off-line analysis. For small sized feedforward neural networks the bit-serial neuro-chip SIOP may lead to even smaller latencies because each synaptic connection is implemented by its own bit serial multiplier and adder.

  3. A primary battery-on-a-chip using monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Kern, Klaus; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2016-07-01

    We present here a bottom-up approach for realizing on-chip on-demand batteries starting out with chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. Single graphene monolayers contacted by electrode lines on a silicon chip serve as electrodes. The anode and cathode are realized by electrodeposition of zinc and copper respectively onto graphene, leading to the realization of a miniature graphene-based Daniell cell on a chip. The electrolyte is housed partly in a gel and partly in liquid form in an on-chip enclosure molded using a 3d printer or made out of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The realized batteries provide a stable voltage (∼1.1 V) for many hours and exhibit capacities as high as 15 μAh, providing enough power to operate a pocket calculator. The realized batteries show promise for deployment as on-chip power sources for autonomous systems in lab-on-a-chip or biomedical applications.

  4. A varying threshold method for ChIP peak-calling using multiple sources of information

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Bei; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Gene regulation commonly involves interaction among DNA, proteins and biochemical conditions. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technologies, protein–DNA interactions are routinely detected in the genome scale. Computational methods that detect weak protein-binding signals and simultaneously maintain a high specificity yet remain to be challenging. An attractive approach is to incorporate biologically relevant data, such as protein co-occupancy, to improve the power of protein-binding detection. We call the additional data related with the target protein binding as supporting tracks. Results: We propose a novel but rigorous statistical method to identify protein occupancy in ChIP data using multiple supporting tracks (PASS2). We demonstrate that utilizing biologically related information can significantly increase the discovery of true protein-binding sites, while still maintaining a desired level of false positive calls. Applying the method to GATA1 restoration in mouse erythroid cell line, we detected many new GATA1-binding sites using GATA1 co-occupancy data. Availability: http://stat.psu.edu/∼yuzhang/pass2.tar Contact: yuzhang@stat.psu.edu PMID:20823314

  5. Detection of cystic fibrosis mutations in a GeneChip{trademark} assay format

    SciTech Connect

    Miyada, C.G.; Cronin, M.T.; Kim, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    We are developing assays for the detection of cystic fibrosis mutations based on DNA hybridization. A DNA sample is amplified by PCR, labeled by incorporating a fluorescein-tagged dNTP, enzymatically treated to produce smaller fragments and hybridized to a series of short (13-16 bases) oligonucleotides synthesized on a glass surface via photolithography. The hybrids are detected by eqifluorescence and mutations are identified by the specific pattern of hybridization. In a GeneChip assay, the chip surface is composed of a series of subarrays, each being specific for a particular mutation. Each subarray is further subdivided into a series of probes (40 total), half based on the mutant sequence and the remainder based on the wild-type sequence. For each of the subarrays, there is a redundancy in the number of probes that should hybridize to either a wild-type or a mutant target. The multiple probe strategy provides sequence information for a short five base region overlapping the mutation site. In addition, homozygous wild-type and mutant as well as heterozygous samples are each identified by a specific pattern of hybridization. The small size of each probe feature (250 x 250 {mu}m{sup 2}) permits the inclusion of additional probes required to generate sequence information by hybridization.

  6. Microfluidic-integrated DNA nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M I Haque; Hassan, Shabir; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    Over the last few decades, an increased demand has emerged for integrating biosensors with microfluidic- and nanofluidic-based lab-on-chip (LOC) devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, in the medical industry and environmental monitoring of pathogenic threat agents. Such a merger of microfluidics with biosensing technologies allows for the precise control of volumes, as low as one nanolitre and the integration of various types of bioassays on a single miniaturized platform. This integration offers several favorable advantages, such as low reagent consumption, automation of sample preparation, reduction in processing time, low cost analysis, minimal handling of hazardous materials, high detection accuracy, portability and disposability. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent developments in the microfluidic-integrated biosensing field by delineating the fundamental theory of microfluidics, fabrication techniques and a detailed account of the various transduction methods that are employed. Lastly, the review discusses state-of-the-art DNA biosensors with a focus on optical DNA biosensors. PMID:27179566

  7. Dopamine-functionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Microbeads are frequently used as solid supports for biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids in heterogeneous microfluidic assays. Chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-biomolecule probes have been used for the detection of various types of DNA. In this study, we developed dopamine (DA)-functionalized InP/ZnS QDs (QDs-DA) as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chips. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the QDs-DA is quenched by Zn2+ because of the strong coordination interactions. In the presence of adenosine, Zn2+ cations preferentially bind to adenosine, and the PL intensity of the QDs-DA is recovered. A polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic chip was fabricated, and adenosine detection was confirmed using QDs-DA probes. PMID:26347351

  8. Technology for melting amber chips to produce a solid block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhareva, A. S.; Melnikov, A. G.; Utyev, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    This research is relevant, because the bulk of the mined amber comes in amber chips. Therefore, we have decided to review the current ways of melting amber chips to develop the most technologically efficient algorithm and to use it further for producing decorative items. The purpose of the work is to perfect the technology of obtaining whole-piece amber from amber chips and to explore the usability of the obtained material in decorative items and jewelry.

  9. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  10. Lithographic chip identification: meeting the failure analysis challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Lynn; Riddell, Kevin G.; Flack, Warren W.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method using stepper photolithography to uniquely identify individual chips for permanent traceability. A commercially available 1X stepper is used to mark chips with an identifier or `serial number' which can be encoded with relevant information for the integrated circuit manufacturer. The permanent identification of individual chips can improve current methods of quality control, failure analysis, and inventory control. The need for this technology is escalating as manufacturers seek to provide six sigma quality control for their products and trace fabrication problems to their source. This need is especially acute for parts that fail after packaging and are returned to the manufacturer for analysis. Using this novel approach, failure analysis data can be tied back to a particular batch, wafer, or even a position within a wafer. Process control can be enhanced by identifying the root cause of chip failures. Chip identification also addresses manufacturers concerns with increasing incidences of chip theft. Since chips currently carry no identification other than the manufacturer's name and part number, recovery efforts are hampered by the inability to determine the sales history of a specific packaged chip. A definitive identifier or serial number for each chip would address this concern. The results of chip identification (patent pending) are easily viewed through a low power microscope. Batch number, wafer number, exposure step, and chip location within the exposure step can be recorded, as can dates and other items of interest. An explanation of the chip identification procedure and processing requirements are described. Experimental testing and results are presented, and potential applications are discussed.

  11. Hybridisation mix synthesis in a spiral lab-on-chip device for fast-track microarray genotyping of human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peham, Johannes R.; Recnik, Lisa-Maria; Grienauer, Walter; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Nöhammer, Christa; Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    DNA microarrays can provide bacterial identification, which is crucial for targeted therapy. However they lack rapidness, because of multiple analysis steps. Therefore a fast one-step method for synthesising a hybridisation-ready reagent out of initial bacterial DNA is required. This work presents the combination and acceleration of PCR and fluorescent labelling within a disposable microfluidic chip, fabricated by injection moulding. The utilised geometry consists of a spiral meander with 40 turns, representing a cyclic-flow PCR system. The used reaction chemistry includes Cy3-conjugated primers and a high-yield polymerase leading to a one-step process accelerated by cyclic-flow PCR. Three different bacterial samples (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were processed and the bacterial DNA was successfully amplified and labelled with detection limits down to 102 cells per reaction. The specificity of species identification was comparable to the approach of separate PCR and labelling. Furthermore the overall processing time was decreased from 6 hours to 1.5 hours. We showed that a disposable polycarbonate chip, fabricated by injection moulding is suitable for the significant acceleration of DNA microarray assays. The reaction output lead to high-sensitivity bacterial identification in a short time, which is crucial for an early and targeted therapy against infectious diseases.

  12. Quantitation of DNA adducts by stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia; Goggin, Melissa; Janis, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to endogenous and exogenous chemicals can lead to the formation of structurally modified DNA bases (DNA adducts). If not repaired, these nucleobase lesions can cause polymerase errors during DNA replication, leading to heritable mutations potentially contributing to the development of cancer. Due to their critical role in cancer initiation, DNA adducts represent mechanism-based biomarkers of carcinogen exposure, and their quantitation is particularly useful for cancer risk assessment. DNA adducts are also valuable in mechanistic studies linking tumorigenic effects of environmental and industrial carcinogens to specific electrophilic species generated from their metabolism. While multiple experimental methodologies have been developed for DNA adduct analysis in biological samples – including immunoassay, HPLC, and 32P-postlabeling – isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) generally has superior selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. As typical DNA adducts concentrations in biological samples are between 0.01 – 10 adducts per 108 normal nucleotides, ultrasensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies are required for their analysis. Recent developments in analytical separations and biological mass spectrometry – especially nanoflow HPLC, nanospray ionization MS, chip-MS, and high resolution MS – have pushed the limits of analytical HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies for DNA adducts, allowing researchers to accurately measure their concentrations in biological samples from patients treated with DNA alkylating drugs and in populations exposed to carcinogens from urban air, drinking water, cooked food, alcohol, and cigarette smoke. PMID:22827593

  13. A Fully Integrated Paperfluidic Molecular Diagnostic Chip for the Extraction, Amplification, and Detection of Nucleic Acids from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Wong, Winnie S.; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps onto a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in under 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  14. A fully integrated paperfluidic molecular diagnostic chip for the extraction, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Natalia M; Wong, Winnie S; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2016-02-21

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps into a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in less than 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  15. Fermions and bosons on an atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extravour, Marcius H. T.

    Ultra-cold dilute gases of neutral atoms are attractive candidates for creating controlled mesoscopic quantum systems. In particular, quantum degenerate gases of bosonic and fermionic atoms can be used to model the correlated many-body behaviour of Bose and Fermi condensed matter systems, and to study matter wave interference and coherence. This thesis describes the experimental realization and manipulation of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of 87Rb and degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) of 40K using static and dynamic magnetic atom chip traps. Atom chips are versatile modern tools used to manipulate atomic gases. The chips consist of micrometre-scale conductors supported by a planar insulating substrate, and can be used to create confining potentials for neutral atoms tens or hundreds of micrometres from the chip surface. We demonstrate for the first time that a DFG can be produced via sympathetic cooling with a BEC using a simple single-vacuum-chamber apparatus. The large 40 K-87Rb collision rate afforded by the strongly confining atom chip potential permits rapid cooling of 40K to quantum degeneracy via sympathetic cooling with 87Rb. By studying 40K-87Rb cross-thermalization as a function of temperature, we observe the Ramsauer-Townsend reduction in the 40K-87Rb elastic scattering cross-section. We achieve DFG temperatures as low as T ≈ 0:1TF, and observe Fermi pressure in the time-of-flight expansion of the gas. This thesis also describes the radio-frequency (RF) manipulation of trapped atoms to create dressed state double-well potentials for BEC and DFG. We demonstrate for the first time that RF-dressed potentials are species-selective, permitting the formation of simultaneous 87Rb double-well and 40K single-well potentials using a 40K-87Rb mixture. We also develop tools to measure fluctuations of the relative atom number and relative phase of a dynamically split 87Rb BEC. In particular, we observe atom number fluctuations at the shot-noise level using time

  16. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation. PMID:26912948

  17. MIL-STD-1750 chip set - Possible designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, H. C.; Moore, R. K.

    The development of a MIL-STD-1750A compliant microprocessor chip set for use in digital avionics systems is presented. Design constraints are identified, and a logical partitioning of the chip set is defined. Signal interfaces are proposed, and potential physical configurations for the chip set are presented. The cost of miniaturization is found to be high, although with user discretion in implementing the instruction set architecture features while providing as much capability as possible, a MIL-STD-1750A compliant microprocessor chip set with wide user acceptance can be produced.

  18. Integrated Atom Chip System for Optical Lattice Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Evan A.; Ivory, Megan K.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-05-01

    We present an ultracold atom system incorporating a hybrid magnetic/optical atom chip for optical lattice experiments. The atom chip uses integrated, millimeter-scale optical elements to enable the production of optical lattice potentials near the atom chip traces and within a few hundred microns of a high-quality vacuum window. Due to their proximity to a window, the atoms are addressable by optics outside of vacuum operating at numerical apertures as high as 0.8. Demonstration of Bose-Einstein condensation in the chip trap and Landau-Zener tunneling in a 1D lattice are presented.

  19. 76 FR 79215 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same... importation of certain semiconductor chips with DRAM circuitry, and modules and products containing same by... after importation of certain semiconductor chips with DRAM circuitry, and modules and...

  20. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility... Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective...

  1. Low-power chip-level optical interconnects based on bulk-silicon single-chip photonic transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyungock; Park, Hyundai; Joo, Jiho; Jang, Ki-Seok; Kwack, Myung-Joon; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, In Gyoo; Kim, Sun Ae; Oh, Jin Hyuk; Park, Jaegyu; Kim, Sanggi

    2016-03-01

    We present new scheme for chip-level photonic I/Os, based on monolithically integrated vertical photonic devices on bulk silicon, which increases the integration level of PICs to a complete photonic transceiver (TRx) including chip-level light source. A prototype of the single-chip photonic TRx based on a bulk silicon substrate demonstrated 20 Gb/s low power chip-level optical interconnects between fabricated chips, proving that this scheme can offer compact low-cost chip-level I/O solutions and have a significant impact on practical electronic-photonic integration in high performance computers (HPC), cpu-memory interface, 3D-IC, and LAN/SAN/data-center and network applications.

  2. Programmable on-chip and off-chip network architecture on demand for flexible optical intra-datacenters.

    PubMed

    Rofoee, Bijan Rahimzadeh; Zervas, Georgios; Yan, Yan; Amaya, Norberto; Qin, Yixuan; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2013-03-11

    The paper presents a novel network architecture on demand approach using on-chip and-off chip implementations, enabling programmable, highly efficient and transparent networking, well suited for intra-datacenter communications. The implemented FPGA-based adaptable line-card with on-chip design along with an architecture on demand (AoD) based off-chip flexible switching node, deliver single chip dual L2-Packet/L1-time shared optical network (TSON) server Network Interface Cards (NIC) interconnected through transparent AoD based switch. It enables hitless adaptation between Ethernet over wavelength switched network (EoWSON), and TSON based sub-wavelength switching, providing flexible bitrates, while meeting strict bandwidth, QoS requirements. The on and off-chip performance results show high throughput (9.86Ethernet, 8.68Gbps TSON), high QoS, as well as hitless switch-over. PMID:23482118

  3. Creative Conceptual Design Based on Evolutionary DNA Computing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiyu; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Yangyang

    Creative conceptual design is an important area in computer aided innovation. Typical design methodology includes exploration and optimization by evolutionary techniques such as EC and swarm intelligence. Although there are many proposed algorithms and applications for creative design by these techniques, the computing models are implemented mostly by traditional von Neumann’s architecture. On the other hand, the possibility of using DNA as a computing technique arouses wide interests in recent years with huge built-in parallel computing nature and ability to solve NP complete problems. This new computing technique is performed by biological operations on DNA molecules rather than chips. The purpose of this paper is to propose a simulated evolutionary DNA computing model and integrate DNA computing with creative conceptual design. The proposed technique will apply for large scale, high parallel design problems potentially.

  4. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  5. Microchips for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrangelo, Carlos H.; Palaniappan, S.; Man, Piu Francis; Burns, Mark A.; Burke, David T.

    1999-08-01

    Genetic information is vital for understanding features and response of an organism. In humans, genetic errors are linked to the development of major diseases such as cancer and diabetes. In order to maximally exploit this information it is necessary to develop miniature sequencing assays that are rapid and inexpensive. In this paper we show how this could be attained with microfluidic chips that contain integrated assays. To date simple silicon/glass chips aimed for sequencing purpose have been realized; but these chips are not yet practical. Some of the solutions that are used to bring these devices closer to commercial applications are discussed.

  6. Fault injection via on-chip debugging in the internal memory of systems-on-chip processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmarev, S. A.; Khanov, V. Kh

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an on-chip debugging method for the injection of single faults in the processor cores of systems-on-chip. The method consists in the placement of faults injection infrastructure in a system-on-chip as an intellectual property core. This simplifies the fault injection environment, reduces delays injection and improves the performance, as well as allows doing long autonomous campaign for injection of faults without the use of external devices.

  7. Evaluation of Pressure Stable Chip-to-Tube Fittings Enabling High-Speed Chip-HPLC with Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Carsten; Heiland, Josef J; Stein, Volkmar; Klimkait, Michael; Queisser, Marco; Belder, Detlev

    2016-08-01

    Appropriate chip-to-tube interfacing is an enabling technology for high-pressure and high-speed liquid chromatography on chip. For this purpose, various approaches, to connect pressure resistant glass chips with HPLC pumps working at pressures of up to 500 bar, were examined. Three side-port and one top-port connection approach were evaluated with regard to pressure stability and extra column band broadening. A clamp-based top-port approach enabled chip-HPLC-MS analysis of herbicides at the highest pressure and speed. PMID:27397738

  8. Effects of chipping, grinding, and heat on survival of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in chips.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Cappaert, David; Clark, Erin L; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor; Smith, Sarah; Pell, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding insect from Asia, was identified in 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus sp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Most larvae overwinter as nonfeeding prepupae in the outer sapwood or thick bark of large trees. In a series of studies, we evaluated effects of grinding, chipping, and heat treatment on survival of A. planipennis prepupae in ash material. Heavily infested ash bolts containing roughly 8,700 prepupae were processed by a horizontal grinder with either a 2.5- or 10-cm screen. There was no evidence of A. planipennis survival in chips processed with the 2.5-cm screen, but eight viable prepupae were recovered from chips processed with the 10-cm screen. We chiseled additional sentinel chips with prepupae from ash logs and buried 45 in each chip pile. In total, six prepupae in sentinel chips survived the winter, but we found no sign of adult A. planipennis emergence from the processed chips. Subsequently, we assessed prepupal survival in chips processed by a chipper or a horizontal grinder fit with 5-, 10-, or 12.7-cm screens. An estimated 1,565 A. planipennis prepupae were processed by each treatment. Chips from the chipper were shorter than chips from the grinder regardless of the screen size used. No live prepupae were found in chips produced by the chipper, but 21 viable prepupae were found in chips from the grinder. Infested wood and bark chips chiseled from logs were held in ovens at 25, 40, or 60 degrees C for 8, 24, or 48 h. Prepupal survival was consistently higher in wood chips than bark chips at 40 degrees C, whereas no prepupae survived exposure to 60 degrees C for eight or more hours. In a second study, prepupae in wood chips were exposed to 40, 45, 50, 55, or 60 degrees C for 20 or 120 min. Some prepupae survived 20 min of exposure to all temperatures. No prepupae survived exposure to 60 degrees C for 120 min, but 17

  9. Wrinkled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, S; Chandrasekaran, R; Puigjaner, L C; Walker, J K; Hall, I H; Birdsall, D L; Ratliff, R L

    1983-01-01

    The B form of poly d(GC):poly d(GC) in orthorhombic microcrystallites in oriented fibers has a secondary structure in which a dinucleotide is the repeated motif rather than a mononucleotide as in standard, smooth B DNA. One set of nucleotides (probably GpC) has the same conformations as the smooth form but the alternate (CpG) nucleotides have a different conformation at C3'-O3'. This leads to a distinctive change in the orientation of the phosphate groups. Similar perturbations can be detected in other poly d(PuPy):poly d(PuPy) DNAs such as poly d(IC):poly d(IC) and poly d(AT):poly d(AT) in their D forms which have tetragonal crystal environments. This suggests that such perturbations are intrinsic to all stretches of duplex DNA where purines and pyrimidines alternate and may play a role in the detection and exploitation of such sequences by regulatory proteins. Images PMID:6572358

  10. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  11. CHIP Is an Essential Determinant of Neuronal Mitochondrial Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Palubinsky, Amy M.; Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Kale, Alixandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Singer, Robert J.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Determine the mechanism by which C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP) induction alters neuronal survival under conditions of mitochondrial stress induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. Results: We report that animals deficient in the E3 ubiquitin ligase, CHIP, have high baseline levels of central nervous system protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, reduced antioxidant defenses, and decreased energetic status. Stress-associated molecules typically linked to Parkinson's disease such as the mitochondrial kinase, PTEN-inducible putative kinase 1 (PINK1), and another E3 ligase, Parkin, are upregulated in brains from CHIP knockout (KO) animals. Utilizing a novel biotin–avidin capture technique, we found that the oxidation status of Parkin and the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), are altered in a CHIP-dependent manner. We also found that following oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD), the expression of CHIP, PINK1, and the autophagic marker, LC3, increase and there is activation of the redox-sensitive kinase p66shc. Under conditions of OGD, CHIP relocalizes from the cytosol to mitochondria. Mitochondria from CHIP KO mice have profound impairments in stress response induced by calcium overload, resulting in accelerated permeability transition activity. While CHIP-deficient neurons are morphologically intact, they are more susceptible to OGD consistent with a previously unknown neuroprotective role for CHIP in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Innovation: CHIP relocalization to the mitochondria is essential for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity and neuronal survival following OGD. Conclusions: CHIP is an essential regulator of neuronal bioenergetics and redox tone. Altering the expression of this protein has profound effects on neuronal survival when cells are exposed to OGD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 535–549. PMID:25602369

  12. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection

    PubMed Central

    He, Diwei; Morgan, Stephen P.; Trachanis, Dimitrios; van Hese, Jan; Drogoudis, Dimitris; Fummi, Franco; Stefanni, Francesco; Guarnieri, Valerio; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1%) with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring. PMID:26184225

  13. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection.

    PubMed

    He, Diwei; Morgan, Stephen P; Trachanis, Dimitrios; van Hese, Jan; Drogoudis, Dimitris; Fummi, Franco; Stefanni, Francesco; Guarnieri, Valerio; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1%) with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring. PMID:26184225

  14. A low pressure on-chip injection strategy for high-performance chip-based chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thurmann, S; Dittmar, A; Belder, D

    2014-05-01

    A microfluidic device for high-performance liquid chromatography is presented. The borosilicate glass chip includes a common cross-channel injector and a column chamber. The column chamber comprises two constrictions (10 μm) to retain the chromatographic particles via the keystone effect. A packing channel was utilized to introduce the particulate material (3-μm). This channel has been sealed permanently via laser-assisted photopolymerization avoiding dead volumes within the chromatographic pathway. A sampling strategy is presented enabling the directed definition of the sample plug on-chip. The injection process is studied via video microscopy and chromatographic separations of test solutes with fluorescence detection. Our approach, based on on-chip flow splitting, allows the usage of traditional, economic and robust HPLC instrumentation avoiding the need for sophisticated nano-flow equipment. The performance of the chip device and the injection process was demonstrated by reversed-phase chromatographic separations of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons achieving constant high efficiencies for the chromatographic signals over the whole elution window. PMID:24674642

  15. "Chips with Everything": A Laboratory Exercise for Comparing Subjective and Objective Measurements of Potato Chips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    The following laboratory exercise was designed to aid student understanding of the differences between subjective and objective measurements. Students assess the color and texture of different varieties of potato chip (crisps) by means of an intensity rating scale and a rank test and objectively with a colorimeter and texture analyzer. For data…

  16. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  17. Excision of HIV-1 DNA by gene editing: a proof-of-concept in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Bella, R; Yin, C; Otte, J; Ferrante, P; Gendelman, H E; Li, H; Booze, R; Gordon, J; Hu, W; Khalili, K

    2016-08-01

    A CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing strategy has been remarkable in excising segments of integrated HIV-1 DNA sequences from the genome of latently infected human cell lines and by introducing InDel mutations, suppressing HIV-1 replication in patient-derived CD4+ T-cells, ex vivo. Here, we employed a short version of the Cas9 endonuclease, saCas9, together with a multiplex of guide RNAs (gRNAs) for targeting the viral DNA sequences within the 5'-LTR and the Gag gene for removing critically important segments of the viral DNA in transgenic mice and rats encompassing the HIV-1 genome. Tail-vein injection of transgenic mice with a recombinant Adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9) vector expressing saCas9 and the gRNAs, rAAV:saCas9/gRNA, resulted in the cleavage of integrated HIV-1 DNA and excision of a 978 bp DNA fragment spanning between the LTR and Gag gene in the spleen, liver, heart, lung and kidney as well as in the circulating lymphocytes. Retro-orbital inoculation of rAAV9:saCas9/gRNA in transgenic rats eliminated a targeted segment of viral DNA and substantially decreased the level of viral gene expression in circulating blood lymphocytes. The results from the proof-of-concept studies, for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo eradication of HIV-1 DNA by CRISPR/Cas9 on delivery by an rAAV9 vector in a range of cells and tissues that harbor integrated copies of viral DNA. PMID:27194423

  18. A lab-on-a-chip device for rapid identification of avian influenza viral RNA by solid-phase PCR.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong; Høgberg, Jonas; Handberg, Kurt; Wolff, Anders

    2011-04-21

    The endemic of Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) in Asia and epizootics in some European regions have caused serious economic losses. Multiplex reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR has been developed to detect and subtype AIV. However, the number of targets that can be amplified in a single run is limited because of uncontrollable primer-primer interferences. In this paper, we describe a lab-on-a-chip device for fast AIV screening by integrating DNA microarray-based solid-phase PCR on a microfluidic chip. A simple UV cross-linking method was used to immobilize the DNA probes on unmodified glass surface, which makes it convenient to integrate microarray with microfluidics. This solid-phase RT-PCR method combined RT amplification of extracted RNA in the liquid phase and species-specific nested PCR on the solid phase. Using the developed approach, AIV viruses and their subtypes were unambiguously identified by the distinct patterns of amplification products. The whole process was reduced to less than 1 hour and the sample volume used in the microfluidic chip was at least 10 times less than in the literature. By spatially separating the primers, highly multiplexed amplification can be performed in solid-phase PCR. Moreover, multiplex PCR and sequence detection were done in one step, which greatly simplified the assay and reduced the processing time. Furthermore, by incorporating the microarray into a microchamber-based PCR chip, the sample and the reagent consumption were greatly reduced, and the problems of bubble formation and solution evaporation were effectively prevented. This microarray-based PCR microchip can be widely employed for virus detection and effective surveillance in wild avian and in poultry productions. PMID:21369571

  19. Pulmonary responses after wood chip mulch exposure.

    PubMed

    Wintermeyer, S F; Kuschner, W G; Wong, H; D'Alessandro, A; Blanc, P D

    1997-04-01

    Organic Dust Toxic Syndrome (ODTS) is a flu-like syndrome that can occur after inhalation of cotton, grain, wood chip dusts, or other organic dusts or aerosols. We investigated whether inflammatory pulmonary responses occur, even after relatively brief, low-level wood chip mulch exposure. Six volunteers were exposed to wood chip mulch dust. Total dust and/or endotoxin levels were measured in five subjects. Pulmonary function and peripheral blood counts were measured before and after exposure in each subject. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in each subject after exposure, and cell, cytokine, and protein concentrations were measured. Control BAL without previous exposure was also performed on three of the subjects. Three of six subjects had symptoms consistent with ODTS. No clinically relevant or statistically significant changes in pulmonary function tests after exposure were found. Three subjects manifested a marked elevation in neutrophil percentage in their BAL (range, 10 to 57%). When these three subjects underwent control BAL, the postexposure comparison demonstrated an increase in neutrophil levels of 154 +/- 89 x 10(3)/mL (mean +/- standard error; P = 0.22). The mean increase in BAL interleukin-8 levels after exposure, compared with paired control values, was 11.2 +/- SE 2.5 pg/mL (P = 0.047). There was also an increase in BAL interleukin-6 levels that reached borderline significance (6.4 +/- SE 2.0 pg/mL; P = 0.08). Tumor necrosis factor levels were increased in all three subjects' BAL as well (0.4 +/- SE 0.2 pg/mL), but this change was not statistically significant (P = 0.2). Our findings of increased BAL proinflammatory cytokine and neutrophil levels are consistent with the theory that cytokine networking in the lung may mediate ODTS. PMID:9113600

  20. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  1. Heterogeneously integrated microsystem-on-a-chip

    DOEpatents

    Chanchani, Rajen

    2008-02-26

    A microsystem-on-a-chip comprises a bottom wafer of normal thickness and a series of thinned wafers can be stacked on the bottom wafer, glued and electrically interconnected. The interconnection layer comprises a compliant dielectric material, an interconnect structure, and can include embedded passives. The stacked wafer technology provides a heterogeneously integrated, ultra-miniaturized, higher performing, robust and cost-effective microsystem package. The highly integrated microsystem package, comprising electronics, sensors, optics, and MEMS, can be miniaturized both in volume and footprint to the size of a bottle-cap or less.

  2. On-a-chip surface plasmon tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H. M. K.; Righini, M.; Gates, J. C.; Smith, P. G. R.; Pruneri, V.; Quidant, R.

    2011-08-01

    We report on an integrated optical trapping platform operated by simple fiber coupling. The system consists of a dielectric channel optical waveguide decorated with an array of gold micro-pads. Through a suitable engineering of the waveguide mode, we achieve light coupling to the surface plasmon resonance of the gold pads that act as individual plasmonic traps. We demonstrate parallel trapping of both micrometer size polystyrene beads and yeast cells at predetermined locations on the chip with only 20 mW total incident laser power.

  3. Compact, Robust Chips Integrate Optical Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Located in Bozeman, Montana, AdvR Inc. has been an active partner in NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Langley Research Center engineers partnered with AdvR through the SBIR program to develop new, compact, lightweight electro-optic components for remote sensing systems. While the primary customer for this technology will be NASA, AdvR foresees additional uses for its NASA-derived circuit chip in the fields of academic and industrial research anywhere that compact, low-cost, stabilized single-frequency lasers are needed.

  4. Chip-to-chip interconnects based on 3D stacking of optoelectrical dies on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, P.; Raz, O.; Smalbrugge, B. E.; Duis, J.; Dorren, H. J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to increase the optical interconnection bandwidth density by stacking the opto-electrical dies directly on the CMOS driver. The suggested implementation is aiming to provide a wafer scale process which will make the use of wire bonding redundant and will allow for impedance matched metallic wiring between the electronic driving circuit and its opto-electronic counter part. We suggest the use of a thick photoresist ramp between CMOS driver and opto-electrical dies surface as the bridge for supporting co-plannar waveguides (CPW) electrically plated with lithographic accuracy. In this way all three dimensions of the interconnecting metal layer, width, length and thickness can be completely controlled. In this 1st demonstration all processing is done on commercially available devices and products, and is compatible with CMOS processing technology. To test the applicability of CPW instead of wire bonds for interconnecting the CMOS circuit and opto-electronic chips, we have made test samples and tested their performance at speeds up to 10 Gbps. In this demonstration, a silicon substrate was used on which we evaporated gold co-planar waveguides (CPW) to mimic a wire on the driver. An optical link consisting of a VCSEL chip and a photodiode chip has been assembled and fully characterized using optical coupling into and out of a multimode fiber (MMF). A 10 Gb/s 27-1 NRZ PRBS signal transmitted from one chip to another chip was detected error free. A 4 dB receiver sensitivity penalty is measured for the integrated device compared to a commercial link.

  5. Microfluidic device (ExoChip) for on-chip isolation, quantification and characterization of circulating exosomes.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Shailender Singh; Dunlay, Christopher James; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2014-06-01

    Membrane bound vesicles, including microvesicles and exosomes, are secreted by both normal and cancerous cells into the extracellular space and in blood circulation. These circulating extracellular vesicles (cirEVs) and exosomes in particular are recognized as a potential source of disease biomarkers. However, to exploit the use of circulatory exosomes as a biomarker, a rapid, high-throughput and reproducible method is required for their isolation and molecular analysis. We have developed a simple, low cost microfluidic-based platform to isolate cirEVs enriched in exosomes directly from blood serum allowing simultaneous capture and quantification of exosomes in a single device. To capture specific exosomes, we employed "ExoChip", a microfluidic device fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and functionalized with antibodies against CD63, an antigen commonly overexpressed in exosomes. Subsequent staining with a fluorescent carbocyanine dye (DiO) that specifically labels the exosomes, we quantitated exosomes using a standard plate-reader. Ten independent ExoChip experiments performed using serum obtained from five pancreatic cancer patients and five healthy individuals revealed a statistically significant increase (2.34 ± 0.31 fold, p < 0.001) in exosomes captured in cancer patients when compared to healthy individuals. Exosomal origins of ExoChip immobilized vesicles were further confirmed using immuno-electron-microscopy and Western blotting. In addition, we demonstrate the ability of ExoChip to recover exosomes with intact RNA enabling profiling of exosomal-microRNAs through openarray analysis, which has potential applications in biomarker discovery. Based on our findings, ExoChip is a well suited platform to be used as an exosome-based diagnostic and research tool for molecular screening of human cancers. PMID:24722878

  6. Energy Harvesting Chip and the Chip Based Power Supply Development for a Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dasheng

    2008-01-01

    In this study, an energy harvesting chip was developed to scavenge energy from artificial light to charge a wireless sensor node. The chip core is a miniature transformer with a nano-ferrofluid magnetic core. The chip embedded transformer can convert harvested energy from its solar cell to variable voltage output for driving multiple loads. This chip system yields a simple, small, and more importantly, a battery-less power supply solution. The sensor node is equipped with multiple sensors that can be enabled by the energy harvesting power supply to collect information about the human body comfort degree. Compared with lab instruments, the nodes with temperature, humidity and photosensors driven by harvested energy had variation coefficient measurement precision of less than 6% deviation under low environmental light of 240 lux. The thermal comfort was affected by the air speed. A flow sensor equipped on the sensor node was used to detect airflow speed. Due to its high power consumption, this sensor node provided 15% less accuracy than the instruments, but it still can meet the requirement of analysis for predicted mean votes (PMV) measurement. The energy harvesting wireless sensor network (WSN) was deployed in a 24-hour convenience store to detect thermal comfort degree from the air conditioning control. During one year operation, the sensor network powered by the energy harvesting chip retained normal functions to collect the PMV index of the store. According to the one month statistics of communication status, the packet loss rate (PLR) is 2.3%, which is as good as the presented results of those WSNs powered by battery. Referring to the electric power records, almost 54% energy can be saved by the feedback control of an energy harvesting sensor network. These results illustrate that, scavenging energy not only creates a reliable power source for electronic devices, such as wireless sensor nodes, but can also be an energy source by building an energy efficient

  7. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  8. HPLC-Chip/MS technology in proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Martin; van de Goor, Tom

    2009-01-01

    HPLC-chip/MS is a novel nanoflow analytical technology conducted on a microfabricated chip that allows for highly efficient HPLC separation and superior sensitive MS detection of complex proteomic mixtures. This is possible through on-chip preconcentration and separation with fluidic connection made automatically in a leak-tight fashion. Minimum precolumn and postcolumn peak dispersion and uncompromised ease of use result in compounds eluting in bands of only a few nanoliters. The chip is fabricated out of bio-inert polyimide-containing channels and integrated chip structures, such as an electrospray emitter, columns, and frits manufactured by laser ablation technology. Meanwhile, a variety of HPLC-chips differing in design and stationary phase are commercially available, which provide a comprehensive solution for applications in proteomics, glycomics, biomarker, and pharmaceutical discovery. The HPLC-chip can also be easily integrated into a multidimensional separation workflow where different orthogonal separation techniques are combined to solve a highly complex separation problems. In this chapter, we describe in detail the methodological chip usage and functionality and its application in the elucidation of the protein profile of human nucleoli. PMID:19488689

  9. An addressable cell array for a platform of biosensor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungkyoung; Choi, Soo-hee; Jung, Moon Youn; Song, Kibong; Park, Jeong Won

    2013-05-01

    In order to detect interested matters in fields, various lab-on-a-chips where chemical, physical, or biological sensors are loaded have been developed. eNOSE can be a representative example among them. Because animals can sense 300~1000 different chemicals by olfactory system - smell -, the olfactory system has been spotlighted as new materials in the field of sensing. Those investigations, however, are usually focused on how to detect signals from the olfactory neurons or receptors loaded on chips and enhance sensing efficacy of chips. Therefore, almost of those chips are designed for only one material sensing. Multi-sensing using multi-channels will be needed when the olfactory systems are adopted well on chips. For multiple sensing, we developed an addressable cell array. The chip has 38 cell-chambers arranged in a circle shape and different cell types of thirty eight can be allocated with specific addresses on the chip without any complex valve system. In order to confirm the cell addressing, we loaded EGFP-transfected and empty vector-transfected HEK293a cells into inlets of the cell array in a planned address and those cells were positioned into each chamber by brief aspiration. The arrayed cells were confirmed as a specific pattern through EGFP and nuclei staining. This cell array which can generate address of sensor materials like cells with their own specification is expected to be applied to a platform for a biosensor chip at various sensing fields.

  10. Using tire chips as a leachate drainage layer

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    Old tires represent a potentially cost-effective construction material that can be used in the installation of leachate drainage and collection systems. In fact, recent studies show that using shredded tires in conjunction with granular soil materials can even enhance the long-term performance of these systems. A typical design using shredded tire chips involves the placement of a minimum 1-foot-thick layer of chips on a granular soil layer overlaying the composite liner system. However, implementation of this design is not as simple as it looks. Protecting the liner from wire protruding from the tire chips derived from belted tires is essential. Because tire chips tend to clump together, placement and spreading also must be in relatively thick lifts and performed by low-ground-pressure equipment. In addition, a significant volume reduction in the tire chip layer can be anticipated as a result of normal loadings from the overlying waste. Equivalent internal friction angles and cohesiveness for the tire chips should be estimated for factors of safety against side-slope failure. Despite theses concerns, however,the advantages of constructing a tire-chip drainage layer often can outweigh the disadvantages, as long as the chips` long-term permeability characteristics and resistance to clogging -- a result of biological activity -- are at least equal to that of typical granular soil materials commonly used in leachate drainage and collection systems.

  11. The three-dimensional structure of human erythrocyte aquaporin CHIP.

    PubMed

    Walz, T; Smith, B L; Agre, P; Engel, A

    1994-07-01

    Water-permeable membranes of several plant and mammalian tissues contain specific water channel proteins, the 'aquaporins'. The best characterized aquaporin is CHIP, a 28 kDa red blood cell channel-forming integral protein. Isolated CHIP and Escherichia coli lipids may be assembled into 2-D crystals for structural analyses. Here we present (i) a structural characterization of the solubilized CHIP oligomers, (ii) projections of CHIP arrays after negative staining or metal-shadowing, and (iii) the 3-D structure at 1.6 nm resolution. Negatively stained CHIP oligomers exhibited a side length of 6.9 nm with four-fold symmetry, and a mass of 202 +/- 3 kDa determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Reconstituted into lipid bilayers, CHIP formed 2-D square lattices with unit cell dimensions a = b = 9.6 nm and a p422(1) symmetry. The 3-D map revealed that CHIP tetramers contain central stain-filled depressions about the fourfold axis. These cavities extend from both sides into the transbilayer domain of the molecule leaving only a thin barrier to be penetrated by the water pores. Although CHIP monomers behave as independent pores, we propose that their particular structure requires tetramerization for stable integration into the bilayer. PMID:7518771

  12. 42 CFR 457.343 - Periodic renewal of CHIP eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Periodic renewal of CHIP eligibility. 457.343 Section 457.343 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of CHIP eligibility. The renewal procedures described in § 435.916 of this chapter apply equally...

  13. 42 CFR 457.343 - Periodic renewal of CHIP eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Periodic renewal of CHIP eligibility. 457.343 Section 457.343 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of CHIP eligibility. The renewal procedures described in § 435.916 of this chapter apply equally...

  14. Wireless spread-spectrum telesensor chip with synchronous digital architecture

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Emery, Michael Steven

    2005-03-08

    A fully integrated wireless spread-spectrum sensor incorporating all elements of an "intelligent" sensor on a single circuit chip is capable of telemetering data to a receiver. Synchronous control of all elements of the chip provides low-cost, low-noise, and highly robust data transmission, in turn enabling the use of low-cost monolithic receivers.

  15. High-Throughput Screening Platform for Engineered Nanoparticle-Mediated Genotoxicity Using CometChip Technology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The likelihood of intentional and unintentional engineered nanoparticle (ENP) exposure has dramatically increased due to the use of nanoenabled products. Indeed, ENPs have been incorporated in many useful products and have enhanced our way of life. However, there are many unanswered questions about the consequences of nanoparticle exposures, in particular, with regard to their potential to damage the genome and thus potentially promote cancer. In this study, we present a high-throughput screening assay based upon the recently developed CometChip technology, which enables evaluation of single-stranded DNA breaks, abasic sites, and alkali-sensitive sites in cells exposed to ENPs. The strategic microfabricated, 96-well design and automated processing improves efficiency, reduces processing time, and suppresses user bias in comparison to the standard comet assay. We evaluated the versatility of this assay by screening five industrially relevant ENP exposures (SiO2, ZnO, Fe2O3, Ag, and CeO2) on both suspension human lymphoblastoid (TK6) and adherent Chinese hamster ovary (H9T3) cell lines. MTT and CyQuant NF assays were employed to assess cellular viability and proliferation after ENP exposure. Exposure to ENPs at a dose range of 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL induced dose-dependent increases in DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity profiles of ZnO > Ag > Fe2O3 > CeO2 > SiO2 in TK6 cells at 4 h and Ag > Fe2O3 > ZnO > CeO2 > SiO2 in H9T3 cells at 24 h were observed. The presented CometChip platform enabled efficient and reliable measurement of ENP-mediated DNA damage, therefore demonstrating the efficacy of this powerful tool in nanogenotoxicity studies. PMID:24617523

  16. Mathematical Simulation for Integrated Linear Fresnel Spectrometer Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon; Yoon, Hargoon; Lee, Uhn; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized solid-state optical spectrometer chip was designed with a linear gradient-gap Fresnel grating which was mounted perpendicularly to a sensor array surface and simulated for its performance and functionality. Unlike common spectrometers which are based on Fraunhoffer diffraction with a regular periodic line grating, the new linear gradient grating Fresnel spectrometer chip can be miniaturized to a much smaller form-factor into the Fresnel regime exceeding the limit of conventional spectrometers. This mathematical calculation shows that building a tiny motionless multi-pixel microspectrometer chip which is smaller than 1 cubic millimter of optical path volume is possible. The new Fresnel spectrometer chip is proportional to the energy scale (hc/lambda), while the conventional spectrometers are proportional to the wavelength scale (lambda). We report the theoretical optical working principle and new data collection algorithm of the new Fresnel spectrometer to build a compact integrated optical chip.

  17. Progress in Atom Chips and the Integration of Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, E. A.; Trupke, M.; Darquie, B.; Goldwin, J.; Dutier, G.

    2008-04-01

    We review recent progress at the Centre for Cold Matter in developing atom chips. An important advantage of miniaturizing atom traps on a chip is the possibility of obtaining very tight trapping structures with the capability of manipulating atoms on the micron length scale. We recall some of the pros and cons of bringing atoms close to the chip surface, as is required in order to make small static structures, and we discuss the relative merits of metallic, dielectric and superconducting chip surfaces. We point out that the addition of integrated optical devices on the chip can enhance its capability through single atom detection and controlled photon production. Finally, we review the status of integrated microcavities that have recently been demonstrated at our Centre and discuss their prospects for future development.

  18. Chipping Resistance of Graded Zirconia Ceramics for Dental Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lee, J.J.-W.; Lawn, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia. PMID:22232142

  19. The Security Implications of VeriChip Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Halamka, John; Juels, Ari; Stubblefield, Adam; Westhues, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The VeriChip™ is a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) tag produced commercially for implantation in human beings. Its proposed uses include identification of medical patients, physical access control, contactless retail payment, and even the tracing of kidnapping victims.As the authors explain, the VeriChip is vulnerable to simple, over-the-air spoofing attacks. In particular, an attacker capable of scanning a VeriChip, eavesdropping on its signal, or simply learning its serial number can create a spoof device whose radio appearance is indistinguishable from the original. We explore the practical implications of this security vulnerability. The authors argue that:1 The VeriChip should serve exclusively for identification, and not authentication or access control.2 Paradoxically, for bearer safety, a VeriChip should be easy to spoof; an attacker then has less incentive to coerce victims or extract VeriChips from victims’ bodies. PMID:16929037

  20. 75 FR 447 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips With Minimized Chip Package Size and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ..., 2007. 73 FR 2276 (Jan. 14, 2008). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of... it determined to review, and on remedy, the public interest and bonding. 74 FR 57192 (Nov. 4, 2009... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips With Minimized Chip Package Size and...

  1. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ximao; Liu, Baihui; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kuiran; Dong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in cancer biology. In the present study, a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma (HB) tissues was performed to verify differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues. As alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has a critical role in HB, AFP methylation levels were also detected using pyrosequencing. Normal and HB liver tissue samples (frozen tissue) were obtained from patients with HB. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in these tissues was performed using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and the results were confirmed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated distinctively less methylation in HB tissues than in non-tumor tissues. In addition, methylation enrichment was observed in positions near the transcription start site of AFP, which exhibited lower methylation levels in HB tissues than in non-tumor liver tissues. Lastly, a significant negative correlation was observed between AFP messenger RNA expression and DNA methylation percentage, using linear Pearson's R correlation coefficients. The present results demonstrate differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues, and imply that aberrant methylation of AFP in HB could reflect HB development. Expansion of these findings could provide useful insight into HB biology. PMID:27446465

  2. DNA microarrays for hybridization detection by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kick, Alfred; Bönsch, Martin; Katzschner, Beate; Voigt, Jan; Herr, Alexander; Brabetz, Werner; Jung, Martin; Sonntag, Frank; Klotzbach, Udo; Danz, Norbert; Howitz, Steffen; Mertig, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We report on the development of a new platform technology for the detection of genetic variations by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. TOPAS chips with integrated optics were exploited in combination with microfluidics. Within minutes, the detection of hybridization kinetics was achieved simultaneously at all spots of the DNA microarray. A nanoliter dispenser is used to deposit thiol-modified single-stranded probe DNA on the gold surface of the chips. We investigated the influence of different parameters on hybridization using model polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. These PCR products comprised a single-stranded tag sequence being complementary to an anti-tag sequence of probes immobilized on the gold surface. The signals increased with increasing length of PCR products (60, 100 or 300 base pairs) as well as with their concentration. We investigated hybridizations on DNA microarrays comprising 90 spots of probe DNA with three different sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sequences with possible hairpin structures significantly lower the binding rate, and thus, the SPR signals during hybridization. PMID:20729067

  3. The next generation of neural network chips

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-08-01

    There have been many national and international neural networks research initiatives: USA (DARPA, NIBS), Canada (IRIS), Japan (HFSP) and Europe (BRAIN, GALA TEA, NERVES, ELENE NERVES 2) -- just to mention a few. Recent developments in the field of neural networks, cognitive science, bioengineering and electrical engineering have made it possible to understand more about the functioning of large ensembles of identical processing elements. There are more research papers than ever proposing solutions and hardware implementations are by no means an exception. Two fields (computing and neuroscience) are interacting in ways nobody could imagine just several years ago, and -- with the advent of new technologies -- researchers are focusing on trying to copy the Brain. Such an exciting confluence may quite shortly lead to revolutionary new computers and it is the aim of this invited session to bring to light some of the challenging research aspects dealing with the hardware realizability of future intelligent chips. Present-day (conventional) technology is (still) mostly digital and, thus, occupies wider areas and consumes much more power than the solutions envisaged. The innovative algorithmic and architectural ideals should represent important breakthroughs, paving the way towards making neural network chips available to the industry at competitive prices, in relatively small packages and consuming a fraction of the power required by equivalent digital solutions.

  4. An MCM/chip concurrent engineering validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Hector; Stark, Shuane

    1992-12-01

    We report on the MOST software system, which implements a concurrent physical design environment for Multi-Chip Modules. The system integrates the work of design teams distributed across a network and using different CAD systems. At present the following systems have been integrated: Cadence's Edge 2.1, Cadence's Allegro 6.1, AutoDesk's AutoCad 12.0, and Harris' Finesse. Software links were established allowing data from those systems to be shared through a ROSE (Rensselaer Object Storage Environment) database management developed under the sponsorship of the DICE program. The code was written in C++ and uses various methods to feed the information in and obtain it out of the design systems: IGES for Allegro, SKILL for Edge and dfile for Finesse, while the AutoCad link is a direct one. The DDR2 (Digital Drop Receiver, version 2) multi-chip module from Harris was entered into the system and routed utilizing a redundant route scheme. The exercise used a concurrent approach, the data defining parts and placement entered through Finesse, the parts modified in Edge, the route done in Allegro and the final merge and verification performed with the Edge tool.

  5. Optical continuum generation on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Boyraz, Ozdal; Koonath, Prakash; Raghunathan, Varun; Indukuri, Tejaswi; Dimitropoulos, Dimitri

    2005-08-01

    Although the Raman effect is nearly two orders of magnitude stronger than the electronic Kerr nonlinearity in silicon, under pulsed operation regime where the pulse width is shorter than the phonon response time, Raman effect is suppressed and Kerr nonlinearity dominates. Continuum generation, made possible by the non-resonant Kerr nonlinearity, offers a technologically and economically appealing path to WDM communication at the inter-chip or intra-chip levels. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a 2 fold spectral broadening is obtained by launching ~4ps optical pulses with 2.2GW/cm2 peak power into a conventional silicon waveguide. Theoretical calculations, that include the effect of two-photon-absorption, free carrier absorption and refractive index change indicate that up to >30 times spectral broadening is achievable in an optimized device. The broadening is due to self phase modulation and saturates due to two photon absorption. Additionally, we find that free carrier dynamics also contributes to the spectral broadening and cause the overall spectrum to be asymmetric with respect to the pump wavelength.

  6. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system. PMID:26920777

  7. BAE systems' SMART chip camera FPA development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Louise; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; McManus, Don; Harris, D. Ahmasi; Blackwell, Richard J.; Bryant, Jeffrey; Boal, Mihir; Binkerd, Evan

    2015-06-01

    BAE Systems' SMART (Stacked Modular Architecture High-Resolution Thermal) Chip Camera provides very compact long-wave infrared (LWIR) solutions by combining a 12 μm wafer-level packaged focal plane array (FPA) with multichip-stack, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and wafer-level optics. The key innovations that enabled this include a single-layer 12 μm pixel bolometer design and robust fabrication process, as well as wafer-level lid packaging. We used advanced packaging techniques to achieve an extremely small-form-factor camera, with a complete volume of 2.9 cm3 and a thermal core weight of 5.1g. The SMART Chip Camera supports up to 60 Hz frame rates, and requires less than 500 mW of power. This work has been supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Low Cost Thermal Imager - Manufacturing (LCTI-M) program, and BAE Systems' internal research and development investment.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA replacement versus nuclear DNA persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, Maurizio

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we consider two populations whose generations are not overlapping and whose size is large. The number of males and females in both populations is constant. Any generation is replaced by a new one and any individual has two parents concerning nuclear DNA and a single one (the mother) concerning mtDNA. Moreover, at any generation some individuals migrate from the first population to the second. In a finite random time T, the mtDNA of the second population is completely replaced by the mtDNA of the first. In the same time, the nuclear DNA is not completely replaced and a fraction F of the ancient nuclear DNA persists. We compute both T and F. Since this study shows that complete replacement of mtDNA in a population is compatible with the persistence of a large fraction of nuclear DNA, it may have some relevance for the 'out of Africa'/multiregional debate in palaeoanthropology.

  9. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  10. Sample introduction interface for on-chip nucleic acid-based analysis of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Mosley, O; Melling, L; Tarn, M D; Kemp, C; Esfahani, M M N; Pamme, N; Shaw, K J

    2016-05-24

    Despite recent advances in microfluidic-based integrated diagnostic systems, the sample introduction interface, especially with regards to large volume samples, has often been neglected. We present a sample introduction interface that allows direct on-chip processing of crude stool samples for the detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The principle of IFAST (immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension) was adapted to include a large volume sample chamber with a septum-based interface for stool sample introduction. Solid chaotropic salt and dry superparamagnetic particles (PMPs) could be stored on-chip and reconstituted upon sample addition, simplifying the process of release of DNA from H. pylori cells and its binding to the PMPs. Finally, the PMPs were pulled via a magnet through a washing chamber containing an immiscible oil solution and into an elution chamber where the DNA was released into aqueous media for subsequent analysis. The entire process required only 7 min while enabling a 40-fold reduction in working volume from crude biological samples. The combination of a real-world interface and rapid DNA extraction offers the potential for the methodology to be used in point-of-care (POC) devices. PMID:27164181

  11. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  12. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  13. Recent progress in preparation and application of microfluidic chip electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Peng, Qiaohong; Tian, Chao

    2015-05-01

    Since its discovery in 1990, microfluidic chip electrophoresis (MCE) has allowed the development of applications with small size, fast analysis, low cost, high integration density and automatic level, which are easy to carry and have made commercialization efficient. MCE has been widely used in the areas of environmental protection, biochemistry, medicine and health, clinical testing, judicial expertise, food sanitation, pharmaceutical checking, drug testing, agrochemistry, biomedical engineering and life science. As one of the foremost fields in the research of capillary electrophoresis, MCE is the ultimate frontier to develop the miniaturized, integrated, automated all-in-one instruments needed in modern analytical chemistry. By adopting the advanced technologies of micro-machining, lasers and microelectronics, and the latest research achievements in analytical chemistry and biochemistry, the sampling, separation and detection systems of commonly used capillary electrophoresis are integrated with high densities onto glass, quartz, silicon or polymer wafers to form the MCE, which can finish the analysis of multi-step operations such as injection, enrichment, reaction, derivatization, separation, and collection of samples in a portable, efficient and super high speed manner. With reference to the different technological achievements in this area, the latest developments in MCE are reviewed in this article. The preparation mechanisms, surface modifications, and properties of different materials in MCE are compared, and the different sampling, separation and detection systems in MCE are summarized. The performance of MCE in analysis of fluorescent substance, metallic ion, sugar, medicine, nucleic acid, DNA, amino acid, polypeptide and protein is discussed, and the future direction of development is forecast.

  14. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  15. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J.; Cowling, Victoria H.; Cairns, Bradley R.; White, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription. PMID:25798578

  16. A Microfluidic Microbeads Fluorescence Assay with Quantum Dots-Bead-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, S R; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for the detection of tumor causing N-Ras genes using quantum dots has been developed. Presently, quantum dots-bead-DNA probe based hybridization detection methods are often called as 'bead based assays' and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capability of the microfluidic technology. This study reports the detection of N-Ras cancer gene by fluorescence quenching of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of polystyrene beads. A microfluidic chip was constructed in which the quantum dots-bead-DNA probes were packed in the channel. The target DNA flowed across the beads and hybridized with immobilized probe sequences. The target DNA can be detected by the fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots due to their transfer of emission energy to intercalation dye after DNA hybridization. The mutated gene also induces fluorescence quenching but with less degree than the perfectly complementary target DNA. PMID:27455729

  17. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema

    Todd DeSantis

    2010-01-08

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  18. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Todd DeSantis

    2009-01-30

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  19. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  20. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  1. Rapid detection of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus sp. in herbal specimens by a simple, bendable, paper-based lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Plubcharoensook, Pattra; Prasongsuk, Sehanat

    2016-06-01

    Postharvest herbal product contamination with mycotoxins and mycotoxin-producing fungi represents a potentially carcinogenic hazard. Aspergillus flavus is a major cause of this issue. Available mold detection methods are PCR-based and rely heavily on laboratories; thus, they are unsuitable for on-site monitoring. In this study, a bendable, paper-based lab-on-a-chip platform was developed to rapidly detect toxigenic Aspergillus spp. DNA. The 3.0-4.0 cm(2) chip is fabricated using Whatman™ filter paper, fishing line and a simple plastic lamination process and has nucleic acid amplification and signal detection components. The Aspergillus assay specifically amplifies the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene, aflR, using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP); hybridization between target DNA and probes on blue silvernanoplates (AgNPls) yields colorimetric results. Positive results are indicated by the detection pad appearing blue due to dispersed blue AgNPls; negative results are indicated by the detection pad appearing colorless or pale yellow due to probe/target DNA hybridization and AgNPls aggregation. Assay completion requires less than 40 min, has a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 aflR copies, and has high specificity (94.47%)and sensitivity (100%). Contamination was identified in 14 of 32 herbal samples tested (43.75%). This work demonstrates the fabrication of a simple, low-cost, paper-based lab-on-a-chip platform suitable for rapid-detection applications. PMID:27168276

  2. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  3. Stem-end Chip Defect Formation Under Controlled Environment Conditions and in the Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is a serious tuber quality defect that affects chipping potatoes. This defect results in dark colored vascular tissues and adjacent cortical tissues in potato chips after frying. Chips with stem-end defects are unappealing to consumers and may cause raw product to be rejected at...

  4. Stem-end defect in chipping potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) as influenced by mild environmental stresses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global consumption of potato (Solanum tuberosum, L.) continues to shift from fresh potatoes to value-added processed food products such as potato chips. One serious tuber quality defect of chipping potatoes is stem-end chip defect, which results in chips with dark vasculature and adjacent tissues at...

  5. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  6. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  7. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  8. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  9. Bayesian modeling of ChIP-chip data using latent variables

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The ChIP-chip technology has been used in a wide range of biomedical studies, such as identification of human transcription factor binding sites, investigation of DNA methylation, and investigation of histone modifications in animals and plants. Various methods have been proposed in the literature for analyzing the ChIP-chip data, such as the sliding window methods, the hidden Markov model-based methods, and Bayesian methods. Although, due to the integrated consideration of uncertainty of the models and model parameters, Bayesian methods can potentially work better than the other two classes of methods, the existing Bayesian methods do not perform satisfactorily. They usually require multiple replicates or some extra experimental information to parametrize the model, and long CPU time due to involving of MCMC simulations. Results In this paper, we propose a Bayesian latent model for the ChIP-chip data. The new model mainly differs from the existing Bayesian models, such as the joint deconvolution model, the hierarchical gamma mixture model, and the Bayesian hierarchical model, in two respects. Firstly, it works on the difference between the averaged treatment and control samples. This enables the use of a simple model for the data, which avoids the probe-specific effect and the sample (control/treatment) effect. As a consequence, this enables an efficient MCMC simulation of the posterior distribution of the model, and also makes the model more robust to the outliers. Secondly, it models the neighboring dependence of probes by introducing a latent indicator vector. A truncated Poisson prior distribution is assumed for the latent indicator variable, with the rationale being justified at length. Conclusion The Bayesian latent method is successfully applied to real and ten simulated datasets, with comparisons with some of the existing Bayesian methods, hidden Markov model methods, and sliding window methods. The numerical results indicate that the Bayesian

  10. Identification of age degradation in EPROM chips using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Lloyd G.

    1998-03-01

    In a recent upgrade of the digital flight control computer for the F-16, there was serious consternation expressed about the quality of the soldering repair process. Dozens of circuit cards failed to function after the upgrade, even though all of these cards operated correctly before the modifications. The shop called for the use of the IR camera to assist in diagnosing and repairing these cards. What the Neural Radiant Energy Detection found was faulty and marginal chips.Of particular interest was the presence of degraded EPROM chips on the Program Memory cards. While it is known that EPROMs have a limited life cycle, the failure has been further characterized. Thermography provides a quantification of the degradation in thermal performance as the EPROMs are reused. Pristine EPROM chips have a rise rate of about 0.008 degrees C/sec. When the heat rates exceed 0.021 degrees C/sec, the EPROM chips will not accept a program. Some of the chips exhibited heat rates exceeding 0.1 degrees C/sec. Some chips with degradation of 0.018 degrees C/sec would accept a program, but fail other functional tests. What is clear from these results is that IR thermography can be used to identify degrading EPROM chips for replacement before failures become immanent.

  11. Biological Denitrification Treatment of Wastewater Using Wood Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadaaki; Koremura, Nao; Sato, Aya; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    A novel method for removing nitrate in waste water which uses wood chips as a reduction agent and growth support mechanism for denitrification bacteria is studied in this report. A higher denitrification rate was obtained when a portion of the wood chips packed in a column were exposed to air than when all of the wood chips were entirely immersed in solution. Cherry tree chips were more effective than cedar chips, as almost a 100% denitirification rate was maintained for at least 69 days at an inlet concentration of 20mg-N/L and HRT of 20 hr. The denitrification rate decreased significantly when the initial nitrate concentration was increased from 21mg-N/L to 46 mg-N/L. It was possible to use wood chips exclusively as a supply source of organic compounds. An excess amount of organic compounds which is discharged from the reactor can be reduced by passing the solution through a column packed with activated carbon. Cedar chips prepared from a fresh log shortly after cutting were used as a supporting material for denitirification bacteria. A satisfactorily high degree of denitirifation was obtained at HRT of 0.76 hr by adding ethanol as a reduction agent for nitrate.

  12. Low-power wireless on-chip microparticle manipulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dei, Yoshiaki; Kishiwada, Yasushi; Yamane, Rie; Inoue, Taisuke; Matsuoka, Toshimasa

    2015-04-01

    In order to realize an easy-to-use on-chip microparticle manipulation system, a chip that can manipulate microparticles by pulse-driven dielectrophoresis (DEP) in a solution with wireless power reception function was designed. Considering both of the DEP operation and power consumption of the chip, the internal supply voltage and the DEP driving signal frequency for CMOS digital circuits including the ring oscillator were assigned to about 0.5 V and about 1 MHz, respectively. The simulation results of wireless power transfer reveals that the use of higher-frequency (13 MHz) and input-matching circuits improve power transfer efficiency (4.7% for the rectification and DEP driving signal generation) and a smaller required available power of the AC power source (19.2 mW). The chip fabricated in a 180 nm triple-well CMOS process demonstrates the wireless on-chip DEP operation. Compared with power transfer systems using an off-chip transformer, the small primary coil on the PCB and the on-chip secondary coil dominate the power dissipation.

  13. Spectral Demultiplexing in Holographic and Fluorescent On-chip Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencan, Ikbal; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Sikora, Uzair; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    Lensfree on-chip imaging and sensing platforms provide compact and cost-effective designs for various telemedicine and lab-on-a-chip applications. In this work, we demonstrate computational solutions for some of the challenges associated with (i) the use of broadband, partially-coherent illumination sources for on-chip holographic imaging, and (ii) multicolor detection for lensfree fluorescent on-chip microscopy. Specifically, we introduce spectral demultiplexing approaches that aim to digitally narrow the spectral content of broadband illumination sources (such as wide-band light emitting diodes or even sunlight) to improve spatial resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy. We also demonstrate the application of such spectral demultiplexing approaches for wide-field imaging of multicolor fluorescent objects on a chip. These computational approaches can be used to replace e.g., thin-film interference filters, gratings or other optical components used for spectral multiplexing/demultiplexing, which can form a desirable solution for cost-effective and compact wide-field microscopy and sensing needs on a chip.

  14. Spectral Demultiplexing in Holographic and Fluorescent On-chip Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sencan, Ikbal; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Sikora, Uzair; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    Lensfree on-chip imaging and sensing platforms provide compact and cost-effective designs for various telemedicine and lab-on-a-chip applications. In this work, we demonstrate computational solutions for some of the challenges associated with (i) the use of broadband, partially-coherent illumination sources for on-chip holographic imaging, and (ii) multicolor detection for lensfree fluorescent on-chip microscopy. Specifically, we introduce spectral demultiplexing approaches that aim to digitally narrow the spectral content of broadband illumination sources (such as wide-band light emitting diodes or even sunlight) to improve spatial resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy. We also demonstrate the application of such spectral demultiplexing approaches for wide-field imaging of multicolor fluorescent objects on a chip. These computational approaches can be used to replace e.g., thin-film interference filters, gratings or other optical components used for spectral multiplexing/demultiplexing, which can form a desirable solution for cost-effective and compact wide-field microscopy and sensing needs on a chip. PMID:24441627

  15. Thermal characterization and modeling of ultra-thin silicon chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshahed, Muhammad; Yu, Zili; Rempp, Horst; Richter, Harald; Harendt, Christine; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing ultra-thin chip is an emerging field in semiconductor technology that is driven by 3-D integrated circuits and flexible electronics. Unlike bulk silicon (Si) chips with thickness greater than 400 μm, the thermal management of ultra-thin Si chips with thickness smaller than 20 μm is challenging due to the increased lateral thermal resistance implying stringent cooling requirements. Therefore, a reasonable prediction of temperature gradients in such chips is necessary. In this work, a thermal chip is implemented in an ultra-thin 0.5 μm CMOS technology to be employed in surface steady-state and transient temperature measurement. Test chips are either packaged in a Pin Grid Array (PGA) ceramic package or attached to a flexible polyimide substrate. The experimental results show an on-chip temperature gradient of ∼15 °C for a dissipated power of 0.4 W in the case of the PGA package and ∼30 °C for the polyimide substrate. The time constants are ∼50 s and ∼1 s for the PGA and the polyimide packages respectively. The measurements are complemented by FEM simulations using ANSYS 14.5 workbench and spice simulations using an equivalent lumped-component thermal circuit model. The lumped-element thermal circuit model is then used for the surface temperature prediction, which is compared to measurement results.

  16. Reviewing ChIPS, The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Burke, D. J.; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; McLaughlin, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System (ChIPS) is a 2D plotting system designed to allow users to easily create, manipulate, and produce publication quality visualizations. ChIPS has a simple but very powerful interactive interface that allows users to dynamically modify the contents and layout of their plots quickly and efficiently, with the results of any changes being immediately visible. ChIPS allows users to construct their plots fully interactively, and then save the final plot commands as a Python script. This bypasses the need to iteratively edit and rerun the script when developing the plot. Features such as undo and redo commands allow users to easily step backwards and forwards through previous commands, while the ability so save ChIPS sessions in a platform-independent state file allows the session to be restored at any time, even on another machine. Because ChIPS offers a Python interface, users can analyze their data using the broad array of modules offered in Python, and visualize the information in ChIPS at the same time. In this paper we explore the design decisions behind the development of ChIPS and some of the lessons learned along the way.

  17. Rework of flip chip bonded radiation pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähänen, S.; Heikkinen, H.; Pohjonen, H.; Salonen, J.; Savolainen-Pulli, S.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, some practical aspects of reworking flip chip hybridized pixel detectors are discussed. As flip chip technology has been advancing in terms of placement accuracy and reliability, large-area hybrid pixel detectors have been developed. The area requirements are usually fulfilled by placing several readout chips (ROCs) on single sensor chip. However, as the number of ROCs increases, the probability of failure in the hybridization process and the ROC operation also increases. Because high accuracy flip chip bonding takes time, a significant part of the price of a pixel detector comes from the flip chip assembly process itself. As large-area detector substrates are expensive, and many flip chip placements are required, the price of an assembled detector can become very high. In a typical case, there is just one bad ROC (out of several) on a faulty detector to be replaced. Considering the high price of pixel detectors and the fact that reworking faulty ROCs does not take much longer than the original placement, it is worthwhile to investigate the feasibility of a rework process.

  18. Solid Phase DNA Amplification: A Simple Monte Carlo Lattice Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Jean-Francois; Slater, Gary W.; Mayer, Pascal

    2003-03-01

    Recently, a new type of PCR called solid phase DNA amplification, has been introduced where surface-bound instead of freely-diffusing primers are used to amplify DNA. This type of amplification is limited to two-dimensional surfaces and therefore allows the easy parallelization of the PCR process in a single system. Furthermore, solid phase DNA amplification could provide an alternate route to DNA target implantation on DNA chips for genomic studies. We propose a simple Lattice Monte Carlo model of solid phase DNA amplification. We study the growth, stability and morphology of isolated PCR colonies under various conditions. Our results indicate that, in most cases, solid phase DNA amplification is characterized by a geometric growth and a rather sharp size distribution. These results are qualitatively different those obtained for liquid PCR processes which are usually characterized (at least initially) by an exponential growth and a broad population distribution. Various non-ideal effects are studied, and we demonstrate that such effects do not generally change the nature of the process, except in extreme cases.

  19. Microfluidic device (ExoChip) for On-Chip isolation, quantification and characterization of circulating exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shailender Singh; Dunlay, Christopher James; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2014-01-01

    Membrane bound vesicles, including microvesicles and exosomes, are secreted by both normal and cancerous cells into the extracellular space and in blood circulation. These circulating extracellular vesicles (cirEVs) and exosomes in particular are recognized as a potential source of disease biomarkers. However, to exploit the use of circulatory exosomes as a biomarker, a rapid, high-throughput and reproducible method is required for their isolation and molecular analysis. We have developed a simple, low cost microfluidic-based platform to isolate cirEVs enriched in exosomes directly from blood serum allowing simultaneous capture and quantification of exosomes in a single device. To capture specific exosomes, we employed “ExoChip”, a microfluidic device fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and functionalized with antibodies against CD63, an antigen commonly overexpressed in exosomes. Subsequent staining with a fluorescent carbocyanine dye (DiO) that specifically labels the exosomes, we quantitated exosomes using a standard plate-reader. Ten independent ExoChip experiments performed using serum obtained from five pancreatic cancer patients and five healthy individuals revealed a statistically significant increase (2.34±0.31 fold, p <0.001) in exosomes captured in cancer patients when compared to healthy individuals. Exosomal origins of ExoChip immobilized vesicles were further confirmed using immuno-electron-microscopy and Western blotting. In addition, we demonstrate the ability of ExoChip to recover exosomes with intact RNA enabling profiling of exosomal-microRNAs through openarray analysis, which has potential applications in biomarker discovery. Based on our findings, ExoChip is a well suited platform to be used as an exosome-based diagnostic and research tool for molecular screening of human cancers. PMID:24722878

  20. Design and application of a GaAs digital RF memory chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, William A.; Taddiken, Albert H.; Shichijo, Hisashi; Vernon, Michael A.; Whitmire, David A.

    1990-08-01

    A GaAs integrated memory/logic chip designed for digital RF memory (DRFM) applications is described. This chip, called a programmable delay-line element (PDLE), implements the basic DRFM storage and delay functions. The configuration combines a 4-kb static RAM with 750 logic gates, providing on a single chip the components for storage, address generation, demultiplexing, multiplexing, and control functions normally provided by a variety of separate chips. A distributed control organization, where the chip is configured to provide as outputs all the signals required as inputs to another identical chip, is used. Chips cascaded into strings implement the programmable delay lines required for DRFM systems. Within a string, signal distribution requires only local interconnections between adjacent chips. Correct operation of all functions was demonstrated in a four-chip string which provides a total memory capacity of 16 kb. The maximum sampling rate was 800 MHz, and power dissipation was approximately 2 W per chip.