Science.gov

Sample records for 9th ed american

  1. The Effects of Single-Gender Classrooms on the Mathematics Achievement of 9th Grade, African American Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbold, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    An achievement gap exists in mathematics between low-income African American male students and their European American counterparts. Although this problem has been approached using different interventions with minimal results, the impact of homogenous grouping is not well understood in spite of its use. As a result, this study was conducted to…

  2. Effective Language Education Practices and Native Language Survival. Proceedings of the Annual International Native American Language Issues (NALI) Institute (9th, Billings, Montana, June 8-9, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon, Ed.

    This volume includes papers delivered at the Ninth Annual International Native American Language Issues (NALI) Institute. Dick Littlebear's keynote address describes the importance of maintaining Native American languages. James Crawford's "Language Freedom and Restriction: A Historical Approach to the Official Language Controversy," describes the…

  3. The 9th INS scientific computational programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    Twelve groups were accepted as the 9-th INS scientific Computational Programs (ISCP). This ISCP can use full resources of the INS central computer without an operational limitation. The 9-th ISCP started on June/1/92 and ended on March/30/93. Some results were already published in journals or appeared in physical meetings. This is a sum of the used statistics of the 9-th ISCP and reports presented by groups at the 9-th ISCP.

  4. Parenteral anticoagulants: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David A; Baglin, Trevor P; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the pharmacology of approved parenteral anticoagulants. These include the indirect anticoagulants, unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), fondaparinux, and danaparoid, as well as the direct thrombin inhibitors hirudin, bivalirudin, and argatroban. UFH is a heterogeneous mixture of glycosaminoglycans that bind to antithrombin via a unique pentasaccharide sequence and catalyze the inactivation of thrombin, factor Xa, and other clotting enzymes. Heparin also binds to cells and plasma proteins other than antithrombin causing unpredictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and triggering nonhemorrhagic side effects, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and osteoporosis. LMWHs have greater inhibitory activity against factor Xa than thrombin and exhibit less binding to cells and plasma proteins than heparin. Consequently, LMWH preparations have more predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, have a longer half-life than heparin, and are associated with a lower risk of nonhemorrhagic side effects. LMWHs can be administered once daily or bid by subcutaneous injection, without coagulation monitoring. Based on their greater convenience, LMWHs have replaced UFH for many clinical indications. Fondaparinux, a synthetic pentasaccharide, catalyzes the inhibition of factor Xa, but not thrombin, in an antithrombin-dependent fashion. Fondaparinux binds only to antithrombin. Therefore, fondaparinux-associated HIT or osteoporosis is unlikely to occur. Fondaparinux exhibits complete bioavailability when administered subcutaneously, has a longer half-life than LMWHs, and is given once daily by subcutaneous injection in fixed doses, without coagulation monitoring. Three additional parenteral direct thrombin inhibitors and danaparoid are approved as alternatives to heparin in patients with HIT. PMID:22315264

  5. 9th Grade, by the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    For big urban districts, it can be slippery work to catch and hold students who are falling off track at a point that derails too many graduations: the transition from 8th to 9th grade. This article reports that the Chicago school district is putting a suite of new data reports into the hands of those who teach and counsel its 30,000 freshmen this…

  6. Study Probes Enrollment "Bulge" in 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2004-01-01

    Three decades of mounting academic and testing requirements are snagging growing numbers of students in the 9th grade. "The bulge" is the name education researchers give to the percentage increase in students in the 9th grade over the same period. This article reports on factors that might explain the growing 9th grade bottleneck and sliding…

  7. Intimate partner violence and mental health symptoms in African American female ED patients#

    PubMed Central

    Houry, Debra; Kemball, Robin; Rhodes, Karin V.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) victims often seek care in the ED, whether for an injury from abuse or other sequelae such as mental health symptoms. Objectives The objective of the study was to assess whether depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidality were associated with physical, sexual, or emotional IPV in African American female ED patients and to determine if experiencing multiple types of abuse was associated with increased mental health symptoms. Methods All eligible African American female patients were approached in the ED waiting room during study periods. Patients participated in the screening process via a computer kiosk. Questions regarding IPV and mental health symptoms were asked using validated tools. Results In this prospective cohort, 569 participated and 36% of those in a relationship in the past year (n = 461) disclosed that there were victims of IPV in the past year. In the past year, 22% experienced recent physical abuse, 9% recent sexual abuse, and 32% recent emotional abuse. A Pearson correlation was conducted and showed that all mental health symptoms were positively correlated with each type of IPV and each type of mental health symptom category. Mental health symptoms increased significantly with amount of abuse: depression (odds ratio [OR], 5.9 for 3 types of abuse), PTSD (OR, 9.4 for 3), and suicidality (OR, 17.5 for 3). Conclusions Emotional, sexual, and physical IPV were significantly associated with mental health symptoms. Each type of abuse was independently associated with depression, suicidality, and PTSD. Experiencing more than 1 type of abuse was also correlated with increased mental health symptoms. PMID:16787803

  8. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the New Orleans area schools team #2 from New Orleans, Louisiana maneuvers through an obstacle course. The team captured second place in the high school division competition. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  9. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the team from Lafayette County High school in Higginsville, Missouri, designated Lafayette County team #1, races through the course to cross the finish line to win the high school division. The team beat out 26 other teams representing high schools from 9 states. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  10. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. This photograph shows the Cornell #2 team driving their vehicle through the course. The team finished the race in second place in the college division. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle, that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  11. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. In this photograph, the Cornell #1 team, the collegiate first place winner, maneuvers their vehicle through the course. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a humanpowered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  12. 9th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2015-08-31

    DOE OFES supported the 9th International Conference on Z-Pinches (DZP 2014) held in Napa, CA in August 2014. Funds were used to support travel for several US students, and to disseminate information through the publication of a proceedings volume.

  13. NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Eight of the twelve members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics attending the 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference posed for this photograph at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 23, 1934. Those pictured are (left to right): Brig. Gen. Charles A. Lindbergh, USAFR Vice Admiral Arthur B. Cook, USN Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Joseph S. Ames, Committee Chairman Orville Wright Edward P. Warner Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, USN Eugene L. Vidal, Director, Bureau of Air Commerce.

  14. General view of underground along 9th street. J street segment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of underground along 9th street. J street segment intersects at left, 9th street segment intersects alley at right. View to the east. - Coolot Building, 812 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  15. Introduction to the Proceedings of the 9th ISDH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, V. Michael, Jr.; Riskin, Seth

    2013-02-01

    The Proceedings As co-chairs of the 9th International Symposium on Display Holography, we welcome readers of this collection of papers and posters presented at the event. We hope that both attendees of the event and others pursuing the art, science, and business of holography and 3D imaging will find the authors' contributions of lasting interest and importance. The Event Since its creation at Lake Forest College in 1982 by Professor Tung H Jeong, ISDH has followed a model that differentiates it from other scientific conferences. The 9th ISDH continued this history, fully occupying a floor of the MIT Media Lab for five days. The single-track conference opened with reports on the state of holography in the various nations represented by the attendees, followed by a series of presentations on Education and Holography. One and one-half days of papers on Art and Holography followed, then sessions on Techniques and Materials, Digital Techniques, and Commercial and Applied Holography. A poster session permitted more in-depth discussion between authors and the audience. Two exhibitions of holographic works opened at ISDH: an informal display area at the symposium, and a 15-month-long MIT Museum exhibition, The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography. The success of an event of this sort requires the help of many people and organizations. We wish especially to recognize our Honorary Conference Chairs: Tung H Jeong and Joseph W Goodman; our Technical Program Committee: Hans I Bjelkhagen, Frank Fan, Nasser Peyghambarian, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa; and our Arts and Exhibition Committee: Betsy Connors-Chen, Melissa Crenshaw, John Durant, Dieter Jung, Linda Law, Martin Richardson, Jonathan Ross, and Sally Weber. Betsy also coordinated the on-site exhibition. Kristin Hall at the MIT Media Lab made local arrangements, while registration was handled by MIT Conference Services. We also gratefully acknowledge support from Lake Forest College, holographer.org, and authentibrand

  16. NANOTR9: 9th Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The conference series NanoTR is the major conference on nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey. It brings together leading scientists and engineers in nanotechnology to exchange information on their latest research progress. An exhibition of the companies working in the related field is also organized as a part of the event. With intensive international participation, NanoTR conference series has spread outside the national border and has become an international event in this field. Among international contributions, a wide interest from the countries around Turkey should be emphasized. 9th in the series was organized by Atatürk University in Erzurum-Turkey on June 24-28, 2013 with more than 900 scientists, researchers, private sector representatives from around the world. Conference program included 6 plenary speakers, 35 invited speakers (18 of them were from outside the country), 116 oral presentations, and 340 poster presentations. In addition to 6 plenary sessions, 17 oral and 4 poster sessions created very lively discussion forums covering a vast range of current and emerging sciences from nano-materials, nanoscience, nanofabrication, nano-engineering, nano-electronics, nano-biotechnology, to ethical and social issues of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Also, panel discussions about industrial applications, tutorial sessions have been organized for students, new-comers and company employees.

  17. FOREWORD: 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, Ahmed, Prof

    2015-08-01

    The 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems will be held in London from 5th - 9th September 2015, and as its Chairman, it is my pleasure to welcome you. This series of conferences started in 1999 organised by the Fluid Machinery Group of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) but since 2009 it has been managed by City University London in conjunction with the IMechE and the Institute of Refrigeration, both of which have been very proactive in promoting it. The Organising committee is grateful for their support and continued encouragement. This year, after rigorous reviewing, we have accepted over 80 technical papers for publication, the highest number in the conference history. On behalf of the organising committee I would like to thank the reviewers for their hard work and assistance. In addition to the main technical sessions, this year we have introduced a third day, specifically for Industry, to consider technology, business and market drivers on compressor developments. The traditional series of the short courses is this year continuing prior to the main event with the second short course/forum on Computational Fluid Dynamics in rotating positive displacement machines. I would like to extend my special thanks to our main sponsors, Holroyd PTG, Howden and Kapp Niels for their continuing support for the conference. With their generous contributions we have managed to keep the conference fees at the same level as in 2013, despite extending it to 3 days and holding it outside the University this year. The welcome reception on Sunday 6th September 2015 is dedicated to the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Centre for Positive Displacement Compressors Technology which was formed at City University in 1995 with support from the Royal Academy of Engineering and Holroyd; its main aim being to assist British manufacturers of screw compressors. The Centre has since made a significant impact on the screw compressor world, far beyond

  18. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  19. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  20. The Pacific Child: Investing in the Future. Conference Evaluation. Annual Pacific Educational Conference (9th, Pago Pago, August 3-5, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Diane

    Proceedings of the Pacific Region Educational Laboratory's (PREL) 9th Annual Pacific Educational Conference, held August 3-5, 1992, in Pago Pago, American Samoa are evaluated in this document. Data were collected from an overall conference evaluation survey, individual workshop surveys, workshop program information, anecdotal information, and…

  1. 9th Circuit says engaging in sex is a major life activity under ADA.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the ability to engage in sexual relations is a major life activity under the definition of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ruling suggests that all adults and adolescents infected with HIV are covered by the ADA because of the risk of transmitting the virus sexually. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last year in the [name removed] v. [Name removed] case that the ability to procreate is a major life activity, but it left unresolved the issue of whether sexual relations were covered. Several other courts have further defined the issue and ruled that sexual dysfunction should count as a disability. The plaintiff in this case sued after his employer refused to relocate him to a different department, stating he was deprived of a reasonable accommodation. The plaintiff suffered from impotence, and claimed a disability under the ADA. The dissenting judge in the ruling noted that he did not see how one's ability to have sexual relations had any connection to employment. PMID:11367019

  2. General view of underground showing the 9th street segment where ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of underground showing the 9th street segment where it intersect with the east end of the J street segment (on the left). View to the east. - Coolot Building, 812 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 2. Closeup of first floor of 9th Street facade. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Close-up of first floor of 9th Street facade. The original first floor arches are visible above the present restaurant front. - Ferree Building, 417 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huajiang

    2011-07-01

    Dear Delegates We would like to welcome you to the 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures. This series of conferences has been held as a biannual event since 1995. The previous venues were Pescara (Italy, 1995), Sheffield (UK, 1997), Dublin (Ireland, 1999), Cardiff (UK, 2001), Southampton (UK, 2003), Gdansk (Poland, 2005), Torino (Italy, 2007) and Beijing (China, 2009). The conference will cover all research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies, and numerical simulations. It has established itself as a major international forum for the above research areas. Typically over 100 papers are presented at each conference. It is thought appropriate to keep the conference at this size to facilitate knowledge exchange. DAMAS Conferences have had support from other learned societies and industry. These include the Technical Division of Vibration and Acoustics of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Society for Strain Measurement, to name a few. There are exhibitors at some conferences. The venue of DAMAS2011, Oxford, is a world-renowned university town. Oxford is also located in the Cotswolds, an area of outstanding natural beauty. And July is arguably the best month of the year in UK. It is hoped that all delegates will enjoy the conference and continue to support DAMAS conferences in the future. Huajiang Ouyang On behalf of the Organising Committee: Professor Huajiang Ouyang, University of Liverpool, UK (Conference Chair) Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, University of Loughborough, UK Professor Fulei Chu, Tsinghua University, China Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Polish Academy of Science, Poland Professor Cecilia Surace, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  5. Environmental Education in High School 9th-12th Biology Course Curricula Started to Be Implemented in 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Bahar, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze 9th-12th grade Biology Course Curricula started to be implemented in 2007 with regard to concepts and attainments addressing to environmental education. In this regard, 9th-12th grade Biology Course Curricula were analyzed using content-analysis technique, one of the qualitative research methods. 9th-12th grade…

  6. The New American University: Preparation of the M.Ed. Graduate Student for the 21st Century Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonucci, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    To sustain world preeminence, 21st century university and college leaders in the United States are redesigning their institutions organizationally and culturally to align with the direction of local and global societies and markets. The New American University enterprise model at Arizona State University has become one of the leading organization…

  7. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  8. A Comparison of Students' Choices of 9th Grade Physical Education Activities by Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant M.; Cleven, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district and to compare preferences by ethnicity. Results indicated that basketball, football, bowling, softball/baseball, swimming, and volleyball were the most preferred activities. These preferences may be…

  9. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  10. A Chemistry Course for High Ability 8th, 9th, and 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Richard, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course designed, in cooperation with local public school districts, to intellectually challenge a group of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade students. Organic chemistry and biochemistry are integrated into the course (titled Chemistry and Everyday Life) to emphasize practical applications of chemistry. The course syllabus is included.…

  11. A Summative Program Evaluation of a Comprehensive 9th Grade Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 8th grade to 9th grade is one that is replete with challenges for students, especially for minority students who live in economically disadvantaged communities. One low-income, high minority comprehensive high school in the western United States implemented five separate strategies to create a freshman transition program to aid…

  12. 20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH FLOOR WITH WHITE GLAZED TERRA COTTA SILL AND HEADERS. MULLIONS ARE ORANGE BROWN BRICKS LIKE THE WALLS. BRICKS ARE IN FLEMISH BOND PATTERN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Program To Increase Selected 9th and 10th Graders' Career Decision-Making Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Linda D.

    This study addresses some of the career decision challenges facing 9th- and 10th-grade students. The researcher discovered that many students possessed inadequate decision-making strategies, that counselors did not focus on career planning prior to and during registration, and that the school district lacked a comprehensive career guidance…

  14. The Effect of Group Work on Misconceptions of 9th Grade Students about Newton's Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergin, Serap

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of group work and traditional method on 9th grade students' misconceptions about Newton Laws was investigated. The study was conducted in three classes in an Anatolian Vocational High School in Ankara/Turkey in the second term of the 2014-2015 academic year. Two of these classes were chosen as the experimental group and…

  15. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  16. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (9th, San Diego, California, May 21-25, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 9th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include connecting service learning and the Environment as an Integrated Context for learning (EIC), and reports from states on…

  17. 37. Mass meeting held July 9th, 1918, in warehouse no.2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Mass meeting held July 9th, 1918, in warehouse no.2 on the Fleet Supply Base, Brooklyn, New York col Americo Pio is speaking in Italian. View depicts one of the activities mounted by Turner Construction Company to stimulates labor enthusiasm during its 1918 construction projects for the U.S. Navy and U.s. Army. - U.S. Navy Fleet Supply Base, Storehouse No. 1, 830 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  18. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  19. The Effect of Conceptual Change Approach to Eliminate 9th Grade High School Students' Misconceptions about Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbas, Yavuz; Gencturk, Ebru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of teaching based on conceptual change overcome misconceptions of 9th grade high school students about the subject of air pressure. The sampling of the study was formed with two classes of 9th grade students from a general high school in the city-center of Trabzon. A quasi-experimental…

  20. EDITORIAL: The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Nader Sadeghi,

  1. FOREWORD: 9th Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering International Conference 2014 (CUTSE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieng Chen, Vincent Lee

    2015-04-01

    A very warm welcome to all participants of the 9th Curtin University Technology, Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference 2014. This annual conference dates back to 2006 when the first Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference was held in Curtin University, Miri Sarawak. CUTSE Conference was initially intended for Curtin's undergraduates such that they are able to experience the presentation of their work in a conference environment. As time passes and following the urge of knowledge dissemination, CUTSE Conference is hence open to public. This year the Department of Mechanical Engineering has been given the honour to organize the 9th CUTSE Conference. It has been a pleasure to watch CUTSE grow from strength to strength over the years. This year, our theme is "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". We hope that it is in this spirit that CUTSE participants may align their respective work, such that we all aim for a greater and better implementation of "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". The 9th CUTSE Conference 2014 is an excellent avenue for researchers, engineers, scientists, academicians, professionals from industry and students to share their research findings and initiate further collaborations in their respective fields. Parallel sessions in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Civil and Chemical engineering as well as the sciences will be hosted over a period of two days. Each year, the conference attracts participation from a number of countries in addition to Malaysia and Australia. In addition, student participants will get the opportunity to present their research projects and gain valuable feedback from industry professionals. This year the Conference will be organised by the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Curtin Sarawak's School of Engineering and Science in collaboration with The Institute of Engineers Malaysia, Miri Branch. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank this year

  2. PREFACE: 9th International Workshop on High-pT Physics at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on High-pT at LHC. The workshop was held from 24-28 September 2013 at LPSC Grenoble, France. The first workshop of this series was organized in 2006 in Trento, Italy. The purpose of the 9th workshop was to offer an opportunity for experimentalists and theoreticians to get together and discuss experimental results from the first heavy-ion program at LHC, lessons learnt from RHIC and theoretical developments. Focus was also given to high pT physics in pA collisions, especially at the LHC energies. Emphasis was given on discussion over a large scope: high-pT physics, jets, photons, correlations, hard scattering and hard probes phenomena. The main topics of the workshop were: • Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions • High pT jet production in pp, pA and AA • High pT parton propagation in matter • Nuclear modifications of the fragmentation functions • Correlations with leading particles • Direct photon and heavy flavor tagging About 50 participants coming from 12 countries participated in the workshop. 6 invited talks and 31 oral contributions were presented at the conference.

  3. PREFACE: 9th International Workshop on High-pT Physics at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnafoldi, Gergely; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Estienne, Magali; Guernane, Rachid; Morsch, Andreas; Rak, Jan; Schienbein, Ingo; Shabetai, Alexandre; Silvestre Tello, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on High-pT at LHC. The workshop was held from 24-28 September 2013 at LPSC Grenoble, France. The first workshop of this series was organized in 2006 in Trento, Italy. The purpose of the 9th workshop was to offer an opportunity for experimentalists and theoreticians to get together and discuss experimental results from the first heavy-ion program at LHC, lessons learnt from RHIC and theoretical developments. Focus was also given to high pT physics in pA collisions, especially at the LHC energies. Emphasis was given on discussion over a large scope: high-pT physics, jets, photons, correlations, hard scattering and hard probes phenomena. The main topics of the workshop were: • Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions • High pT jet production in pp, pA and AA • High pT parton propagation in matter • Nuclear modifications of the fragmentation functions • Correlations with leading particles • Direct photon and heavy flavor tagging About 50 participants coming from 12 countries participated in the workshop. 6 invited talks and 31 oral contributions were presented at the conference.

  4. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: `Intermolecular Forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-05-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students’ understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student’s alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight 9th grade students were stratified by cognitive levels and then randomly assigned to experimental (PBL, 40 students) and control (lecture-style teaching, 38 students) groups. Following a preparatory lesson where activation and remediation of existing knowledge occur, a pre-test was given, and no significant difference was found between the two groups of students ( p > .05). After the instruction was completed, a post-test and also a questionnaire related to the quality of the problem, the teacher’s role and group functioning were administered. Results from the post-test of both groups ( p < .05) and questionnaire showed that PBL is affective on students’ achievement, remedying formation of alternate conceptions and also social skills.

  5. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  6. The 9th Siena meeting: from genome to proteome: open innovations.

    PubMed

    Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2012-12-01

    The Siena Meeting has been held biannually since 1994, when for the first time the concept of the proteome was introduced to a large scientific audience. Over the years, the meeting has grown to be a major international conference in the field of proteomics and has attracted excellent scientists from all corners of the world. The 9th Siena Meeting: 'from Genome to Proteome: Open Innovations' was attended by 300 scientists. There were four plenary and eight parallel sessions with 50 invited talks and three poster sessions with 94 posters covering wide range of functional proteomics, signaling, biomarkers, cancer, neuroscience, glycoproteomics, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. As in the past, this year's Siena Meeting maintained its tradition of placing science at centre stage, which generated a wide range of discussions of major importance for the future. PMID:23256669

  7. Treatment of gout in a recently published 9th century manuscript of Rhazes.

    PubMed

    Geronikolou, Styliani A

    2014-01-01

    Gout is a common lifestyle disease and was identified by Hippocrates in the fifth century BC although the condition was known ancient Egypt some two millennia earlier. The pharmaceutical suggestions described in a recently edited manuscript, the oldest known medical manuscript of the Arab world, is presented, here for the first time. It is entitled Treatise on Gout by Rhazes, the greatest of Arab clinicians, and was written in the late 9th or early 10th century. Rhazes' pharmaceutics are presented in descriptive tables and their components are also compared with other recipes from manuscripts of the Galen and a recently edited medieval Syrian manuscript of Le Livre des simples (Tables 1-2). It is noteworthy that Rhazes insists that the drugs should be taken before sunrise and at down, showing ignorance of current knowledge of circadian rhythms. This is of interest as arthritis chronotherapy is widely discussed in recent literature. PMID:25739155

  8. The 9th Siena meeting: from genome to proteome: open innovations.

    PubMed

    Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2012-12-01

    The Siena Meeting has been held biannually since 1994, when for the first time the concept of the proteome was introduced to a large scientific audience. Over the years, the meeting has grown to be a major international conference in the field of proteomics and has attracted excellent scientists from all corners of the world. The 9th Siena Meeting: 'from Genome to Proteome: Open Innovations' was attended by 300 scientists. There were four plenary and eight parallel sessions with 50 invited talks and three poster sessions with 94 posters covering wide range of functional proteomics, signaling, biomarkers, cancer, neuroscience, glycoproteomics, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. As in the past, this year's Siena Meeting maintained its tradition of placing science at centre stage, which generated a wide range of discussions of major importance for the future.

  9. Summary of the 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology (SIV) comprised seven plenary sessions focused on: General virology and viral genetics; Virus-Host interaction and pathogenesis; Viral oncology; Emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne, and environmental pathways of transmission; Viral immunology and vaccines; Medical virology and antiviral therapy; Viral biotechnologies and gene therapy. Moreover, four hot topics were discussed in special lectures: the Pioneer in human virology lecture regarding the control of viral epidemics with particular emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Pioneer in plant virology lecture focused on cell responses to plant virus infection, a Keynote lecture on the epidemiology and genetic diversity of Crimea-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus, and the G.B. Rossi lecture on the molecular basis and clinical implications of human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported.

  10. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  11. Fish from Head to Tail: The 9th European Zebrafish Meeting in Oslo.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gareth; Müller, Ferenc; Ledin, Johan; Patton, E Elizabeth; Gjøen, Tor; Lobert, Viola Hélène; Winther-Larsen, Hanne Cecilie; Mullins, Mary; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Press, Charles McLean; Aleström, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The 9th European Zebrafish Meeting took place recently in Oslo (June 28-July 2, 2015). A total of 650 participants came to hear the latest research news focused on the zebrafish, Danio rerio, and to its distant evolutionary relative medaka, Oryzias latipes. The packed program included keynote and plenary talks, short oral presentations and poster sessions, workshops, and strategic discussions. The meeting was a great success and revealed dramatically how important the zebrafish in particular has become as a model system for topics, such as developmental biology, functional genomics, biomedicine, toxicology, and drug development. A new emphasis was given to its potential as a model for aquaculture, a topic of great economic interest to the host country Norway and for the future global food supply in general. Zebrafish husbandry as well as its use in teaching were also covered in separate workshops. As has become a tradition in these meetings, there was a well-attended Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and ZFIN workshop focused on Zebrafish Genome Resources on the first day. The full EZM 2015 program with abstracts can be read and downloaded from the EZM 2015 Web site zebrafish2015.org . PMID:26859625

  12. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  13. Scientific Tools and Techniques: An Innovative Introduction to Planetary Science / Astronomy for 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2014-11-01

    Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA) offers instruction in planetary science and astronomy to gifted 9th grade students within a program called "Scientific Tools and Techniques" (STT). Although STT provides a semester long overview of all sciences, the planetary science / astronomy section is innovative since students have access to instruction in the Center's Zeiss planetarium and observatory, which includes a 0.9 m cassegrain telescope. The curriculum includes charting the positions of planets in planetarium the sky; telescopic observations of the Moon and planets; hands-on access to meteorites and tektites; and an introduction to planetary spectroscopy utilizing LPI furnished ALTA reflectance spectrometers. In addition, students have the opportunity to watch several full dome planetary themed planetarium presentations, including "Back to the Moon for Good" and "Ring World: Cassini at Saturn." An overview of NASA's planetary exploration efforts is also considered, with special emphasis on the new Orion / Space Launch System for human exploration of the solar system. A primary goal of our STT program is to not only engage but encourage students to pursue careers in the field of science, with the hope of inspiring future scientists / leaders in the field of planetary science.

  14. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: the 9th international symposium on poisonous plants.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, Russell J; Panter, Kip E; Zhao, Mengli

    2014-07-30

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held July 15-21, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilinhot Region of the Mongolian Grasslands, encompassing grazing conditions consisting of desert, grassland, and steppes. This was the first time that an ISOPP meeting has been held in Asia and provided an opportunity for visitors from outside China to become aware of livestock poisonings caused by plant species with which they were previously not familiar while at the same time demonstrating that many of the problems experienced around the world have a common etiology. Presentations focused on botany, veterinary science, toxicology, mechanism of action, and chemistry. As is appropriate for the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, this cluster of papers consists of selected oral and poster presentations in which the chemistry of the toxins played a significant role. The symposium revealed that there is considerable scope for isolation, structural elucidation, and analysis of the toxins from the numerous poisonous plant species that have been identified in China. It became apparent that there are abundant opportunities for chemists both within China and abroad to collaborate with Chinese scientists working on biological aspects of livestock poisonings.

  15. F/A-18 1/9th scale model tail buffet measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. A.; Glaister, M. K.; Maclaren, L. D.; Meyn, L. A.; Ross, J.

    1991-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on a 1/9th scale model of the F/A-18 at high angles of attack to investigate the characteristics of tail buffet due to bursting of the wing leading edge extension (LEX) vortices. The tests were carried out at the Aeronautical Research Laboratory low-speed wind tunnel facility and form part of a collaborative activity with NASA Ames Research Center, organized by The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). Information from the program will be used in the planning of similar collaborative tests, to be carried out at NASA Ames, on a full-scale aircraft. The program covered the measurement of unsteady pressures and fin vibration for cases with and without the wing LEX fences fitted. Fourier transform methods were used to analyze the unsteady data, and information on the spatial and temporal content of the vortex burst pressure field was obtained. Flow visualization of the vortex behavior was carried out using smoke and a laser light sheet technique.

  16. Survey of Oral Health Awareness in Neuchâtel 9th Graders.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Klaus W; Müller, Magali E; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The oral health habits of pupils had not yet been analyzed for the canton of Neuchâtel. A questionnaire was provided to 9th grade high school pupils (final year) of the three schools located in the Neuchâtel area to asses both oral health knowledge and habits in this connection. The average age was 15.5±0.8 years, and 78.1% of the questionnaires were returned. The prophylaxis program was conducted for a total of 4.5 h during pupils’ entire time at school. The results showed that both knowledge and oral health habits could be improved. As a positive outcome, 99% of the pupils brush their teeth before going to bed. Comparisons with similar 10-year-old studies from other cantons (Bern, Vaud) showed major differences in knowledge, for example on the importance of fluoridation. Only 54% of the pupils in Neuchâtel knew that fluoride offers some protection against caries, in spite of the fact that 89% thought that brushing with fluoridated toothpaste protects against caries. Most of the pupils used a fluoridated toothpaste. Furthermore, we found that self-reported sugar consumption was correlated with caries experience, but brushing frequency was not. We recommend introducing a review course for pupils in their last school year, in order to practice interdental cleaning, redefine appropriate, tooth-friendly snacks, and emphasize the importance of regular dental check-ups. PMID:27622326

  17. A Comparison Study of 9th Graders in the U.S. and Albania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garo, Sofokli

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to compare American and Albanian students' achievement in Algebra 1 and to identify the educational practices that influence students' achievement in each country. The study compared algebraic solving abilities of 242 ninth-grade American students in Grand Forks (U.S.) and 219 students in Durres (Albania). The data…

  18. Successful Transition to High School: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Barr Model with 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ninth grade is a pivotal year for students. Numerous studies find that academic performance in 9th grade often sets the student's trajectory throughout the high school years, as well as the probability of graduation. The Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) model is a comprehensive approach that addresses developmental, academic, and school…

  19. A Comparison of 9th Grade Male and Female Physical Education Activities Preferences and Support for Coeducational Groupings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant; Cleven, Brian

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district, to identify which activities students felt should be offered in coeducation or gender separate formats, and to determine whether physical education is one of their favorite classes. Results…

  20. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to

  1. New Horizons for Indian Education. Annual American Indian Education Conference (9th, Arizona State University, March 22-23, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe. Bureau of Educational Research and Services.

    Innovative programs have been undertaken at several reservation schools to meet the special needs of Indian students. Often, however, the cultural background of the student is neglected, and he is forced to adapt to an alien school system. This creates an especially difficult problem set for the student with a poor grasp of the English language.…

  2. The 9th Annual Meeting of the Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery Dammam, Saudi Arabia, 3-5 March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro

    2015-01-01

    The 9th Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery (9th SANS) Annual Meeting was held in the Sheraton Dammam Hotel and Towers, Dammam, Saudi Arabia on March 3-5, 2015, organized by the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Dammam with a theme of “Research is the Bridge to the Future.” The meeting was preceded by a Public Awareness Campaign on March 2, 2015 held at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and several pre-conference workshops that were highly beneficial for neurosurgery today. The scientific program was loaded with innovative and interactive presentations from respected and reputable speakers from different parts of the world. Abstracts were carefully selected and reviewed based on their scientific value and relevance to the clinical, surgical, academic, and research aspects of neurosurgery in the Kingdom, and the world.

  3. The Effectiveness of a Self Regulated Learning-Based Training Program on Improving Cognitive and Metacognitive EFL Reading Comprehension of 9th Graders with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a self regulated learning intervention program on cognitive and metacognitive EFL reading comprehension of 9th graders with reading disabilities. The participants in this study were 40 9th Graders with reading disabilities, selected from two schools located in Baltim Educational Edara. A…

  4. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  5. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5.

  6. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5. PMID:26741063

  7. Types of alcoholic beverages usually consumed by students in 9th-12th grades--four states, 2005.

    PubMed

    2007-07-27

    Excessive alcohol consumption contributes to approximately 4,500 deaths among underage youths in the United States each year (e.g., from homicides, motor-vehicle crashes, and suicides) and an average of 60 years of life lost per death. However, little is known about the specific types of alcoholic beverages consumed by youths. These data are important because numerous evidence-based strategies for reducing underage drinking rates are beverage-specific, including increasing alcohol excise taxes and increasing restrictions on the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages. To examine types of alcoholic beverages usually consumed by students in 9th-12th grades, CDC analyzed 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data from the four state surveys that included a question on the type of alcohol consumed (Arkansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Wyoming). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that liquor (e.g., bourbon, rum, scotch, vodka, or whiskey) was the most prevalent type of alcoholic beverage usually consumed among students in 9th-12th grades who reported current alcohol use or binge drinking. These findings suggest that considering beverage-specific alcohol consumption by youths is important when developing alcohol-control policies, specifically those related to the price and availability of particular types of alcoholic beverages. PMID:17657207

  8. Three centuries of geomagnetic field intensity changes in Spain (from the 9th to the 12th centuries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Jimenez-Castillo, P.; Perez-Asensio, M.

    2013-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations (at least of ~20 μT/century) interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes by the acquisition of well-dated high-quality archeomagnetic data. In this study we report the archeomagnetic study of Spanish ceramic fragments. The collected fragments belong to 14 superposed stratigraphic levels corresponding to a surface no bigger than 3 m by 7 m. The pottery fragments dates back to the 9th and 11th centuries. The dating was established by 4 radiocarbon dates and by archeological/historical constraints including typological comparisons and well-controlled stratigraphic constrains between the different stratigraphic units. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 79 fragments, twelve new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. Together with previously published high-quality data from Western Europe, the new data provide an improved description of the intensity changes that took place in Spain between the 9th and the 12th centuries. The results confirm that rapid intensity changes took place in Western Europe during the recent history of the Earth.

  9. 9th Seah Cheng Siang Memorial Lecture: gastric cancer--where are we now?

    PubMed

    Lam, S K

    1999-11-01

    Gastric cancer, the second most common cancer in the world, kills about one million people a year, almost half of whom are Chinese. Chinese, Japanese and Koreans as well as east Europeans top the list with over 40 per 100,000 population per year, with a wide margin over Americans, Indians and Zimbabweans in whom the rates are below 1 per 100,000. The excellent prognosis of early gastric cancer is well established, and survival of cancer involving beyond the submucosa remains poor and there is little new in management. However, recent years have witnessed a breakthrough in the understanding of causative factors and molecular genetic abnormalities in gastric cancer that should pave the way for prevention, early detection and prognostication. Established carcinogens for gastric cancer now include Helicobacter pylori and N-nitroso compounds; other causative factors include salt and salted food intake, cigarette smoking, male sex, and familial genetic abnormalities. H. pylori infection increases cancer risk by about 5 in a 10-year period. Diet high in salt carries a relative risk of up to 6, and a highly significant correlation between 24 h urinary salt content and incidence of gastric cancer has been shown in 24 countries. The risk from smoking and male sex is under 2. Many N-nitroso compounds, which come from nitrites, which in turn come from nitrates in food following bacterial transformation in a hypochlorhydric environment, are established carcinogens in animals, but their risk for human gastric cancer is still debatable. The intestinal type of gastric cancer, according to Correa's hypothesis, develops from chronic inflammation leading to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and cancer, and is more associated with H. pylori and early gastric cancer. The diffuse type of gastric cancer does not go through these precancerous conditions and moves straight from inflammation to cancer. Associated with inflammation are an increase in proliferation and apoptosis, and this fine

  10. Neutron Diffraction Study On Gamma To Alpha Phase Transition In Ce0.9th0.1 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, Jason C1; Heffner, Robert H; Llobet, A; Darling, T W; Jeong, I K

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive neutron diffraction measurements were performed to study the isostructural {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} phase transition in Ce{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1} alloy. Using Rietveld refinements, we obtained lattice and thermal parameters as a function of temperature. From the temperature slope of the thermal parameters, we determined Debye temperatures {Theta}{sup {gamma}}{sub D} = 133(1) K and {Theta}{sup {alpha}}{sub D} = 140(1) K for the {gamma} phase and the {alpha} phase, respectively. This result implies that the vibrational entropy change is not significant at the {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} transition, contrary to that from elemental Cerium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105702, 2004].

  11. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between

  12. The city and the river A reconstruction of the strategical position of early 9th century Dorestad, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosian, Menne; Weerts, Henk; Steur, Roeland; Abrahamse, Jaap-Evert

    2013-04-01

    Why was the Early-medieval trade-port of Dorestad located at a relatively inland position in the Rhine delta and not at the coast, as one would expect? We combined palaeogeographical, environmental-archaeological, geomorphological/geological and laser-altimetry data to propose an answer to this question. Local Dorestad data had to be combined with a regional paleogeographical reconstruction of active river branches in the 9th-century Rhine delta to come to a satisfactory answer. The location of Dorestad on a high natural levee along a relatively stable navigable branch of the Rhine in the central Rhine delta was perfect for trade. The high levee gave protection from the annual river floods. Although this branch of the Rhine was fairly stable in the heydays of Dorestad, the meanders near Dorestad slowly migrated. Excavations at Dorestad show that the harbour works of Dorestad were constantly adapted to this migration, thereby following the meander on which they were located. Ships could reach the port from the sea through at least three navigable Rhine branches: the Lek, the Old Rhine and the Vecht rivers. Dorestad was thus easily accessible and yet far enough from the coast to be safe from storm floods - but was it located at its specific location for these reasons alone? We combined existing geomorphological and geological maps with recent nation-wide laser-altimetry (AHN, General Elevation model of the Netherlands') for a regional palaeogeographical reconstruction of 9th-century active Rhine branches in a GIS. This reconstruction revealed that river connections with the Flemish, French and German hinterland were perfect. Other delta branches ensured safe connections to the Zeeland delta and the open Flemish coast, all the way to Dover Straight to the south and to the open Frisian coast all the way to present Southern Denmark in the North. The dangerously closed coast of Holland without any safe shelter places for storms could thus be avoided by ships coming in

  13. [Arterial myocardial revascularization in the 9th decade of life. Personal results and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Mortasawi, A; Ennker, I C; Albert, A; Rosendahl, U; Dalladaku, F; Alexander, T; Ennker, J

    1999-04-01

    The rate of the population being 80 years of age and even older, has an increasing tendency in the Federal Republic of Germany. In 1996, a total of 87,372 patients received surgery supported by the heart-lung-machine, 2,383 patients out of these (2.7%) were 80 years of age and older. In view of the limited life expectance, the arterial revascularization in this age category is faced with controverse discussions. We analysed our patients in relation to this aspect. Between January 1, 1995 and June 30, 1997, 4,338 patients underwent surgery supported by the heart-lung-machine. Hundred and fifty-five out of these (3.6%) were in the 9th decade of life. Seventy-seven patients out of the 155 (49.7%, 34 women, 43 men, 80 to 88 years old, mean: 82 years of age) underwent an isolated myocardial revascularization. We performed 55 (71%) elective, 16 (21%) urgent and 6 (8%) emergency surgeries. Twelve patients (15.6%) solely received venous bypasses (Group I), 65 (84.4%) additionally also received unilateral bypasses of the internal mammaria artery (IMA) (Group II). Three patients died at our facility (3.9%), 3 further patients died during the follow-up treatment in outlying hospitals, the in-patient mortality rate in Group I therefore presented a rate of 8.3%, in Group II 7.7% and in total, a rate of 7.8%. In 1996, the in-patient mortality rate could be reduced to 3.6%. The follow-up observation time ranged between 7 and 138 weeks (median 44 weeks). The survival rate for patients with an IMA-bypass after 1 year was 86.3%, after 2 years 77%, and for the entire collective 85.3% and 75%. Whereas 96% of the patients could pre-operatively be related to Class III or IV of the NYHA-classification, 55 of the 63 survivors (87%) belonged to Class I (6%) or II (81%). Two Group I patients (22.2%), 3 Group II patients (5.6%) and 7.9% of the total collective complained about repeated angina symptoms. The myocardial revascularization with the internal mammaria artery performed on patients

  14. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  15. Computational mediation as factor of motivation and meaningful learning in education of sciences of 9th grade: astronomy topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, F. M.; Furtado, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of using hypertext and pedagogic mediation in search of a Meaningful Learning Process in Sciences. We investigate the usage of hypertext in the teaching and learning methods of Astronomy modules. A survey was conducted with students from the 9th grade of Primary School of a public school in the city of Goiânia, Goiás in Brazil. We have analyzed the possibilities that hypermedia can offer in the teaching and learning process, using as reference David Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Learning. The study was divided into four phases: application of an initial questionnaire on students, development of didactic material (hypertext), six classes held in a computer lab with the use of hypermedia and a final questionnaire applied in the lab after classes. This research indicated that the use of hypertext linked to pedagogical mediation processes is seen as a motivational tool and has potential to foster to Meaningful Learning.

  16. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  17. Integrated diagnostics: proceedings from the 9th biennial symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Krestin, G P; Grenier, P A; Hricak, H; Jackson, V P; Khong, P L; Miller, J C; Muellner, A; Schwaiger, M; Thrall, J H

    2012-11-01

    The International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology held its 9th biennial meeting in August 2011. The focus of the programme was integrated diagnostics and massive computing. Participants discussed the opportunities, challenges, and consequences for the discipline of radiology that will likely arise from the integration of diagnostic technologies. Diagnostic technologies are increasing in scope, including advanced imaging techniques, new molecular imaging agents, and sophisticated point-of-use devices. Advanced information technology (IT), which is increasingly influencing the practice of medicine, will aid clinical communication and the development of "population images" that represent the phenotype of particular diseases, which will aid the development of diagnostic algorithms. Integrated diagnostics offer increased operational efficiency and benefits to patients through quicker and more accurate diagnoses. As physicians with the most expertise in IT, radiologists are well placed to take the lead in introducing IT solutions and cloud computing to promote integrated diagnostics. To achieve this, radiologists must adapt to include quantitative data on biomarkers in their reports. Radiologists must also increase their role as participating physicians, collaborating with other medical specialties, not only to avoid being sidelined by other specialties but also to better prepare as leaders in the selection and sequence of diagnostic procedures. Key Points • New diagnostic technologies are yielding unprecedented amounts of diagnostic information.• Advanced IT/cloud computing will aid integration and analysis of diagnostic data.• Better diagnostic algorithms will lead to faster diagnosis and more rapid treatment. PMID:22699871

  18. Beyond Parenting Practices: Extended Kinship Support and the Academic Adjustment of African-American and European-American Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallock, Linda L.; Lamborn, Susie D.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' perceptions of parenting practices and extended kinship support in relation to academic adjustment for 104 African American and 60 European American 9th and 10th graders (14 and 15 year olds). For African-American teens, parental acceptance was associated with school values, teacher bonding, and work orientation.…

  19. 76 FR 27182 - Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... United States Mint Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is..., Associate Director for Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street NW.; Washington, DC 20220;...

  20. Trends in weight management goals and behaviors among 9th-12th grade students: United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zewditu; Lowry, Richard; Eaton, Danice K; Nihiser, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    To examine trends in weight management goals and behaviors among U.S. high school students during 1999-2009. Data from six biennial cycles (1999-2009) of the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Cross-sectional, nationally representative samples of 9th-12th grade students (approximately 14,000 students/cycle) completed self-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression models adjusted for grade, race/ethnicity, and obesity were used to test for trends in weight management goals and behaviors among subgroups of students. Combined prevalences and trends differed by sex and by race/ethnicity and weight status within sex. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of female students trying to gain weight decreased (7.6-5.7 %). Among female students trying to lose or stay the same weight, prevalences decreased for eating less (69.6-63.2 %); fasting (23.3-17.6 %); using diet pills/powders/liquids (13.7-7.8 %); and vomiting/laxatives (9.5-6.6 %) for weight control. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of male students trying to lose weight increased (26.1-30.5 %). Among male students trying to lose or stay the same weight, the prevalence of exercising to control weight did not change during 1999-2003 and then increased (74.0-79.1 %) while the prevalence of taking diet pills/powders/liquids for weight control decreased (6.9-5.1 %) during 1999-2009. Weight management goals and behaviors changed during 1999-2009 and differed by subgroup. To combat the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors, efforts may be needed to teach adolescents about recommended weight management strategies and avoiding the risks associated with unhealthy methods. PMID:24781877

  1. Trends in weight management goals and behaviors among 9th-12th grade students: United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zewditu; Lowry, Richard; Eaton, Danice K; Nihiser, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    To examine trends in weight management goals and behaviors among U.S. high school students during 1999-2009. Data from six biennial cycles (1999-2009) of the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Cross-sectional, nationally representative samples of 9th-12th grade students (approximately 14,000 students/cycle) completed self-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression models adjusted for grade, race/ethnicity, and obesity were used to test for trends in weight management goals and behaviors among subgroups of students. Combined prevalences and trends differed by sex and by race/ethnicity and weight status within sex. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of female students trying to gain weight decreased (7.6-5.7 %). Among female students trying to lose or stay the same weight, prevalences decreased for eating less (69.6-63.2 %); fasting (23.3-17.6 %); using diet pills/powders/liquids (13.7-7.8 %); and vomiting/laxatives (9.5-6.6 %) for weight control. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of male students trying to lose weight increased (26.1-30.5 %). Among male students trying to lose or stay the same weight, the prevalence of exercising to control weight did not change during 1999-2003 and then increased (74.0-79.1 %) while the prevalence of taking diet pills/powders/liquids for weight control decreased (6.9-5.1 %) during 1999-2009. Weight management goals and behaviors changed during 1999-2009 and differed by subgroup. To combat the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors, efforts may be needed to teach adolescents about recommended weight management strategies and avoiding the risks associated with unhealthy methods.

  2. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry…

  3. The Impact of a Teaching-Learning Program Based on a Brain-Based Learning on the Achievement of the Female Students of 9th Grade in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabatat, Kawthar; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the impact of teaching-learning program based on a brain-based learning on the achievement of female students of 9th grade in chemistry, to accomplish the goal of this study the researchers designed instruments of: instructional plans, pre achievement and past achievement exams to use them for the study-validity and…

  4. Influence of Computer-Assisted Roundhouse Diagrams on High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding the Subjects of "Force and Motion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocakaya, F.; Gönen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Main aim of this study is to examine the influence of computer-assisted roundhouse diagrams on high school 9th grade students' academic achievements in the subjects of "Force and Motion". The study was carried out in a public high school in Diyarbakir the province in the Southeast of Turkey. In the study, the…

  5. The Development of Veteran 9th-Grade Physics Teachers' Knowledge for Using Representations to Teach the Topics of Energy Transformation and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study…

  6. Alcohol, Tobacco, & Other Drug Use by 9th-12th Grade Students: Results from the 1993 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikow, Victoria A.

    This survey examined the behaviors associated with the six leading causes of death or disability in one state's high school youth. Participants were 2,439 9th-12th grade students. Results identified alcohol as the drug most frequently used by high school students, with over half of students having used alcohol by their senior year and almost half…

  7. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  8. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  9. The impact of smoking-related illness in the ED: an attributable risk model.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Steven L

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the clinical and economic impact of smoking among adult emergency department (ED) patients. An attributable risk analysis of patients seen in 2 urban EDs in 1998 was performed. Data were obtained from hospital databases, national sources describing the prevalence of smoking in the state, and risk ratios for smoking-related illnesses. Of 78,617 patient visits, 12,573 (16.0%) had any smoking-related International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision code. The smoking-attributable risk fraction (SARF) for all patients was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7%-5.0%). Of 13,245 admissions, 6.8% (95% CI 6.4%-7.2%) were smoking attributable. Of $296,962,685 in hospital charges, 10.0% (95% CI 9.9%-10.1%) were smoking attributable. The SARFs for ED visits, admissions, and charges for men were higher than for women (all P <.0001). Smoking-attributable illness accounts for 4.9% of ED adult visits, 6.8% of ED adult admissions, and 10.0% of hospital charges. The use of ED-based smoking intervention remains to be determined.

  10. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  11. Problem Gambling in Chinese American Adolescents: Characteristics and Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Eddie Yu-Wai; Woo, Kent

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study examined the characteristics and risk factors of problem gambling among Chinese American adolescents. A total of 192 Chinese American students (aged 13-19) from 9th to 12th grades were recruited from three high schools in San Francisco, California. Students were administered the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised for…

  12. Rebooting the EdD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  13. 9th GCC closed forum: CAPA in regulated bioanalysis; method robustness, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, regulatory audit experiences and electronic laboratory notebooks.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Roger; LeLacheur, Richard; Dumont, Isabelle; Couerbe, Philippe; Safavi, Afshin; Islam, Rafiq; Pattison, Colin; Cape, Stephanie; Rocci, Mario; Briscoe, Chad; Cojocaru, Laura; Groeber, Elizabeth; Silvestro, Luigi; Bravo, Jennifer; Shoup, Ron; Verville, Manon; Zimmer, Jennifer; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Khadang, Ardeshir; Bourdage, James; Hughes, Nicola; Fatmi, Saadya; Di Donato, Lorella; Sheldon, Curtis; Keyhani, Anahita; Satterwhite, Christina; Yu, Mathilde; Fiscella, Michele; Hulse, James; Lin, Zhongping John; Garofolo, Wei; Savoie, Natasha; Xiao, Yi Qun; Kurylak, Kai; Harris, Sarah; Saxena, Manju; Buonarati, Mike; Lévesque, Ann; Boudreau, Nadine; Lin, Jenny; Khan, Masood U; Ray, Gene; Liu, Yansheng; Xu, Allan; Soni, Gunjan; Ward, Ian; Kingsley, Clare; Ritzén, Hanna; Tabler, Edward; Nicholson, Bob; Bennett, Patrick; van de Merbel, Nico; Karnik, Shane; Bouhajib, Mohammed; Wieling, Jaap; Mulvana, Daniel; Ingelse, Benno; Allen, Mike; Malone, Michele; Fang, Xinping

    2016-03-01

    The 9th GCCClosed Forum was held just prior to the 2015 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) in Miami, FL, USA on 13 April 2015. In attendance were 58 senior-level participants, from eight countries, representing 38 CRO companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for CRO bioanalytical representatives to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues selected at this year's closed forum include CAPA, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, and ELNs. A summary of the industry's best practices and the conclusions from the discussion of these topics is included in this meeting report.

  14. School Improvement Grants: Selected States Generally Awarded Funds Only to Eligible Schools. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Final Audit Report. ED-OIG/A05L0002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This final audit report covers the results of the review of five State educational agencies' monitoring plans and awarding processes for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and regular School Improvement Grants funds that the State educational agencies awarded for fiscal year 2009 (for use during school year 2010-2011). The objectives…

  15. [Native or not? Isotope analysis of a female skeleton on the 9th century A.D. from Elsau, Canton Zurich, Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tütken, Thomas; Langenegger, Elisabeth; Wild, Werner

    2008-03-01

    At Elsau near Winterthur (CH), a 9th century AD grave with a female skeleton was found in 2003. This grave was reopened one to six years after burial. After manipulating the partially decayed skeleton, the grave was filled with a layer of rocks and a claw of a sea eagle as well as the paw of a fox was placed on top. At least from this time onwards, the grave was situated in the annex of a church. Because of this special burial site for the 42 year old woman, who suffered from different severe illnesses, it is thought that she belonged to the upper class. The postmortal changes at the grave are exceptional and even after thorough research, no equivalent burial procedures are known from this area. To investigate the possibility if the woman migrated to the region of Elsau, the oxygen and strontium isotope composition of several teeth and one long bone of her skeleton was analysed. The results indicate a certain but restricted mobility within the northern Alpine foreland and as a result changes of the isotope composition of the food and drinking water during her childhood. Immigration from regions in which similar burial customs to those used for the woman persisted into the 9th century AD can be largely excluded based on the isotope composition of her skeletal remains. The mobility in the pre-Alpine region supports the interpretation that the woman belonged to the upper class, whose properties where widely distributed.

  16. A functional EDS1 ortholog is differentially regulated in powdery mildew resistant and susceptible grapevines and complements an Arabidopsis eds1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Shu, Xiaomei; Ali, Mohammad Babar; Howard, Susanne; Li, Nan; Winterhagen, Patrick; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Vitis vinifera (grapevine) is the most economically important deciduous fruit crop, but cultivated grapevine varieties lack adequate innate immunity to a range of devastating diseases. To identify genetic resources for grapevine innate immunity and understand pathogen defense pathways in a woody perennial plant, we focus in this study on orthologs of the central Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). The family of EDS1-like genes is expanded in grapevine, and members of this family were previously found to be constitutively upregulated in the resistant variety 'Norton' of the North American grapevine species Vitis aestivalis, while they were induced by Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of grapevine powdery mildew (PM), in the susceptible V. vinifera variety 'Cabernet Sauvignon'. Here, we determine the responsiveness of individual EDS1-like genes in grapevine to PM and salicylic acid, and find that EDS1-like paralogs are differentially regulated in 'Cabernet Sauvignon', while two are constitutively upregulated in 'Norton'. Sequencing of VvEDS1 and VaEDS1 cDNA and genomic clones revealed high conservation in the protein-encoding sequence and some divergence of the promoter sequence in the two grapevine varieties. Complementation of the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant showed that the EDS1-like gene with highest predicted amino acid sequence similarity to AtEDS1 from either grapevine varieties is a functional ortholog of AtEDS1. Together, our analyses show that differential susceptibility to PM is correlated with differences in EDS1 expression, not differences in EDS1 function, between resistant 'Norton' and susceptible 'Cabernet Sauvignon'.

  17. Burkitt lymphoma research in East Africa: highlights from the 9th African organization for research and training in cancer conference held in Durban, South Africa in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A one-day workshop on Burkitt lymphoma (BL) was held at the 9th African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) conference in 2013 in Durban, South Africa. The workshop featured 15 plenary talks by delegates representing 13 institutions that either fund or implement research on BL targeting AORTIC delegates primarily interested in pediatric oncology. The main outcomes of the meeting were improved sharing of knowledge and experience about ongoing epidemiologic BL research, BL treatment in different settings, the role of cancer registries in cancer research, and opportunities for African scientists to publish in scientific journals. The idea of forming a consortium of BL to improve coordination, information sharing, accelerate discovery, dissemination, and translation of knowledge and to build capacity, while reducing redundant efforts was discussed. Here, we summarize the presentations and discussions from the workshop. PMID:25686906

  18. The association between problematic parental substance use and adolescent substance use in an ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Fite, Paula J; Elkins, Sara R; Frissell, Kevin C; Tortolero, Susan R; Stuart, Gregory L; Temple, Jeff R

    2013-12-01

    Adolescents of parents who use substances are at an increased risk for substance use themselves. Both parental monitoring and closeness have been shown to mediate the relationship between parents' and their adolescents' substance use. However, we know little about whether these relationships vary across different substances used by adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, we examined these associations within a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders (N = 927). Path analyses indicated that maternal closeness partially mediated the association between maternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol use. Parental monitoring partially mediated the relationship between paternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, inhalant, and illicit prescription drug use. These results were consistent across gender and race/ethnicity. These findings suggest that parental interventions designed to increase closeness and monitoring may help to reduce adolescent substance use.

  19. The Association Between Problematic Parental Substance Use and Adolescent Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of 9th and 10th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Fite, Paula J.; Elkins, Sara R.; Frissell, Kevin C.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Temple, Jeff R.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents of parents who use substances are at an increased risk for substance use themselves. Both parental monitoring and closeness have been shown to mediate the relationship between parents’ and their adolescents’ substance use. However, we know little about whether these relationships vary across different substances used by adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, we examined these associations within a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders (N = 927). Path analyses indicated that maternal closeness partially mediated the association between maternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol use. Parental monitoring partially mediated the relationship between paternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, inhalant, and illicit prescription drug use. These results were consistent across gender and race/ethnicity. These findings suggest that parental interventions designed to increase closeness and monitoring may help to reduce adolescent substance use. PMID:24006209

  20. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  1. Functions of EDS1-like and PAD4 genes in grapevine defenses against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Dai, Ru; Pike, Sharon M; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The molecular interactions between grapevine and the obligate biotrophic fungus Erysiphe necator are not understood in depth. One reason for this is the recalcitrance of grapevine to genetic modifications. Using defense-related Arabidopsis mutants that are susceptible to pathogens, we were able to analyze key components in grapevine defense responses. We have examined the functions of defense genes associated with the salicylic acid (SA) pathway, including ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), EDS1-LIKE 2 (EDL2), EDL5 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) of two grapevine species, Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, which is susceptible to E. necator, and V. aestivalis cv. Norton, which is resistant. Both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were previously found to functionally complement the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant. Here we show that the promoters of both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were induced by SA, indicating that the heightened defense of Norton is related to its high SA level. Other than Va/VvEDS1, only VaEDL2 complemented Arabidopsis eds1-1, whereas Va/VvPAD4 did not complement Arabidopsis pad4-1. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation results indicated that Vitis EDS1 and EDL2 proteins interact with Vitis PAD4 and AtPAD4, suggesting that Vitis EDS1/EDL2 forms a complex with PAD4 to confer resistance, as is known from Arabidopsis. However, Vitis EDL5 and PAD4 did not interact with Arabidopsis EDS1 or PAD4, correlating with their inability to function in Arabidopsis. Together, our study suggests a more complicated EDS1/PAD4 module in grapevine and provides insight into molecular mechanisms that determine disease resistance levels in Vitis species native to the North American continent.

  2. Social Research in North American Moisture-Deficient Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John W., Ed.

    Five papers presented at the 9th symposium held during the 42nd annual meeting of the Southwestern and Rocky Mountain Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science are: (1) "Do We Need a Sociology of Arid Regions"?; (2) "Deficit Creating Influences for Role Performance and Status Acquisition in Sparsely Populated Regions of…

  3. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  4. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  5. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents.

  6. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents. PMID:27563919

  7. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents. PMID:27563919

  8. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population. PMID:25256815

  9. An INTEGRAL view of the high-energy sky (the first 10 years) - 9th INTEGRAL Workshop and celebration of the 10th anniversary of the launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 9th INTEGRAL workshop "An INTEGRAL view of the high-energy sky (the first 10 years)" took place from 15 to 19 October 2012 in Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Bibliothèque François Mitterrand). The workshop was sponsored by ESA, CNES and other French and European Institutions. During this week, and in particular on 17 October 2012, we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the launch of the INTEGRAL mission. The main goal of this workshop was to present and to discuss (via invited and contributed talks and posters) latest results obtained in the field of high-energy astrophysics using the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL, as well as results from observations from other ground- and space-based high-energy observatories and from associated multi-wavelength campaigns. Contributions to the workshop covered the following scientific topics: - X-ray binaries (IGR sources, black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs) - Isolated neutron stars (gamma-ray pulsars, magnetars) - Nucleo-synthesis (SNe, Novae, SNRs, ISM) and gamma-ray lines (511 keV) - Galactic diffuse continuum emission (including Galactic Ridge) - Massive black holes in AGNs, elliptical galaxies, nucleus of the Galaxy - Sky surveys, source populations and unidentified gamma-ray sources - Cosmic background radiation - Gamma-ray bursts - Coordinated observations with other ground- and space-based observatories - Science data processing and analysis (posters only) - Future instruments and missions (posters only)

  10. Real time analysis under EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    The analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis.

  11. Power Conversion and Transmission Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The document is a guide to a 9th and 10th grade industrial education course investigating the total system of power--how man controls, converts, transmits, and uses energy; the rationale is that if one is to learn of the total system of industry, the subsystem of power must be investigated. The guide provides a "body of knowledge" chart…

  12. Earthlinks '97: Proceedings of the Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Education Society of Australasia (9th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, January 13-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, John J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 9th Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Society of Australasia. The contents provide a valuable snapshot of the state of environmental education in Australia while moving towards the end of the 20th century. Papers include: (1) "Stand…

  13. Instability of EDS maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    Instabilities of an EDS maglev suspension system with 3 D.O.F. and 5 D.O.F. vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors have been investigated with various experimentally measured magnetical force data incorporated into the theoretical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the 3 D.O.F. maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motions (heave, slip, rill, pitch and yaw) are observed for the 4 D.O.F. vehicle model. It demonstrates that system parameters, such as, system damping, vehicle geometry and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  14. PREFACE: 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity and 9th International Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Grinberga, Liga; Sarakovskis, Anatolijs; Rutkis, Martins

    2015-03-01

    The joint International Symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT successfully has united two international events - 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity (RCBJSF-12) and 9th International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2014). The RCBJSF symposium is a continuation of series of meetings on ferroelectricity, the first of which took place in Novosibirsk (USSR) in 1976. FM&NT conferences started in 2006 and have been organized by Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia in Riga. In 2012 the International program committee decided to transform this conference into a traveling Baltic State conference and the FM&NT-2013 was organized by the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia. In 2014 the joint international symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia and was part of Riga - 2014, the European Capital of Culture event. The purpose of the joint Symposium was to bring together scientists, students and high-level experts in solid state physics, materials science, engineering and related disciplines. The number of the registered participants from 26 countries was over 350. During the Symposium 128 high quality scientific talks (5 plenary, 42 invited, 81 oral) and over 215 posters were presented. All presentations were divided into 4 parallel sessions according to 4 main topics of the Symposium: Ferroelectricity, including ferroelectrics and multiferroics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics and actuators, integrated ferroelectrics, relaxors, phase transitions and critical phenomena. Multifunctional Materials, including theory, multiscale and multiphenomenal material modeling and simulation, advanced inorganic, organic and hybrid materials. Nanotechnologies, including progressive methods, technologies and design for production, investigation of nano- particles, composites, structures, thin films and coatings. Energy, including perspective materials and

  15. The development of veteran 9th-grade physics teachers' knowledge for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study was guided by the assumption that there are a limited number of experiences in which teachers engage throughout their career that contribute in significant ways to the development of their knowledge. The primary sources of data were observations of an entire unit of instruction on energy and a series of four stimulated-recall interviews throughout the unit of instruction. The stimulated recall interviews focused on the participants' instruction and knowledge regarding the representations used throughout the energy unit. These data sources were supported by interviews focused on the participants' work history and professional development as well interviews focused on their unit/lesson plans. The results of the phenomenographic analysis revealed that nine categories of experiences informed the development of the three participant's PCK for using representations to teach the energy topics. The categories included: 1) teaching experience, 2) Physics First professional development, 3) other school district-supported professional development 4) collaboration with current colleagues, 5) past collaboration with experienced teachers, 6) academic experiences as a learner of science, 7) school district expectations, 8) collaboration with university faculty and other university professional development, and 9) non-academic life experiences. The analysis also revealed that as a result of engaging in the nine experiences, the participants developed more integrated knowledge for using representations in their instruction, which included understandings regarding the essential features of specific representations, knowledge of barriers to

  16. Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography (with ERIC Abstracts). ERIC/CRESS Supplement No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Albert D., Comp.

    Access to some of the latest research findings and developments in Mexican American education is provided in this bibliography. A supplement to 2 previous ERIC/CRESS publications: "Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography" (ED 031 352) and "Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography--Supplement No. 1" (ED 048 961), the present…

  17. Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography (with ERIC Abstracts). ERIC/CRESS Supplement No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.

    Access to some of the latest research findings and developments in Mexican American education is provided in this bibliography. A supplement to 3 previous ERIC/CRESS publications: "Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography" (ED 031 352), "Mexican American Education, A Selected Bibliography--Supplement No. 1" (ED 048 961), and "Mexican…

  18. APA Reporting Standards in Quantitative Research Dissertations from an Online EdD Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Griselle

    2013-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the reporting practices in dissertations with quantitative research designs produced by students enrolled in an online Doctor of Education (EdD) program, one that follows the American Psychological Association (APA) standards for reporting research. Limited, empirical information exists about the competencies in…

  19. ED's Proposed Changes to SFSF Data Collection and Reporting Requirements: DQC's Submitted Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This letter is submitted to comment on the U.S. Department of Education's (ED) proposed revisions to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's (ARRA) State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF), as published in the September 23, 2011, Federal Register. Overall, the Data Quality Campaign believes the proposed changes strike a sensible balance: they…

  20. African American Adolescents' Perceptions of Family Interactions: Kinship Support, Parent-Child Relationships, and Teen Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamborn, Susie D.; Nguyen, Dang-Giao T.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined perceived kinship support and parenting practices for 158 African American adolescents in the 9th and 10th grades. Kinship support showed direct associations with teen outcomes that, for work orientation and school orientation, were partially mediated by parenting practices. With a few exceptions, kinship support was positively…

  1. Implications of Out-of-School Activities for School Engagement in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotterer, Aryn M.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    The connection between out-of-school activities and school engagement was examined in 140, 6th through 9th grade African American adolescents. Youth's out-of-school activities were measured with a series of 7 nightly phone calls and focused on time in structured (homework, academically-oriented, extracurricular/sports) and unstructured (watching…

  2. ED security: a national telephone survey.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L; Dehart, D A; Black, C; Gula, M J; Owens, A

    1994-03-01

    To determine current practices regarding security measures in the emergency department (ED), a random sample of 250 hospitals with EDs was surveyed by telephone. Security issues addressed included personnel (in-house security, contract guards, or police), hours of staffing in the ED, how security is armed, whether ED doors are locked at off-hours, and whether alarm buttons, direct phone lines, a paging code, closed circuit surveillance, metal detectors, and seclusion rooms are used. This information was stratified according to hospital size, ED census, rural/suburban/urban setting, teaching/nonteaching status, and region. Generally, on-site security presence increases with increasing hospital size and ED census, suburban and urban locations, and teaching status. Small, rural hospitals are more likely to lock the ED doors at off-hours, whereas the use of security codes does not clearly follow demographic trends. Larger hospitals in suburban and urban settings and having a teaching status are more likely to have secure/detention rooms and closed circuit surveillance. The use of alarm buttons and/or direct telephone lines varies widely, but is generally more common in larger, teaching hospitals, located in urban and suburban settings.

  3. Beyond parenting practices: extended kinship support and the academic adjustment of African-American and European-American teens.

    PubMed

    Pallock, Linda L; Lamborn, Susie D

    2006-10-01

    This study examined adolescents' perceptions of parenting practices and extended kinship support in relation to academic adjustment for 104 African American and 60 European American 9th and 10th graders (14 and 15 year olds). For African-American teens, parental acceptance was associated with school values, teacher bonding, and work orientation. Higher levels of behavioral control and lower levels of psychological control were associated with a stronger work orientation. After accounting for the demographic variables and the three parenting practices, higher levels of extended kinship support related to stronger school values, higher teacher bonding, and a stronger work orientation. For European-American teens, parental acceptance related to academic adjustment, including stronger school values, higher teacher bonding, and a stronger work orientation. European-American adolescents with stronger extended kinship networks reported higher teacher bonding and a stronger work orientation. Results indicate the importance of extended kinship support for both African-American and European-American adolescents.

  4. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... stakeholders from the education, technology, and government sectors to share ideas, discuss policies, and... convene stakeholders from the education, technology, and government sectors to share ideas, discuss... National Telecommunications and Information Administration ConnectED Workshop AGENCY:...

  5. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  6. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  7. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009) Selected papers from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodssi, Reza; Livermore, Carol; Arnold, David

    2010-10-01

    This special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering presents papers selected from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009), which was held in Washington DC, USA from 1-4 December 2009. Since it was first held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the PowerMEMS workshop has focused on small-scale systems that process, convert, or generate macroscopically significant amounts of power, typically with high power density or high energy density. In the workshop's early years, much of the research presented was on small-scale fueled systems, such as micro heat engines and micro fuel cells. The past nine years have seen a dramatic expansion in the range of technologies that are brought to bear on the challenge of high-power, small-scale systems, as well as an increase in the applications for such technologies. At this year's workshop, 158 contributed papers were presented, along with invited and plenary presentations. The papers focused on applications from micro heat engines and fuel cells, to energy harvesting and its enabling electronics, to thermal management and propulsion. Also presented were the technologies that enable these applications, such as the structuring of microscale, nanoscale and biological systems for power applications, as well as combustion and catalysis at small scales. This special section includes a selection of 12 expanded papers representing energy harvesting, chemical and fueled systems, and elastic energy storage at small scales. We would like to express our appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, the Local Organizing Committee, and to the workshop's financial supporters. We are grateful to the referees for their contributions to the review process. Finally, we would like to thank Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, and the staff

  8. Non–Emergency Department (ED) Interventions to Reduce ED Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Chang, Anna Marie; Alqatari, Mahfood; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent health policy changes have focused efforts on reducing emergency department (ED) visits as a way to reduce costs and improve quality of care. This was a systematic review of interventions based outside the ED aimed at reducing ED use. Methods This study was designed as a systematic review. We reviewed the literature on interventions in five categories: patient education, creation of additional non-ED capacity, managed care, prehospital diversion, and patient financial incentives. Studies written in English, with interventions administered outside of the ED, and a comparison group where ED use was an outcome, were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results using MEDLINE, Cochrane, OAIster, or Scopus. The following data were abstracted from included studies: type of intervention, study design, population, details of intervention, effect on ED use, effect on non-ED health care use, and other health and financial outcomes. Quality of individual articles was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Results Of 39 included studies, 34 were observational and five were randomized controlled trials. Two of five studies on patient education found reductions in ED use ranging from 21% to 80%. Out of 10 studies of additional non-ED capacity, four showed decreases of 9% to 54%, and one a 21% increase. Both studies on prehospital diversion found reductions of 3% to 7%. Of 12 studies on managed care, 10 had decreases ranging from 1% to 46%. Nine out of 10 studies on patient financial incentives found decreases of 3% to 50%, and one a 34% increase. Nineteen studies reported effect on non-ED use with mixed results. Seventeen studies included data on health outcomes, but 13 of these only included data on hospitalizations rather than morbidity and mortality. Seven studies included data on cost outcomes. According to the GRADE guidelines, all studies had at least some risk of bias, with four

  9. Daily Stress and Emotional Well-Being among Asian American Adolescents: Same-Day, Lagged, and Chronic Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Buchanan, Christy M.

    2014-01-01

    Daily-diary data from 180 Asian American 9th-10th graders (58% female, 75% second generation; "M" age = 14.97 years) were used to investigate how family, school, and peer stress are each associated with same-day and next-day (lagged) well-being, and vice versa. Hierarchical linear modeling provided support for reciprocal links when…

  10. Developmental Differences in Engagement Style, Locus of Control, and Parent-Adolescent Relationships in African-American Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nancy E.

    A study examined age and sex differences in engagement style and locus of control and their influence on African-American parent-adolescent relationships. The study subjects were 71 students in 9th grade and 57 students in 11th grade from 4 high schools in a large midwestern city; 46 college freshmen attending a large midwestern university; and 46…

  11. Plant immunity: the EDS1 regulatory node.

    PubMed

    Wiermer, Marcel; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E

    2005-08-01

    ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1) and its interacting partner, PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4), constitute a regulatory hub that is essential for basal resistance to invasive biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens. EDS1 and PAD4 are also recruited by Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-type nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins to signal isolate-specific pathogen recognition. Recent work points to a fundamental role of EDS1 and PAD4 in transducing redox signals in response to certain biotic and abiotic stresses. These intracellular proteins are important activators of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and also mediate antagonism between the jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) defense response pathways. EDS1 forms several molecularly and spatially distinct complexes with PAD4 and a newly discovered in vivo signaling partner, SENESCENCE ASSOCIATED GENE 101 (SAG101). Together, EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 provide a major barrier to infection by both host-adapted and non-host pathogens.

  12. Surveying the History of American Education: Four Recent Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Dalton B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Interpretations of American educational history in the following four books are compared: "History of Education and Culture in America" (H. Warren Button and Eugene F. Provenzo, Jr.), "Americans and Their Schools" (Erwin V. Johanningmeier), "History of Education in America" 3rd ed. (John D. Pulliam), and "The Opening Up of American Education: A…

  13. ED Patients with Prolonged Complaints and Repeat ED Visits Have an Increased Risk of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Kristopher R.; Bahl, Rajiv; Marcinkowski, Nathan F.; Ammons, Katelyn R.; Akpunonu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to explore associations between presenting chief complaints of prolonged symptomatology, patient usage of the emergency department (ED), and underlying depression so that emergency physicians may better target patients for depression screening. Methods A convenience sample of ED patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) to assess for depression. We correlated completed BDI-II surveys to patient information including demographics, pertinent history of present illness information, and past medical history. Results Out of 425 participants screened, we identified complaints of two weeks or longer in 92 patients (22%). Of these patients, mild to severe depression was recognized in over half of the population (47), yet only nine patients reported a prior depression diagnosis. These 92 patients also visited the ED three times as frequently as those patients with more acute complaints (p<0.001). Finally, our study showed that patients with mild to severe depression had three times as many ED visits compared to patients with minimal or no depression (p<0.001). Conclusion Patients with complaints of symptomatology two weeks or longer are more likely to have underlying depression when presenting to the ED. Patients with three or more ED visits within the past year also have a greater incidence of underlying depression. We found a strong correlation between complaints with symptomatology of two weeks or longer and multiple ED visits, in which underlying depression may have contributed to these patients’ ED visits. PMID:27625727

  14. A Quantitative Content Analysis of Mercer University MEd, EdS, and Doctoral Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Gaiek, Lura S.; White, Torian A.; Slappey, Lisa A.; Chastain, Andrea; Harris, Rose Prejean

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative content analysis of a body of research not only helps budding researchers understand the culture, language, and expectations of scholarship, it helps identify deficiencies and inform policy and practice. Because of these benefits, an analysis of a census of 980 Mercer University MEd, EdS, and doctoral theses was conducted. Each thesis…

  15. MedEdPORTAL: a report on oral health resources for health professions educators.

    PubMed

    Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Sandmeyer, Sue; Valachovic, Richard W; Candler, Christopher S; Saleh, Michael; Cahill, Emily; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-09-01

    MedEdPORTAL is a unique web-based peer-reviewed publication venue for clinical health educators sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The open exchange of educational resources promotes professional collaboration across health professions. In 2008, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) collaborated with AAMC to allow dental educators to use the platform to publish dental curriculum resources. Oral health is integral to general health; hence, collaboration among health care professionals brings enormous value to patient-centered care. The aim of this study was to conduct a current survey of metrics and submission statistics of MedEdPORTAL resources. The data were collected using the MedEdPORTAL search engine and ADEA and AAMC staff. The data collected were categorized and reported in tables and charts. Results showed that at the time of this study there were over 2,000 medical and dental resources available to anyone worldwide. Oral health resources constituted approximately 30 percent of the total resources, which included cross-indexing with information relevant to both medical and dental audiences. There were several types of dental resources available; the most common were the ones focusing on critical thinking. The usage of MedEdPORTAL has been growing, with participation from over 190 countries and 10,000 educational institutions around the world. The findings of this report suggest that MedEdPORTAL is succeeding in its aim to foster global collaborative education, professional education, and educational scholarship. As such, MedEdPORTAL is providing a new forum for collaboration and opens venues for promising future work in professional education.

  16. 34 CFR 85.942 - ED Deciding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false ED Deciding Official. 85.942 Section 85.942 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.942 ED Deciding Official. The ED Deciding Official is an ED officer who has...

  17. MicroED data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M Jason; Leslie, Andrew G W; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  18. MicroED data collection and processing

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  19. Improving ED efficiency to capture additional revenue.

    PubMed

    Mandavia, Sujal; Samaniego, Loretta

    2016-06-01

    An increase in the number of patients visiting emergency departments (EDs) presents an opportunity for additional revenue if hospitals take four steps to optimize resources: Streamline the patient pathway and reduce the amount of time each patient occupies a bed in the ED. Schedule staff according to the busy and light times for patient arrivals. Perform registration and triage bedside, reducing initial wait times. Create an area for patients to wait for test results so beds can be freed up for new arrivals. PMID:27451568

  20. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  1. The Trouble with the Ed.D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessa, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This article review examines Arthur Levine's 2005 "Educating School Leaders," a report that recommended the elimination of the Ed.D. and the establishment of a new degree, the Master's in Educational Administration. The article review draws attention to the central irony of Levine's report: after chronicling the many ways that schools of education…

  2. Precipitator rehabilitation ComEd Waukegan station

    SciTech Connect

    Sanda, L.; Hermanas, G.

    1996-12-31

    ComEd`s Waukegan Station successfully completed a total rehabilitation of its Unit 8 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and recovered 66 MW that has been lost due to burning Western Coal. This practice began in the 1970`s for emission`s compliance. The unit now operates at it maximum continuous rating (MCR) with increased fuel flexibility.

  3. The Consequences of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    States and teacher preparation programs across the country are increasingly using a teacher candidate assessment called edTPA. The purpose? To make sure that teacher candidates are ready and able to teach before they begin their careers. The teacher performance assessment requires candidates to compile a portfolio that consists of lesson plans,…

  4. Violence prevention in the ED: linkage of the ED to a social service agency.

    PubMed

    Zun, Leslie S; Downey, La Vonne; Rosen, Jodi

    2003-10-01

    Interpersonal violence continues to be a problem in the United States, most prominent in the inner-city minority young persons population. The medical approach of "treat 'em and street 'em" philosophy has led to foregoing the psychosocial needs of injured young persons. This study describes a program to link young persons who are victims of interpersonal violence to a healthcare system and a social service agency in an effort to meet their psychosocial needs. An unvalidated screening tool was developed by a team consisting of an EP, social worker, and public health scientist to determine the young victims' psychosocial needs. Patients aged 10 to 24 years who were victims of interpersonal violence (excluding child abuse, sexual assault, and domestic violence) were randomly assigned in the study. The control group was given a list of services and the treatment group received an assessment, case management, and referral to appropriate resources. The study site was a community, teaching level 1 trauma center. The study was approved by the institutional review board. Numbers of referrals in both groups were counted and compared using SPSS (version 10, Chicago, IL). One hundred eighty-eight victims of interpersonal violence were enrolled. A total of 82.5% were male, 65.4% were African American and 31.4% were Hispanic. At the end of 6 months, 78 of the 96 young persons (81.3%) in the treatment group made one or more contacts with their case manager and made use of social service, healthcare, and other referrals. Education (21.6%), job readiness (19.1%), and mental health (11.9%) were the most frequently used services. Nine of the 92 (9.8%) in the control group used services; most of these referrals were for social services (7 of 9 respondents) and the others were healthcare-related. The difference in utilization of services between the treatment and the control groups were found to be significant different (95% confidence interval, 1.41-1.55, significance =.00), and there

  5. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  6. Terrorism drill shows ED response plan flaws.

    PubMed

    2005-07-01

    Valuable lessons can be learned by paying attention to your processes and communication equipment during a disaster drill. Did your radios and pagers work adequately? If not, it may be time for a new vendor. Going through the drill helps remind the entire ED staff to funnel all communications and key decisions through the disaster response leader. Make sure to update your disaster response handbook to reflect important lessons learned during the drill.

  7. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  8. Part C Updates: 9th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the ninth volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  9. Nine Months to 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enter large comprehensive high schools without having the necessary social and academic skills or understanding of what will be expected of them as they move through the high school curriculum. To help a higher number of students experience success, schools must help them develop academic, social, and self-management skills.…

  10. The 9th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with performance and development of various spacecraft components, mechanical devices, and subsystems. Topics discussed include: manipulator arms, the Skylab Parasol, cooling system performance, extendable booms, magnetically suspended reaction wheels, the Skylab Trash Airlock, magnetometers, actuators, life support systems, and technology transfer.

  11. Tech Ed Sticks to Its Guns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, John W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented of the issues and concerns discussed and the recommendations made by the American Vocational Association's (AVA) Technical Education Division Policy Committee during its meeting at the 1975 AVA Convention. (AJ)

  12. EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

    1984-02-01

    This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

  13. Cultural Dysthymia: An Unrecognized Disorder among African Americans?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontress, Clemmont E.; Woodland, Calvin E.; Epp, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Many African Americans experience low-grade depression, referred to as dysthymia in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). After more than 250 years of enslavement, prejudice, and discrimination, dysthymia is reflected in chronic low-grade sadness, anger, hostility,…

  14. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  15. Text message program improves outcomes, decreases ED utilization among ED patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic patients who lack access to primary care tend to frequent the ED, often with complications from their disease that could have been prevented with proper management and education. To get around the problem of access, researchers tested an automated program that continuously delivered educational messaging via text to a group of patients who presented to the ED with poorly controlled diabetes. After six months, researchers noted improvements in Hb A1c levels, self-reported medication adherence, and ED utilization when compared with a control group. And the impact was particularly noteworthy among Latinos, according to the researchers. The text messaging program, dubbed TExT-Med, was developed by four physicians and two diabetes educators. The messages were delivered daily, and contained educational as well motivational content derived from the National Diabetes Education Program.There were also medication reminders, healthy living challenges, and trivia questions about diabetes. At six months, Hb A1c levels decreased by 1.05% in the intervention group, compared to 0.60% in the control group, and self-reported medication adherence improved from 4.5 to 5.4 (as measured on an 8 point scale) in the intervention group versus a decrease of 0.1 in the control group. During the six-month study period, 35.9% of patients in the intervention group presented to the ED for care, as compared to 51.6% of patients in the control group.

  16. Exposure to Community Violence is Associated with Asthma Hospitalizations and ED Visits

    PubMed Central

    Apter, Andrea J.; Garcia, Laura A.; Boyd, Rhonda C.; Wang, Xingmei; Bogen, Daniel K.; Have, Thomas Ten

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to community violence (ECV) has been associated with asthma morbidity of children living in inner-city neighborhoods. Objective To examine with prospective longitudinal data whether ECV is independently associated with asthma-related health outcomes in adults. Methods Adults with moderate-severe asthma, recruited from clinics serving inner-city neighborhoods, completed questionnaires covering socio-demographics, asthma severity, and ECV and were followed for 26 weeks. Longitudinal models were employed to assess unadjusted and adjusted associations of subsequent asthma outcomes (emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, FEV1, quality of life). Results 397 adults, 47±14 years, 73% female, 70% African American, 7% Latino, mean FEV1 66%±19%, 133 with hospitalizations and 222 with ED visits for asthma in the year before entry were evaluated. 91 reported ECV. Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income, those exposed to violence had 2.27 (95% CI: 1.32-3.90) times more asthma-related ED visits per month and 2.49 (95% CI: 1.11-5.60) times more asthma-related hospitalizations per month over the 26-week study period compared to those unexposed. Violence-exposed participants also had 1.71 (95% CI: 1.14-2.56) times more overall ED visits per month and 1.72 (95% CI: 0.95-3.11) times more overall hospitalizations per month from any cause. Asthma-related quality of life was lower in the violence-exposed participants (-0.40 (95%CI: -0.77-0.025), p=0.04). Effect modification by depressive symptoms was only statistically significant for the ECV association with overall ED visits and quality of life outcomes (p<.01). Conclusion In adults, ECV is associated with increased hospitalizations and emergency care for asthma or any condition and with asthma-related quality of life. PMID:20816190

  17. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5-8, 2011, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ~800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics session comprised five sessions: (1)Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies.

  18. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  19. Rates and Correlates of Violent Behaviors among Adolescents Treated in an Urban ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Goldstein, Abby L.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Zimmerman, Marc; Bingham, C. Raymond; Shope, Jean T.; Stanley, Rachel; Blow, Frederic C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Violence is a leading cause of death for adolescents in inner-city settings. This paper describes violent behaviors in relation to other risk behaviors (e.g., substance use) among adolescents screened in an urban ED. Methods Patients ages 14–18 were approached to self-administer a computerized survey assessing violent behaviors (i.e., physical aggression), substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana), and weapon carriage. Results 1128 adolescents (83.8% participation rate; 45.9% male; 58.0% African-American) were surveyed. In the past year, 75.3% of adolescents reported peer violence, 27.6% reported dating violence, and 23.5% carried a weapon. In the past year, 28.0% drank alcohol, 14.4% binge drank, 5.7% reported alcohol-related fighting, and 36.9% smoked marijuana. Logistic regression analyses predicting violent behaviors were significant. Teens reporting peer violence were more likely to be younger, African-American, on public assistance, carry a weapon, binge drink, and smoke marijuana. Teens reporting dating violence were more likely to be female, African-American, carry a weapon, binge drink, screen positive for alcohol problems, and smoke marijuana. Teens reporting alcohol-related fighting were more likely to carry a weapon, binge drink, screen positive for alcohol problems, and smoke marijuana. Conclusions Adolescents presenting to an urban ED have elevated rates of violent behaviors. Substance use (i.e., binge drinking and smoking marijuana) is an important risk factor for violent behaviors among urban adolescents. Universal screening and intervention protocols to address multiple risk behaviors, including violent behaviors and substance use, may be useful to prevent injury among adolescents presenting to the urban ED. PMID:19541253

  20. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  1. Who Controls Certification of Voc Ed Personnel?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Aaron J.; Roehrich, Robert R.

    1978-01-01

    An American Vocational Association ad hoc committee on professional standards investigated the status and practices of all state boards or agencies controlling certification of vocational education teachers and concluded that vocational educators must participate in the process and that state vocational associations have little knowledge of their…

  2. Stimulus Offers Funding Support for Ed. Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Some two months after enactment of the federal economic-stimulus package, school facilities directors are still trying to piece together how much money will be available under the measure for school construction projects, what it can be used for, and when it can be accessed. Before President Barack Obama signed the $787 billion American Recovery…

  3. Crafting Voc Ed for the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1988-01-01

    The American Association of School Administrators has recently tapped all segments of the education community to gather and craft a viable, forward-looking vocational education recommendation to Congress. At present, vocational education is not integrated with the regular curriculum. Many barriers need to fall, and education needs to drop its…

  4. Shifting Landscapes, Changing Assumptions Reshape Higher Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSalvio, Philip

    2012-01-01

    In 1852, Massachusetts became the first state to provide all its citizens access to a free public education. Over the next 66 years, every other state made the same guarantee. Massachusetts may again be a geographic hotspot that signals the displacement from the old to the new. Just as key sectors of the American economy have experienced huge and…

  5. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  6. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services. PMID:11781909

  7. The Purpose of the American Public Library. A Revisionist Interpretation of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Michael

    1973-01-01

    The intention of this article is to serve as a guide to the literature treating the historical development of the American public library. (A fuller version of this article is ERIC document ED 071 668.) (22 references) (Author/SJ)

  8. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey C.W.J. Johnson's Views of California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey C.W.J. Johnson's Views of California Scenery - Ed Grabhorn's Collection San Francisco, California About 1870 - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  9. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  10. Teaching Elementary School Social Studies Methods under edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a self-study that analyzes my experience as a teacher educator navigating a turbulent educational landscape with the advent of edTPA. The data consist of my journal entries, the syllabi, handouts, work submitted by my students, and course evaluations. Data were analyzed by using an inductive process to describe how the edTPA…

  11. Web Formation - Skylab Student Experiment ED-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Judith S. Miles of Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts, proposed skylab student experiment ED-52, Web Formation. This experiment was a study of a spider's behavior in a weightless environment. The geometrical structure of the web of the orb-weaving spider provides a good measure of the condition of its central nervous system. Since the spider senses its own weight to determine the required thickness of web material and uses both the wind and gravity to initiate construction of its web, the lack of gravitational force in Skylab provided a new and different stimulus to the spider's behavioral response. Two common cross spiders, Arabella and Anita, were used for the experiment aboard the Skylab-3 mission. After initial disoriented attempts, both spiders produced almost Earth-like webs once they had adapted to weightlessness. This photograph is of Arabella, a cross spider, in her initial attempt at spirning a web. This picture was taken by the crew of the Skylab 3 mission before Arabella adapted to her new environment.

  12. TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series Fact Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murbach, Marcus; Martinez, Andres; Guarneros Luna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    TechEdSat-3p is the second generation in the TechEdSat-X series. The TechEdSat Series uses the CubeSat standards established by the California Polytechnic State University Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. With typical blocks being constructed from 1-unit (1U 10x10x10 cm) increments, the TechEdSat-3p has a 3U volume with a 30 cm length. The project uniquely pairs advanced university students with NASA researchers in a rapid design-to-flight experience lasting 1-2 semesters.The TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series provides a rapid platform for testing technologies for future NASA Earth and planetary missions, as well as providing students with an early exposure to flight hardware development and management.

  13. Prevalence of Past Year Assault among Inner-City ED Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Murray, Regan; Walton, Maureen A.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Wojnar, Marcin; Wozniak, Piotr; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the rates of past year non-partner violent assault (NPV), both victimization and aggression. 2) To assess variables associated with NPV, particularly with regards to substance use. Method A cross sectional computerized standardized survey study was conducted to assess NPV, physical and mental health, and substance use among patients presenting to an inner-city ED over two years. Patients (age 19–60) with normal vital signs in an urban ED from 9am–11pm were eligible; pregnant patients and those with a chief complaint of psychiatric evaluation were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict any NPV Results 10,744 patients were enrolled (80 % response rate); 14% of the sample reported any past year NPV (9% perpetration; 11% victimization). Findings from regression analyses found participants with any past year NPV (victimization or aggression) were more likely than their counterparts to be younger (OR 1.1), male (2.2), single (1.5), unemployed (1.1), present to the ED for injury (1.9), report poor physical health (1.32) poor mental health (1.9). They were less likely to be African-American (0.8). Alcohol use (1.7), marijuana use (2.4), cocaine use (3.1), prescription drug use (1.4) and past treatment (1.7) were associated with experiencing past year NPV. Conclusions Fourteen percent of patients seeking care in this inner-city ED experience violence with a non-partner. Substance use and cocaine specifically, was the strongest predictor of any NPV. PMID:19282061

  14. American ginseng

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking capsules containing 1 gram of American ginseng root three times daily for 14 days while receiving ... l’Ontario, Ginseng du Wisconsin, Ginseng Occidental, Ginseng Root, North American Ginseng, Occidental Ginseng, Ontario Ginseng, Panax ...

  15. Haitian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catanese, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    Uses 1990 U.S. Census data to show the changing demographic profile of Haitian Americans. Haitian Americans are likely to live along the Atlantic seaboard and to have relatively low, although not the lowest, incomes. However, the demographic mosaic of Haitian Americans is diverse, showing the effects of Haitian national and ethnic history. (SLD)

  16. ED's nonemergent patients must pay first or be referred.

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Patients presenting to your ED with complaints that should be seen by a primary care physician can exacerbate overcrowding and tie up staff unnecessarily. The ED at Metro Health Medical Center in Cleveland has addressed this problem with a two-pronged approach: Nonemergent patients who are uninsured but wish to be treated in the ED must pay $75 before treatment can begin. Patients also are offered the option of being referred to one of the system's neighborhood clinics. Referred patients are guaranteed they will be seen within 72 hours. PMID:18807396

  17. Com Ed's fuel buying probed by Illinois Commerce Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-06-07

    The Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) challenged Commonwealth Edison Company's oversupply of coal, which could damage the utility's credit rating and raise rates, after an earlier move to prevent the utility from collecting fuel-adjustment charges. Com Ed also purchased an oversupply of high-priced oil. A loss of credit will worsen Com Ed's financial problems and its nuclear-construction program. Regulators object to poor utility procurement practices following an accepted rate increase. Com Ed testified that the surplus inventory is due to poor planning, but the company is taking corrective steps to adjust its coal contracts despite a glut of coal and a sluggish economy. (DCK)

  18. Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160906.html Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade International study finds courses ... HealthDay News) -- Teens around the world are getting sex education in schools that fail to address their ...

  19. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED

    PubMed Central

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03600.001 PMID:25303172

  20. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED.

    PubMed

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. PMID:25303172

  1. Elephants or Dinosaurs? A Call to Action for Ed Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01

    To conclude this special section, guest editor Murphy examines why Ed Schools should redesign their leadership education programs, explores what it will take to foster change, and presents a model program to stimulate debate and action. (Contains 21 endnotes.)

  2. Ice storm puts staff in ED to the test.

    PubMed

    2005-11-01

    Creativity, planning ahead can help offset the problems severe winter weather can create for your ED. "Super-size" your wintertime staff to help deal with the inevitable patient surge during cold-weather months. Make sure your ED is fully stocked with blanket warmers and intravenous fluid warmers year-round, so you're always prepared for first winter storm. Optimize staff health by stressing re-education in procedures such as hand washing. PMID:16749577

  3. Redefining the EdD: Seeking a Separate Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to discuss the recommendations and guidelines of the Carnegie Group's 2007 effort to "Reclaim the EdD" as well as to outline the work completed at the University of Virginia related to their re-design of the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. In order to address the re-envision and re-formulation of the Doctor of…

  4. Bacteria and Spores - Skylab Student Experiment ED-31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Pictures 1 and 2 show samples of Bacillus Subtillus grown during the first performance of Robert Staehle's experiment (ED-31) aboard Skylab. Pictures 3 and 4 show colonies of the same bacteria that developed during the second performance of the experiment. The experiment ED-31 was proposed by Robert L. Staehle of Rochester, New York to determine the effect of the Skylab environment (particularly weightlessness) on the survival, growth rates, and mutations of certain bacteria and spores.

  5. How the American Society for Virology was founded.

    PubMed

    Joklik, Wolfang K; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2006-01-01

    The American Society for Virology, the very first such Society to be formed anywhere, was founded at a meeting of some 40 virologists at Chicago O'Hare International airport on June 9, 1981. They met after a decade and a half of intense discussion that originated at the 9th International Congress of Microbiology in Moscow in 1966 when a small group of virologists requested the International Association of Microbiological Societies to form a Virology Section within IAMS, and this request was rejected. Virologists therefore held their own First International Congress of Virology in Helsinki in 1968 which was very successful and generated intense informal discussion among leading virologists in this country as to the desirability of founding an American society for virologists. Proposals were circulated and discussed which resulted in the informal Chicago meeting that created the mechanism for founding the ASV and organizing its 1st Annual Meeting at Cornell in Ithaca in August 1982.

  6. Shared decision making in the ED: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Chadd K; Marco, Catherine A

    2016-08-01

    The process of shared decision making (SDM) is an ethical imperative in the physician-patient relationship, especially in the emergency department (ED), where SDM can present unique challenges because patients and emergency physicians often have no established relationship and decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and disposition are time dependent. SDM should be guided by the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice and the related principle of stewardship of finite resources. The objective of this article is to outline the ethical considerations of SDM in the ED in the context of diagnostic evaluations, therapeutic interventions, disposition decisions, and conflict resolution and to explore strategies for reaching decision consensus. Several cases are presented to highlight the ethical principles in SDM in the ED. SDM is an important approach to diagnostic testing in the ED. Achieving agreement regarding diagnostic evaluations requires a balance of respect for patient autonomy and stewardship of resources. SDM regarding ED therapeutic interventions is an important component of the balance of respect for patient autonomy and beneficence. While respecting patient autonomy, emergency physicians also recognize the importance of the application of professional judgment to achieve the best possible outcome for patients. SDM as an ethical imperative in the context of ED disposition is especially important because of the frequent ambiguity of equipoise in these situations. Unique clinical situations such as pediatric patients or patients who lack decisional capacity merit special consideration. PMID:27260552

  7. Culturally Grounded Stress Reduction and Suicide Prevention for African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W. LaVome; Case, Mary H.; Whipple, Christopher R.; Gooden, Adia S.; Lopez-Tamayo, Roberto; Lambert, Sharon F.; Jason, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is an often-overlooked manifestation of violence among African American youth that has become more prevalent in the last two decades. This article reports on the process used to culturally adapt a cognitive-behavioral coping with stress prevention intervention for African American adolescents. We implemented this adapted school-based suicide prevention intervention with 758 African American 9th, 10th and 11th grade students at four high schools in a large Midwestern city. The findings presented are preliminary. The adolescents in this sample endorsed high levels of suicide risk, with females endorsing significantly more suicide risk than males. Those receiving the prevention intervention evidenced an 86% relative suicide risk reduction, compared to the standard care control participants. The presented model of adaptation and resulting culturally-grounded suicide prevention intervention significantly reduced suicide risk among African American adolescents. Clinical, research and policy implications are discussed. PMID:27517094

  8. [Book review] Battle against extinction: Native fish management in the American West, by W. L. Minckley and J. E. Deacon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Review of: BATTLE AGAINST EXTINCTION: NATIVE FISH MANAGEMENT IN THE AMERICAN WEST. W. L. Minckley and J. E. Deacon (eds.). 1991. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson. ISBN 0-8165-1221-3. 517 p., $40.00 (hardcover).

  9. Ethnic Heritage Studies: German-American Profiles and Contributions--Major Figures. Experimental Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Talbott

    This teaching guide focuses on several prominent German-Americans and their contributions to American life, and provides some insights into German culture. It is part of the Louisville Area Ethnic Heritage Studies Project described in ED 150 043. The project materials are designed to foster communication across intercultural/ethnic lines. The…

  10. Chick embryo proliferation studies using EdU labeling

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Michelle; Puskarczyk, Karolina; Chapman, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Cell proliferation studies are an important experimental tool. The most commonly used thymidine analogues, tritiated thymidine and BrdU label cells during S-phase. Both methods have significant drawbacks; low sensitivity in the case of tritiated thymidine and a denaturation step during BrdU detection that destroys most cellular epitopes, requiring careful optimization. The antibody against BrdU is also large and tissue penetration can be difficult. EdU is a closely chemically related to BrdU, with detection achieved by a copper catalyzed reaction requiring a small fluorescently conjugated azide. Cell cultures, flow cytometry and high throughput studies using EdU labeled cells is exceptionally fast and does not require denaturation or antibodies. We have developed a tissue labeling technique in chick embryos using EdU. Following EdU chemistry to detect proliferating cells the tissue can undergo immunolabeling. We demonstrate fluorescent EdU chemistry followed by Tuj1 antibody staining resulting in multiplex fluorescent tissues. PMID:19253396

  11. Solar power-desalination PV*ED system

    SciTech Connect

    Kvajic, G.

    1980-12-01

    Photovoltaic-electrodialysis, PV*ED, power-desalination system is studied in which the seawater feed is heated in the PV-cells. Under simplified assumptions of a constancy of thermal PV efficiency and conversion factor of 0.5 for ED brakish water system, it is found that maximum potable water production per unit of insolation depends strongly on the temperature of seawater feed and the concentration factor of the optical collector. By varying these two parameters of the PV*ED system, it seems possible that one could control the ratio of power to water production within a large range so that various potential demands for power and water could be met.

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis of low-voltage EDS spectrum images

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.

    1998-03-01

    Whereas energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) has been used for compositional analysis in the scanning electron microscope for 30 years, the benefits of using low operating voltages for such analyses have been explored only during the last few years. This paper couples low-voltage EDS with two other emerging areas of characterization: spectrum imaging and multivariate statistical analysis. The specimen analyzed for this study was a finished Intel Pentium processor, with the polyimide protective coating stripped off to expose the final active layers.

  13. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved.

  14. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  15. An unusual syncope cause in the ED: favism.

    PubMed

    Soyuncu, Secgin; Bektas, Firat; Isik, Soner; Yigit, Ozlem

    2011-04-01

    Favism is an acute hemolytic syndrome occurring in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals after the consumption of fava beans. The highest incidence is in boys aged 2-6 years. We report a 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with recurrent syncope attacks due to favism. In our knowledge, this is the first report of favism-caused syncope in an adult patient without a G6PD deficiency diagnosis in the past and diagnosed in ED. PMID:20930025

  16. Microbiologic Methods Utilized in the MAL-ED Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Eric; Gratz, Jean; Kosek, Margaret; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Qureshi, Shahida; Kang, Gagandeep; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Samie, Amidou; Bessong, Pascal; Barrett, Leah; Lima, Aldo; Havt, Alexandre; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Taniuchi, Mami; Stroup, Suzanne; McGrath, Monica; Lang, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A central hypothesis of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is that enteropathogens contribute to growth faltering. To examine this question, the MAL-ED network of investigators set out to achieve 3 goals: (1) develop harmonized protocols to test for a diverse range of enteropathogens, (2) provide quality-assured and comparable results from 8 global sites, and (3) achieve maximum laboratory throughput and minimum cost. This paper describes the rationale for the microbiologic assays chosen and methodologies used to accomplish the 3 goals. PMID:25305291

  17. ED becomes 'lean' and cuts LBTC, LOS times.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    Lean manufacturing techniques, first developed by Toyota, can be successfully adapted to help improve processes in your ED. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has used Lean to reduce median length of stay, frequency of diversions, and the percentage of patients who left before treatment was complete (LBTC). Here's why "Lean" can help improve the performance of your ED: It enables you and your staff to see things from the patient's point of view. Lean tools enable you to view the status of your department in real-time and to compare that status with your performance goals. Exercises help identify areas where your processes break down and determine the most likely solutions.

  18. Microbiologic methods utilized in the MAL-ED cohort study.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Eric; Gratz, Jean; Kosek, Margaret; Zaidi, Anita K M; Qureshi, Shahida; Kang, Gagandeep; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Samie, Amidou; Bessong, Pascal; Barrett, Leah; Lima, Aldo; Havt, Alexandre; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Taniuchi, Mami; Stroup, Suzanne; McGrath, Monica; Lang, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    A central hypothesis of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is that enteropathogens contribute to growth faltering. To examine this question, the MAL-ED network of investigators set out to achieve 3 goals: (1) develop harmonized protocols to test for a diverse range of enteropathogens, (2) provide quality-assured and comparable results from 8 global sites, and (3) achieve maximum laboratory throughput and minimum cost. This paper describes the rationale for the microbiologic assays chosen and methodologies used to accomplish the 3 goals. PMID:25305291

  19. ESSEA On-Line Courses and the WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognier, E.

    2001-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its second year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." WERC has been able to use its EdGateway online community network to offer these courses to environmental education and science teachers nationwide. Through partnerships with the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE), the National Environmental Education Advancement Project (NEEAP), and other regional, state and local science and environmental education organizations, WERC has a broad reach in connecting with science educators nationwide. WERC manages several state and national listservs, which enable us to reach thousands of educators with information about the courses. EdGateway also provides a private online community in which we offer the courses. WERC partners with two Master Teachers from Utah, who facilitate the courses, and with the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at Weber State University, who provides low-cost graduate credit for the courses. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Two Earth Science Experts, Dr. Rick Ford from Weber State University, and Dr. Art Sussman from WestEd also contribute to the high caliber of learning the students experience in the courses. (Dr. Sussman's book, Dr. Art's Guide to Planet Earth, is used as one of

  20. Homophobic Attitudes and Associated Factors Among Adolescents: A Comparison of Six Latin American Countries.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Enrique; León, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Homophobic attitudes are still very common in the world, although there are large differences between countries. This study analyzed the responses of almost 30,000 8th- and 9th-grade students from six countries who participated in the Latin American component of the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study. Higher levels of homophobia were found in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, and Paraguay than in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico. Homophobic attitudes were positively associated with being male, having lower levels of empathy, spending less time with friends and the media, having aggressive attitudes, and being more religious, in particular non-Catholic Christian. PMID:26861958

  1. Homophobic Attitudes and Associated Factors Among Adolescents: A Comparison of Six Latin American Countries.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Enrique; León, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Homophobic attitudes are still very common in the world, although there are large differences between countries. This study analyzed the responses of almost 30,000 8th- and 9th-grade students from six countries who participated in the Latin American component of the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study. Higher levels of homophobia were found in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, and Paraguay than in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico. Homophobic attitudes were positively associated with being male, having lower levels of empathy, spending less time with friends and the media, having aggressive attitudes, and being more religious, in particular non-Catholic Christian.

  2. FETC, TCEA Commemorate 25 Years of Serving Ed Tech Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There's only one way to prepare for all of the exciting things that the ed tech market has in store for 2005-- by attending a conference. That's why T.H.E. Journal hopes readers will join them at this year's FETC (Booth 1505) and TCEA (Booth 1934) conferences to help celebrate their 25th anniversaries. Overviews are provided for both conferences…

  3. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  4. Three Ways edTPA Prepared Me for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    edTPA, a capstone assessment designed to assess whether new teachers are ready for the job by evaluating their teaching and their analysis of their teaching, helped prepare the author for the classroom in three ways. First, he became accountable to his students. Second, he learned to analyze his teaching. Third, he discovered how to relate…

  5. Engaging the public through writing an op-ed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labosier, Chris; Zhu, Laiyin; Quiring, Steven

    2012-10-01

    In May, prior to the start of the 2012 hurricane season, AGU asked us to write an op-ed for the Houston Chronicle on the importance of funding hurricane research. We were excited to be asked and pleased that AGU facilitated the process by providing us with some guidance on writing the op-ed. Given the impact that Hurricane Ike had in Texas just a few years ago, we felt it was important to remind the citizens of the greater Houston metropolitan area of the societal benefits of funding hurricane research. Thanks to the assistance of AGU staff, writing the article required only a few hours of time. Our op-ed was published in the print edition of the Houston Chronicle on 1 June 2012, the official start of the hurricane season (http://www.chron.com/default/article/Tight-budgets-posing-threat-to-Texas-hurricane-3600363.php). It was picked up by the media relations office in the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and featured on the college's Web site in the dean's biweekly briefing and on its Facebook page. As a result, the op-ed reached a large and diverse audience.

  6. Candidate Success and edTPA: Looking at the Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lesley A.; Kelly, Mary K.; Baldwin, Joni L.; Arnold, Jackie M.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study looks at the correlations between Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) data and numerous program data points, including GPA, major GPA, and benchmark assignment scores, gathered in an Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Previous studies have looked to correlate grade point average (GPA) with pre-service teacher…

  7. EdMOO: One Approach to a Multimedia Collaborative Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holkner, Bernard

    The nature of the multiuser object oriented (MOO) environment lends itself to flexible and rich interactive collaboration space providing interactive discussion, mail, mailing list, and news features to its virtual denizens. EdMOO (HREF1) was created in mid-1995 as an environment for teachers to experience the text based virtual reality…

  8. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Peggy Brick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taverner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Peggy Brick, former director of Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey's Center for Family Life Education (CFLE) and author of numerous sexuality education resources used worldwide, is the subject of this interview. Ms. Brick was interviewed by William J.…

  9. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    PubMed

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  10. 5 Ways That edX Could Change Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Since MIT and Harvard started edX, their joint experiment with free online courses, the venture has attracted enormous attention for opening the ivory tower to the world. But in the process, the world will become part of an expensive and ambitious experiment testing some of the most interesting--and difficult--questions in digital education. Can…

  11. HAZ-ED Classroom Activities for Understanding Hazardous Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Superfund Program investigates and cleans up hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. Part of this program is devoted to informing the public and involving people in the process of cleaning up hazardous waste sites from beginning to end. The Haz-Ed program was developed to assist the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)…

  12. Teaching Russian Via Distance Learning, the EdNet Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsiray, Stephen W., Jr.; And Others

    In Utah, the statewide distance education network (EdNet) enables students from five rural and suburban high schools to learn Russian and earn college credits. Courses in Russian are offered through a partnership involving the Cache County School District, Utah State University, and the Utah State Office of Education. Classes are taught on one…

  13. Self-Instructional Workbook for the ED Form 799.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, Washington DC. Student Financial Assistance Programs.

    To assist in making funds available for student higher education loans and to keep their interest rates as low as possible, the Department of Education compensates participating lending institutions using a combination of interest subsidies and special allowance payments. Lenders use ED Form 799, Lender's Interest and Special Allowance Request and…

  14. CCR5 is a receptor for Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    III, Francis Alonzo; Kozhaya, Lina; Rawlings, Stephen A.; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; DuMont, Ashley L.; Myszka, David G.; Landau, Nathaniel; Unutmaz, Derya; Torres, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens and are central to Staphylococcus aureus-mediated killing of host cells. S. aureus encodes pore-forming bi-component leukotoxins that are toxic toward neutrophils, but also specifically target other immune cells. Despite decades since the first description of Staphylococcal leukocidal activity, the host factors responsible for the selectivity of leukotoxins toward different immune cells remain unknown. Here we identified the HIV co-receptor, CCR5, as a cellular determinant required for cytotoxic targeting of subsets of myeloid cells and T lymphocytes by the S. aureus leukotoxin ED (LukED). We further demonstrate that LukED-dependent cell killing is blocked by CCR5 receptor antagonists, including the HIV drug maraviroc. Remarkably, CCR5-deficient mice are largely resistant to lethal S. aureus infection, highlighting the importance of CCR5 targeting in S. aureus pathogenesis. Thus, depletion of CCR5+ leukocytes by LukED suggests a novel S. aureus immune evasion mechanism that can be therapeutically targeted. PMID:23235831

  15. About Issues Facing High Schools. EdFact Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.

    The list of resources printed in this guide were taken from the EdSource report, "High Schools in the Hot Seat," an overview of the challenges facing California's high schools. The information is divided into three sections: students, standards, and high-school reform. The topics covered include peer culture, disengagement, and motivation; the…

  16. The Pre-Health Collection within MedEdPORTAL's iCollaborative: Helping Faculty Prepare Students for the Competencies in the New MCAT[superscript 2015] Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski, Henry V.; Zapanta, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    To help faculty prepare and revise courses in all the disciplines represented in the MCAT[superscript 2015], the American Association of Medical Colleges, through its MedEdPORTAL's iCollaborative, has established the Pre-health Collection, a repository of reviewed web resources that are openly and freely available to faculty, and indirectly…

  17. U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government's Reaction to the EEOC African American Workgroup Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks in Government (BIG) reviewed and responded to the EEOC [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Office] African American Workgroup Report. The BIG ED Chapter considered whether: There is any evidence indicating that the number and percentage of African Americans employed by any federal government…

  18. Factors affecting ED length-of-stay in surgical critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, B; Sullivan, S; Levine, A; Dallara, J

    1995-09-01

    To determine what patient characteristics are associated with prolonged emergency department (ED) length-of-stay (LOS) for surgical critical care patients, the charts of 169 patients admitted from the ED directly to the operating room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU) during a 6-week period in 1993 were reviewed. The ED record was reviewed for documentation of factors that might be associated with prolonged ED LOS, such as use of computed tomographic (CT), radiology special procedures, and the number of plain radiographs and consultants. ED LOS was considered to be the time from triage until a decision was made to admit the patient. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, use of CT and special procedures were the strongest independent predictors of prolonged ED length-of-stay. The number of plain radiographs and consultants had only a minimal effect. Use of a protocol-driven trauma evaluation system was associated with a shorter ED LOS. In addition to external factors that affect ED overcrowding, ED patient management decisions may also be associated with prolonged ED length-of-stay. Such ED-based factors may be more important in surgical critical care patients, whose overall ED LOS is affected more by the length of the ED work-up rather than the time spent waiting for a ICU bed or operating suite.

  19. Direct interaction between the Arabidopsis disease resistance signaling proteins, EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Feys, B J; Moisan, L J; Newman, M A; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    The Arabidopsis EDS1 and PAD4 genes encode lipase-like proteins that function in resistance (R) gene-mediated and basal plant disease resistance. Phenotypic analysis of eds1 and pad4 null mutants shows that EDS1 and PAD4 are required for resistance conditioned by the same spectrum of R genes but fulfil distinct roles within the defence pathway. EDS1 is essential for elaboration of the plant hypersensitive response, whereas EDS1 and PAD4 are both required for accumulation of the plant defence-potentiating molecule, salicylic acid. EDS1 is necessary for pathogen-induced PAD4 mRNA accumulation, whereas mutations in PAD4 or depletion of salicylic acid only partially compromise EDS1 expression. Yeast two-hybrid analysis reveals that EDS1 can dimerize and interact with PAD4. However, EDS1 dimerization is mediated by different domains to those involved in EDS1-PAD4 association. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that EDS1 and PAD4 proteins interact in healthy and pathogen-challenged plant cells. We propose two functions for EDS1. The first is required early in plant defence, independently of PAD4. The second recruits PAD4 in the amplification of defences, possibly by direct EDS1-PAD4 association.

  20. Patient's jewelry stolen as she rests in the ED.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    In a hospital ED in Rhode Island, a 96-year-old patient was robbed of her jewelry while she rested in her room. The thief was dressed in scrubs. Identification badges are only one way of keeping unwanted intruders out and your patients' belongings safe. Other suggestions: Have different groups of staff members, i.e., ED doctors and nurses, wear color-coded scrubs that distinguish them from other hospital personnel. If your staff see a strangely dressed person or someone who looks lost or like they don't fit in, they should question them about their identity. Create protocols for the removal and safekeeping of patients' jewelry that cover several different scenarios.

  1. ER vs. ED: A Comparison of Televised and Real-Life Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Roberts, Traci; Fine, Michael J.; Dillman Carpentier, Francesca R.; Rice, Kristen R.; Barnato, Amber E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although accurate health-related representations of medical situations on television can be valuable, inaccurate portrayals can engender misinformation. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare socio-demographic and medical characteristics of patients depicted on television vs. actual U.S. Emergency Department (ED) patients. Methods Two independently working coders analyzed all 22 programs in one complete year of the popular emergency room drama ER. Inter-rater reliability was excellent, and all initial coding differences were easily adjudicated. Actual health data were obtained from the National Heath and Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from the same year. We used Pearson’s chi-squared test to compare televised vs. real distribution across key socio-demographic and medical variables. Results Ages at the extremes (e.g., ≤4 and ≥45) were less commonly represented on television compared with reality. Compared with reality, characters on television were less commonly women (31.2% vs. 52.9%), African American (12.7% vs. 20.3%) or Hispanic (7.1% vs. 12.5%). The two most common acuity categories for television were the extreme categories “non-urgent” and “emergent,” whereas the two most common categories for reality were the middle categories “semi-urgent” and “urgent.” Compared with reality, televised visits were most commonly due to injury (63.5% vs. 37.0%), and televised injuries were less commonly work-related (4.2% vs. 14.8%). Conclusions Comparison of represented and actual characteristics of ED patients may be valuable in helping us determine what types of patient misperceptions may exist as well as what types of interventions may be beneficial in correcting that potential misinformation. PMID:22766407

  2. ED Utilization Trends in Sports-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Wendy J.; Gittelman, Mike

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency department (ED) visits for sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have risen. This study evaluated how the number and severity of admissions have changed as ED visits for sports-related TBIs have increased. METHODS: A retrospective study of children aged 0 to 19 years at a level 1 trauma center was performed. Patients from 2002 to 2011 with a primary or secondary diagnosis of TBI were identified from the hospital’s inpatient and outpatient trauma registries. Frequencies were used to characterize the population, χ2 analysis was performed to determine differences between groups, and regression analysis looked at relationship between year and injury severity score or length of stay. RESULTS: Sport was responsible for injury in 3878 (15.4%) cases during the study period; 3506 (90.4%) were discharged from the hospital, and 372 (9.6%) were admitted. Seventy-three percent were male patients and 78% Caucasian; mean age was 13 ± 3.5 years. ED visits for sports-related TBIs increased 92% over the study period, yet there was no significant change (χ2 = 9.8, df = 9, P = .37) in the percentage of children admitted. Mean injury severity score for those admitted decreased from 7.8 to 4.8 (β = –0.46; P = .006); length of stay trended downward (β = –0.05; P = .05). CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of children being admitted from the ED with sports-related TBI has not changed over the past 10 years. The severity of admitted sports-related TBI is decreasing. Additional research is needed to correlate these trends with other TBI mechanisms. PMID:24081999

  3. ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed3A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-12

    ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed3A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  ... Order Data Guide Documents:  GEO Description/Abstract Detailed CERES ISCCP-D2like Product ... Data Products Catalog:  DPC_ISCCP-D2like-GEO_R5V3  (PDF) Readme Files:  Readme GEO R5-987 ...

  4. ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed2A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-24

    ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed2A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  ... Order Data Guide Documents:  GEO Description/Abstract Detailed CERES ISCCP-D2like Product ... Data Products Catalog:  DPC_ISCCP-D2like-GEO_R5V3  (PDF) Readme Files:  Readme GEO R5-909 ...

  5. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative. PMID:25688413

  6. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  7. Teachers are students in ZPG program called 'Pop Ed.'.

    PubMed

    Schline, S

    1977-01-01

    Zero Population Growth's Population Education (Pop Ed) program began in 1975 as an ongoing effort to bring the "real world" into the classroom by demonstrating the relationships among population trends, food and energy resources, and environmental and economic problems. The training workshops which last for a day or 2 have the following goals: 1) to offer a brief demographic overview for teachers, 2) to provide lesson plans and techniques readily usable in the classroom, 3) to alert teachers to the best written and audiovisual materials available, 4) to identify local resources for teaching Pop Ed, and 5) to provide sample materials. In the 1st year of program operation 10 workshops were held. These workshops are credited, at least partly, with the subsequent population instruction that reached over 10,400 students and 1600 teachers. Another 15 workshops were held in the 2nd year of operation. Obstacles to the program are the assumption on the part of some teachers that Pop Ed belongs in disciplines other than their own and the belief on the part of many teachers that they will require extensive training. PMID:12308748

  8. Fresh policies and procedures, transparency fuel ED turnaround.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The ED at Banner Payson Medical Center in Payson, AZ, has charted dramatic improvements on key metrics through a range of staff and policy changes. In just a few months, the ED has halved wait times, patient satisfaction has improved, and daily volume is up. Administrators say the secret to the success of the effort is a move to be transparent by posting key metrics regarding patient flow, a tactic that has helped the team pull together and feel a sense of accomplishment when performance goals are achieved. Administrators adjusted staff schedules to better match patient volume patterns in the ED, and they added staff to help nurses during peak hours. A new provider group enlisted the assistance of scribes during peak hours to manage the documentation workload while also enabling physicians to focus more patient interaction. Physicians hold end-of-shift huddles to review successes and challenges, and to improve physician/nurse communication. The tactic also helps develop the staff from an educational standpoint. PMID:27266001

  9. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative.

  10. Chinese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Stanford M.

    This book on the Chinese Americans focuses on such aspects of intergroup relations, community characteristics, social problems, acculturation, racial and social discrimination, and economic opportunities for the ethnic group as: the Chinese diaspora; forerunners of overseas Chinese community organization; Chinese community organization in the…

  11. Does the Op-Ed Page Have a Chance to Become a Public Forum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciofalo, Andrew; Traverso, Kim

    1994-01-01

    Surveys op-ed page editors, finding that fewer than half of the responding papers have op-ed pages; that professional journalists, public figures, and propagandists dominate the pages; and that editors firmly control the agenda. (SR)

  12. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition. PMID:27625723

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) from Gossypium barbadense.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng; Qi, Xiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays an important role in plant defense against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae infection of Gossypium barbadense could lead to Verticillium wilt which seriously reduces the cotton production. Here, we cloned and characterized a G. barbadense homolog of EDS1, designated as GbEDS1. The full-length cDNA of the GbEDS1 gene was obtained by the technique of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of the GbEDS1 gene was 1,647 bp long and encoded a protein of 548 amino acids residues. Comparison of the cDNA and genomic DNA sequence of GbEDS1 indicated that this gene contained a single intron and two exons. Like other EDS1s, GbEDS1 contained a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Subcellular localization assay revealed that GbEDS1-green fluorescence protein fusion protein was localized in both cytosol and nucleus. Interestingly, the transcript levels of GbEDS1 were dramatically increased in response to pathogen V. dahliae infection. To investigate the role of GbEDS1 in plant resistance against V. dahliae, a conserved fragment derived from GbEDS1 was used to knockdown the endogenous EDS1 in Nicotiana benthamiana by heterologous virus-induced gene silencing. Our data showed that silencing of NbEDS1 resulted in increased susceptibility to V. dahliae infection in N. benthamiana, suggesting a possible involvement of the novelly isolated GbEDS1 in the regulation of plant defense against V. dahliae.

  14. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition.

  15. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. PMID:21871744

  16. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  17. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  18. Self-Esteem and Emotional Intelligence among B.Ed Trainees of Tsunami Affected Coastal Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babu M, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Through this study the author investigates the relationship between self-esteem and emotional intelligence among B.Ed trainees of Tsunami affected coastal belt of Alappey district of Kerala, India. Stream of study, marital status and age based comparisons were made among the B.Ed trainees. 92 B.Ed trainees were the participants in the study. It…

  19. Reading between the lines: building collaboration with ED clinicians can increase revenue.

    PubMed

    Edelberg, Caral

    2009-05-01

    Steps hospitals can take to enhance their ED billing, coding, and compliance include: Auditing records regularly to ensure ED nurses understand which procedures require specialized documentation. Determining whether assessment criteria would pass a compliance review. Ensuring ED documentation guidelines can be easily used by staff. Maintaining dated copies of revisions to these guidelines. PMID:19445397

  20. What Voc Ed Administrators Should Know About the Welding Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, M. Andrew

    1976-01-01

    Information on the development of a welding program and curriculum is presented to assist instructors and administrators in the implementation of a training program. The American Welding Society is recommended as an authoritative source for assistance. (EC)

  1. EMS transports patients to clinics--seeks to relieve ED crowding.

    PubMed

    2010-07-01

    With most EDs overcrowded and with no relief in sight, ED managers will take all the help they can get. In some areas of the country, the local EMS providers are looking to offer some relief by transporting less urgent patients to alternative sites such as urgent care clinics. EDs assist in the development of program protocols and processes. ED nurses are considered for consultation on whether a patient can appropriately be seen in a less urgent setting. EMS providers must be trained on the requirements patients must fulfill to be transported to an ED PMID:20608479

  2. Constitutive disease resistance requires EDS1 in the Arabidopsis mutants cpr1 and cpr6 and is partially EDS1-dependent in cpr5.

    PubMed

    Clarke, J D; Aarts, N; Feys, B J; Dong, X; Parker, J E

    2001-05-01

    The systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response in Arabidopsis is characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), expression of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, and enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens. The cpr (constitutive expressor of PR genes) mutants express all three SAR phenotypes. In addition, cpr5 and cpr6 induce expression of PDF1.2, a defense-related gene associated with activation of the jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance pathways. cpr5 also forms spontaneous lesions. In contrast, the eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility) mutation abolishes race-specific resistance conferred by a major subclass of resistance (R) gene products in response to avirulent pathogens. eds1 plants also exhibit increased susceptibility to virulent pathogens. Epistasis experiments were designed to explore the relationship between the cpr- and EDS1-mediated resistance pathways. We found that a null eds1 mutation suppresses the disease resistance phenotypes of both cpr1 and cpr6. In contrast, eds1 only partially suppresses resistance in cpr5, leading us to conclude that cpr5 expresses both EDS1-dependent and EDS1-independent components of plant disease resistance. Although eds1 does not prevent lesion formation on cpr5 leaves, it alters their appearance and reduces their spread. This phenotypic difference is associated with increased pathogen colonization of cpr5 eds1 plants compared to cpr5. The data allow us to place EDS1 as a necessary downstream component of cpr1- and cpr6-mediated responses, but suggest a more complex relationship between EDS1 and cpr5 in plant defense.

  3. Statistical analysis of low-voltage EDS spectrum images

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.

    1998-03-01

    The benefits of using low ({le}5 kV) operating voltages for energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) of bulk specimens have been explored only during the last few years. This paper couples low-voltage EDS with two other emerging areas of characterization: spectrum imaging of a computer chip manufactured by a major semiconductor company. Data acquisition was performed with a Philips XL30-FEG SEM operated at 4 kV and equipped with an Oxford super-ATW detector and XP3 pulse processor. The specimen was normal to the electron beam and the take-off angle for acquisition was 35{degree}. The microscope was operated with a 150 {micro}m diameter final aperture at spot size 3, which yielded an X-ray count rate of {approximately}2,000 s{sup {minus}1}. EDS spectrum images were acquired as Adobe Photoshop files with the 4pi plug-in module. (The spectrum images could also be stored as NIH Image files, but the raw data are automatically rescaled as maximum-contrast (0--255) 8-bit TIFF images -- even at 16-bit resolution -- which poses an inconvenience for quantitative analysis.) The 4pi plug-in module is designed for EDS X-ray mapping and allows simultaneous acquisition of maps from 48 elements plus an SEM image. The spectrum image was acquired by re-defining the energy intervals of 48 elements to form a series of contiguous 20 eV windows from 1.25 kV to 2.19 kV. A spectrum image of 450 x 344 pixels was acquired from the specimen with a sampling density of 50 nm/pixel and a dwell time of 0.25 live seconds per pixel, for a total acquisition time of {approximately}14 h. The binary data files were imported into Mathematica for analysis with software developed by the author at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A 400 x 300 pixel section of the original image was analyzed. MSA required {approximately}185 Mbytes of memory and {approximately}18 h of CPU time on a 300 MHz Power Macintosh 9600.

  4. Designing concrete EDS maglev guideways: Power losses in metallic reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Beto, D.; Plotkin, D.

    1997-05-01

    Conventional reinforced concrete designs will have to be altered when designing a guideway for a maglev using an electrodynamically suspended (EDS) propulsion system. This type of propulsion system generates large magnetic fields that will develop magnetically induced, circulating eddy currents in any conventional steel reinforcement in close proximity to the magnets. These eddy currents, if large enough, may produce significant power losses that could adversely effect operation of the system. This paper presents a method and explanation for civil engineers to use for estimating the power losses due to the presence of metallic reinforcement. This procedure may be used to help guide future designs in the selection and placement of reinforcing material.

  5. Pilot explores organ donation in the ED--challenges raised.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    A pilot program for ED organ donation at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)--Presbyterian Hospital is seeking much-needed organs, while maintaining optimal medical care for the living and avoiding potential conflicts of interest. Separate teams are involved with organ donation and with patient care, creating a "firewall" to prevent conflicts of interest. After failed CPR, a minimum of two minutes of no-CPR time is allowed to pass after death is pronounced to be certain there is no occult cardiac activity. Infusions of cold fluids are used to give enough time for the transplant surgeon to arrive and determine if any organs can be procured. PMID:20535893

  6. SEM/EDS Characterization of Ambient PM during Agricultural Burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wall, S.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected with UNC passive samplers during agricultural burns in Imperial Valley, California. Four Bermuda grass field burn events were sampled at 3-8 locations surrounding each burn. Sampling began at the start of each burn (30-60 min) and continued for 24-120 hours. During 3 of the 4 burn events, winds were calm and plumes were observed to travel straight up to the inversion layer. In one event, winds created a ground-level plume that enveloped two UNC samplers mounted on telephone poles very close to the field (0.2-0.3 miles away). Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy / energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDS) was used to measure particle sizes and elemental composition, from which mass concentrations and size distributions were calculated. The median PM2.5 and PM10 levels measured in this study were 3.4 and 20 ug/m3, respectively. To determine quantitative accuracy, UNC sampler PM2.5 results (PM< 2.5 um) were compared to PM2.5 results from four co-located, continuous-reading beta-attenuation monitors (EBAMs). The median agreement (EBAM - UNC) was 3.8 ug/m3. Manual SEM/EDS detected various distinctive species in these samples, including sea salt, spores, plant fragments, and large soot agglomerates. During the ‘plume event’, 24-hour PM2.5 exposures downwind were up to 17 times higher than that measured upwind. Numerous submicron combustion particles with carbon and oxygen only were directly observed by manual SEM/EDS in the two plume-impacted samples, along with larger ash particles enriched in potassium, sulfur, chlorine, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. CCSEM/EDS data from this event was grouped into 5 particle classes to generate size-fraction-specific pie charts. Burn-related particle types contributed 95% of the PM2.5 in the location directly impacted by the ground-level plume, compared to only 12% in the upwind location. A sample of Imperial County Bermuda grass analyzed in bulk and

  7. Status of the Development of EDS Coal Liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Vick, G K; Epperly, W R

    1982-07-23

    This article traces the evolution and development of a modern coal liquefaction technology, the EDS (Exxon Donor Solvent) process, over a period of 15 years. During this time the technology has been advanced from laboratory experiments to a pilot plant with a coal feed rate of 250 tons per day, and findings from several areas of science and technology have been important. The process is now in the final stage of development to generate the data needed to design a plant of commercial size.

  8. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  9. Secondary contamination of ED personnel from hazardous materials events, 1995-2001.

    PubMed

    Horton, D Kevin; Berkowitz, Zahava; Kaye, Wendy E

    2003-05-01

    Hazardous materials (hazmat) events pose a health threat not only for those individuals in the immediate vicinity of the release (ie, members of the general public, on-site first responders, employees), but also for ED personnel (ie, physicians and nurses) treating the chemically contaminated victims arriving at the hospital. Secondary contamination injuries to ED personnel result when exposed victims enter the ED without being properly decontaminated. Data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance System were used to conduct a retrospective analysis on hazmat events occurring in 16 states from 1995 through 2001 that involved secondary injury to ED personnel. Six events were identified in which 15 ED personnel were secondarily injured while treating contaminated victims. The predominant injuries sustained were respiratory and eye irritation. Proper victim decontamination procedures, good field-to-hospital communication, and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) use can help prevent ED personnel injuries and contamination of the ED. PMID:12811712

  10. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  11. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  12. Pediatric mental health emergencies in the emergency medical services system. American College of Emergency Physicians.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Margaret A; Mace, Sharon E

    2006-10-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) are vital in the management of pediatric patients with mental health emergencies (MHE). Pediatric MHE are an increasing part of emergency medical practice because EDs have become the safety net for a fragmented mental health infrastructure which is experiencing critical shortages in services in all sectors. EDs must safely, humanely, and in a culturally and developmentally appropriate manner manage pediatric patients with undiagnosed and known mental illnesses including those with mental retardation, autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and those experiencing a behavioral crisis. EDs also manage patients with suicidal ideation, depression, escalating aggression, substance abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, maltreatment, and those exposed to violence and unexpected deaths. EDs must address not only the physical but also the mental health needs of patients during and after mass casualty incidents and disasters. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Emergency Physicians support the following actions: advocacy for increased mental health resources, including improved pediatric mental health tools for the ED, increased mental health insurance coverage, adequate reimbursement at all levels; acknowledgment of the importance of the child's medical home, and promotion of education and research for mental health emergencies. PMID:16997698

  13. Micro Slot Generation by μ-ED Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, H. K.; Mayanak, M. K.; Rajpurohit, S. R.; Mathai, V. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micro electro discharge machining is one of the most widely used advanced micro machining technique owing to its capability to fabricate micro features on any electrically conductive materials irrespective of its material properties. Despite its wide acceptability, the process is always adversely affected by issues like wear that occurred on the tool electrode, which results into generation of inaccurate features. Micro ED milling, a process variant in which the tool electrode simultaneously rotated and scanned during machining, is reported to have high process efficiency for generation of 3D complicated shapes and features with relatively less electrode wear intensity. In the present study an attempt has been made to study the effect of two process parameters viz. capacitance and scanning speed of tool electrode on end wear that occurs on the tool electrode and overcut of micro slots generated by micro ED milling. The experiment has been conducted on Al 1100 alloy with tungsten electrode having diameter of 300 μm. Results suggest that wear on the tool electrode and overcut of the micro features generated are highly influenced by the level of the capacitance employed during machining. For the parameter usage employed for present study however, no significant effect of variation of scanning speed has been observed on both responses.

  14. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals.

  15. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals. PMID:27077331

  16. American Hero(es).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valore, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    Entering Re-ED (Reeducation of Emotional Disturbed Children) at age 15, Alex, spent three years working and learning together to reach the goals that Alex speaks to in his culminating story. Presents a transcript of a videotaped Petition to Graduate meeting held at the Positive Education Program as an example of the Re-ED philosophy, its…

  17. Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians: Can They Communicate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Clark S.

    A failure in communication between Anglo American, American Indian, and Mexican American communities exists because of the inadequate reporting of the events that occur within each of these groups. This speech outlines several basic ways in which communication can eventually be improved. First, it emphasizes that educators must recognize and…

  18. The use of WIKIs in 9^th grade Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohstreter, Pete; Wyatt, Rachel; Taylor, Richard

    2009-04-01

    With the introduction of our laptop computer program several years ago, we have been charged with finding more ways to introduce technology into the classroom. It seemed only logical to incorporate the WIKIPEDIA philosophy in our Physics classes. Students are required to make entries to the WIKI on a regular basis. The documents become a storehouse of cumulative knowledge produced by all students and accessible to all students. Example WIKIs will be shown and suggestions on how to incorporate a WIKI into your classroom will be given.

  19. NASA Space Biology Program: 9th Annual Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered include plant and animal gravity receptors and transduction; the role of gravity in growth and development of plants and animals; biological support structures and the role of calcium; mechanisms and responses of gravity sensitive systems; and mechanisms of plant responses to gravity.

  20. PREFACE: 9th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitmann, Christoph; David, Christian; Nolting, Frithjof; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Conference logo This volume compiles the contributions to the International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM2008) held on 20-25 July 2008 in Zurich, Switzerland. The conference was the ninth in a series which started in Göttingen in 1984. Over the years the XRM conference series has served as a forum bringing together all relevant players working on the development of methods, building instrumentation, and applying x-ray microscopy to challenging issues in materials science, condensed matter research, environmental science and biology. XRM2008 was attended by about 300 participants who followed 44 oral presentations and presented 220 posters. Conference photograph Figure 1: Participants of the XRM2008 conference gathered in front of the main building of the ETH-Zurich. The conference showed that x-ray microscopy has become a mature field resting on three pillars. The first are workhorse instruments available even to non-specialist users. These exist at synchrotron sources world-wide as well as in laboratories. They allow the application of established microscopy methods to solve scientific projects in areas as diverse as soil science, the investigation of cometary dust particles, magnetic materials, and the analysis of ancient parchments. Examples of all of these projects can be found in this volume. These instruments have become so well understood that now they are also commercially available. The second pillar is the continued development of methods. Methods like stroboscopic imaging, wet cells or high and low temperature environments add versatility to the experiments. Methods like phase retrieval and ptychographic imaging allow the retrieval of information which hitero was thought to be inaccessible. The third pillar is the extension of such instruments and methods to new photon sources. With x-ray free electron lasers on the horizon the XRM community is working to transfer their know-how to these novel sources which will offer unprecedented brightness and time structure, but which at the same time require unprecedented effort to perform the experiment and to extract meaningful information from the data. Resting on these three pillars, the XRM community seems well prepared to solve the scientific questions of today and to help solve even more challenging scientific questions in the future. Many people contributed to the success of XRM2008, first and foremost were the participants with their excellent contributions and through their lively discussions. Organizing the event was made possible due to many helping hands and brains at the organizing institution, the Paul Scherrer Institut. It is our pleasure to thank all of these people. Financial support was given by the Gold Sponsor, XRADIA, by the European Round Table for Synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers, the Center for Imaging Science and Technology at Zurich, and by the Swiss National Science Foundation. The conference was kindly hosted by ETH Zurich which provided a perfect setting for this venue. We thank all the participants of XRM2008, everybody who helped in the organization and all financial supporters and are looking forward to hearing about further progress during XRM2010 which will be organized by Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. C Quitmann, C David, F Nolting, F Pfeiffer and M Stampanoni Proceedings Editors Conference photograph Figure 2 View over Zurich and into the alps from the terrace of the ETHZ main building during the XRM2008 reception. Conference photograph Figure 3 Flag tosser and Alphorn blowers in front of the ETH Zurich main building during the XRM2008 opening reception. Conference photograph Figure 4 Industry exhibition in the entrance hall of the ETHZ main building. Conference photograph Figure 5 Lively discussions amongst the conference participants took place during the two poster sessions. Conference photograph Figure 6 Lecture hall with the participants busily discussing between talks. Conference photograph Figure 7 Past and present winners of the Werner Meyer-Ilse Award are joined by Andrea Meyer-Ilse, the wife of the deceased x-ray microscopy pioneer Werner Meyer-Ilse. From left to right: Weilun Chao (winner 2005), Ann Sakdinawat (winner 2008), Piere Thibault (winner 2008), Andrea Meyer-Ilse and M Feser (winner 2002). Conference photograph Figure 8 Reception in the court of Schloss Rapperswil during the XRM2008 conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 9 Conference participants walking towards the castle of Rapperswil during the conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 10 Accompanying persons group gathered in the port of Lucerne.

  1. Introduction to Marketing for 9th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotosky, Paul; Johnson, Jeannie G.

    Designed to enable students to develop knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses and to be able to understand the relationship of these characteristics to educational and vocational choices, this guide presents an introductory program on vocations using a thematic interdisciplinary approach to career awareness. It is suggested that the…

  2. 9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

    2003-08-24

    The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

  3. A "Humanities" Approach to 9th Grade Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, William

    1979-01-01

    Describes an integrated language arts and social studies program designed to consider man as a totality and to promote empathy in students for six different cultural areas in Asia and Africa. Literature, art, music, and writing exercises are listed. Activities include slide shows, cooking a Chinese meal, and a speech by an Indian woman and her…

  4. Occupational Exploration at Ontario Junior High School: 9th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gene; And Others

    The document contains 56 activities for Grade 9. The contents include the following areas: questions about the future; job seeking activities and guidelines; career games; a personal interest check list; unit guides for courses in World of Work (55 pages), and Career Educational Planning (40 pages) which include objectives, activities, evaluation,…

  5. Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery Davis

    2011-09-09

    The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

  6. The Illinois 9th Grade Adolescent Health Survey. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    A survey was conducted in Illinois to identify the risk of certain health problems among adolescents; to determine the health status of Illinois youth in relation to the Surgeon General's "Healthy People 2000 Objectives" and monitor progress toward national and state goals; and to help those working at national, state, and local levels develop…

  7. College & Career Programs for Deaf Students. 9th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlings, Brenda W., Ed.; And Others

    This directory of 136 postsecondary programs serving deaf and hard of hearing students in North America is based on a 1994 survey. Introductory material provides guidance for the student, including answers to frequently asked questions and suggestions for counselors such as guidelines to help students choose the most appropriate program. Program…

  8. Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Papers are reported which were presented at the conference in the areas of displays, ride qualities and handling, driving and psychomotor skills, control, system identification and signal detection, electrophysiological and systems analysis, and modelling.

  9. Indiana's Academic Standards: 9th Grade English/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This booklet of academic standards spells out what students should be able to do in Grade 9 English/Language Arts. The booklet gives examples to help students understand what is required to meet the standards and comes accompanied with a list of 10 things parents can do to help their child get a good education. It outlines the following seven…

  10. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  11. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  12. As Higher Ed Goes Global, Ethics Become an Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Ian

    2012-01-01

    For international educators, 2012 may well be remembered as the Year of Scrutiny, when perennial questions about overseas programs became more pointed. Missteps by some American colleges have led to a sharper focus on how they handle their recruitment of foreign students and their campuses abroad. Accreditors urge universities to be more watchful…

  13. A Global Tech Ed View from Central Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2004-01-01

    One often hears about the need to prepare American technical education students to compete in the burgeoning global manufacturing community. In addition, one hears experts say that learning certain programs and techniques can put the youth first in line for jobs where beating the offshore competition depends on production speed, product quality,…

  14. The 2015 "EdNext" Poll on School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    In May and June 2015, the ninth annual "Education Next" survey was administered to a nationally representative sample of some 4,000 respondents, including oversamples of roughly 700 teachers, 700 African Americans, and 700 Hispanics. The 2015 survey posed many new questions exploring opinion on curricular and other issues that have never…

  15. Reindustrialization: Implications for Voc Ed. Information Series No. 233.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.

    The decline of American industry and its loss of competitive strength in the world economy has led to a need for stimulation of the economy through reindustrialization. Reindustrialization is a part of, or a tool for, economic growth. As such this term is directly linked to productivity and job creation. Several critical elements and procedures…

  16. The African American Image in American Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, St. Clair

    1990-01-01

    Political conditions have influenced the screen images of U.S. cinema, and the images of African Americans have reflected prevailing social stereotypes. The history of African-American representation in films is traced, and it is noted that the tendency to portray African Americans stereotypically has not changed. (SLD)

  17. Historiography, American Theatre, and the First Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Linda Walsh

    American theatre history should include a study of Native American performances, since these performances are rich with "American" symbolic materials such as imagery, symbols, and heraldic visions of animals and landscapes. Indian cultures understood the importance of performance for both the visionary and the community at large. Even the pow-wow…

  18. Parental Monitoring, Association with Externalized Behavior, and Academic Outcomes in Urban African-American Youth: A Moderated Mediation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Tamayo, Roberto; LaVome Robinson, W; Lambert, Sharon F; Jason, Leonard A; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2016-06-01

    African-American adolescents exposed to neighborhood disadvantage are at increased risk for engaging in problem behavior and academic underachievement. It is critical to identify the mechanisms that reduce problem behavior and promote better academic outcomes in this population. Based on social disorganization and socioecological theories, the current prospective study examined pathways from parental monitoring to academic outcomes via externalizing behavior at different levels of neighborhood disadvantage. A moderated mediation model employing maximum likelihood was conducted on 339 African-American students from 9th to 11th grade (49.3% females) with a mean age of 14.8 years (SD ± 0.35). The results indicated that parental monitoring predicted low externalizing behavior, and low externalizing behavior predicted better academic outcomes after controlling for externalizing behavior in 9th grade, intervention status, and gender. Mediation was supported, as the index of mediation was significant. Conversely, neighborhood disadvantage did not moderate the path from parental monitoring to externalizing behavior. Implications for intervention at both community and individual levels and study limitations are discussed.

  19. Parental Monitoring, Association with Externalized Behavior, and Academic Outcomes in Urban African-American Youth: A Moderated Mediation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Tamayo, Roberto; LaVome Robinson, W; Lambert, Sharon F; Jason, Leonard A; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2016-06-01

    African-American adolescents exposed to neighborhood disadvantage are at increased risk for engaging in problem behavior and academic underachievement. It is critical to identify the mechanisms that reduce problem behavior and promote better academic outcomes in this population. Based on social disorganization and socioecological theories, the current prospective study examined pathways from parental monitoring to academic outcomes via externalizing behavior at different levels of neighborhood disadvantage. A moderated mediation model employing maximum likelihood was conducted on 339 African-American students from 9th to 11th grade (49.3% females) with a mean age of 14.8 years (SD ± 0.35). The results indicated that parental monitoring predicted low externalizing behavior, and low externalizing behavior predicted better academic outcomes after controlling for externalizing behavior in 9th grade, intervention status, and gender. Mediation was supported, as the index of mediation was significant. Conversely, neighborhood disadvantage did not moderate the path from parental monitoring to externalizing behavior. Implications for intervention at both community and individual levels and study limitations are discussed. PMID:27237941

  20. FormEd: An X Window System application for managing first-order formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, T.L.; McCune, W.W.

    1990-11-01

    FormEd is a window-based program for constructing, displaying, and managing first-order logic formulas. The main motivation for constructing FormEd was the desire to have formulas displayed in a readable, two-dimensional format. Users of FormEd can make two kinds of transformation on formulas: logic transformations, such as negation normal form translation, which preserve the meaning of a formula, and edit transformations, which can be used to make arbitrary changes, such as adding a hypothesis to a subformula. FormEd was written by using the X Window System, Version 11, and code from the theorem prover OTTER. 4 refs.

  1. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses.

  2. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses. PMID:26551890

  3. A preliminary examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Matherne, Camden E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Schvey, Natasha A; Brady, Sheila M; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6-12years with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29years±1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8% White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n=19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n=33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n=199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p=0.001) and adiposity (p=0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p=0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p=0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p=0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) and BMIz (p=0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p=0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain.

  4. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p = 0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p = 0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) and BMIz (p = 0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p = 0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  5. Chestnut, American (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Maynard, Charles A; McGuigan, Linda D; Oakes, Allison D; Zhang, Bo; Newhouse, Andrew E; Northern, Lilibeth C; Chartrand, Allison M; Will, Logan R; Baier, Kathleen M; Powell, William A

    2015-01-01

    The key to successful transformation of American chestnut is having the correct combination of explant tissue, selectable markers, a very robust DNA delivery system, and a reliable regeneration system. The most important components of this transformation protocol for American chestnut are the following: starting out with rapidly dividing somatic embryos, treating the embryos gently throughout the Agrobacterium inoculation and cocultivation steps, doing the cocultivation step in desiccation plates, and finally transferring the embryos into temporary-immersion bioreactors for selection. None of these departures from standard Agrobacterium transformation protocols is sufficient by itself to achieve transgenic American chestnut, but each component makes a difference, resulting in a highly robust protocol. The average transformation efficiency that can be expected using the described protocol is approximately 170 stable embryogenic transformation events per gram of somatic embryo tissue, a considerable improvement over the 20 transformation events per gram we reported in 2006 (Maynard et al. American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) Agrobacterium protocols, 2nd ed., 2006). We have regenerated nearly 100 of these events, containing 23 different gene constructs, into whole plants. As of the fall of 2013, we had a total of 1,275 transgenic chestnut trees planted at eight locations in New York State and one in Virginia. Based on a combination of field-trial inoculations, greenhouse small-stem inoculations, and detached-leaf assays, we have identified three transgenes that produce stronger resistance to chestnut blight than non-transgenic American chestnut. Depending on the transgene and the event, this resistance can be either intermediate between American chestnut and Chinese chestnut, approximately equal to or even higher than the resistance naturally found in Chinese chestnut.

  6. The American Advisor Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Bernard M.

    Mutual understanding of both similarities and differences between Americans and host nation counterparts is a key to effective use of American advisors abroad. When Americans and their hosts know what to expect of each other, the interpersonal competence, consulting skill, and technical knowledge of American consultants can be brought to bear more…

  7. [Educational objectives in the new interdisciplinary subject "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Techniques" under the 9th Revision of the Licensing Regulations for Doctors--consensus recommendations of the German Society for Rehabilitative Sciences and the German Society for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Gülich, M; Gutenbrunner, C; Lampe, B; Morfeld, M; Schwarzkopf, S R; Smolenski, U C

    2004-12-01

    In October 2003 the 9 (th) revision of the Federal Medical Training Regulations (Approbationsordnung) came into effect. The new compulsory interdisciplinary subject "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Treatment" offers the opportunity to teach all students in comprehensive concepts of Rehabilitation such as the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) of the WHO and the new book 9 of the German Social Code (SGB 9), as well as Physical Medicine and Naturopathic Treatment. Since the content of this new subject has not been defined up to date a joint task force of the German Society of Rehabilitation Science and the German Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation was founded in order to recommend teaching standards. As part of these teaching standards educational objectives are introduced in this article. They should guide the persons in charge of teaching the subject in the medical faculties. In some areas the students should acquire profound abilities and skills in addition to knowledge. The medical faculties may focus on different educational targets according to their individual teaching profile.

  8. Debunking the Myths. Research Offers Ammunition to Fight Misperceptions of Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Debunks seven myths: vocational students are low achievers, they do not pursue higher education, voc ed does not help academic competence, it does not make a difference in the labor market, vocational students are economically rich and psychologically poor, student employment engenders poor work attitudes, and voc ed is a poor investment. (SK)

  9. EdTrAc Teacher Education Program: First-Year Implementation Evaluation (2005-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Brian; Shelton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The Educational Training Academy (EdTrAc) is an NSF-funded project of Normandale Community College to increase the number, diversity, and skills of students preparing to be elementary and middle school teachers with a specialty in math and science. Overall, this evaluation indicates that the EdTrAc implementation is on track after its first year…

  10. Standalone engine simulator (SAES), Engine Dynamics simulator (EDS) Xerox Sigma 5 interface hardware manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshten, P. M.; Black, S.; Pearson, R.

    1979-01-01

    The ESS-EDS and EDS-Sigma interfaces within the standalone engine simulator are described. The operation of these interfaces, including the definition and use of special function signals and data flow paths within them during data transfers, is presented along with detailed schematics and circuit layouts of the described equipment.

  11. Unstandardized Responses to a "Standardized" Test: The edTPA as Gatekeeper and Curriculum Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Katherine; Oyler, Celia

    2016-01-01

    We examine edTPA (a teacher performance assessment) implementation at one private university during the first year that our state required this exam for initial teaching certification. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 19 teacher educators from 12 programs as well as public information on edTPA pass rates, we explore whether the…

  12. Evaluation of the Demonstration Sites in the ConnectEd Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Beverly; Bradby, Denise; Hartry, Ardice; Sipes, Laurel; Hall, Leslie; Tasoff, Shayna

    2009-01-01

    In California, the James Irvine Foundation created ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career to promote multiple pathways that link to the state's 15 major industry sectors. The ConnectEd Network of Schools, a demonstration project supported by Irvine, plays a critical role in expanding student options through multiple pathways and…

  13. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  14. Characteristics of Reading Disability Types in Middle School Students Classified ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Types of reading disabilities (RD) have not yet been investigated in students classified with emotional disturbance (ED). The prevalence of RD and differentiating characteristics were examined in 118 middle school students attending a self-contained school for ED students by defining RDs with reading standard scores less than 85 on the two…

  15. Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracious, F. L. Antony; Shyla, F. L. Jasmine Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of prospective B.Ed teachers was probed to find the relationship between Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers. Data for the study were collected using self made Multiple Intelligence Inventory and Digital Learning Awareness Scale.…

  16. "What about Bilingualism?" A Critical Reflection on the edTPA with Teachers of Emergent Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana; López, Dina; Makar, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the debates surrounding teacher quality and preparation programs, the edTPA (education Teaching Performance Assessment) has emerged to assess future teachers through a portfolio-based certification process. This study offers the perspective of three faculty members who participated in an experimental configuration of edTPA implementation…

  17. Economic Development Network (ED>Net): 1995-96 Report to the Governor and the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The Economic Development Network (ED>Net) of the California Community Colleges was designed to advance the state's economic growth and competitiveness by coordinating and facilitating workforce improvement, technology deployment, and business development initiatives. This report reviews outcomes for ED>Net for 1995-96 based on reports prepared by…

  18. Internet-Based Economic Education: The Case of EconEdLink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFossen, Phillip J.; Herman-Ellison, Lisa C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconEdLink site provides lessons and classroom learning activities based on economics topics in the news, as well as access to real-time economic data. EconEdLink's content is designed to help integrate economic concepts across the curriculum as outlined in the Voluntary National Content…

  19. G. ED. Paper-Book 1974-1984. The Process of Growth of an Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verduin-Muller, Henriette, Ed.

    Fifteen papers presented at conferences throughout Europe and in the USSR, Nigeria, Japan, Jamaica, and Tunesia provide an introduction to the research work being done by the graduate level Department of Geography for Education (G.ED.) at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. An introductory chapter describes the three G.ED. modules, which…

  20. Race to the Top District Competition: The Data Quality Campaign's Comments on ED's Proposed Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) submits these comments in response to the US Department of Education's (ED) draft requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions for the Race to the Top District (RTT-D) competition. DQC applauds ED for including the following components of the proposal: (1) Data is acknowledged throughout the…

  1. A Review of "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Joan Mogul

    2010-01-01

    While virtually all sex ed curricula are designed to be used with children, teens and young adults, "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only" ([C] 2009, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey) offers lessons to help participants fully embrace the possibility of sexual pleasure and intimacy from mid-life through…

  2. An Evaluation of California's Community College Based Economic Development Programs (ED>Net).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman (James) Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This study describes economic outcomes of California's ED>Net (California Community College Economic Network) program, an alliance between community colleges and California businesses. ED>Net's purpose is to advance the state's economic growth by providing job-related education and services to businesses and organizations. This report develops…

  3. Interdisciplinary mistrust, communication breakdowns cited in survey of ED handoffs.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Both emergency and inpatient physicians agree that miscommunication during interunit handoffs can compromise patient care and that sequential handoffs are particularly problematic, according to a new study conducted at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) in Omaha, NE. The study highlights physician survey data showing that there is mistrust between inpatient and emergency physicians, and that which provider is responsible for patient care can be unclear when a verbal handoff is made. To make improvements, UNMC has been piloting a tool aimed at standardizing verbal and written handoff communications. Nearly a third of all the participating physicians surveyed reported having handoff-related adverse events, and most put the blame on ineffective communication. Ninety-four percent of emergency physicians surveyed indicated that they had to defend their clinical decisions at least some of the time. The admitting physicians largely validated this concern, with more than 25% noting that they usually disagree with decisions made in the ED. Using the situation, background, assessment, recommendation (SBAR) form of communication as a starting point, an intervention tool aims to streamline handoff communications, both verbally and in the electronic medical record.

  4. The MAL-ED cohort study in Mirpur, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Islam, Md Munirul; Mondal, Dinesh; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Am Shamsir; Tofail, Fahmida; Gaffar, Sm Abdul; Haque, Rashidul; Guerrant, Richard L; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study site in Bangladesh is located in the capital city of Dhaka in an urban slum that has one of the highest population densities in the world. The site is in the Bauniabadh area of Mirpur, Dhaka. A typical squatter settlement, the average family size of households in Mirpur Bauniabadh is 4.5, with 48% females. About 20% of households have a monthly income of only US$62. About 30% of mothers never attended school, and only 3% obtained secondary school education. The majority of the people are day laborers, garment workers, and transport workers. About 72% of caregivers always wash their hands after helping the child defecate and 6.6% never wash their hands. The diarrheal attack rate for Mirpur is 4.69 episodes per child per year. The study site is representative of a typical urban slum of Dhaka city in terms of demographics, socioeconomic status, and general health indicators.

  5. The MAL-ED cohort study in Mirpur, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Islam, Md Munirul; Mondal, Dinesh; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Am Shamsir; Tofail, Fahmida; Gaffar, Sm Abdul; Haque, Rashidul; Guerrant, Richard L; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study site in Bangladesh is located in the capital city of Dhaka in an urban slum that has one of the highest population densities in the world. The site is in the Bauniabadh area of Mirpur, Dhaka. A typical squatter settlement, the average family size of households in Mirpur Bauniabadh is 4.5, with 48% females. About 20% of households have a monthly income of only US$62. About 30% of mothers never attended school, and only 3% obtained secondary school education. The majority of the people are day laborers, garment workers, and transport workers. About 72% of caregivers always wash their hands after helping the child defecate and 6.6% never wash their hands. The diarrheal attack rate for Mirpur is 4.69 episodes per child per year. The study site is representative of a typical urban slum of Dhaka city in terms of demographics, socioeconomic status, and general health indicators. PMID:25305298

  6. Perceived social support among adults seeking care for acute respiratory tract infections in US EDs.

    PubMed

    Levin, Sara K; Metlay, Joshua P; Maselli, Judith H; Kersey, Ayanna S; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2009-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) provide a disproportionate amount of care to disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. We examined social support levels among a diverse population of adults seeking ED care for acute respiratory tract infections. A convenience sample of adults seeking care in 1 of 15 US EDs was telephone interviewed 1 to 6 weeks postvisit. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (7-point Likert) assessed social support across 3 domains: friends, family, and significant others. Higher scores indicate higher support. Of 1104 subjects enrolled, 704 (64%) completed the follow-up interview. Factor analysis yielded 3 factors. Mean social support score was 5.54 (SD 1.04). Female sex, greater household income, and better health status were independently associated with higher levels of social support. Social support levels among adults seeking care in the ED for acute respiratory tract infections are similar to general population cohorts, suggesting that social support is not a strong determinant of health care seeking in EDs.

  7. ED diversion: multidisciplinary approach engages high utilizers, helps them better navigate the health care system.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Working with partners, the St. Charles Health System in Bend, OR, has implemented an ED diversion project that is helping patients who frequent the ED connect with more appropriate settings for their primary care needs. The hospital identifies high ED utilizers using claims data, then a multidisciplinary engagement team establishes care plans for these patients. The most at-risk patients are paired with community health workers to help them better navigate the health care system. The ED diversion project has reduced unnecessary ED utilization by 45% to 70% in cohorts of patients that the hospital has analyzed thus far. The hospital contracts with a non-profit organization to supply and train community health workers. Community health workers follow a structured model that includes more than 80 different pathways to follow, based on patient conditions. PMID:22043590

  8. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Gonen, T

    2016-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment.

  9. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Gonen, T

    2016-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment. PMID:27572734

  10. Asian American-Pacific American Relations: The Asian American Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sucheng

    This paper examines the migration and settlement history of Asians into the United States and the interaction of the major Asian immigrants with each other and with American society. An important thesis is that, because the differences between Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are much greater than the similarities between them, they should no…

  11. Evaluation of Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal-derived liquid as utility diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heater, W.R.; Froh, T.W.; Ariga, S.; Baker, Q.A.; Piispanen, W.; Webb, P.; Trayser, D.; Keane, W.J.

    1983-10-01

    The program consisted of three phases: (I) characterization of the physical and chemical properties of EDS, (II) evaluation of EDS in a laboratory medium-speed diesel engine, and (III) evaluation of EDS in a low-speed diesel engine operating at a utility. The characteristics of high aromatic content and low cetane number that were found during Phase I made it unlikely that EDS could be used as a direct substitute for diesel fuel without engine modification to provide ignition assistance. Phase II was conducted on a 12-cylinder General Electric Company 7FDL diesel engine. Blends of up to 30% EDS and 70% 0.2 diesel fuel (DF-2) were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing engine fuel oil system and injecting DF-2 through an auxiliary nozzle as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 5 to 10% pilot oil heat input. Phase III was conducted on a 16-cylinder Cooper-Bessemer LSV-16-GDT diesel engine at an EUC plant in Easton, Maryland. Blends of up to 66.7% EDS and 33.3% DF-2 were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing fuel oil system and using a natural-gas-fueled precombustion chamber as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 3 to 6% pilot gas heat input. The program confirmed that it is feasible to consume significant proportions of EDS in a diesel engine, but more development is needed before EDS can be considered a viable alternative liquid fuel for diesel engines, and an industrial hygiene program is needed to assure safe handling of the fuel.

  12. Ecological Diversity in South American Mammals: Their Geographical Distribution Shows Variable Associations with Phylogenetic Diversity and Does Not Follow the Latitudinal Richness Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fergnani, Paula Nilda; Ruggiero, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which the latitudinal gradient in species richness may be paralleled by a similar gradient of increasing functional or phylogenetic diversity is a matter of controversy. We evaluated whether taxonomic richness (TR) is informative in terms of ecological diversity (ED, an approximation to functional diversity) and phylogenetic diversity (AvPD) using data on 531 mammal species representing South American old autochthonous (marsupials, xenarthrans), mid-Cenozoic immigrants (hystricognaths, primates) and newcomers (carnivorans, artiodactyls). If closely related species are ecologically more similar than distantly related species, AvPD will be a strong predictor of ED; however, lower ED than predicted from AvPD may be due to species retaining most of their ancestral characters, suggesting niche conservatism. This pattern could occur in tropical rainforests for taxa of tropical affinity (old autochthonous and mid-Cenozoic immigrants) and in open and arid habitats for newcomers. In contrast, higher ED than expected from AvPD could occur, possibly in association with niche evolution, in arid and open habitats for taxa of tropical affinity and in forested habitats for newcomers. We found that TR was a poor predictor of ED and AvPD. After controlling for TR, there was considerable variability in the extent to which AvPD accounted for ED. Taxa of tropical affinity did not support the prediction of ED deficit within tropical rainforests, rather, they showed a mosaic of regions with an excess of ED interspersed with zones of ED deficit within the tropics; newcomers showed ED deficit in arid and open regions. Some taxa of tropical affinity showed excess of ED in tropical desert areas (hystricognaths) or temperate semideserts (xenarthrans); newcomers showed excess of ED at cold-temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This result suggests that extreme climatic conditions at both temperate and tropical latitudes may have promoted niche evolution in mammals

  13. Ecological Diversity in South American Mammals: Their Geographical Distribution Shows Variable Associations with Phylogenetic Diversity and Does Not Follow the Latitudinal Richness Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fergnani, Paula Nilda; Ruggiero, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which the latitudinal gradient in species richness may be paralleled by a similar gradient of increasing functional or phylogenetic diversity is a matter of controversy. We evaluated whether taxonomic richness (TR) is informative in terms of ecological diversity (ED, an approximation to functional diversity) and phylogenetic diversity (AvPD) using data on 531 mammal species representing South American old autochthonous (marsupials, xenarthrans), mid-Cenozoic immigrants (hystricognaths, primates) and newcomers (carnivorans, artiodactyls). If closely related species are ecologically more similar than distantly related species, AvPD will be a strong predictor of ED; however, lower ED than predicted from AvPD may be due to species retaining most of their ancestral characters, suggesting niche conservatism. This pattern could occur in tropical rainforests for taxa of tropical affinity (old autochthonous and mid-Cenozoic immigrants) and in open and arid habitats for newcomers. In contrast, higher ED than expected from AvPD could occur, possibly in association with niche evolution, in arid and open habitats for taxa of tropical affinity and in forested habitats for newcomers. We found that TR was a poor predictor of ED and AvPD. After controlling for TR, there was considerable variability in the extent to which AvPD accounted for ED. Taxa of tropical affinity did not support the prediction of ED deficit within tropical rainforests, rather, they showed a mosaic of regions with an excess of ED interspersed with zones of ED deficit within the tropics; newcomers showed ED deficit in arid and open regions. Some taxa of tropical affinity showed excess of ED in tropical desert areas (hystricognaths) or temperate semideserts (xenarthrans); newcomers showed excess of ED at cold-temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This result suggests that extreme climatic conditions at both temperate and tropical latitudes may have promoted niche evolution in mammals

  14. Ecological Diversity in South American Mammals: Their Geographical Distribution Shows Variable Associations with Phylogenetic Diversity and Does Not Follow the Latitudinal Richness Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fergnani, Paula Nilda; Ruggiero, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which the latitudinal gradient in species richness may be paralleled by a similar gradient of increasing functional or phylogenetic diversity is a matter of controversy. We evaluated whether taxonomic richness (TR) is informative in terms of ecological diversity (ED, an approximation to functional diversity) and phylogenetic diversity (AvPD) using data on 531 mammal species representing South American old autochthonous (marsupials, xenarthrans), mid-Cenozoic immigrants (hystricognaths, primates) and newcomers (carnivorans, artiodactyls). If closely related species are ecologically more similar than distantly related species, AvPD will be a strong predictor of ED; however, lower ED than predicted from AvPD may be due to species retaining most of their ancestral characters, suggesting niche conservatism. This pattern could occur in tropical rainforests for taxa of tropical affinity (old autochthonous and mid-Cenozoic immigrants) and in open and arid habitats for newcomers. In contrast, higher ED than expected from AvPD could occur, possibly in association with niche evolution, in arid and open habitats for taxa of tropical affinity and in forested habitats for newcomers. We found that TR was a poor predictor of ED and AvPD. After controlling for TR, there was considerable variability in the extent to which AvPD accounted for ED. Taxa of tropical affinity did not support the prediction of ED deficit within tropical rainforests, rather, they showed a mosaic of regions with an excess of ED interspersed with zones of ED deficit within the tropics; newcomers showed ED deficit in arid and open regions. Some taxa of tropical affinity showed excess of ED in tropical desert areas (hystricognaths) or temperate semideserts (xenarthrans); newcomers showed excess of ED at cold-temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This result suggests that extreme climatic conditions at both temperate and tropical latitudes may have promoted niche evolution in mammals.

  15. Isolation and cloning of a papillomavirus from a North American porcupine by using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification: the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Tachezy, Ruth; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; MacNamara, Tracey; Burk, Robert D; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2005-01-20

    The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus was isolated from a cutaneous papillomatous lesion of a North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA). The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1 (EdPV-1) were determined. EdPV-1 is only distantly related to other benign cutaneous papillomavirus sequences and is the first member of the novel Sigma papillomavirus genus. PMID:15629787

  16. Improved spectrum simulation for validating SEM-EDS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, P.; Penman, C.; Duncumb, P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray microanalysis by SEM-EDS requires corrections for the many physical processes that affect emitted intensity for elements present in the material. These corrections will only be accurate provided a number of conditions are satisfied and it is essential that the correct elements are identified. As analysis is pushed to achieve results on smaller features and more challenging samples it becomes increasingly difficult to determine if all conditions are upheld and whether the analysis results are valid. If a theoretical simulated spectrum based on the measured analysis result is compared with the measured spectrum, any marked differences will indicate problems with the analysis and can prevent serious mistakes in interpretation. To achieve the necessary accuracy a previous theoretical model has been enhanced to incorporate new line intensity measurements, differential absorption and excitation of emission lines, including the effect of Coster-Kronig transitions and an improved treatment of bremsstrahlung for compounds. The efficiency characteristic has been measured for a large area SDD detector and data acquired from an extensive set of standard materials at both 5 kV and 20 kV. The parameterized model has been adjusted to fit measured characteristic intensities and both background shape and intensity at the same beam current. Examples are given to demonstrate how an overlay of an accurate theoretical simulation can expose some non-obvious mistakes and provide some expert guidance towards a valid analysis result. A new formula for calculating the effective mean atomic number for compounds has also been derived that is appropriate and should help improve accuracy in techniques that calculate the bremsstrahlung or use a bremsstrahlung measurement for calibration.

  17. Hierarchy and social inequality in the American Southwest, A.D. 800-1200.

    PubMed

    Plog, Stephen; Heitman, Carrie

    2010-11-16

    Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico has been the focus of much recent archaeological research on Pueblo groups who lived during the 9th through 12th centuries in the American Southwest. Here, we examine variation in mortuary patterns in the canyon, focusing in particular on one mortuary crypt, to address questions of social differentiation and the chronology of important sociopolitical processes. Based on new radiocarbon dates as well as reanalysis of the stratigraphy and spatial distribution of materials in the mortuary crypt, we conclude that significant social differentiation began in Chaco ca. 150-200 y earlier than suggested by previous research. We argue that social inequality was sanctified and legitimized by linking people to founders, ancestors, and cosmological forces.

  18. Hierarchy and social inequality in the American Southwest, A.D. 800–1200

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephen; Heitman, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico has been the focus of much recent archaeological research on Pueblo groups who lived during the 9th through 12th centuries in the American Southwest. Here, we examine variation in mortuary patterns in the canyon, focusing in particular on one mortuary crypt, to address questions of social differentiation and the chronology of important sociopolitical processes. Based on new radiocarbon dates as well as reanalysis of the stratigraphy and spatial distribution of materials in the mortuary crypt, we conclude that significant social differentiation began in Chaco ca. 150–200 y earlier than suggested by previous research. We argue that social inequality was sanctified and legitimized by linking people to founders, ancestors, and cosmological forces. PMID:21059921

  19. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing. PMID:24890806

  20. College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the

  1. Population-Based Burden of COPD-Related Visits in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Steven J.; Waller, Anna E.; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Travers, Debbie; Weinberger, Morris; Donohue, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the population-based burden of ED care for COPD. Methods: We analyzed statewide ED surveillance system data to quantify the frequency of COPD-related ED visits, hospital admissions, and comorbidities. Results: In 2008 to 2009 in North Carolina, 97,511 COPD-related ED visits were made by adults ≥ 45 years of age, at an annual rate of 13.8 ED visits/1,000 person-years. Among patients with COPD (n = 33,799), 7% and 28% had a COPD-related return ED visit within a 30- and 365-day period of their index visit, respectively. Compared with patients on private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and noninsured patients were more likely to have a COPD-related return visit within 30 and 365 days and have three or more COPD-related visits within 365 days. There were no differences in return visits by sex. Fifty-one percent of patients with COPD were admitted to the hospital from the index ED visit. Subsequent hospital admission risk in the cohort increased with age, peaking at 65 to 69 years (risk ratio [RR], 1.41; 95% CI, 1.26-1.57); there was no difference by sex. Patients with congestive heart failure (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.22-1.37), substance-related disorders (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.60), or respiratory failure/supplemental oxygen (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.19-1.31) were more likely to have a subsequent hospital admission compared with patients without these comorbidities. Conclusions: The population-based burden of COPD-related care in the ED is significant. Further research is needed to understand variations in COPD-related ED visits and hospital admissions. PMID:23579283

  2. Vietnamese Americans: Lessons in American History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Tolerance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Teaching Tolerance is pleased to announce a new partnership with the Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance in the online release of its interdisciplinary curriculum, "Vietnamese Americans: Lessons in American History." The curriculum guide-- complete with timelines, maps and primary sources--offers eight lesson plans,…

  3. Native American Loanwords in American English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Ginny

    1997-01-01

    Examines the history of White-Indian relationships in Latin America and North America and the corresponding fluctuations in loanword borrowing into English from Native American languages. Explores 20th-century attitudes toward Native Americans and the impact of these attitudes on borrowing today, particularly in Alaska where Natives are resisting…

  4. New levitation scheme with AC superconducting magnet for EDS MAGLEV system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, J.K.; Hahn, S.Y.; Cha, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a new magnetic levitation scheme which is able to generate levitation force for all speeds including a standstill. Auxiliary wheels which are needed in EDS MAGLEV vehicle can be eliminated. This scheme uses AC superconducting magnets to generate levitation force. In this paper, magnetic fields, forces and power dissipations generated by AC magnets moving above a conducting slab are calculated analytically. Results of calculation show characteristics of EDS system with AC magnet, such as levitation force and loss, are superior to those of EDS system with DC magnets for all speeds.

  5. AB006. Erectile dysfunction (ED) as a marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVD)

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2015-01-01

    In 1973 V. Michal, a vascular surgeon said “Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to diseases of the vascular bed”. And this makes sense since ED and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) share many risk factors like aging, obesity, inactivity, smoking, depression, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes/insuline resistance. These conditions may lead to an oxidative stress which ultimately can promote vasoconstriction, thrombosis, atherosclerosis and finally ED and CVD. One of the most accepted Idea is that small vessels plug earlier, it means, small arteries when have for example 50% of obstruction will probably have a clinical manifestation before bigger arteries!

  6. American Indian Epistemologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cajete, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides general insights into American Indian epistemologies that can assist student affairs professionals in their work and examines the shared understandings of American Indians with regard to tribal knowledge and education.

  7. Native American Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horse, Perry G.

    2005-01-01

    Many issues and elements--including ethnic nomenclature, racial attitudes, and the legal and political status of American Indian nations and Indian people--influence Native American identity. (Contains 3 notes.)

  8. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Governors, Directors at Annual Convention in Nashville American Health Care Association Files Court Challenge to Arbitration Rule AHCA ... this Page | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions © American Health Care Association Google Plus .

  9. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Ear Canals Read More ABTA News October 5, 2016 Largest American Brain Tumor Association Team Running in Bank of America Chicago Marathon Sunday, October 9 September 21, 2016 American Brain Tumor Association Awards 16 Grants to Support ...

  10. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) Fact sheet Updated March 2016 Key facts About ... is essential. Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by ...

  11. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  12. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  13. The Comparative Effects of Function-Based versus Nonfunction-Based Interventions on the Social Behavior of African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustian, April Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Disproportionality has been a persistent problem in special education for decades. Despite mandates outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), African American students continue to be disproportionately represented in the Emotional Disturbance (ED) category in special education (e.g., Skiba,…

  14. The Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher, 1999: Violence in America's Public Schools--Five Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binns, Katherine; Markow, Dana

    1999-01-01

    "The Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher, 1999: Violence in America's Public Schools: Five Years Later" revisits issues addressed in a 1993 study (ED397190), and compares findings of the two studies on the issue of school violence from the perspectives of students, teachers, and law enforcement officers across the country, about the…

  15. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Ana V; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  16. Balanced Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of EDS1 Are Required for a Complete Plant Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P.; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack. PMID:20617163

  17. Asian American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, William T.; Yu, Elena S. H.

    The sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics of all Asian American communities since 1950 have been greatly influenced by federal immigration legislation, and it is not possible to consider the field of Asian American studies without an understanding of the history of immigration legislation. Asian American research may be divided into…

  18. The Latin American University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Joseph, Ed.; Weatherhead, Richard W., Ed.

    A comparative overview is presented of the Latin American university, which is seen as an institution with a particular history and definite role. Chapters are as follows: "The Latin American University: An Introduction," by Joseph Maier and Richard W. Weatherhead; "Origin and Philosophy of the Spanish American University," by Mario Gongora;…

  19. Urban American Indian Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Josea

    This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American Indians that are especially pernicious to older American Indians living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American Indian elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes…

  20. American Humor. [Course Syllabus].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane, David E. E.

    This syllabus describes a three-credit course entitled "American Humor," offered at the University of New Haven (Connecticut). According to the syllabus, "American Humor" will identify traits of American humor as historical phenomena with relations to national character, business attitudes, regionalism, folk humor, and health; historical…

  1. Unlearning American Patriotism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Immoral excesses of American foreign policy are so severe and so deep-rooted that American patriotism is now a moral burden. This love, which pulls toward amnesia, wishful thinking and inattention to urgent foreign interests, should be replaced by commitment to a global social movement that seeks to hem in the American empire. Teachers can advance…

  2. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  3. Soviet American Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

    This is a glossary of Russian and English terms related to building design and construction. It is intended for use by interpreters and specialists dealing with American and Soviet literature on buildings. The glossary consists of two parts: the Soviet-American section, which presents the Soviet terms written in Russian and the American equivalent…

  4. 16 Extraordinary Hispanic Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    The lives of many Hispanic Americans have made a difference in the story of America. Hispanic Americans are people whose families can be traced to the Spanish speaking countries. At the time of the 1990 census, there were 22,400,000 Hispanic Americans in the United States. They should be proud of their heritage, and should recognize the…

  5. Culture and Personality Among European American and Asian American Men

    PubMed Central

    Eap, Sopagna; DeGarmo, David S.; Kawakami, Ayaka; Hara, Shelley N.; Hall, Gordon C.N.; Teten, Andra L.

    2009-01-01

    Personality differences between Asian American (N = 320) and European American men (N = 242) and also among Asian American ethnic groups (Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and mixed Asian) are examined on the Big Five personality dimension. Personality structures for Asian Americans and European Americans closely replicate established norms. However, congruence is greater for European American and highly acculturated Asian American men than for low acculturated Asian American men. Similar patterns are found for the construct loss of face (LOF). Asian American men with a high concern for LOF are less similar in their personality structure to European American men than Asian American men with low LOF concern. Mean differences are also found among Asian American and European American men, who differ significantly on Extraversion, Conscientiousness, Openness, and Neuroticism. Results indicate that acculturation and LOF are significantly associated with these four personality dimensions for both Asian American and European American men. PMID:19169434

  6. Variation of retinal ED50 with exposure duration for near-IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Fuller, Daniel R.; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Edsall, P. R.

    1997-05-01

    A body of data relates the ED50 for laser-induced retinal damage to exposure duration for visible-wavelength laser exposure and for 1064 nm laser exposure. The database, extending from sub-nanosecond exposures to kilosecond exposures, can for the most part, be fit to models based on thermal interactions, thermal-mechanical mechanisms, and photochemical processes. Exceptions to this fit occur between 1 and 100 microseconds where the damage mechanism transitions from exclusively thermal to thermal-mechanical. Disagreement exists as to whether this anomalous dip of ED50 is real or is an artifact of the data. We determined the laser-induced retinal ED50 in Rhesus monkey eyes for several exposure durations from 12 nanoseconds to 1000 milliseconds at 755 nm using a dye laser, an alexandrite laser, and a Ti:Sapphire laser. These data do not show a dip in ED50 in the microsecond time period.

  7. Harvesting Your Prof Crop: Nine Tips for Launching an Op-Ed Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joseph L.

    1983-01-01

    Faculty can be helpful by providing commentaries to newspaper op-ed pages, but such a public relations program requires consistency, tact, good internal communications, thoughtfulness, and marketing skills. (MSE)

  8. Alcohol Interventions Among Underage Drinkers in the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chermack, Stephen T.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Carter, Patrick M.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.; Barry, Kristen L.; Walton, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the efficacy of emergency department (ED)-based brief interventions (BIs), delivered by a computer or therapist, with and without a post-ED session, on alcohol consumption and consequences over 12 months. METHODS: Patients (ages 14–20 years) screening positive for risky drinking were randomized to: BI (n = 277), therapist BI (n = 278), or control (n = 281). After the 3-month follow-up, participants were randomized to receive a post-ED BI session or control. Incorporating motivational interviewing, the BIs addressed alcohol consumption and consequences, including driving under the influence (DUI), and alcohol-related injury, as well as other concomitant drug use. The computer BI was an offline, Facebook-styled program. RESULTS: Among 4389 patients screened, 1054 patients reported risky drinking and 836 were enrolled in the randomized controlled trial. Regression models examined the main effects of the intervention conditions (versus control) and the interaction effects (ED condition × post-ED condition) on primary outcomes. The therapist and computer BIs significantly reduced consumption at 3 months, consequences at 3 and 12 months, and prescription drug use at 12 months; the computer BI reduced the frequency of DUI at 12 months; and the therapist BI reduced the frequency of alcohol-related injury at 12 months. The post-ED session reduced alcohol consequences at 6 months, benefiting those who had not received a BI in the ED. CONCLUSIONS: A single-session BI, delivered by a computer or therapist in the ED, shows promise for underage drinkers. Findings for the fully automated stand-alone computer BI are particularly appealing given the ease of future implementation. PMID:26347440

  9. Symptoms and functional health status of individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS).

    PubMed

    Berglund, B; Nordström, G

    2001-10-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited connective tissue disorder that can have a substantial impact on daily life. The aims of this study were to describe the symptoms reported in a group of individuals with EDS and to investigate the impact on functional health status by means of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Seventy-seven individuals, members of the Swedish EDS Association, completed 2 mailed questionnaires. The most frequent symptoms were related to activity, e.g., joint problems (75%), to pain (71%), and to skin/tissue (52%). Pain was reported by 37 individuals (48%) as their most severe symptom. The SIP results showed an overall mean score of 13.0 (females 13.9, males 5.6), compared with a Swedish reference group with a SIP score 1.3. Women with EDS reported a better functional health status than females with rheumatoid arthritis (overall SIP score 13.9 versus 21.4). In comparison with women with fibromyalgia, the EDS females rated their functional health status as worse on the physical dimension (p <0.05) and the subscale home management (p <0.05), and as better on the subscale work (p <0.05). Impact of EDS on the individual's daily life needs to be acknowledged, assessed, and evaluated in healthcare. PMID:17039161

  10. Arabidopsis EDS1 connects pathogen effector recognition to cell compartment-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Katharina; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Tasset, Céline; Pouzet, Cécile; Deslandes, Laurent; Parker, Jane E

    2011-12-01

    Pathogen effectors are intercepted by plant intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors. However, processes linking receptor activation to downstream defenses remain obscure. Nucleo-cytoplasmic basal resistance regulator EDS1 (ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1) is indispensible for immunity mediated by TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor)-NB-LRR receptors. We show that Arabidopsis EDS1 molecularly connects TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance protein RPS4 recognition of bacterial effector AvrRps4 to defense pathways. RPS4-EDS1 and AvrRps4-EDS1 complexes are detected inside nuclei of living tobacco cells after transient coexpression and in Arabidopsis soluble leaf extracts after resistance activation. Forced AvrRps4 localization to the host cytoplasm or nucleus reveals cell compartment-specific RPS4-EDS1 defense branches. Although nuclear processes restrict bacterial growth, programmed cell death and transcriptional resistance reinforcement require nucleo-cytoplasmic coordination. Thus, EDS1 behaves as an effector target and activated TIR-NB-LRR signal transducer for defenses across cell compartments.

  11. Solving the worldwide emergency department crowding problem - what can we learn from an Israeli ED?

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Bernstein, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    ED crowding is a prevalent and important issue facing hospitals in Israel and around the world, including North and South America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa. ED crowding is associated with poorer quality of care and poorer health outcomes, along with extended waits for care. Crowding is caused by a periodic mismatch between the supply of ED and hospital resources and the demand for patient care. In a recent article in the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, Bashkin et al. present an Ishikawa diagram describing several factors related to longer length of stay (LOS), and higher levels of ED crowding, including management, process, environmental, human factors, and resource issues. Several solutions exist to reduce ED crowding, which involve addressing several of the issues identified by Bashkin et al. This includes reducing the demand for and variation in care, and better matching the supply of resources to demands in care in real time. However, what is needed to reduce crowding is an institutional imperative from senior leadership, implemented by engaged ED and hospital leadership with multi-disciplinary cross-unit collaboration, sufficient resources to implement effective interventions, access to data, and a sustained commitment over time. This may move the culture of a hospital to facilitate improved flow within and across units and ultimately improve quality and safety over the long-term.

  12. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  13. Biophysical Investigations with MARCKS-ED: Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Its Curvature Sensing Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Armando J.; Espinoza, Arianna; Yin, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Curved membranes are a common and important attribute in cells. Protein and peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways, initiate vesicle budding, trigger membrane fusion, and facilitate molecular transport across cell membranes. Nonetheless, there is little understanding how these proteins and peptides achieve preferential binding of different membrane curvatures. The current study is to elucidate specific factors required for curvature sensing. As a model system, we employed a recently identified peptide curvature sensor, MARCKS-ED, derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate protein, for these biophysical investigations. An atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggested an important role played by the insertion of the Phe residues within MARCKS-ED. To test these observations from our computational simulations, we performed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies to determine the insertion depth of MARCKS-ED into differently curved membrane bilayers. Next, studies with varied lipid compositions revealed their influence on curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED, suggesting contributions from membrane fluidity, rigidity, as well as various lipid structures. Finally, we demonstrated that the curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED is configuration independent. In summary, our studies have shed further light to the understanding of how MARCKS-ED differentiates between membrane curvatures, which may be generally applicable to protein curvature sensing behavior. PMID:25195712

  14. Test Review: Epstein, M. H., & Cullinan, D. (2010). "Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance" (2nd Ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews "Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance-Second Edition" (SAED-2; Epstein & Cullinan, 2010), an assessment system primarily designed to assist in determining eligibility for special education services under the category of emotional disturbance (ED), as defined by the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act…

  15. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  16. Presbyopia

    MedlinePlus

    ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 3.10 Crouch ER, ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Doane JF. Accommodating intraocular ...

  17. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Duker JS. Retinal arterial ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 6.18. Reiss GR, Sipperley ...

  18. American Macular Degeneration Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to content Contact DONATE Search for: Search Saving sight through research and education American Macular Degeneration Foundation Saving Sight Through Research and Education Menu About Macular Degeneration ...

  19. The capacity of Australian ED to absorb the projected increase in intern numbers.

    PubMed

    Chong, Anthony; Weiland, Tracey J; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A

    2010-04-01

    As a reaction to the medical workforce shortage in Australia, a large expansion of undergraduate medical education has occurred through the provision of funding of additional medical student places. As a consequence, the number of medical graduates is anticipated to increase by as much as 90% with a peak in numbers anticipated in 2012. With ED already under pressure, this increase has serious implications for ED, particularly the delivery of intern and student teaching. This integrated review describes potential challenges that might arise from the predicted increase in intern numbers working in ED. A structured literature search was conducted from which 44 directly relevant articles were identified. We discuss the possible impact of an increased number of medical graduates on emergency medical staff, education, supervision and feedback to interns, and given the potential impacts on the education of junior doctors; we review the purpose and implementation of the Australian Curriculum framework for Junior Doctors in relation to their learning requirements. Although there is consensus by most postgraduate bodies that the core emergency term in emergency medicine should be retained, the impact of increased intern numbers might dramatically affect the clinical experiences, supervision and educational resources in the ED. This might necessitate cultural changes in medical education and ED function.

  20. Critical care by emergency physicians in American and English hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graff, L G; Clark, S; Radford, M J

    1993-09-01

    The object of this study was to compare emergency physician critical care services in an American (A) and an English (E) Emergency Department (ED). A prospective case comparison trial was used. The study was carried out at two university affiliated community hospitals, one in the U.S.A and one in England. Subjects were consecutive patients triaged as requiring critical care services and subsequently admitted to the hospital ward (A, n = 17; E, n = 18) or the intensive/critical care unit ([ICU] A, n = 14; E, n = 24). The study time period was randomly selected 8-h shifts occurring over a 4-week period. All patients were treated by standard guidelines for critical care services at the study hospital emergency department. For all study patients mean length of stay was significantly longer for the American (233 min, 95% CI 201, 264) than the English ED (24 min, 95% CI 23, 25). American emergency physicians spent less total time providing physician services (19.2 min, 95% CI 16.8, 21.6) vs. (23 min, 95% CI 21.6, 24.4) than English emergency physicians. American emergency physicians spent less time with the patient than English emergency physicians: 12.4 min (95% CI 10.3, 14.5) vs. 17 min (95% CI 15.8, 18.2). American emergency physicians spent more time on the telephone 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.2 min (95% CI 1.1, 1.3), and in patient care discussions/order giving 1.8 min (95% CI 1.4, 2.2) vs. 1.1 min (95% CI .8, 1.4), There was no significant difference in time charting (3.2 min, 95% CI 2.8, 3.6 vs. 3.5 min, 95% CI 3.2, 3.8). Results did not vary significantly whether analysed subgroups or the whole study group. American emergency physicians provided 81% of their service during the first hour. There were delays at the American hospital until the physician saw the patient: 4.9 min (95% CI 2.5, 7.3) for patients admitted to the ICU/CVU (Cardiovascular Unit), and 9.2 min (95% CI 4.6, 13.8) for patients admitted to the ward. At the American hospital, ICU

  1. Textbooks, Mexican Americans, and Twentieth-Century American History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Secondary and college level American textbooks should include information about minority groups, particularly Mexican-Americans. Surveys history textbooks with regard to their treatment of the Mexican American minority. For journal availability, see so 506 696. (DB)

  2. Improving service quality by understanding emergency department flow: a White Paper and position statement prepared for the American Academy of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Eitel, Dave R; Rudkin, Scott E; Malvehy, M Albert; Killeen, James P; Pines, Jesse M

    2010-01-01

    Emergency Department (ED) crowding is a common problem in the United States and around the world. Process reengineering methods can be used to understand factors that contribute to crowding and provide tools to help alleviate crowding by improving service quality and patient flow. In this article, we describe the ED as a service business and then discuss specific methods to improve the ED quality and flow. Methods discussed include demand management, critical pathways, process-mapping, Emergency Severity Index triage, bedside registration, Lean and Six Sigma management methods, statistical forecasting, queuing systems, discrete event simulation modeling and balanced scorecards. The purpose of this review is to serve as a background for emergency physicians and managers interested in applying process reengineering methods to improving ED flow, reducing waiting times, and maximizing patient satisfaction. Finally, we present a position statement on behalf of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine addressing these issues.

  3. Bedside point of care toxicology screens in the ED: Utility and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to drugs and toxins is a major cause for patients’ visits to the emergency department (ED). For most drugs-of-abuse intoxication, ED physicians are skeptical to rely on results of urine drug testing for emergent management decisions. This is partially because immunoassays, although rapid, have limitations in sensitivity and specificity and chromatographic assays, which are more definitive, are more labor intensive. Testing for toxic alcohols is needed, but rapid commercial assays are not available. ED physicians need stat assays for acetaminophen, salicylates, co-oximetry, cholinesterase, iron, and some therapeutic drugs that could be used as agents of self-harm. In this review, we look at the potential limitations of these screening tests and suggest improvements and innovations needed for better clinical utilization. New drugs of abuse should be sought and assays should be developed to meet changing abuse patterns. PMID:25337490

  4. Enhanced Mental Health Interventions in the Emergency Department: Suicide and Suicide Attempt Prevention in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer L.; Asarnow, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents, and often youths with suicidal behavior or ideation present to the emergency department (ED) for care. Many suicidal youths do not receive mental health care after discharge from the ED, and interventions are needed to enhance linkage to outpatient intervention. This paper describes the Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP). Designed for use in emergency settings, the FISP is a family-based cognitive-behavior therapy session designed to increase motivation for follow-up treatment, support, coping, and safety, augmented by care linkage telephone contacts after discharge. In a randomized trial of the intervention, the FISP was shown to significantly increase the likelihood of youths receiving outpatient treatment, including psychotherapy and combined medication and psychotherapy. The FISP is a brief, focused, efficacious treatment that can be delivered in the ED to improve the probability of follow-up treatment for suicidal youths. PMID:25904825

  5. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  6. Combined EBSD/EDS tomography in a dual-beam FIB/FEG-SEM.

    PubMed

    West, G D; Thomson, R C

    2009-03-01

    An automated method for collecting combined three-dimensional (3D) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data sets on a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB)/field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) microscope is described. The method uses simple scripting files on the dual beam to move between the EBSD collection and the FIB slicing positions, which are linked to a commercial EBSD data collection programme. The EDS data are collected simultaneously with the EBSD patterns analogous to combined two-dimensional (2D) EBSD/EDS. The technique has been successfully applied to study both the interdiffusion zone between a coating and a substrate and a complex multi-phase coating on a nickel-based superalloy sample. This analysis is shown to enable the complex grain shapes, location of precipitates and phase interconnectivity within these samples to be determined without the ambiguities associated with 2D stereographic analysis. PMID:19250465

  7. Patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED boosts satisfaction, improves safety.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    To improve safety and patient flow, administrators at Hallmark Health System, based in Melrose, MA, implemented a new patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED at the health system's two hospitals. Under the new approach, inpatient nurses come down to the ED to take reports on new patients in a process that includes the ED care team as well as family members. The inpatient nurses then accompany the patients up to their designated floors. Since the new patient-transfer process was implemented in June 2012, patient satisfaction has increased by at least one point on patient satisfaction surveys. Administrators anticipate that medical errors or omissions related to the handoff process will show a drop of at least 50%, when data is tabulated.

  8. Study: To minimize errors, rely on interpreters when caring for LEP patients in the ED.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    A new study strongly suggests that it is important for EDs to rely on professional interpreters, rather than ad hoc interpreters or no interpreters at all, when caring for patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). The researchers examined health care encounters involving LEP patients at two pediatric EDs, and found that the encounters associated with professional interpreters were associated with far fewer errors of potential clinical consequence than the encounters associated with ad hoc interpreters or no interpreters. Experts say the most important first step in minimizing language-based errors is to identify patients with LEP when they present for care. Professional interpreters are defined as having at least 100 hours of training. Researchers say that when evaluating interpreters, professional training is more valuable in terms of minimizing errors than experience on the job. Make sure that interpreters are available to LEP patients throughout the course of their ED visit as well as during any follow-up visits or telephone calls.

  9. Combined EBSD/EDS tomography in a dual-beam FIB/FEG-SEM.

    PubMed

    West, G D; Thomson, R C

    2009-03-01

    An automated method for collecting combined three-dimensional (3D) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data sets on a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB)/field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) microscope is described. The method uses simple scripting files on the dual beam to move between the EBSD collection and the FIB slicing positions, which are linked to a commercial EBSD data collection programme. The EDS data are collected simultaneously with the EBSD patterns analogous to combined two-dimensional (2D) EBSD/EDS. The technique has been successfully applied to study both the interdiffusion zone between a coating and a substrate and a complex multi-phase coating on a nickel-based superalloy sample. This analysis is shown to enable the complex grain shapes, location of precipitates and phase interconnectivity within these samples to be determined without the ambiguities associated with 2D stereographic analysis.

  10. Bedside point of care toxicology screens in the ED: Utility and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Ashish

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to drugs and toxins is a major cause for patients' visits to the emergency department (ED). For most drugs-of-abuse intoxication, ED physicians are skeptical to rely on results of urine drug testing for emergent management decisions. This is partially because immunoassays, although rapid, have limitations in sensitivity and specificity and chromatographic assays, which are more definitive, are more labor intensive. Testing for toxic alcohols is needed, but rapid commercial assays are not available. ED physicians need stat assays for acetaminophen, salicylates, co-oximetry, cholinesterase, iron, and some therapeutic drugs that could be used as agents of self-harm. In this review, we look at the potential limitations of these screening tests and suggest improvements and innovations needed for better clinical utilization. New drugs of abuse should be sought and assays should be developed to meet changing abuse patterns. PMID:25337490

  11. Asian American Cultural Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libretti, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Explores the encounter of Marxism and Asian American literary theory and imagines an Asian American Marxism. To do so requires theorizing race, class, and gender not as substantive categories of antagonisms but as complementary and coordinated elements of a totality of social relations structuring racial patriarchal capitalism. (SLD)

  12. Native American Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Carl D., Comp.; And Others

    Focusing on the Southeastern American Indian cultures, this Native American resource guide is designed for use in the elementary and secondary schools of the East Baton Rouge Parish and is a product of a 1975 Indian Advisory Committee composed of Indian parents, teachers, and staff members. Objectives of these materials require the Indian student,…

  13. The Other African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matory, J. Lorand

    Black North America is ethnically and culturally diverse. It contains many groups who do not call themselves or have not always called themselves "Negro,""Black,""African-American," and so forth, such as Louisiana Creoles of color and many of the Indian tribes east of the Mississippi. There are also numerous North American ethnic groups of African…

  14. Legends of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Presents a theme unit that includes elementary-level, cross-curricular lessons about lifestyle, belief systems, traditions, and history of Native Americans. The unit includes a poster which offers a traditional Cherokee story, literature on Native American legends, and a variety of cross-curricular activities. The unit ends with students writing…

  15. 16 Extraordinary African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader…

  16. The Japanese American Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukei, Budd

    This book presents a view of the Japanese American experience from the time of their immigration to this country in the 1800s to their acculturation into American society in the 1970s. Topics dealt with include the prejudice and mistrust experienced by the Japanese immigrants in this country, particularly their evacuation and internment in…

  17. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  18. The American Bilingual Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloss, Heinz

    This volume, published on the occasion of the American Bicentennial, is based on a revision of a 1963 German-language publication describing and analyzing the phenomenon of cultural and linguistic pluralism in American society. It is part of a series on bilingual education, intended to inform the public about how people have used bilingual…

  19. The Quiet American Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legters, Lyman H.

    1984-01-01

    What is wrong in the American parochialism about foreign languages is the assumption that language acquisition is a cosmetic gain, without any immediate or forseeable practical use. Languages will only be learned effectively when Americans learn that they can be used in getting tasks accomplished. (MSE)

  20. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  1. Reviving the American Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Harriet B.

    American society and its educators are faced with many challenges, particularly from the growing use of computers, which lead to the question of whether the American dream of a viable democracy with an equal chance for all can be revived. The individual, community, thought, and morality provide four standpoints from which to consider technological…

  2. The American Advisor Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Bernard M.

    1971-01-01

    A program which collects information about the similarities and differences between American and a host national counterpart is described. How knowledge of this data has relevance to relations between the American and the host national and how, through educational procedures, this information can be disseminated, are also discussed. (Author/CG(

  3. American Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Univ., Shreveport.

    The Louisiana State University in Shreveport (LSUS) American Studies Program is an annual sequence of interdisciplinary activities on and off campus designed to bring students, faculty, and local residents into closer contact with their American heritage and develop their leadership potential. It addresses the problem of lapses in current civic…

  4. Native American Preparatory School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Preparatory School, Rowe, NM.

    This booklet provides information on the Native American Preparatory School, a residential secondary school in Rowe, New Mexico, for high-achieving Native American students. The school sponsors two programs: a 5-week rigorously academic summer school for junior high school students and, beginning in fall 1995, a 4-year college preparatory program.…

  5. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  6. Asian Americans: Chinese-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Korean-Americans. Staff Development Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Keiko; And Others

    This staff development module is designed to: (1) introduce significant facts basic to understanding the cultural and historical heritage of three Asian-American cultures; (2) develop an accurate knowledge and awareness of the experiences of Asian-Americans; and (3) relate the geography and past history of China, Korea, and Japan to the United…

  7. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  8. American Independence. Fifth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Annette

    This fifth grade teaching unit covers early conflicts between the American colonies and Britain, battles of the American Revolutionary War, and the Declaration of Independence. Knowledge goals address the pre-revolutionary acts enforced by the British, the concepts of conflict and independence, and the major events and significant people from the…

  9. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  10. Native American Entrepreneurship. Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    Although Native Americans have owned and started the fewest small businesses of all U.S. minority groups, entrepreneurship is considered to be an efficient tool for alleviating their economic problems. Barriers to Native American entrepreneurship include poverty, scarce start-up capital, poor access to business education and technical assistance,…

  11. Usefulness of ED036 kit for measuring serum PIVKA-II levels in small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuromatsu, R; Tanaka, M; Shimauchi, Y; Shimada, M; Tanikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokoo, T

    1997-08-01

    As a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), serum protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has high specificity, yet its sensitivity is relatively low, marking it less suitable to serve as an adjunct in the diagnosis of small HCC. Recently, the ED036 kit (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan), whose detection limit is approximately ten times superior to that of a conventional kit (Eitest MONOP II, Eisai) has been developed. In this study, serum PIVKA-II levels in serum samples from 83 patients with benign chronic liver diseases (CLD) and 129 patients with HCC were measured with those two kits. With the ED036 kit, the cut-off value was set at 40 mAU/ml. For PIVKA-II measured with the ED036 kit, sensitivity was 45.0%, specificity 92.8%, and accuracy 63.7%, when we discriminated patients with HCC from those with CLD without HCC. While maintaining a high specificity, of 92.8%, the ED036 kit showed a significantly higher sensitivity than the conventional kit (45.0% versus 27.9%; P < 0.0001). With patients who had HCC consisting of a single nodule 30 mm or less in diameter, the positivity rate for serum PIVKA-II with the ED036 kit was significantly greater than the rate with the conventional kit (21.4% versus 9.5%; P < 0.005). Thus, the ED036 kit was thought to be more useful than the conventional kit as a tumor marker for small HCC.

  12. Effect of Job Specialization on the Hospital Stay and Job Satisfaction of ED Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Hosein; Sirati Nir, Masoud; Babatabar Darzi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, the increasing crowdedness of the emergency departments has posed various problems for patients and healthcare systems worldwide. These problems include prolonged hospital stay, patient dissatisfaction and nurse burnout or job dissatisfaction. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of emergency department (ED) nurses’ job specialization on their job satisfaction and the length of patient stay in the ED. Patients and Methods: This before-after quasi-experimental study was conducted from April to May 2014 at the Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Initially, 35 patients were recruited as controls and the length of their stay in the ED was measured in minutes via a chronometer; Moreover, nurses’ job satisfaction was evaluated using the Mohrman-Cooke-Mohrman job satisfaction scale. Then, a job specialization intervention was developed based on the stabilization model. After that, 35 new patients were recruited to the treatment group and received specialized care services. Accordingly, the length of their stay in the ED was measured. Moreover, the same nurses’ job satisfaction was re-evaluated after the study. The study intervention lasted one month. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 20 and statistical tests such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov, the paired and the independent t, and chi-square tests. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups of patients concerning the length of their stay in the ED (P < 0.001). Moreover, compared with the pretest readings, nurses had greater job satisfaction after the study (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The job specialization intervention can improve nurses’ satisfaction and relieve the crowdedness of the EDs. PMID:27218054

  13. SEM/EDS analysis for problem solving in the food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Wayne D.

    2015-10-01

    For forensic investigation in the food industry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a powerful, often non-destructive, instrumental analysis tool to provide information about: • Identification of inorganic (and some organic) materials found as foreign contaminants in food products returned by consumers or detected during quality control inspections in the production facilities • Identification of wear particles found in production lines • Distribution of materials within a matrix • Corrosion and failure analysis of production equipment The identification of materials by SEM/EDS is accomplished through a combination of morphology by SEM imaging and the elemental composition of the material by EDS. Typically, the EDS analysis provides a qualitative spectrum showing the elements present in the sample. Further analysis can be done to quantify the detected elements in order to further refine the material identification. Metal alloys can often be differentiated even within the same family such as 300 Series stainless steels. Glass types can be identified by the elemental composition where the detected elements are quantified as the oxides of each element. In this way, for example, common window glass is distinguishable from insulation glass used in many ovens. Wear particles or fragments from breakage can find their way into food products. SEM/EDS analysis of the materials is an important resource to utilize when trying to determine the original source. Suspected source materials can then be sampled for comparative analysis. EDS X-ray mapping is another tool that is available to provide information about the distribution of materials within a matrix. For example, the distribution of inorganic ingredients in a dried food helps to provide information about the grind and blend of the materials.

  14. Washington state initiative trims Medicaid budget, ED utilization without denying access.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    In its first year of operation, Washington state's "ER is for Emergencies" initiative has helped to save the state's Medicaid budget $33.6 million. The initiative, which is based on the implementation of seven best practices, has succeeded in part by improving care coordination and by linking EDs across the state so information can be shared electronically. Leaders of the effort concede that while state pressure was essential in pushing providers to address excess use of the ED for nonemergency needs, they stress that the approach worked because all sides were willing to sit down and hammer out a solution. Further, they note that the infrastructure is now in place to address other problems in a similar fashion. An analysis of claims data shows that in the first year of the initiative, ED visits by Medicaid recipients declined by 9.9%, and the rate of visits by frequent ED utilizers declined by 10.7%. The analysis also shows that ED visits resulting in a scheduled drug prescription fell by 24%, and the rate of visits for a low-acuity diagnosis declined by 14.2%. While many EDs had to adjust their staffing and other resources to accommodate reduced volumes, others experienced few changes or even saw an uptick in volume, possibly from implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Leaders of the effort say the biggest challenge involved with implementing the initiative was securing administrative buy-in for investments that would likely result in improved efficiency and care, but also reduced revenue--at least initially.

  15. Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of type 2 diabetes. Culturally sensitive strategies, structured disease management protocols, and the assistance of nurses, diabetic educators, and other health care professionals are effective in improving the outcome of diabetes in the African American community. PMID:16344294

  16. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  17. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B.; Havens, Joaquim M.; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006–2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser). We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (−7.2%, 95% CI [−7.78 to −6.62]; p<0.001 for trend). The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (−8.4%, 95% CI [−9.6 to −7.2]; p<0.001 for trend). Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (−1.8%, 95% CI [−2.1 to −1.5]; p<0.001 for trend), and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (−1.8%, 95% CI [−4.5 to −1.7]; p<0.001 for trend). Conclusion From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  18. ED handles 30 burn patients after plant fire and explosion in Georgia.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    Dealing with a mass casualty event involving a high number of burn victims requires strategic use of ED resources. The ED at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah, GA, was praised by the receiving burn center for the care it gave victims of a recent plant disaster. Here are some of their key strategies: After making your primary concern the patient's airway, turn to fluid resuscitation and pain management. Be certain burn victims are placed in warm rooms and are covered with blankets. Have a pre-plan with a regional burn center, then establish contact with that center in multiple-burn patient incidents.

  19. EdU, a new thymidine analogue for labelling proliferating cells in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chehrehasa, Fatemah; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Dwyer, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Greger; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2009-02-15

    Labelling and identifying proliferating cells is central to understanding neurogenesis and neural lineages in vivo and in vitro. We present here a novel thymidine analogue, ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) for labelling dividing cells, detected with a fluorescent azide which forms a covalent bond via the "click" chemistry reaction (the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of an organic azide to a terminal acetylene). Unlike the commonly used BrdU, EdU detection requires no heat or acid treatment. It is quick and easy and compatible with multiple probes for fluorescence immunochemistry, facilitating the characterisation of proliferating cells at high resolution.

  20. Formative Assessment Using Social Marketing Principles to Identify Health and Nutrition Perspectives of Native American Women Living within the Chickasaw Nation Boundaries in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stephany; Hunter, Toma; Briley, Chiquita; Miracle, Sarah; Hermann, Janice; Van Delinder, Jean; Standridge, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify health product and promotion channels for development of a Chickasaw Nation Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Education Program (SNAP-Ed) social marketing program. Methods: The study was qualitative and used social marketing principles to assess Native American women's views of health and nutrition. Focus groups (n = 8) and…

  1. The West Indian Americans. The New Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henke, Holger

    This book, which is part of a series on new immigrant groups in the United States, captures the experiences of West Indian Americans who have arrived in the country since 1965. The seven chapters include: (1) "History of Jamaica and the English-Speaking Caribbean" (e.g., from plantation society to the third world and the Creolization of cultures…

  2. American History Activators (Early American History).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Bill

    This document consists of a package of seven separately published "activities" or simulations that allow students to learn about and participate in many of the aspects of United States history that have influenced our present institutions and way of life. The seven units include: (1) First Americans Arrive: 11.000 BC; (2) Puritan General Court,…

  3. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  4. EDS1, an essential component of R gene-mediated disease resistance in Arabidopsis has homology to eukaryotic lipases.

    PubMed

    Falk, A; Feys, B J; Frost, L N; Jones, J D; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1999-03-16

    A major class of plant disease resistance (R) genes encodes leucine-rich-repeat proteins that possess a nucleotide binding site and amino-terminal similarity to the cytoplasmic domains of the Drosophila Toll and human IL-1 receptors. In Arabidopsis thaliana, EDS1 is indispensable for the function of these R genes. The EDS1 gene was cloned by targeted transposon tagging and found to encode a protein that has similarity in its amino-terminal portion to the catalytic site of eukaryotic lipases. Thus, hydrolase activity, possibly on a lipid-based substrate, is anticipated to be central to EDS1 function. The predicted EDS1 carboxyl terminus has no significant sequence homologies, although analysis of eight defective eds1 alleles reveals it to be essential for EDS1 function. Two plant defense pathways have been defined previously that depend on salicylic acid, a phenolic compound, or jasmonic acid, a lipid-derived molecule. We examined the expression of EDS1 mRNA and marker mRNAs (PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively) for these two pathways in wild-type and eds1 mutant plants after different challenges. The results suggest that EDS1 functions upstream of salicylic acid-dependent PR1 mRNA accumulation and is not required for jasmonic acid-induced PDF1.2 mRNA expression.

  5. Breakers, Benders, and Obeyers: Inquiring into Teacher Educators' Mediation of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Andrew R.; Kolman, Joni S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects a qualitative exploratory inquiry into the lived experiences of faculty members working within a system of urban schools of education as they supported diverse teacher candidates in completing the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) during its first semesters of high-stakes implementation. Drawing upon…

  6. Studying Learning in the Worldwide Classroom Research into edX's First MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lori; Pritchard, David E.; DeBoer, Jennifer; Stump, Glenda S.; Ho, Andrew D.; Seaton, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    "Circuits and Electronics" (6.002x), which began in March 2012, was the first MOOC developed by edX, the consortium led by MIT and Harvard. Over 155,000 students initially registered for 6.002x, which was composed of video lectures, interactive problems, online laboratories, and a discussion forum. As the course ended in June 2012,…

  7. Measuring relative performance of an EDS detector using a NiO standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, Joshua Daniel; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2013-09-01

    A method for measuring the relative performance of energy dispersive spectrometers (EDS) on a TEM is discussed. A NiO thin-film standard fabricated at Sandia CA is used. A performance parameter,, is measured and compared to values on several TEM systems.

  8. Meeting the Needs of Distance Learners of M.Ed Program: Bangladesh Open University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Amirul; Ferdowsi, Sakiba

    2014-01-01

    This study draws on the experience of a cohort of 22 students from 09 tutorial centers enrolled in a Master of Education (M Ed) distance learning program administered by the Bangladesh Open University (BOU). It's purpose is to locate the aims and philosophies of distance learning within the experiences of actual distance learners in order to…

  9. PROJECT RE-ED, A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Mental Health, Raleigh.

    THE PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN (PROJECT RE-ED), A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT (1961-1968) TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS (SUNDAY THROUGH FRIDAY) FOR DISTURBED CHILDREN, IS DESCRIBED. THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AT GEORGE PEABODY COLLEGE, TENNESSEE, AND USE OF CAREFULLY SELECTED…

  10. Racist Ordering, Settler Colonialism, and EdTPA: A Participatory Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve; Gorlewski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This article tells the story of an intervention by a collective of teacher educators on New York State's adoption of edTPA. Too often in education policy analysis, issues of race are discussed briefly, if at all. This article argues that attending to constructions of race specific to settler colonialism is an important approach to education policy…

  11. Chemical quantification of atomic-scale EDS maps under thin specimen conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-12-01

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). With thin specimen conditions and localized EDS scattering potential, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak width are investigated using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak width and spatial resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study cation occupancy in a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries (APBs) present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the APBs likely owing to the effect of strain.

  12. A Model for Developing Literacy Leadership through an M.A. Ed. Program in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice-Crickmer, Janet; Thompson, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    Arthur Levine's (2006) study of teacher preparation in the United States and his resulting controversial recommendations have increased the need for teacher educators in independent institutions to share insights into designing and implementing effective degree programs. To that end, this article highlights aspects of an innovative M.A. Ed.…

  13. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore,more » the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.« less

  14. EFNEP and SNAP-Ed Initial Paraprofessional Training Materials and Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Charlene; Baker, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Western Region EFNEP coordinators were frustrated by the apparent lack of materials available for training newly hired paraprofessional nutrition educators. An on-line survey was distributed to all EFNEP and SNAP-Ed state coordinators seeking details about initial training and available materials and requesting copies of materials for review.…

  15. Towards Understanding the DO-178C / ED-12C Assurance Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes initial work towards building an explicit assurance case for DO-178C / ED-12C. Two specific questions are explored: (1) What are some of the assumptions upon which the guidance in the document relies, and (2) What claims are made concerning test coverage analysis?

  16. Buyer Beware: Lessons Learned from EdTPA Implementation in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah; O'Hara, Kate E.

    2015-01-01

    As states across the country continue their implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment Portfolio (edTPA), a complex and high-stakes certification requirement for teacher certification, there are important lessons for educators and education advocates to learn from New York State's implementation. As Linda Darling-Hammond, developer and…

  17. Pathogen effectors target Arabidopsis EDS1 and alter its interactions with immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Halane, Morgan K; Kim, Sang Hee; Gassmann, Walter

    2011-12-01

    Plant resistance proteins detect the presence of specific pathogen effectors and initiate effector-triggered immunity. Few immune regulators downstream of resistance proteins have been identified, none of which are known virulence targets of effectors. We show that Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1), a positive regulator of basal resistance and of effector-triggered immunity specifically mediated by Toll-interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR) resistance proteins, forms protein complexes with the TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance proteins RPS4 and RPS6 and with the negative immune regulator SRFR1 at a cytoplasmic membrane. Further, the cognate bacterial effectors AvrRps4 and HopA1 disrupt these EDS1 complexes. Tight association of EDS1 with TIR-NB-LRR-mediated immunity may therefore derive mainly from being guarded by TIR-NB-LRR proteins, and activation of this branch of effector-triggered immunity may directly connect to the basal resistance signaling pathway via EDS1.

  18. EDS1 contributes to nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Manon; Degrave, Alexandre; Vedel, Régine; Bitton, Frédérique; Patrit, Oriane; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Barny, Marie-Anne; Fagard, Mathilde

    2012-03-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in rosaceous plants. In nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, E. amylovora triggers necrotic symptoms associated with transient bacterial multiplication, suggesting either that A. thaliana lacks a susceptibility factor or that it actively restricts E. amylovora growth. Inhibiting plant protein synthesis at the time of infection led to an increase in necrosis and bacterial multiplication and reduced callose deposition, indicating that A. thaliana requires active protein synthesis to restrict E. amylovora growth. Analysis of the callose synthase-deficient pmr4-1 mutant indicated that lack of callose deposition alone did not lead to increased sensitivity to E. amylovora. Transcriptome analysis revealed that approximately 20% of the genes induced following E. amylovora infection are related to defense and signaling. Analysis of mutants affected in NDR1 and EDS1, two main components of the defense-gene activation observed, revealed that E. amylovora multiplied ten times more in the eds1-2 mutant than in the wild type but not in the ndr1-1 mutant. Analysis of mutants affected in three WRKY transcription factors showing EDS1-dependent activation identified WRKY46 and WRKY54 as positive regulators and WRKY70 as a negative regulator of defense against E. amylovora. Altogether, we show that EDS1 is a positive regulator of nonhost resistance against E. amylovora in A. thaliana and hypothesize that it controls the production of several effective defenses against E. amylovora through the action of WRKY46 and WRKY54, while WRKY70 acts as a negative regulator.

  19. Is the EdTPA the Right Choice for Evaluating Teacher Readiness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Powell, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the edTPA, a performance assessment created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) and administered by Pearson, Inc., to assess the professional readiness of student teachers. We challenge claims made in support of using this assessment, specifically within the…

  20. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours. PMID:24195141

  1. Evaluating the Amazon water cycle components using ED model against GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Han, S. C.; Yeo, I. Y.; Longo, M.; Swann, A. L. S.; Knox, R. G.; Briscoe, J.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the water cycle components of the Amazon and its surrounding regions are a key to assessing regional impacts of climate and land-cover changes, as they may affect rain-fed agriculture and hydroelectric power generation in Brazil. A comprehensive validation of the modeled water budget, therefore, is a necessary part of understanding the region's hydroclimatology. We evaluate the water cycle components from Ecosystem Demography (ED) model both as a stand-alone model and a coupled model to the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS). Model results are compared with satellite-driven observations and a flux tower measurement in central Amazon. Our results indicate that the modeled EDBRAMS precipitation over Amazonia replicates the observed patterns of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from 2001 to 2009. Total Water Storage Change (TWSC) anomalies from the ED model at the Paraná River basin shows a better agreement with the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observation from 2002 to 2008, as compared to the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/NOAH model. The Nash-Sutcliff model efficiency coefficient improved from 0.50 (GLDAS/NOAH vs. GRACE) to 0.65 (ED vs. GRACE). We also evaluate the modeled evapotranspiration (ET) against the flux tower measurement. Our study affirms the capabilities of the ED model in simulating the Amazon hydrological cycle, which helps investigate its sustainable thresholds with various land-cover and climate change scenarios.

  2. WORK-ED. (World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development). A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraleigh, Virginia A.

    This manual is designed to assist personnel responsible for training teachers in the implementation of the World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development (WORK-ED). (The program is a career education course for ninth graders developed to enable students who have not chosen the traditional college-prep high school course to make career…

  3. Work-Ed. A Guide to the Changing World of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraleigh, Virginia A.

    A description of the project, its development process, evaluation results, and exportability are included in this overview of WORK-ED (World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development), a program to provide ninth grade students both basic skills in communication and exposure to twelve career clusters. Introductory sections describe the…

  4. ED50 determination of corneal lesions produced by 1318-nm laser radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzenberger, Bryan K.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Wild, Steven P.; Pletcher, Kenneth B.; Roach, William P.

    2001-05-01

    High-energy use of 1318 nm laser systems is becoming more prevalent in military and industrial settings. Threshold, ED50, exposure data and mechanism of laser-tissue interaction need to be determined for this wavelength using appropriate animal models that allow for extrapolation to control human exposures. Threshold, ED50, exposure data at 1318 nm for retinal and corneal injury have previously been undertaken and reported for rhesus monkeys. Using comparable methods, we examine exposure data at 1318 nm to determine the ED50 and laser-tissue interaction in the rabbit model to evaluate cornea. We present preliminary data for the ED50 threshold on the cornea from exposure to 1318 nm single laser pulses. Delivery of laser energy is accomplished using an Nd:YAG system producing 1318 nm light in the 0.5 millisecond time exposure regime and in the range of 0 to 500 mJ. Results from this work will aid in the establishment of safety standards for near infrared laser systems.

  5. Shifting Interests: Changes in the Lexical Semantics of ED-MEDIA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Fridolin; Valentine, Chris; Scott, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Large research networks naturally form complex communities with overlapping but not identical expertise. To map the distribution of professional competence in field of "technology-enhanced learning", the lexical semantics expressed in research articles published in a representative, large-scale conference (ED-MEDIA) can be investigated and changes…

  6. Crystal structures of the components of the Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    Nocadello, S.; Minasov, G.; Shuvalova, L.; Dubrovska, I.; Sabini, E.; Bagnoli, F.; Grandi, G.; Anderson, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal leukotoxins are a family of β-barrel, bicomponent, pore-forming toxins with membrane-damaging functions. These bacterial exotoxins share sequence and structural homology and target several host-cell types. Leukotoxin ED (LukED) is one of these bicomponent pore-forming toxins that Staphylococcus aureus produces in order to suppress the ability of the host to contain the infection. The recent delineation of the important role that LukED plays in S. aureus pathogenesis and the identification of its protein receptors, combined with its presence in S. aureus methicillin-resistant epidemic strains, establish this leukocidin as a possible target for the development of novel therapeutics. Here, the crystal structures of the water-soluble LukE and LukD components of LukED have been determined. The two structures illustrate the tertiary-structural variability with respect to the other leukotoxins while retaining the conservation of the residues involved in the interaction of the protomers in the bipartite leukotoxin in the pore complex. PMID:26894539

  7. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  8. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  9. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  10. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  11. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.

  12. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them…

  13. Time to Grow: Year Two Report on ExpandED Schools. A TASC Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traill, Saskia; Brohawn, Katie

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of data from the second year of The After-School Corporation's (TASC's) national demonstration of an expanded school day for elementary and middle school students shows that ExpandED Schools improved school culture, decreased rates of students' chronic absenteeism and helped students develop positive learning habits and attitudes.…

  14. Choice of Instructional Media of B.Ed. Students of Ignou from Two Indian Metropolises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bose, Sutapa; Sharma, Parveen

    2010-01-01

    Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) of India uses multiple media and modes for reaching out to its distant learners. For most of the programmes offered to these learners, print is the master medium and other media supplement it. Instructions for the Bachelor in Education (B.Ed.), one of the popular programmes of IGNOU, are also…

  15. Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems: Contribution, Impact and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on the ontology engineering methodology discussed by the paper entitled "Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems" published in this journal in 2000. We discuss the achievements obtained in the last 10 years, the impact of our work as well as recent trends and perspectives in ontology engineering for…

  16. An Analysis of Professional Practice Ed.D. Dissertations in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara; Kumar, Swapna

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida offers an online professional practice Ed.D. focused on Educational Technology. Twenty-three students have completed professional practice dissertations and graduated since the program's inception in 2008. The purpose of this article is to share what these dissertations have looked like and to begin a dialogue about…

  17. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1984-02-01

    All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

  18. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  19. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS. D.K. Tarka*1,2, J.D. Suarez*2, N.L. Roberts*2, J.M. Rogers*1,2, M.P. Hardy3, and G.R. Klinefelter1,2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC; 2USEPA,...

  20. Sex Ed for Caring Schools: Creating an Ethics-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    While arguments for and against teaching abstinence, the use of contraceptives, and sexual identity are becoming more and more polarized, most people agree that students must learn to navigate an increasingly sexual world. "Sex Ed for Caring Schools" presents a curriculum that goes beyond the typical health education most students receive today.…

  1. Developing Scientific Literacy Skills through Interdisciplinary, Technology-Based Global Simulations: GlobalEd 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Kimberly A.; Brown, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    GlobalEd 2 (GE2) is a set of technology-mediated, problem-based learning (PBL) simulations for middle-grade students, that capitalises on the multidisciplinary nature of the social sciences as an expanded curricular space for students to learn and apply scientific literacies and concepts, while simultaneously also enriching their understanding of…

  2. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours.

  3. Impact of Curricular Reforms on Educational Philosophy Courses in M.Ed Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, K. Abdul; Remia, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of Vision of Teacher Education envisaged in National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, this study probes "Do M.Ed programmes provide for the prerequisites of educational philosophy for teacher educators?" and "whether the syllabi following credit and non credit pattern vary in their coverage of content of…

  4. With Medicare revenues at stake, ED managers place new importance on elevating the patient experience.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    With a portion of Medicare revenue soon to be on the line based on patient satisfaction, ED managers have a heightened focus on making sure patients not only receive first-rate care, but that they also come away from the experience with good things to say. Some hospitals have implemented "patient centric" training for all employees, including the clinical staff, and they're getting regular feedback from patients on things they could do better. Furthermore, patient throughput--always an important factor--has taken on added significance. Beginning this fall, Medicare will begin withholding 1% of payments to hospitals so that it can use these funds to provide incentives to institutions that score high on patient satisfaction. The percent of payments withheld will rise to 2% by 2017. ED managers have implemented rounding through the waiting areas so that patients and family members are kept informed, and they're coming up with new ways to shorten patient-to-provider times. Experts say patient views of time spent in the ED also impact satisfaction scores from inpatient stays. Sophistication in the art of cue management is helping some EDs clear waiting rooms and maximize resources.

  5. Structural and biophysical analysis of sero-specific immune responses using epitope grafted Dengue ED3 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R; Islam, Monirul M; Numoto, Nobutaka; Elahi, Montasir; Mahib, Mamunur R; Ito, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    Dengue fever is a re-emerging tropical disease and its severe form is caused by cross-reactivity between its four serotypes (DEN1, DEN2, DEN3 and DEN4). The third domain of the viral envelope protein (ED3) contains the two major putative epitopes and is a highly suitable model protein for examining the molecular determinants of a virus' sero-specificity. Here we examine d the sero-specificity and cross-reactivity of the immune response against DEN3 and DEN4 ED3 using six epitope grafted ED3 variants where the surface-exposed epitope residues from DEN3 ED3 were switched to those of DEN4 ED3 and vice versa. We prepared anti-DEN3 and anti-DEN4 ED3 serum by immunizing Swiss albino mice and measured their reactivities against all six grafted mutants. As expected, both sera exhibited strong reactivity against its own serotype's ED3, and little cross-reactivity against their counterpart serotype's ED3s. E2 played a major role in the sero-specificity of anti-DEN3 serum, whereas E1 was important for DEN4 ED3's sero-specificity. Next, the reactivity patterns corroborated our working hypothesis that sero-specificity could be transferred by grafting the surface exposed epitope residues from one serotype to the other. To analyze the above results from a structural viewpoint, we determined the crystal structure of a DEN4 ED3 variant, where E2 was grafted from DEN3 ED3, at 2.78Å resolution and modeled the structures of the five remaining grafted variants by assuming that the overall backbone remained unchanged. The examination of the electrostatic and molecular surfaces of the variants suggested some further rationale for the sero-specificity of the immune responses.

  6. The Customers' Perspective: The EdNET 98 Survey of Buyers and Managers of Educational Technology. Constructive Input for the Educational Technology Industry from the EdNET 98 Education Executives Advisory Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craighead, Donna; Bigham, Vicki Smith; Heller, Nelson B.

    The EdNET 98 Education Executives Advisory Board, also known as Partners in Education Program (PEP), is a featured activity of the EdNET 98 Conference. Its focus is to bring educators and vendors together to share their perspectives about technology in education and discussion technology-related concerns and issues. This report presents results…

  7. School Engagement Mediates Long Term Prevention Effects for Mexican American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Nancy A.; Wong, Jessie J.; Toomey, Russell B.; Millsap, Roger; Dumka, Larry E.; Mauricio, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    This five year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of a family-focused intervention delivered in middle school to increase school engagement following transition to high school (2 years posttest), and also evaluated mediated effects through school engagement on multiple problem outcomes in late adolescence (5 years posttest). The study sample included 516 Mexican American adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program (Bridges/ Puentes). Path models representing the direct and indirect effects of the program on four outcome variables were evaluated using school engagement measured in the 9th grade as a mediator. The program significantly increased school engagement, with school engagement mediating intervention effects on internalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and school dropout in late adolescence when most adolescents were in the 12th grade. Effects on substance use were stronger for youth at higher risk based on pretest report of substance use initiation. There were no direct or indirect intervention effects on externalizing symptoms. Findings support that school engagement is an important prevention target for Mexican American adolescents. PMID:24398825

  8. School engagement mediates long-term prevention effects for Mexican American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Nancy A; Wong, Jessie J; Toomey, Russell B; Millsap, Roger; Dumka, Larry E; Mauricio, Anne M

    2014-12-01

    This 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of a family-focused intervention delivered in middle school to increase school engagement following transition to high school (2 years post-test), and also evaluated mediated effects through school engagement on multiple problem outcomes in late adolescence (5 years post-test). The study sample included 516 Mexican American adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program (Bridges/Puentes). Path models representing the direct and indirect effects of the program on four outcome variables were evaluated using school engagement measured in the 9th grade as a mediator. The program significantly increased school engagement, with school engagement mediating intervention effects on internalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and school dropout in late adolescence when most adolescents were in the 12th grade. Effects on substance use were stronger for youth at higher risk based on pretest report of substance use initiation. There were no direct or indirect intervention effects on externalizing symptoms. Findings support that school engagement is an important prevention target for Mexican American adolescents. PMID:24398825

  9. School engagement mediates long-term prevention effects for Mexican American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Nancy A; Wong, Jessie J; Toomey, Russell B; Millsap, Roger; Dumka, Larry E; Mauricio, Anne M

    2014-12-01

    This 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of a family-focused intervention delivered in middle school to increase school engagement following transition to high school (2 years post-test), and also evaluated mediated effects through school engagement on multiple problem outcomes in late adolescence (5 years post-test). The study sample included 516 Mexican American adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program (Bridges/Puentes). Path models representing the direct and indirect effects of the program on four outcome variables were evaluated using school engagement measured in the 9th grade as a mediator. The program significantly increased school engagement, with school engagement mediating intervention effects on internalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and school dropout in late adolescence when most adolescents were in the 12th grade. Effects on substance use were stronger for youth at higher risk based on pretest report of substance use initiation. There were no direct or indirect intervention effects on externalizing symptoms. Findings support that school engagement is an important prevention target for Mexican American adolescents.

  10. From Napkin to Orbit in 9 Months; The TechEdSat Spacecraft Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron; Hoppins, Nicholas; Trinh, Greenfield; Schulte, Jan; Bruhn, Fredrik; Loefgren, Henrik; Selin, Per

    2013-01-01

    The TechEdSat spacecraft mission saw one of the fastest turn around times for concept through launch of a CubeSat. On 26 October 2011, John Hines sketched on a brown paper napkin the outline for which components would be in this 1U CubeSat, and how they would be stacked; 269 days later that spacecraft launched from Tanegashima Space Center aboard the HTV-3 ISS resupply mission, with a total development time of only eight months. TechEdSat was among the first of five CubeSats deployed from the ISS. The goals of the TechEdSat mission were to explore the use of the Space Plug-n-Play Architecture (SPA) in a CubeSat, and to evaluate Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) space-to-space communication solutions. TechEdSat featured an array of processors from ÅAC Microtec including four NanoRTU's and the RTULite main processor, all communicating using the SPA-1 protocol. TechEdSat featured two primary payloads: an Iridium 9602 Modem, and a Quake Global Q1000 OrbComm modem. After a successful deployment on 4 October 2012 from the ISS, over 2000 packets of 122 bytes each (250 kB total) were received in the first four months of the mission. In this paper we discuss the challenges to rapid CubeSat development, the experience of having a CubeSat approved for deployment from the ISS, the ongoing results of the mission and lessons learned.

  11. Native American Tribal Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  12. American Sleep Apnea Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep ...

  13. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Login The Hendren Project Resources Research Continuing Education Residents / Fellows Membership About APSA American Pediatric Surgical Association One Parkview Plaza, Suite 800 Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181 USA Phone: +1-847-686-2237 Fax: +1-847- ...

  14. Singing American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to use music when teaching U.S. History. Provides examples such as teaching about the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the Vietnam War and showing the contributions of African Americans. Includes a discography. (CMK)

  15. American Diabetes Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2383) Give by Mail Close November is American Diabetes Month® Share your personal diabetes story and show ... Next » « Previous Our Mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people ...

  16. Contemporary American Physics Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Alan J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the works by six contemporary American novelists that illustrate the current state of "physics fiction." The discussed examples of physics fiction ranged from the fluent and frequent inclusion of the casual, to the elaborate systems of physics metaphors. (GA)

  17. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Remember Me I forgot my password American Therapeutic Recreation Association Empowering Recreational Therapists Call for 2017 Webinars – ... http://ow.ly/qzAj304HTCi Join thousands of Therapeutic Recreation specialists today Join Now Renew your membership today ...

  18. Native American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Americans.

  19. Asian American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Asian Americans.

  20. African American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect African Americans.

  1. Hispanic American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Hispanic Americans.

  2. Profile: Asian Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... the visibility of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islander health issues. Overview (Demographics): This racial group ... White population. Selected Data by Disease/Condition Asian/Pacific Islanders and Asthma . Asian/Pacific Islanders and Cancer . ...

  3. Latin American Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsunce, Cesar A. Garcia

    1983-01-01

    Examination of the situation of archives in four Latin American countries--Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Costa Rica--highlights national systems, buildings, staff, processing of documents, accessibility and services to the public and publications and extension services. (EJS)

  4. General American: An Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Riper, William R.

    1973-01-01

    Disputes use of the term General American'' because of the excessive breadth of its scope and its indefiniteness; article is part of Lexicography and Dialect Geography, Festgabe for Hans Kurath''. (DD)

  5. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  6. American Sleep Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Codes and Names Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Signs and Symptoms of Insomnia Anxiety Disorder ...

  7. American Association of Suicidology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Youth Suicide Resources Someone Needs Help U OK? Program Warning Signs & Risk Factors Current Projects Mission ... American Association of Suicidology | Privacy Statement {1} ##LOC[OK]## {1} ##LOC[OK]## ##LOC[Cancel]## {1} ##LOC[OK]## ## ...

  8. The Peoples Multicultural Almanac: America from the 1400s to Present. 365 Days of Contributions by African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, European Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Earl J., Jr.; And Others

    The Peoples Multicultural Almanac provides five entries for each day in the school year, September through May, organized for the following ethnic groups: (1) African Americans; (2) Asian Americans; (3) European Americans; (4) Hispanic Americans; and (5) Native Americans. The entries highlight significant social, political, historical, cultural,…

  9. American College of Emergency Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Requirements by State Portfolio Tracker Professional Development Financial Planning Faculty Development Research and EM Foundation Portfolio Tracker Chapter Leadership Development Meetings & Events Educational Meetings Advanced Pediatric Emergency Medicine Assembly ED Directors ...

  10. Depression Prevention for Early Adolescent Girls: A Pilot Study of All Girls Versus Co-Ed Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Samuels, Barbra; Freres, Derek R.; Winder, Breanna; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2006-01-01

    Given the dramatic increase in depression that occurs during early adolescence in girls, interventions must address the needs of girls. The authors examined whether a depression prevention program, the Penn Resiliency Program, was more effective for girls in all-girls groups than in co-ed groups. Within co-ed groups, the authors also tested…

  11. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  12. Disruption of the Arabidopsis Defense Regulator Genes SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 Confers Enhanced Freezing Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin-Fang; Xu, Le; Tan, Wei-Juan; Chen, Liang; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Liu, Bin-Yi; Yu, Lu-Jun; Yao, Nan; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, three lipase-like regulators, SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4, act downstream of resistance protein-associated defense signaling. Although the roles of SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 in biotic stress have been extensively studied, little is known about their functions in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we show that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in the regulation of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. With or without cold acclimation, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 single mutants, as well as their double mutants, exhibited similarly enhanced tolerance to freezing temperatures. Upon cold exposure, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants showed increased transcript levels of C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTORs and their regulons compared with the wild type. Moreover, freezing-induced cell death and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide were ameliorated in sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants. The sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants had much lower salicylic acid (SA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents than the wild type, and exogenous application of SA and DAG compromised the freezing tolerance of the mutants. Furthermore, SA suppressed the cold-induced expression of DGATs and DGKs in the wild-type leaves. These findings indicate that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in the freezing response in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by modulating the homeostasis of SA and DAG.

  13. Effectiveness of Mathematics Teaching and Learning Experiences through Wireless Technology as Recent Style to Enhance B.Ed. Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of learning through Wireless technologies and the traditional method in teaching and learning Mathematics. The investigator adopted experimental research to find the effectiveness of implementing Wireless technologies in the population of B.Ed. trainees. The investigator selected 32 B.Ed.…

  14. Effectiveness of Mutual Learning Approach in the Academic Achievement of B.Ed Students in Learning Optional II English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at finding out the effectiveness of Mutual learning approach over the conventional method in learning English optional II among B.Ed students. The randomized pre-test, post test, control group and experimental group design was employed. The B.Ed students of the same college formed the control and experimental groups. Each…

  15. Competencies for Effective School Leadership: To What Extent Are They Included in Ed.D. Leadership Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Jody; Li, Jinyi; Kladifko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing need for well-­-prepared and leading practitioners in the field of education as well as the renewed efforts to further distinguish the EdD from the PhD in higher education in recent years, the curriculum of EdD programs nationwide has been questioned and criticized for its disconnection from the needs of leading…

  16. Making everyday tasks easier - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  17. Comparison of adjuvant ED and EC-D regimens in operable breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liyu; Jing, Chuyu; Kong, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoyan; Ma, Tingting; Huo, Qiang; Chen, Junfei; Wang, Xiaoting; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    In China, the adjuvant epirubicin and docetaxel (ED) regimen is widely used as a substitute for the epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel (EC-D) regimen in patients with operable breast cancer. However, their equivalence has not yet been demonstrated. This retrospective study compared these two adjuvant regimens as regards feasibility, safety and efficacy. Data on consecutive patients who received either ED (70/75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) or EC-D (70/600 mg/m2 epirubicin/cyclophosphamide followed by 75 mg/m2 docetaxel every 3 weeks for 4 cycles each) as their adjuvant chemotherapy in our center from January 2009 to January 2014, were analyzed. A total of 374 patients was enrolled, among whom 250 patients received the ED regimen, and 124 patients received the EC-D regimen. The overall median follow-up time was 38.6 months. In total, 90 and 94.4% of patients in the ED and EC-D groups, respectively, completed full cycles of chemotherapy (P=0.174). There was no difference in efficacy in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (DFS, P=0.919; OS, P=0.069). The incidence of neutropenia in the ED group was similar to that in the EC-D group (81.2 vs. 78.9%, P=0.660) with a similar utilization rate of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 76.9 vs. 75.2%, P=0.850). However, grade 3/4 gastrointestinal reactions were more frequently observed in the patients who received the EC-D regimen (42.0 vs. 29.2%, P=0.058). The findings of our study indicate that with similar feasibility, safety and mid-term efficacy, the adjuvant ED regimen for 6 cycles may be an alternative to the EC-D regimen in operable breast cancer. PMID:27446451

  18. Different roles of Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) bound to and dissociated from Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) in Arabidopsis immunity.

    PubMed

    Rietz, Steffen; Stamm, Anika; Malonek, Stefan; Wagner, Stephan; Becker, Dieter; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Vlot, A Corina; Feys, Bart J; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2011-07-01

    • Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) is an important regulator of plant basal and receptor-triggered immunity. Arabidopsis EDS1 interacts with two related proteins, Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) and Senescence Associated Gene101 (SAG101), whose combined activities are essential for defense signaling. The different sizes and intracellular distributions of EDS1-PAD4 and EDS1-SAG101 complexes in Arabidopsis leaf tissues suggest that they perform nonredundant functions. • The nature and biological relevance of EDS1 interactions with PAD4 and SAG101 were explored using yeast three-hybrid assays, in vitro analysis of recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli, and characterization of Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing an eds1 mutant (eds1(L262P) ) protein which no longer binds PAD4 but retains interaction with SAG101. • EDS1 forms molecularly distinct complexes with PAD4 or SAG101 without additional plant factors. Loss of interaction with EDS1 reduces PAD4 post-transcriptional accumulation, consistent with the EDS1 physical association stabilizing PAD4. The dissociated forms of EDS1 and PAD4 are fully competent in signaling receptor-triggered localized cell death at infection foci. By contrast, an EDS1-PAD4 complex is necessary for basal resistance involving transcriptional up-regulation of PAD4 itself and mobilization of salicylic acid defenses. • Different EDS1 and PAD4 molecular configurations have distinct and separable functions in the plant innate immune response.

  19. Book Review: E.D. Hirsch, Jr.'s Cultural Literacy: Quality of Life or Mere Level of Brow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Malcolm B.

    1988-01-01

    A critical examination is made of the central thesis of "Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know" that the acculturative responsibility of American formal education is an essential teaching obligation and each American child should become culturally literate. (JD)

  20. Methodology of AA CRASH: a prospective observational study evaluating the incidence and pathogenesis of adverse post-traumatic sequelae in African-Americans experiencing motor vehicle collision

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Hu, JunMei; Liu, Andrea Y; Soward, April C; Bollen, Kenneth A; Wang, Henry E; Hendry, Phyllis L; Zimny, Erin; Lewandowski, Christopher; Velilla, Marc-Anthony; Damiron, Kathia; Pearson, Claire; Domeier, Robert; Kaushik, Sangeeta; Feldman, James; Rosenberg, Mark; Jones, Jeffrey; Swor, Robert; Rathlev, Niels; McLean, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A motor vehicle collision (MVC) is one of the most common life-threatening events experienced by individuals living in the USA. While most individuals recover following MVC, a significant proportion of individuals develop adverse post-traumatic sequelae such as post-traumatic stress disorder or persistent musculoskeletal pain. Adverse post-traumatic sequelae are common, morbid and costly public health problems in the USA and other industrialised countries. The pathogenesis of these disorders following MVC remains poorly understood. In the USA, available data suggest that African-Americans experience an increased burden of adverse post-traumatic sequelae after MVC compared to European Americans, but to date no studies examining the pathogenesis of these disorders among African-Americans experiencing MVC have been performed. Methods and analysis The African-American CRASH (AA CRASH) study is an NIH-funded, multicentre, prospective study that enrols African-Americans (n=900) who present to the emergency department (ED) within 24 hours of MVC. Participants are enrolled at 13 ED sites in the USA. Individuals who are admitted to the hospital or who report a fracture or tissue injury are excluded. Participants complete a detailed ED interview that includes an assessment of crash history, current post-traumatic symptoms and health status prior to the MVC. Blood samples are also collected in the ED using PAXgene DNA and PAXgene RNA tubes. Serial mixed-mode assessments 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after MVC include an assessment of adverse sequelae, general health status and health service utilisation. The results from this study will provide insights into the incidence and pathogenesis of persistent pain and other post-traumatic sequelae in African-Americans experiencing MVC. Ethics and dissemination AA CRASH has ethics approval in the USA, and the results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:27601501

  1. IMAGES OF BLACK AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Susan T.; Bergsieker, Hilary B.; Russell, Ann Marie; Williams, Lyle

    2013-01-01

    Images of Black Americans are becoming remarkably diverse, enabling Barack Obama to defy simple-minded stereotypes and succeed. Understood through the Stereotype Content Model’s demonstrably fundamental trait dimensions of perceived warmth and competence, images of Black Americans show three relevant patterns. Stereotyping by omission allows non-Blacks to accentuate the positive, excluding any lingering negativity but implying it by its absence; specifically, describing Black Americans as gregarious and passionate suggests warmth but ignores competence and implies its lack. Obama’s credentials prevented him from being cast as incompetent, though the experience debate continued. His legendary calm and passionate charisma saved him on the warmth dimension. Social class subtypes for Black Americans differentiate dramatically between low-income Blacks and Black professionals, among both non-Black and Black samples. Obama clearly fit the moderately warm, highly competent Black-professional subtype. Finally, the campaign’s events (and nonevents) allowed voter habituation to overcome non-Blacks’ automatic emotional vigilance to Black Americans. PMID:24235974

  2. Neighborhood environment and urban African American marijuana use during high school.

    PubMed

    Reboussin, Beth A; Green, Kerry M; Milam, Adam J; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2014-12-01

    African American male high school students have the highest rates of marijuana use among all racial, ethnic, and gender groups, yet there is limited research examining contextual factors salient to the African American community. The purpose of this study was to examine how neighborhood environment measured in 8th grade is related to longitudinal transitions in marijuana use during high school (9th to 12th grades) in a sample of urban African Americans. Four hundred and fifty-two African American children were interviewed annually beginning in 1st grade as part of a longitudinal field study in Baltimore city. Latent transition analysis indicated early in high school posed the greatest risk for initiation and progression of marijuana use. Community violence exposure was associated with an increased likelihood of transitioning from no marijuana use to infrequent use (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 2.40, p < 0.001). Higher perceived neighborhood disorder (AOR = 3.20, p = 0.004), drug activity and sales in the neighborhood (AOR = 2.28, p = 0.028), and community violence exposure (AOR = 4.54, p < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of transitioning from no use to frequent/problematic marijuana use. There was evidence for partial mediation of these associations by perceptions of harm and depressed mood. Drug activity and sales was associated with progression from infrequent to frequent and problematic use (AOR = 2.87, p = 0.029). African American youth living in urban environments with exposure to drug activity, violence, and neighborhood disorder are at increased risk for both initiation and progression to more frequent and problematic marijuana use during high school. These findings highlight the need to develop interventions for African American youth that are mindful of the impact of the additional stressors of living in a high-risk urban environment during a critical developmental transition period. Reducing exposure

  3. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis.

  4. Segregation Behavior of Sulfur and Other Impurities Onto the Free Surfaces of ED-Ni Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Jerman, Gregory; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Most researchers attribute grain boundary embrittlement in electro-deposited Nickel (ED-Ni) to the presence of small quantities of Sulfur as an impurity. It occurs in a highly mobile form that segregates to the grain boundaries. Evaluation of Sulfur segregation requires that a sample be fractured through the grain boundaries. However, this action may not always be possible. ED-Ni is inherently tough at ambient temperature, especially if a low level of Sulfur was intentionally maintained. A new method was developed to study Sulfur and other migrant species to the grain boundaries, which also migrate to free surfaces. A test specimen is heated by a quartz lamp within the sample preparation chamber, allowing the mobile species to migrate to polished free surfaces. There the mobile species are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also known as Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA).

  5. Segregation Behavior of Sulfur and Other Impurities onto the Free Surfaces of ED-NI Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, B.; Jerman, G.

    2001-01-01

    Most researchers attribute grain boundary embrittlement in electro-deposited nickel (ED-Ni) to the presence of small quantities of sulfur as an impurity. It occurs in a highly mobile form that segregates to the grain boundaries. Evaluation of sulfur segregation requires that a sample be fractured through the grain boundaries. However, this action may not always be possible. ED-Ni is inherently tough at ambient temperature, especially if a low level of sulfur was intentionally maintained. A new method was developed to study sulfur and other migrant species to the grain boundaries, which also migrate to free surfaces. A test specimen is heated by a quartz lamp within the sample preparation chamber, allowing the mobile species to migrate to polished free surfaces. There the mobile species are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also known as Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA).

  6. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  7. Modeling and analysis of the EDS Maglev system with the Halbach magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wonsuk

    The magnetic field analysis based on the wavelet transform is performed. The Halbach array magnetic field analysis has been studied using many methods such as magnetic scalar potential, magnetic vector potential, Fourier analysis and Finite Element Methods. But these analyses cannot identify a transient oscillation at the beginning stage of levitation. The wavelet transform is used for analyzing the transient oscillatory response of an EDS Maglev system. The proposed scheme explains the under-damped dynamics that results from the cradle's dynamic response to the irregular distribution of the magnetic field. It suggests this EDS Maglev system that responds to a vertical repulsive force could be subject to such instability at the beginning stage of a low levitation height. The proposed method is useful in analyzing instabilities at the beginning stage of levitation height. A controller for the EDS maglev system with the Halbach array magnet is designed for the beginning stage of levitation and after reaching the defined levitation height. To design a controller for the EDS system, two different stages are suggested. Before the object reaches a stable position and after it has reached a stable position. A stable position can be referred to as a nominal height. The former is the stage I and the latter is the stage II. At the stage I, to achieve a nominal height the robust controller is investigated. At the stage II, both translational and rotational motions are considered for the control design. To maintain system stability, damping control as well as LQR control are performed. The proposed method is helpful to understand system dynamics and achieve system stability.

  8. Improvement in student science proficiency through InSciEd out.

    PubMed

    Pierret, Chris; Sonju, James D; Leicester, Jean E; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K-8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5(th) and 8(th) grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools.

  9. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  10. COL5A1 haploinsufficiency is a common molecular mechanism underlying the classical form of EDS.

    PubMed Central

    Wenstrup, R J; Florer, J B; Willing, M C; Giunta, C; Steinmann, B; Young, F; Susic, M; Cole, W G

    2000-01-01

    We have identified haploinsufficiency of the COL5A1 gene that encodes the proalpha1(V) chain of type V collagen in the classical form of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a heritable connective-tissue disorder that severely alters the collagen-fibrillar structure of the dermis, joints, eyes, and blood vessels. Eight of 28 probands with classical EDS who were heterozygous for expressed polymorphisms in COL5A1 showed complete or nearly complete loss of expression of one COL5A1 allele. Reduced levels of proalpha1(V) mRNA relative to the levels of another type V collagen mRNA, proalpha2(V), were also observed in the cultured fibroblasts from EDS probands. Products of the two COL5A1 alleles were approximately equal after the addition of cycloheximide to the fibroblast cultures. After harvesting of mRNAs from cycloheximide-treated cultured fibroblasts, heteroduplex analysis of overlapping reverse transcriptase-PCR segments spanning the complete proalpha1(V) cDNA showed anomalies in four of the eight probands that led to identification of causative mutations, and, in the remaining four probands, targeting of CGA-->TGA mutations in genomic DNA revealed a premature stop at codon in one of them. We estimate that approximately one-third of individuals with classical EDS have mutations of COL5A1 that result in haploinsufficiency. These findings indicate that the normal formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils that contain types I, III, and V collagen requires the expression of both COL5A1 alleles. PMID:10777716

  11. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  12. Improvement in Student Science Proficiency Through InSciEd Out

    PubMed Central

    Sonju, James D.; Leicester, Jean E.; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K–8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5th and 8th grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools. PMID:23244687

  13. Selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors improve performance on the ED/ID cognitive task in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodefer, Joshua S; Saland, Samantha K; Eckrich, Samuel J

    2012-03-01

    A number of selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have been demonstrated to improve learning in several rodent models of cognition. Given that schizophrenia is associated with impairments in frontal lobe-dependent cognitive functions (e.g., working memory and cognitive flexibility), we examined whether PDE inhibitors would attenuate cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Persistent suppression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function produces enduring structural changes in neocortical and limbic regions in a pattern similar to changes reported in schizophrenia. This similarity suggests that subchronic treatment with NMDA receptor antagonists (e.g., phencyclidine, PCP) may represent a useful preclinical model of neurobiological and related cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. We treated male Long-Evans rats with subchronic PCP (5 mg/kg, ip, BID, 7 d) or saline and then examined the effects of acute treatment with selected doses of PDE inhibitors that have been demonstrated to regulate both intracellular levels of cAMP and/or cGMP, and to improve cognitive function. We used an extradimensional-intradimensional (ED/ID) test of cognitive flexibility similar to those used in humans and non-human primates for assessing executive function. Subchronic treatment with PCP produced a selective impairment on ED shift (EDS) performance without significant impairment on any other discrimination problem when compared to saline-treated control animals. Selected doses of the four PDEIs evaluated (PDE2: BAY 60-7550; PDE4: rolipram; PDE5: sildenafil; PDE10A: papaverine) were able to significantly attenuate this cognitive deficit in EDS performance. This suggests that this rodent model of executive function was sensitive to pro-cognitive effects of intracellular effects resulting from PDE inhibition. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of PDE activity may represent valuable therapeutic targets to improve cognition associated with

  14. Advances in EBSD and EBSD/EDS integration for the characterization of mineralogical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.

    2013-12-01

    Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a well-known powerful technique for petrofabric studies using Scanning Electron Microscope. By assessing the quantitative microstructural information, i.e. crystallographic orientation data, it allows a large variety of applications: understanding the deformation mechanisms, seismic properties, metamorphic processes; and more recently, performing phase identification and discrimination when combined with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). However, it is known that for multiphase mineralogical samples, the information delivered either by EBSD or by EDS alone is not enough to successfully distinguish the present phases. Typical examples for EBSD related indexing issues are phases creating similar patterns; and for EDS technique alone, phases with similar chemical composition like calcite and aragonite, quartz and cristobalite. Recent software and hardware developments have significantly improved the data quality as well as the efficiency/productivity. This presentation aims to reveal the latest development in data processing that has transformed the combination of the two complementary techniques into a powerful tool for characterizing multiphase materials. Through geosciences application examples, we will present the advantages brought by this new approach which uses the quantified EDS results and EBSP to identify the correct phase, reducing the need of data cleaning, and without spending extra time at the SEM. We will also demonstrate how powerful EBSD indexing algorithm can overcome the limitation from sample preparation, with some examples of high hit rate achieved on polyphase mineralogical specimen and even on shock-metamorphosed minerals. Last but not least, recent developments also enable the investigation of nanostructured materials in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Through some mineralogical applications, we will demonstrate the high spatial resolution

  15. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  16. Data-driven process and operational improvement in the emergency department: the ED Dashboard and Reporting Application.

    PubMed

    Stone-Griffith, Suzanne; Englebright, Jane D; Cheung, Dickson; Korwek, Kimberly M; Perlin, Jonathan B

    2012-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States are expected to provide consistent, high-quality care to patients. Unfortunately, EDs are encumbered by problems associated with the demand for services and the limitations of current resources, such as overcrowding, long wait times, and operational inefficiencies. While increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of emergency care would improve both access and quality of patient care, coordinated improvement efforts have been hindered by a lack of timely access to data. The ED Dashboard and Reporting Application was developed to support data-driven process improvement projects. It incorporated standard definitions of metrics, a data repository, and near real-time analysis capabilities. This helped acute care hospitals in a large healthcare system evaluate and target individual improvement projects in accordance with corporate goals. Subsequently, there was a decrease in "arrival to greet" time--the time from patient arrival to physician contact--from an average of 51 minutes in 2007 to the goal level of less than 35 minutes by 2010. The ED Dashboard and Reporting Application has also contributed to data-driven improvements in length of stay and other measures of ED efficiency and care quality. Between January 2007 and December 2010, overall length of stay decreased 10.5 percent while annual visit volume increased 13.6 percent. Thus, investing in the development and implementation of a system for ED data capture, storage, and analysis has supported operational management decisions, gains in ED efficiency, and ultimately improvements in patient care. PMID:22724375

  17. Structural basis for signaling by exclusive EDS1 heteromeric complexes with SAG101 or PAD4 in plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephan; Stuttmann, Johannes; Rietz, Steffen; Guerois, Raphael; Brunstein, Elena; Bautor, Jaqueline; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2013-12-11

    Biotrophic plant pathogens encounter a postinfection basal resistance layer controlled by the lipase-like protein enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and its sequence-related interaction partners, senescence-associated gene 101 (SAG101) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4). Maintainance of separate EDS1 family member clades through angiosperm evolution suggests distinct functional attributes. We report the Arabidopsis EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer crystal structure with juxtaposed N-terminal α/β hydrolase and C-terminal α-helical EP domains aligned via a large conserved interface. Mutational analysis of the EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer and a derived EDS1-PAD4 structural model shows that EDS1 signals within mutually exclusive heterocomplexes. Although there is evolutionary conservation of α/β hydrolase topology in all three proteins, a noncatalytic resistance mechanism is indicated. Instead, the respective N-terminal domains appear to facilitate binding of the essential EP domains to create novel interaction surfaces on the heterodimer. Transitions between distinct functional EDS1 heterodimers might explain the central importance and versatility of this regulatory node in plant immunity.

  18. Native American medicine.

    PubMed

    Cohen, K

    1998-11-01

    This article summarizes common principles, practices, and ethics of Native American healing, the traditional medicine of North America. Native American healing, spirituality, culture, and, in modern times, political, social, and economic concerns are closely intertwined. Intuition and spiritual awareness are a healer's most essential diagnostic tools. Therapeutic methods include prayer, music, ritual purification, herbalism, massage, ceremony, and personal innovations of individual healers. A community of friends, family, and helpers often participate in the healing intervention and help to alleviate the alienation caused by disease. A healthy patient has a healthy relationship with his or her community and, ultimately, with the greater community of nature known as "All Relations." The goal of Native American healing is to find wholeness, balance, harmony, beauty, and meaning. "Healing," making whole, is as important as curing disease; at times they are identical.

  19. An electrodynamics-Langevin dynamics (ED-LD) approach to simulate metal nanoparticle interactions and motion.

    PubMed

    Sule, N; Rice, S A; Gray, S K; Scherer, N F

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the formation of electrodynamically interacting assemblies of metal nanoparticles requires accurate computational methods for determining the forces and propagating trajectories. However, since computation of electromagnetic forces occurs on attosecond to femtosecond timescales, simulating the motion of colloidal nanoparticles on milliseconds to seconds timescales is a challenging multi-scale computational problem. Here, we present a computational technique for performing accurate simulations of laser-illuminated metal nanoparticles. In the simulation, we self-consistently combine the finite-difference time-domain method for electrodynamics (ED) with Langevin dynamics (LD) for the particle motions. We demonstrate the ED-LD method by calculating the 3D trajectories of a single 100-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticle and optical trapping and optical binding of two and three 150-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticles in simulated optical tweezers. We show that surface charge on the colloidal metal nanoparticles plays an important role in their optically driven self-organization. In fact, these simulations provide a more complete understanding of the assembly of different structures of two and three Ag nanoparticles that have been observed experimentally, demonstrating that the ED-LD method will be a very useful tool for understanding the self-organization of optical matter.

  20. Sevoflurane administration initiated out of the ED for life-threatening status asthmaticus.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel; Fahimi, Jahan; Hern, H Gene

    2015-08-01

    Status asthmaticus is both a common and dangerous cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency department (ED) setting. Although most cases respond favorably to standard treatment, there are rare cases in which therapy beyond traditional treatment is needed. One of these treatment modalities includes inhalational anesthesia. We present a case in which inhaled sevoflurane was initiated out of the ED for a life-threatening asthma exacerbation refractory to conventional treatment. To our knowledge, this is only the second case to report the use of inhaled anesthetics initiated out of the ED for status asthmaticus and is the first report of its kind to thoroughly detail the respiratory response noted while inhalation anesthesia was being implemented. A brief review of other case reports involving the use of sevoflurane for asthma is included. This case, as well as the others reviewed, illustrates the significant beneficial effect inhaled anesthetics can have on asthma, making this a treatment modality that must be recognized and appreciated by all emergency medicine providers. PMID:25662208