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Sample records for 9l gliosarcoma model

  1. Interstitial chemotherapy of the 9L gliosarcoma: controlled release polymers for drug delivery in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, R J; Myseros, J S; Epstein, J I; Yang, M B; Chasin, M; Brem, H

    1993-01-15

    The administration of drugs directly into the central nervous system using polymers as drug carriers may improve the treatment of malignant brain tumors. In this study, the effect of the interstitial, localized delivery of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) incorporated into controlled release polymers implanted adjacent to the 9L gliosarcoma was assessed in s.c. and intracranial (i.c.) models. In the s.c. experiment, the 9L gliosarcoma was implanted in the flank of rats and subsequently treated with BCNU either (a) delivered in controlled release polymers inserted adjacent to the tumor or (b) administered systemically by i.p. injections or by controlled release polymers inserted at a site distant from the tumor. The interstitial release of BCNU adjacent to the tumor in the flank resulted in a significant tumor growth delay of 16.3 days, as compared to a growth delay of 9.3 and 11.2 days obtained with the systemic administration of BCNU. In the i.c. experiment, the 9L gliosarcoma was implanted in the brain of Fischer 344 rats and treated either (a) with controlled release polymers containing BCNU inserted into the brain or (b) with the systemic i.p. administration of BCNU. The interstitial release of BCNU in the brain resulted in a significant 5.4- to 7.3-fold increased survival, compared with a 2.4-fold increased survival after the systemic administration of the same dose of BCNU. The two groups with i.c. tumors treated interstitially had 17 and 42% cures, but no long-term cures were obtained in the group treated with systemic therapy. The localized, controlled delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in the s.c. tissues and in the brain via polymeric carriers may be more effective than standard systemic chemotherapy. This approach could be used to deliver a wide variety of agents into the central nervous system to treat diverse neuropathological conditions which remain refractory to systemic therapy.

  2. Distribution of hematoporphyrin derivative in the rat 9l gliosarcoma brain tumor analyzed by digital video fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boggan, J E; Walter, R; Edwards, M S; Borcich, J K; Davis, R L; Koonce, M; Berns, M W

    1984-12-01

    A digital video fluorescence microscopy technique was used to evaluate the distribution of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) in the rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma brain-tumor model at 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg of the drug. Compared to surrounding normal brain, there was significant preferential uptake of HPD into the tumor. In sections surveyed, fluorescence reached a maximum value by 24 hours; however, only 33% to 44% of the tumor was fluorescent. In contrast, fluorescence within the surrounding normal brain was maximum at 4 hours, but was present in less than 1% of the brain tissue evaluated. The effect of HPD sensitization to a laser light dose (633 nm) of 30 joules/sq cm delivered through the intact skull was evaluated histologically in 10 rats. A patchy coagulation necrosis, possibly corresponding to the distribution of HPD fluorescence seen within the tumor, was observed. There was evidence that photoradiation therapy (PRT) affects defective tumor vasculature and that a direct tumor cell toxicity spared normal brain tissue. Despite these findings, limited uptake of HPD in tumor and the brain adjacent to tumor may decrease the effectiveness of PRT in the 9L gliosarcoma brain-tumor model. Because of the similarity between the capillary system of the 9L tumor and human brain tumors, PRT may have a limited therapeutic effect in patients with malignant brain tumors. PMID:6239014

  3. Cell cycle dependence of protophorphyrin IX generation in 9L rat gliosarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shiming; Da, Xing; Chen, Qun

    2006-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer therapy that utilizes optical energy to activate a photosensitizer drug in a target tissue. Always, the curative effect is dependent on the light fluence, the concentration of the photosensitizer and the concentration of the oxygen. To date, Protophorphyrin IX (PpIX) as the only one endogenous photosensitizer is widely used in PDT of brain tumors. Since PpIX is synthesized in intracellular structure, and is likely dependent on the phase of the cell cycle. The cell cycle dependence of PpIX production is thus investigated in the current work in 9L gliosarcoma cells.

  4. Preferential Effect of Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy on Intracerebral 9L Gliosarcoma Vascular Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Audrey; Lemasson, Benjamin; Le Duc, Geraldine; Maisin, Cecile; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Renaud, Luc; Khalil, Enam; Remy, Chantal; Poillot, Cathy; Bravin, Alberto; Laissue, Jean A.; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Serduc, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) relies on spatial fractionation of the incident photon beam into parallel micron-wide beams. Our aim was to analyze the effects of MRT on normal brain and 9L gliosarcoma tissues, particularly on blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Responses to MRT (two arrays, one lateral, one anteroposterior (2 x 400 Gy), intersecting orthogonally in the tumor region) were studied during 6 weeks using MRI, immunohistochemistry, and vascular endothelial growth factor Western blot. Results: MRT increased the median survival time of irradiated rats (x3.25), significantly increased blood vessel permeability, and inhibited tumor growth; a cytotoxic effect on 9L cells was detected 5 days after irradiation. Significant decreases in tumoral blood volume fraction and vessel diameter were measured from 8 days after irradiation, due to loss of endothelial cells in tumors as detected by immunochemistry. Edema was observed in the normal brain exposed to both crossfired arrays about 6 weeks after irradiation. This edema was associated with changes in blood vessel morphology and an overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Conversely, vascular parameters and vessel morphology in brain regions exposed to one of the two arrays were not damaged, and there was no loss of vascular endothelia. Conclusions: We show for the first time that preferential damage of MRT to tumor vessels versus preservation of radioresistant normal brain vessels contributes to the efficient palliation of 9L gliosarcomas in rats. Molecular pathways of repair mechanisms in normal and tumoral vascular networks after MRT may be essential for the improvement of such differential effects on the vasculature.

  5. Systemic chemotherapy combined with local adoptive immunotherapy cures rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kruse, C A; Mitchell, D H; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K; Bellgrau, D; Eule, J M; Parra, J R; Kong, Q; Lillehei, K O

    1993-02-01

    Survival of Fischer rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma in the brain was measured to determine the efficacy of 1) systemically administered chemotherapy with local adoptive immunotherapy (chemo-adoptive immunotherapy) or 2) systemically administered chemo-immunotherapy. Winn assays, where tumor instillation coincided with the start of treatment, and one-week established tumor assays were conducted. Survival of chemo-adoptive immunotherapy treated groups given intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide and intracranial lymphokine activated killer cells and recombinant Interleukin-2 was significantly extended when compared to sham treated control groups, to groups given chemotherapy with intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide, and to groups treated by local adoptive immunotherapy with intracranial lymphokine activated killer cells and Interleukin-2. The killer cells were generated from spleens of donor rats that either had or had not been given cyclophosphamide 24 h earlier. Long-term survivors (9/39), sacrificed at day 70, were obtained only in the chemo-adoptive immunotherapy treated groups; 7/39 had no histologic evidence of tumor and had focal sterile abscesses at the site of killer cell instillation. Average group weight plotted over time showed that there was acceptable toxicity with chemo-adoptive immunotherapy; the toxicity was identical to that obtained with systemic cyclophosphamide treatment. In contrast, survival of chemo-immunotherapy treated groups given systemic cyclophosphamide and Interleukin-2 was not significantly extended from groups which were sham treated or treated only with systemic Interleukin-2. Rapid decline of average group weight plotted over time and early deaths following chemo-immunotherapy treatment indicated that the regimen was toxic. The effect of cyclophosphamide administration on the splenocytes of donor rats and the LAK cells generated from them was determined by in vitro studies analyzing cell number, viability, phenotypic expression and cytotoxicity

  6. Quantification of microvascular cerebral blood flux and late-stage tumor compartmentalization in 9L gliosarcoma using flow enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Olivier; Geffroy, Françoise; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of tumor microvasculature are important to obtain an understanding of tumor angiogenesis and for the evaluation of therapies. In this work, we characterize the evolution of the microvascular flux at different stages of tumor growth in the 9L rat brain tumor model. The absolute quantification of cerebral blood flux is achieved with MRI at 7 T using the flow enhanced signal intensity (FENSI) method. FENSI flux maps were obtained between 5 and 14 days after glioma cell inoculation. Based on cerebral blood flux maps, we highlighted two main stages of tumor growth, below and above 3 mm, presenting distinct flux patterns and vascular properties. No significant difference emerged from the group analysis performed on the data collected at an early developmental stage (tumor size < 3 mm) when compared with healthy tissue. At a late developmental stage (tumor size > 3 mm), we observed a significant decrease in the cerebral blood flux inside the gliosarcoma (-33%, p < 0.01) and compartmentalization of the tumor (p < 0.05). FENSI flux maps delineated a low-flux tumor core (58 ± 17 μL/min/cm(2) ) and higher vascularized regions around the tumor periphery (85 ± 21 μL/min/cm(2) ). Histology was performed on 11 animals to finely probe the intratumor heterogeneity and microvessel density, and the results were compared with the information derived from FENSI flux maps. The hyper- and hypoperfused tumor regions revealed with FENSI at the late tumor developmental stage correlated well with the ratios of high and low blood vessel density (R(2) = 0.41) and fractional vascular surface (R(2) = 0.67) observed with fluorescence microscopy [cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) staining].

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of anti-1-amino-2-[18F]fluoro-cyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid (anti-2-[18F]FACBC) in rat 9L gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiping; Williams, Larry; Camp, Vernon M; Olson, Jeffrey J; Goodman, Mark M

    2010-04-01

    A new [(18)F] labeled amino acid anti-1-amino-2-[(18)F]fluoro-cyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid 9 (anti-2-[(18)F]FACBC) was synthesized in 30% decay-corrected yield with high radiochemical purity over 99%. The cyclic sulfamidate precursor was very stable and highly reactive towards nucleophilic radiofluorination. Cell uptake assays with rat 9L gliosarcoma cells showed that [(18)F]9 was transported into tumor cells via multiple amino acid transport systems, including L and A systems. Biodistribution study in rats with intracranial 9L gliosarcoma tumors demonstrated that [(18)F]9 had a rapid and prolonged accumulation in tumors with 26:1 tumor to brain ratio at 120 min post-injection. In this model, [(18)F]9 is a potential PET tracer for brain tumor imaging.

  8. Post-acute response of 9L gliosarcoma to Photofrin-mediated PDT in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Jiang, Feng; Kalkanis, Steven N; Zhang, ZhengGang; Hong, Xin; Yang, Hongyan; Chopp, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study is to measure the chronic responses of 9L glioma and normal brain to photodynamic therapy (PDT). Tumor size, proliferation activity of glioma cells, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in both the tumor area and the brain adjacent to tumor (BAT) were observed 7 days after clinically relevant doses of PDT treatment. 9L Gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the brain of 20 athymic nude mice. Fifteen mice were injected intraperitoneally with Photofrin at a dose of 2 mg/kg on day 6 after tumor implantation and were treated with laser at different optical doses of 40 J/cm(2) (n = 5), 80 J/cm(2) (n = 5), and 120 J/cm(2) (n = 5) at 24 h after Photofrin injection, respectively. The remaining five tumor-bearing mice served as a tumor-only control. All animals were killed 14 days after tumor implantation. Hematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining were performed to assess tumor volume, VEGF expression in the tumor and the BAT, as well as Ki67 expression in the tumor area. The tumor volume of the mice receiving 80 or 120 J/cm(2) group was significantly smaller than the control group (p < 0.01). VEGF immunoreactivity in the BAT was significantly increased in the 120 J/cm(2) PDT-treated mice (p < 0.001), compared with the immunoreactivity seen in untreated mice and those receiving Photofrin and lower optical doses. No significant differences were detected in the proliferation of glioma cells and VEGF expression in the tumor area between these groups. These data indicate that PDT can shrink tumor, especially at the high light dose, and that PDT induces expression of VEGF in the BAT, which is associated with tumor recurrence. Therefore, PDT combined with anti-angiogenic agents may be an effective treatment strategy for glioma. PMID:17505777

  9. Irradiation of intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma by a single array of microplanar x-ray beams from a synchrotron: balance between curing and sparing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnard, Pierrick; LeDuc, Géraldine; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Troprès, Irène; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Kusak, Audrey; Clair, Charlotte; Bernard, Hélène; Dallery, Dominique; Laissue, Jean A.; Bravin, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this work was the understanding of microbeam radiation therapy at the ESRF in order to find the best compromise between curing of tumors and sparing of normal tissues, to obtain a better understanding of survival curves and to report its efficiency. This method uses synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams. Rats were implanted with 9L gliosarcomas and the tumors were diagnosed by MRI. They were irradiated 14 days after implantation by arrays of 25 µm wide microbeams in unidirectional mode, with a skin entrance dose of 625 Gy. The effect of using 200 or 100 µm center-to-center spacing between the microbeams was compared. The median survival time (post-implantation) was 40 and 67 days at 200 and 100 µm spacing, respectively. However, 72% of rats irradiated at 100 µm spacing showed abnormal clinical signs and weight patterns, whereas only 12% of rats were affected at 200 µm spacing. In parallel, histological lesions of the normal brain were found in the 100 µm series only. Although the increase in lifespan was equal to 273% and 102% for the 100 and 200 µm series, respectively, the 200 µm spacing protocol provides a better sparing of healthy tissue and may prove useful in combination with other radiation modalities or additional drugs.

  10. Resorbable polymer microchips releasing BCNU inhibit tumor growth in the rat 9L flank model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace Y; Tyler, Betty M; Tupper, Malinda M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Langer, Robert S; Brem, Henry; Cima, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Sustained local delivery of single agents and controlled delivery of multiple chemotherapeutic agents are sought for the treatment of brain cancer. A resorbable, multi-reservoir polymer microchip drug delivery system has been tested against a tumor model. The microchip reservoirs were loaded with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). BCNU was more stable at 37 degrees C within the microchip compared to a uniformly impregnated polymeric wafer (70% intact drug vs. 38%, at 48 h). The half-life of the intact free drug in the microchip was 11 days, which is a marked enhancement compared to its half-life in normal saline and 10% ethanol (7 and 10 min, respectively) [P. Tepe, S.J. Hassenbusch, R. Benoit, J.H. Anderson, BCNU stability as a function of ethanol concentration and temperature, J. Neurooncol. 10 (1991) 121-127; P. Kari, W.R. McConnell, J.M. Finkel, D.L. Hill, Distribution of Bratton-Marshall-positive material in mice following intravenous injections of nitrosoureas, Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 4 (1980) 243-248]. A syngeneic Fischer 344 9L gliosarcoma rat model was used to study the tumoricidal efficacy of BCNU delivery from the microchip or homogeneous polymer wafer. A dose-dependent decrease in tumor size was found for 0.17, 0.67, and 1.24 mg BCNU-microchips. Tumors treated with 1.24 mg BCNU-microchips showed significant tumor reduction (p=0.001) compared to empty control microchips at two weeks. The treatment showed similar efficacy to a polymer wafer with the same dosage. The microchip reservoir array may enable delivery of multiple drugs with independent release kinetics and formulations.

  11. The therapeutic ratio in BNCT: Assessment using the Rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor and spinal cord models

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Fisher, C.D.; Bywaters, A.; Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    During any radiation therapy, the therapeutic tumor dose is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. The short ranges of the products of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction produced during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) present an opportunity to increase the therapeutic ratio (tumor dose/normal tissue dose) to levels unprecedented in photon radiotherapy. The mixed radiation field produced during BNCT comprises radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) and different relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The short ranges of the two high-LET products of the `B(n,a)`Li reaction make the microdistribution of the boron relative to target cell nuclei of particular importance. Due to the tissue specific distribution of different boron compounds, the term RBE is inappropriate in defining the biological effectiveness of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction. To distinguish these differences from true RBEs we have used the term {open_quotes}compound biological effectiveness{close_quotes} (CBE) factor. The latter can be defined as the product of the true, geometry-independent, RBE for these particles times a {open_quotes}boron localization factor{close_quotes}, which will most likely be different for each particular boron compound. To express the total BNCT dose in a common unit, and to compare BNCT doses with the effects of conventional photon irradiation, multiplicative factors (RBEs and CBEs) are applied to the physical absorbed radiation doses from each high-LET component. The total effective BNCT dose is then expressed as the sum of RBE-corrected physical absorbed doses with the unit Gray-equivalent (Gy-Eq).

  12. Magnetic Targeting of Novel Heparinized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evaluated in a 9L-glioma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A novel PEGylated and heparinized magnetic iron oxide nano-platform (DNPH) was synthesized for simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tumor targeting. Methods Starch-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (“D”) were crosslinked, aminated (DN) and then simultaneously PEGylated and heparinized with different feed ratios of PEG and heparin (DNPH1-4). DNPH products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The magentic targeting of DNPH3, with appropriate amounts of conjugated PEG and heparin, in a mouse 9L-glioma subcutaneous tumor model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/electron spin resonance (ESR). Results DNPH3 showed long circulating properties in vivo (half-life > 8 h, more than 60-fold longer than that of parent D) and low reticuloendothelial system (RES) recognition in liver and spleen. Protamine, a model cationic protein, was efficiently loaded onto DNPH3 with a maxium loading content of 26.4 μg/mg Fe. Magnetic capture of DNPH3 in tumor site with optimized conditions (I.D. of 12 mg/kg, targeting time of 45 min) was up to 29.42 μg Fe/g tissue (12.26% I.D./g tissue). Conclusion DNPH3 showed the potential to be used as a platform for cationic proteins for simultaneous tumor targeting and imaging. PMID:24065589

  13. Primary Multifocal Gliosarcoma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh M.; Finn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuro-axis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord. PMID:27134708

  14. Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields have no effect on the in vivo proliferation of the 9L brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Higashikubo, R; Culbreth, V O; Spitz, D R; LaRegina, M C; Pickard, W F; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Roti, J L

    1999-12-01

    The intracranial 9L tumor model was used to determine if exposure to a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field similar to those used in cellular telephone has any effects on the growth of a central nervous system tumor. Fischer 344 rats implanted with different numbers of 9L gliosarcoma cells were exposed to 835.62 MHz frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) or 847.74 MHz code division multiple access (CDMA) RF field with nominal slot-average specific absorption rates in the brain of 0.75 +/- 0.25 W/kg. The animals were exposed to the RF field for 4 h a day, 5 days a week starting 4 weeks prior to and up to 150 days after the implantation of tumor cells. Among sham-exposed animals injected with 2 to 10 viable cells (group 1), the median survival was 70 days, with 27% of the animals surviving at 150 days. The median survival length and final survival fraction for animals injected with 11 to 36 viable cells (group 2) were 52 days and 14%, respectively, while the values for those injected with 37 to 100 cells (group 3) were 45 days and 0%. The animals exposed to CDMA or FMCW had similar survival parameters, and the statistical comparison of the survival curves for each of the groups 1, 2 and 3 showed no significant differences compared to sham-exposed controls. PMID:10581537

  15. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Gliosarcoma: A rare primary CNS tumor. Presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, José; Murcia, Mauricio; García, Felip; Alvarado, Arnaldo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Introduction Gliosarcoma is a very rare primary mixed tumor in the central nervous system, with a biphasic pattern consisting of glial and malignant mesenchymal elements. Its onset is between the fourth and sixth decade of life, and it has a male/female ratio of 1.8/1. Here we present two cases of Gliosarcoma treated in our department. Discussion The monoclonal or biclonal origin of its biphasic nature is still subject to debate; hence the importance of its diagnosis and histogenesis. Results Standard treatment consists in surgical resection of the tumor followed in some cases by external radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:24376932

  17. Radiotherapy plus concomitant temozolomide in primary gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Bernhardt, Denise; Harrabi, Semi Ben; Diehl, Christian; Koelsche, Christian; Rieken, Stefan; Unterberg, Andreas; von Deimling, Andreas; Debus, Juergen

    2016-06-01

    Clinical guidelines for gliosarcoma (GSM) are poorly defined and GSM patients are usually treated in accordance with existing guidelines for glioblastoma (GBM), with maximal surgical resection followed by chemoradiation with temozolomide (TMZ). However, it is not clear yet if GSM patients profit from TMZ therapy and if O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is crucial. We retrospectively evaluated 37 patients with histologically proven, primary GSM who had received radiation therapy since the temozolomide era (post-2005). Twenty-five patients (67.6 %) received combined chemoradiation with temozolomide, and 12 cases (32.4 %) received radiation therapy alone. Molecular markers were determined retrospectively. Survival and correlations were calculated using log-rank, univariate, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards-ratio analyses. All cases were isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) wildtype, MGMT promoter methylation could be observed in 33.3 % of the assessable cases (10/30) and TERT promoter mutation was seen in a high frequency of 86.7 % (26/30). The influence of TMZ therapy on overall survival (OS) was significantly improved compared with cases in which radiation therapy alone was performed (13.9 vs. 9.9 months; p = 0.045), independently of MGMT promoter methylation. The positive effect of TMZ on OS was confirmed in this study's multivariate analyses (p = 0.04), after adjusting our results for potential confounders. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that concomitant TMZ together with radiation therapy increases GSM-patient survival independent of MGMT promoter methylation. Thus, GSM can be treated in accordance to GBM guidelines. MGMT promoter methylation was infrequent and TERT promoter mutation common without influencing the survival rates. The mechanisms of TMZ effects in GSM are still not fully understood and merit further clinical and molecular-genetic and -biological evaluation. PMID:27025857

  18. Post-Treatment Gliosarcoma Extension into the Pterygomaxillary Fossa: Literature Review and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Alexander; Villavicencio, Alan T; Nelson, Ewell L; Forsythe, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Only four primary gliosarcoma case reports are described in the literature with transcranial (intradural to extradural) penetration into the region of the infratemporal fossa. This is the first report of a primary glioblastoma (GBM) that evolved into secondary or post-treatment gliosarcoma without evidence of a second de novo tumor and with extension into the left pterygomaxillary fossa.

  19. DTI-015 produces cures in T9 gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pietronigro, Dennis; Drnovsky, Frank; Cravioto, Humberto; Ransohoff, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    DTI-015 (BCNU in 100% ethanol) utilizes solvent-facilitated perfusion for the intratumoral treatment of gliomas. The water-miscible organic solvent vehicle, ethanol, facilitates a rapid and thorough saturation of the'tumor with the dissolved anticancer agent, BCNU. Rats bearing established intracranial T9 gliosarcoma tumors received no treatment (group 1), a single intratumoral injection of ethanol vehicle (group 2) or DTI-015 (5 mg/kg BCNU) (group 3), or a single intratumoral injection of DTI-015 followed by systemic BCNU (group 4). Ethanol alone (n=13) had no effect on survival; MST=17 days compared to 18 days for untreated controls (n=35). DTI-015 (n=45) produced an ILS of 417% (MST=93) and 472% (MST=103) when combined with systemic BCNU (n=14). Overall, 24 of 59 rats receiving DTI-015 were judged to be cured, with 20 living a normal life span of 600 to 700 days, and 4 rats sacrificed healthy at 121, 135, 307, and 384 days post DTI-015 with no evidence of viable T9 tumor. Histology demonstrated that DTI-015 totally eradicated the T9 tumors in animals living a normal life span. The results demonstrate that a single injection of DTI-015 produces a 40% cure rate in rats bearing established intracranial T9 tumors.

  20. Primary gliosarcoma with long-survival: report of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Zhen; Yang, Di; Shen, Jie; Li, Yuan; Wu, Huanwen; Meng, Yunxiao; Zhang, Shuying; Luo, Yufeng; Cao, Jinling; Liang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare high-grade malignant tumor with poor prognosis. The survival period of GS ranges from 4 to 18.5 months. Rarely would it be over 40 months. Survival of intraventricular GS is less than 8 months. Methods: There were 2 cases of primary gliosarcoma in our hospital with long-term survival after resection, with one of pure intraventricular origin. We confirmed that our diagnosis was correct by light microscopy, GFAP immunohistochemistry and histochemistry of reticular fiber staining. Results: In the first case, a 47-year-old man with intraventricular gliosarcoma survived for 130 months after surgery. In another case, a 63-year-old woman survived for 4 years after resection. Both cases of GS exhibited biphasic glioblastoma and fibrosarcoma with necrosis. According to the review of surgical records, complete tumor resections, including extended resections were carried out in both cases. The two patients received postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy without any further recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions: We reported two cases of GS with long survival. The presented cases demonstrate that, in rare instances, gliosarcoma may show prolonged survival with after surgical excision combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25337286

  1. Gliosarcomas arising from the pineal gland region: uncommon localization and rare tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Tanigawa, Ken; Ohshima, Koichi; Morioka, Motohiro; Higaki, Koichi; Nakagawa, Setsuko; Shimokawa, Shoko; Nakashima, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Gliosarcomas are a variant of glioblastomas and present a biphasic pattern, with coexisting glial and mesenchymal components. In this study, two unusual cases are presented. Case 1 is a 52-year-old woman with a headache and memory disturbance for a month. Case 2 is an 18-year-old man with a headache lasting two weeks. In both cases, an MRI revealed enhancing T1-low to iso, T2-iso to high intensity lesions in the pineal gland region. Histologically, in case 1, the tumor showed spindle cell proliferation with disorganized fascicles and cellular pleomorphism. Tumor cells variously exhibited oncocytic transformation. Immunohistochemically, most of the spindle tumor cells were positive for myoglobin and desmin. Some of the tumor cells were positive for GFAP and S-100 protein. On the other hand, all tumor cells were positive for CD133, Musashi1, and SOX-2 which are the markers of neural stem cells. In case 2, the tumor showed monotonous proliferation of short spindle cells with disorganized fascicles and cellular atypism. The morphological distinction between glial and mesenchymal components was not apparent. Immunohistochemically, most of the spindle tumor cells were positive for desmin. Glial tumor cells that were dispersed within the sarcoma as single cells were positive for GFAP. In addition, all tumor cells were positive for CD133, Musashi1 and SOX-2. Based on these microscopic appearances, and immunohistochemical findings, these cases were diagnosed as gliosarcomas arising from the pineal gland region. These results also indicated that pluripotential cancer stem cells differentiated into glial and muscle cell lines at the time of tumor growth. In a survey of previous publications on gliosarcoma arising from the pineal gland, these cases are the second and third reports found in English scientific writings.

  2. Giant parietal lobe infantile gliosarcoma in a 5-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Savant, Hemant V.; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Mahajan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The relative frequency of pediatric gliosarcoma (GSM) is 1.9% among glioblastomas and 0.5% among pediatric central nervous system tumors. A 5-year-old female child came to us with history of fever and loss of appetite since 2 weeks and right sided weakness since 4 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large heterogeneously enhancing space occupying lesion in the left parieto-occipital region. A parieto-occipital craniotomy with radical excision of tumor was performed. The patient was given adjuvant therapy following surgery and survived until 9 months following surgery. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis of GSM is discussed. PMID:26167224

  3. Giant parietal lobe infantile gliosarcoma in a 5-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Savant, Hemant V; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Mahajan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The relative frequency of pediatric gliosarcoma (GSM) is 1.9% among glioblastomas and 0.5% among pediatric central nervous system tumors. A 5-year-old female child came to us with history of fever and loss of appetite since 2 weeks and right sided weakness since 4 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large heterogeneously enhancing space occupying lesion in the left parieto-occipital region. A parieto-occipital craniotomy with radical excision of tumor was performed. The patient was given adjuvant therapy following surgery and survived until 9 months following surgery. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis of GSM is discussed.

  4. Delayed onset of paresis in rats with experimental intramedullary spinal cord gliosarcoma following intratumoral administration of the paclitaxel delivery system OncoGel

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Betty M.; Hdeib, Alia; Caplan, Justin; Legnani, Federico G.; Fowers, Kirk D.; Brem, Henry; Jallo, George; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Object Treatment options for anaplastic or malignant intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) remain limited. Paclitaxel has potent cytotoxicity against experimental intracranial gliomas and could be beneficial in the treatment of IMSCTs, but poor CNS penetration and significant toxicity limit its use. Such limitations could be overcome with local intratumoral delivery. Paclitaxel has been previously incorporated into a biodegradable gel depot delivery system (OncoGel) and in this study the authors evaluated the safety of intramedullary injections of OncoGel in rats and its efficacy against an intramedullary rat gliosarcoma. Methods Safety of intramedullary OncoGel was tested in 12 Fischer-344 rats using OncoGel concentrations of 1.5 and 6.0 mg/ml (5 μl); median survival and functional motor scores (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] scale) were compared with those obtained with placebo (ReGel) and medium-only injections. Efficacy of OncoGel was tested in 61 Fischer-344 rats implanted with an intramedullary injection of 9L gliosarcoma containing 100,000 cells in 5 μl of medium, and randomized to receive OncoGel administered on the same day (in 32 rats) or 5 days after tumor implantation (in 29 rats) using either 1.5 mg/ml or 3.0 mg/ml doses of paclitaxel. Median survival and BBB scores were compared with those of ReGel-treated and tumor-only rats. Animals were killed after the onset of deficits for histopathological analysis. Results OncoGel was safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 μl of 3.0 mg/ml of paclitaxel; a dose of 5 μl of 6.0 mg/ml caused rapid deterioration in BBB scores. OncoGel at concentrations of 1.5 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml paclitaxel given on both Day 0 and Day 5 prolonged median survival and preserved BBB scores compared with controls. OncoGel 1.5 mg/ml produced 62.5% long-term survivors when delivered on Day 0. A comparison between the 1.5 mg/ml and the 3.0 mg/ml doses showed higher median survival with the 1.5 mg/ml dose on Day 0

  5. Human and rat glioma growth, invasion, and vascularization in a novel chick embryo brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Fotos, Joseph S; Little, Brian W; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the insidiously invasive nature of malignant gliomas are poorly understood, and their study would be facilitated by an in vivo model that is easy to manipulate and inexpensive. The developing chick embryo brain was assessed as a new xenograft model for the production, growth, and study of human and rat glioma cell lines. Three established glioma lines (U-87 MG, C6, and 9L) were injected into chick embryo brain ventricles on embryonic day (E) 5 and brains were examined after several days to two weeks after injection. All glioma lines survived, produced vascularized intraventricular tumors, and invaded the brain in a manner similar to that in rodents. Rat C6 glioma cells spread along vasculature and also invaded the neural tissue. Human U-87 glioma cells migrated along vasculature and exhibited slight invasion of neural tissue. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells were highly motile, but migrated only along the vasculature. A derivative of 9L cells that stably expressed the cell surface adhesion molecule NgCAM/L1 was produced and also injected into chick embryo brain ventricles to see if this protein could facilitate tumor cell migration away from the vasculature into areas such as axonal tracts. 9L/NgCAM cells, however, did not migrate away from the vasculature and, thus, this protein alone cannot be responsible for diffuse invasiveness of some gliomas. 9L/NgCAM cell motility was assessed in vitro using sophisticated time-lapse microscopy and quantitative analysis, and was significantly altered compared to parental 9L cells. These studies demonstrate that the chick embryo brain is a successful and novel xenograft model for mammalian gliomas and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new model for studying glioma tumor cell growth, vascularization, and invasiveness.

  6. Evolution and divergence of the mammalian SAMD9/SAMD9L gene family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The physiological functions of the human Sterile Alpha Motif Domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) gene and its chromosomally adjacent paralogue, SAMD9-like (SAMD9L), currently remain unknown. However, the direct links between the deleterious mutations or deletions in these two genes and several human disorders, such as inherited inflammatory calcified tumors and acute myeloid leukemia, suggest their biological importance. SAMD9 and SAMD9L have also recently been shown to play key roles in the innate immune responses to stimuli such as viral infection. We were particularly interested in understanding the mammalian evolutionary history of these two genes. The phylogeny of SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes was reconstructed using the Maximum Likelihood method. Furthermore, six different methods were applied to detect SAMD9 and SAMD9L codons under selective pressure: the site-specific model M8 implemented in the codeml program in PAML software and five methods available on the Datamonkey web server, including the Single Likelihood Ancestor Counting method, the Fixed Effect Likelihood method, the Random Effect Likelihood method, the Mixed Effects Model of Evolution method and the Fast Unbiased Bayesian AppRoximation method. Additionally, the house mouse (Mus musculus) genome has lost the SAMD9 gene, while keeping SAMD9L intact, prompting us to investigate whether this loss is a unique event during evolution. Results Our evolutionary analyses suggest that SAMD9 and SAMD9L arose through an ancestral gene duplication event after the divergence of Marsupialia from Placentalia. Additionally, selection analyses demonstrated that both genes have been subjected to positive evolutionary selection. The absence of either SAMD9 or SAMD9L genes from some mammalian species supports a partial functional redundancy between the two genes. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first study on the evolutionary history of mammalian SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes. We conclude that

  7. Neuropathology of ablation of rat gliosarcomas and contiguous brain tissues using a microplanar beam of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X rays.

    PubMed

    Laissue, J A; Geiser, G; Spanne, P O; Dilmanian, F A; Gebbers, J O; Geiser, M; Wu, X Y; Makar, M S; Micca, P L; Nawrocky, M M; Joel, D D; Slatkin, D N

    1998-11-23

    Adult-rat-brain tissues display an unusually high resistance to necrosis when serially irradiated with parallel, thin slices of a microplanar (i.e., microscopically thin and macroscopically broad) beam of synchrotron-wiggler-generated, approx. 35-120 keV (median approx. 50 keV) Gd-filtered X rays at skin-entrance absorbed doses of 312 to 5000 Gy per slice. Such microplanar beams were used to irradiate young adult rats bearing right frontocerebral 9L gliosarcomas (approx. 4 mm diameter), through a volume of tissue containing the tumor and contiguous brain tissue, either in a single array or in 2 orthogonally crossed arrays of tissue slices. Each array included 101 parallel microplanar slices, 100 microm center-to-center distance, each slice being approx. 25 microm wide and 12 mm high, with skin-entrance absorbed doses of 312.5 Gy or 625 Gy per slice. Compared with unirradiated controls with a median survival time of 20 days after tumor initiation, the median survival time was extended in irradiated rats by 139 days (625 Gy, crossed arrays), 96 days (312 Gy, crossed arrays) or 24 days (625 Gy, single array). The tumors disappeared in 22 of the 36 irradiated rats, 4/11 even after unidirectional microbeam irradiation. The extent and severity of radiation damage to the normal brain in rats with or without tumor was graded histopathologically. Correlation of those grades with radiation doses shows that loss of tissue structure was confined to beam-crossing regions and that only minor damage was done to zones of the brain irradiated unidirectionally.

  8. Gliosarcoma: A rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme in paediatric patient: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Sharma, Sumit; Chopra, Sanjeev; Jain, Shashi Kant

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma is rare central nervous system tumour and a variant of glioblastoma multiforme with bimorphic histological pattern of glial and sarcomatous differentiation. It occurs in elderly between 5th and 6th decades of life and extremely rare in children. It is highly aggressive tumour and managed like glioblastoma multiforme. A 12-year-old female child presented with complaints of headache and vomiting from 15 d and blurring of vision from 3 d. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain shows heterogeneous mass in right parieto-occipital cortex. A right parieto-occipito-temporal craniotomy with complete excision of mass revealed a primary glioblastoma on histopathological investigation. Treatment consists of maximum surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis is discussed. The available literature is also reviewed.

  9. Gliosarcoma: A rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme in paediatric patient: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Sharma, Sumit; Chopra, Sanjeev; Jain, Shashi Kant

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma is rare central nervous system tumour and a variant of glioblastoma multiforme with bimorphic histological pattern of glial and sarcomatous differentiation. It occurs in elderly between 5th and 6th decades of life and extremely rare in children. It is highly aggressive tumour and managed like glioblastoma multiforme. A 12-year-old female child presented with complaints of headache and vomiting from 15 d and blurring of vision from 3 d. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain shows heterogeneous mass in right parieto-occipital cortex. A right parieto-occipito-temporal craniotomy with complete excision of mass revealed a primary glioblastoma on histopathological investigation. Treatment consists of maximum surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis is discussed. The available literature is also reviewed. PMID:27672648

  10. Gliosarcoma: A rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme in paediatric patient: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Sharma, Sumit; Chopra, Sanjeev; Jain, Shashi Kant

    2016-09-16

    Gliosarcoma is rare central nervous system tumour and a variant of glioblastoma multiforme with bimorphic histological pattern of glial and sarcomatous differentiation. It occurs in elderly between 5(th) and 6(th) decades of life and extremely rare in children. It is highly aggressive tumour and managed like glioblastoma multiforme. A 12-year-old female child presented with complaints of headache and vomiting from 15 d and blurring of vision from 3 d. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain shows heterogeneous mass in right parieto-occipital cortex. A right parieto-occipito-temporal craniotomy with complete excision of mass revealed a primary glioblastoma on histopathological investigation. Treatment consists of maximum surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis is discussed. The available literature is also reviewed. PMID:27672648

  11. Cytopatholologic features of gliosarcoma with areas of primitive neuroepithelial differentiation of the brain in squash smears.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshitetsu; Kushida, Yoshio; Kadota, Kyuichi; Katsuki, Naomi; Bando, Kenji; Miyai, Yumi; Funamoto, Yasunobu; Haba, Reiji

    2009-12-01

    Gliosarcoma with areas of primitive neuroepithelial differentiation (GSPNED) is an extremely rare neoplasm. A case is presented here in which squash smears of a left temporal lobe tumor in a 76-year-old male demonstrated two distinct and easily recognizable cellular populations, i.e., densely hyperchromatic cells of a primitive nature in a fibrillary background and pleomorphic spindle-shaped cells. Occasional pseudo-rosette formations and nuclear cannibalism suggestive of neuroendocrine differentiation were also found. A cytologic diagnosis of a malignant tumor was suggested, and histochemical and immunohistochemical studies were conducted on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Reticulin stain highlighted increased intercellular collagen and reticulin deposition within the spindled regions, whereas nodules with primitive cells were reticulin-poor. There was a diffuse and strong reactivity to neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin and CD56 immunostains. A stain for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S-100 protein demonstrated a subset of tumor cells including elongated cytoplasmic processes. The spindled component was positive for vimentin and smooth muscle actin, whereas the primitive-appearing tumor cells were negative. The diagnosis of GSPNED was confirmed based on cytopathologic, histopathological and immunohistochemical results. The cytomorphologic features of this distinctive tumor are illustrated, and the adjunctival value of squash smears for frozen-section diagnosis is also discussed. This is the first presentation of a cytopathologic analysis that provides an important clue to an accurate diagnosis of GSPNED.

  12. Gliosarcoma: an unusual cause of cerebral mass lesion in a patient with AIDS. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Corti, M; Trione, N; Muzzio, E; Yampolsky, C; Lewi, D; Schtirbu, R; Sevlever, G

    2009-01-20

    Malignant glioma is the most common primary brain neoplasm. Generally, gliomas are not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system in patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. We report a case of gliosarcoma in a patient with AIDS presenting as a single cerebral lesion. Stereotactic brain biopsy was obtained and definitive histopathological diagnosis of gliosarcoma was made. A decline in the incidence of opportunistic infections associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy suggest the importance of early stereotactic biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of these neoplasms. PMID:24257054

  13. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the jejunum presenting as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a history of gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso Puentes, Nidia; Jimenez-Alfaro Larrazabal, Carmen; García Higuera, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel malignant tumors are rare and sarcomatoid carcinomas have rarely been reported at this site. We report a 56-year-old woman, with history of an excised gliosarcoma, who presented with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. She underwent endoscopy and colonoscopy, which failed to identify the cause of the bleeding. The abdominal computed tomography scan located a tumor in the small bowel. Pathology revealed a jejunal sarcomatoid carcinoma. She developed tumor recurrence and multiple liver metastases shortly after surgery. Immunohistochemistry is required for accurate diagnosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:24759341

  14. Arylethynyl Substituted 9,lO-Anthraquinones: Tunable Stokes Shifts by Substitution and Solvent Polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jinhua; Dass, Amala; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Panzner, Matthew J.; Tyson, Daniel S.; Kinder, James D.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    2-Arylethynyl- and 2,6- and 2,7-diarylethynyl-substituted 9,lO-anthraquinones were synthesized via Sonogashira coupling reactions of 2-bromo-, 2,6-dibromo-, and 2,7-dibromo-9,10- anthraquinone with para-substituted phenylacetylenes. While the redox properties of those compounds are almost insensitive to substitution, their absorption maxima are linearly related to the Hammett constants with different slopes for electron donors and electron acceptors. ABI compounds are photoluminescent both in solution (quantum yields of emission <= 6 %), and as solids. The emission spectra have the characteristics of charge-transfer bands with large Stokes shifts (100-250 nm). The charge-transfer character of the emitting state is supported by large dipole moment differences between the ground and the excited state as concluded on the basis of molecular modeling and Lippert-Mataga correlations of the Stokes shifts with solvent polarity. Maximum Stokes shifts are attained by both electron-donating and -withdrawing groups. This is explained by a destabilization of the HOMO by electron donors and a stabilization of the LUMO by electron acceptors. X-ray crystallographic analysis of, for example, 2,7-bisphenylethynfl- 9,lO-anthraquinone reveals a monoclinic P21In space group and no indication for pi-overlap that would promote quenching, thus explaining emission from the solid state. Representative reduced forms of the title compounds were isolated as stable acetates of the corresponding dihydrs-9,10- anthraquinones. The emission of these compounds is blue-shifted relative to the parent oxidized forms and is attributed to internal transitions in the dihydro-9,lO-anthraquinone core.

  15. Identification and characterization of rat Bcl9l gene in silico.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2005-03-01

    Drosophila wingless (wg), shaggy (sgg), armadillo (arm), legless (lgs), pygopus (pygo), pangolin (pan), and engrailed (en) are segment polarity genes implicated in Wg-Arm (WNT-beta-catenin) pathway. Drosophila lgs encodes nuclear scaffold protein functioning as positive regulator for Wg-Arm pathway. Cancer-associated genes BCL9 and BCL9L are human homologs for Drosophila lgs. Here, we identified and characterized rat Bcl9l gene by using bioinformatics. Rat Bcl9l gene, consisting of eight exons, was located within AC124034.4 and AC105645.5 genome sequences. Bcl9l gene was linked to Blr1 gene at rat chromosome 8q22 in the tail-to-tail manner with an interval less than 2 kb. Rat Bcl9l gene was found to encode a 1494-aa Bcl9l protein, which showed 97.7% and 94.2% total-amino-acid identity with mouse Bcl9l and human BCL9L, respectively. B9H1-B9H6 domains, originally identified as conserved regions among mammalian BCL9 and BCL9L homologs, were also identified within rat Bcl9l. B9H1 and B9H2 domains corresponded to HD1 and HD2 domains of Drosophila lgs, functioning as binding regions for Pygo and Arm, respectively. B9H4 domain was characterized by multiple Ser-Pro repeats. Thr 954 within B9H4 domain of rat Bcl9l was conserved in mammalian BCL9 and BCL9L homologs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mammalian Bcl9l homologs were more related to human BCL9 than to Drosophila lgs. This is the first report on rat Bcl9l gene. PMID:15703843

  16. BCL9/9L-β-catenin Signaling is Associated With Poor Outcome in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moor, Andreas E; Anderle, Pascale; Cantù, Claudio; Rodriguez, Patrick; Wiedemann, Norbert; Baruthio, Frédérique; Deka, Jürgen; André, Sylvie; Valenta, Tomas; Moor, Matthias B; Győrffy, Balázs; Barras, David; Delorenzi, Mauro; Basler, Konrad; Aguet, Michel

    2015-12-01

    BCL9/9L proteins enhance the transcriptional output of the β-catenin/TCF transcriptional complex and contribute critically to upholding the high WNT signaling level required for stemness maintenance in the intestinal epithelium. Here we show that a BCL9/9L-dependent gene signature derived from independent mouse colorectal cancer (CRC) models unprecedentedly separates patient subgroups with regard to progression free and overall survival. We found that this effect was by and large attributable to stemness related gene sets. Remarkably, this signature proved associated with recently described poor prognosis CRC subtypes exhibiting high stemness and/or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) traits. Consistent with the notion that high WNT signaling is required for stemness maintenance, ablating Bcl9/9l-β-catenin in murine oncogenic intestinal organoids provoked their differentiation and completely abrogated their tumorigenicity, while not affecting their proliferation. Therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting WNT responses may be limited by intestinal toxicity. Our findings suggest that attenuating WNT signaling to an extent that affects stemness maintenance without disturbing intestinal renewal might be well tolerated and prove sufficient to reduce CRC recurrence and dramatically improve disease outcome.

  17. Differential repair of potentially lethal damage in exponentially growing and quiescent 9L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, M.S.; Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L. )

    1990-04-01

    The alteration of potentially lethal damage repair by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic saline (0.5 M PBS) was investigated in exponentially growing and quiescent 9L cells in vitro. A single dose of X rays (8.5 Gy) immediately followed by a 30-min treatment with hypertonic PBS at 37 degrees C reduced the survival of exponentially growing 9L cells by a factor of 13-18 compared to survival of irradiated immediately and delayed-plated cells, while the survival of quiescent cells was reduced by only a factor of 5-8. Survival curves confirmed the relative resistance of the quiescent 9L cells versus exponentially growing 9L cells to X rays plus hypertonic treatment. Both the slope and the shoulder of the survival curve were reduced to a greater extent in exponentially growing cells than in the quiescent cells by hypertonic treatment. The response of quiescent cells cannot be explained by either the duration of hypertonic treatment or the redistribution of the cells into G1 phase. We show that quiescent 9L cells can recover from hypertonically induced potentially lethal damage when incubated under conditions which have been found to delay progression through the cell cycle, and postulate that an altered chromatin structure or an enhanced repair capacity of quiescent 9L cells may be responsible for their resistance.

  18. Uptake of [sup 10]B in gliosarcomas following the injection of gluthathione monoethyl ester and sulfhydryl borane

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.; Coderre, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The sulfhydryl borane Na[sub 2][sup 10]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH (BSH) was developed as a capture agent for BNCT about 20 years ago and is the compound currently used clinically in Japan for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Tumor [sup 10]B concentrations following the infusion of the oxidized BSH, a disulfide dimer (Na[sub 4][sup 10]B[sub 24]H[sub 22]S[sub 2]), are nearly twice those obtained following administration of equal amounts of boron as BSH. Also, the rate of decrease of tumor [sup 10]B concentration is slower after dimer infusion than after BSH infusion. When BNCT was administered to rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas, the animals infused with dimer had a significant longer median survival time. Dimer, on the other hand, induces a moderately severe, but reversible, hepatotoxicity which may complicate its use in humans. Intracellular glutathione plays an important role in defense against radical-mediated tissue injury. Glutathione monoesters have been reported to have a protective effective on cisplatin toxicity and on radical-induced acute pancreatitis. We investigated the possibility of reducing dimer-induced hepatotoxicity by pre-administration of GSH-ME. The results indicate that not only does the pre-administration of GSH-ME markedly reduce dimer-induced hepatotoxicity, but also results in nearly a doubling of tumor boron concentration. Furthermore, GSH-ME markedly increases tumor boron uptake and retention following administration of BSH.

  19. Uptake of {sup 10}B in gliosarcomas following the injection of gluthathione monoethyl ester and sulfhydryl borane

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.; Coderre, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    The sulfhydryl borane Na{sub 2}{sup 10}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH (BSH) was developed as a capture agent for BNCT about 20 years ago and is the compound currently used clinically in Japan for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Tumor {sup 10}B concentrations following the infusion of the oxidized BSH, a disulfide dimer (Na{sub 4}{sup 10}B{sub 24}H{sub 22}S{sub 2}), are nearly twice those obtained following administration of equal amounts of boron as BSH. Also, the rate of decrease of tumor {sup 10}B concentration is slower after dimer infusion than after BSH infusion. When BNCT was administered to rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas, the animals infused with dimer had a significant longer median survival time. Dimer, on the other hand, induces a moderately severe, but reversible, hepatotoxicity which may complicate its use in humans. Intracellular glutathione plays an important role in defense against radical-mediated tissue injury. Glutathione monoesters have been reported to have a protective effective on cisplatin toxicity and on radical-induced acute pancreatitis. We investigated the possibility of reducing dimer-induced hepatotoxicity by pre-administration of GSH-ME. The results indicate that not only does the pre-administration of GSH-ME markedly reduce dimer-induced hepatotoxicity, but also results in nearly a doubling of tumor boron concentration. Furthermore, GSH-ME markedly increases tumor boron uptake and retention following administration of BSH.

  20. Depot delivery of dexamethasone and cediranib for the treatment of brain tumor associated edema in an intracranial rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Qunya; Hochberg, Fred H; Cima, Michael J

    2015-11-10

    Treatments of brain tumor associated edema with systemically delivered dexamethasone, the standard of care, and cediranib, a novel anti-edema agent, are associated with systemic toxicities in brain tumor patients. A tunable, reservoir-based drug delivery device was developed to investigate the effects of delivering dexamethasone and cediranib locally in the brain in an intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat model. Reproducible, sustained releases of both dexamethasone and solid dispersion of cediranib in polyvinylpyrrolidone (AZD/PVP) from these devices were achieved. The water-soluble AZD/PVP, which exhibited similar bioactivity as cediranib, was developed to enhance the release of cediranib from the device. Local and systemic administration of both dexamethasone and cediranib was equally efficacious in alleviating edema but had no effect on tumor growth. Edema reduction led to modest but significant improvement in survival. Local delivery of dexamethasone prevented dexamethasone-induced weight loss, an adverse effect seen in animals treated with systemic dexamethasone. Local deliveries of dexamethasone and cediranib via these devices used only 2.36% and 0.21% of the systemic doses respectively, but achieved similar efficacy as systemic drug deliveries without the side effects associated with systemic administration. Other therapeutic agents targeting brain tumor can be delivered locally in the brain to provide similar improved treatment outcomes.

  1. Phase II and pharmacogenomics study of enzastaurin plus temozolomide during and following radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme and gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Polley, Mei–Yin; Pieper, Russell; Costello, Joseph F.; Vandenberg, Scott; Parvataneni, Rupa; Nicole, Angelina; Sneed, Patricia K.; Clarke, Jennifer; Hsieh, Emily; Costa, Bruno M.; Reis, Rui M.; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Nicol, Steven J.; Thornton, Donald E.; Prados, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This open-label, single-arm, phase II study combined enzastaurin with temozolomide plus radiation therapy (RT) to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. Adults with newly diagnosed disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60 were enrolled. Treatment was started within 5 weeks after surgical diagnosis. RT consisted of 60 Gy over 6 weeks. Temozolomide was given at 75 mg/m2 daily during RT and then adjuvantly at 200 mg/m2 daily for 5 days, followed by a 23-day break. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and in the adjuvant period at 250 mg/day. Cycles were 28 days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and correlations between efficacy and molecular markers analyzed from tumor tissue samples were also evaluated. A prospectively planned analysis compared OS and PFS of the current trial with outcomes from 3 historical phase II trials that combined novel agents with temozolomide plus RT in patients with GBM or gliosarcoma. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. The treatment regimen was well tolerated. OS (median, 74 weeks) and PFS (median, 36 weeks) results from the current trial were comparable to those from a prior phase II study using erlotininb and were significantly better than those from 2 other previous studies that used thalidomide or cis-retinoic acid, all in combination with temozolomide plus RT. A positive correlation between O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation and OS was observed. Adjusting for age and KPS, no other biomarker was associated with survival outcome. Correlation of relevant biomarkers with OS may be useful in future trials. PMID:21896554

  2. Phase II Study of Erlotinib Plus Temozolomide During and After Radiation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme or Gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael D.; Chang, Susan M.; Butowski, Nicholas; DeBoer, Rebecca; Parvataneni, Rupa; Carliner, Hannah; Kabuubi, Paul; Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer; Rabbitt, Jane; Page, Margaretta; Fedoroff, Anne; Sneed, Penny K.; Berger, Mitchel S.; McDermott, Michael W.; Parsa, Andrew T.; Vandenberg, Scott; James, C. David; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Stokoe, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This open-label, prospective, single-arm, phase II study combined erlotinib with radiation therapy (XRT) and temozolomide to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. The objectives were to determine efficacy of this treatment as measured by survival and to explore the relationship between molecular markers and treatment response. Patients and Methods Sixty-five eligible adults with newly diagnosed GBM or gliosarcoma were enrolled. We intended to treat patients not currently treated with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) with 100 mg/d of erlotinib during XRT and 150 mg/d after XRT. Patients receiving EIAEDs were to receive 200 mg/d of erlotinib during XRT and 300 mg/d after XRT. After XRT, the erlotinib dose was escalated until patients developed tolerable grade 2 rash or until the maximum allowed dose was reached. All patients received temozolomide during and after XRT. Molecular markers of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), and methylation status of the promotor region of the MGMT gene were analyzed from tumor tissue. Survival was compared with outcomes from two historical phase II trials. Results Median survival was 19.3 months in the current study and 14.1 months in the combined historical control studies, with a hazard ratio for survival (treated/control) of 0.64 (95% CI, 0.45 to 0.91). Treatment was well tolerated. There was a strong positive correlation between MGMT promotor methylation and survival, as well as an association between MGMT promotor-methylated tumors and PTEN positivity shown by immunohistochemistry with improved survival. Conclusion Patients treated with the combination of erlotinib and temozolomide during and following radiotherapy had better survival than historical controls. Additional studies are warranted. PMID:19075262

  3. Phase II and pharmacogenomics study of enzastaurin plus temozolomide during and following radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme and gliosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Polley, Mei-Yin; Pieper, Russell; Costello, Joseph F; Vandenberg, Scott; Parvataneni, Rupa; Nicole, Angelina; Sneed, Patricia K; Clarke, Jennifer; Hsieh, Emily; Costa, Bruno M; Reis, Rui M; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Nicol, Steven J; Thornton, Donald E; Prados, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    This open-label, single-arm, phase II study combined enzastaurin with temozolomide plus radiation therapy (RT) to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. Adults with newly diagnosed disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60 were enrolled. Treatment was started within 5 weeks after surgical diagnosis. RT consisted of 60 Gy over 6 weeks. Temozolomide was given at 75 mg/m(2) daily during RT and then adjuvantly at 200 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days, followed by a 23-day break. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and in the adjuvant period at 250 mg/day. Cycles were 28 days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and correlations between efficacy and molecular markers analyzed from tumor tissue samples were also evaluated. A prospectively planned analysis compared OS and PFS of the current trial with outcomes from 3 historical phase II trials that combined novel agents with temozolomide plus RT in patients with GBM or gliosarcoma. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. The treatment regimen was well tolerated. OS (median, 74 weeks) and PFS (median, 36 weeks) results from the current trial were comparable to those from a prior phase II study using erlotinib and were significantly better than those from 2 other previous studies that used thalidomide or cis-retinoic acid, all in combination with temozolomide plus RT. A positive correlation between O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation and OS was observed. Adjusting for age and KPS, no other biomarker was associated with survival outcome. Correlation of relevant biomarkers with OS may be useful in future trials.

  4. PDT-induced apoptosis: investigations using two malignant brain tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Menzies, Keir; Bisland, Stuart K.; Lin, Annie; Wilson, Brian C.

    2002-06-01

    PDT included necrosis in brain tissue and an intracranial tumor has been quantified for various photosensitizers, and it has been shown to be dependent on the sub-cellular localization of these photosensitizers. In quantifying non- necrotic biological endpoints, such as PDT induced apoptosis, the expression and translation of apoptosis inhibiting or promoting genes is of considerable importance. We studied the susceptibility of two glioblastoma cell lines to under go apoptotic cell death following photodynamic treatment with either Photofrin or delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta) ALA) in vivo. Murine 9L Gliosarcoma cells or human U87 Glioblastoma cells were implanted into the cortex of rats, and following 12 or 14 days of growth respectively, subjected to either Photofrin-mediated PDT or ALA-mediated PDT. 9L gliosarcoma cells express the phosphatase Tensin homologue (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene while in U87 cells PTEN is mutated. Differences in the Photofrin mediated PDT induced apoptosis were noted between the two different cell lines in vivo, suggesting that Photofrin mediated PDT may be dependent on apoptotic pathways. ALA induced PPIX showed higher selectivity towards 9L than Photofrin mediated PDT. These studies suggests that PDT could be used as an effective treatment for intracranial neoplasm. Endogenous photosensitizers such as ALA could be used to promote apoptosis in tumor cells due to PDT treatment and thereby minimize the extent of necrotic infarction in the surrounding normal brain.

  5. Three Novel Rice Genes Closely Related to the Arabidopsis IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14 Genes and Their Roles in Xylan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chiniquy, Dawn; Varanasi, Patanjali; Oh, Taeyun; Harholt, Jesper; Katnelson, Jacob; Singh, Seema; Auer, Manfred; Simmons, Blake; Adams, Paul D.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide on Earth, and represents a major component of both dicot wood and the cell walls of grasses. Much knowledge has been gained from studies of xylan biosynthesis in the model plant, Arabidopsis. In particular, the irregular xylem (irx) mutants, named for their collapsed xylem cells, have been essential in gaining a greater understanding of the genes involved in xylan biosynthesis. In contrast, xylan biosynthesis in grass cell walls is poorly understood. We identified three rice genes Os07g49370 (OsIRX9), Os01g48440 (OsIRX9L), and Os06g47340 (OsIRX14), from glycosyltransferase family 43 as putative orthologs to the putative β-1,4-xylan backbone elongating Arabidopsis IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14 genes, respectively. We demonstrate that the over-expression of the closely related rice genes, in full or partly complement the two well-characterized Arabidopsis irregular xylem (irx) mutants: irx9 and irx14. Complementation was assessed by measuring dwarfed phenotypes, irregular xylem cells in stem cross sections, xylose content of stems, xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity of stems, and stem strength. The expression of OsIRX9 in the irx9 mutant resulted in XylT activity of stems that was over double that of wild type plants, and the stem strength of this line increased to 124% above that of wild type. Taken together, our results suggest that OsIRX9/OsIRX9L, and OsIRX14, have similar functions to the Arabidopsis IRX9 and IRX14 genes, respectively. Furthermore, our expression data indicate that OsIRX9 and OsIRX9L may function in building the xylan backbone in the secondary and primary cell walls, respectively. Our results provide insight into xylan biosynthesis in rice and how expression of a xylan synthesis gene may be modified to increase stem strength. PMID:23596448

  6. Delivery of Transferrin-Conjugated Polysaccharide Nanoparticles in 9L Gliosacoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Young-Wook; Jung, Shin; Pei, Jian; Wen, Min; Li, Song-Yuan; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Lim, Jung Cheol; Jang, Woo-Youl; Kim, In-Young; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Jung, Tae-Young

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of drug targeting via the transferrin receptor-mediated pathway, iron-saturated transferrin was conjugated with chitosan (Tr-chitosan) and complexed with doxorubicin-conjugated methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-dextran succinate (DEX-DOX). DEX-DOX nanoparticles have spherical morphologies with less than 150 nm particle sizes. When Tr-chitosan was complexed with DEX-DOX nanoparticles (TR nanoparticle), particle sizes were increased to higher than 200 nm. Viability of 9L cells with treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) or DEX-DOX nanoparticle was dose-dependently decreased regardless of transferrin receptor blocking. However, cytotoxicity of TR nanoparticles was reduced by blocking of transferrin receptor. Flow cytometric analysis and confocal microscopic observation showed that fluorescence intensity of tumor cells with treatment of TR nanoparticles was significantly decreased by blocking of transferring receptor while DEX-DOX nanoparticles were not affected by blocking of transferring receptor. These results indicated that TR nanoparticles are promising candidates for brain tumor drug delivery. PMID:26328315

  7. Cell survival as a determinant of tumor cure for rat 9L subcutaneous tumors following microwave-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wallen, C A; Michaelson, S M; Wheeler, K T

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of cell survival to tumor cure after local hyperthermia treatment was studied in subcutaneous 9L rat tumors. Tumors weighing 0.2-0.4 g were heated to 42.5, 43.0, 44.0 and 45.0 degrees C by local exposure to 2450 MHz microwaves. Cell survival data was obtained by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming technique and a cell survival curve was constructed for each temperature as a function of exposure duration (0-180 min). Cell survival followed a simple exponential function with an increasingly steeper slope as temperature increased. At 44 degrees C, it was observed that cells from large tumors (1.0-1.4 g) were inactivated at the same rate as those from small tumors. When tumor response was monitored in the small tumors for 90 days following treatment, a direct correlation between the percentage of tumor cures and time at 44 degrees C (0-60 min) was observed; therefore, at 44 degrees C, tumor cure was exponentially related to cell survival in this range. However, when approximately the same cell survival was obtained with 3 other temperature--time regimens, the resulting percentage of tumor cures was not the same. These results indicate that while cell survival is related to tumor cure, it is probably not the primary determinant of tumor response following local hyperthermia in these 9L subcutaneous tumors.

  8. Impact of IUdR on Rat 9L glioma cell survival for 25-35 keV photon-activated auger electron therapy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Diane; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Brown, Thomas A D; Ii, Kenneth L Matthews; Dugas, Joseph P; Ham, Kyungmin; Varnes, Marie E

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to measure the energy dependence of survival of rat 9L glioma cells labeled with iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) that underwent photon-activated Auger electron therapy using 25-35 keV monochromatic X rays, i.e., above and below the K-edge energy of iodine. Rat 9L glioma cells were selected because of their radioresistance, ability to be implanted for future in vivo studies and analogy to radioresistant human gliomas. Survival curves were measured for a 4 MV X-ray beam and synchrotron produced monochromatic 35, 30 and 25 keV X-ray beams. IUdR was incorporated into the DNA at levels of 0, 9 and 18% thymidine replacement for 4 MV and 35 keV and 0 and 18% thymidine replacement for 30 and 25 keV. For 10 combinations of beam energy and thymidine replacement, 62 data sets (3-13 per combination) provided 776 data points (47-148 per combination). Survival versus dose data taken for the same combination, but on different days, were merged by including the zero-dose points in the nonlinear, chi-squared data fitting using the linear-quadratic model and letting the best estimate to the zero-dose plating efficiency for each of the different days be a fitting parameter. When comparing two survival curves, the ratio of doses resulting in 10% survival gave sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) from which contributions due to linear energy transfer (LET) (SER10,LET), IUdR radiosensitization (SER10,RS), the Auger effect (SER10,AE) and the total of all effects (SER10,T) were determined. At 4 MV and 35, 30 and 25 keV, SER10,LET values were 1.00, 1.08 ± 0.03, 1.22 ± 0.02 and 1.37 ± 0.02, respectively. At 4 MV SER10,RS values for 9 and 18% IUdR were 1.28 ± 0.02 and 1.40 ± 0.02, respectively. Assuming LET effects were independent of percentage IUdR and radiosensitization effects were independent of energy, SER10,AE values for 18% IUdR at 35, 30 and 25 keV were 1.35 ± 0.05, 1.06 ± 0.03 and 0.98 ± 0.03, respectively. The value for 9% IUdR at 35 keV was 1

  9. Effect of EGR on spray development, combustion and emissions in a 1.9L direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Arcoumanis, C.; Nagwaney, A.; Hentschel, W.; Ropke, S.

    1995-12-31

    The spray development, combustion and emissions in a 1.9L optical, four-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine were investigated by means of pressure analysis, high-speed cinematography, the two-color method and exhaust gas analysis for various levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), three EGR temperatures (uncontrolled, hot and cold) and three fuels (diesel, n-heptane and a two-component fuel 7D3N). Engine operating conditions included 1,000 rpm/idle and 2,000 rpm/2bar with EGR-rates ranging from 0 to 70%. Independent of rate, EGR was found to have a very small effect on spray angle and spray tip penetration but the auto-ignition sites seemed to increase in size and number at higher EGR-rates with associated reduction in the flame luminosity and flame temperature, by, say, 100K at 50% EGR. The emission tests confirmed that for different intake temperatures and three fuels, increasing the EGR-rate leads to reduced NO{sub x} and O{sub 2} levels but increased soot, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HC concentrations. Cold EGR resulted in lower NO{sub x} emissions at EGR-rates below 30% but at higher rates hot EGR seems to offer marginal improvements relative to cold EGR and significant NO{sub x} reduction compared to the uncontrolled EGR case.

  10. 77 FR 58371 - Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9, L.P., and U.S. Bank National Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9, L.P., and U.S. Bank National Association Allegheny Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On August 31, 2012, Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9,...

  11. Immunochemical characterization of cross-reactivity of pneumococcal group 9 capsular polysaccharide types 9N, 9A, 9L, and 9V.

    PubMed Central

    Szu, S; Lee, C J; Carlo, D; Henrichsen, J

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and immunochemical characterization of the four cross-reactive pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides within group 9 (types 9N, 9A, 9L, and 9V) were investigated. Their serological reactions were studied by using unabsorbed antisera prepared by immunizing rabbits with pneumococci of each of the four group 9 capsular polysaccharide types. Type 9A antiserum showed the most extensive cross-reactions with the four group 9 polysaccharides. Absorption with type 9N, 9L, or 9V polysaccharide removed 63, 96, or 87%, respectively, of the heterologous antibodies from the type 9A antiserum. All four of the group 9 polysaccharides contained glucose, N-acetylmannosamine, and glucuronic acid. In addition, types 9N and 9L had N-acetylglucosamine, and types 9A, 9L, and 9V contained galactose. Reduction of the uronic acid residues of the type 9 polysaccharides removed most of their homologous and much of their heterologous reactivities, indicating an important role for the uronic acid component in their antigenicity. The four group 9 polysaccharide preparations had comparable molecular sizes and only traces of protein and nucleic acid. Further studies to evaluate the most protective type among the group 9 strains to be included in the current pneumococcal vaccine are discussed. Images PMID:7216451

  12. Enhanced and selective delivery of enzyme therapy to 9L-glioma tumor via magnetic targeting of PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    The stability of enzyme-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in plasma is of great importance for in vivo delivery of the conjugated enzyme. In this study, β-glucosidase was conjugated on aminated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the glutaraldehyde method (β-Glu-MNP), and further PEGylated via N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-immobilized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG-β-Glu-MNPs) were characterized by hydrodynamic diameter distribution, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. The results showed that the multidomain structure and magnetization properties of these nanoparticles were conserved well throughout the synthesis steps, with an expected diameter increase and zeta potential shifts. The Michaelis constant was calculated to evaluate the activity of conjugated β-glucosidase on the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating 73.0% and 65.4% of enzyme activity remaining for β-Glu-MNP and PEG-β-Glu-MNP, respectively. Both magnetophoretic mobility analysis and pharmacokinetics showed improved in vitro/in vivo stability of PEG-β-Glu-MNP compared with β-Glu-MNP. In vivo magnetic targeting of PEG-β-Glu-MNP was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and electron spin resonance analysis in a mouse model of subcutaneous 9L-glioma. Satisfactory accumulation of PEG-β-Glu-MNP in tumor tissue was successfully achieved, with an iron content of 627±45 nmol Fe/g tissue and β-glucosidase activity of 32.2±8.0 mU/g tissue. PMID:24959078

  13. Tissue pO{sub 2} of Orthotopic 9L and C6 Gliomas and Tumor-Specific Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperoxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Nadeem Li Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P.; Gladstone, David J.; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is a well-known therapeutic problem; however, a lack of methods for repeated measurements of glioma partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) limits the ability to optimize the therapeutic approaches. We report the effects of 9.3 Gy of radiation and carbogen inhalation on orthotopic 9L and C6 gliomas and on the contralateral brain pO{sub 2} in rats using a new and potentially widely useful method, multisite in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Methods and Materials: Intracerebral 9L and C6 tumors were established in the left hemisphere of syngeneic rats, and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was successfully used for repeated tissue pO{sub 2} measurements after 9.3 Gy of radiation and during carbogen breathing for 5 consecutive days. Results: Intracerebral 9L gliomas had a pO{sub 2} of 30-32 mm Hg and C6 gliomas were relatively hypoxic, with a pO{sub 2} of 12-14 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The tissue pO{sub 2} of the contralateral brain was 40-45 mm Hg in rats with either 9L or C6 gliomas. Irradiation resulted in a significant increase in pO{sub 2} of the 9L gliomas only. A significant increase in the pO{sub 2} of the 9L and C6 gliomas was observed in rats breathing carbogen, but this effect decreased during 5 days of repeated experiments in the 9L gliomas. Conclusion: These results highlight the tumor-specific effect of radiation (9.3.Gy) on tissue pO{sub 2} and the different responses to carbogen inhalation. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry to provide direct repeated measurements of tissue pO{sub 2} could have a vital role in understanding the dynamics of hypoxia during therapy that could then be optimized by scheduling doses at times of improved tumor oxygenation.

  14. LEF1 and B9L shield β-catenin from inactivation by Axin, desensitizing colorectal cancer cells to tankyrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Marc; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactive β-catenin drives colorectal cancer, yet inhibiting its activity remains a formidable challenge. Interest is mounting in tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi) which destabilize β-catenin through stabilizing Axin. Here, we confirm that TNKSi inhibit Wnt-induced transcription, similarly to carnosate which reduces the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by blocking its binding to BCL9, and attenuates intestinal tumors in ApcMin mice. By contrast, β-catenin’s activity is unresponsive to TNKSi in colorectal cancer cells, and in cells after prolonged Wnt stimulation. This TNKSi insensitivity is conferred by β-catenin’s association with LEF1 and BCL9-2/B9L, which accumulate during Wnt stimulation, thereby providing a feed-forward loop that converts transient into chronic β-catenin signaling. This limits the therapeutic value of TNKSi in colorectal carcinomas most of which express high LEF1 levels. Our study provides proof-of-concept that the successful inhibition of oncogenic β-catenin in colorectal cancer requires the targeting of its interaction with LEF1 and/or BCL9/B9L, as exemplified by carnosate. PMID:24419084

  15. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  16. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    DOE PAGES

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays,more » and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.« less

  17. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Jenny C; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components. PMID:26043357

  18. Involvement of Calcium-Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species in Inductive GRP78 Expression by Geldanamycin in 9L Rat Brain Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang-Chun; Shyu, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Lai, Yiu-Kay

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with geldanamycin (GA) leads to an increase in [Ca2+]c and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat brain tumor 9L RBT cells. GA-exerted calcium signaling was blocked by BAPTA/AM and EGTA. The effect of GA on [Ca2+]c was significantly reduced in the presence of thapsigargin (TG) and ruthenium red (RR). GA-induced GRP78 expression is significantly decreased in the presence of BAPTA/AM, EGTA and RR, suggesting that the calcium influx from the extracellular space and intracellular calcium store oscillations are contributed to by the calcium mobilization and GRP78 expression induced by GA. The induced GRP78 expression is sensitive to added U73122 and Ro-31-8425, pinpointing the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in GA-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC), BAPTA/AM, EGTA and H7 also have significant inhibitory effects on ROS generation. Finally, neither H7 nor NAC was able to affect the calcium response elicited by GA. Our results suggest that the causal signaling cascade during GA-inducted GRP78 expression occurs via a pathway that connects PLC to cytoplasmic calcium increase, PKC activation and, then, finally, ROS generation. Our data provides new insights into the influence of GA on ER stress response in 9L RBT cells. PMID:24051401

  19. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Jenny C; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1-2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  20. Response of 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids to single and fractionated doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Hoshino, T; Barker, M; Deen, D F

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the relative effect of each of four fractions of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) against 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids and to compare the results of the cell survival and growth delay assays. Similar levels of cell kill resulted when BCNU was administered either as single fractions of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr or as one to four fractions of 1.5 micrograms/ml that were administered sequentially for 1 hr each. Survival was increased if the assay was delayed until 24 hr after drug treatment, which indicates that 9L cells in spheroids recover from BCNU-induced potentially lethal damage. When BCNU was administered in 1.5-micrograms/ml fractions, plating efficiencies depended markedly on the interval between the fractions. The 12-hr protocol produced an overall higher cell kill. Fractionation schedules of 24 and 36 hr produced less cell kill than did the other schedules. Survival plateaued for the last three treatments with BCNU in the 36-hr schedule. Cells in S phase at the time of administration of the initial 1.5-micrograms/ml fraction of BCNU moved into G1- and G2-M phases by 12 hr after treatment. For time periods longer than 12 hr, cells began to appear in the BCNU-resistant S phase. Thus, the movement of cells into the drug-sensitive and -resistant phases after the first fraction correlates well with the corresponding overall cytotoxic effect produced by treatment with the combined BCNU (1.5 micrograms/ml) fractions. For a higher concentration (3.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr), maximum cell kill was reached within the 12- to 18-hr interval, after which cell kill plateaued. Cells were not found in the S-phase fraction 12 to 36 hr after the first treatment with 3.0 micrograms/ml; maximum cell kill for the fractionated protocols resulted at these times. Therefore, BCNU, which is classified as a cell cycle-nonspecific drug, can induce a partial synchrony in 9L spheroid cells, which determines

  1. Preparation of curcumin loaded poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers and their in vitro antitumor activity against Glioma 9L cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Fu, Shaozhi; Zhou, Liangxue; Liang, Hang; Fan, Min; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop implantable curcumin-loaded poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL, PCEC) nanofibers, which might have potential application in cancer therapy. Curcumin was incorporated into biodegradable PCEC nanofibers by electrospinning method. The surface morphology of the composite nanofibers was characterized on Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The average diameter of the nanofibers was 2.3-4.5μm. In vitro release behavior of curcumin from the fiber mats was also studied in detail. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that the PCEC fibers themselves did not affect the growth of rat Glioma 9L cells. Antitumor activity of the curcumin-loaded fibers against the cells was kept over the whole experiment process, while the antitumor activity of pure curcumin disappeared within 48 h. These results strongly suggested that the curcumin/PCEC composite nanofibers might have potential application for postoperative chemotherapy of brain cancers.

  2. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  3. WE-E-BRE-08: Impact of IUdR in Rat 9L Glioma Cell Survival for 25–35 KeV Photo-Activated Auger Electron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, D; Hogstrom, K; Brown, T; Dugas, J; Varnes, M; Matthews, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the biological effect from Auger electrons with 9% and 18% iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) incorporated into the DNA of rat 9L glioma cells at photon energies above and below the K-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). Methods: Rat 9L glioma cell survival versus dose curves with 0%, 9%, and 18% thymidine replacement with IUdR were measured using four irradiation energies (4 MV x-rays; monochromatic 35, 30, and 25 keV synchrotron photons). For each of 11 conditions (Energy, %IUdR) survival curves were fit to the data (826 cell cultures) using the linear-quadratic model. The ratio of doses resulting in 10% survival gave sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) from which contributions due to linear-energy transfer (LET), radiosensitization (RS), and Auger effect (AE) were extracted. Results: At 35, 30, and 25 keV, SER10,LET values were 1.08±0.03, 1.22±0.02, and 1.37±0.02, respectively. At 4 MV SER10,RS values for 9% and 18% IUdR were 1.28±0.02 and 1.40±0.02, respectively. Assuming LET effects are independent of %IUdR and radiosensitization effects are independent of energy, SER10,AE values for 18% IUdR at 35, 30, and 25 keV were 1.35±0.05, 1.06±0.03, and 0.98±0.03, respectively; values for 9% IUdR at 35 and 25 keV were 1.01±0.04 and 0.82±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: For 18% IUdR the radiosensitization effect of 1.40 and the Auger effect of 1.35 at 35 keV are equally important to the combined effect of 1.90. No measureable Auger effect was observed for energies below the K-edge at 20 and 25 keV, as expected. The insignificant Auger effect at 9% IUdR was not expected. Additional data (40–70 keV) and radiobiological modeling are being acquired to better understand the energy dependence of Auger electron therapy with IUdR. Funding support in part by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and in part by Contract No. W81XWH-10-1-0005 awarded by the U.S. Army Research Acquisition Activity. This paper does not necessarily

  4. Prospective study of prognostic factors in asymptomatic patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like lymphocytosis: the cut-off of 11 × 10(9)/L monoclonal lymphocytes better identifies subgroups with different outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C; Fernández de Sevilla, A; Domingo, A; De La Banda, E; Domingo-Domènech, E; Mercadal, S; Ruiz-Xivillé, N; Alonso, E; Encuentra, M; González-Barca, E

    2015-04-01

    The arbitrary threshold of 5 × 10(9)/L chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-like lymphocytes differentiates monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) from CLL. There are no prospective studies that search for the optimal cut-off of monoclonal lymphocytes able to predict outcome and simultaneously analyze the prognostic value of classic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic variables in patients with asymptomatic clonal CLL lymphocytosis (ACL), which includes MBL plus Rai 0 CLL patients. From 2003 to 2010, 231 ACL patients were enrolled in this study. Patients with 11q deletion and atypical lymphocyte morphology at diagnosis had shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.007 and p = 0.015, respectively) and treatment-free survival (TFS) (p = 0.009 and p = 0.017, respectively). Elevated beta-2 microglobulin (B2M) also correlated with worse TFS (p = 0.002). The optimal threshold of monoclonal lymphocytes independently correlated with survival was 11 × 10(9)/L (p = 0.000 for PFS and p = 0.016 for TFS). As conclusion, monoclonal lymphocytosis higher than 11 × 10(9)/L better identifies two subgroups of patients with different outcomes than the standard cut-off value of 5 × 10(9)/L. Atypical lymphocyte morphology, 11q deletion and elevated B2M had a negative impact on the survival in ACL patients.

  5. PDE5 inhibitors enhance tumor permeability and efficacy of chemotherapy in a rat brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Black, Keith L; Yin, Dali; Ong, John M; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu M; Wang, Xiao; Ko, MinHee K; Bayan, Jennifer-Ann; Sacapano, Manuel R; Espinoza, Andreas; Irvin, Dwain K; Shu, Yan

    2008-09-16

    The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) significantly limits delivery of therapeutic concentrations of chemotherapy to brain tumors. A novel approach to selectively increase drug delivery is pharmacologic modulation of signaling molecules that regulate BTB permeability, such as those in cGMP signaling. Here we show that oral administration of sildenafil (Viagra) and vardenafil (Levitra), inhibitors of cGMP-specific PDE5, selectively increased tumor capillary permeability in 9L gliosarcoma-bearing rats with no significant increase in normal brain capillaries. Tumor-bearing rats treated with the chemotherapy agent, adriamycin, in combination with vardenafil survived significantly longer than rats treated with adriamycin alone. The selective increase in tumor capillary permeability appears to be mediated by a selective increase in tumor cGMP levels and increased vesicular transport through tumor capillaries, and could be attenuated by iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor for calcium-dependent potassium (K(Ca)) channels, that are effectors in cGMP signaling. The effect by sildenafil could be further increased by simultaneously using another BTB "opener", bradykinin. Collectively, this data demonstrates that oral administration of PDE5 inhibitors selectively increases BTB permeability and enhances anti-tumor efficacy for a chemotherapeutic agent. These findings have significant implications for improving delivery of anti-tumor agents to brain tumors. PMID:18674521

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy to Countermeasure Cancer in Astronauts during Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, S.; Kindred, R. P.; Roach, A-N.; Edossa, A.; Kim, B. C.; Gonda, S. R.; Emami, K.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation can cause chromosomal mutations, which may lead to cancer in astronauts engaged in space exploration. Therefore, our goals are to develop countermeasures to prevent space-induced cancer using hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy. This presentation focuses on HSCT for cancer. Our previous experiments on a simulated, space-induced immuno-deficiency model (mouse hind limb unloading ) indicated that transplanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could enhance the host's immunity by effectively eliminating bacterial infection (Ohi S, et. al. J Grav Physiol 10, P63-64, 2003; Ohi S, et. al. Proceedings of the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) . American Institute of Physics, New York, pp. 938-950, 2004). Hence, we hypothesized that the HSCs might be effective in combating cancer as well. Studies of cocultured mouse HSCs with beta-galactosidase marked rat gliosarcoma spheroids (9L/lacZ), a cancer model, indicated antagonistic interactions , resulting in destruction of the spheroids by HSCs. Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assays were consistent with the conclusion. These results show potential usehlness of HSCT for cancer. Currently, the NASA Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB), a space analog tissue/cell culture system, is being used to study invasion of the gliosarcoma (GS) spheroids into mouse brain with or without co-cultured HSCs. This may simulate the metastasis of gliosarcoma to brain. There is a tendency for the HSCs to inhibit invasion of GS spheroids into brain, as evidenced by the X-gal staining.

  7. Enhancement in blood-tumor barrier permeability and delivery of liposomal doxorubicin using focused ultrasound and microbubbles: evaluation during tumor progression in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Park, Juyoung; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Effective drug delivery to brain tumors is often challenging because of the heterogeneous permeability of the ‘blood tumor barrier’ (BTB) along with other factors such as increased interstitial pressure and drug efflux pumps. Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as the blood-brain barrier in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize the FUS-induced permeability changes of the BTB in a rat glioma model at different times after implantation. 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 9, 14, or 17 days after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690 kHz ultrasound and definity microbubbles was performed in one tumor in each animal. Before FUS, liposomal doxorubicin was administered at a dose of 5.67 mg kg-1. This chemotherapy agent was previously shown to improve survival in animal glioma models. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was measured via DCE-MRI before and after sonication. We found that tumor doxorubicin concentrations increased monotonically (823  ±  600, 1817  ±  732 and 2432  ±  448 ng g-1) in the control tumors at 9, 14 and 17 d. With FUS-induced BTB disruption, the doxorubicin concentrations were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.0001 at days 9, 14, and 17, respectively) and were greater than the control tumors by a factor of two or more (2222  ±  784, 3687  ±  796 and 5658  ±  821 ng g-1) regardless of the stage of tumor growth. The transfer coefficient Ktrans was significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced compared to control tumors only at day 9 but not at day 14 or 17. These results suggest that FUS-induced enhancements in tumor drug delivery are relatively consistent over time, at least in this tumor model. These results are

  8. Multielectron ultrastrong laser field ionization of Arn+, Krm+ and Xel+ (n <= 9, m <= 9, l <= 12) at intensities from 1015 W cm-2 to 1018 W cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, S.; Di Chiara, A.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Huskins, E. L.; Falkowski, A.; Pajerowski, D.; Walker, B. C.

    2006-07-01

    Ionization yields are reported for Ar, Kr and Xe in ultrastrong fields from 1015 W cm-2 to 1018 W cm-2. Non-sequential ionization (NSI) is shown to be a robust and general feature in ultrahigh field ionization. NSI yields measured are consistent with the trends predicted by a rescattering model, but as one proceeds to higher Z atoms more NSI is observed than predicted theoretically. Additional recollision mechanisms that may need to be considered in future theories of ultrastrong field-atom interactions include 'chain' NSI, NSI from excited states of the atom (e.g. Rydberg states or inner-shell holes) and the possibility of ultrastrong field enhanced recollision/impact processes.

  9. RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF M DWARF/L DWARF BINARIES. IV. DISCOVERY OF AN M9 + L6 BINARY SEPARATED BY OVER 100 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Dhital, Saurav; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2011-01-15

    We report the discovery of a faint L6 {+-} 1 companion to the previously known M9 dwarf, 2MASS J01303563-4445411, based on our near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations with the 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX imager/spectrometer. The visual binary is separated by 3.''28 {+-} 0.''05 on the sky at a spectrophotometric distance of 40 {+-} 14 pc. The projected physical separation is 130 {+-} 50 AU, making it one of the widest very low mass (VLM) field multiples containing a brown dwarf companion. 2MASS J0130-4445 is only one of ten wide VLM pairs and only one of six in the field. The secondary is considerably fainter ({Delta}K{approx} 2.35 mag) and redder ({Delta} (J - K{sub s}) {approx} 0.81 dex), consistent with component near-infrared types of M9.0 {+-} 0.5 and L6 {+-} 1 based on our resolved spectroscopy. The component types suggest a secondary mass well below the hydrogen-burning limit and an age-dependent mass ratio of 0.6-0.9. The system's space motion and spectroscopic indicators suggest an age of 2-4 Gyr while the model-dependent masses and binding energies suggest that this system is unlikely to have formed via dynamical ejection. The age, composition, and separation of the 2MASS J01303563-4445411 system make it useful for tests of VLM formation theories and of condensate cloud formation in L dwarfs.

  10. Stereoselective synthesis and biological evaluation of syn-1-amino-3-[18F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid as a potential positron emission tomography brain tumor imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiping; Williams, Larry; Camp, Vernon M; Malveaux, Eugene; Olson, Jeffrey J; Goodman, Mark M

    2009-03-01

    Amino acid syn-1-amino-3-fluoro-cyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid (syn-FACBC) 12, the isomer of anti-FACBC, has been selectively synthesized and [(18)F] radiofluorinated in 52% decay-corrected yield using no-carrier-added [(18)F]fluoride. The key step in the synthesis of the desired isomer involved stereoselective reduction using lithium alkylborohydride/zinc chloride, which improved the ratio of anti-alcohol to syn-alcohol from 17:83 to 97:3. syn-FACBC 12 entered rat 9L gliosarcoma cells primarily via L-type amino acid transport in vitro with high uptake of 16% injected dose per 5 x 10(5) cells. Biodistribution studies in rats with 9L gliosarcoma brain tumors demonstrated high tumor to brain ratio of 12:1 at 30 min post injection. In this model, amino acid syn-[(18)F]FACBC 12 is a promising metabolically based radiotracer for positron emission tomography brain tumor imaging.

  11. Glioma-specific cytotoxic T cells can be effectively induced by subcutaneous vaccination of irradiated wild-type tumor cells without artificial cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Yamaura, Akira; Sakiyama, Shigeru; Sato, Yasuo; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2003-08-01

    Effective induction of systemic antitumor immunity is a crucial step for success of immune gene therapy for intracerebral gliomas. We examined in this study the ability to induce glioma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization of irradiated whole-tumor cell vaccine with or without artificial cytokine production, and also examined in vivo efficacy of the induced CTL against a rat brain tumor model with 9L gliosarcoma cells. Murine neuroblastoma C1300 cells transduced with the interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene (C1300/IL-2, C1300/IL-4 or C1300/GM-CSF) were used as cytokine-producers. Glioma-specific CTL activity was equivalently induced in the rats vaccinated s.c. with irradiated 9L, irradiated IL-2-producing 9L cells or the mixed population of irradiated 9L and C1300/IL-2 cells, while the activity was relatively lower in the rats vaccinated with irradiated 9L cells mixed with either C1300/IL-4 or C1300/GM-CSF cells. In the rats immunized s.c. with irradiated 9L cells, intracerebral (i.c.) 9L tumors implanted together with either C1300/IL-2 or C1300/IL-4 were completely rejected. Pre-established brain tumor also could be eliminated by the s.c. immunization of irradiated 9L cells and i.c. transplantation of IL-2-producers. These results suggest that glioma-specific CTLs could be effectively induced by s.c. immunization of irradiated wild-type tumor cells without artificial cytokine production.

  12. Increased post-induction intensification improves outcome in children and adolescents with a markedly elevated white blood cell count (≥200 × 10(9) /l) with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia but not B cell disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Caroline; Gaynon, Paul S; Nachman, James B; Sather, Harland N; Lu, Xiaomin; Devidas, Meenakshi; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-02-01

    Children and adolescents presenting with a markedly elevated white blood cell (ME WBC) count (WBC ≥200 × 10(9) /l) comprise a unique subset of high-risk patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We evaluated the outcomes of the 251 patients (12% of the study population) with ME WBC treated on the Children's Cancer Group-1961 protocol. Patients were evaluated for early response to treatment by bone marrow morphology; those with a rapid early response were randomized to treatment regimens testing longer and stronger post-induction therapy. We found that ME WBC patients have a poorer outcome compared to those patients presenting with a WBC <200 × 10(9) /l (5-year event-free survival 62% vs. 73%, P = 0·0005). Longer duration of therapy worsened outcome for T cell ME WBC with a trend to poorer outcome in B-ALL ME WBC patients. Augmented therapy benefits T cell ME WBC patients, similar to the entire study cohort, however, there appeared to be no impact on survival for B-ALL ME WBC patients. ME WBC was not a prognostic factor for T cell patients. In patients with high risk features, B lineage disease in association with ME WBC has a negative impact on survival.

  13. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  14. Assessment of Proton Microbeam Analysis of 11B for Quantitative Microdistribution Analysis of Boronated Neutron Capture Agent Analogs in Biological Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G; Grant, P G; Ueda, D L; Autry-Conwell, S A; Hou, Y; Boggan, J E

    2002-12-04

    Purpose: To assess the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction for quantitatively mapping the in-vivo sub-cellular distribution of boron within gliosarcoma tumors treated with boronated neutron capture therapy agent (NCTA) analogs. Materials and Methods: Intracranial tumors were produced in Fisher 344 rats using a 9L gliosarcoma model. Fourteen days later, the majority of rats were treated with f-boronophenylalanine and sacrificed 30 or 180 minutes after intravenous injection. Freeze dried tumor cryosections were imaged using the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction and proton microbeams obtained from the nuclear microprobe at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Results/Discussion: With{sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis, {sup 11}B distributions within cells can be quantitatively imaged with spatial resolutions down to 1.5 {micro}m, minimum detection limits of 0.8 mg/kg and acquisition times of several hours. These capabilities offer advantages over alpha track autoradiography, electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for 'B quantitation in tissues. However, the spatial resolution, multi-isotope capability and analysis times achieved with SIMS are superior to those achieved with {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis. Conclusions: When accuracy in quantitation is crucial, the assessing the microdistribution of {sup 11}B. {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* reaction is well suited for Otherwise, SIMS may well be better suited to image the microdistribution of boron associated with NCTAs in biological tissues.

  15. Synthesis of syn- and anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluoromethyl-cyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FMACBC), potential PET ligands for tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Martarello, Laurent; McConathy, Jonathan; Camp, Vernon M; Malveaux, Eugene J; Simpson, Nicholas E; Simpson, Chiab P; Olson, Jeffrey J; Bowers, Geoffrey D; Goodman, Mark M

    2002-05-23

    syn- and anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluoromethyl-cyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FMACBC, 16 and 17), analogues of anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC), were prepared to evaluate the contributions of C-3 substitution and configuration on the uptake of these radiolabeled amino acids in a rodent model of brain tumors. Radiofluorinated targets [18F]16 and [18F]17 were prepared by no-carrier-added radiofluorination from their corresponding methanesulfonyl esters 12 and 13, respectively, with decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 30% for [18F]16 and 20% for [18F]17. In amino acid transport assays performed in vitro using 9L gliosarcoma cells, both [18F]16 and [18F]17 were substrates for L type amino acid transport, while [18F]17 but not [18F]16 was a substrate for A type transport. Biodistribution studies in normal Fischer rats with [18F]16 and [18F]17 showed high uptake of radioactivity (>2.0% dose/g) in the pancreas while other tissues studied, including liver, heart, lung, kidney, blood, muscle, and testis, showed relatively low uptake of radioactivity (<1.0% dose/g). In rats implanted intracranially with 9L gliosarcoma cells, the retention of radioactivity in tumor tissue was high at 5, 60, and 120 min after intravenous injection of [18F]16 and [18F]17 while the uptake of radioactivity in brain tissue contralateral to the tumor remained low (<0.3% dose/g). Ratios of tumor uptake to normal brain uptake for [18F]16 were 7.5:1, 7:1, and 5:1 at 5, 60, and 120 min, respectively, while for [18F]17 the ratios were 7.5:1, 9:1, and 9:1 at the same time points. This work demonstrates that like anti-[18F]FACBC, [18F]16 and [18F]17 are excellent candidates for imaging brain tumors.

  16. Exploiting apoptosis in photodynamic therapy: is it possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar D.

    2003-06-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme is the most common form of malignant brain tumors and accounts for approximately 25% of all primary brain tumors. Only 5% of these patients survive longer than 2 years. The standard form of treatment is radiation therapy and surgery if the site is accessible. Different forms of adjuvant chemotherapy have been largely proven unsuccessful. Another form of adjuvant therapy, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), has undergone preliminary trials showing some promising results but at the cost of increased side effects like rise in intracranial blood pressure and neurological deficiency. Apoptotic cell kill used as a biological treatment endpoint can possibly ameliorate these side effects. This study evaluates the significance of apoptotic cell death in the 9L rat gliosarcoma using the aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced endogenous photosensitizer Protophorphyrin IX (PpIX). A strong influence of drug incubation time with cell kill was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cell death was less than 10% for 2 and 4 hours incubation times and irradiation times ensuring up to 70 and 80% cell kill respectively. Accumulation of PpIX in the mitochondria and cytoplasm was quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy showing a linear relationship of PpIX fluorescence with concentration. The possibility of an in vitro threshold in the PDT dose is discussed, above which cell repair mechanisms may become exhausted. In conclusion for the range of parameters investigated, apoptotic cell kill may be hard to exploit therapeutically in this tumor model.

  17. Toxicity studies in thymidine kinase-deficient herpes simplex virus therapy for malignant astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, W W; Tan, J; Redekop, G J; Goldie, J H

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that genetically engineered thymidine kinase (tk)-defective herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can effectively and selectively destroy gliomas in animal models. The consequences of viral infection and tumor regression must be characterized before this therapy can be applied in human trials. To study the potential for long-term toxicity, immunocompetent rats harboring 9L gliosarcomas were injected intratumorally with a tk-defective HSV-1, KOS-SB, at titers that previously have been demonstrated to cause tumor regression. In animals surviving 3 months or longer following viral treatment, there was no evidence of persistent infection or inflammation in peritumoral brain tissue or in remote systemic organs studied with routine histological and immunocytochemical analyses. Polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for HSV-1 detected HSV-1 DNA in peritumoral tissue only in animals sacrificed within 3 months of viral injection. There was no evidence of HSV-1 DNA in systemic tissues at any time after treatment. We conclude that stereotactic intratumoral injection of tk-deficient HSV can be attempted for the treatment of brain tumors without risk of systemic infection or significant toxicity to normal brain or remote proliferating tissues. PMID:8814171

  18. 5-Iodo-2-deoxyuridine administered into the lateral cerebral ventricle as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of disseminated glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Rewers, A.B.; Redgate, E.S.; Fisher, E.R.; Boggs, S.S. )

    1989-09-06

    A rat brain tumor model (Fischer 344 rats) with the clinical and pathological features of dissemination via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways was used to demonstrate the efficacy of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IUDR) as a radiosensitizer when it is administered directly into the CSF. Stereotaxic implantation of 9L gliosarcoma cells (5 X 10(5)) into the CSF of the lateral cerebral ventricle resulted in widespread dissemination and median survival of 18.5 and 20 days (range, 10-22) in two experiments. A continuous 7-day infusion of IUDR into the CSF starting on the day of tumor implantation did not provide any beneficial effect. Irradiation of the cranial spinal axis with 800 rad on days 4, 6, and 7 after implantation achieved an increase in survival time that was modest but statistically significant. However, the combination of IUDR infusion and radiotherapy resulted in marked improvement in survival time and a 10% cure rate (two of 20 rats). This is the first demonstration in vivo that IUDR administered into the CSF can be a potent radiosensitizer.

  19. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  20. BPA uptake in rat tissues after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Coderre, J.A.; Fisher, C.D.; Joel, D.D.; Lombardo, D.T.; Micca, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), boron given as boronophenylalanine (BPA) accumulates transiently not only in tumors but also in normal tissues. Average boron concentrations in transplanted 9L gliosarcoma tumors of 20 rats were 2.5 to 3.7 times concentrations found in blood. Although boron levels in a variety of tissues were also higher than blood the concentrations were less than the lowest found in the tumor. Further note than although BPA is a structural analogue of phenylalanine (Phe), the pathway of BPA uptake into regenerating liver may not be linked to Phe uptake mechanisms.

  1. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-15

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  2. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Thrombocytopenia model with minimal manipulation of blood cells allowing whole blood assessment of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann Skipper, Mette; Rubak, Peter; Halfdan Larsen, Ole; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-06-01

    In vitro models of thrombocytopenia are useful research tools. Previously published models have shortcomings altering properties of platelets and other blood components. The aim of the present study was to develop a whole blood method to induce thrombocytopenia with minimal manipulation, and to describe platelet function in induced thrombocytopenia in individuals with healthy platelets. Hirudin anticoagulated blood was obtained from 20 healthy volunteers. One part of the blood was gently centrifuged at 130g for 15 minutes. The platelet-rich plasma was replaced with phosphate-buffered saline to establish thrombocytopenia. Various levels of thrombocytopenia were achieved by combining different volumes of baseline whole blood and thrombocytopenic blood. Platelet counts were measured by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) and routine haematological analyser (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet function was analysed by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer, Roche) and by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) using collagen, adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and ristocetin as agonists. Median baseline platelet count was 227×10(9)/l. The in vitro model yielded median platelet counts at 51×10(9)/l (range 26-93×10(9)/l). We observed minor, yet significant, changes in platelet size and maturity from baseline to modelled thrombocytopenia. In the thrombocytopenic samples, significant and positive linear associations were found between platelet count and platelet aggregation across all agonists (all p-values<0.001). Platelet function assessed by flow cytometry showed minimal alterations in the thrombocytopenic samples. A new whole blood-based model of thrombocytopenia was established and validated. This new model serves as a useful future tool, particularly to explore platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia.

  4. Impact of Focused Ultrasound-enhanced Drug Delivery on Survival in Rats with Glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treat, Lisa Hsu; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Malignancies of the brain remain difficult to treat with chemotherapy because the selective permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks many potent agents from reaching their target. Previous studies have illustrated the feasibility of drug and antibody delivery across the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound. In this study, we investigated the impact of focused ultrasound-enhanced delivery of doxorubicin on survival in rats with aggressive glioma. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with 9 L gliosarcoma cells in the brain. Eight days after implantation, each rat received one of the following: (1) no treatment (control), (2) a single treatment with microbubble-enhanced MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS only), (3) a single treatment with i.v. liposomal doxorubicin (DOX only), or (4) a single treatment with microbubble-enhanced MRI-guided focused ultrasound and concurrent i.v. injections of liposomal doxorubicin (FUS+DOX). The survival time from implantation to death or euthanasia was recorded. We observed a modest but significant increase in median survival time in rats treated with combined MRI-guided focused ultrasound chemotherapy, compared to chemotherapy alone (p<0.001). There was no significant improvement in survival between those who received stand-alone chemotherapy and those who did not receive any treatment (p>0.10). Our study demonstrates for the first time a therapeutic benefit achieved with ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. This confirmation of efficacy in an in vivo tumor model indicates that targeted drug delivery using MRI-guided focused ultrasound has the potential to have a major impact on the treatment of patients with brain tumors and other neurological disorders.

  5. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eudocia Q.; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P.; Levin, Victor A.; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E.; Wright, John J.; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor–β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents. PMID:23099651

  6. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eudocia Q; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H Ian; Chang, Susan M; Yung, W K Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P; Levin, Victor A; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E; Wright, John J; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Gilbert, Mark R; Wen, Patrick Y

    2012-12-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents.

  7. Modeling X-Linked Ancestral Origins in Multiparental Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chaozhi

    2015-01-01

    The models for the mosaic structure of an individual’s genome from multiparental populations have been developed primarily for autosomes, whereas X chromosomes receive very little attention. In this paper, we extend our previous approach to model ancestral origin processes along two X chromosomes in a mapping population, which is necessary for developing hidden Markov models in the reconstruction of ancestry blocks for X-linked quantitative trait locus mapping. The model accounts for the joint recombination pattern, the asymmetry between maternally and paternally derived X chromosomes, and the finiteness of population size. The model can be applied to various mapping populations such as the advanced intercross lines (AIL), the Collaborative Cross (CC), the heterogeneous stock (HS), the Diversity Outcross (DO), and the Drosophila synthetic population resource (DSPR). We further derive the map expansion, density (per Morgan) of recombination breakpoints, in advanced intercross populations with L inbred founders under the limit of an infinitely large population size. The analytic results show that for X chromosomes the genetic map expands linearly at a rate (per generation) of two-thirds times 1 – 10/(9L) for the AIL, and at a rate of two-thirds times 1 – 1/L for the DO and the HS, whereas for autosomes the map expands at a rate of 1 – 1/L for the AIL, the DO, and the HS. PMID:25740936

  8. A prognostic model to predict survival in 867 World Health Organization-defined essential thrombocythemia at diagnosis: a study by the International Working Group on Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Francesco; Thiele, Jürgen; Girodon, Francois; Rumi, Elisa; Carobbio, Alessandra; Gisslinger, Heinz; Kvasnicka, Hans Michael; Ruggeri, Marco; Randi, Maria Luigia; Gangat, Naseema; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Gianatti, Andrea; Gisslinger, Bettina; Müllauer, Leonhard; Rodeghiero, Francesco; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Bertozzi, Irene; Hanson, Curtis A; Boveri, Emanuela; Marino, Filippo; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Antonioli, Elisabetta; Carrai, Valentina; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Pascutto, Cristiana; Cazzola, Mario; Barbui, Tiziano; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2012-08-01

    Diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia (ET) has been updated in the last World Health Organization (WHO) classification. We developed a prognostic model to predict survival at diagnosis, named IPSET (International Prognostic Score for ET), studying patients with WHO-defined ET. Age 60 years or older, leukocyte count ≥ 11 × 10(9)/L, and prior thrombosis significantly affected survival, by multivariable Cox regression. On the basis of the hazard ratio, we assigned 2 points to age and 1 each to leukocyte count and thrombosis. So, the IPSET model allocated 867 patients into 3 risk categories with significantly different survival: low (sum of points = 0; median survival not reached), intermediate (sum = 1-2; median survival 24.5 years), and high (sum = 3-4, median survival 13.8 years). The IPSET model was further validated in 2 independent cohorts including 132 WHO-defined ET and 234 Polycythemia Vera Study Group-defined ET patients. The IPSET model was able to predict the occurrence of thrombosis, and not to predict post-ET myelofibrosis. In conclusion, IPSET, based on age ≥ 60 years, leukocyte count ≥ 11 × 10(9)/L, and history of thrombosis allows prognostic assessment of WHO-defined ET and the validation process makes IPSET applicable in all patients phenotypically appearing as ET.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  10. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of {sup 10}B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed.

  11. Induction of immunity in peripheral tissues combined with intracerebral transplantation of interleukin-2-producing cells eliminates established brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Y; Yamaura, A; Sato, Y; Sakiyama, S; Tagawa, M

    2001-12-15

    Cytokine gene therapy for the induction of potent immune responses against central nervous system tumors has proven to have significant potential. However, this strategy needs improvement in the process of antigen presentation and/or insufficient recruitment of immunocompetent cells to achieve successful eradication of established brain tumors. We investigated the therapeutic potential of induced systemic immunity in peripheral tissues combined with interleukin-2 (IL-2) production in the vicinity of brain tumors to treat established brain tumors. Sequential magnetic resonance image monitoring showed that the combinatory therapy consisting of intracerebral (i.c.) transplantation of IL-2-producing rat gliosarcoma 9L (9L/IL-2) cells and s.c. vaccination using irradiated 9L or 9L/IL-2 cells could cure 9L-bearing rats, whereas either the i.c. injection of 9L/IL-2 cells or the s.c. vaccination produced little or marginal antitumor effects, respectively. Xenogeneic murine neuroblastoma cells secreting IL-2 could substitute for 9L/IL-2 cells, producing significant antitumor effects in the vaccinated rats. Tumor-specific cytotoxic activity was induced in the vaccinated rats but not fully in the rats treated only with i.c. injection of 9L/IL-2 cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that a number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells infiltrated into the brain tumors which were treated with the combinatory therapy. The level of cell infiltration was similar to that found in s.c. 9L/IL-2 tumors which were subsequently rejected. In contrast, the brain tumors treated with either i.c. transplantation of 9L/IL-2 cells or the s.c. vaccination showed only moderate infiltration of T cells. The combinatory strategy, i.c. grafting of IL-2-producing cells, and s.c. immunization of irradiated whole tumor cell vaccine, is, thus, effective for recruiting activated T cells into the brain tumor site and could be a potential therapy for brain tumors.

  12. Leadership Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Thomas J.

    This paper discusses six different models of organizational structure and leadership, including the scalar chain or pyramid model, the continuum model, the grid model, the linking pin model, the contingency model, and the circle or democratic model. Each model is examined in a separate section that describes the model and its development, lists…

  13. Models and role models.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of action and was also utilized for the formulation of oral care products. In addition, we made use of intra-oral (in situ) models to study other features of the oral environment that drive the de/remineralization balance in individual patients. This model addressed basic questions, such as how enamel and dentine are affected by challenges in the oral cavity, as well as practical issues related to fluoride toothpaste efficacy. The observation that perhaps fluoride is not sufficiently potent to reduce dental caries in the present-day society triggered us to expand our knowledge in the bacterial aetiology of dental caries. For this we developed the Amsterdam Active Attachment biofilm model. Different from studies on planktonic ('single') bacteria, this biofilm model captures bacteria in a habitat similar to dental plaque. With data from the combination of these models, it should be possible to study separate processes which together may lead to dental caries. Also products and novel agents could be evaluated that interfere with either of the processes. Having these separate models in place, a suggestion is made to design computer models to encompass the available information. Models but also role models are of the utmost importance in bringing and guiding research and researchers. PMID:25871413

  14. Models, Fiction, and Fictional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang

    2014-03-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Why Most Models in Science Are Not Fictional * Typically Fictional Models in Science * Modeling the Unobservable * Fictional Models for the Unobservable? * References

  15. Improved treatment of a brain-tumor model. Part 2: Sequential therapy with BCNU and 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, M A; Dougherty, D V; Wilson, C B; Rosenblum, M L

    1983-03-01

    A combination chemotherapy regimen for brain tumors was developed, based on investigations of the survival of animals harboring the intracerebral 9L rat brain-tumor model and on analyses of their clonogenic tumor cells. Fischer 344 rats harboring 9L brain tumors were treated with 2-day courses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), in order to expose all cycling tumor cells to the drug during DNA synthesis and achieve maximum anti-tumor activity for this cell-cycle-specific anti-metabolite. Although a 74% cell kill was obtained for a total dose of 45 mg/kg or greater, animal life span was not increased over that of untreated tumor-bearing controls. However, when 5-FU (48 to 96 mg/kg total dose over 2 days) was administered after a single LD10 dose of BCNU (13.3 mg/kg), additive cell kill was suggested. In three large series, long-term animal survivors and occasional tumor cures were observed with this drug combination, a result never observed following BCNU alone. Schedule dependency was not apparent. A previously published protocol for treating recurrent malignant gliomas with sequential courses of BCNU and 5-FU was partially planned based upon these initial observations. Anti-tumor activity with the combination of drugs was superior to therapy with BCNU alone. Both animal and human studies confirm that, contrary to presently accepted oncological tenets, a chemotherapeutic agent that kills significant numbers of tumor cells but is clinically ineffective when given alone might, nevertheless, be useful in combination therapy regimens.

  16. Synthesis, Radiolabeling and Biological Evaluation of (R)- and (S)-2-Amino-3-[18F]Fluoro-2-Methylpropanoic Acid (FAMP) and (R)- and (S)-3-[18F]Fluoro-2-Methyl-2-N-(Methylamino)propanoic Acid (NMeFAMP) as Potential PET Radioligands for Imaging Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weiping; McConathy, Jonathan; Williams, Larry; Camp, Vernon M.; Malveaux, Eugene J.; Zhang, Zhaobin; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Goodman, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    The non-natural amino acids (R)- and (S)-2-amino-3-fluoro-2-methylpropanoic acid 5 and (R)- and (S)-3-fluoro-2-methyl-2-N-(methylamino)propanoic acid 8 were synthesized in shorter reaction sequences than in the original report starting from enantiomerically pure (S)- and (R)-α-methyl-serine, respectively. The reaction sequence provided the cyclic sulfamidate precursors for radiosynthesis of (R)- and (S)-[18F]5 and (R)- and (S)-[18F]8 in fewer steps than in the original report. (R)- and (S)-[18F]5 and(R)- and (S)-[18F]8 were synthesized by no-carrier-added nucleophilic [18F]fluorination in 52–66% decay-corrected-yields with radiochemical purity over 99%. The cell assays showed that all four compounds were substrates for amino acid transport and enter 9L rat gliosarcoma cells in vitro at least in part by system-A amino acid transport. The biodistribution studies demonstrated that in vivo tumor to normal brain ratios for all compounds were high with ratios of 20:1 to115:1 in rats with intracranial 9L tumors. The (R)- enantiomers of [18F]5 and [18F]8 demonstrated higher tumor uptake in vivo compared to the (S)- enantiomers. PMID:20028004

  17. Boronated metalloporphyrins: a novel approach to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer using contrast-enhanced MR imaging and neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, L R; Straubinger, R M; Kahl, S B; Koo, M S; Alletto, J J; Mazurchuk, R; Chau, R I; Thamer, S L; Fiel, R J

    1993-01-01

    Porphyrins are a unique class of metal chelating agents that have shown specific affinity for neoplasms. The water-soluble free-base derivative, tetrakiscarborane carboxylate ester of 2,4-(alpha,beta-dihydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX (BOPP), an agent designed for neutron capture therapy, has previously demonstrated selective localization and retention in a C6 murine glioma. In the present work, the authors demonstrate that the manganese chelate of BOPP also selectively localizes in a rat 9L gliosarcoma and preferentially enhances the tumor-normal brain contrast of T1-weighted images for at least 92 hours. The data indicate a maximal enhancement of contrast between tumor and normal brain at 24 hours after injection, compared with 5 minutes for manganese (III) tetraphenylporphine sulfonate (TPPS4). The results also indicate that Mn-BOPP may have a slower uptake in the 9L glioma than Mn-TPPS4 but a longer retention in the tumor. Mn-BOPP is unique in that it represents, to the authors' knowledge, the first example of a single agent that can enhance contrast between tumor and normal tissue and be potentially effective as an agent for boron neutron capture therapy.

  18. Experimental investigations of the steady flow through an idealized model of a femoral artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgea, Corina; Bode, Florin; Ioan Budiu, Octavian; Nascutiu, Lucian; Banyai, Daniel; Damian, Mihai

    2014-03-01

    The present paper presents the steps taken by the authors in the first stage of an experimental program within a larger national research project whose objective is to characterize the flow through a femoral artery bypass with a view to finding solutions for its optimization. The objective of the stage is to investigate by means of the PIV method the stationary flow through a bypass model with an idealized geometry. A bypass assembly which reunites the idealized geometry models of the proximal and distal anastomoses, and which respects the lengths of a femoral artery bypass was constructed on the basis of data for a real patient provided by medical investigations. With the aim of testing the model and the established experimental set-up with regard to their suitability for the assessment of the velocity field associated to the steady flow through the bypass, three zones that can restore the whole distal anastomosis were PIV investigated. The measurements were taken in the conditions of maintained inflow at the bypass entry of 0.9 l / min (Re = 600). The article presents comparatively the flow spectra and the velocity fields for each zone obtained in two situations: with the femoral artery completely occluded and completely open.

  19. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Basic Operating Characteristics and Cylinder-to-Cylinder Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-12

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  20. Effect of treatment with baicalein on the intracerebral tumor growth and survival of orthotopic glioma models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Rong; Jiang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Baicalein, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has been proved as a promising chemopreventive compound for many cancers. The aim of this work was to assess the anti-tumor effect of baicalein in the orthotopic glioma models. It was found that treatment of mice with U87 gliomas with baicalein (20 and 40 mg/kg/day, i.p.) significantly inhibited the intracerebral tumor growth and prolonged the survival. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein suppressed cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein reduced tumor permeability, attenuated edema of tumors and brains, and improved tight junctions in gliomas. Finally, treatment with baicalein reduced the expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and VEGFR2 in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein also markedly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged the survival of rats with 9L gliomas. In conclusion, baicalein has an obvious anti-tumor activity in the orthotopic glioma models. Our results suggested that treatment with baicalein might be an effective therapy for recurrent malignant brain cancers through suppressing tumor growth and alleviating edema.

  1. Investigation of residence time and groundwater flux in Venice Lagoon: comparing radium isotope and hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Rapaglia, John; Ferrarin, Christian; Zaggia, Luca; Moore, Willard S; Umgiesser, Georg; Garcia-Solsona, Ester; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Masqué, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The four naturally-occurring isotopes of radium were coupled with a previously evaluated hydrodynamic model to determine the apparent age of surface waters and to quantify submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Mean apparent age of water in the Venice Lagoon was calculated using the ratio of 224Ra to 228Ra determined from 30 monitoring stations and a mean pore water end member. Average apparent age was calculated to be 6.0 d using Ra ratios. This calculated age was very similar to average residence time calculated for the same period using a hydrodynamic model (5.8 d). A mass balance of Ra was accomplished by quantifying each of the sources and sinks of Ra in the lagoon, with the unknown variable being attributed to SGD. Total SGD were calculated to be 4.1 +/- 1.5, 3.8 +/- 0.7, 3.0 +/- 1.3, and 3.5 +/- 1.0 x 10(10) L d(-1) for (223,224,226, 228)Ra, respectively, which are an order of magnitude larger than total mean fluvial discharge into the Venice Lagoon (3.1 x 10(9) L d(-1)). The SGD as a source of nutrients in the Venice Lagoon is also discussed and, though significant to the nutrient budget, is likely to be less important as the dominant control on SGD is recirculated seawater rather than freshwater.

  2. Seasonal differences of model predictability and the impact of SST in the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, X. M.; Wang, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Both seasonal potential predictability and the impact of SST in the Pacific on the forecast skill over China are investigated by using a 9-level global atmospheric general circulation model developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IAP9L-ACCM). For each year during 1970 to 1999, the ensemble consists of seven integrations started from consecutive observational daily atmospheric fields and forced by observational monthly SST. For boreal winter, spring and summer, the variance ratios of the SST-forced variability to the total variability and the differences in the spatial correlation coefficients of seasonal mean fields in special years versus normal years are computed respectively. It follows that there are slightly inter-seasonal differences in the model potential predictability in the Tropics. At northern middle and high latitudes, prediction skill is generally low in spring and relatively high either in summer for surface air temperature and middle and upper tropospheric geopotential height or in winter for wind and precipitation. In general, prediction skill rises notably in western China, especially in northwestern China, when SST anomalies (SSTA) in the Ni (n) over tildeo-3 region are significant. Moreover, particular attention should be paid to the SSTA in the North Pacific (NP) if one aims to predict summer climate over the eastern part of China, i.e., northeastern China, North China and southeastern China.

  3. Models, Part IV: Inquiry Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses models for information skills that include inquiry-oriented activities. Highlights include WebQuest, which uses Internet resources supplemented with videoconferencing; Minnesota's Inquiry Process based on the Big Six model for information problem-solving; Indiana's Student Inquiry Model; constructivist learning models for inquiry; and…

  4. Supermatrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    Radom matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  5. Supermatrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, S.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-09-30

    In this paper, random matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two-component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  6. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  7. Architectural Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Harold E.; Hurni, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Suggests building models as a way to reinforce and enhance related subjects such as architectural drafting, structural carpentry, etc., and discusses time, materials, scales, tools or equipment needed, how to achieve realistic special effects, and the types of projects that can be built (model of complete building, a panoramic model, and model…

  8. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  9. Response surface methodology for the modeling and optimization of oil-in-water emulsion separation using gas sparging assisted microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Fouladitajar, Amir; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Dabir, Bahram; Rezaei, Hamid; Valizadeh, Bardiya

    2015-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were used to develop models for optimization and modeling of a gas sparging assisted microfiltration of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. The effect of gas flow rate (Q G ), oil concentration (C oil ), transmembrane pressure (TMP), and liquid flow rate (Q L ) on the permeate flux and oil rejection were studied by RSM. Two sets of experiments were designed to investigate the effects of different gas-liquid two-phase flow regimes; low and high gas flow rates. Two separate RSM models were developed for each experimental set. The oil concentration and TMP were found to be the most significant factors influencing both permeate flux and rejection. Also, the interaction between these parameters was the most significant one. At low Q G , the more the gas flow rate, the higher the permeate flux; however, in the high gas flow rate region, higher Q G did not necessarily improve the permeate flux. In the case of rejection, gas and liquid flow rates were found to be insignificant. The optimum process conditions were found to be the following: Q G  = 1.0 (L/min), C oil  = 1,290 (mg/L), TMP = 1.58 (bar), and Q L  = 3.0 (L/min). Under these optimal conditions, maximum permeate flux and rejection (%) were 115.9 (L/m(2)h) and 81.1 %, respectively.

  10. Hydrological models are mediating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  11. Model Experiments and Model Descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose; Sze, N. D.; Vohralik, Peter; Randeniya, Lakshman; Plumb, Ian

    1999-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Stratospheric Models and Measurements Workshop (M&M II) is the continuation of the effort previously started in the first Workshop (M&M I, Prather and Remsberg [1993]) held in 1992. As originally stated, the aim of M&M is to provide a foundation for establishing the credibility of stratospheric models used in environmental assessments of the ozone response to chlorofluorocarbons, aircraft emissions, and other climate-chemistry interactions. To accomplish this, a set of measurements of the present day atmosphere was selected. The intent was that successful simulations of the set of measurements should become the prerequisite for the acceptance of these models as having a reliable prediction for future ozone behavior. This section is divided into two: model experiment and model descriptions. In the model experiment, participant were given the charge to design a number of experiments that would use observations to test whether models are using the correct mechanisms to simulate the distributions of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. The purpose is closely tied to the needs to reduce the uncertainties in the model predicted responses of stratospheric ozone to perturbations. The specifications for the experiments were sent out to the modeling community in June 1997. Twenty eight modeling groups responded to the requests for input. The first part of this section discusses the different modeling group, along with the experiments performed. Part two of this section, gives brief descriptions of each model as provided by the individual modeling groups.

  12. Analytical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A system-level design and analysis model was developed. This model was conceived to have several key elements: a solar pond thermodynamic performance model, a power generation subsystem model, and an economic analysis element. The basic approach was to create these elements or modules and refine them on an individual basis yet retain the capability to easily couple them into a full system design model. This building block approach allows for maximum flexibility and substitution of refined descriptions as the technology develops. A general overview of interconnecting these subsystem models is presented. The primary program control element will perform the administrative functions of data input, data output, information storage and transfer, and sequential calling of the subsystem models. From the point of view of the requirements of a system design model, a power conversion subsystem model was developed. The goal of the effort was a preliminary subsystem model compatible with the solar pond subsystem model so that a first order system simulation analysis could be performed.

  13. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  14. ICRF modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.

    1985-12-01

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  16. Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate models is a very broad topic, so a single volume can only offer a small sampling of relevant research activities. This volume of 14 chapters includes descriptions of a variety of modeling studies for a variety of geographic regions by an international roster of authors. The climate research community generally uses the rubric climate models to refer to organized sets of computer instructions that produce simulations of climate evolution. The code is based on physical relationships that describe the shared variability of meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, precipitation rate, circulation, radiation fluxes, etc. Three-dimensional climate models are integrated over time in order to compute the temporal and spatial variations of these parameters. Model domains can be global or regional and the horizontal and vertical resolutions of the computational grid vary from model to model. Considering the entire climate system requires accounting for interactions between solar insolation, atmospheric, oceanic and continental processes, the latter including land hydrology and vegetation. Model simulations may concentrate on one or more of these components, but the most sophisticated models will estimate the mutual interactions of all of these environments. Advances in computer technology have prompted investments in more complex model configurations that consider more phenomena interactions than were possible with yesterday s computers. However, not every attempt to add to the computational layers is rewarded by better model performance. Extensive research is required to test and document any advantages gained by greater sophistication in model formulation. One purpose for publishing climate model research results is to present purported advances for evaluation by the scientific community.

  17. Phenomenological models

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.

    1990-09-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. A range of models covering different endpoints and phenomena has developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Building models

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-04-01

    As developers make progress on independent power projects around the world, models for success are beginning to emerge. Different models are evolving to create ownership structures that accomoate a complex system of regulatory requirements. Other frameworks make use of previously untapped fuel resources, or establish new sources of financing; however, not all models may be applied to a given project. This article explores how developers are finding new alternatives for overcoming development challenges that are common to projects in many countries.

  19. Calorimetry modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    A heat-flow calorimeter has been modeled on a Compaq PC, using the Algor Heat Transfer Modeling and Analysis Program, Algor Interactive Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA. Employed in this application of the Algor finite element analysis program are two-dimensional axisymmetric thermal conductivity elements. The development of a computer calorimeter modeling program allows for the testing of new materials and techniques without actual fabrication of the calorimeter. 2 figs.

  20. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  1. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  2. Model Selection for Geostatistical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Davis, Richard A.; Merton, Andrew A.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2006-02-01

    We consider the problem of model selection for geospatial data. Spatial correlation is typically ignored in the selection of explanatory variables and this can influence model selection results. For example, the inclusion or exclusion of particular explanatory variables may not be apparent when spatial correlation is ignored. To address this problem, we consider the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) as applied to a geostatistical model. We offer a heuristic derivation of the AIC in this context and provide simulation results that show that using AIC for a geostatistical model is superior to the often used approach of ignoring spatial correlation in the selection of explanatory variables. These ideas are further demonstrated via a model for lizard abundance. We also employ the principle of minimum description length (MDL) to variable selection for the geostatistical model. The effect of sampling design on the selection of explanatory covariates is also explored.

  3. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  4. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  5. Modeling Sunspots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok; Oh, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling in science has been studied by education researchers for decades and is now being applied broadly in school. It is among the scientific practices featured in the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") (Achieve Inc. 2013). This article describes modeling activities in an extracurricular science club in a high…

  6. Phonological Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, W.L.

    1968-01-01

    The article discusses models of synchronic and diachronic phonology and suggests changes in them. The basic generative model of phonology is outlined with the author's reinterpretations. The systematic phonemic level is questioned in terms of its unreality with respect to linguistic performance and its lack of validity with respect to historical…

  7. Student Modelers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confrey, Jere; Doerr, Helen M.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an argument for learner-centered modeling tools and approaches that take into account students' conceptions. Based on a theoretical argument for the interplay of grounded activity and systematic inquiry, the article reports on a study of an integrated science and mathematics high school class that investigated modeling activities.…

  8. Incorporation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data into a simple mathematical model of tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuegwu, N. C.; Colvin, D. C.; Loveless, M. E.; Xu, L.; Gore, J. C.; Yankeelov, T. E.

    2012-01-01

    We build on previous work to show how serial diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) data can be used to estimate proliferation rates in a rat model of brain cancer. Thirteen rats were inoculated intracranially with 9L tumor cells; eight rats were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and five rats were untreated controls. All animals underwent DW-MRI immediately before, one day and three days after treatment. Values of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated from the DW-MRI data and then used to estimate the number of cells in each voxel and also for whole tumor regions of interest. The data from the first two imaging time points were then used to estimate the proliferation rate of each tumor. The proliferation rates were used to predict the number of tumor cells at day three, and this was correlated with the corresponding experimental data. The voxel-by-voxel analysis yielded Pearson's correlation coefficients ranging from -0.06 to 0.65, whereas the region of interest analysis provided Pearson's and concordance correlation coefficients of 0.88 and 0.80, respectively. Additionally, the ratio of positive to negative proliferation values was used to separate the treated and control animals (p <0.05) at an earlier point than the mean ADC values. These results further illustrate how quantitative measurements of tumor state obtained non-invasively by imaging can be incorporated into mathematical models that predict tumor growth.

  9. Protein structure modeling with MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects have resulted in a rapid increase in the number of known protein sequences. In contrast, only about one-hundredth of these sequences have been characterized at atomic resolution using experimental structure determination methods. Computational protein structure modeling techniques have the potential to bridge this sequence-structure gap. In this chapter, we present an example that illustrates the use of MODELLER to construct a comparative model for a protein with unknown structure. Automation of a similar protocol has resulted in models of useful accuracy for domains in more than half of all known protein sequences.

  10. Linguistic models and linguistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Pedryez, W; Vasilakos, A V

    1999-01-01

    The study is concerned with a linguistic approach to the design of a new category of fuzzy (granular) models. In contrast to numerically driven identification techniques, we concentrate on budding meaningful linguistic labels (granules) in the space of experimental data and forming the ensuing model as a web of associations between such granules. As such models are designed at the level of information granules and generate results in the same granular rather than pure numeric format, we refer to them as linguistic models. Furthermore, as there are no detailed numeric estimation procedures involved in the construction of the linguistic models carried out in this way, their design mode can be viewed as that of a rapid prototyping. The underlying algorithm used in the development of the models utilizes an augmented version of the clustering technique (context-based clustering) that is centered around a notion of linguistic contexts-a collection of fuzzy sets or fuzzy relations defined in the data space (more precisely a space of input variables). The detailed design algorithm is provided and contrasted with the standard modeling approaches commonly encountered in the literature. The usefulness of the linguistic mode of system modeling is discussed and illustrated with the aid of numeric studies including both synthetic data as well as some time series dealing with modeling traffic intensity over a broadband telecommunication network.

  11. OSPREY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to

  12. Vorinostat and Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Therapy With Vorinostat in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  13. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  14. Temsirolimus and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  15. WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-07

    Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  16. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  18. Combination Adenovirus + Pembrolizumab to Trigger Immune Virus Effects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-30

    Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasm; Glioma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Malignant Brain Tumor; Neoplasm, Neuroepithelial; Neuroectodermal Tumors; Neoplasm by Histologic Type; Neoplasm, Nerve Tissue; Nervous System Diseases

  19. Veliparib, Radiation Therapy, and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Pontine Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Childhood Mixed Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  20. p28 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Central Nervous System Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Teratoid Tumor, Atypical; Choroid Plexus Neoplasms; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brainstem Tumors; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Medulloblastoma; Neuroectodermal Tumor, Primitive

  1. Model hydrographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, W.D.

    1972-01-01

    Model hydrographs are composed of pairs of dimensionless ratios, arrayed in tabular form, which, when modified by the appropriate values of rainfall exceed and by the time and areal characteristics of the drainage basin, satisfactorily represent the flood hydrograph for the basin. Model bydrographs are developed from a dimensionless translation hydrograph, having a time base of T hours and appropriately modified for storm duration by routing through reservoir storage, S=kOx. Models fall into two distinct classes: (1) those for which the value of x is unity and which have all the characteristics of true unit hydrographs and (2) those for which the value of x is other than unity and to which the unit-hydrograph principles of proportionality and superposition do not apply. Twenty-six families of linear models and eight families of nonlinear models in tabular form from the principal subject of this report. Supplemental discussions describe the development of the models and illustrate their application. Other sections of the report, supplemental to the tables, describe methods of determining the hydrograph characteristics, T, k, and x, both from observed hydrograph and from the physical characteristics of the drainage basin. Five illustrative examples of use show that the models, when properly converted to incorporate actual rainfall excess and the time and areal characteristics of the drainage basins, do indeed satisfactorily represent the observed flood hydrographs for the basins.

  2. Stereometric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-07-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : - the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); - the shot visualization in two distinct windows - the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  3. Phenomenological models.

    PubMed

    Braby, L A

    1991-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions which are modified by characteristics of the radiation, the timing of its administration, the chemical and physical environment, and the nature of the biological system. However, it is generally agreed that the health effects in animals originate from changes in individual cells, or possibly small groups of cells, and that these cellular changes are initiated by ionizations and excitations produced by the passage of charged particles through the cells. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. Different phenomena (LET dependence, dose rate effect, oxygen effect etc.) and different end points (cell survival, aberration formation, transformation, etc.) have been observed, and no single model has been developed to cover all of them. Instead, a range of models covering different end points and phenomena have developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. PMID:1811477

  4. Phenomenological models.

    PubMed

    Braby, L A

    1991-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions which are modified by characteristics of the radiation, the timing of its administration, the chemical and physical environment, and the nature of the biological system. However, it is generally agreed that the health effects in animals originate from changes in individual cells, or possibly small groups of cells, and that these cellular changes are initiated by ionizations and excitations produced by the passage of charged particles through the cells. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. Different phenomena (LET dependence, dose rate effect, oxygen effect etc.) and different end points (cell survival, aberration formation, transformation, etc.) have been observed, and no single model has been developed to cover all of them. Instead, a range of models covering different end points and phenomena have developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified.

  5. Modular Modeling System Model Builder

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, C.S.; Matthews, M.T.

    1996-12-31

    The latest release of the Modular Modeling System (MMS) Model Builder adds still more time-saving features to an already powerful MMS dynamic-simulation tool set. The Model Builder takes advantage of 32-bit architecture within the Microsoft Windows 95/NT{trademark} Operating Systems to better integrate a mature library of power-plant components. In addition, the MMS Library of components can now be modified and extended with a new tool named MMS CompGen{trademark}. The MMS Model Builder allows the user to quickly build a graphical schematic representation for a plant by selecting from a library of predefined power plant components to dynamically simulate their operation. In addition, each component has a calculation subroutine stored in a dynamic-link library (DLL), which facilitates the determination of a steady-state condition and performance of routine calculations for the component. These calculations, termed auto-parameterization, help avoid repetitive and often tedious hand calculations for model initialization. In striving to meet the needs for large models and increase user productivity, the MMS Model Builder has been completely revamped to make power plant model creation and maintainability easier and more efficient.

  6. A Model for Math Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tony; Erfan, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is an open-ended research subject where no definite answers exist for any problem. Math modeling enables thinking outside the box to connect different fields of studies together including statistics, algebra, calculus, matrices, programming and scientific writing. As an integral part of society, it is the foundation for many…

  7. Energy Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  8. Modeling Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Vetizer, S.; Mahalingam, S.

    2011-12-23

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gradient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  9. Programming models

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, David J; Mc Pherson, Allen; Thorp, John R; Barrett, Richard; Clay, Robert; De Supinski, Bronis; Dube, Evi; Heroux, Mike; Janssen, Curtis; Langer, Steve; Laros, Jim

    2011-01-14

    A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

  10. PREDICTIVE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.M. )

    1986-12-01

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3) in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4) polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5) steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

  11. Molecular and cellular response of the most extensively used rodent glioma models to radiation and/or cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Bencokova, Zuzana; Pauron, Laurianne; Devic, Clément; Joubert, Aurélie; Gastaldo, Jérôme; Massart, Catherine; Balosso, Jacques; Foray, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Anti-glioma strategies are generally based on trials involving rodent models whose choice remains based on proliferative capacity and availability. Recently, our group obtained the most protracted survival of rats bearing F98 gliomas by combining synchrotron X-rays and intracerebral cisplatin injection (Biston et al., Cancer Res, 64:2317-2323, 2004). The response to such treatment was suggested to be dependent on BRCA1, a tumour suppressor known to be involved in the response to radiation and cisplatin. In order to verify the impact of BRCA1 functionality upon success of anti-glioma trials, radiobiological features and BRCA1-dependent stress signalling were investigated in the most extensively used rodent glioma models. Methods Cell death pathways, cell cycle arrests, DNA repair and stress signalling were evaluated in response to radiation and cisplatin in C6, 9L and F98 models. Results Rodent glioma models showed a large spectrum of cellular radiation response. Surprisingly, BRCA1 was found to be functionally impaired in C6 and F98 favouring genomic instability, tumour heterogeneity and tolerance of unrepaired DNA damage. Significance Our findings strengthened the importance of the choice of the glioma model on genetic and radiobiological bases, inasmuch as all these rat glioma models are induced by nitrosourea-mediated mutagenesis that may favour specific gene mutations. Particularly, BRCA1 status may condition the response to anti-glioma treatments. Furthermore, since BRCA1 acts as a tumour suppressor in a number of malignancies, our findings raise also the question of the implication of BRCA1 in brain tumours formation. PMID:17611717

  12. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) interaction'' of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) ``interaction`` of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  14. Modeling reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Although powerful computers have allowed complex physical and manmade hardware systems to be modeled successfully, we have encountered persistent problems with the reliability of computer models for systems involving human learning, human action, and human organizations. This is not a misfortune; unlike physical and manmade systems, human systems do not operate under a fixed set of laws. The rules governing the actions allowable in the system can be changed without warning at any moment, and can evolve over time. That the governing laws are inherently unpredictable raises serious questions about the reliability of models when applied to human situations. In these domains, computers are better used, not for prediction and planning, but for aiding humans. Examples are systems that help humans speculate about possible futures, offer advice about possible actions in a domain, systems that gather information from the networks, and systems that track and support work flows in organizations.

  15. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  16. Painting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  17. Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although air quality models have been applied historically to address issues specific to ambient air quality standards (i.e., one criteria pollutant at a time) or welfare (e.g.. acid deposition or visibility impairment). they are inherently multipollutant based. Therefore. in pri...

  18. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  19. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  20. Ensemble Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ensemble forecasting has been used for operational numerical weather prediction in the United States and Europe since the early 1990s. An ensemble of weather or climate forecasts is used to characterize the two main sources of uncertainty in computer models of physical systems: ...

  1. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  2. Models, Part V: Composition Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Describes four models: The Authoring Cycle, a whole language approach that reflects the inquiry process; I-Search, an approach to research that uses the power of student interests; Cultural Celebration, using local heritage topics; and Science Lab Report, for the composition of a lab report. (LRW)

  3. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  4. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Modeling biomembranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven James; Heffernan, Julieanne; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Frink, Laura J. Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the properties and behavior of biomembranes is fundamental to many biological processes and technologies. Microdomains in biomembranes or ''lipid rafts'' are now known to be an integral part of cell signaling, vesicle formation, fusion processes, protein trafficking, and viral and toxin infection processes. Understanding how microdomains form, how they depend on membrane constituents, and how they act not only has biological implications, but also will impact Sandia's effort in development of membranes that structurally adapt to their environment in a controlled manner. To provide such understanding, we created physically-based models of biomembranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using these models were applied to phenomena such as microdomain formation, membrane fusion, pattern formation, and protein insertion. Because lipid dynamics and self-organization in membranes occur on length and time scales beyond atomistic MD, we used coarse-grained models of double tail lipid molecules that spontaneously self-assemble into bilayers. DFT provided equilibrium information on membrane structure. Experimental work was performed to further help elucidate the fundamental membrane organization principles.

  6. Model checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Automatic formal verification methods for finite-state systems, also known as model-checking, successfully reduce labor costs since they are mostly automatic. Model checkers explicitly or implicitly enumerate the reachable state space of a system, whose behavior is described implicitly, perhaps by a program or a collection of finite automata. Simple properties, such as mutual exclusion or absence of deadlock, can be checked by inspecting individual states. More complex properties, such as lack of starvation, require search for cycles in the state graph with particular properties. Specifications to be checked may consist of built-in properties, such as deadlock or 'unspecified receptions' of messages, another program or implicit description, to be compared with a simulation, bisimulation, or language inclusion relation, or an assertion in one of several temporal logics. Finite-state verification tools are beginning to have a significant impact in commercial designs. There are many success stories of verification tools finding bugs in protocols or hardware controllers. In some cases, these tools have been incorporated into design methodology. Research in finite-state verification has been advancing rapidly, and is showing no signs of slowing down. Recent results include probabilistic algorithms for verification, exploitation of symmetry and independent events, and the use symbolic representations for Boolean functions and systems of linear inequalities. One of the most exciting areas for further research is the combination of model-checking with theorem-proving methods.

  7. Mechanisms of transport of p-borono-phenylalanine through the cell membrane in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wittig, A; Sauerwein, W A; Coderre, J A

    2000-02-01

    The mechanisms of transport of p-(dihydroxyboryl)-phenylalanine (BPA) through the cell membrane were investigated in vitro, evaluating especially the systems responsible for the transport of neutral amino acids as potential carriers for BPA. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to BPA under controlled conditions and in a defined medium that was free of amino acids. The time course of (10)B (delivered by BPA) uptake and efflux was measured under different conditions. To analyze the intracellular boron content, direct-current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) was used after separating the cells from extracellular boron in the cell medium using an oil filtration technique. The dependence of factors such as cell type, temperature, composition and concentration of amino acids and specific substrates for amino acid transport systems in the culture medium or in intracellular compartments on BPA uptake and efflux were studied. The results of this study support the hypothesis that BPA is transported by the L system and that transport can be further stimulated by amino acids preaccumulated in the cell by either the L or A amino acid transport system.

  8. Chalcone JAI-51 improves efficacy of synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Audrey; Boumendjel, Ahcene; Khalil, Enam; Serduc, Raphael; Bräuer, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Laissue, Jean A; Boutonnat, Jean

    2012-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), a preclinical form of radiosurgery, uses spatially fractionated micrometre-wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beams. As MRT alone is predominantly palliative for animal tumors, the effects of the combination of MRT and a newly synthesized chemotherapeutic agent JAI-51 on 9L gliosarcomas have been evaluated. Fourteen days (D14) after implantation (D0), intracerebral 9LGS-bearing rats received either MRT, JAI-51 or both treatments. JAI-51, alone or immediately after MRT, was administered three times per week. Animals were kept up to ∼20 weeks after irradiation or sacrificed at D16 or D28 after treatment for cell cycle analysis. MRT plus JAI-51 increased significantly the lifespan compared with MRT alone (p = 0.0367). JAI-51 treatment alone had no effect on rat survival. MRT alone or associated with JAI-51 induced a cell cycle blockade in G2/M (p < 0.01) while the combined treatment also reduced the proportion of G0/G1 cells. At D28 after irradiation, MRT and MRT/JAI-51 had a smaller cell blockade effect in the G2/M phase owing to a significant increase in tumor cell death rate (<2c) and a proportional increase of endoreplicative cells (>8c). The combination of MRT and JAI-51 increases the survival of 9LGS-bearing rats by inducing endoreduplication of DNA and tumor cell death; further, it slowed the onset of tumor growth resumption two weeks after treatment.

  9. Selective ablation of rat brain tumors by boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.; Joel, D. ); Rubin, P.; Freedman, A.; Hansen, J.; Wooding, T.S. Jr.; Gash, D. )

    1994-03-30

    Damage to the surrounding normal brain tissue limits the amount of radiation that can be delivered to intracranial tumors. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment that allows selective tumor irradiation. This study evaluates the damage imparted to the normal brain during BNCT or x-irradiation. The brains of rats with implanted 9L gliosarcomas were examined 1 year after tumor-curative doses of either 250 kV X-rays or BNCT. Histopathologic techniques included hematoxylin and eosin staining, horseradish peroxidase perfusion, and electron microscopy. Longterm X-ray survivors showed extensive cortical atrophy, loss of neurons, and widespread leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), particularly around the tumor scar. In contrast, the brains and the BBB of longterm BNCT survivors appeared relatively normal under both light- and electron-microscopic examination. Intact blood vessels were observed running directly through the avascular, collagenous tumor scar. The selective therapeutic effect of BNCT is evident in comparison to x-irradiation. Both groups of animals showed no evidence of residual tumor at 1 year. However, with x-irradiation there is no therapeutic ratio and tumor eradication severely injuries the remaining brain parenchyma. These observations indicate a substantial therapeutic gain for BNCT. 50 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  11. Students' Models of Curve Fitting: A Models and Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shweta

    2010-01-01

    The Models and Modeling Perspectives (MMP) has evolved out of research that began 26 years ago. MMP researchers use Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) to elicit students' mental models. In this study MMP was used as the conceptual framework to investigate the nature of students' models of curve fitting in a problem-solving environment consisting of…

  12. 10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 400' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL), AND GREENVILLE BRIDGE MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 360' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL). - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  13. Biomimetic modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Julian F V

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetics is seen as a path from biology to engineering. The only path from engineering to biology in current use is the application of engineering concepts and models to biological systems. However, there is another pathway: the verification of biological mechanisms by manufacture, leading to an iterative process between biology and engineering in which the new understanding that the engineering implementation of a biological system can bring is fed back into biology, allowing a more complete and certain understanding and the possibility of further revelations for application in engineering. This is a pathway as yet unformalized, and one that offers the possibility that engineers can also be scientists. PMID:14561351

  14. Fault models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayah, H. R.; Buehler, M. G.

    1985-06-01

    A major problem in the qualification of integrated circuit cells and in the development of adequate tests for the circuits is to lack of information on the nature and density of fault models. Some of this information is being obtained from the test structures. In particular, the Pinhole Array Capacitor is providing values for the resistance of gate oxide shorts, and the Addressable Inverter Matrix is providing values for parameter distributions such as noise margins. Another CMOS fault mode, that of the open-gated transistor, is examined and the state of the transistors assessed. Preliminary results are described for a number of open-gated structures such as transistors, inverters, and NAND gates. Resistor faults are applied to various CMOS gates and the time responses are noted. The critical value for the resistive short to upset the gate response was determined.

  15. Penetration of intra-arterially administered vincristine in experimental brain tumor1,2

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Frances M.; Eller, Susan L.; Grossman, Stuart A.

    2004-01-01

    Vincristine is an integral part of the “PCV” regimen that is commonly administered to treat primary brain tumors. The efficacy of vincristine as a single agent in these tumors has been poorly studied. This study was designed to determine whether vincristine enters normal rat brain or an intracranially or subcutaneously implanted glioma and to assess the presence of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on tumor and vascular endothelial cells. The 9L rat gliosarcoma was implanted intracranially and subcutaneously in three Fischer 344 rats. On day 7, [3H]vincristine (50 μCi, 4.8 μg) was injected into the carotid artery, and the animals were euthanized 10 or 20 min later. Quantitative autoradiography revealed that vincristine levels in the liver were 6- to 11-fold greater than in the i.c. tumor, and 15- to 37-fold greater than in normal brain, the reverse of the expected pattern with intra-arterial delivery. Vincristine levels in the s.c. tumor were 2-fold higher than levels in the i.c. tumor. P-gp was detected with JSB1 antibody in vascular endothelium of both normal brain and the i.c. tumor, but not in the tumor cells in either location, or in endothelial cells in the s.c. tumor. These results demonstrate that vincristine has negligible penetration of normal rat brain or i.c. 9L glioma despite intra-arterial delivery and the presence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction as demonstrated by Evan’s blue. Furthermore, this study suggests that P-gp-mediated efflux from endothelium may explain these findings. The lack of penetration of vincristine into brain tumor and the paucity of single-agent activity studies suggest that vincristine should not be used in the treatment of primary brain tumors. PMID:15494097

  16. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (<35%). Non-parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG

  17. Modeling uncertainty: quicksand for water temperature modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty has been a hot topic relative to science generally, and modeling specifically. Modeling uncertainty comes in various forms: measured data, limited model domain, model parameter estimation, model structure, sensitivity to inputs, modelers themselves, and users of the results. This paper will address important components of uncertainty in modeling water temperatures, and discuss several areas that need attention as the modeling community grapples with how to incorporate uncertainty into modeling without getting stuck in the quicksand that prevents constructive contributions to policy making. The material, and in particular the reference, are meant to supplement the presentation given at this conference.

  18. Pre-Modeling Ensures Accurate Solid Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2010-01-01

    Successful solid modeling requires a well-organized design tree. The design tree is a list of all the object's features and the sequential order in which they are modeled. The solid-modeling process is faster and less prone to modeling errors when the design tree is a simple and geometrically logical definition of the modeled object. Few high…

  19. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  20. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation. PMID:25894575

  1. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation.

  2. CISNET lung models: Comparison of model assumptions and model structures

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Hazelton, William; Kimmel, Marek; Clarke, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Sophisticated modeling techniques can be powerful tools to help us understand the effects of cancer control interventions on population trends in cancer incidence and mortality. Readers of journal articles are however rarely supplied with modeling details. Six modeling groups collaborated as part of the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) to investigate the contribution of US tobacco control efforts towards reducing lung cancer deaths over the period 1975 to 2000. The models included in this monograph were developed independently and use distinct, complementary approaches towards modeling the natural history of lung cancer. The models used the same data for inputs and agreed on the design of the analysis and the outcome measures. This article highlights aspects of the models that are most relevant to similarities of or differences between the results. Structured comparisons can increase the transparency of these complex models. PMID:22882887

  3. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  4. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  5. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2014-09-08

    Functional characterization of a protein sequence is one of the most frequent problems in biology. This task is usually facilitated by accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structure of the studied protein. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, comparative or homology modeling can sometimes provide a useful 3-D model for a protein that is related to at least one known protein structure. Comparative modeling predicts the 3-D structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described.

  6. Toxicokinetic modeling of captan fungicide and its tetrahydrophthalimide biomarker of exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Ortiz, Roberto; Bouchard, Michèle

    2012-08-13

    Measurement of tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) in urine has been used for the biomonitoring of exposure to the widely used captan fungicide in workers. To allow a better understanding of the toxicokinetics of captan and its key biomarker of exposure, a human multi-compartment model was built to simulate the transformation of captan into THPI and its subsequent excretion while accounting for other non-monitored metabolites. The mathematical parameters of the model were determined from best-fits to the time courses of THPI in blood and urine of five volunteers administered orally 1mg/kg and dermally 10mg/kg of captan. In the case of oral administration, the mean elimination half-life of THPI from the body (either through faeces, urine or metabolism) was found to be 13.43 h. In the case of dermal application, mean THPI elimination half-life was estimated to be 21.27 h and was governed by the dermal absorption rate. The average final fractions of administered dose recovered in urine as THPI were 3.6% and 0.02%, for oral and dermal administration, respectively. Furthermore, according to the model, after oral exposure, only 8.6% of the THPI formed in the GI reaches the bloodstream. As for the dermal absorption fraction of captan, it was estimated to be 0.09%. Finally, the average blood clearance rate of THPI calculated from the oral and dermal data was 0.18 ± 0.03 ml/h and 0.24 ± 0.6 ml/h while the predicted volume of distribution was 3.5 ± 0.6l and 7.5 ± 1.9l, respectively. Our mathematical model is in complete accordance with both independent measurements of THPI levels in blood (R(2)=0.996 for oral and R(2)=0.908 for dermal) and urine (R(2)=0.979 for oral and R(2)=0.982 for dermal) as well as previous experimental data published in the literature.

  7. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Comparative protein structure modeling predicts the three-dimensional structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and how to use the ModBase database of such models, and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322406

  8. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2016-06-20

    Comparative protein structure modeling predicts the three-dimensional structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and how to use the ModBase database of such models, and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. An extended cure model and model selection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingwei; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-04-01

    We propose a novel interpretation for a recently proposed Box-Cox transformation cure model, which leads to a natural extension of the cure model. Based on the extended model, we consider an important issue of model selection between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model via the likelihood ratio test, score test and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). Our empirical study shows that AIC is informative and both the score test and the likelihood ratio test have adequate power to differentiate between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model when the sample size is large. We apply the tests and AIC methods to leukemia and colon cancer data to examine the appropriateness of the cure models considered for them in the literature.

  10. Model selection for logistic regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duller, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Model selection for logistic regression models decides which of some given potential regressors have an effect and hence should be included in the final model. The second interesting question is whether a certain factor is heterogeneous among some subsets, i.e. whether the model should include a random intercept or not. In this paper these questions will be answered with classical as well as with Bayesian methods. The application show some results of recent research projects in medicine and business administration.

  11. Multilevel Model Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frees, Edward W.; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2006-01-01

    Multilevel models are proven tools in social research for modeling complex, hierarchical systems. In multilevel modeling, statistical inference is based largely on quantification of random variables. This paper distinguishes among three types of random variables in multilevel modeling--model disturbances, random coefficients, and future response…

  12. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  13. Sand-box modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.

    1983-01-01

    As the result of an enquiry into BHRA's physical-reservoir-modelling experience, the use of sand box models was investigated. The type of model was considered a possible means of confirmation of a numerical model. The problem facing the numerical model user was comparing the performance of inclined or horizontal oil wells with that of the conventional vertical well.

  14. Solicited abstract: Global hydrological modeling and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong-Yu

    2010-05-01

    The origins of rainfall-runoff modeling in the broad sense can be found in the middle of the 19th century arising in response to three types of engineering problems: (1) urban sewer design, (2) land reclamation drainage systems design, and (3) reservoir spillway design. Since then numerous empirical, conceptual and physically-based models are developed including event based models using unit hydrograph concept, Nash's linear reservoir models, HBV model, TOPMODEL, SHE model, etc. From the late 1980s, the evolution of global and continental-scale hydrology has placed new demands on hydrologic modellers. The macro-scale hydrological (global and regional scale) models were developed on the basis of the following motivations (Arenll, 1999). First, for a variety of operational and planning purposes, water resource managers responsible for large regions need to estimate the spatial variability of resources over large areas, at a spatial resolution finer than can be provided by observed data alone. Second, hydrologists and water managers are interested in the effects of land-use and climate variability and change over a large geographic domain. Third, there is an increasing need of using hydrologic models as a base to estimate point and non-point sources of pollution loading to streams. Fourth, hydrologists and atmospheric modellers have perceived weaknesses in the representation of hydrological processes in regional and global climate models, and developed global hydrological models to overcome the weaknesses of global climate models. Considerable progress in the development and application of global hydrological models has been achieved to date, however, large uncertainties still exist considering the model structure including large scale flow routing, parameterization, input data, etc. This presentation will focus on the global hydrological models, and the discussion includes (1) types of global hydrological models, (2) procedure of global hydrological model development

  15. Bohr model as an algebraic collective model

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D. J.; Welsh, T. A.; Caprio, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Developments and applications are presented of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model. Illustrative examples show that fully converged calculations can be performed quickly and easily for a large range of Hamiltonians. As a result, the Bohr model becomes an effective tool in the analysis of experimental data. The examples are chosen both to confirm the reliability of the algebraic collective model and to show the diversity of results that can be obtained by its use. The focus of the paper is to facilitate identification of the limitations of the Bohr model with a view to developing more realistic, computationally tractable models.

  16. Building mental models by dissecting physical models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to ensure focused learning; models that are too constrained require less supervision, but can be constructed mechanically, with little to no conceptual engagement. We propose "model-dissection" as an alternative to "model-building," whereby instructors could make efficient use of supervisory resources, while simultaneously promoting focused learning. We report empirical results from a study conducted with biology undergraduate students, where we demonstrate that asking them to "dissect" out specific conceptual structures from an already built 3D physical model leads to a significant improvement in performance than asking them to build the 3D model from simpler components. Using questionnaires to measure understanding both before and after model-based interventions for two cohorts of students, we find that both the "builders" and the "dissectors" improve in the post-test, but it is the latter group who show statistically significant improvement. These results, in addition to the intrinsic time-efficiency of "model dissection," suggest that it could be a valuable pedagogical tool. PMID:26712513

  17. Allosteric Remodelling of the Histone H3 Binding Pocket in the Pygo2 PHD Finger Triggered by Its Binding to the B9L/BCL9 Co-Factor

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas C.R.; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2010-01-01

    The Zn-coordinated PHD fingers of Pygopus (Pygo) proteins are critical for β-catenin-dependent transcriptional switches in normal and malignant tissues. They bind to methylated histone H3 tails, assisted by their BCL9 co-factors whose homology domain 1 (HD1) binds to the rear PHD surface. Although histone-binding residues are identical between the two human Pygo paralogs, we show here that Pygo2 complexes exhibit slightly higher binding affinities for methylated histone H3 tail peptides than Pygo1 complexes. We solved the crystal structure of the Pygo2 PHD–BCL9-2 HD1 complex, which revealed paralog-specific interactions in its PHD–HD1 interface that could contribute indirectly to its elevated affinity for the methylated histone H3 tail. Interestingly, using NMR spectroscopy, we discovered that HD1 binding to PHD triggers an allosteric communication with a conserved isoleucine residue that lines the binding channel for histone H3 threonine 3 (T3), the link between the two adjacent binding pockets accommodating histone H3 alanine 1 and methylated lysine 4, respectively. This modulates the surface of the T3 channel, providing a plausible explanation as to how BCL9 co-factors binding to Pygo PHD fingers impact indirectly on their histone binding affinity. Intriguingly, this allosteric modulation of the T3 channel is propagated through the PHD structural core by a highly conserved tryptophan, the signature residue defining the PHD subclass of Zn fingers, which suggests that other PHD proteins may also be assisted by co-factors in their decoding of modified histone H3 tails. PMID:20637214

  18. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  19. Association of Hematological Nadirs and Survival in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Hematopoietic Syndrome of Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gluzman-Poltorak, Zoya; Vainstein, Vladimir; Basile, Lena A

    2015-08-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-12 (rHuIL-12) mitigates the hematopoietic subsyndrome of acute radiation syndrome (HSARS) after total body irradiation (TBI) in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of HSARS. The mechanism for this effect appears to involve multiple effects of rHuIL-12 on hematopoiesis. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine hematological nadirs and survival across our three NHP completed studies. Animals were irradiated (700 cGy) and treated with a single subcutaneous injection of vehicle (n = 64) or rHuIL-12 (50-500 ng/kg; n = 108) 24-25 h after irradiation, or with daily subcutaneous injections of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 10 μg/kg/day) for 18 days starting 24-25 h after exposure (n = 26). Blood samples were obtained at various time points up to day 60 after TBI. Lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the overall sample and in each treatment group (P < 0.001 for each comparison, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Lymphocyte nadir was the strongest and most consistent predictor of death by Spearman's rank correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of death and threshold hematologic nadir values (where nadir values less than or equal the threshold are predictive of death) showed that a threshold of 0.08 × 10(9)/L for lymphocytes had the largest positive predictive value of death (97.2% and 92.5% for the control and rHuIL-12 groups, respectively) and high sensitivity (76.1% and 62.7%, respectively), consistent with human radiation victims data. The current findings suggest that enhanced early bone marrow regeneration resulting in increases in nadir values for all major blood cell types may be the main mechanism of action by which rHuIL-12 mitigates the lethality of HSARS.

  20. Effects of maternal low-protein diet on parameters of locomotor activity in a rat model of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kássia Oliveira Gomes da; Pereira, Sabrina da Conceição; Portovedo, Mariana; Milanski, Marciane; Galindo, Lígia Cristina Monteiro; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Toscano, Ana Elisa

    2016-08-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have feeding difficulties that can contribute to undernutrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of early undernutrition on locomotor activity and the expression of the myofibrillar protein MuRF-1 in an experimental model of cerebral palsy (CP). In order to achieve this aim, pregnant rats were divided into two groups according to the diet provided: Normal Protein (NP, n=9) and Low Protein (LP, n=12) groups. After birth, the pups were divided into four groups: Normal Protein Sham (NPS, n=16), Normal Protein Cerebral Palsy (NPCP, n=21), Low Protein Sham (LPS, n=20) and Low Protein Cerebral Palsy (LPCP, n=18) groups. The experimental cerebral palsy protocol consisted of two episodes of anoxia at birth and during the first days of life. Each day, nitrogen flow was used (9l/min during 12min). After nitrogen exposure, sensorimotor restriction was performed 16h per day, from the 2nd to the 28th postnatal day (PND). Locomotor activity was evaluated at 8th, 14th, 17th, 21th and 28th PND. At PND 29, soleus muscles were collected to analyse myofibrillar protein MuRF-1. Our results show that CP animals decreased body weight (p<0.001), which were associated with alterations of various parameters of locomotor activity (p<0.05), compared to their control. Undernourished animals also showed a decrease (p<0.05) in body weight and locomotor activity parameters. Moreover, CP decreased MuRF-1 levels in nourished rats (p=0.015) but not in undernourished rats. In summary, perinatal undernutrition exacerbated the negative effects of cerebral palsy on locomotor activity and muscle atrophy, but it appears not be mediated by changes in MuRF-1 levels.

  1. Models of Magnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, A. Tarciso; Gilbert, John K.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the mental models that people construct about magnetic phenomena. Involves students, physics teachers, engineers, and practitioners. Proposes five models following a progression from simple description to a field model. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  2. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  3. Forest succession models

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.; West, D.C.

    1980-05-01

    Studies in succession attempt to determine the changes in species composition and other ecosystem attributes expected to occur over periods of time. Mathematical models developed in forestry and ecology to study ecological succession are reviewed. Tree models, gap models and forest models are discussed. Model validation or testing procedures are described. Model applications can involve evaluating large-scale and long-term changes in the ambient levels of pollutants and assessing the effects of climate change on the environment. (RJC)

  4. Modeling of geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    During the last decade the use of numerical modeling for geothermal resource evaluation has grown significantly, and new modeling approaches have been developed. In this paper we present a summary of the present status in numerical modeling of geothermal systems, emphasizing recent developments. Different modeling approaches are described and their applicability discussed. The various modeling tasks, including natural-state, exploitation, injection, multi-component and subsidence modeling, are illustrated with geothermal field examples. 99 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Generalized smooth models

    SciTech Connect

    Glosup, J.

    1992-07-23

    The class of gene linear models is extended to develop a class of nonparametric regression models known as generalized smooth models. The technique of local scoring is used to estimate a generalized smooth model and the estimation procedure based on locally weighted regression is shown to produce local likelihood estimates. The asymptotically correct distribution of the deviance difference is derived and its use in comparing the fits of generalized linear models and generalized smooth models is illustrated. The relationship between generalized smooth models and generalized additive models is discussed, also.

  6. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  7. Scaled models, scaled frequencies, and model fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxburgh, Ian W.

    2015-12-01

    I show that given a model star of mass M, radius R, and density profile ρ(x) [x = r/R], there exists a two parameter family of models with masses Mk, radii Rk, density profile ρk(x) = λρ(x) and frequencies νknℓ = λ1/2νnℓ, where λ,Rk/RA are scaling factors. These models have different internal structures, but all have the same value of separation ratios calculated at given radial orders n, and all exactly satisfy a frequency matching algorithm with an offset function determined as part of the fitting procedure. But they do not satisfy ratio matching at given frequencies nor phase shift matching. This illustrates that erroneous results may be obtained when model fitting with ratios at given n values or frequency matching. I give examples from scaled models and from non scaled evolutionary models.

  8. Better models are more effectively connected models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Bielders, Charles; Darboux, Frederic; Fiener, Peter; Finger, David; Turnbull-Lloyd, Laura; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    The concept of hydrologic and geomorphologic connectivity describes the processes and pathways which link sources (e.g. rainfall, snow and ice melt, springs, eroded areas and barren lands) to accumulation areas (e.g. foot slopes, streams, aquifers, reservoirs), and the spatial variations thereof. There are many examples of hydrological and sediment connectivity on a watershed scale; in consequence, a process-based understanding of connectivity is crucial to help managers understand their systems and adopt adequate measures for flood prevention, pollution mitigation and soil protection, among others. Modelling is often used as a tool to understand and predict fluxes within a catchment by complementing observations with model results. Catchment models should therefore be able to reproduce the linkages, and thus the connectivity of water and sediment fluxes within the systems under simulation. In modelling, a high level of spatial and temporal detail is desirable to ensure taking into account a maximum number of components, which then enables connectivity to emerge from the simulated structures and functions. However, computational constraints and, in many cases, lack of data prevent the representation of all relevant processes and spatial/temporal variability in most models. In most cases, therefore, the level of detail selected for modelling is too coarse to represent the system in a way in which connectivity can emerge; a problem which can be circumvented by representing fine-scale structures and processes within coarser scale models using a variety of approaches. This poster focuses on the results of ongoing discussions on modelling connectivity held during several workshops within COST Action Connecteur. It assesses the current state of the art of incorporating the concept of connectivity in hydrological and sediment models, as well as the attitudes of modellers towards this issue. The discussion will focus on the different approaches through which connectivity

  9. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  10. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Wu

    2003-07-16

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  11. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), the TSPA-LA. The ERMYN model provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs), the reference biosphere, the human receptor, and assumptions (Section 6.2 and Section 6.3); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN model compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN model by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); and (8) Validating the ERMYN model by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  12. Qualitative Student Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancey, William J.

    The concept of a qualitative model is used as the focus of this review of qualitative student models in order to compare alternative computational models and to contrast domain requirements. The report is divided into eight sections: (1) Origins and Goals (adaptive instruction, qualitative models of processes, components of an artificial…

  13. Biomass Scenario Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a unique, carefully validated, state-of-the-art dynamic model of the domestic biofuels supply chain which explicitly focuses on policy issues, their feasibility, and potential side effects. It integrates resource availability, physical/technological/economic constraints, behavior, and policy. The model uses a system dynamics simulation (not optimization) to model dynamic interactions across the supply chain.

  14. The Instrumental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  15. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  16. Enclosure fire dynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.

    1979-01-01

    A practical situation of an enclosure fire is presented and why the need for a fire dynamic model is addressed. The difficulties in establishing a model are discussed, along with a brief review of enclosure fire models available. The approximation of the practical situation and the model developed are presented.

  17. Modeling for Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Eric; Colella, Vanessa

    This paper focuses on one method used to introduce model design and creation using StarLogo to a group of high school teachers. Teachers with model-building skills can easily customize modeling environments for their classes. More importantly, model building can enable teachers to approach their curricula from a more holistic perspective, as well…

  18. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  19. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  20. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  1. Stable models of superacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Rajaraman, Arvind

    2007-05-15

    We discuss an instability in a large class of models where dark energy is coupled to matter. In these models the mass of the scalar field is much larger than the expansion rate of the Universe. We find models in which this instability is absent, and show that these models generically predict an apparent equation of state for dark energy smaller than -1, i.e., superacceleration. These models have no acausal behavior or ghosts.

  2. WASP TRANSPORT MODELING AND WASP ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on excercises will be used to introduce pollutant transport modeling with the U.S. EPA's general water quality model, WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program). WASP features include a user-friendly Windows-based interfa...

  3. Multiple model inference.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Urbina, Angel

    2010-07-01

    This paper compares three approaches for model selection: classical least squares methods, information theoretic criteria, and Bayesian approaches. Least squares methods are not model selection methods although one can select the model that yields the smallest sum-of-squared error function. Information theoretic approaches balance overfitting with model accuracy by incorporating terms that penalize more parameters with a log-likelihood term to reflect goodness of fit. Bayesian model selection involves calculating the posterior probability that each model is correct, given experimental data and prior probabilities that each model is correct. As part of this calculation, one often calibrates the parameters of each model and this is included in the Bayesian calculations. Our approach is demonstrated on a structural dynamics example with models for energy dissipation and peak force across a bolted joint. The three approaches are compared and the influence of the log-likelihood term in all approaches is discussed.

  4. Model Validation Status Review

    SciTech Connect

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-11-28

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and

  5. Trapped Radiation Model Uncertainties: Model-Data and Model-Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The standard AP8 and AE8 models for predicting trapped proton and electron environments have been compared with several sets of flight data to evaluate model uncertainties. Model comparisons are made with flux and dose measurements made on various U.S. low-Earth orbit satellites (APEX, CRRES, DMSP, LDEF, NOAA) and Space Shuttle flights, on Russian satellites (Photon-8, Cosmos-1887, Cosmos-2044), and on the Russian Mir Space Station. This report gives the details of the model-data comparisons-summary results in terms of empirical model uncertainty factors that can be applied for spacecraft design applications are given in a combination report. The results of model-model comparisons are also presented from standard AP8 and AE8 model predictions compared with the European Space Agency versions of AP8 and AE8 and with Russian-trapped radiation models.

  6. Trapped Radiation Model Uncertainties: Model-Data and Model-Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The standard AP8 and AE8 models for predicting trapped proton and electron environments have been compared with several sets of flight data to evaluate model uncertainties. Model comparisons are made with flux and dose measurements made on various U.S. low-Earth orbit satellites (APEX, CRRES, DMSP. LDEF, NOAA) and Space Shuttle flights, on Russian satellites (Photon-8, Cosmos-1887, Cosmos-2044), and on the Russian Mir space station. This report gives the details of the model-data comparisons -- summary results in terms of empirical model uncertainty factors that can be applied for spacecraft design applications are given in a companion report. The results of model-model comparisons are also presented from standard AP8 and AE8 model predictions compared with the European Space Agency versions of AP8 and AE8 and with Russian trapped radiation models.

  7. Modeling nonstationary longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Antón, V; Zimmerman, D L

    2000-09-01

    An important theme of longitudinal data analysis in the past two decades has been the development and use of explicit parametric models for the data's variance-covariance structure. A variety of these models have been proposed, of which most are second-order stationary. A few are flexible enough to accommodate nonstationarity, i.e., nonconstant variances and/or correlations that are not a function solely of elapsed time between measurements. We review five nonstationary models that we regard as most useful: (1) the unstructured covariance model, (2) unstructured antedependence models, (3) structured antedependence models, (4) autoregressive integrated moving average and similar models, and (5) random coefficients models. We evaluate the relative strengths and limitations of each model, emphasizing when it is inappropriate or unlikely to be useful. We present three examples to illustrate the fitting and comparison of the models and to demonstrate that nonstationary longitudinal data can be modeled effectively and, in some cases, quite parsimoniously. In these examples, the antedependence models generally prove to be superior and the random coefficients models prove to be inferior. We conclude that antedependence models should be given much greater consideration than they have historically received.

  8. Modeling Hydrothermal Mineralization: Fractal or Multifrcatal Models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.

    2004-05-01

    Hydrothermal mineralization occurs when the natural geo-processes involve the interaction of ore material-carrying hydrothermal fluids with rocks in the earth's crust in a specific geological environment. Mineralization can cause element concentration enrichment or depletion in the country rocks. Local enrichment may form ore body that can be mined for profit at the current economic and technological conditions. To understand the spatial distribution of element concentration enrichment or depletion caused by mineralization in a mineral district is essential for mineral exploration and mineral prediction. Grade-tonnage model and mineral deposits size distribution model are common models used for characterizing mineral deposits. This paper proposes a non-linear mineralization model on the basis of a modified classical igneous differentiation mineralization model to describe the generation of multifractal distribution of element concentration in the country rocks as well as grade-tonnage fractal/multifractal distribution of ore deposits that have been often observed in hydrothermal mineralization. This work may also lead to a singularity model to explain the common properties of mineralization and mineralization-associated geochemical anomaly diversity and the generalized self-similarity of the anomalies. The model has been applied to a case study of mineral deposits prediction and mineral resource assessment in the Abitibi district, northern Ontario, Canada.

  9. Modeling the transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of transition-region models is reviewed in this report. To understand modeling problems, various flow features that influence the transition process are discussed first. Then an overview of the different approaches to transition-region modeling is given. This is followed by a detailed discussion of turbulence models and the specific modifications that are needed to predict flows undergoing laminar-turbulent transition. Methods for determining the usefulness of the models are presented, and an outlook for the future of transition-region modeling is suggested.

  10. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  11. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider.

  12. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider. PMID:26024160

  13. Modeling worldwide highway networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villas Boas, Paulino R.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; da F. Costa, Luciano

    2009-12-01

    This Letter addresses the problem of modeling the highway systems of different countries by using complex networks formalism. More specifically, we compare two traditional geographical models with a modified geometrical network model where paths, rather than edges, are incorporated at each step between the origin and the destination vertices. Optimal configurations of parameters are obtained for each model and used for the comparison. The highway networks of Australia, Brazil, India, and Romania are considered and shown to be properly modeled by the modified geographical model.

  14. Energy-consumption modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

  15. Reliability model generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMann, Catherine M. (Inventor); Cohen, Gerald C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for automatically generating reliability models for use with a reliability evaluation tool is described. The reliability model generator of the present invention includes means for storing a plurality of low level reliability models which represent the reliability characteristics for low level system components. In addition, the present invention includes means for defining the interconnection of the low level reliability models via a system architecture description. In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a reliability model for the entire system is automatically generated by aggregating the low level reliability models based on the system architecture description.

  16. A future of the model organism model

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Changes in technology are fundamentally reframing our concept of what constitutes a model organism. Nevertheless, research advances in the more traditional model organisms have enabled fresh and exciting opportunities for young scientists to establish new careers and offer the hope of comprehensive understanding of fundamental processes in life. New advances in translational research can be expected to heighten the importance of basic research in model organisms and expand opportunities. However, researchers must take special care and implement new resources to enable the newest members of the community to engage fully with the remarkable legacy of information in these fields. PMID:24577733

  17. Develop a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  18. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  19. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  20. Nonlinear Modeling by Assembling Piecewise Linear Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full order system over a parameters range of interest, we propose a simple modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise local solutions, including the first-order Taylor series terms expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions. The assembly of these local approximations is accomplished by assigning nonlinear weights, through radial basis functions in this study. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving at different Mach numbers and pitching motions, under which the flow exhibits prominent nonlinear behaviors. All results confirm that our nonlinear model is accurate and stable for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robustness-accurate for inputs considerably different from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling preserves nonlinearity of the problems considered in a rather simple and accurate manner.

  1. Aggregation in ecosystem models and model stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Evgeniya

    2015-05-01

    Using a multimodal approach to research ecosystems improves usage of available information on an object. This study presents several models of the Bering Sea ecosystem. The ecosystem is considered as a closed object, that is, the influence of the environment is not provided. We then add the links with the external medium in the models. The models differ in terms of the degree and method of grouping components. Our method is based on the differences in habitat and food source of groups, which allows us to determine the grouping of species with a greater effect on system dynamics. In particular, we determine whether benthic fish aggregation or pelagic fish aggregation can change the consumption structure of some groups of species, and consequently, the behavior of the entire model system.

  2. PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.M.

    1992-02-26

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3 in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4 polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5 steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

  3. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  4. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  5. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  6. Communication system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Wetherington, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    This report presents the results of work on communications systems modeling and covers three different areas of modeling. The first of these deals with the modeling of signals in communication systems in the frequency domain and the calculation of spectra for various modulations. These techniques are applied in determining the frequency spectra produced by a unified carrier system, the down-link portion of the Command and Communications System (CCS). The second modeling area covers the modeling of portions of a communication system on a block basis. A detailed analysis and modeling effort based on control theory is presented along with its application to modeling of the automatic frequency control system of an FM transmitter. A third topic discussed is a method for approximate modeling of stiff systems using state variable techniques.

  7. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. SEDIMENT GEOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, sediment geochemical models (diagenetic models) have been only able to explain sedimentary flux and concentration profiles for a few simplified geochemical cycles (e.g., nitrogen, carbon and sulfur). However with advances in numerical methods, increased accuracy ...

  9. Mass modeling for bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of modeling mass for bars are surveyed. A method for extending John Archer's concept of consistent mass beyond just translational inertia effects is included. Recommendations are given for various types of modeling situations.

  10. Models (Part 1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Defines models and describes information search models that can be helpful to instructional media specialists in meeting users' abilities and information needs. Explains pathfinders and Kuhlthau's information search process, including the pre-writing information search process. (LRW)

  11. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDAS models require a breadth of knowledge, the network draws together an interdisciplinary team of researchers with expertise in epidemiology, infectious diseases, computational biology, statistics, social sciences, physics, computer sciences and informatics. In 2006, MIDAS modelers simulated ...

  12. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  13. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  14. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  15. System Advisor Model

    2010-03-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a performance and economic model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry, ranging from project managers and engineers to incentive program designers, technology developers, and researchers.

  16. Future of groundwater modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Panday, Sorab

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing need to better manage water resources, the future of groundwater modeling is bright and exciting. However, while the past can be described and the present is known, the future of groundwater modeling, just like a groundwater model result, is highly uncertain and any prediction is probably not going to be entirely representative. Thus we acknowledge this as we present our vision of where groundwater modeling may be headed.

  17. Mathematical circulatory system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method of modeling a circulatory system including a regulatory mechanism parameter. In one embodiment, a regulatory mechanism parameter in a lumped parameter model is represented as a logistic function. In another embodiment, the circulatory system model includes a compliant vessel, the model having a parameter representing a change in pressure due to contraction of smooth muscles of a wall of the vessel.

  18. Modeling of spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of modeling of spacecraft charging are discussed: statistical models, parametric models, and physical models. Local time dependence of circuit upset for DoD and communication satellites, and electron current to a sphere with an assumed Debye potential distribution are presented. Four regions were involved in spacecraft charging: (1) undisturbed plasma, (2) plasma sheath region, (3) spacecraft surface, and (4) spacecraft equivalent circuit.

  19. Hierarchical Bass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new model about diffusion of a product which includes a memory of how many adopters or advertisements a non-adopter met, where (non-)adopters mean people (not) possessing the product. This effect is lacking in the Bass model. As an application, we utilize the model to fit the iPod sales data, and so the better agreement is obtained than the Bass model.

  20. Wonderland climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Lacis, A.; Russell, G.; Sato, M.; Lerner, J.; Rind, D.; Stone, P.

    1997-03-01

    We obtain a highly efficient global climate model by defining a sector version (120° of longitude) of the coarse resolution Goddard Institute for Space Studies model II. The geography of Wonderland is chosen such that the amount of land as a function of latitude is the same as on Earth. We show that the zonal mean climate of the Wonderland model is very similar to that of the parent model II.

  1. Soil moisture modeling review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    A determination of the state of the art in soil moisture transport modeling based on physical or physiological principles was made. It was found that soil moisture models based on physical principles have been under development for more than 10 years. However, these models were shown to represent infiltration and redistribution of soil moisture quite well. Evapotranspiration has not been as adequately incorporated into the models.

  2. Modeling Complex Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software suite that models complex calorimeters in the time and frequency domain. These models can reproduce all measurements that we currently do in a lab setting, like IV curves, impedance measurements, noise measurements, and pulse generation. Since all these measurements are modeled from one set of parameters, we can fully describe a detector and characterize its behavior. This leads to a model than can be used effectively for engineering and design of detectors for particular applications.

  3. Updating applied diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, J.C.

    1985-11-01

    Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Society organized a workshop to help improve the basis of such models, their physics and hopefuly their performance. Reviews and recommendations were made on models in three areas: diffusion in the convective boundary layer (CBL), diffusion in the stabe boundary layer (SBL), and model uncertainty.

  4. Models of change.

    PubMed

    Reineck, Carol

    2007-09-01

    Implementing change in organizations is a key nursing leadership competency. At the same time, it is a daunting responsibility. Fortunately, models of successful change illustrate useful concepts for leaders. Change concepts embedded in successful models include careful use of power, reason, reeducation, structure, behavior, and technology. This article discusses models of change. Learning from models may help nurse executives avoid perils such as change fatigue and may promote smoother movement toward safer systems of care.

  5. A Model Chemistry Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerlin, Lee; Borgford, Christie

    1989-01-01

    Described is an activity which uses a 96-well reaction plate and soda straws to construct a model of the periodic table of the elements. The model illustrates the ionization energies of the various elements. Construction of the model and related concepts are discussed. (CW)

  6. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  7. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  8. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  9. Campus Energy Modeling Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott; Kemper, Travis; Larsen, Ross; Graf, Peter

    2014-09-19

    NREL's Campus Energy Modeling project provides a suite of simulation tools for integrated, data driven energy modeling of commercial buildings and campuses using Simulink. The tools enable development of fully interconnected models for commercial campus energy infrastructure, including electrical distribution systems, district heating and cooling, onsite generation (both conventional and renewable), building loads, energy storage, and control systems.

  10. Biophysical and spectral modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Activities and results of a project to develop strategies for modeling vegetative canopy reflectance are reported. Specific tasks included the inversion of canopy reflectance models to estimate agronomic variables (particularly leaf area index) from in-situ reflectance measurements, and a study of possible uses of ecological models in analyzing temporal profiles of greenness.

  11. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  12. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  13. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  14. A Model Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bradley D.; Smalley, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) uses three-dimensional modeling concepts, information technology and interoperable software to design, construct and operate a facility. However, BIM can be more than a tool for virtual modeling--it can provide schools with a 3-D walkthrough of a project while it still is on the electronic drawing board. BIM can…

  15. Modeling Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogiages, Christopher A.; Lotter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In their research, scientists generate, test, and modify scientific models. These models can be shared with others and demonstrate a scientist's understanding of how the natural world works. Similarly, students can generate and modify models to gain a better understanding of the content, process, and nature of science (Kenyon, Schwarz, and Hug…

  16. Progress in mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.K.

    1997-03-14

    We have identified the Cranfill multifluid turbulence model (Cranfill, 1992) as a starting point for development of subgrid models of instability, turbulent and mixing processes. We have differenced the closed system of equations in conservation form, and coded them in the object-oriented hydrodynamics code FLAG, which is to be used as a testbed for such models.

  17. Modelling a Suspension Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The quadratic function can be modeled in real life by a suspension bridge that supports a uniform weight. This activity uses concrete models and computer generated graphs to discover the mathematical model of the shape of the main cable of a suspension bridge. (MDH)

  18. Tests of Rating Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masin, Sergio Cesare; Busetto, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The study reports empirical tests of Anderson's, Haubensak's, Helson's, and Parducci's rating models when two end anchors are used for rating. The results show that these models cannot predict the judgment effect called here the Dai Pra effect. It is shown that an extension of Anderson's model is consistent with this effect. The results confirm…

  19. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  20. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  1. Impact-GMI Model

    2007-03-22

    IMPACT-GMI is an atmospheric chemical transport model designed to run on massively parallel computers. It is designed to model trace pollutants in the atmosphere. It includes models for emission, chemistry and deposition of pollutants. It can be used to assess air quality and its impact on future climate change.

  2. Modeling Climate Dynamically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Jim; McGehee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A dynamical systems approach to energy balance models of climate is presented, focusing on low order, or conceptual, models. Included are global average and latitude-dependent, surface temperature models. The development and analysis of the differential equations and corresponding bifurcation diagrams provides a host of appropriate material for…

  3. Elementary Teacher Training Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blewett, Evelyn J., Ed.

    This collection of articles contains descriptions of nine elementary teacher training program models conducted at universities throughout the United States. The articles include the following: (a) "The University of Toledo Model Program," by George E. Dickson; (b) "The Florida State University Model Program," by G. Wesley Sowards; (c) "The…

  4. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  5. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  6. Modeling and Remodeling Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, John R.

    2012-01-01

    In Section 1 of this article, the author discusses the succession of models of adult writing that he and his colleagues have proposed from 1980 to the present. He notes the most important changes that differentiate earlier and later models and discusses reasons for the changes. In Section 2, he describes his recent efforts to model young…

  7. Models, Norms and Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary B.

    To investigate the effect of modeling on altruism, 156 third and fifth grade children were exposed to a model who either shared with them, gave to a charity, or refused to share. The test apparatus, identified as a game, consisted of a box with signal lights and a chute through which marbles were dispensed. Subjects and the model played the game…

  8. Models for Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speiser, Bob; Walter, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores how models can support productive thinking. For us a model is a "thing", a tool to help make sense of something. We restrict attention to specific models for whole-number multiplication, hence the wording of the title. They support evolving thinking in large measure through the ways their users redesign them. They assume new…

  9. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  10. New Directions for Modeling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Thomas R.

    1976-01-01

    Noting the disappointing results of past experimentation with computer modeling technology in higher education, the author discusses developments which promise potential: communication between model builders and users, interaction between large- and small-scale models, interface with operating data systems, emphasis on outcomes, and continued…

  11. Surface complexation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  12. Modelling Vocabulary Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meara, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes some simple simulation models of vocabulary attrition. The attrition process is modelled using a random autonomous Boolean network model, and some parallels with real attrition data are drawn. The paper argues that applying a complex systems approach to attrition can provide some important insights, which suggest that real…

  13. Modelling MIZ dynamics in a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynders, Stefanie; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Feltham, Daniel; Nurser, George; Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of large, previously ice-covered areas of the Arctic Ocean to the wind and surface ocean waves results in the Arctic pack ice cover becoming more fragmented and mobile, with large regions of ice cover evolving into the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). The need for better climate predictions, along with growing economic activity in the Polar Oceans, necessitates climate and forecasting models that can simulate fragmented sea ice with a greater fidelity. Current models are not fully fit for the purpose, since they neither model surface ocean waves in the MIZ, nor account for the effect of floe fragmentation on drag, nor include sea ice rheology that represents both the now thinner pack ice and MIZ ice dynamics. All these processes affect the momentum transfer to the ocean. We present initial results from a global ocean model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) coupled to the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE. The model setup implements a novel rheological formulation for sea ice dynamics, accounting for ice floe collisions, thus offering a seamless framework for pack ice and MIZ simulations. The effect of surface waves on ice motion is included through wave pressure and the turbulent kinetic energy of ice floes. In the multidecadal model integrations we examine MIZ and basin scale sea ice and oceanic responses to the changes in ice dynamics. We analyse model sensitivities and attribute them to key sea ice and ocean dynamical mechanisms. The results suggest that the effect of the new ice rheology is confined to the MIZ. However with the current increase in summer MIZ area, which is projected to continue and may become the dominant type of sea ice in the Arctic, we argue that the effects of the combined sea ice rheology will be noticeable in large areas of the Arctic Ocean, affecting sea ice and ocean. With this study we assert that to make more accurate sea ice predictions in the changing Arctic, models need to include MIZ dynamics and physics.

  14. [Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of triclosan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2011-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in many personal care products. We investigated oxidation of TCS by aqueous ferrate Fe(VI) to determine reaction kinetics, interpreted the reaction mechanism by a linear free-energy relationship, and evaluated the degradation efficiency. Second-order reaction kinetics was used to model Fe (VI) oxidation of TCS, with the apparent second-order rate constant (k(app)) being 531.9 L x (mol x s)(-1) at pH 8.5 and (24 +/- 1) degrees C. The half life (t1/2) is 25.8 s for an Fe( VI) concentration of 10 mg x L(-1). The rate constants of the reaction decrease with increasing pH values. These pH-dependent variations in k(app) could be distributed by considering species-specific reactions between Fe(VI) species and acid-base species of an ionizable TCS. Species-specific second-order reaction rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of HFeO4(-) with each of TCS's acid-base species. The value of k determined for neutral TCS was (4.1 +/- 3.5) x 10(2) L x (mol x s)(-1), while that measured for anionic TCS was (1.8 +/- 0.1) x 10(4) L x (mol x s)(-1). The reaction between HFeO4(-) and the dissociated TCS controls the overall reaction. A linear free-energy relationship illustrated the electrophilic oxidation mechanism. Fe (VI) reacts initially with TCS by electrophilic attack at the latter's phenol moiety. At a n[Fe(VI)]: n(TCS) > 7: 1, complete removal of TCS was achieved. And lower concentration of the humic acid could enhance the k(app) of Fe( VI) with TCS. In conclusion, Fe(VI) oxidation technology appears to be a promising tool for applications of WWTPs effluents and other decontamination processes.

  15. Advances in Watershed Models and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, G. T.; Zhang, F.

    2015-12-01

    The development of watershed models and their applications to real-world problems has evolved significantly since 1960's. Watershed models can be classified based on what media are included, what processes are dealt with, and what approaches are taken. In term of media, a watershed may include segregated overland regime, river-canal-open channel networks, ponds-reservoirs-small lakes, and subsurface media. It may also include integrated media of all these or a partial set of these as well as man-made control structures. In term of processes, a watershed model may deal with coupled or decoupled hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. These processes include fluid flow, thermal transport, salinity transport, sediment transport, reactive transport, and biota and microbe kinetics. In terms of approaches, either parametric or physics-based approach can be taken. This talk discusses the evolution of watershed models in the past sixty years. The advances of watershed models center around their increasing design capability to foster these segregated or integrated media and coupled or decoupled processes. Widely used models developed by academia, research institutes, government agencies, and private industries will be reviewed in terms of the media and processes included as well as approaches taken. Many types of potential benchmark problems in general can be proposed and will be discussed. This presentation will focus on three benchmark problems of biogeochemical cycles. These three problems, dealing with water quality transport, will be formulated in terms of reactive transport. Simulation results will be illustrated using WASH123D, a watershed model developed and continuously updated by the author and his PhD graduates. Keywords: Hydrological Cycles, Biogeochemical Cycles, Biota Kinetics, Parametric Approach, Physics-based Approach, Reactive Transport.

  16. Transgenesis for pig models

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Soo-Young; Yoon, Ki-Young; Lee, Choong-Il; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Animal models, particularly pigs, have come to play an important role in translational biomedical research. There have been many pig models with genetically modifications via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, because most transgenic pigs have been produced by random integration to date, the necessity for more exact gene-mutated models using recombinase based conditional gene expression like mice has been raised. Currently, advanced genome-editing technologies enable us to generate specific gene-deleted and -inserted pig models. In the future, the development of pig models with gene editing technologies could be a valuable resource for biomedical research. PMID:27030199

  17. The FREZCHEM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Giles M.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    Implementation of the Pitzer approach is through the FREZCHEM (FREEZING CHEMISTRY) model, which is at the core of this work. This model was originally designed to simulate salt chemistries and freezing processes at low temperatures (-54 to 25°C) and 1 atm pressure. Over the years, this model has been broadened to include more chemistries (from 16 to 58 solid phases), a broader temperature range for some chemistries (to 113°C), and incorporation of a pressure dependence (1 to 1000 bars) into the model. Implementation, parameterization, validation, and limitations of the FREZCHEM model are extensively discussed in Chapter 3.

  18. Mechanics of materials model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    The Mechanics of Materials Model (MOMM) is a three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis code for use as an early design stage tool for hot section components. MOMM is a stiffness method finite element code that uses a network of beams to characterize component behavior. The MOMM contains three material models to account for inelastic material behavior. These include the simplified material model, which assumes a bilinear stress-strain response; the state-of-the-art model, which utilizes the classical elastic-plastic-creep strain decomposition; and Walker's viscoplastic model, which accounts for the interaction between creep and plasticity that occurs under cyclic loading conditions.

  19. Models of Goldstone gauginos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele S. M.; Galloway, Jamison; McCullough, Matthew; Weiner, Neal

    2016-04-01

    Models with Dirac gauginos are appealing scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model. They have smaller radiative corrections to scalar soft masses, a suppression of certain supersymmetry (SUSY) production processes at the LHC, and ameliorated flavor constraints. Unfortunately, they are generically plagued by tachyons charged under the Standard Model, and attempts to eliminate such states typically spoil the positive features. The recently proposed "Goldstone gaugino" mechanism provides a simple realization of Dirac gauginos that is automatically free of dangerous tachyonic states. We provide details on this mechanism and explore models for its origin. In particular, we find SUSY QCD models that realize this idea simply and discuss scenarios for unification.

  20. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  1. CRAC2 model description

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Johnson, J.D.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Aldrich, D.C.; Blond, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions.

  2. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  3. A model of strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Douglas H.; Cook, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    In her AAAS News & Notes piece "Can the Southwest manage its thirst?" (26 July, p. 362), K. Wren quotes Ajay Kalra, who advocates a particular method for predicting Colorado River streamflow "because it eschews complex physical climate models for a statistical data-driven modeling approach." A preference for data-driven models may be appropriate in this individual situation, but it is not so generally, Data-driven models often come with a warning against extrapolating beyond the range of the data used to develop the models. When the future is like the past, data-driven models can work well for prediction, but it is easy to over-model local or transient phenomena, often leading to predictive inaccuracy (1). Mechanistic models are built on established knowledge of the process that connects the response variables with the predictors, using information obtained outside of an extant data set. One may shy away from a mechanistic approach when the underlying process is judged to be too complicated, but good predictive models can be constructed with statistical components that account for ingredients missing in the mechanistic analysis. Models with sound mechanistic components are more generally applicable and robust than data-driven models.

  4. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  5. Distributed fuzzy system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrycz, W.; Chi Fung Lam, P.; Rocha, A.F.

    1995-05-01

    The paper introduces and studies an idea of distributed modeling treating it as a new paradigm of fuzzy system modeling and analysis. This form of modeling is oriented towards developing individual (local) fuzzy models for specific modeling landmarks (expressed as fuzzy sets) and determining the essential logical relationships between these local models. The models themselves are implemented in the form of logic processors being regarded as specialized fuzzy neural networks. The interaction between the processors is developed either in an inhibitory or excitatory way. In more descriptive way, the distributed model can be sought as a collection of fuzzy finite state machines with their individual local first or higher order memories. It is also clarified how the concept of distributed modeling narrows down a gap between purely numerical (quantitative) models and the qualitative ones originated within the realm of Artificial Intelligence. The overall architecture of distributed modeling is discussed along with the detailed learning schemes. The results of extensive simulation experiments are provided as well. 17 refs.

  6. Modelling Farm Animal Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lisa M.; Part, Chérie E.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In this review paper we discuss the different modeling techniques that have been used in animal welfare research to date. We look at what questions they have been used to answer, the advantages and pitfalls of the methods, and how future research can best use these approaches to answer some of the most important upcoming questions in farm animal welfare. Abstract The use of models in the life sciences has greatly expanded in scope and advanced in technique in recent decades. However, the range, type and complexity of models used in farm animal welfare is comparatively poor, despite the great scope for use of modeling in this field of research. In this paper, we review the different modeling approaches used in farm animal welfare science to date, discussing the types of questions they have been used to answer, the merits and problems associated with the method, and possible future applications of each technique. We find that the most frequently published types of model used in farm animal welfare are conceptual and assessment models; two types of model that are frequently (though not exclusively) based on expert opinion. Simulation, optimization, scenario, and systems modeling approaches are rarer in animal welfare, despite being commonly used in other related fields. Finally, common issues such as a lack of quantitative data to parameterize models, and model selection and validation are discussed throughout the review, with possible solutions and alternative approaches suggested. PMID:26487411

  7. Modelling structured data with Probabilistic Graphical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, F.

    2016-05-01

    Most clustering and classification methods are based on the assumption that the objects to be clustered are independent. However, in more and more modern applications, data are structured in a way that makes this assumption not realistic and potentially misleading. A typical example that can be viewed as a clustering task is image segmentation where the objects are the pixels on a regular grid and depend on neighbouring pixels on this grid. Also, when data are geographically located, it is of interest to cluster data with an underlying dependence structure accounting for some spatial localisation. These spatial interactions can be naturally encoded via a graph not necessarily regular as a grid. Data sets can then be modelled via Markov random fields and mixture models (e.g. the so-called MRF and Hidden MRF). More generally, probabilistic graphical models are tools that can be used to represent and manipulate data in a structured way while modeling uncertainty. This chapter introduces the basic concepts. The two main classes of probabilistic graphical models are considered: Bayesian networks and Markov networks. The key concept of conditional independence and its link to Markov properties is presented. The main problems that can be solved with such tools are described. Some illustrations are given associated with some practical work.

  8. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  9. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  10. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  11. Minor changes in the macrocyclic ligands but major consequences on the efficiency of gold nanoparticles designed for radiosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, G.; Bernhard, C.; Dufort, S.; Jiménez Sánchez, G.; Bazzi, R.; Boschetti, F.; Moreau, M.; Vu, T. H.; Collin, B.; Oudot, A.; Herath, N.; Requardt, H.; Laurent, S.; Vander Elst, L.; Muller, R.; Dutreix, M.; Meyer, M.; Brunotte, F.; Perriat, P.; Lux, F.; Tillement, O.; Le Duc, G.; Denat, F.; Roux, S.

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have been devoted to adapting the design of gold nanoparticles to efficiently exploit their promising capability to enhance the effects of radiotherapy. In particular, the addition of magnetic resonance imaging modality constitutes an attractive strategy for enhancing the selectivity of radiotherapy since it allows the determination of the most suited delay between the injection of nanoparticles and irradiation. This requires the functionalization of the gold core by an organic shell composed of thiolated gadolinium chelates. The risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis induced by the release of gadolinium ions should encourage the use of macrocyclic chelators which form highly stable and inert complexes with gadolinium ions. In this context, three types of gold nanoparticles (Au@DTDOTA, Au@TADOTA and Au@TADOTAGA) combining MRI, nuclear imaging and radiosensitization have been developed with different macrocyclic ligands anchored onto the gold cores. Despite similarities in size and organic shell composition, the distribution of gadolinium chelate-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@TADOTA-Gd and Au@TADOTAGA-Gd) in the tumor zone is clearly different. As a result, the intravenous injection of Au@TADOTAGA-Gd prior to the irradiation of 9L gliosarcoma bearing rats leads to the highest increase in lifespan whereas the radiophysical effects of Au@TADOTAGA-Gd and Au@TADOTA-Gd are very similar.Many studies have been devoted to adapting the design of gold nanoparticles to efficiently exploit their promising capability to enhance the effects of radiotherapy. In particular, the addition of magnetic resonance imaging modality constitutes an attractive strategy for enhancing the selectivity of radiotherapy since it allows the determination of the most suited delay between the injection of nanoparticles and irradiation. This requires the functionalization of the gold core by an organic shell composed of thiolated gadolinium chelates. The risk of nephrogenic systemic

  12. Dimers of melampomagnolide B exhibit potent anticancer activity against hematological and solid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Janganati, Venumadhav; Ponder, Jessica; Jordan, Craig T.; Borrelli, Michael J.; Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Crooks, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel carbamate and carbonate dimers of melampomagnolide B (MMB) have been synthesized by reaction of the MMB-triazole carbamate synthon 6 with various terminal diamino and dihydroxy alkanes. The resulting dimeric products 7b, 7c and 7f were selected and evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human hematological and solid tumor cell lines. The most active compounds, 7b, 7c and 7f, exhibited GI50 values in the range 250-780 nM against the majority of leukemia cell lines in the tumor cell panel. Specifically, compounds 7b and 7f exhibited potent growth inhibition against non-small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H522 (GI50 = 160 nM) and HOP-92 (GI50 = 170 nM), respectively. Also, compound 7f also potently inhibited the growth of melanoma cell lines LOX IMVI, MALME-3M, and UACC-62 (GI50 values = 170, 190 and 190 nM, respectively); breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 (GI50 = 190 nM); colon cancer cell line HCT-116 (GI50 = 190 nM); and renal cancer cell line RXF 393 (GI50 = 160 nM). Compound 7f and the simple dicarbonate dimer of MMB (8) showed anticancer activity 300-fold and 1 × 106-fold, respectively, more cytotoxic than 7f and DMAPT at a concentration of 10 μM against rat 9L-SF gliosarcoma cells. The dimeric compounds 7a-7j & 8 were also screened for antileukemic activity against M9-ENL1 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and primary AML cell specimens. These compounds exhibited two to twelve-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.5-2.9 μM) against the M9-ENL1 cell line when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 6.0 μM). The dimeric analogues were also active against the primary AML cell specimens in the nanomolar to lower micromolar range and exhibited two to ten-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.86-4.2 μM) when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 2.5-16 μM). Thus, dimer 7f exhibited promising anticancer activity against a variety of both hematological and solid human tumor cell lines, while dimer 8 was

  13. Phyloclimatic modeling: combining phylogenetics and bioclimatic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yesson, C; Culham, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the impact of past climates on plant diversification by tracking the "footprint" of climate change on a phylogenetic tree. Diversity within the cosmopolitan carnivorous plant genus Drosera (Droseraceae) is focused within Mediterranean climate regions. We explore whether this diversity is temporally linked to Mediterranean-type climatic shifts of the mid-Miocene and whether climate preferences are conservative over phylogenetic timescales. Phyloclimatic modeling combines environmental niche (bioclimatic) modeling with phylogenetics in order to study evolutionary patterns in relation to climate change. We present the largest and most complete such example to date using Drosera. The bioclimatic models of extant species demonstrate clear phylogenetic patterns; this is particularly evident for the tuberous sundews from southwestern Australia (subgenus Ergaleium). We employ a method for establishing confidence intervals of node ages on a phylogeny using replicates from a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. This chronogram shows that many clades, including subgenus Ergaleium and section Bryastrum, diversified during the establishment of the Mediterranean-type climate. Ancestral reconstructions of bioclimatic models demonstrate a pattern of preference for this climate type within these groups. Ancestral bioclimatic models are projected into palaeo-climate reconstructions for the time periods indicated by the chronogram. We present two such examples that each generate plausible estimates of ancestral lineage distribution, which are similar to their current distributions. This is the first study to attempt bioclimatic projections on evolutionary time scales. The sundews appear to have diversified in response to local climate development. Some groups are specialized for Mediterranean climates, others show wide-ranging generalism. This demonstrates that Phyloclimatic modeling could be repeated for other plant groups and is fundamental to the understanding of

  14. Phyloclimatic modeling: combining phylogenetics and bioclimatic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yesson, C; Culham, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the impact of past climates on plant diversification by tracking the "footprint" of climate change on a phylogenetic tree. Diversity within the cosmopolitan carnivorous plant genus Drosera (Droseraceae) is focused within Mediterranean climate regions. We explore whether this diversity is temporally linked to Mediterranean-type climatic shifts of the mid-Miocene and whether climate preferences are conservative over phylogenetic timescales. Phyloclimatic modeling combines environmental niche (bioclimatic) modeling with phylogenetics in order to study evolutionary patterns in relation to climate change. We present the largest and most complete such example to date using Drosera. The bioclimatic models of extant species demonstrate clear phylogenetic patterns; this is particularly evident for the tuberous sundews from southwestern Australia (subgenus Ergaleium). We employ a method for establishing confidence intervals of node ages on a phylogeny using replicates from a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. This chronogram shows that many clades, including subgenus Ergaleium and section Bryastrum, diversified during the establishment of the Mediterranean-type climate. Ancestral reconstructions of bioclimatic models demonstrate a pattern of preference for this climate type within these groups. Ancestral bioclimatic models are projected into palaeo-climate reconstructions for the time periods indicated by the chronogram. We present two such examples that each generate plausible estimates of ancestral lineage distribution, which are similar to their current distributions. This is the first study to attempt bioclimatic projections on evolutionary time scales. The sundews appear to have diversified in response to local climate development. Some groups are specialized for Mediterranean climates, others show wide-ranging generalism. This demonstrates that Phyloclimatic modeling could be repeated for other plant groups and is fundamental to the understanding of

  15. Loehlin's original models and model contributions.

    PubMed

    McArdle, John J

    2014-11-01

    This is a short story about John C. Loehlin who is now at the University of Texas at Austin, dealing with his original simulation models and developments, which led to his current latent variable models. This talk was initially presented at a special meeting for John before the BGA in Rhode Island, and I was very pleased to contribute. It probably goes without saying, but John helped create this important society, has been a key contributor to this journal for several decades, and he deserves a lot for this leadership.

  16. Constitutive models in LAME.

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-09-01

    The Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) provides a common repository for constitutive models that can be used in computational solid mechanics codes. A number of models including both hypoelastic (rate) and hyperelastic (total strain) constitutive forms have been implemented in LAME. The structure and testing of LAME is described in Scherzinger and Hammerand ([3] and [4]). The purpose of the present report is to describe the material models which have already been implemented into LAME. The descriptions are designed to give useful information to both analysts and code developers. Thus far, 33 non-ITAR/non-CRADA protected material models have been incorporated. These include everything from the simple isotropic linear elastic models to a number of elastic-plastic models for metals to models for honeycomb, foams, potting epoxies and rubber. A complete description of each model is outside the scope of the current report. Rather, the aim here is to delineate the properties, state variables, functions, and methods for each model. However, a brief description of some of the constitutive details is provided for a number of the material models. Where appropriate, the SAND reports available for each model have been cited. Many models have state variable aliases for some or all of their state variables. These alias names can be used for outputting desired quantities. The state variable aliases available for results output have been listed in this report. However, not all models use these aliases. For those models, no state variable names are listed. Nevertheless, the number of state variables employed by each model is always given. Currently, there are four possible functions for a material model. This report lists which of these four methods are employed in each material model. As far as analysts are concerned, this information is included only for the awareness purposes. The analyst can take confidence in the fact that model has been properly implemented

  17. Preliminary DIAL model

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.; Taylor, J.; Stephenson, D.

    1994-06-01

    A unique end-to-end LIDAR sensor model has been developed supporting the concept development stage of the CALIOPE UV DIAL and UV laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) efforts. The model focuses on preserving the temporal and spectral nature of signals as they pass through the atmosphere, are collected by the optics, detected by the sensor, and processed by the sensor electronics and algorithms. This is done by developing accurate component sub-models with realistic inputs and outputs, as well as internal noise sources and operating parameters. These sub-models are then configured using data-flow diagrams to operate together to reflect the performance of the entire DIAL system. This modeling philosophy allows the developer to have a realistic indication of the nature of signals throughout the system and to design components and processing in a realistic environment. Current component models include atmospheric absorption and scattering losses, plume absorption and scattering losses, background, telescope and optical filter models, PMT (photomultiplier tube) with realistic noise sources, amplifier operation and noise, A/D converter operation, noise and distortion, pulse averaging, and DIAL computation. Preliminary results of the model will be presented indicating the expected model operation depicting the October field test at the NTS spill test facility. Indications will be given concerning near-term upgrades to the model.

  18. Differential Topic Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyou; Buntine, Wray; Ding, Nan; Xie, Lexing; Du, Lan

    2015-02-01

    In applications we may want to compare different document collections: they could have shared content but also different and unique aspects in particular collections. This task has been called comparative text mining or cross-collection modeling. We present a differential topic model for this application that models both topic differences and similarities. For this we use hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric models. Moreover, we found it was important to properly model power-law phenomena in topic-word distributions and thus we used the full Pitman-Yor process rather than just a Dirichlet process. Furthermore, we propose the transformed Pitman-Yor process (TPYP) to incorporate prior knowledge such as vocabulary variations in different collections into the model. To deal with the non-conjugate issue between model prior and likelihood in the TPYP, we thus propose an efficient sampling algorithm using a data augmentation technique based on the multinomial theorem. Experimental results show the model discovers interesting aspects of different collections. We also show the proposed MCMC based algorithm achieves a dramatically reduced test perplexity compared to some existing topic models. Finally, we show our model outperforms the state-of-the-art for document classification/ideology prediction on a number of text collections. PMID:26353238

  19. Quantitative Rheological Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Ewoldt, Randy

    2014-11-01

    The more parameters in a rheological the better it will reproduce available data, though this does not mean that it is necessarily a better justified model. Good fits are only part of model selection. We employ a Bayesian inference approach that quantifies model suitability by balancing closeness to data against both the number of model parameters and their a priori uncertainty. The penalty depends upon prior-to-calibration expectation of the viable range of values that model parameters might take, which we discuss as an essential aspect of the selection criterion. Models that are physically grounded are usually accompanied by tighter physical constraints on their respective parameters. The analysis reflects a basic principle: models grounded in physics can be expected to enjoy greater generality and perform better away from where they are calibrated. In contrast, purely empirical models can provide comparable fits, but the model selection framework penalizes their a priori uncertainty. We demonstrate the approach by selecting the best-justified number of modes in a Multi-mode Maxwell description of PVA-Borax. We also quantify relative merits of the Maxwell model relative to powerlaw fits and purely empirical fits for PVA-Borax, a viscoelastic liquid, and gluten.

  20. Geochemical modeling: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  1. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  2. A Rasch Hierarchical Measurement Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.

    This paper describes a model that integrates an item response theory (IRT) Rasch model and a hierarchical linear model and presents a method of estimating model parameter values that does not rely on large-sample theory and normal approximations. The model resulting from the integration of a hierarchical linear model and the Rasch model allows one…

  3. Modeling Imports in a Keynesian Expenditure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses several issues that instructors of introductory macroeconomics courses should consider when introducing imports in the Keynesian expenditure model. The analysis suggests that the specification of the import function should partially, if not completely, be the result of a simple discussion about the spending and import…

  4. Energy balance climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Cahalan, R. F.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An introductory survey of the global energy balance climate models is presented with an emphasis on analytical results. A sequence of increasingly complicated models involving ice cap and radiative feedback processes are solved, and the solutions and parameter sensitivities are studied. The model parameterizations are examined critically in light of many current uncertainties. A simple seasonal model is used to study the effects of changes in orbital elements on the temperature field. A linear stability theorem and a complete nonlinear stability analysis for the models are developed. Analytical solutions are also obtained for the linearized models driven by stochastic forcing elements. In this context the relation between natural fluctuation statistics and climate sensitivity is stressed.

  5. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  6. Load Model Data Tool

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to bemore » provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.« less

  7. Carcinogenesis models: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1992-12-31

    Biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are not only an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment but also raise fundamental questions about the nature of the events leading to malignancy. In this paper two such models are reviewed. The first is the multistage model proposed by Armitage and Doll in the 1950s; most of the paper is devoted to a discussion of the two-mutation model proposed by the author and his colleagues. This model is a generalization of the idea of recessive oncogenesis proposed by Knudson and has been shown to be consistent with a large body of epidemiologic and experimental data. The usefulness of the model is illustrated by analyzing a large experimental data set in which rats exposed to radon developed malignant lung tumors.

  8. Load Model Data Tool

    SciTech Connect

    David Chassin, Pavel Etingov

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to be provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.

  9. Modelling of biofilm reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Grasmick, A.; Elmaleh, S.

    1982-10-01

    Comprehensive models of biofilm reactors are developed. Model I assumes a zero-order reaction of a limiting substrate and a diffusional mass transport through the biofilm; in the diffusion-controlled regime the model is fully characterized by one parameter alpha. From this model the conversion of substrate or reactor efficiency can be calculated, for continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and plug flow reactors respectively, as follows: EA = )alpha(alpha + 2)) 1/2 - alpha; and Ep = (2 alpha) 1/2 - alpha/2: Validation of the model is tested for different experimental systems. Model II includes liquid film mass transfer resistance. The conversion gap between plug flow reactors and CSTRs is always lower than 25% and, as a first approximation, the biofilm reactor design does not then require accurate residence time distribution measurements. (Refs. 23).

  10. Multiscale Cancer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Simulating cancer behavior across multiple biological scales in space and time, i.e., multiscale cancer modeling, is increasingly being recognized as a powerful tool to refine hypotheses, focus experiments, and enable more accurate predictions. A growing number of examples illustrate the value of this approach in providing quantitative insight on the initiation, progression, and treatment of cancer. In this review, we introduce the most recent and important multiscale cancer modeling works that have successfully established a mechanistic link between different biological scales. Biophysical, biochemical, and biomechanical factors are considered in these models. We also discuss innovative, cutting-edge modeling methods that are moving predictive multiscale cancer modeling toward clinical application. Furthermore, because the development of multiscale cancer models requires a new level of collaboration among scientists from a variety of fields such as biology, medicine, physics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science, an innovative Web-based infrastructure is needed to support this growing community. PMID:21529163

  11. Cloud model bat algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Li, Liangliang; Ma, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: "bats approach their prey." Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization. PMID:24967425

  12. Probabilistic Mesomechanical Fatigue Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic mesomechanical fatigue life model is proposed to link the microstructural material heterogeneities to the statistical scatter in the macrostructural response. The macrostructure is modeled as an ensemble of microelements. Cracks nucleation within the microelements and grow from the microelements to final fracture. Variations of the microelement properties are defined using statistical parameters. A micromechanical slip band decohesion model is used to determine the crack nucleation life and size. A crack tip opening displacement model is used to determine the small crack growth life and size. Paris law is used to determine the long crack growth life. The models are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical distribution of total fatigue life for the macrostructure. The modeled response is compared to trends in experimental observations from the literature.

  13. Animal models of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Bobyn, Justin D; Little, David G; Gray, Randolph; Schindeler, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Multiple techniques designed to induce scoliotic deformity have been applied across many animal species. We have undertaken a review of the literature regarding experimental models of scoliosis in animals to discuss their utility in comprehending disease aetiology and treatment. Models of scoliosis in animals can be broadly divided into quadrupedal and bipedal experiments. Quadrupedal models, in the absence of axial gravitation force, depend upon development of a mechanical asymmetry along the spine to initiate a scoliotic deformity. Bipedal models more accurately mimic human posture and consequently are subject to similar forces due to gravity, which have been long appreciated to be a contributing factor to the development of scoliosis. Many effective models of scoliosis in smaller animals have not been successfully translated to primates and humans. Though these models may not clarify the aetiology of human scoliosis, by providing a reliable and reproducible deformity in the spine they are a useful means with which to test interventions designed to correct and prevent deformity.

  14. Outside users payload model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The outside users payload model which is a continuation of documents and replaces and supersedes the July 1984 edition is presented. The time period covered by this model is 1985 through 2000. The following sections are included: (1) definition of the scope of the model; (2) discussion of the methodology used; (3) overview of total demand; (4) summary of the estimated market segmentation by launch vehicle; (5) summary of the estimated market segmentation by user type; (6) details of the STS market forecast; (7) summary of transponder trends; (8) model overview by mission category; and (9) detailed mission models. All known non-NASA, non-DOD reimbursable payloads forecast to be flown by non-Soviet-block countries are included in this model with the exception of Spacelab payloads and small self contained payloads. Certain DOD-sponsored or cosponsored payloads are included if they are reimbursable launches.

  15. Teaching macromolecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S C; Tan, R K

    1992-12-01

    Training newcomers to the field of macromolecular modeling is as difficult as is training beginners in x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, or other methods in structural biology. In one or two lectures, the most that can be conveyed is a general sense of the relationship between modeling and other structural methods. If a full semester is available, then students can be taught how molecular structures are built, manipulated, refined, and analyzed on a computer. Here we describe a one-semester modeling course that combines lectures, discussions, and a laboratory using a commercial modeling package. In the laboratory, students carry out prescribed exercises that are coordinated to the lectures, and they complete a term project on a modeling problem of their choice. The goal is to give students an understanding of what kinds of problems can be attacked by molecular modeling methods and which problems are beyond the current capabilities of those methods.

  16. Indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy: a targeted approach to increase biological efficiency of x-rays based on energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktaria, Sianne; Corde, Stéphanie; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tehei, Moeava

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of multimodal treatments incorporating surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, local control of gliomas remains a major challenge. The potential of a new treatment approach called indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy using the synergy created by combining methotrexate (MTX) with bromodeoxyuridine (BrUdR) under optimum energy x-ray irradiation is assessed. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells pre-treated with 0.01 μM MTX and/or 10 μM BrUdR were irradiated in vitro with 50 kVp, 125 kVp, 250 kVp, 6 MV and 10 MV x-rays. The cytotoxicity was assessed using clonogenic survival as the radiobiological endpoint. The photon energy with maximum effect was determined using radiation sensitization enhancement factors at 10% clonogenic survival (SER10%). The cell cycle distribution was investigated using flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide staining. Incorporation of BrUdR in the DNA was detected by the fluorescence of labelled anti-BrUdR antibodies. The radiation sensitization enhancement exhibits energy dependence with a maximum of 2.3 at 125 kVp for the combined drug treated cells. At this energy, the shape of the clonogenic survival curve of the pharmacological agents treated cells changes substantially. This change is interpreted as an increased lethality of the local radiation environment and is attributed to supplemented inhibition of DNA repair. Radiation induced chemo-beta therapy was demonstrated in vitro by the targeted activation of combined pharmacological agents with optimized energy tuning of x-ray beams on 9 L cells. Our results show that this is a highly effective form of chemo-radiation therapy.

  17. Indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy: a targeted approach to increase biological efficiency of x-rays based on energy.

    PubMed

    Oktaria, Sianne; Corde, Stéphanie; Lerch, Michael L F; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Tehei, Moeava

    2015-10-21

    Despite the use of multimodal treatments incorporating surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, local control of gliomas remains a major challenge. The potential of a new treatment approach called indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy using the synergy created by combining methotrexate (MTX) with bromodeoxyuridine (BrUdR) under optimum energy x-ray irradiation is assessed. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells pre-treated with 0.01 μM MTX and/or 10 μM BrUdR were irradiated in vitro with 50 kVp, 125 kVp, 250 kVp, 6 MV and 10 MV x-rays. The cytotoxicity was assessed using clonogenic survival as the radiobiological endpoint. The photon energy with maximum effect was determined using radiation sensitization enhancement factors at 10% clonogenic survival (SER10%). The cell cycle distribution was investigated using flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide staining. Incorporation of BrUdR in the DNA was detected by the fluorescence of labelled anti-BrUdR antibodies. The radiation sensitization enhancement exhibits energy dependence with a maximum of 2.3 at 125 kVp for the combined drug treated cells. At this energy, the shape of the clonogenic survival curve of the pharmacological agents treated cells changes substantially. This change is interpreted as an increased lethality of the local radiation environment and is attributed to supplemented inhibition of DNA repair. Radiation induced chemo-beta therapy was demonstrated in vitro by the targeted activation of combined pharmacological agents with optimized energy tuning of x-ray beams on 9 L cells. Our results show that this is a highly effective form of chemo-radiation therapy.

  18. Bystander effect-mediated therapy of experimental brain tumor by genetically engineered tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Namba, H; Tagawa, M; Iwadate, Y; Kimura, M; Sueyoshi, K; Sakiyama, S

    1998-01-01

    Transfer of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene, followed by administration of ganciclovir (GCV), generates the "bystander effect," in which HSV-tk-negative wild-type cells, as well as HSV-tk-expressing cells, are killed by GCV. To eradicate an intracranial tumor by this bystander effect, we injected the tumor cells transduced with the HSV-tk gene (TK cells) in the vicinity of the preimplanted wild-type tumor and then administered GCV. Wild-type 9L-gliosarcoma cells (1 x 10[5]) were implanted into the brain of syngeneic Fisher rats. On the next day, rats were injected with TK cells (1 x 10(5) or 3 x 10[5]) or medium alone at the same brain coordinate and then treated with GCV or saline. Administration of GCV significantly prolonged the survival of the rats injected with TK cells compared with that injected with medium alone (p < 0.01). Reduction in tumor size and retardation of tumor growth were observed by serial magnetic resonance imaging in the rats that received the combination of TK cells and GCV. The results show that the bystander effect is also achieved in vivo even when TK cells and wild-type cells are not simultaneously implanted. This treatment modality circumvents potential risks accompanied with in vivo gene transfer. Because there remained substantially no HSV-tk-positive cells in the recurrent tumors, this modality offers a "safe" therapeutic strategy against human malignant gliomas. PMID:9458237

  19. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io.

  20. F-14 modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Baron, S.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results in the application of a closed loop pilot/simulator model to the analysis of some simulator fidelity issues are discussed in the context of an air to air target tracking task. The closed loop model is described briefly. Then, problem simplifications that are employed to reduce computational costs are discussed. Finally, model results showing sensitivity of performance to various assumptions concerning the simulator and/or the pilot are presented.

  1. Acid rain: Mesoscale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A mesoscale numerical model of the Florida peninsula was formulated and applied to a dry, neutral atmosphere. The prospective use of the STAR-100 computer for the submesoscale model is discussed. The numerical model presented is tested under synoptically undisturbed conditions. Two cases, differing only in the direction of the prevailing geostrophic wind, are examined: a prevailing southwest wind and a prevailing southeast wind, both 6 m/sec at all levels initially.

  2. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  3. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qian; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  4. The Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; Freiere deCarvalho, Mary; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) are to develop an integrated, quantified, evidence-based decision support tool useful to crew health and mission planners and to help align science, technology, and operational activities intended to optimize crew health, safety, and mission success. Presentation slides address scope and approach, beneficiaries of IMM capabilities, history, risk components, conceptual models, development steps, and the evidence base. Space adaptation syndrome is used to demonstrate the model's capabilities.

  5. Atmospheric prediction model survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellck, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the SEASAT Satellite program of NASA, a survey of representative primitive equation atmospheric prediction models that exist in the world today was written for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Seventeen models developed by eleven different operational and research centers throughout the world are included in the survey. The surveys are tutorial in nature describing the features of the various models in a systematic manner.

  6. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. PMID:27631126

  7. AREST model description

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) have supported the development of the Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. AREST is a computer model developed to evaluate radionuclide release from an underground geologic repository. The AREST code can be used to calculate/estimate the amount and rate of each radionuclide that is released from the engineered barrier system (EBS) of the repository. The EBS is the man-made or disrupted area of the repository. AREST was designed as a system-level models to simulate the behavior of the total repository by combining process-level models for the release from an individual waste package or container. AREST contains primarily analytical models for calculating the release/transport of radionuclides to the lost rock that surrounds each waste package. Analytical models were used because of the small computational overhead that allows all the input parameters to be derived from a statistical distribution. Recently, a one-dimensional numerical model was also incorporated into AREST, to allow for more detailed modeling of the transport process with arbitrary length decay chains. The next step in modeling the EBS, is to develop a model that couples the probabilistic capabilities of AREST with a more detailed process model. This model will need to look at the reactive coupling of the processes that are involved with the release process. Such coupling would include: (1) the dissolution of the waste form, (2) the geochemical modeling of the groundwater, (3) the corrosion of the container overpacking, and (4) the backfill material, just to name a few. Several of these coupled processes are already incorporated in the current version of AREST.

  8. Conceptual IT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaoudova, Kristina; Stanchev, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The business processes are the key asset for every organization. The design of the business process models is the foremost concern and target among an organization's functions. Business processes and their proper management are intensely dependent on the performance of software applications and technology solutions. The paper is attempt for definition of new Conceptual model of IT service provider, it could be examined as IT focused Enterprise model, part of Enterprise Architecture (EA) school.

  9. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  10. Liftoff Model for MELCOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Michael F.

    2015-07-01

    Aerosol particles that deposit on surfaces may be subsequently resuspended by air flowing over the surface. A review of models for this liftoff process is presented and compared to available data. Based on this review, a model that agrees with existing data and is readily computed is presented for incorporation into a system level code such as MELCOR. Liftoff Model for MELCOR July 2015 4 This page is intentionally blank

  11. Dataset Modelability by QSAR

    PubMed Central

    Golbraikh, Alexander; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simple MODelability Index (MODI) that estimates the feasibility of obtaining predictive QSAR models (Correct Classification Rate above 0.7) for a binary dataset of bioactive compounds. MODI is defined as an activity class-weighted ratio of the number of the nearest neighbor pairs of compounds with the same activity class versus the total number of pairs. The MODI values were calculated for more than 100 datasets and the threshold of 0.65 was found to separate non-modelable from the modelable datasets. PMID:24251851

  12. Mathematical model of sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Crouser, Elliott D.; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease involving abnormal collection of inflammatory cells forming nodules, called granulomas. Such granulomas occur in the lung and the mediastinal lymph nodes, in the heart, and in other vital and nonvital organs. The origin of the disease is unknown, and there are only limited clinical data on lung tissue of patients. No current model of sarcoidosis exists. In this paper we develop a mathematical model on the dynamics of the disease in the lung and use patients’ lung tissue data to validate the model. The model is used to explore potential treatments. PMID:25349384

  13. Models of Reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-06-02

    Conscious awareness of our environment is based on a feedback loop comprised of sensory input transmitted to the central nervous system leading to construction of our ''model of the world,'' (Lewis et al, 1982). We then assimilate the neurological model at the unconscious level into information we can later consciously consider useful in identifying belief systems and behaviors for designing diverse systems. Thus, we can avoid potential problems based on our open-to-error perceived reality of the world. By understanding how our model of reality is organized, we allow ourselves to transcend content and develop insight into how effective choices and belief systems are generated through sensory derived processes. These are the processes which provide the designer the ability to meta model (build a model of a model) the user; consequently, matching the mental model of the user with that of the designer's and, coincidentally, forming rapport between the two participants. The information shared between the participants is neither assumed nor generalized, it is closer to equivocal; thus minimizing error through a sharing of each other's model of reality. How to identify individual mental mechanisms or processes, how to organize the individual strategies of these mechanisms into useful patterns, and to formulate these into models for success and knowledge based outcomes is the subject of the discussion that follows.

  14. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  15. Models of HERG gating.

    PubMed

    Bett, Glenna C L; Zhou, Qinlian; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2011-08-01

    HERG (Kv11.1, KCNH2) is a voltage-gated potassium channel with unique gating characteristics. HERG has fast voltage-dependent inactivation, relatively slow deactivation, and fast recovery from inactivation. This combination of gating kinetics makes study of HERG difficult without using mathematical models. Several HERG models have been developed, with fundamentally different organization. HERG is the molecular basis of I(Kr), which plays a critical role in repolarization. We programmed and compared five distinct HERG models. HERG gating cannot be adequately replicated using Hodgkin-Huxley type formulation. Using Markov models, a five-state model is required with three closed, one open, and one inactivated state, and a voltage-independent step between some of the closed states. A fundamental difference between models is the presence/absence of a transition directly from the proximal closed state to the inactivated state. The only models that effectively reproduce HERG data have no direct closed-inactivated transition, or have a closed-inactivated transition that is effectively zero compared to the closed-open transition, rendering the closed-inactivation transition superfluous. Our single-channel model demonstrates that channels can inactivate without conducting with a flickering or bursting open-state. The various models have qualitative and quantitative differences that are critical to accurate predictions of HERG behavior during repolarization, tachycardia, and premature depolarizations. PMID:21806931

  16. Modeling plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle

    2006-02-01

    Applications of computational techniques to developmental plant biology include the processing of experimental data and the construction of simulation models. Substantial progress has been made in these areas over the past few years. Complex image-processing techniques are used to integrate sequences of two-dimensional images into three-dimensional descriptions of development over time and to extract useful quantitative traits. Large amounts of data are integrated into empirical models of developing plant organs and entire plants. Mechanistic models link molecular-level phenomena with the resulting phenotypes. Several models shed light on the possible properties of active auxin transport and its role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:16376602

  17. Model Error Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2008-01-01

    An error budget is a commonly used tool in design of complex aerospace systems. It represents system performance requirements in terms of allowable errors and flows these down through a hierarchical structure to lower assemblies and components. The requirements may simply be 'allocated' based upon heuristics or experience, or they may be designed through use of physics-based models. This paper presents a basis for developing an error budget for models of the system, as opposed to the system itself. The need for model error budgets arises when system models are a principle design agent as is increasingly more common for poorly testable high performance space systems.

  18. Lightning return stroke models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. T.; Uman, M. A.; Standler, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    We test the two most commonly used lightning return stroke models, Bruce-Golde and transmission line, against subsequent stroke electric and magnetic field wave forms measured simultaneously at near and distant stations and show that these models are inadequate to describe the experimental data. We then propose a new return stroke model that is physically plausible and that yields good approximations to the measured two-station fields. Using the new model, we derive return stroke charge and current statistics for about 100 subsequent strokes.

  19. Modeling plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle

    2006-02-01

    Applications of computational techniques to developmental plant biology include the processing of experimental data and the construction of simulation models. Substantial progress has been made in these areas over the past few years. Complex image-processing techniques are used to integrate sequences of two-dimensional images into three-dimensional descriptions of development over time and to extract useful quantitative traits. Large amounts of data are integrated into empirical models of developing plant organs and entire plants. Mechanistic models link molecular-level phenomena with the resulting phenotypes. Several models shed light on the possible properties of active auxin transport and its role in plant morphogenesis.

  20. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  1. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  2. Modelling approaches in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R McN

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual, physical and mathematical models have all proved useful in biomechanics. Conceptual models, which have been used only occasionally, clarify a point without having to be constructed physically or analysed mathematically. Some physical models are designed to demonstrate a proposed mechanism, for example the folding mechanisms of insect wings. Others have been used to check the conclusions of mathematical modelling. However, others facilitate observations that would be difficult to make on real organisms, for example on the flow of air around the wings of small insects. Mathematical models have been used more often than physical ones. Some of them are predictive, designed for example to calculate the effects of anatomical changes on jumping performance, or the pattern of flow in a 3D assembly of semicircular canals. Others seek an optimum, for example the best possible technique for a high jump. A few have been used in inverse optimization studies, which search for variables that are optimized by observed patterns of behaviour. Mathematical models range from the extreme simplicity of some models of walking and running, to the complexity of models that represent numerous body segments and muscles, or elaborate bone shapes. The simpler the model, the clearer it is which of its features is essential to the calculated effect. PMID:14561333

  3. Wind power prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Mcginness, H.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed to predict the power available from the wind at the Goldstone, California, antenna site complex. The background for power prediction was derived from a statistical evaluation of available wind speed data records at this location and at nearby locations similarly situated within the Mojave desert. In addition to a model for power prediction over relatively long periods of time, an interim simulation model that produces sample wind speeds is described. The interim model furnishes uncorrelated sample speeds at hourly intervals that reproduce the statistical wind distribution at Goldstone. A stochastic simulation model to provide speed samples representative of both the statistical speed distributions and correlations is also discussed.

  4. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  5. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, O.; Griffiths, D.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  6. Models of HERG Gating

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C.L.; Zhou, Qinlian; Rasmusson, Randall L.

    2011-01-01

    HERG (Kv11.1, KCNH2) is a voltage-gated potassium channel with unique gating characteristics. HERG has fast voltage-dependent inactivation, relatively slow deactivation, and fast recovery from inactivation. This combination of gating kinetics makes study of HERG difficult without using mathematical models. Several HERG models have been developed, with fundamentally different organization. HERG is the molecular basis of IKr, which plays a critical role in repolarization. We programmed and compared five distinct HERG models. HERG gating cannot be adequately replicated using Hodgkin-Huxley type formulation. Using Markov models, a five-state model is required with three closed, one open, and one inactivated state, and a voltage-independent step between some of the closed states. A fundamental difference between models is the presence/absence of a transition directly from the proximal closed state to the inactivated state. The only models that effectively reproduce HERG data have no direct closed-inactivated transition, or have a closed-inactivated transition that is effectively zero compared to the closed-open transition, rendering the closed-inactivation transition superfluous. Our single-channel model demonstrates that channels can inactivate without conducting with a flickering or bursting open-state. The various models have qualitative and quantitative differences that are critical to accurate predictions of HERG behavior during repolarization, tachycardia, and premature depolarizations. PMID:21806931

  7. Gefitinib and Radiation Therapy in Treating Children With Newly Diagnosed Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood Oligodendroglioma

  8. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  9. Phase II Pediatric Study With Dabrafenib in HGG Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Glioblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Anaplastic Ganglioglioma; Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Pineoblastoma; Medulloblastoma; PNET; Rhabdoid Tumor; Perineurioma; MPNST; Malignant Meningloma; Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma

  10. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  11. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  12. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  13. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  14. Lapatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Central Nervous System Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma

  15. Radiation Environment Modeling for Spacecraft Design: New Model Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Xapsos, Mike; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Ladbury, Ray

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on various new space radiation environment models for spacecraft design is described. The topics include: 1) The Space Radiatio Environment; 2) Effects of Space Environments on Systems; 3) Space Radiatio Environment Model Use During Space Mission Development and Operations; 4) Space Radiation Hazards for Humans; 5) "Standard" Space Radiation Environment Models; 6) Concerns about Standard Models; 7) Inadequacies of Current Models; 8) Development of New Models; 9) New Model Developments: Proton Belt Models; 10) Coverage of New Proton Models; 11) Comparison of TPM-1, PSB97, AP-8; 12) New Model Developments: Electron Belt Models; 13) Coverage of New Electron Models; 14) Comparison of "Worst Case" POLE, CRESELE, and FLUMIC Models with the AE-8 Model; 15) New Model Developments: Galactic Cosmic Ray Model; 16) Comparison of NASA, MSU, CIT Models with ACE Instrument Data; 17) New Model Developmemts: Solar Proton Model; 18) Comparison of ESP, JPL91, KIng/Stassinopoulos, and PSYCHIC Models; 19) New Model Developments: Solar Heavy Ion Model; 20) Comparison of CREME96 to CREDO Measurements During 2000 and 2002; 21) PSYCHIC Heavy ion Model; 22) Model Standardization; 23) Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models; and 24) Summary.

  16. Groundwater Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed E. Hassan

    2006-01-24

    Models have an inherent uncertainty. The difficulty in fully characterizing the subsurface environment makes uncertainty an integral component of groundwater flow and transport models, which dictates the need for continuous monitoring and improvement. Building and sustaining confidence in closure decisions and monitoring networks based on models of subsurface conditions require developing confidence in the models through an iterative process. The definition of model validation is postulated as a confidence building and long-term iterative process (Hassan, 2004a). Model validation should be viewed as a process not an end result. Following Hassan (2004b), an approach is proposed for the validation process of stochastic groundwater models. The approach is briefly summarized herein and detailed analyses of acceptance criteria for stochastic realizations and of using validation data to reduce input parameter uncertainty are presented and applied to two case studies. During the validation process for stochastic models, a question arises as to the sufficiency of the number of acceptable model realizations (in terms of conformity with validation data). Using a hierarchical approach to make this determination is proposed. This approach is based on computing five measures or metrics and following a decision tree to determine if a sufficient number of realizations attain satisfactory scores regarding how they represent the field data used for calibration (old) and used for validation (new). The first two of these measures are applied to hypothetical scenarios using the first case study and assuming field data consistent with the model or significantly different from the model results. In both cases it is shown how the two measures would lead to the appropriate decision about the model performance. Standard statistical tests are used to evaluate these measures with the results indicating they are appropriate measures for evaluating model realizations. The use of validation

  17. Why business models matter.

    PubMed

    Magretta, Joan

    2002-05-01

    "Business model" was one of the great buzz-words of the Internet boom. A company didn't need a strategy, a special competence, or even any customers--all it needed was a Web-based business model that promised wild profits in some distant, ill-defined future. Many people--investors, entrepreneurs, and executives alike--fell for the fantasy and got burned. And as the inevitable counterreaction played out, the concept of the business model fell out of fashion nearly as quickly as the .com appendage itself. That's a shame. As Joan Magretta explains, a good business model remains essential to every successful organization, whether it's a new venture or an established player. To help managers apply the concept successfully, she defines what a business model is and how it complements a smart competitive strategy. Business models are, at heart, stories that explain how enterprises work. Like a good story, a robust business model contains precisely delineated characters, plausible motivations, and a plot that turns on an insight about value. It answers certain questions: Who is the customer? How do we make money? What underlying economic logic explains how we can deliver value to customers at an appropriate cost? Every viable organization is built on a sound business model, but a business model isn't a strategy, even though many people use the terms interchangeably. Business models describe, as a system, how the pieces of a business fit together. But they don't factor in one critical dimension of performance: competition. That's the job of strategy. Illustrated with examples from companies like American Express, EuroDisney, WalMart, and Dell Computer, this article clarifies the concepts of business models and strategy, which are fundamental to every company's performance.

  18. Biosphere Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  19. Bayesian Data-Model Fit Assessment for Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Bayesian approaches to modeling are receiving an increasing amount of attention in the areas of model construction and estimation in factor analysis, structural equation modeling (SEM), and related latent variable models. However, model diagnostics and model criticism remain relatively understudied aspects of Bayesian SEM. This article describes…

  20. Spiral model pilot project information model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was an evaluation of the Spiral Model (SM) development approach to allow NASA Marshall to develop an experience base of that software management methodology. A discussion is presented of the Information Model (IM) that was used as part of the SM methodology. A key concept of the SM is the establishment of an IM to be used by management to track the progress of a project. The IM is the set of metrics that is to be measured and reported throughout the life of the project. These metrics measure both the product and the process to ensure the quality of the final delivery item and to ensure the project met programmatic guidelines. The beauty of the SM, along with the IM, is the ability to measure not only the correctness of the specification and implementation of the requirements but to also obtain a measure of customer satisfaction.

  1. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  2. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  3. Canister Model, Systems Analysis

    1993-09-29

    This packges provides a computer simulation of a systems model for packaging nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel in canisters. The canister model calculates overall programmatic cost, number of canisters, and fuel and waste inventories for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (other initial conditions can be entered).

  4. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  5. Fictional models in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    When James Clerk Maxwell set out his famous equations 150 years ago, his model of electromagnetism included a piece of pure fiction: an invisible, all-pervasive "aether" made up of elastic vortices separated by electric charges. Margaret Morrison explores how this and other "fictional" models shape science.

  6. Modeling Water Filtration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Model-eliciting activities (MEAs) are not new to those in engineering or mathematics, but they were new to Melissa Parks. Model-eliciting activities are simulated real-world problems that integrate engineering, mathematical, and scientific thinking as students find solutions for specific scenarios. During this process, students generate solutions…

  7. Dasymetric Modeling and Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Nicholas N.; Buttenfield, Barbara P.; Leyk, Stefan; Speilman, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Dasymetric models increase the spatial resolution of population data by incorporating related ancillary data layers. The role of uncertainty in dasymetric modeling has not been fully addressed as of yet. Uncertainty is usually present because most population data are themselves uncertain, and/or the geographic processes that connect population and the ancillary data layers are not precisely known. A new dasymetric methodology - the Penalized Maximum Entropy Dasymetric Model (P-MEDM) - is presented that enables these sources of uncertainty to be represented and modeled. The P-MEDM propagates uncertainty through the model and yields fine-resolution population estimates with associated measures of uncertainty. This methodology contains a number of other benefits of theoretical and practical interest. In dasymetric modeling, researchers often struggle with identifying a relationship between population and ancillary data layers. The PEDM model simplifies this step by unifying how ancillary data are included. The P-MEDM also allows a rich array of data to be included, with disparate spatial resolutions, attribute resolutions, and uncertainties. While the P-MEDM does not necessarily produce more precise estimates than do existing approaches, it does help to unify how data enter the dasymetric model, it increases the types of data that may be used, and it allows geographers to characterize the quality of their dasymetric estimates. We present an application of the P-MEDM that includes household-level survey data combined with higher spatial resolution data such as from census tracts, block groups, and land cover classifications. PMID:25067846

  8. Connectionist Modelling and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Colin W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a detailed, technical introduction to the state of cognitive science research, in particular the rise of the "new cognitive science," especially artificial neural net (ANN) models. Explains one influential ANN model and describes diverse applications and their implications for education. (EV)

  9. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  10. Animal models for osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Maran, A.; Lotinun, S.; Hefferan, T.; Evans, G. L.; Zhang, M.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge.

  11. Models and Metaphors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Humanity delights in spinning conceptual models of the world. These models, in turn, mirror their respective root metaphors. Three root metaphors--spiritual, organic, and mechanical--have dominated western thought. The spiritual metaphor runs from Plato, through Hegel, and connects with Montessori. The organic metaphor extends from Aristotle,…

  12. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  13. Evaluating Causal Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    Pointing out that linear causal models can organize the interrelationships of a large number of variables, this paper contends that such models are particularly useful to mass communication research, which must by necessity deal with complex systems of variables. The paper first outlines briefly the philosophical requirements for establishing a…

  14. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  15. Using Models Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, John

    2005-01-01

    Models are crucial to science teaching and learning, yet they can create unforeseen and overlooked challenges for students and teachers. For example, consider the time-tested clay volcano that relies on a vinegar and-baking-soda mixture for its "eruption." Based on a classroom demonstration of that geologic model, elementary students may interpret…

  16. Multilevel Mixture Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varriale, Roberta; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2012-01-01

    Factor analysis is a statistical method for describing the associations among sets of observed variables in terms of a small number of underlying continuous latent variables. Various authors have proposed multilevel extensions of the factor model for the analysis of data sets with a hierarchical structure. These Multilevel Factor Models (MFMs)…

  17. Modelling extended chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the concept that the warm, partially ionized plasma (presently called chromosphere) associated with such stars as Alpha Boo and Rho Per extends outwards at least several photospheric radii. Calculations are presented for the Mg II K line in light of two input model atmospheres. Specific predictions are deduced from the results obtained by each of the two models.

  18. Model-Based Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifenthaler, Dirk; Seel, Norbert M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, there will be a particular focus on mental models and their application to inductive reasoning within the realm of instruction. A basic assumption of this study is the observation that the construction of mental models and related reasoning is a slowly developing capability of cognitive systems that emerges effectively with proper…

  19. A night sky model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpylev, N. P.; Smirnov, M. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    A night sky model is proposed. It includes different components of light polution, such as solar twilight, moon scattered light, zodiacal light, Milky Way, air glow and artificial light pollution. The model is designed for calculating the efficiency of astronomical installations.

  20. Solar Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  1. Stereolithography models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the first stereolithographic models made, which proved in a new release of ProEngineer software (Parametric Technologies, or PTC) and 3D Systems (Valencia, California) software for the SLA 250 machine. They are a model of benzene and the {alpha}-carbon backbone of the variable region of an antibody.

  2. Mathematical models of hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The ongoing research has largely been focused on the development of mathematical models of hysteretic nonlinearities with nonlocal memories. The distinct feature of these nonlinearities is that their current states depend on past histories of input variations. It turns out that memories of hysteretic nonlinearities are quite selective. Indeed, experiments show that only some past input extrema (not the entire input variations) leave their marks upon future states of hysteretic nonlinearities. Thus special mathematical tools are needed in order to describe nonlocal selective memories of hysteretic nonlinearities. The origin of such tools can be traced back to the landmark paper of Preisach. Their research has been primarily concerned with Preisach-type models of hysteresis. All these models have a common generic feature; they are constructed as superpositions of simplest hysteretic nonlinearities-rectangular loops. During the past four years, the study has been by and large centered around the following topics: (1) further development of Scalar and vector Preisach-type models of hysteresis; (2) experimental testing of Preisach-type models of hysteresis; (3) development of new models for viscosity (aftereffect) in hysteretic systems; (4) development of mathematical models for superconducting hysteresis in the case of gradual resistive transitions; (5) software implementation of Preisach-type models of hysteresis; and (6) development of new ideas which have emerged in the course of the research work. The author briefly describes the main scientific results obtained in the areas outlined above.

  3. Dynamic Eye Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Science and Mathematics Education in Southeast Asia, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Instructions (with diagrams and parts list) are provided for constructing an eye model with a pliable lens made from a plastic bottle which can vary its convexity to accommodate changing positions of an object being viewed. Also discusses concepts which the model can assist in developing. (Author/SK)

  4. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  5. Modelling Hadronic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Débora P.

    2016-04-01

    Hadron physics stands somewhere in the diffuse intersection between nuclear and particle physics and relies largely on the use of models. Historically, around 1930, the first nuclear physics models known as the liquid drop model and the semi-empirical mass formula established the grounds for the study of nuclei properties and nuclear structure. These two models are parameter dependent. Nowadays, around 500 hundred non-relativistic (Skyrme-type) and relativistic models are available in the literature and largely used and the vast majority are parameter dependent models. In this review I discuss some of the shortcomings of using non-relativistic models and the advantages of using relativistic ones when applying them to describe hadronic matter. I also show possible applications of relativistic models to physical situations that cover part of the QCD phase diagram: I mention how the description of compact objects can be done, how heavy-ion collisions can be investigated and particle fractions obtained and show the relation between liquid-gas phase transitions and the pasta phase.

  6. Models in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Addresses the most popular models currently being chosen for biological research and the reasons behind those choices. Among the current favorites are zebra fish, fruit flies, mice, monkeys, and yeast. Concludes with a brief examination of the ethical issues involved, and why some animals may need to be replaced in research with model systems.…

  7. Anticipatory model of cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Dress, William B.; Hylton, James O.

    1999-03-01

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  8. A Model for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor-Petruso, Sharon Anne

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Constructural Multi-Modalities Model for MST (math, science, and technology) Inquiry Units. The MST Model uses an interdisciplinary and constructivist approach and allows teachers to create lesson plans that: integrate MST in tandem; adhere to local, state, and national standards; and actively engage students' differentiated learning…

  9. Video Self-Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buggey, Tom; Ogle, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Video self-modeling (VSM) first appeared on the psychology and education stage in the early 1970s. The practical applications of VSM were limited by lack of access to tools for editing video, which is necessary for almost all self-modeling videos. Thus, VSM remained in the research domain until the advent of camcorders and VCR/DVD players and,…

  10. Model State Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    Models of state involvement in training child care providers are briefly discussed and the employers' role in training is explored. Six criteria for states that are taken as models are identified, and four are described. Various state activities are described for each criterion. It is noted that little is known about employer and other private…

  11. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  12. Symposium on ID Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Kenneth H., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents papers on four different instructional development models currently in use either in a university or a business setting. All phases of systematic development are covered, including project selection, production, implementation, performance analysis, constraints, and unusual features that distinguish each model. References are listed. (BK)

  13. Math, Science, and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    For the past five summers, the authors have taught summer school to recent immigrants and refugees. Their experiences with these fourth-grade English language learners (ELL) have taught them the value of using models to build scientific and mathematical concepts. In this article, they describe the use of different forms of 2- and 3-D models to…

  14. Dual-Schemata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    In this paper, a new machine-learning method, called Dual-Schemata model, is presented. Dual-Schemata model is a kind of self-organizational machine learning methods for an autonomous robot interacting with an unknown dynamical environment. This is based on Piaget's Schema model, that is a classical psychological model to explain memory and cognitive development of human beings. Our Dual-Schemata model is developed as a computational model of Piaget's Schema model, especially focusing on sensori-motor developing period. This developmental process is characterized by a couple of two mutually-interacting dynamics; one is a dynamics formed by assimilation and accommodation, and the other dynamics is formed by equilibration and differentiation. By these dynamics schema system enables an agent to act well in a real world. This schema's differentiation process corresponds to a symbol formation process occurring within an autonomous agent when it interacts with an unknown, dynamically changing environment. Experiment results obtained from an autonomous facial robot in which our model is embedded are presented; an autonomous facial robot becomes able to chase a ball moving in various ways without any rewards nor teaching signals from outside. Moreover, emergence of concepts on the target movements within a robot is shown and discussed in terms of fuzzy logics on set-subset inclusive relationships.

  15. Modeling for Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  16. SOSS ICN Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan

    2016-01-01

    Under the NASA-KAIA-KARI ATM research collaboration agreement, SOSS ICN Model has been developed for Incheon International Airport. This presentation describes the model validation work in the project. The presentation will show the results and analysis of the validation.

  17. Animal models of candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Cornelius J; Cheng, Shaoji; Nguyen, Minh Hong

    2009-01-01

    Animal models are powerful tools to study the pathogenesis of diverse types of candidiasis. Murine models are particularly attractive because of cost, ease of handling, technical feasibility, and experience with their use. In this chapter, we describe methods for two of the most popular murine models of disease caused by Candida albicans. In an intravenously disseminated candidiasis (DC) model, immunocompetent mice are infected by lateral tail vein injections of a C. albicans suspension. Endpoints include mortality, tissue burdens of infection (most importantly in the kidneys, although spleens and livers are sometimes also assessed), and histopathology of infected organs. In a model of oral/esophageal candidiasis, mice are immunosuppressed with cortisone acetate and inoculated in the oral cavities using swabs saturated with a C. albicans suspension. Since mice do not die from oral candidiasis in this model, endpoints are tissue burden of infection and histopathology. The DC and oral/esophageal models are most commonly used for studies of C. albicans virulence, in which the disease-causing ability of a mutant strain is compared with an isogenic parent strain. Nevertheless, the basic techniques we describe are also applicable to models adapted to investigate other aspects of pathogenesis, such as spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, specific aspects of host immune response and assessment of antifungal agents, immunomodulatory strategies, and vaccines.

  18. SUSY GUT Model Building

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Stuart

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I discuss the evolution of SUSY GUT model building as I see it. Starting with 4 dimensional model building, I then consider orbifold GUTs in 5 dimensions and finally orbifold GUTs embedded into the E{sub 8}xE{sub 8} heterotic string.

  19. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  20. On Some Electroconvection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Peter; Elgindi, Tarek; Ignatova, Mihaela; Vicol, Vlad

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model of electroconvection motivated by studies of the motion of a two-dimensional annular suspended smectic film under the influence of an electric potential maintained at the boundary by two electrodes. We prove that this electroconvection model has global in time unique smooth solutions.

  1. Acid rain: Microphysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    A microphysical model was used to simulate the case of a ground cloud without dilution by entrainment and without precipitation. The numerical integration techniques of the model are presented. The droplet size spectra versus time and the droplet molalities for each value of time are discussed.

  2. THE AQUATOX MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will present AQUATOX, an aquatic ecosystem simulation model developed by Dr. Dick Park and supported by the U.S. EPA. The AQUATOX model predicts the fate of various pollutants, such as nutrients and organic chemicals, and their effects on the ecosystem, including fi...

  3. Stormwater Management Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    SWMM is a model for urban hydrology. It has a long history and is relied upon by professional engineers in the US and around the world. SWMM provides both gray and green Infrastructure modeling capabilities. As such, it is a convenient tool for understanding the tradeoff between ...

  4. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  5. Generalized simplicial chiral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, Masoud

    2000-02-01

    Using the auxiliary field representation of the simplicial chiral models on a ( d-1)-dimensional simplex, the simplicial chiral models are generalized through replacing the term Tr (AA †) in the Lagrangian of these models by an arbitrary class function of AA †; V(AA †) . This is the same method used in defining the generalized two-dimensional Yang-Mills theories (gYM 2) from ordinary YM 2. We call these models the "generalized simplicial chiral models". Using the results of the one-link integral over a U( N) matrix, the large- N saddle-point equations for eigenvalue density function ρ( z) in the weak ( β> βc) and strong ( β< βc) regions are computed. In d=2, where the model is in some sense related to the gYM 2 theory, the saddle-point equations are solved for ρ( z) in the two regions, and the explicit value of critical point βc is calculated for V(B)= Tr B n(B=AA †) . For V(B)= Tr B 2, Tr B 3, and Tr B4, the critical behaviour of the model at d=2 is studied, and by calculating the internal energy, it is shown that these models have a third order phase transition.

  6. Introduction to Theoretical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Matthew J.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Hanna, Thomas M.; Nygaard, Nicolai; Proukakis, Nick P.; Szymańska, Marzena H.

    2013-02-01

    We briefly overview commonly encountered theoretical notions arising in the modelling of quantum gases, intended to provide a unified background to the `language' and diverse theoretical models presented elsewhere in this book, and aimed particularly at researchers from outside the quantum gases community.

  7. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  8. Reliability model generator specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Mccann, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The Reliability Model Generator (RMG), a program which produces reliability models from block diagrams for ASSIST, the interface for the reliability evaluation tool SURE is described. An account is given of motivation for RMG and the implemented algorithms are discussed. The appendices contain the algorithms and two detailed traces of examples.

  9. Warm Inflation Model Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun

    We review the main aspects of the warm inflation scenario, focusing on the inflationary dynamics and the predictions related to the primordial spectrum of perturbations, to be compared with the recent cosmological observations. We study in detail three different classes of inflationary models, chaotic, hybrid models and hilltop models, and discuss their embedding into supersymmetric models and the consequences for model building of the warm inflationary dynamics based on first principles calculations. Due to the extra friction term introduced in the inflaton background evolution generated by the dissipative dynamics, inflation can take place generically for smaller values of the field, and larger values of couplings and masses. When the dissipative dynamics dominates over the expansion, in the so-called strong dissipative regime, inflation proceeds with sub-Planckian inflaton values. Models can be naturally embedded into a supergravity framework, with SUGRA corrections suppressed by the Planck mass now under control, for a larger class of Kähler potentials. In particular, this provides a simpler solution to the "eta" problem in supersymmetric hybrid inflation, without restricting the Kähler potentials compatible with inflation. For chaotic models dissipation leads to a smaller prediction for the tensor-to-scalar ratio and a less tilted spectrum when compared to the cold inflation scenario. We find in particular that a small component of dissipation renders the quartic model now consistent with the current CMB data.

  10. Computational Modeling of Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Tanner, John A. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains presentations and discussions from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Modeling of Tires. The workshop attendees represented NASA, the Army and Air force, tire companies, commercial software developers, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state of technology in the computational modeling of tires and to provide guidelines for future research.

  11. Animal models of tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Brozoski, Thomas J; Bauer, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Presented is a thematic review of animal tinnitus models from a functional perspective. Chronic tinnitus is a persistent subjective sound sensation, emergent typically after hearing loss. Although the sensation is experientially simple, it appears to have central a nervous system substrate of unexpected complexity that includes areas outside of those classically defined as auditory. Over the past 27 years animal models have significantly contributed to understanding tinnitus' complex neurophysiology. In that time, a diversity of models have been developed, each with its own strengths and limitations. None has clearly become a standard. Animal models trace their origin to the 1988 experiments of Jastreboff and colleagues. All subsequent models derive some of their features from those experiments. Common features include behavior-dependent psychophysical determination, acoustic conditions that contrast objective sound and silence, and inclusion of at least one normal-hearing control group. In the present review, animal models have been categorized as either interrogative or reflexive. Interrogative models use emitted behavior under voluntary control to indicate hearing. An example would be pressing a lever to obtain food in the presence of a particular sound. In this type of model animals are interrogated about their auditory sensations, analogous to asking a patient, "What do you hear?" These models require at least some training and motivation management, and reflect the perception of tinnitus. Reflexive models, in contrast, employ acoustic modulation of an auditory reflex, such as the acoustic startle response. An unexpected loud sound will elicit a reflexive motor response from many species, including humans. Although involuntary, acoustic startle can be modified by a lower-level preceding event, including a silent sound gap. Sound-gap modulation of acoustic startle appears to discriminate tinnitus in animals as well as humans, and requires no training or

  12. Modeling cytomegalovirus infection in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard Lee; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that cytomegalovirus (CMV) modulates cancer is evolving. Originally discovered in glioblastoma in 2002, the number of cancers, where intratumoral CMV antigen is detected, has increased in recent years suggesting that CMV actively affects the pathobiology of certain tumors. These findings are controversial as several groups have also reported inability to replicate these results. Regardless, several clinical trials for glioblastoma are underway or have been completed that target intratumoral CMV with anti-viral drugs or immunotherapy. Therefore, a better understanding of the possible pathobiology of CMV in cancer needs to be ascertained. We have developed genetic, syngeneic, and orthotopic malignant glioma mouse models to study the role of CMV in cancer development and progression. These models recapitulate for the most part intratumoral CMV expression as seen in human tumors. Additionally, we discovered that CMV infection in Trp53(-/+) mice promotes pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas. These mouse models are not only a vehicle for studying pathobiology of the viral-tumor interaction but also a platform for developing and testing cancer therapeutics. PMID:25853089

  13. Integrated Environmental Control Model

    1999-09-03

    IECM is a powerful multimedia engineering software program for simulating an integrated coal-fired power plant. It provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integratedmore » into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of dofferent costs and performance results. A Graphical Use Interface (GUI) facilitates the configuration of the technologies, entry of data, and retrieval of results.« less

  14. Modeling earthquake dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Arthur; Durand, Marilou

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate questions arising in Parsons and Geist (Bull Seismol Soc Am 102:1-11, 2012). Pseudo causal models connecting magnitudes and waiting times are considered, through generalized regression. We do use conditional model (magnitude given previous waiting time, and conversely) as an extension to joint distribution model described in Nikoloulopoulos and Karlis (Environmetrics 19: 251-269, 2008). On the one hand, we fit a Pareto distribution for earthquake magnitudes, where the tail index is a function of waiting time following previous earthquake; on the other hand, waiting times are modeled using a Gamma or a Weibull distribution, where parameters are functions of the magnitude of the previous earthquake. We use those two models, alternatively, to generate the dynamics of earthquake occurrence, and to estimate the probability of occurrence of several earthquakes within a year or a decade.

  15. Direct insolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.; Hulstrom, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Several recently published models of the direct component of the broadband insolation are compared for clear sky conditions. The comparison includes seven simple models and one rigorous model that is used as a basis for determining accuracy. Where possible, the comparison is made between the results of each model for each atmospheric constituent (H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, O/sub 2/, aerosol and molecular scattering) separately as well as for the combined effect of all of the constituents. Two optimum simple models of varying degrees of complexity are developed as a result of this comparison. The study indicates: aerosols dominate the attenuation of the direct beam for reasonable atmospheric conditions; molecular scattering is next in importance; water vapor is an important absorber; and carbon dioxide and oxygen are relatively unimportant as attenuators of the broadband solar energy.

  16. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  17. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  18. Hypertabastic survival model.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Mohammad A; Bursac, Zoran; Williams, David K; Singh, Karan P

    2007-10-26

    A new two-parameter probability distribution called hypertabastic is introduced to model the survival or time-to-event data. A simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the hypertabastic distribution in comparison with popular distributions. We then demonstrate the application of the hypertabastic survival model by applying it to data from two motivating studies. The first one demonstrates the proportional hazards version of the model by applying it to a data set from multiple myeloma study. The second one demonstrates an accelerated failure time version of the model by applying it to data from a randomized study of glioma patients who underwent radiotherapy treatment with and without radiosensitizer misonidazole. Based on the results from the simulation study and two applications, the proposed model shows to be a flexible and promising alternative to practitioners in this field.

  19. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  20. Fuzzy object modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Falcao, Alexandre X.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Miranda, Paulo A. V.; Vaideeswaran, Pavithra; Mishra, Shipra; Grevera, George J.; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A.

    2011-03-01

    To make Quantitative Radiology (QR) a reality in routine clinical practice, computerized automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) becomes essential. As part of this larger goal, we present in this paper a novel fuzzy strategy for building bodywide group-wise anatomic models. They have the potential to handle uncertainties and variability in anatomy naturally and to be integrated with the fuzzy connectedness framework for image segmentation. Our approach is to build a family of models, called the Virtual Quantitative Human, representing normal adult subjects at a chosen resolution of the population variables (gender, age). Models are represented hierarchically, the descendents representing organs contained in parent organs. Based on an index of fuzziness of the models, 32 thorax data sets, and 10 organs defined in them, we found that the hierarchical approach to modeling can effectively handle the non-linear relationships in position, scale, and orientation that exist among organs in different patients.

  1. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  2. Rainfall erosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanovskii, Yu. P.

    2010-09-01

    A model describing rainfall erosion over the course of a long time period is proposed. The model includes: (1) a new equation of detachment of soil particles by water flows based on the Mirtskhulava equation; (2) a new equation for the transport capacity of the flow based on a modified Bagnold equation, which is used in the AGNPS model; (3) modified SCS runoff equation; (4) probability distributions for rainfall. The proposed equations agree satisfactorily with the data of on-site observations of the Moldova and Nizhnedevitsk water-balance stations. The Monte Carlo method is used for numerical modeling of random variables. The results of modeling agree satisfactorily with empirical equations developed for conditions in Russia and the United States. The effect of climatic conditions on the dependence of longtime average annual soil loss on various factors is analyzed. Minimum information is used for assigning the initial data.

  3. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  4. Stochastic patch exploitation model

    PubMed Central

    Rita, H.; Ranta, E.

    1998-01-01

    A solitary animal is foraging in a patch consisting of discrete prey items. We develop a stochastic model for the accumulation of gain as a function of elapsed time in the patch. The model is based on the waiting times between subsequent encounters with the prey items. The novelty of the model is in that it renders possible–via parameterization of the waiting time distributions: the incorporation of different foraging situations and patch structures into the gain process. The flexibility of the model is demonstrated with different foraging scenarios. Dependence of gain expectation and variance of the parameters of the waiting times is studied under these conditions. The model allows us to comment upon some of the basic concepts in contemporary foraging theory.

  5. Impedance modelling of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. Austin

    2016-03-01

    Impedance models of pipes can be used to estimate resonant frequencies of standing waves and model acoustic pressure of closed and open ended pipes. Modelling a pipe with impedance methods allows additional variations to the pipe to be included in the overall model as a system. Therefore an actuator can be attached and used to drive the system and the impedance model is able to include the dynamics of the actuator. Exciting the pipe system with a chirp signal allows resonant frequencies to be measured in both the time and frequency domain. The measurements in the time domain are beneficial for introducing undergraduates to resonances without needing an understanding of fast Fourier transforms. This paper also discusses resonant frequencies in open ended pipes and how numerous texts incorrectly approximate the resonant frequencies for this specific pipe system.

  6. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  7. Stratiform chromite deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2010-01-01

    Stratiform chromite deposits are of great economic importance, yet their origin and evolution remain highly debated. Layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld, Great Dyke, Kemi, and Stillwater Complexes, provide opportunities for studying magmatic differentiation processes and assimilation within the crust, as well as related ore-deposit formation. Chromite-rich seams within layered intrusions host the majority of the world's chromium reserves and may contain significant platinum-group-element (PGE) mineralization. This model of stratiform chromite deposits is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. The model focuses on features that may be common to all stratiform chromite deposits as a way to gain insight into the processes that gave rise to their emplacement and to the significant economic resources contained in them.

  8. Updating applied diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Most diffusion models currently used in air-quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Society organized a workshop to help improve the basis of such models, their physics and hopefully their performance. Reviews and recommendations were made on models in three areas: diffusion in the convective boundary layer (CBL), diffusion in the stable boundary layer (SBL), and model uncertainty. Progress has been made in all areas, but it is most significant and ready for application to practical models in the case of the CBL. This has resulted from a clear understanding of the vertical structure and diffusion in the CBL, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments, numerical simulations, and field observations. Understanding of turbulence structure and diffusion in the SBL is less complete and not yet ready for general use in applications.

  9. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  10. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  11. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  12. Conditional statistical model building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Hansen, Michael Sass; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-03-01

    We present a new statistical deformation model suited for parameterized grids with different resolutions. Our method models the covariances between multiple grid levels explicitly, and allows for very efficient fitting of the model to data on multiple scales. The model is validated on a data set consisting of 62 annotated MR images of Corpus Callosum. One fifth of the data set was used as a training set, which was non-rigidly registered to each other without a shape prior. From the non-rigidly registered training set a shape prior was constructed by performing principal component analysis on each grid level and using the results to construct a conditional shape model, conditioning the finer parameters with the coarser grid levels. The remaining shapes were registered with the constructed shape prior. The dice measures for the registration without prior and the registration with a prior were 0.875 +/- 0.042 and 0.8615 +/- 0.051, respectively.

  13. Modeling glacial climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Crowley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical climate modelling has matured as a discipline to the point that it is useful in paleoclimatology. As an example a new two dimensional energy balance model is described and applied to several problems of current interest. The model includes the seasonal cycle and the detailed land-sea geographical distribution. By examining the changes in the seasonal cycle when external perturbations are forced upon the climate system it is possible to construct hypotheses about the origin of midlatitude ice sheets and polar ice caps. In particular the model predicts a rather sudden potential for glaciation over large areas when the Earth's orbital elements are only slightly altered. Similarly, the drift of continents or the change of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geological time induces radical changes in continental ice cover. With the advance of computer technology and improved understanding of the individual components of the climate system, these ideas will be tested in far more realistic models in the near future.

  14. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  15. Integrated Workforce Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    There are several computer-based systems, currently in various phases of development at KSC, which encompass some component, aspect, or function of workforce modeling. These systems may offer redundant capabilities and/or incompatible interfaces. A systems approach to workforce modeling is necessary in order to identify and better address user requirements. This research has consisted of two primary tasks. Task 1 provided an assessment of existing and proposed KSC workforce modeling systems for their functionality and applicability to the workforce planning function. Task 2 resulted in the development of a proof-of-concept design for a systems approach to workforce modeling. The model incorporates critical aspects of workforce planning, including hires, attrition, and employee development.

  16. Linear models: permutation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.; Everitt, B.S.; Howell, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Permutation tests (see Permutation Based Inference) for the linear model have applications in behavioral studies when traditional parametric assumptions about the error term in a linear model are not tenable. Improved validity of Type I error rates can be achieved with properly constructed permutation tests. Perhaps more importantly, increased statistical power, improved robustness to effects of outliers, and detection of alternative distributional differences can be achieved by coupling permutation inference with alternative linear model estimators. For example, it is well-known that estimates of the mean in linear model are extremely sensitive to even a single outlying value of the dependent variable compared to estimates of the median [7, 19]. Traditionally, linear modeling focused on estimating changes in the center of distributions (means or medians). However, quantile regression allows distributional changes to be estimated in all or any selected part of a distribution or responses, providing a more complete statistical picture that has relevance to many biological questions [6]...

  17. Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    These lectures constitute a short course in ``Beyond the Standard Model`` for students of experimental particle physics. The author discusses the general ideas which guide the construction of models of physics beyond the Standard model. The central principle, the one which most directly motivates the search for new physics, is the search for the mechanism of the spontaneous symmetry breaking observed in the theory of weak interactions. To illustrate models of weak-interaction symmetry breaking, the author gives a detailed discussion of the idea of supersymmetry and that of new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale. He discusses experiments that will probe the details of these models at future pp and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders.

  18. Open ocean tide modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Two trends evident in global tidal modelling since the first GEOP conference in 1972 are described. The first centers on the incorporation of terms for ocean loading and gravitational self attraction into Laplace's tidal equations. The second centers on a better understanding of the problem of near resonant modelling and the need for realistic maps of tidal elevation for use by geodesists and geophysicists. Although new models still show significant differences, especially in the South Atlantic, there are significant similarities in many of the world's oceans. This allows suggestions to be made for future locations for bottom pressure gauge measurements. Where available, estimates of M2 tidal dissipation from the new models are significantly lower than estimates from previous models.

  19. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  20. Staged Models for Interdisciplinary Research.

    PubMed

    Lafuerza, Luis F; Dyson, Louise; Edmonds, Bruce; McKane, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Modellers of complex biological or social systems are often faced with an invidious choice: to use simple models with few mechanisms that can be fully analysed, or to construct complicated models that include all the features which are thought relevant. The former ensures rigour, the latter relevance. We discuss a method that combines these two approaches, beginning with a complex model and then modelling the complicated model with simpler models. The resulting "chain" of models ensures some rigour and relevance. We illustrate this process on a complex model of voting intentions, constructing a reduced model which agrees well with the predictions of the full model. Experiments with variations of the simpler model yield additional insights which are hidden by the complexity of the full model. This approach facilitated collaboration between social scientists and physicists-the complex model was specified based on the social science literature, and the simpler model constrained to agree (in core aspects) with the complicated model. PMID:27362836

  1. Saturn Radiation (SATRAD) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Saturnian radiation belts have not received as much attention as the Jovian radiation belts because they are not nearly as intense-the famous Saturnian particle rings tend to deplete the belts near where their peak would occur. As a result, there has not been a systematic development of engineering models of the Saturnian radiation environment for mission design. A primary exception is that of Divine (1990). That study used published data from several charged particle experiments aboard the Pioneer 1 1, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft during their flybys at Saturn to generate numerical models for the electron and proton radiation belts between 2.3 and 13 Saturn radii. The Divine Saturn radiation model described the electron distributions at energies between 0.04 and 10 MeV and the proton distributions at energies between 0.14 and 80 MeV. The model was intended to predict particle intensity, flux, and fluence for the Cassini orbiter. Divine carried out hand calculations using the model but never formally developed a computer program that could be used for general mission analyses. This report seeks to fill that void by formally developing a FORTRAN version of the model that can be used as a computer design tool for missions to Saturn that require estimates of the radiation environment around the planet. The results of that effort and the program listings are presented here along with comparisons with the original estimates carried out by Divine. In addition, Pioneer and Voyager data were scanned in from the original references and compared with the FORTRAN model s predictions. The results were statistically analyzed in a manner consistent with Divine s approach to provide estimates of the ability of the model to reproduce the original data. Results of a formal review of the model by a panel of experts are also presented. Their recommendations for further tests, analyses, and extensions to the model are discussed.

  2. Maximally Expressive Task Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Japp, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Theresa G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiment activities for the Space Station. The equipment used in these experiments is some of the most complex hardware ever developed by mankind, the information sought by these experiments is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures for executing the experiments are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of space station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling space station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema. Modeling even the simplest of activities cannot be automated; no sensor can be attached to a piece of equipment that can discern how to use that piece of equipment; no camera can quantify how to operate a piece of equipment. Modeling is a human enterprise-both an art and a science. The modeling schema should allow the models to flow from the keyboard of the user as easily as works of literature flowed from the pen of Shakespeare. The Ground Systems Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center has embarked on an effort to develop a new scheduling engine that is highlighted by a maximally expressive modeling schema. This schema, presented in this paper, is a synergy of technological advances and domain-specific innovations.

  3. Animal Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Godfrey S.; Reardon, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular disease. Both cells of the vessel wall and cells of the immune system participate in atherogenesis. This process is heavily influenced by plasma lipoproteins, genetics and the hemodynamics of the blood flow in the artery. A variety of small and large animal models have been used to study the atherogenic process. No model is ideal as each has its own advantages and limitations with respect to manipulation of the atherogenic process and modeling human atherosclerosis or lipoprotein profile. Useful large animal models include pigs, rabbits and non-human primates. Due in large part to the relative ease of genetic manipulation and the relatively short time frame for the development of atherosclerosis, murine models are currently the most extensively used. While not all aspects of murine atherosclerosis are identical to humans, studies using murine models have suggested potential biological processes and interactions that underlie this process. As it becomes clear that different factors may influence different stages of lesion development, the use of mouse models with the ability to turn on or delete proteins or cells in tissue specific and temporal manner will be very valuable. PMID:22383700

  4. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  5. Biophysical models in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.; Elsaesser, T.

    One major rationale for the application of ion beams in tumor therapy is their increased relative biological effectiveness RBE in the Bragg peak region For dose prescription the increased effectiveness has to be taken into account in treatment planning Hence the complex dependencies of RBE on the dose level biological endpoint position in the field etc require biophysical models which have to fulfill two important criteria simplicity and quantitative precision Simplicity means that the number of free parameters should be kept at a minimum Due to the lack of precise quantitative data at least at present this requirement is incompatible with approaches aiming at the molecular modeling of the whole chain of production processing and repair of biological damages Quantitative precision is required since steep gradients in the dose response curves are observed for most tumor and normal tissues thus even small uncertainties in the estimation of the biologically effective dose can transform into large uncertainties in the clinical outcome The paper will give a general introduction into the field followed by a brief description of a specific model the so called Local Effect Model LEM This model has been successfully applied within treatment planning in the GSI pilot project for carbon ion tumor therapy over almost 10 years now The model is based on the knowledge of charged particle track structure in combination with the response of the biological objects to conventional photon radiation The model will be critically discussed with respect to other

  6. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  7. Modeling mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    The mitochondrion represents a unique opportunity to apply mathematical modeling to a complex biological system. Understanding mitochondrial function and control is important since this organelle is critical in energy metabolism as well as playing key roles in biochemical synthesis, redox control/signaling, and apoptosis. A mathematical model, or hypothesis, provides several useful insights including a rigorous test of the consensus view of the operation of a biological process as well as providing methods of testing and creating new hypotheses. The advantages of the mitochondrial system for applying a mathematical model include the relative simplicity and understanding of the matrix reactions, the ability to study the mitochondria as a independent contained organelle, and, most importantly, one can dynamically measure many of the internal reaction intermediates, on line. The developing ability to internally monitor events within the metabolic network, rather than just the inflow and outflow, is extremely useful in creating critical bounds on complex mathematical models using the individual reaction mechanisms available. However, many serious problems remain in creating a working model of mitochondrial function including the incomplete definition of metabolic pathways, the uncertainty of using in vitro enzyme kinetics, as well as regulatory data in the intact system and the unknown chemical activities of relevant molecules in the matrix. Despite these formidable limitations, the advantages of the mitochondrial system make it one of the best defined mammalian metabolic networks that can be used as a model system for understanding the application and use of mathematical models to study biological systems.

  8. Invertebrate models of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Henrike; Mustard, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    For invertebrates to become useful models for understanding the genetic and physiological mechanisms of alcoholism related behaviors and the predisposition towards alcoholism, several general requirements must be fulfilled. The animal should encounter ethanol in its natural habitat, so that the central nervous system of the organism will have evolved mechanisms for responding to ethanol exposure. How the brain adapts to ethanol exposure depends on its access to ethanol, which can be regulated metabolically and/or by physical barriers. Therefore, a model organism should have metabolic enzymes for ethanol degradation similar to those found in humans. The neurons and supporting glial cells of the model organism that regulate behaviors affected by ethanol should share the molecular and physiological pathways found in humans, so that results can be compared. Finally, the use of invertebrate models should offer advantages over traditional model systems and should offer new insights into alcoholism-related behaviors. In this review we will summarize behavioral similarities and identified genes and mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced behaviors in invertebrates. This review mainly focuses on the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the honey bee Apis mellifera and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as model systems. We will discuss insights gained from those studies in conjunction with their vertebrate model counterparts and the implications for future research into alcoholism and alcohol-induced behaviors.

  9. Intraocular Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Mary E.; Shen, Defen; Hochman, Jacob; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a subtype of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), a high-grade, extranodal, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, predominantly of B-cell origin. PVRL is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. Human studies are not ideally suited for the study of intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis or treatment strategies due to the rare nature of the disease, its variable presentation, limited volume of available ocular fluids, and fragility of sampled lymphoma cells. Animal models have been critical in making progress in understanding intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis and investigating potential therapeutic strategies. Early murine models for intraocular lymphoma used intraperitoneal injection of mouse T-cell lymphomas. This was followed by intravitreal T-cell murine models. More recent murine models have used B-cell lymphomas to more closely mimic human disease. The most current B-cell lymphoma models employ a combined approach of inoculating both the mouse vitreous cavity and brain. The challenge in murine models for intraocular lymphoma lies in recreating the clinical features, disease behavior, molecular profile, systemic immunity, and the microenvironment observed in human disease. In the future, animal models will continue to be central to furthering our understanding of the disease and in the investigation of potential treatment targets. PMID:27171354

  10. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  11. SPAR Model Structural Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    John Schroeder; Dan Henry

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are supporting initiatives aimed at improving the quality of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Included in these initiatives are the resolution of key technical issues that are have been judged to have the most significant influence on the baseline core damage frequency of the NRC’s Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and licensee PRA models. Previous work addressed issues associated with support system initiating event analysis and loss of off-site power/station blackout analysis. The key technical issues were: • Development of a standard methodology and implementation of support system initiating events • Treatment of loss of offsite power • Development of standard approach for emergency core cooling following containment failure Some of the related issues were not fully resolved. This project continues the effort to resolve outstanding issues. The work scope was intended to include substantial collaboration with EPRI; however, EPRI has had other higher priority initiatives to support. Therefore this project has addressed SPAR modeling issues. The issues addressed are • SPAR model transparency • Common cause failure modeling deficiencies and approaches • Ac and dc modeling deficiencies and approaches • Instrumentation and control system modeling deficiencies and approaches

  12. Atmospheric Models for Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta L.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight destinations in the solar System with sufficient atmosphere for aerocapture to be a viable aeroassist option - Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and its moon Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. Engineering-level atmospheric models for four of these targets (Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune) have been developed for NASA to support systems analysis studies of potential future aerocapture missions. Development of a similar atmospheric model for Venus has recently commenced. An important capability of all of these models is their ability to simulate quasi-random density perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithm, and for thermal systems design. Similarities and differences among these atmospheric models are presented, with emphasis on the recently developed Neptune model and on planned characteristics of the Venus model. Example applications for aerocapture are also presented and illustrated. Recent updates to the Titan atmospheric model are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan.

  13. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  14. Computationally modeling interpersonal trust

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Joo; Knox, W. Bradley; Wormwood, Jolie B.; Breazeal, Cynthia; DeSteno, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind's readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naiveté of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to investigate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust. PMID:24363649

  15. Interactive geologic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, J.D.; Krajewski, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Improved success in finding hydrocarbons and minerals depends on developing geologic models from seismic, gravity, and magnetic data that most closely approximate real-world settings. Although data processing remains the chore of mainframe and minicomputers, interpretations and modeling of geologic and geophysical information now are best accomplished on personal computers because these computers afford the explorationist maximum freedom to shape and fine tune geophysical evaluations. Three case histories use the GEOSIM geophysical modeling systems to delineate exploration targets. The first example is Silurian Niagaran reef trends in the Michigan basin. Here, differences in seismic reef anomalies result from variations in carbonate-evaporite stratigraphy encasing the reefs, reef geometry, and reef reservoir parameters. These variations which influence real seismic-response differences can be successfully matched using appropriate geologic models in generating synthetic seismic reef anomalies. The second example applies gravity and magnetic data to seismic modeling of a Wyoming coal field. Detailed seismic stratigraphy helps locate those portions of the field having multiple seams, although it does not resolve individual economic zones. Gravity data do identify pinchout margins of multiseam zones and pinchouts between principal coals. Magnetic data are then used to delineate the burn (clinker) margin. Seismic modeling of subtle stratigraphic traps is the broader area of exploration interest contained in the first 2 examples. In the third, successfully modeled and tested examples of lateral changes in deltaic facies and of faulted, unconformity-bounded continent-margin sequences are shown to be successful guides to reinterpretation of seismic data.

  16. SSCL groundwater model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.; Bull, J.; Stapleton, G.; Baker, S.; Goss, D.; Coulson, L.

    1994-02-01

    Activation of groundwater due to accelerator operations has been a consideration since the conceptual stages of the SSC. Prior to site selection, an elementary hydrological model assuming a porous medium with a shallow well in proximity to the tunnel was used to determine the radionuclide concentrations in the water pumped from a well. The model assumed that radionuclides produced within a few feet of the tunnel would migrate to the shallow well and be diluted as the well drew water from a conically symmetric region. After the Ellis County site was selected, the compatibility of this model with the site specific geology was evaluated. The host geology at the selected site is low permeability rock, Austin chalk, shale, and marl, however, vertical fractures do exist. Since the host rock has a low permeability, groundwater in proximity to the tunnel would have to travel primarily through fractures. This hydrology is not compatible with the above mentioned model since water does not percolate uniformly from the surrounding rock into local wells. The amount of dilution of activated water will vary significantly depending on the specific relationship of the well to the activation zone. A further complication in the original model is that it assumes the high energy particles escaping from the accelerator enclosure are localized. The model does not provide for particles being lost over a large area as will happen with routine operational losses. These losses will be distributed along the accelerator over the life of the project. The SSCL groundwater model has been recast to account for the site specific hydrology and both point and distributed losses. Using the new groundwater model, the SSC accelerators are designed to limit the activation concentration in the water located one meter outside the accelerator enclosure to meet the federal drinking water standards. This technical note provides the details of this model.

  17. Turbulence Modeling Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R. (Editor); Rumsey, C. L. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor); Thomas, J. L. (Editor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advances in turbulence modeling are needed in order to calculate high Reynolds number flows near the onset of separation and beyond. To this end, the participants in this workshop made the following recommendations. (1) A national/international database and standards for turbulence modeling assessment should be established. Existing experimental data sets should be reviewed and categorized. Advantage should be taken of other efforts already under-way, such as that of the European Research Community on Flow, Turbulence, and Combustion (ERCOFTAC) consortium. Carefully selected "unit" experiments will be needed, as well as advances in instrumentation, to fill the gaps in existing datasets. A high priority should be given to document existing turbulence model capabilities in a standard form, including numerical implementation issues such as grid quality and resolution. (2) NASA should support long-term research on Algebraic Stress Models and Reynolds Stress Models. The emphasis should be placed on improving the length-scale equation, since it is the least understood and is a key component of two-equation and higher models. Second priority should be given to the development of improved near-wall models. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) would provide valuable guidance in developing and validating new Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. Although not the focus of this workshop, DNS, LES, and hybrid methods currently represent viable approaches for analysis on a limited basis. Therefore, although computer limitations require the use of RANS methods for realistic configurations at high Reynolds number in the foreseeable future, a balanced effort in turbulence modeling development, validation, and implementation should include these approaches as well.

  18. SMC: SCENIC Model Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Priyaka; Kraus, Jeff; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bertsel, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program manages three active networks: the Near Earth Network, the Space Network, and the Deep Space Network. These networks simultaneously support NASA missions and provide communications services to customers worldwide. To efficiently manage these resources and their capabilities, a team of student interns at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a distributed system to model the SCaN networks. Once complete, the system shall provide a platform that enables users to perform capacity modeling of current and prospective missions with finer-grained control of information between several simulation and modeling tools. This will enable the SCaN program to access a holistic view of its networks and simulate the effects of modifications in order to provide NASA with decisional information. The development of this capacity modeling system is managed by NASAs Strategic Center for Education, Networking, Integration, and Communication (SCENIC). Three primary third-party software tools offer their unique abilities in different stages of the simulation process. MagicDraw provides UMLSysML modeling, AGIs Systems Tool Kit simulates the physical transmission parameters and de-conflicts scheduled communication, and Riverbed Modeler (formerly OPNET) simulates communication protocols and packet-based networking. SCENIC developers are building custom software extensions to integrate these components in an end-to-end space communications modeling platform. A central control module acts as the hub for report-based messaging between client wrappers. Backend databases provide information related to mission parameters and ground station configurations, while the end user defines scenario-specific attributes for the model. The eight SCENIC interns are working under the direction of their mentors to complete an initial version of this capacity modeling system during the summer of 2015. The intern team is composed of four students in

  19. Sandia Material Model Driver

    2005-09-28

    The Sandia Material Model Driver (MMD) software package allows users to run material models from a variety of different Finite Element Model (FEM) codes in a standalone fashion, independent of the host codes. The MMD software is designed to be run on a variety of different operating system platforms as a console application. Initial development efforts have resulted in a package that has been shown to be fast, convenient, and easy to use, with substantialmore » growth potential.« less

  20. Computer Modeling Of Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M.; Ibrahim, E.; Przekwas, A.; Cheuch, S.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mathematical models based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum developed for use in computer simulation of atomization of jets of liquid fuel in rocket engines. Models also used to study atomization in terrestrial applications; prove especially useful in designing improved industrial sprays - humidifier water sprays, chemical process sprays, and sprays of molten metal. Because present improved mathematical models based on first principles, they are minimally dependent on empirical correlations and better able to represent hot-flow conditions that prevail in rocket engines and are too severe to be accessible for detailed experimentation.

  1. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  2. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  3. Beyond Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bellantoni, L.

    2009-11-01

    There are many recent results from searches for fundamental new physics using the TeVatron, the SLAC b-factory and HERA. This talk quickly reviewed searches for pair-produced stop, for gauge-mediated SUSY breaking, for Higgs bosons in the MSSM and NMSSM models, for leptoquarks, and v-hadrons. There is a SUSY model which accommodates the recent astrophysical experimental results that suggest that dark matter annihilation is occurring in the center of our galaxy, and a relevant experimental result. Finally, model-independent searches at D0, CDF, and H1 are discussed.

  4. Vesta thermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, M.; Federico, C.; Coradini, A.

    Vesta thermal evolution and structural models are compared. These models, based on decay of 26Al, 60Fe and long-lived radionuclides (40K, 232Th, 235U and 238U), differ for the delay in injection (Delta td) of 26Al by the nebula in which Vesta was formed. In all models we can see the pristine formation of a metallic core followed by the differentiation of silicatic mantle and we can observe the evolution of the crust. This is in preparation of the Dawn mission that will provide us with constraints on the crust thickness and composition of the crust and underlying mantle.

  5. Acoustooptical spectrum analysis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, M. J.

    1981-06-01

    A summary of Bragg deflection theory and various approaches to direct detection acoustooptic spectrum analysis (AOSA) modeling is presented. A suitable model is chosen and extended to include the effects of diffraction efficiency, transducer efficiency, irradiance profiles of incident laser illumination, aperture size of the Bragg cell, and the acoustic attenuation experienced by the acoustic wavetrain generated by the input r-f signal. A FORTRAN program is developed to model the AOSA and predict the output image plane intensity profiles. A second version of the program includes a time variable permitting dynamic simulation of the system response.

  6. Hierarchical model of matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrycz, Witold; Roventa, Eugene

    1992-01-01

    The issue of matching two fuzzy sets becomes an essential design aspect of many algorithms including fuzzy controllers, pattern classifiers, knowledge-based systems, etc. This paper introduces a new model of matching. Its principal features involve the following: (1) matching carried out with respect to the grades of membership of fuzzy sets as well as some functionals defined on them (like energy, entropy,transom); (2) concepts of hierarchies in the matching model leading to a straightforward distinction between 'local' and 'global' levels of matching; and (3) a distributed character of the model realized as a logic-based neural network.

  7. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  8. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed.

  9. Modeling Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  10. The Finslerian wormhole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur; Banerjee, Ayan; De, S. S.; Ray, Saibal; Usmani, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present models of wormhole under the Finslerian structure of spacetime. This is a sequel of our previous work (Eur Phys J 75:564, 2015) where we constructed a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian spacetime geometry. In the present investigation, a wide variety of solutions are obtained, which explore the wormhole geometry by considering different choices for the form function and energy density. The solutions, like in the previous work, are revealed to be physically interesting and viable models for the explanation of wormholes as far as the background theory and literature are concerned.

  11. Perspectives on multifield models

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.

    1997-07-01

    Multifield models for prediction of nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics are reviewed from the viewpoint of their structure and requirements for closure relationships. Their strengths and weaknesses are illustrated with examples, indicating that they are effective in predicting separated and distributed flow regimes, but have problems for flows with large oscillations. Needs for multifield models are also discussed in the context of reactor operations and accident simulations. The highest priorities for future developments appear to relate to closure relationships for three-dimensional multifield models with emphasis on those needed for calculations of phase separation and entrainment/de-entrainment in complex geometries.

  12. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  13. The inert Zee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longas, Robinson; Portillo, Dilia; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    We study a realization of the topology of the Zee model for the generation of neutrino masses at one-loop with a minimal set of vector-like fermions. After imposing an exact Z 2 symmetry to avoid tree-level Higgs-mediated flavor changing neutral currents, one dark matter candidate is obtained from the subjacent inert doublet model, but with the presence of new co-annihilating particles. We show that the model is consistent with the constraints coming from lepton flavor violation processes, oblique parameters, dark matter and neutrino oscillation data.

  14. Dynamical model for thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni Lamooki, Gholam Reza; Shirazi, Amir H.; Mani, Ali R.

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid's main chemical reactions are employed to develop a mathematical model. The presented model is based on differential equations where their dynamics reflects many aspects of thyroid's behavior. Our main focus here is the well known, but not well understood, phenomenon so called as Wolff-Chaikoff effect. It is shown that the inhibitory effect of intake iodide on the rate of one single enzyme causes a similar effect as Wolff-Chaikoff. Besides this issue, the presented model is capable of revealing other complex phenomena of thyroid hormones homeostasis.

  15. Quantum causal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Fabio; Shrapnel, Sally

    2016-06-01

    Causal modelling provides a powerful set of tools for identifying causal structure from observed correlations. It is well known that such techniques fail for quantum systems, unless one introduces ‘spooky’ hidden mechanisms. Whether one can produce a genuinely quantum framework in order to discover causal structure remains an open question. Here we introduce a new framework for quantum causal modelling that allows for the discovery of causal structure. We define quantum analogues for core features of classical causal modelling techniques, including the causal Markov condition and faithfulness. Based on the process matrix formalism, this framework naturally extends to generalised structures with indefinite causal order.

  16. Deconstructed Higgsless Models

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2006-01-12

    We consider the possibility of constructing realistic Higgsless models within the context of deconstructed or moose models. We show that the constraints coming from the electro-weak experimental data are very severe and that it is very difficult to reconcile them with the requirement of improving the unitarity bound of the Higgsless Standard Model. On the other hand, with some fine tuning, a solution is found by delocalizing the standard fermions along the lattice line, that is allowing the fermions to couple to the moose gauge fiel0008.

  17. Modeling relativistic nuclear collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderlik, C.; Magas, V.; Strottman, D.; Csernai, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Modeling Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisioiis at RHIC and LHC energies using a Multi Module Model is presented. The first Module is the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this module is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid hydrodynainical calculation module. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is presented for RHIC energies. The final module describing the Freeze Out; and Hadronization is also discussed.

  18. ATHENA radiation model

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1987-10-01

    The ATHENA computer program has many features that make it desirable to use as a space reactor evaluation tool. One of the missing features was a surface-to-surface thermal radiation model. A model was developed that allows any of the regular ATHENA heat slabs to radiate to any other heat slab. The view factors and surface emissivities must be specified by the user. To verify that the model was properly accounting for radiant energy transfer, two different types of test calculations were performed. Both calculations have excellent results. The updates have been used on both the INEL CDC-176 and the Livermore Cray. 7 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Freeze Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, C. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of wind speed, net irradiation, and of air, soil, and dew point temperatures in an orchard at the Rock Springs Agricultural Research Center, as well as topographical and climatological data and a description of the major apple growing regions of Pennsylvania were supplied to the University of Florida for use in running the P-model, freeze prediction program. Results show that the P-model appears to have considerable applicability to conditions in Pennsylvania. Even though modifications may have to be made for use in the fruit growing regions, there are advantages for fruit growers with the model in its present form.

  20. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.