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Sample records for 9th iea workshop

  1. Summary of the 9th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

    1997-08-01

    Twenty one scientists attended an IEA workshop in Cincinnati, Ohio on May 8-9, 1997, which was mainly devoted to reviewing the current knowledge base on the phenonenon of radiation induced electrical degradation in ceramic insulators. Whereas convincing evidence for bulk RIED behavior has been observed by two research groups in sapphire after electron irradiation, definitive levels of bulk RIED have not been observed in high purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by several research groups during energetic ion or fission neutron irradiation. Possible reasons for the conflicting RIED results obtained by different research groups were discussed. It was conducted that RIED does not appear to be of immediate concern for near-term fusion devices such as ITER. However, continued research on the RIED phenomenon with particular emphasis on electron irradiations of single crystal alumina was recommended in order to determine the underlying physical mechanisms. This will allow a better determination of whether RIED might occur under any of the widely varying experimental conditions in a fusion energy device. Several critical issues which are recommended for future study were outlined by the workshop attendees.

  2. Review of the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop

    DOE PAGES

    Piron, Robin; Gilleron, Franck; Aglitskiy, Yefim; ...

    2017-02-24

    Here, we review the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop, which was held in the Jussieu campus, Paris, from November 30th to December 4th, 2015. This time, the workshop was mainly focused on a systematic investigation of iron NLTE steady-state kinetics and emissivity, over a broad range of temperature and density. Through these comparisons, topics such as modeling of the dielectronic processes, density effects or the effect of an external radiation field were addressed. The K-shell spectroscopy of iron plasmas was also addressed, notably through the interpretation of tokamak and laser experimental spectra.

  3. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment (IWAA06)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, B.,; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    The 9th International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment (IWAA06) took place at SLAC from September 25th to 29th of 2006. On Monday many participants registered for the event and took part in an ice-breaker reception sponsored by FARO Technologies. Following this, four days of talks and discussion began with status reports and presentations from various accelerators or similar laboratories around the world. Subsequent talks ranged from large-scale metrology, integrating and adjusting survey data, survey instrumentation and presentations on monitoring systems. This event included ongoing poster displays and a vendor exhibition. In these proceedings the presentations, papers and posters of the IWAA06 participants are available for online review.

  4. Proceedings of the ninth IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Burn, G.L.; Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

    1997-12-31

    Several IEA workshops have been held over the past few years to discuss the growing number of experimental studies on the intriguing phenomenon of radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED). In the past year, several new RIED irradiation experiments have been performed which have a significant impact on the understanding of the RIED phenomenon. These experiments include a HFIR neutron irradiation experiment on 12 different grades of single- and poly-crystal alumina (450 C, {approximately}3 dpa, 200 V/mm) and several additional neutron, electron and light ion irradiation experiments. The primary objective of the IEA workshop was to review the available RIED studies on ceramic insulators. Some discussion of recent work in other areas such as loss tangent measurements, mechanical strength, etc. occurred on the final afternoon of the workshop. The IEA workshop was held in conjunction with a US-Japan JUPITER program experimenter`s workshop on dynamic radiation effects in ceramic insulators.

  5. Proceedings of the 9th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, Annecy, France, 15-18 December 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, F.; Mours, B.

    2005-09-01

    The yearly Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) is now a well established meeting. As usual, the scope of the meeting covered the status of ground-based and space-based detectors, sources and population modelling, detector characterization, event searches, multi-detector analysis and new analysis methods. The 9th GWDAW followed the trend observed in previous years: more presentations that included real data and more sophisticated analysis techniques. However, the biggest change observed was a significant increase in the number of presentations dealing with the analysis of data coming from multiple detectors. Our field needs to combine these data to best extract the astrophysical information. This yearly meeting, bringing together all the worldwide players in the field, is a chance for us to make progress in this direction, and we will certainly see more results in future GWDAW meetings. The importance of the 9th GWDAW meeting can be assessed not only by the record attendance and number of submitted contributions, but also by looking at the work schedules of the various groups. People are now using the GWDAW dates to set deadlines for their activities in order to present their results at the next GWDAW. This special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity contains the most up-to-date papers on the topics covered by the meeting. Besides being a good reference that will fit proudly into the series of previous GWDAW proceedings, it provides valuable details about current work. As organizers of this workshop, we would like to thank not only the sponsors that made this meeting possible, but also all the participants for coming, sharing their results and enjoying the event with us. The following institutions have sponsored the 9th GWDAW: Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP) European Gravitational Observatory (EGO) Université de Savoie Groupement de Recherche: Phénomènes cosmiques de haute énergie (GDR-PCHE) Institut National de

  6. The HUPO Brain Proteome project wish list--summary of the 9(th) HUPO BPP Workshop 9-10 January 2008, Barbados.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Eisenacher, Martin; Tribl, Florian; Stephan, Christian; Marcus, Katrin; Hardt, Tanja; Wiltfang, Jens; Martens, Lennart; Desiderio, Dominic; Gutstein, Howard; Park, Young Mok; Meyer, Helmut E

    2008-06-01

    The Human Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) aims at advancing knowledge and the understanding of neurodiseases and aging with the purpose of identifying prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, as well as to push new diagnostic approaches and medications. The participating groups meet in semi-annual workshops to discuss the progress, as well as the needs, within the field of proteomics. The 9(th) HUPO BPP workshop took place in Barbados from 9-10 January, 2008. Discussing the future HUPO BPP Roadmap, the attendees drafted the so called HUPO BPP wish list containing timelines, suggestions and missions. This wish list will be updated regularly and will serve as a guideline for the next phase.

  7. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  8. Mathematics 9th Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The Materials in this bulletin indicate suggested teaching procedures needed to implement the teaching of "mathematics, 9th Year" as outlined in Curriculum Bulletin No. 3, 1958-59 series, Course of Study Mathematics 7-8-9. Whereas the course of study suggests the application of mathematical principles such as commutativity,…

  9. Summary of the IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    A brief summary is given of research on radiation effects in ceramic insulators for fusion energy application performed during the last two years in Europe, Canada, Japan, the Russian Federation, the Ukraine and the United States. The IEA round-robin radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) experiment on Wesgo AL995 polycrystalline alumina has been completed by 5 research groups, with none of the groups observing clear indications of REID.

  10. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop (9th, Tokyo/Makuhari, Japan, July 31-August 6, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Hyman, Ed.; Usiskin, Zalman P., Ed.; Burrill, Gail, Ed.

    The Ninth International Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME-9) held in Makuhari, Japan, in August 2000 provided a unique opportunity for the Mathematical Sciences Education Board and the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction. Together with educators from the Japanese mathematical community, they hosted a workshop on teacher…

  11. Pittsburgh Building "Nation" of 9th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Bitter experience has shown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that if students are going to leave school, they are most likely to do it between the 8th and 9th grades. To combat that problem, the school district has launched a full-on campaign to get its rising freshmen into high school and keep them there. Two weeks before school opened, the district…

  12. 9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

    2003-08-24

    The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

  13. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. This photograph shows the Cornell #2 team driving their vehicle through the course. The team finished the race in second place in the college division. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle, that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  14. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the team from Lafayette County High school in Higginsville, Missouri, designated Lafayette County team #1, races through the course to cross the finish line to win the high school division. The team beat out 26 other teams representing high schools from 9 states. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  15. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. In this photograph, the Cornell #1 team, the collegiate first place winner, maneuvers their vehicle through the course. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a humanpowered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  16. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the New Orleans area schools team #2 from New Orleans, Louisiana maneuvers through an obstacle course. The team captured second place in the high school division competition. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  17. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  18. Former 9th and possible future 9th planet in the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    4 terrestrial planets and 4 giant planets were formed in the Solar system. The Main asteroid belt is located between them, and the Kuiper belt and Oort cloud are located beyond the giant planets. Therefore, the planetary system is surrounded by a swarm of rocky-icy bodies up to a distance of 105 AU. The former 9th planet in the Solar system, Pluto, is the first known object of the Kuiper Belt. Due to data from the spacecraft "New Horizons" we made significant progress in the study of the physical characteristics of the object and its surface. Numerous observations have shown that the Kuiper belt itself is dynamically stable. And the source of cometary nuclei is a disk scattered by the gravitational perturbation of the giant planets more than 4 billion years ago. Recently, it was reported on indirect evidence of the existence of a new 9th planet in the Solar system with a mass 10 times greater than the mass of the Earth, a distance from the Sun ∼200 AU at perihelion, 600-1200 AU at aphelion, and an orbital period of ∼15000 years. These conclusions are based on the calculation of the orbits of 6 presently known objects of the scattered disc. We pay attention that, in moments close to their discovery, they were located near the perihelion, had a maximum brightness and a maximum orbital velocity. On the basis of probabilistic assumptions, we estimated that the probable number of the same bodies with eccentric orbits should be estimated at many thousands rather than at a few. For the initial evaluation, we used observational data from the Infrared Space Telescope "WISE". They showed that any Saturn's analog has not been registered at distances up to 30 000 AU. Therefore, a super-Earth with a radius of <11000 km (with a mass of ∼10 Earth masses) would have been seen at a distance up to 1000 AU. Thus, either unknown 9th planet is now at a greater distance, or these results cannot be directly scaled to the super-Earth with a disproporti! onately lower internal heat

  19. The Pacific Child: Investing in the Future. Conference Evaluation. Annual Pacific Educational Conference (9th, Pago Pago, August 3-5, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Diane

    Proceedings of the Pacific Region Educational Laboratory's (PREL) 9th Annual Pacific Educational Conference, held August 3-5, 1992, in Pago Pago, American Samoa are evaluated in this document. Data were collected from an overall conference evaluation survey, individual workshop surveys, workshop program information, anecdotal information, and…

  20. Development of Literacy Follow-Up Materials for Women and Other Disadvantaged Population. Final Report of the Regional Workshop on the Preparation of Literacy Follow-Up Materials in Asia and the Pacific (9th, Islamabad, Pakistan, November 2-13, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Islamabad (Pakistan).

    This report contains materials from a workshop to provide training in audiovisual materials development for women and other disadvantaged populations, such as slum dwellers, minorities, and migrants. The proceedings section contains an introduction, objective, and summaries of opening, workshop, and other presentations. Chapter 1 provides details…

  1. 9th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2015-08-31

    DOE OFES supported the 9th International Conference on Z-Pinches (DZP 2014) held in Napa, CA in August 2014. Funds were used to support travel for several US students, and to disseminate information through the publication of a proceedings volume.

  2. The Ethnic Context and Attitudes toward 9th Grade Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Sandra; Morales-Chicas, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the relations between ethnic context and attitudes about 9th grade math in youth from different ethnic groups who had recently transitioned to high school. The large sample comprised African American, Latino, White, and Asian youth (n = 2,265, 55% girls, M[subscript age] = 14.6 yrs.) A new questionnaire was developed…

  3. The Impact of Having 9th Graders "Do History"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlmeier, Jada

    2005-01-01

    The views of the author's students about history caused her to reflect on her teaching, specifically, what she was lacking in her attempts to teach civic competence through history. This process led her to research historical thinking and design a study in which she exposed her students to the rigors of history. Grant's (2001) study of 9th grade…

  4. IEA Wind Energy Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2001-05-01

    The twenty-third IEA Wind Energy Annual Report reviews the progress during 2000 of the activities in the Implementing Agreement for Co-operation in the Research and Development on Wind Turbine Systems under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The agreement and its program, which is known as IEA R&D Wind, is a collaborative venture among 19 contracting parties from 17 IEA member countries and the European Commission.

  5. CCD observations of Phoebe, 9th satellite of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienga, A.; Arlot, J.-E.; Baron, N.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Crochot, A.; Emelyanov, N.; Thuillot, W.

    2002-08-01

    In 1998 and 1999, we started observations of the 9th satellite of Saturn. We made 163 observations using the 120 cm-telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. We used the USNO A2 catalogue of stars for the astrometric reduction. With the help of observations of optical counterparts of ICRF sources, a zonal correction to the USNO A2.0 catalogue was computed and applied to the Phoebe positions. A comparison with the most recent theories was made.

  6. The 9th Annual Meeting of the Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery Dammam, Saudi Arabia, 3-5 March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro

    2015-01-01

    The 9th Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery (9th SANS) Annual Meeting was held in the Sheraton Dammam Hotel and Towers, Dammam, Saudi Arabia on March 3-5, 2015, organized by the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Dammam with a theme of “Research is the Bridge to the Future.” The meeting was preceded by a Public Awareness Campaign on March 2, 2015 held at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and several pre-conference workshops that were highly beneficial for neurosurgery today. The scientific program was loaded with innovative and interactive presentations from respected and reputable speakers from different parts of the world. Abstracts were carefully selected and reviewed based on their scientific value and relevance to the clinical, surgical, academic, and research aspects of neurosurgery in the Kingdom, and the world.

  7. NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Eight of the twelve members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics attending the 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference posed for this photograph at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 23, 1934. Those pictured are (left to right): Brig. Gen. Charles A. Lindbergh, USAFR Vice Admiral Arthur B. Cook, USN Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Joseph S. Ames, Committee Chairman Orville Wright Edward P. Warner Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, USN Eugene L. Vidal, Director, Bureau of Air Commerce.

  8. On a possible origin of the 9th planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doultsinou, V.; Varvoglis, H.

    2017-03-01

    In order to interpret some observational evidence in the bodies of the external Solar System (Kuiper Belt Objects - KBOs), it has been recently hypothesized that there exists a so-called 9th planet in the outskirts of our Solar System. Based on this assumption, we have decided to study a new scenario on the possible origin of this body. Instead of assuming that it originates from the Solar System, we will attempt to show that there can be a non-trivial possibility that the 9th planet was originally a free-floating planet (FFP) which, after a close encounter with the Solar System, was either gravitationally captured or flew by, affecting certain orbital elements, ω, Ω and π, as well as the position and orientation in physical space of certain KBOs. We have used a rather simple toy-model based on gravitational scattering in the general 3-dimensional 3-body problem, with the KBOs initially on a circular orbit around the Sun. Promising results serve as indications on this being a plausible scenario, and so this effort could be used as a springboard for a more involved study, based on a more realistic model.

  9. Introduction to the Proceedings of the 9th ISDH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, V. Michael, Jr.; Riskin, Seth

    2013-02-01

    The Proceedings As co-chairs of the 9th International Symposium on Display Holography, we welcome readers of this collection of papers and posters presented at the event. We hope that both attendees of the event and others pursuing the art, science, and business of holography and 3D imaging will find the authors' contributions of lasting interest and importance. The Event Since its creation at Lake Forest College in 1982 by Professor Tung H Jeong, ISDH has followed a model that differentiates it from other scientific conferences. The 9th ISDH continued this history, fully occupying a floor of the MIT Media Lab for five days. The single-track conference opened with reports on the state of holography in the various nations represented by the attendees, followed by a series of presentations on Education and Holography. One and one-half days of papers on Art and Holography followed, then sessions on Techniques and Materials, Digital Techniques, and Commercial and Applied Holography. A poster session permitted more in-depth discussion between authors and the audience. Two exhibitions of holographic works opened at ISDH: an informal display area at the symposium, and a 15-month-long MIT Museum exhibition, The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography. The success of an event of this sort requires the help of many people and organizations. We wish especially to recognize our Honorary Conference Chairs: Tung H Jeong and Joseph W Goodman; our Technical Program Committee: Hans I Bjelkhagen, Frank Fan, Nasser Peyghambarian, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa; and our Arts and Exhibition Committee: Betsy Connors-Chen, Melissa Crenshaw, John Durant, Dieter Jung, Linda Law, Martin Richardson, Jonathan Ross, and Sally Weber. Betsy also coordinated the on-site exhibition. Kristin Hall at the MIT Media Lab made local arrangements, while registration was handled by MIT Conference Services. We also gratefully acknowledge support from Lake Forest College, holographer.org, and authentibrand

  10. NANOTR9: 9th Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The conference series NanoTR is the major conference on nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey. It brings together leading scientists and engineers in nanotechnology to exchange information on their latest research progress. An exhibition of the companies working in the related field is also organized as a part of the event. With intensive international participation, NanoTR conference series has spread outside the national border and has become an international event in this field. Among international contributions, a wide interest from the countries around Turkey should be emphasized. 9th in the series was organized by Atatürk University in Erzurum-Turkey on June 24-28, 2013 with more than 900 scientists, researchers, private sector representatives from around the world. Conference program included 6 plenary speakers, 35 invited speakers (18 of them were from outside the country), 116 oral presentations, and 340 poster presentations. In addition to 6 plenary sessions, 17 oral and 4 poster sessions created very lively discussion forums covering a vast range of current and emerging sciences from nano-materials, nanoscience, nanofabrication, nano-engineering, nano-electronics, nano-biotechnology, to ethical and social issues of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Also, panel discussions about industrial applications, tutorial sessions have been organized for students, new-comers and company employees.

  11. Task V of the IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Program: Implementing Accomplishments and Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Ward

    1999-06-10

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) is an energy forum for 24 industrialized countries and was established in 1974 as an autonomous body within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) program implementing agreement was signed in 1993, and renewed for another five years in 1998. Twenty-two countries are collaborating under the auspices of the IEA in the PVPS to address common technical and informational barriers that often limit the rate at which photovoltaic technologies advance into the markets. Task V of the IEA PVPS is entitled "Grid Interconnection of Building-Integrated and Other Dispersed Photovoltaic Power Systems." The task sponsored a workshop in September 1997 on grid-interconnection of photovoltaic systems and is planning a second workshop to address impacts of more penetration of dispersed systems into the utility grid. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of Task V over the last five years and will detail the planned work for the next three years.

  12. FOREWORD: 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, Ahmed, Prof

    2015-08-01

    The 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems will be held in London from 5th - 9th September 2015, and as its Chairman, it is my pleasure to welcome you. This series of conferences started in 1999 organised by the Fluid Machinery Group of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) but since 2009 it has been managed by City University London in conjunction with the IMechE and the Institute of Refrigeration, both of which have been very proactive in promoting it. The Organising committee is grateful for their support and continued encouragement. This year, after rigorous reviewing, we have accepted over 80 technical papers for publication, the highest number in the conference history. On behalf of the organising committee I would like to thank the reviewers for their hard work and assistance. In addition to the main technical sessions, this year we have introduced a third day, specifically for Industry, to consider technology, business and market drivers on compressor developments. The traditional series of the short courses is this year continuing prior to the main event with the second short course/forum on Computational Fluid Dynamics in rotating positive displacement machines. I would like to extend my special thanks to our main sponsors, Holroyd PTG, Howden and Kapp Niels for their continuing support for the conference. With their generous contributions we have managed to keep the conference fees at the same level as in 2013, despite extending it to 3 days and holding it outside the University this year. The welcome reception on Sunday 6th September 2015 is dedicated to the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Centre for Positive Displacement Compressors Technology which was formed at City University in 1995 with support from the Royal Academy of Engineering and Holroyd; its main aim being to assist British manufacturers of screw compressors. The Centre has since made a significant impact on the screw compressor world, far beyond

  13. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  14. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  15. What Comes Beyond the Standard Models, Proceedings to the 9th Workshop held in Bled, Slovenia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoc Borstnik, Norma; Nielsen, Holger Bech; Froggatt, Colin D.; Lukman, Dragan

    2006-12-01

    Contents: 1. Child Universes in the Laboratory (S. Ansoldi and E.I. Guendelman) 2. Relation between Finestructure Constants at the Planck Scale from Multiple Point Principle (D.L. Bennett, L.V. Laperashvili and H.B. Nielsen) 3. On the Origin of Families of Fermions and Their Mass Matrices -- Approximate Analyses of Properties of Four Families Within Approach Unifying Spins and Charges (M. Breskvar, D. Lukman and N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 4. Cosmoparticle Physics: Cross-disciplinary Study of Physics Beyond the Standard Model (M.Yu. Khlopov) 5. Discussion Section on 4th Generation (M.Yu. Khlopov) 6. Involution Requirement on a Boundary Makes Massless Fermions Compactified on a Finite Flat Disk Mass Protected (N.S. Mankoc Borstnik and H.B. Nielsen) 7. How Can Group Theory be Generalized so Perhaps Providing Further Information About Our Universe? (R. Mirman) 8. Future Dependent Initial Conditions from Imaginary Part in Lagrangian (H.B. Nielsen and M. Ninomiya) 9. Coupling Self-tuning to Critical Lines From Highly Compact Extra Dimensions (K. Petrov)

  16. Optoelectronic Workshops. Dynamical Instabilities in Homogeneously Broadened Lasers (9th) (23 August 1988)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-23

    Broadened Lasers: Dye Lasers Karl Koch Modulation Techniques: Alexandrite Lasers Stephen Chakmakjian Summary Carlos R. Stroud B. CECOM Center for Night... alexandrite , another phonon assisted homogeneously broadened laser. He described in some detail modulation spectroscopic techniques developed in Rochester that...measurement determines the population cycling rate slow decay from level 1 may cause instabilities Single Laser AM Experiments ruby alexandrite modulator

  17. Aiming Higher: Is Your 9th Grader on Track for College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A teenager's future starts on 9th grade with the safe and welcoming environment, excellent teachers, and challenging instruction provided at this school. Believe it or not, college begins in 9th grade. If parents dream of their son or daughter going to college, they should not put off planning until their junior or senior year in high school--it…

  18. STS-33: At Pad B - IEA Removal; STS-32: In the VAB HB1 - IEA Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-33 at Pad B Integrated Electronic Assembly (I.E.A.) is shown. The STS-32 I.E.A. removal in the Vehicle Assembly Building (V.A.B) High Bay 1 (H.B.1) is also presented. The change out of the short they found in boosters is the purpose for the video.

  19. Burkitt lymphoma research in East Africa: highlights from the 9th African organization for research and training in cancer conference held in Durban, South Africa in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A one-day workshop on Burkitt lymphoma (BL) was held at the 9th African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) conference in 2013 in Durban, South Africa. The workshop featured 15 plenary talks by delegates representing 13 institutions that either fund or implement research on BL targeting AORTIC delegates primarily interested in pediatric oncology. The main outcomes of the meeting were improved sharing of knowledge and experience about ongoing epidemiologic BL research, BL treatment in different settings, the role of cancer registries in cancer research, and opportunities for African scientists to publish in scientific journals. The idea of forming a consortium of BL to improve coordination, information sharing, accelerate discovery, dissemination, and translation of knowledge and to build capacity, while reducing redundant efforts was discussed. Here, we summarize the presentations and discussions from the workshop. PMID:25686906

  20. [Experience of coronary artery bypass grafting with inferior epigastric artery (IEA) and pathological examination of the IEA].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Kawaue, Y

    1995-01-01

    From January to March 1994, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) were performed in 10 patients. The stumps of the IEAs were examined pathologically. 1. Intimal thickening of the IEA was scarcely noted. 2. Internal elastic lamina of the IEA showed good development equivalent to the internal thoracic artery (ITA). 3. Tunica media of the IEA was poor in elastic fibers and rich in smooth muscle cells compared with the ITA. 4. The thickness of intima + media was 150-360 microns, suggesting its low risk of ischemic necrosis in case of free grafting. These results suggested the IEA to be a good graft material applicable for CABG.

  1. 9th GCC closed forum: CAPA in regulated bioanalysis; method robustness, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, regulatory audit experiences and electronic laboratory notebooks.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Roger; LeLacheur, Richard; Dumont, Isabelle; Couerbe, Philippe; Safavi, Afshin; Islam, Rafiq; Pattison, Colin; Cape, Stephanie; Rocci, Mario; Briscoe, Chad; Cojocaru, Laura; Groeber, Elizabeth; Silvestro, Luigi; Bravo, Jennifer; Shoup, Ron; Verville, Manon; Zimmer, Jennifer; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Khadang, Ardeshir; Bourdage, James; Hughes, Nicola; Fatmi, Saadya; Di Donato, Lorella; Sheldon, Curtis; Keyhani, Anahita; Satterwhite, Christina; Yu, Mathilde; Fiscella, Michele; Hulse, James; Lin, Zhongping John; Garofolo, Wei; Savoie, Natasha; Xiao, Yi Qun; Kurylak, Kai; Harris, Sarah; Saxena, Manju; Buonarati, Mike; Lévesque, Ann; Boudreau, Nadine; Lin, Jenny; Khan, Masood U; Ray, Gene; Liu, Yansheng; Xu, Allan; Soni, Gunjan; Ward, Ian; Kingsley, Clare; Ritzén, Hanna; Tabler, Edward; Nicholson, Bob; Bennett, Patrick; van de Merbel, Nico; Karnik, Shane; Bouhajib, Mohammed; Wieling, Jaap; Mulvana, Daniel; Ingelse, Benno; Allen, Mike; Malone, Michele; Fang, Xinping

    2016-03-01

    The 9th GCCClosed Forum was held just prior to the 2015 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) in Miami, FL, USA on 13 April 2015. In attendance were 58 senior-level participants, from eight countries, representing 38 CRO companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for CRO bioanalytical representatives to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues selected at this year's closed forum include CAPA, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, and ELNs. A summary of the industry's best practices and the conclusions from the discussion of these topics is included in this meeting report.

  2. Preface: Bulk nitride workshop 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jaime A.; Pasova, Tania; Bockowski, Michal; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The 9th ;International Workshop on Bulk Nitride Semiconductors; (IWBNS-IX) was held in Wonju, South Korea, from November 2-6, 2015, following the eight previous workshops held in November 2000 (Brazil), May 2002 (Brazil), September 2004 (Poland), October 2006 (Japan), September 2007 (Brazil), August 2009 (Poland), March 2011 (Japan), and October 2013 (Germany). The quietude and the beautiful surrounding nature of the Hansol Oak Valley provided the right environment to host the latest edition of this workshop series, the first one held in South Korea.

  3. A Summative Program Evaluation of a Comprehensive 9th Grade Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 8th grade to 9th grade is one that is replete with challenges for students, especially for minority students who live in economically disadvantaged communities. One low-income, high minority comprehensive high school in the western United States implemented five separate strategies to create a freshman transition program to aid…

  4. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  5. The Effect of Group Work on Misconceptions of 9th Grade Students about Newton's Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergin, Serap

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of group work and traditional method on 9th grade students' misconceptions about Newton Laws was investigated. The study was conducted in three classes in an Anatolian Vocational High School in Ankara/Turkey in the second term of the 2014-2015 academic year. Two of these classes were chosen as the experimental group and…

  6. 5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. Immediatly to the west lie the Illinois and Michigan Canal, the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, and the Des Plaines River. - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  7. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  8. The Relationship between Mathematics Teachers' Teaching Approaches and 9th Grade Students' Mathematics Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briede, Liene

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between the teaching approach adopted by mathematics teachers and their 9th grade students' mathematical self. The study searched for the answers on three research questions, namely, about 1) the approaches prevailing in mathematics teachers' beliefs about effective teaching and self-reports…

  9. The Evaluation of Health Education Program (HEP) of 9th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Polat; Gürol, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of evaluation is to improve the quality of program. So, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the Health Education Program of 9th graders (HEP) with Educational Criticism Model of Eisner. The study was conducted with the qualitative research method. A holistic single case design was employed in this study. The typical case…

  10. A Comparison of Students' Choices of 9th Grade Physical Education Activities by Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant M.; Cleven, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district and to compare preferences by ethnicity. Results indicated that basketball, football, bowling, softball/baseball, swimming, and volleyball were the most preferred activities. These preferences may be…

  11. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  12. International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

    2005-11-01

    This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

  13. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  14. The Implementation of Effective Teaching Practices in English Classroom for Grades 8th, 9th, and 10th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; And Others

    This study explored teachers' behavior as related to effective teaching practices in 8th, 9th, and 10th grade English classrooms in Jordan. The study also examined some variables that could predict teachers' implementation of effective teaching practices and aimed at finding an estimate of the percentage of students in 8th, 9th, and 10th grades…

  15. The Effect of Conceptual Change Approach to Eliminate 9th Grade High School Students' Misconceptions about Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbas, Yavuz; Gencturk, Ebru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of teaching based on conceptual change overcome misconceptions of 9th grade high school students about the subject of air pressure. The sampling of the study was formed with two classes of 9th grade students from a general high school in the city-center of Trabzon. A quasi-experimental…

  16. The IEA/SSPS high flux experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schiel, W.; Geyer, M.; Contreras, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Results and conclusions of the IEA-SSPS High Experiment are presented together with the thermodynamic theory of the Advanced Sodium Receiver. During the experiment, flux distributions, surface temperature distributions, efficiencies and losses, were measured and calculated in a power range of 0.8-3.5 MW at different sodium inlet/outlet temperatures. The design heat flux of 1.4 MW/m/sup 2/ was increased to 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/ resulting in a slightly increased total receiver efficiency of over 90%.

  17. FOREWORD: 9th Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering International Conference 2014 (CUTSE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieng Chen, Vincent Lee

    2015-04-01

    A very warm welcome to all participants of the 9th Curtin University Technology, Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference 2014. This annual conference dates back to 2006 when the first Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference was held in Curtin University, Miri Sarawak. CUTSE Conference was initially intended for Curtin's undergraduates such that they are able to experience the presentation of their work in a conference environment. As time passes and following the urge of knowledge dissemination, CUTSE Conference is hence open to public. This year the Department of Mechanical Engineering has been given the honour to organize the 9th CUTSE Conference. It has been a pleasure to watch CUTSE grow from strength to strength over the years. This year, our theme is "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". We hope that it is in this spirit that CUTSE participants may align their respective work, such that we all aim for a greater and better implementation of "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". The 9th CUTSE Conference 2014 is an excellent avenue for researchers, engineers, scientists, academicians, professionals from industry and students to share their research findings and initiate further collaborations in their respective fields. Parallel sessions in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Civil and Chemical engineering as well as the sciences will be hosted over a period of two days. Each year, the conference attracts participation from a number of countries in addition to Malaysia and Australia. In addition, student participants will get the opportunity to present their research projects and gain valuable feedback from industry professionals. This year the Conference will be organised by the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Curtin Sarawak's School of Engineering and Science in collaboration with The Institute of Engineers Malaysia, Miri Branch. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank this year

  18. 9th Circuit to reconsider earlier ruling in religious rights case.

    PubMed

    1999-11-26

    The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will re-examine a ruling that allows landlords with strongly held religious beliefs to refuse to rent to unmarried persons. In [name removed] v. Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, the court ruled that landlords did not have to comply with local and State statutes forbidding discrimination on the basis of marital status. An appeals panel had ruled that landlords had a valid claim to First Amendment and Fifth Amendment protection. The court is expected either to reverse on the issue of standing or to find that the hybrid rights doctrine was misused in the case.

  19. Multidisciplinary molecular diagnostics: the 9th European meeting on molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loonen, Anne J M; Schuurman, Rob; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2016-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the 9th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, 14-16 October 2015. This 3-day conference covered many relevant topics in the field of molecular diagnostics in humans, including infectious disease, oncology, outbreak management, population-based cancer screening, standardization and quality control, chronic diseases and pharmacogenetics. Beyond these different areas, shared values are new technologies and novel technical and clinical applications. Approximately 450 participants, the majority coming from European countries, attended the meeting. Besides high quality scientific presentations, more than 35 diagnostic companies presented their latest innovations, altogether in an informal and inspiring scientific ambience.

  20. The recent history of the IEA: an analysis of IEA Congress presentations since 1961.

    PubMed

    Waterson, Patrick; Falzon, Pierre; Barcellini, Flore

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review historical material relating to the growth and coverage of past IEA meetings and congresses. In particular, we report on presentations at IEA Congresses dating back to the first one in Stockholm in 1961. A content analysis of Congress proceedings was carried out and we present findings on changes since 1961 covering: numbers and nationalities of conference participants and the types of topics presented at Congresses. Our findings point to evidence of widening participation at the conferences, in particular delegates drawn from Asia, South East Asia and the Far East. In addition, some topics (e.g., physiology, methodological papers and studies of workload) appear to have waned in popularity over the period, whereas some topics (e.g., ODAM, Cognitive Ergonomics) have grown in popularity. We discuss these findings in the light of other evidence covering historical trends and developments within human factors and ergonomics.

  1. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  2. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: `Intermolecular Forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-05-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students’ understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student’s alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight 9th grade students were stratified by cognitive levels and then randomly assigned to experimental (PBL, 40 students) and control (lecture-style teaching, 38 students) groups. Following a preparatory lesson where activation and remediation of existing knowledge occur, a pre-test was given, and no significant difference was found between the two groups of students ( p > .05). After the instruction was completed, a post-test and also a questionnaire related to the quality of the problem, the teacher’s role and group functioning were administered. Results from the post-test of both groups ( p < .05) and questionnaire showed that PBL is affective on students’ achievement, remedying formation of alternate conceptions and also social skills.

  3. IEA Bioenergy Countries' Report: Bioenergy policies and status of implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Bacovsky, Dina; Ludwiczek, Nikolaus; Pointner, Christian; Verma, Vijay Kumar

    2016-08-05

    This report was prepared from IEA statistical data, information from IRENA, and IEA Bioenergy Tasks’ country reports, combined with data provided by the IEA Bioenergy Executive Committee. All individual country reports were reviewed by the national delegates to the IEA Bioenergy Executive Committee, who have approved the content. In the first section of each country report, national renewable energy targets are presented (first table in each country report), and the main pieces of national legislation are discussed. In the second section of each country report the total primary energy supply (TPES) by resources and the contribution of bioenergy are presented. All data is taken from IEA statistics for the year 2014. Where 2014 data was not available, 2013 data was used. It is worth noting that data reported in national statistics can differ from the IEA data presented, as the reporting categories and definitions are different. In the third section of each country report, the research focus related to bioenergy is discussed. Relevant funding programs, major research institutes and projects are described. In the fourth section, recent major bioenergy developments are described. Finally, in the fifth section, links to sources of information are provided.

  4. Summary of the 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology (SIV) comprised seven plenary sessions focused on: General virology and viral genetics; Virus-Host interaction and pathogenesis; Viral oncology; Emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne, and environmental pathways of transmission; Viral immunology and vaccines; Medical virology and antiviral therapy; Viral biotechnologies and gene therapy. Moreover, four hot topics were discussed in special lectures: the Pioneer in human virology lecture regarding the control of viral epidemics with particular emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Pioneer in plant virology lecture focused on cell responses to plant virus infection, a Keynote lecture on the epidemiology and genetic diversity of Crimea-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus, and the G.B. Rossi lecture on the molecular basis and clinical implications of human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported.

  5. Preliminary results of the solar corona spectroscopic observation of 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungging Mumpuni, Emanuel; Zamzam Nurzaman, Muhamad; Suryana, Nana

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopy observation of solar corona has been carried out from 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse expedition in Maba, East Halmahera. Due to limitation by the weather condition during the observation, the obtained data were not favorable. Because of the low signal to noise ratio, the wavelength calibration was not straightforward. To obtain the optimum results, steps for data reduction were performed as the following: selecting the finest data, extracting the 1D spectrum from 2D spectrum, and calibrating spectrum wavelength (including careful interpolation). In this preliminary result, we discuss the instrumentation, the data under investigation, the extraction process of spectrum, and the polynomial interpolation that has been used for extracting information from our data.

  6. Overview of IEA biomass combustion activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustad, J. E.

    1994-07-01

    The objectives of the International Energy Agency (IEA) bioenergy program are: (1) to encourage cooperative research, development and use of energy and the increased utilization of alternatives to oil; and (2) to establish increased program and project cooperation between participants in the whole field of bioenergy. There are four Task Annexes to the Implementing Agreement during the period 1992-1994: Efficient and Environmentally Sound Biomass Production Systems; Harvesting and Supply of Woody Biomass for Energy; Biomass Utilization; and Conversion of Municipal Solid Waste Feedstock to Energy. The report describes the following biomass combustion activities during the period 1992-1994: Round robin test of a wood stove; Emissions from biomass combustion; A pilot project cofiring biomass with oil to reduce SO2 emissions; Small scale biomass chip handling; Energy from contaminated wood waste combustion; Modeling of biomass combustion; Wood chip cogeneration; Combustion of wet biomass feedstocks, ash reinjection and carbon burnout; Oxidation of wet biomass; Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances; Characterization of biomass fuels and ashes; Measurement techniques (FTIR).

  7. Identification of moon craters and solar corona during total solar eclipse on 9th March 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthfiandari; Ekawanti, N.; Purwati, F. G.; Herdiwijaya, D.

    2016-11-01

    Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) is a rare natural event in which the positions of Sun, Moon, and Earth are perfectly aligned. In the past by using this phenomenon, many researches have been done to understand characteristic of the corona. In this paper we carried out the study of TSE which crossed over Indonesia from West to East on 9th March 2016. We observed TSE which occured in Palembang (2.9883° S 104.7513° E), Indonesia. The aim of this research is to understand the effect of moon craters on the appearance of solar corona and identification of solar active regions during TSE. This research was done using Canon SX170 IS camera with ND 5 sun-filter. Although the sky was cloudy during the totality of the phase, coronal video was still taken. Camera also took solar images of partial eclipse phase. Coronal images for every frame were then extracted from the video. Image processing of coronal images was done using RegiStax and PhotoScape freewares. To study solar corona, images from Virtual Moon Atlas, Hinode XRT, and SOHO-LASCO were compared with the result of oriented coronal image. Wider and many more moon craters were found having positive correlation with the brighter effect on solar corona as shown at westward coronal streamer. Those craters are represented by Bel'kovich crater, the biggest one. We also found that only the eastward coronal streamer was correlated with active region, sunspot number 12519, from behind solar limb.

  8. F/A-18 1/9th scale model tail buffet measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. A.; Glaister, M. K.; Maclaren, L. D.; Meyn, L. A.; Ross, J.

    1991-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on a 1/9th scale model of the F/A-18 at high angles of attack to investigate the characteristics of tail buffet due to bursting of the wing leading edge extension (LEX) vortices. The tests were carried out at the Aeronautical Research Laboratory low-speed wind tunnel facility and form part of a collaborative activity with NASA Ames Research Center, organized by The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). Information from the program will be used in the planning of similar collaborative tests, to be carried out at NASA Ames, on a full-scale aircraft. The program covered the measurement of unsteady pressures and fin vibration for cases with and without the wing LEX fences fitted. Fourier transform methods were used to analyze the unsteady data, and information on the spatial and temporal content of the vortex burst pressure field was obtained. Flow visualization of the vortex behavior was carried out using smoke and a laser light sheet technique.

  9. Obsessional Disorders in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2015-07-15

    Some argue that the earliest case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) was reported by Robert Burton in his compendium The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) and that only in the 19th century did modern concepts of OCD evolve, differentiating it from other types of mental illness. In this paper, we aim to reveal an even earlier presentation of the malady we now call OCD based on the 9th century work, Sustenance of the Body and Soul, written by Abu Zayd al-Balkhi during the Islamic Golden Era. Discovery of this manuscript reveals that Abu Zayd al-Balkhi should be credited with differentiating OCD from other forms of mental illnesses nearly a millennium earlier than is currently claimed by anthologies documenting the history of mental illness. Particular attention is paid to al-Balkhi's classifications, symptom descriptions, predisposing factors, and the treatment modalities for obsessional disorders. Analysis of this manuscript in light of the DSM-5 and modern scientific discoveries reveals transcultural diagnostic consistency of OCD across many centuries. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  10. Stellar background observation during Total Solar Eclipse March 9th 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumtahana, Farahhati; Timur Jaelani, Anton; Muhamad, Johan; Sutastio, Heri

    2016-11-01

    We report observation and an early analysis of stellar background from total solar eclipse in Ternate, Indonesia. The eclipse phenomena which occurred on March, 9th 2016 was observed with certain portable instruments in order to obtain the stars behind the Sun in particular field of view and resolution. From our observation site in Ternate city, solar eclipse occurred in the late morning when the weather was unfortunately cloudy. However, during the darkness of totality, we obtained several point source objects between the gaps of the moving clouds and we suspected them as very faint stars due to their appearance in several frames. Those so called stars have been identified and measured with respect to their positions toward the center of the Sun. The main purpose of this research is to revisit strong lensing calculation of the Sun during total solar eclipse by measuring the deflection angle of the background stars as it had been calculated by Einstein and proved by Eddington at a total solar eclipse in 1919. To accomplish this aim, we need to conduct another observation to measure position of the same stars in the next period when those stars appear in the night sky.

  11. Survey of Oral Health Awareness in Neuchâtel 9th Graders.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Klaus W; Müller, Magali E; Lussi, Adrian

    The oral health habits of pupils had not yet been analyzed for the canton of Neuchâtel. A questionnaire was provided to 9th grade high school pupils (final year) of the three schools located in the Neuchâtel area to asses both oral health knowledge and habits in this connection. The average age was 15.5±0.8 years, and 78.1% of the questionnaires were returned. The prophylaxis program was conducted for a total of 4.5 h during pupils’ entire time at school. The results showed that both knowledge and oral health habits could be improved. As a positive outcome, 99% of the pupils brush their teeth before going to bed. Comparisons with similar 10-year-old studies from other cantons (Bern, Vaud) showed major differences in knowledge, for example on the importance of fluoridation. Only 54% of the pupils in Neuchâtel knew that fluoride offers some protection against caries, in spite of the fact that 89% thought that brushing with fluoridated toothpaste protects against caries. Most of the pupils used a fluoridated toothpaste. Furthermore, we found that self-reported sugar consumption was correlated with caries experience, but brushing frequency was not. We recommend introducing a review course for pupils in their last school year, in order to practice interdental cleaning, redefine appropriate, tooth-friendly snacks, and emphasize the importance of regular dental check-ups.

  12. The 9th Grade Shock and the High School Dropout Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Hirschman, Charles; Willhoft, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective questions on educational attainment in national surveys and censuses tend to over-estimate high school graduation rates by 15 to 20 percentage points relative to administrative records. Administrative data on educational enrollment are, however, only available at the aggregate level (state, school district, and school levels) and the recording of inter-school transfers are generally incomplete. With access to linked individual-level administrative records from a very large “West Coast metropolitan school district” we track patterns of high school attrition and on-time high school graduation of individual students. Even with adjustments for the omission of out-of-district transfers (estimates of omission are presented), the results of this study show that failure in high school, as indexed by retention and attrition, are almost as common as on-time high school graduation. In addition to the usual risk factors of disadvantaged background, we find that the “9th grade shock”—an unpredicted decline in academic performance upon entering high school—is a key mechanism behind the continuing crisis of high school attrition. PMID:23017804

  13. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  14. Scientific Tools and Techniques: An Innovative Introduction to Planetary Science / Astronomy for 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2014-11-01

    Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA) offers instruction in planetary science and astronomy to gifted 9th grade students within a program called "Scientific Tools and Techniques" (STT). Although STT provides a semester long overview of all sciences, the planetary science / astronomy section is innovative since students have access to instruction in the Center's Zeiss planetarium and observatory, which includes a 0.9 m cassegrain telescope. The curriculum includes charting the positions of planets in planetarium the sky; telescopic observations of the Moon and planets; hands-on access to meteorites and tektites; and an introduction to planetary spectroscopy utilizing LPI furnished ALTA reflectance spectrometers. In addition, students have the opportunity to watch several full dome planetary themed planetarium presentations, including "Back to the Moon for Good" and "Ring World: Cassini at Saturn." An overview of NASA's planetary exploration efforts is also considered, with special emphasis on the new Orion / Space Launch System for human exploration of the solar system. A primary goal of our STT program is to not only engage but encourage students to pursue careers in the field of science, with the hope of inspiring future scientists / leaders in the field of planetary science.

  15. 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huajiang

    2011-07-01

    Dear Delegates We would like to welcome you to the 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures. This series of conferences has been held as a biannual event since 1995. The previous venues were Pescara (Italy, 1995), Sheffield (UK, 1997), Dublin (Ireland, 1999), Cardiff (UK, 2001), Southampton (UK, 2003), Gdansk (Poland, 2005), Torino (Italy, 2007) and Beijing (China, 2009). The conference will cover all research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies, and numerical simulations. It has established itself as a major international forum for the above research areas. Typically over 100 papers are presented at each conference. It is thought appropriate to keep the conference at this size to facilitate knowledge exchange. DAMAS Conferences have had support from other learned societies and industry. These include the Technical Division of Vibration and Acoustics of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Society for Strain Measurement, to name a few. There are exhibitors at some conferences. The venue of DAMAS2011, Oxford, is a world-renowned university town. Oxford is also located in the Cotswolds, an area of outstanding natural beauty. And July is arguably the best month of the year in UK. It is hoped that all delegates will enjoy the conference and continue to support DAMAS conferences in the future. Huajiang Ouyang On behalf of the Organising Committee: Professor Huajiang Ouyang, University of Liverpool, UK (Conference Chair) Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, University of Loughborough, UK Professor Fulei Chu, Tsinghua University, China Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Polish Academy of Science, Poland Professor Cecilia Surace, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  16. Evaluation of Three Models of Instruction for 9th Grade Turkish Literature Course and Implications for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilav, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which each of the three types of instruction (authentic, where, differentiated) engages 9th grade high school students in achieving language proficiency. The paper examines the features of these models of instructions and teachers? opinion about them. It includes a descriptive research in survey…

  17. A Comparison of 9th and 10th Grade Boys' and Girls' Bullying Behaviors in Two States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isernhagen, Jody; Harris, Sandy

    This study examined the incidences of bullying behaviors among male and female 9th and 10th graders in rural Nebraska and suburban Texas schools. Nebraska students were predominantly Caucasion, and Texas students were African American, Hispanic American, and Caucasion. Student surveys examined such issues as how often bullying occurred, where it…

  18. Successful Transition to High School: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Barr Model with 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ninth grade is a pivotal year for students. Numerous studies find that academic performance in 9th grade often sets the student's trajectory throughout the high school years, as well as the probability of graduation. The Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) model is a comprehensive approach that addresses developmental, academic, and school…

  19. A Comparison of 9th Grade Male and Female Physical Education Activities Preferences and Support for Coeducational Groupings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant; Cleven, Brian

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district, to identify which activities students felt should be offered in coeducation or gender separate formats, and to determine whether physical education is one of their favorite classes. Results…

  20. IEA Small Solar Power Systems Project: operation status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    The status of the operation of the IEA Small Solar Power Systems Project is reported for the period from January 1, 1983 to August 31, 1983. Included are reports of new hardware activities as given by the installation of both the advanced sodium receiver in the central receiver system and a 3rd collector field in the distributed collector system. (LEW)

  1. The Second IEA Science Study--U.S. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Willard J.; And Others

    The Second IEA Science Study (SISS) was carried out in 1983 in 24 countries. In the United States a second phase of testing was undertaken in 1986. This document describes the organization of the study in the United States and highlights some of the results and their possible implications for science education. The countries included in the SISS…

  2. Achievement Data in IEA Studies and Simpson's Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuzovsky, Ruth; Steinberg, David M.; Libman, Zipi

    2011-01-01

    This paper is meant to highlight the occurrence of Simpson's Paradox when using aggregated data obtained from two IEA studies in Israel, while ignoring the effect of a powerful intervening variable in the local context--the ethnicity factor. It will demonstrate faulty conclusions regarding either the absence of relationships between a contextual…

  3. The PRIME Partnership: 9th Graders, Graduate Students and Integrated, Inquiry-Based Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, A. M.; Miguelez, S.

    2001-12-01

    The PRIME program (Partnership for Research in Inquiry-based Math, science and engineering Education) is a collaboration between the UW Colleges of Education and Engineering and several Seattle-area school districts. This project, funded by the NSF GK-12 program, pairs UW graduate students from math, science and engineering disciplines with local middle school teachers. The graduate student spends a year working with the teacher, on projects designed to meet the needs and interests of the specific partnership and classroom. In the partnership, the graduate student spends 15 hours per week in the classroom, interacting with the students, as well as additional planning time outside of the classroom. Goals of the PRIME program are enriched learning by middle school students, professional development for middle school teachers, improved communication and teaching skills for the graduate students, and strengthened partnerships between the University of Washington and local school districts. The goal of our partnership was to develop an inquiry-based, 9th grade unit that integrates the pre-existing Earth Science and Chemistry units, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching Chemistry in the context of Earth Science. We have observed that students often become engaged and excited when they do hands-on activities that utilize the intrinsic understanding that they have of concepts that draw upon experiences in their daily lives. When science is taught and learned in one such context - in the context of the natural world - the students may gain a more solid fundamental understanding of the science that they learn. The day-to-day activities for this unit vary widely. We started each topic with a question designed to get the students thinking independently and to identify the preconceptions that the students brought into the classroom. Discussions of students' preconceptions served as a justification and springboard for the subsequent activities and experiments. Examples of

  4. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to

  5. Summary of the 9th international symposium on high energy spin-physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1990-11-01

    Summarizing an international conference in high energy spin physics is never an easy task, because of the wide-ranging subjects in physics and technology that are involved. I have chosen to organize the topics of this conference into three broad categories relating to spin; intrinsic spin; composite spin; and spin, the experimental tool. In the first category, I will briefly revisit some historical and recent developments to set a background. In the second category, composite spin, I will discuss the status and developments in several areas, including magnetic moments of baryons, hyperon polarization in high energy high p {perpendicular} production, transverse polarization and asymmetries from transversely polarized targets in high p {perpendicular} scattering, spin structure of the proton, and the Bjorken sum rule. In the third category, I will discuss the steady, and at times rapid, progress in spin technology. In this part I include recent progress in high energy facilities, and comment on the highlights of the Workshops.

  6. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism.

    PubMed

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-11-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th-10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today's Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the 'Great Moravian Empire' in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions.

  7. PIRLS-IEA Reading Literacy Framework: Comparative Analysis of the 1991 IEA Reading Study and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapinus, Barbara

    A study examined how two international studies--the 1991 International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Reading Literacy Study and the 2001 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS, also conducted by IEA)--compared to each other in the aspects of reading literacy each assessed, the types of texts they…

  8. PREFACE: 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebner, Richard

    2004-05-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains invited and contributed papers presented at the 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego, California, on 24-26 September, 2003, and it was organized by General Atomics. As has been the tradition at the last four meetings of this series, the programme was sub-divided into six topics. For each topic there was an invited talk whose purpose was to give an overview of the topic, based on contributed papers presented at the meeting and on external results. These talks were followed by discussion periods, which were used for extended question and answer sessions for the invited speakers or for additional short presentations by contributing speakers. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, of which there were about 70. The topics were: Structure and dynamics of internal transport barriers Structure and dynamics of the H-mode pedestal Understanding transport barriers through modelling Control of transport barriers Transport within transport barriers: theorist's view of the future Diagnostic and analysis issues for transport barriers The topics were focused on the physics of edge and core transport barriers. Similar to the previous meeting, held in Toki, Japan, the universality of this physics in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric machines was featured. In addition, the physics of transport barriers in relation to burning plasma experiments was emphasized. In particular, one of the hopes and goals of the participants is that the physics of transport barriers can be used to enhance the prospects for burning plasmas. Because this meeting occurred approximately 21 years after the discovery of the H-mode in 1982, a special session was held to commemorate more than 20 years of research on transport barriers. In this session, Dr R Stambaugh and Professor K Itoh presented personal views on the

  9. Using TI-92 in the 9th-Grade of Austrian Grammar Schools--Hypotheses, Experiences, Results, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurnig, Otto

    This paper reports the results of student use of a TI-92 graphing calculator to solve algebra and analytic geometry problems in 9th grade Austrian classes. Students who had been trained in using the TI-92 were asked to compute x, given that a right-angled triangle had sides x, x+3, and x+6 in at least three ways, and to document their solution…

  10. The Effectiveness of a Self Regulated Learning-Based Training Program on Improving Cognitive and Metacognitive EFL Reading Comprehension of 9th Graders with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a self regulated learning intervention program on cognitive and metacognitive EFL reading comprehension of 9th graders with reading disabilities. The participants in this study were 40 9th Graders with reading disabilities, selected from two schools located in Baltim Educational Edara. A…

  11. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  12. Evaluation of Reading Fluency and Reading Errors of 9th Grade Students with a View to Diagnosing the Sources of Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Üstten, Aliye Uslu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the sources of reading difficulties and to evaluate reading fluency of 9th grade students which aims to improve students' reading and their understanding of complex literary texts. The sample is composed of 120 students selected from 9th grade of 10 different high schools in central province of Ankara in…

  13. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility get ready to attach an overhead crane (center top) to the solar array below it to move the array for installation onto the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA). A component of the International Space Station, the solar array is the second one being installed on the IEA. The arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS-97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  14. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers rise to the occasion on accordion lifts as they oversee the movement of solar array in front of them. The solar array will be installed onto the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA). A component of the International Space Station, the solar array is the second one being installed on the IEA. The arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS-97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  15. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The overhead crane carrying a solar array turns on its axis to move the array to the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) for installation. A component of the International Space Station, the solar array is the second one being installed on the IEA. The arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS-97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  16. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility lifts a solar array as workers stand by to help guide it. The solar array will be installed onto the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA). A component of the International Space Station, the solar array is the second one being installed on the IEA. The arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS-97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  17. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility help guide an overhead crane toward a workstand containing a solar array in order to move it for installation onto the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA). A component of the International Space Station, the solar array is the second one being installed on the IEA. The arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS-97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  18. Workshop Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviews a leadership development aerospace educators workshop held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, July 22, 1977, and an introductory/advanced aerospace workshop held at Central Washington State College. (SL)

  19. Wind power forecasting: IEA Wind Task 36 & future research issues

    SciTech Connect

    Giebel, G.; Cline, J.; Frank, H.; Shaw, W.; Pinson, P.; Hodge, B-M; Kariniotakis, G.; Madsen, J.; Möhrlen, C.

    2016-10-03

    Here, this paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national meteorological centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, MetOffice, met.no, DMI,...), operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions. As first results, an overview of current issues for research in short-term forecasting of wind power is presented.

  20. Wind power forecasting: IEA Wind Task 36 & future research issues

    DOE PAGES

    Giebel, G.; Cline, J.; Frank, H.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Here, this paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national meteorological centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, MetOffice, met.no, DMI,...), operational forecaster and forecast users. The Taskmore » is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions. As first results, an overview of current issues for research in short-term forecasting of wind power is presented.« less

  1. Wind power forecasting: IEA Wind Task 36 & future research issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, G.; Cline, J.; Frank, H.; Shaw, W.; Pinson, P.; Hodge, B.-M.; Kariniotakis, G.; Madsen, J.; Möhrlen, C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national meteorological centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, MetOffice, met.no, DMI,...), operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions. As first results, an overview of current issues for research in short-term forecasting of wind power is presented.

  2. IEA Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Meredydd; Meier, Alan; Runci, Paul J.

    2008-08-05

    This guide presents insights and guidance from DOE’s gathered through longstanding and extensive participation in IEA implementing agreements (IAs) and annexes. Even though DOE has been a key participant in international research activities through the IEA since the 1970s, the experience, knowledge, and institutional memory associated with these activities can be lost or forgotten easily as key DOE managers retire or leave the department. The guide seeks to assemble in a single reference some of the learning that has occurred through participation in IEA IAs as a guide for BTP managers currently responsible for IAs and for those who might consider entering into new IEA activities in the future.

  3. FOREWORD: The 9th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Julian; Ikonen, Erkki

    2006-04-01

    The ninth NEWRAD Conference was held in Davos, Switzerland, between 16 and 19 October 2005. The Conference was organized by the Physikalisch- Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC). The Conference was attended by 169 participants from five continents, which makes it the largest NEWRAD conference to date. The NEWRAD Conference followed the 10th international pyrheliometer comparison IPC-X, which is held every five years at PMOD/WRC. In addition, the 6th UVnet Workshop was held in connection with the NEWRAD Conference on 20 and 21 October. The NEWRAD Conference brings together people from the national metrology institutes and the principal user communities of advanced radiometry, including meteorological and remote-sensing communities. A total of 153 papers were presented, of which eight were keynote or invited talks, and there were 105 posters. Coffee breaks and extended lunch breaks created a stimulating atmosphere for lively discussions and exchange of ideas. Notwithstanding the excellent weather and the tantalizing surroundings of Davos, most participants managed to attend the poster sessions, which were organized during the noon lunch breaks. The conference proceedings can be downloaded from the NEWRAD 2005 website at www.pmodwrc.ch/newrad2005/pdfabstracts/Newrad_Proceedings_2005_A7.pdf. For this and future conferences, a new policy was adopted to publish a selected number of contributions in a special issue of Metrologia. The purpose of the change is to increase the overall impact of this journal. The NEWRAD Scientific Committee invited the contributions to this special issue on the basis of the quality of the extended abstracts, and later the submitted manuscripts were reviewed by the Committee members. On behalf of the Scientific Committee and all the participants, one of us (EI) wishes to thank Werner Schmutz and his colleagues from the Local Organizing Committee for arranging an excellent conference in the beautiful city of

  4. Improvement of the ephemerides of Phoebe, 9th satellite of Saturn, from new observations made from 1995 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, J.-E.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Fienga, A.; Baron, N.

    2003-11-01

    In order to improve the model used for the ephemerides of Phoebe, the 9th satellite of Saturn, we started observations in 1998. We made 135 observations in 1998 and 39 observations in 1999 using the 120 cm-telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. We used a numerical integration in order to calculate new initial conditions and to be able to build new ephemerides. We also used some precise observations made from 1995 to 2000 together with old observations for that purpose. The result is a decrease in the uncertainties on Phoebe's orbit. Based in part on observations made at observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France.

  5. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5.

  6. Three centuries of geomagnetic field intensity changes in Spain (from the 9th to the 12th centuries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Jimenez-Castillo, P.; Perez-Asensio, M.

    2013-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations (at least of ~20 μT/century) interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes by the acquisition of well-dated high-quality archeomagnetic data. In this study we report the archeomagnetic study of Spanish ceramic fragments. The collected fragments belong to 14 superposed stratigraphic levels corresponding to a surface no bigger than 3 m by 7 m. The pottery fragments dates back to the 9th and 11th centuries. The dating was established by 4 radiocarbon dates and by archeological/historical constraints including typological comparisons and well-controlled stratigraphic constrains between the different stratigraphic units. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 79 fragments, twelve new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. Together with previously published high-quality data from Western Europe, the new data provide an improved description of the intensity changes that took place in Spain between the 9th and the 12th centuries. The results confirm that rapid intensity changes took place in Western Europe during the recent history of the Earth.

  7. Open Session IEA General Assembly (24th, Enschede, Netherlands, August 15-19, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, T. J. H. M., Ed.

    Ten papers, four general overviews,, and three commentaries delivered at the General Assembly of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in 1983 are presented. The papers include: (1) "Why Join IEA?" (J. P. Keeves); (2) "Research and Policymaking in Education: An International…

  8. State-of-the-Art of Fast Pyrolysis in IEA Bioenergy Member Countries

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Dietrich; van de Beld, Bert; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Oasmaa, Anja; Preto, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass is becoming increasingly important in some member countries of the International Energy Agency(IEA). Six countries have joined the IEA Task 34 of the Bioenergy Activity: Canada, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, UK, and USA. The National Task Leaders give an overview of the current activities in their countries both on research, pilot and demonstration level.

  9. Funding Formulas and Arrangements under IEA Implementing Agreements

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2008-12-30

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has researched how participating countries divide funding obligations under International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreements (IAs). This is part of a broader assessment evaluating the buildings-area IAs. This particular part of the analysis looked at 12 IAs funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. By selecting a range of agreements, we hoped to understand the types of arrangements and the range of funding formulas. PNNL asked the U.S. Executive Committee (ExCo) members how the total contribution for their IA and its Annexes were determined, and how the total was then divided between participating countries.

  10. Neutron Diffraction Study On Gamma To Alpha Phase Transition In Ce0.9th0.1 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, Jason C1; Heffner, Robert H; Llobet, A; Darling, T W; Jeong, I K

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive neutron diffraction measurements were performed to study the isostructural {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} phase transition in Ce{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1} alloy. Using Rietveld refinements, we obtained lattice and thermal parameters as a function of temperature. From the temperature slope of the thermal parameters, we determined Debye temperatures {Theta}{sup {gamma}}{sub D} = 133(1) K and {Theta}{sup {alpha}}{sub D} = 140(1) K for the {gamma} phase and the {alpha} phase, respectively. This result implies that the vibrational entropy change is not significant at the {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} transition, contrary to that from elemental Cerium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105702, 2004].

  11. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    PubMed

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań.

  12. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  13. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lifted from a rotation stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC to be placed on a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS- 97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  14. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC prepare to lower an Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) onto a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  15. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved from the low bay into the high bay at the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the ISS. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  16. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is suspended in air after being lifted from a rotation stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC in order to be moved to a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  17. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved into the center of the Space Station Processing Facility clean room at KSC for transition to the high bay. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS- 97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  18. The IEA for the ISS is being processed in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Technicians carefully lower an Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) onto a work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC . The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999.

  19. IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, VAN

    2003-05-19

    With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case has its own

  20. (Workshop on Willow Breeding and Biotechnology Development Activities)

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, P.A.

    1988-10-12

    P.A. Layton attended a workshop on Willow Breeding and Biotechnology Development Activities,'' which was organized by the International Energy Agency/Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA) Task II. The traveler spent 1 d prior to the meeting to visit scientists and administrators of Shell Research Limited. Physiology and Biological Chemistry Division to discus their interest in biomass production research as well as their other research interests in tissue culture, biotechnology, and management of forests and agricultural crops that are pertinent to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Biomass Production program.

  1. Workshop Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    19 Workshops were held during IAU S285. 15 submitted reports of the discussions that took place, while for the remaining 4 we have reproduced the summaries that were available on our wiki prior to the Symposium.

  2. Workshop Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandes, Herbert

    1970-01-01

    Workshop titles are: (1) "Authenticity in Communication ; (2) "Inter Cultural Communication ; (3) "Enticements to Eupsychia ; (4) "Psychoneurosensory Problems in Education ; (5) "Why Education for Family Life and Human Sexuality ; and (6) "Communication in the Hazards of Drug Abuse . (EK)

  3. A second solar array is moved to the IEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the overhead crane carrying a solar array arrives at the Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) on which it will be installed. Solar Array Wing-3 is already in place. Components of the International Space Station, the arrays are scheduled to be launched on mission STS- 97 in late November along with the P6 truss. The Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Each of the eight solar arrays will be 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station.

  4. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  5. Computational mediation as factor of motivation and meaningful learning in education of sciences of 9th grade: astronomy topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, F. M.; Furtado, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of using hypertext and pedagogic mediation in search of a Meaningful Learning Process in Sciences. We investigate the usage of hypertext in the teaching and learning methods of Astronomy modules. A survey was conducted with students from the 9th grade of Primary School of a public school in the city of Goiânia, Goiás in Brazil. We have analyzed the possibilities that hypermedia can offer in the teaching and learning process, using as reference David Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Learning. The study was divided into four phases: application of an initial questionnaire on students, development of didactic material (hypertext), six classes held in a computer lab with the use of hypermedia and a final questionnaire applied in the lab after classes. This research indicated that the use of hypertext linked to pedagogical mediation processes is seen as a motivational tool and has potential to foster to Meaningful Learning.

  6. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  7. The flash flood of the Bisagno Creek on 9th October 2014: An "unfortunate" combination of spatial and temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, F.; Rebora, N.; Giannoni, F.; Cavallo, A.; Ferraris, L.

    2016-10-01

    On the 9th October, 2014 a strong event hit the central part of Liguria Region producing disastrous consequences to the city of Genoa where the Bisagno Creek flooded causing one death and lots of damage. The precipitation pattern responsible for the event had peculiar spatial and temporal characteristics that led to an unexpected flash flood. The temporal sequence of rainfall intensities and the particular severity of rainfall showers at small temporal scale, together with the size of the sub-basin hit by the most intense part of the rainfall were the unfortunate concurrent ingredients that led to an "almost perfect" flash flood. The peak flow was estimated to be a 100-200 years order return period. The effects of the spatial and temporal scales of the precipitation pattern were investigated by coupling a rainfall downscaling model with a hydrological model setting up an experiment that follows a probabilistic approach. Supposing that the correct volume of precipitation at different spatial and temporal scales is known, the experiment provided the probability of generating events with similar effects in terms of streamflow. Furthermore, the study gives indications regarding the goodness and reliability of the forecasted rainfall field needed, not only in terms of total rainfall volume, but even in spatial and temporal pattern, to produce the observed ground effects in terms of streamflow.

  8. Post-seismic deformation of the Mw 6.4 Shonbeh earthquake (south western Iran) of April 9th, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathian Baneh, Aram; Tolomei, Cristiano; Lugari, Alessandro; Trasatti, Elisa; Salvi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The study of post-seismic deformation within a region is of high significance to have a better understanding of the kinematic behavior of a seismogenic fault. We perform the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method to process a large number of X-Band, COSMO-SkyMed images to measure the post-seismic deformation due to the Shonbeh earthquake (Iran) of 9th April 2013 (Mw 6.4). The meizoseismal zone of the earthquake and following aftershocks' epicenters cover an area in the frontal edge of the Zagros Simply Folded Zone, in the southwest of Iran, between Kaki and Kangan anticlines. Exploiting the available dataset of images from the beginning of 2013 to mid 2014, we observe the concentration of the deformation along at least two NW- striking, southwest-dipping fault segments arranged in right-step pattern and parallel to the trend of the folds. The preliminary InSAR results illustrate the migration of the post-seismic deformation and stress relaxation from the southeastern toward the northwestern fault segments.

  9. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  10. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    1997-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including a brief summary of hydrogen in general. The Chairman's report provides highlights for the year. Sections are included on hydrogen energy activities in the IEA Hydrogen Agreement member countries, including Canada, European Commission, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. Lastly, Annex reports are given for the following tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage.

  11. Trends in weight management goals and behaviors among 9th-12th grade students: United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zewditu; Lowry, Richard; Eaton, Danice K; Nihiser, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    To examine trends in weight management goals and behaviors among U.S. high school students during 1999-2009. Data from six biennial cycles (1999-2009) of the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Cross-sectional, nationally representative samples of 9th-12th grade students (approximately 14,000 students/cycle) completed self-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression models adjusted for grade, race/ethnicity, and obesity were used to test for trends in weight management goals and behaviors among subgroups of students. Combined prevalences and trends differed by sex and by race/ethnicity and weight status within sex. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of female students trying to gain weight decreased (7.6-5.7 %). Among female students trying to lose or stay the same weight, prevalences decreased for eating less (69.6-63.2 %); fasting (23.3-17.6 %); using diet pills/powders/liquids (13.7-7.8 %); and vomiting/laxatives (9.5-6.6 %) for weight control. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of male students trying to lose weight increased (26.1-30.5 %). Among male students trying to lose or stay the same weight, the prevalence of exercising to control weight did not change during 1999-2003 and then increased (74.0-79.1 %) while the prevalence of taking diet pills/powders/liquids for weight control decreased (6.9-5.1 %) during 1999-2009. Weight management goals and behaviors changed during 1999-2009 and differed by subgroup. To combat the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors, efforts may be needed to teach adolescents about recommended weight management strategies and avoiding the risks associated with unhealthy methods.

  12. PREFACE: Eucas '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains all contributed papers that were accepted for the Conference Proceedings. The Dresden EUCAS conference with 712 participants from 43 countries continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and especially we would like to express our gratitude to all members of the Local Organization Committee. Their enthusiastic and well organized work made this Dresden EUCAS conference a memorable event for all participants. Last but not least we are very grateful to W. Goldacker , S. Haindl, J. Hänisch, R. Hühne, M. Noe, P. Seidel and M. Siegel for their extraordinary help during the proceedings review process. Bernhard Holzapfel Ludwig Schultz Conference Chairmen The IW-SMI 2010 Organizing Committee: Masato Okada (University of Tokyo) Yoshiyuki Kabashima, General Chair (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Shin Ishii (Kyoto University) Jun-ichi Inoue, Publications Chair (Hokkaido University) Kazuyuki Tanaka (Tohoku University) Toshiyuki Tanaka, Vice-General Chair (Kyoto University)

  13. The Development of Veteran 9th-Grade Physics Teachers' Knowledge for Using Representations to Teach the Topics of Energy Transformation and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study…

  14. The Impact of a Teaching-Learning Program Based on a Brain-Based Learning on the Achievement of the Female Students of 9th Grade in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabatat, Kawthar; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the impact of teaching-learning program based on a brain-based learning on the achievement of female students of 9th grade in chemistry, to accomplish the goal of this study the researchers designed instruments of: instructional plans, pre achievement and past achievement exams to use them for the study-validity and…

  15. Influence of Computer-Assisted Roundhouse Diagrams on High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding the Subjects of "Force and Motion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocakaya, F.; Gönen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Main aim of this study is to examine the influence of computer-assisted roundhouse diagrams on high school 9th grade students' academic achievements in the subjects of "Force and Motion". The study was carried out in a public high school in Diyarbakir the province in the Southeast of Turkey. In the study, the "pre-test-post-test…

  16. Alcohol, Tobacco, & Other Drug Use by 9th-12th Grade Students: Results from the 1993 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikow, Victoria A.

    This survey examined the behaviors associated with the six leading causes of death or disability in one state's high school youth. Participants were 2,439 9th-12th grade students. Results identified alcohol as the drug most frequently used by high school students, with over half of students having used alcohol by their senior year and almost half…

  17. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry courses. A…

  18. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  19. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  20. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5-8, 2011, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ~800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics session comprised five sessions: (1)Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies.

  1. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platform for next-generation collaborative computational infrastructures, building ties with the biodiversity research community and two discussion panels with government and industry participants. Progress was made on all fronts, and major outcomes included the completion of the MIENS specification for publication and the formation of the Biodiversity working group. PMID:21304722

  2. Wordland Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlish, Harvey Neil

    Can and should the preschool child learn to read? To answer this and related questions, a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a television program and parental home assistance in teaching reading skills to three-year-old children. For five days a week over a 39-week period, an experimental group watched "Wordland Workshop," a…

  3. Writers' Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherris, Arieh

    1998-01-01

    Israeli 12th graders studying English as a Second Language benefit from writers' workshops where they compose written portfolios and learn to express themselves fluently in writing. Students write with paper and pen or work via the Internet. They write on selected issues and send letters and articles to various online and print journals and…

  4. Poetry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeczko, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    This workshop offers activities to teach students about poetry. After describing haiku as a brief snapshot rather than a story, it explains how to teach poetry using an attached reproducible and poster. The tear-out reproducible sheet teaches students how to write their own haiku, offering a sample one as a model. The poster presents three sample…

  5. Teacher workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  6. Women's Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karelius, Karen

    The Women's Workshop Notebook is the tool used in the nine-week course designed for the mature woman returning to school at Antelope Valley College. The notebook exercises along with the group interaction and instruction stress the importance of personal assessment of strengths, weaknesses, dreams, deliberations and life history in…

  7. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data…

  8. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  9. Radiotherapy of stage IEA primary breast lymphoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Antonio; Zivković, Mirko; Samija, Mirko; Bagović, Davorin; Purisić, Anka; Viculin, Tomislav; Bistrović, Matija; Stanec, Mladen; Juzbasić, Stjepan; Lesar, Miro; Tomek, Rudolf

    2002-10-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred for the treatment to our Hospital because of a palpable nodule in the upper medial quadrant of her right breast. After tumor excision, pathohistological examination showed a follicular center cell lymphoma grade 2, B-cell type (CD20+, bc16+, CD10+, bcl2+). The final diagnosis was stage IEA primary extranodal non-Hodgkin s breast lymphoma. The involved breast was irradiated isocentrically with two opposite 6-megavolt (MeV) photon beams delivered from the linear accelerator (tangential fields) using asymmetric collimator opening. Radiation volume, inclinations of the medial and lateral field, and the part of the underlying chest wall and lung parenchyma were determined during the radiotherapy simulation process. The total irradiation dose was 44 Gy delivered in single daily doses of 2 Grays (Gy). After breast photon irradiation, a boost to the tumor bed was performed by a direct 12 MeV electron beam, with a total dose of 6 Gy delivered over three days. Since primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the breast is rather rare, there has been no uniform approach to its treatment. The advantage of applying the asymmetric collimator jaw opening in breast radiotherapy is the instant reduction of the dose at margin fields, resulting in both the protection of neighboring lung parenchyma and the good coverage of planned target volume.

  10. IEA Wind Task 26: Offshore Wind Farm Baseline Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, Gavin; Smith, Aaron; Warner, Ethan; Sperstad, Iver Bakken; Prinsen, Bob; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    This document has been produced to provide the definition and rationale for the Baseline Offshore Wind Farm established within IEA Wind Task 26--Cost of Wind Energy. The Baseline has been developed to provide a common starting point for country comparisons and sensitivity analysis on key offshore wind cost and value drivers. The baseline project reflects an approximate average of the characteristics of projects installed between 2012 and 2014, with the project life assumed to be 20 years. The baseline wind farm is located 40 kilometres (km) from construction and operations and maintenance (O&M) ports and from export cable landfall. The wind farm consists of 100 4-megawatt (MW) wind turbines mounted on monopile foundations in an average water depth of 25 metres (m), connected by 33-kilovolt (kV) inter-array cables. The arrays are connected to a single offshore substation (33kV/220kV) mounted on a jacket foundation, with the substation connected via a single 220kV export cable to an onshore substation, 10km from landfall. The wind farm employs a port-based O&M strategy using crew-transfer vessels.

  11. Solar photoproduction of hydrogen. IEA technical report of the IEA Agreement of the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, J.R.

    1996-09-30

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Program and represents the result of subtask C, Annex 10 - Photoproduction of Hydrogen. The concept of using solar energy to drive the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen has been examined, from the standpoints of potential and ideal efficiencies, measurement of (and how to calculate) solar hydrogen production efficiencies, a survey of the state-of-the-art, and a technological assessment of various solar hydrogen options. The analysis demonstrates that the ideal limit of the conversion efficiency for 1 sun irradiance is {approximately}31% for a single photosystem scheme and {approximately}42% for a dual photosystem scheme. However, practical considerations indicate that real efficiencies will not likely exceed {approximately}10% and {approximately}16% for single and dual photosystem schemes, respectively. Four types of solar photochemical hydrogen systems have been identified: photochemical systems, semiconductor systems, photobiological systems, and hybrid and other systems. A survey of the state-of-the-art of these four types is presented. The four types (and their subtypes) have also been examined in a technological assessment, where each has been examined as to efficiency, potential for improvement, and long-term functionality. Four solar hydrogen systems have been selected as showing sufficient promise for further research and development: (1) Photovoltaic cells plus an electrolyzer; (2) Photoelectrochemical cells with one or more semiconductor electrodes; (3) Photobiological systems; and (4) Photodegradation systems. The following recommendations were presented for consideration of the IEA: (1) Define and measure solar hydrogen conversion efficiencies as the ratio of the rate of generation of Gibbs energy of dry hydrogen gas (with appropriate corrections for any bias power) to the incident solar power (solar irradiance times the irradiated area); (2) Expand support for pilot

  12. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  14. [Research on HBsAg: comparison between two methods of the third generation, RPHA and IEA].

    PubMed

    Moretti, R; Vujovic, A; Benda, N

    1982-06-01

    Two tests of the 3rd generation were evaluated for the identification of HBsAg: the reverse hemoagglutination and the enzymatic immunoassay. The results of the study, carried out on 2,434 sera of occasional and periodic donors, have been slightly discordant. It was confirmed the greater sensibility of the IEA test over the RHA and there was a high incidence of false positive results of the IEA test probably caused by the presence in the sera of an elevated concentration of lipid and/or Hb. However, we can consider the RHA a useful test adaptable as an emergency test while the IEA method, being more sensible, can be used as a basic screening test.

  15. IEA Task 32: Wind Lidar Systems for Wind Energy Deployment (LIDAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Martin; Trabucchi, Davide; Clifton, Andrew; Courtney, Mike; Rettenmeier, Andreas

    2016-05-09

    Under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) Task 11, researchers started examining novel applications for remote sensing and the issues around them during the 51st topical expert meeting about remote sensing in January 2007. The 59th topical expert meeting organized by Task 11 in October 2009 was also dedicated to remote sensing, and the first draft of the Task's recommended practices on remote sensing was published in January 2013. The results of the Task 11 topical expert meetings provided solid groundwork for a new IEA Wind Task 32 on wind lidar technologies. Members of the wind community identified the need to consolidate the knowledge about wind lidar systems to facilitate their use, and to investigate how to exploit the advantages offered by this technology. This was the motivation that led to the start of IEA Wind Task 32 'Lidar Application for Wind Energy Deployment' in November 2011. The kick-off was meeting was held in May 2012.

  16. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  17. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, Laura B.; Clark, Blythe G.; Colbert, Rachel S.; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Gupta, Vipin P.; Hibbs, Michael R.; Perkins, David Nikolaus; West, Roger Derek

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  18. Missed Opportunities: The IEA's Study of Civic Education and Civic Education in Post-Communist Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buk-Berge, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the opportunity in Phase I of the IEA's Civic Education Study to include the new democracies' experiences of citizenship education have not been sufficiently exploited. "Borrowing" citizenship education from abroad and citizenship education for "civil society" have been chosen as examples of problems in…

  19. Reading Achievement and Social Selection in Independent Schools in Sweden: Results from IEA PIRLS 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrberg, Eva; Rosen, Monica

    2006-01-01

    The study investigates the mean difference in reading achievement between third-graders in public and independent schools in Sweden. The data come from the Swedish participation in PIRLS 2001 conducted by IEA. Variables from the home questionnaire mainly indicating possession of cultural capital are used as independent variables. A total IRT score…

  20. Democracy, Citizenship, Participation. The Results of the Second IEA Civic Education Study in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losito, Bruno; Annamaria D'Apice

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the Italian results of the IEA Civic Education study with particular reference to the concepts of democracy and citizenship as well as attitudes towards political participation. The results are presented in relation to the organisation of civic education teaching and to the degree of participation in school life in the…

  1. Reading Literacy in an International Perspective: Collected Papers from the IEA Reading Literacy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Marilyn, Ed.; And Others

    Presenting nine papers from the IEA (International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement) Reading Literacy Study that place results in an international perspective, this report address factors related to variation in literacy outcomes, both across and within countries; the teaching of reading; and the quality of life in…

  2. Methodological Issues in Comparative Educational Studies: The Case of the IEA Reading Literacy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Marilyn, Ed.; And Others

    This report discusses various methodological issues confronted in the Reading Literacy Study conducted under the auspices of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and issues relating to analysis of the data. The study analyzed in the report involved fourth- and ninth-grade students (9-year-olds and…

  3. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  4. Loss of IGF-IEa or IGF-IEb impairs myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Ronald W; Nindl, Bradley C

    2011-05-01

    Actions of protein products resulting from alternative splicing of the Igf1 gene have received increasing attention in recent years. However, the significance and functional relevance of these observations remain poorly defined. To address functions of IGF-I splice variants, we examined the impact of loss of IGF-IEa and IGF-IEb on the proliferation and differentiation of cultured mouse myoblasts. RNA interference-mediated reductions in total IGF-I, IGF-IEa alone, or IGF-IEb alone had no effect on cell viability in growth medium. However, cells deficient in total IGF-I or IGF-IEa alone proliferated significantly slower than control cells or cells deficient in IGF-IEb in serum-free media. Simultaneous loss of both or specific loss of either splice variant significantly inhibited myosin heavy chain (MyHC) immunoreactivity by 70-80% (P < 0.01) under differentiation conditions (48 h in 2% horse serum) as determined by Western immunoblotting. This loss in protein was associated with reduced MyHC isoform mRNAs, because reductions in total IGF-I or IGF-IEa mRNA significantly reduced MyHC mRNAs by approximately 50-75% (P < 0.05). Loss of IGF-IEb also reduced MyHC isoform mRNA significantly, with the exception of Myh7, but to a lesser degree (∼20-40%, P < 0.05). Provision of mature IGF-I, but not synthetic E peptides, restored Myh3 expression to control levels in cells deficient in IGF-IEa or IGF-IEb. Collectively, these data suggest that IGF-I splice variants may regulate myoblast differentiation through the actions of mature IGF-I and not the E peptides.

  5. [Native or not? Isotope analysis of a female skeleton on the 9th century A.D. from Elsau, Canton Zurich, Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tütken, Thomas; Langenegger, Elisabeth; Wild, Werner

    2008-03-01

    At Elsau near Winterthur (CH), a 9th century AD grave with a female skeleton was found in 2003. This grave was reopened one to six years after burial. After manipulating the partially decayed skeleton, the grave was filled with a layer of rocks and a claw of a sea eagle as well as the paw of a fox was placed on top. At least from this time onwards, the grave was situated in the annex of a church. Because of this special burial site for the 42 year old woman, who suffered from different severe illnesses, it is thought that she belonged to the upper class. The postmortal changes at the grave are exceptional and even after thorough research, no equivalent burial procedures are known from this area. To investigate the possibility if the woman migrated to the region of Elsau, the oxygen and strontium isotope composition of several teeth and one long bone of her skeleton was analysed. The results indicate a certain but restricted mobility within the northern Alpine foreland and as a result changes of the isotope composition of the food and drinking water during her childhood. Immigration from regions in which similar burial customs to those used for the woman persisted into the 9th century AD can be largely excluded based on the isotope composition of her skeletal remains. The mobility in the pre-Alpine region supports the interpretation that the woman belonged to the upper class, whose properties where widely distributed.

  6. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

    2009-01-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

  7. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  8. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results.

  9. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  10. Formaldehyde Workshop Agenda

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is the agenda for the Formaldehyde Workshop hosted by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments in cooperation with the IRIS Program. The workshop was held in April 2014

  11. Report from the World Health Organization's Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) meeting, Geneva, 7-9th Sep 2015.

    PubMed

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Kaslow, David C; Moorthy, Vasee S

    2016-06-03

    There are more vaccines in development, against a greater number of pathogens, than ever before. A challenge with this exceptional level of activity and investment is how to select and resource the most promising approaches to have the most significant impact on public health. The WHO Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) was established in 2014 to provide strategic advice and recommendations to WHO for vaccines in clinical development that could have a significant impact on public health in low and middle income countries. On 7-9th September 2015, PDVAC was convened for the second time, when the committee reviewed vaccine developments in 24 disease areas. This report summarises the key recommendations from that consultation.

  12. Long term persistence of inflammation in children vaccinated with Salmonella conjugate vaccine is associated with augmented Th9-Th17 cytokine.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Chinnasamy; Kevinkumar, Vijayakumar; Aravindhan, Vivekanandhan

    2017-03-01

    Vaccine induced serum cytokines not only serves as a biomarker of immunity but also serves as a reliable measure of inflammation. Long term persistence of inflammation can lead to metabolic derangement. Towards this end, in the present study, we measured levels of cytokines along with hormones (insulin, leptin and adiponectin) in children who have been vaccinated with Salmonella typhi Vi conjugate vaccine, 30months after vaccination. Vaccinated children showed a unique cytokine profile with suppressed Th1-Th2 and increased Th9-Th17 cytokines indicating immune polarization which was associated with decreased serum adiponectin (but not insulin or leptin) levels. The study gains major importance since it is a longitudinal study which reports vaccine induced long term persistence of inflammation for the first time in the high risk ethnic population.

  13. Reading Workshop Survival Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Gary Robert

    Intended for reading and classroom teachers, this book, organized in two parts, is a complete, step-by-step guide to setting up and running a reading workshop for grades 5-12 where reading is "the" priority. Part 1, "Management of the Reading Workshop," shows how to create a reading workshop, offers specific tools and…

  14. Thematic Issue: Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The articles in this publication trace the historical development of the theatre workshop, explain the relationship between the workshop and experimental theatre, and analyze the ways in which current drama workshops teach and develop the dramatic skills of the participants. The topics discussed include the special skills, production-oriented, and…

  15. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  16. Workshop Proceedings on Financing the Development and Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-16

    The Working Party on Renewable Energy (REWP) of the International Energy Agency (IEA) organized a two-day seminar on the role of financing organizations in the development and deployment of renewable energy (RE). The World Bank (WB) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) hosted the workshop. Delegates were mainly senior government representatives from the 23 IEA member countries, whose responsibilities are related to all or most of the renewable sources of energy. In addition, representatives of the European Union, United Nations, trade organizations, utilities and industries and the WB attended the meeting. The workshop was recognized as an important first step in a dialog required between the parties involved in the development of RE technology, project preparation and the financing of RE. It was also recognized that much more is required--particularly in terms of increased collaboration and coordination, and innovative financing--for RE to enter the market at an accelerated pace, and that other parties (for example from the private sector and recipient countries) need to have increased involvement in future initiatives.

  17. 9th Annual Safar Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    residents, medical students, nursing, pharmacy, and undergraduate trainees. Each trainee presentation was judged by an august group of faculty and a total...Environmental Enrichment-Mediated Functional Improvement After Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury." 62 Megan Miller, BS - " COMT Gene Variant

  18. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  19. Rural Education: A Hope for the Future. Proceedings of the Annual Rural and Small Schools Conference (9th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 26-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmley, Fran, Ed.

    This collection of conference papers covers various aspects of rural education in changing times. The conference focused on changes and innovations in rural education and on reasons why rural educators can be optimistic. The proceedings report includes brief papers and workshop summaries on topics ranging from rural public relations to…

  20. Applied antineutrino physics workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

  1. The Causality Study of External Environment Analysis (EEA), Internal Environment Analysis (IEA), Strategy Implementation on Study Program Performance at Vocational High School (VHS) in Nias Archipelago, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waruwu, Binahati; Sitompul, Harun; Manullang, Belferik

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to find out the significant effect of: (1) EEA on strategy implementation, (2) IEA on strategy implementation, (3) EEA on study program performance, (4) IEA on study program performance, and (5) strategy implementation on study program performance of Vocational High School (VHS) in Nias Archipelago. The population of…

  2. State of the art and clinical recommendations in periapical implant lesions. 9th Mozo-Grau Ticare Conference in Quintanilla, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Blaya-Tárraga, Juan-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the statements and clinical recommendations in periapical implant lesions, as per the state of the art and expert opinion agreement among the participants in the 9th Mozo-Grau Conference 2016 held in Quintanilla (Valladolid, Spain). The current status of the concept, frequency, etiology, diagnosis, clinical classification, surgical procedure and prognosis are described. If following implant placement localized pain develops in the periapical area, with or without radiographic changes, the diagnosis of periapical implant lesion should be suspected. It is important to monitor the condition in order to identify any change in its evolution. Radiological changes in the periapical radiographs are not always manifest in the early stages, and in this regard small-volume cone beam computed tomography can help us visualize such peri-implant changes. The early diagnosis of periapical implant lesions during the osseointegration phase and the provision of early treatment result in increased implant survival rates, thereby avoiding the need for implant extraction. Key words:Apical peri-implantitis, retrograde peri-implantitis, inflammatory peri-implantitis lesion. PMID:28298994

  3. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population.

  4. Climate Change, Risks and Natural Resources didactic issues of educational content geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermendzhieva, Stela; Nejdet, Semra

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to follow "Climate change, risks and Natural Resources" in the curriculum of Geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade and to interpret some didactic aspects. Analysis of key themes, concepts and categories related to the environment, events and approaches to environmental protection and the environmentally sound development of sectors of the economy is didikticheski targeted. Considering the emergence and development of geo-ecological issues, their scope and their importance to the environment, systematize some species and some approaches to solving them. Geography education in grade 9 and 10 involves acquiring knowledge, developing skills and composing behaviors of objective perception and assessment of the reality of globed, regional and local aspect. The emerging consumer and individualistic culture snowballing globalization, are increasingly occurring global warming, declining biodiversity form new realities which education must respond appropriately. The objective, consistency, accessibility and relevance in real terms are meaningful, logical accents. Whether and how reproduced in the study of Geography of Bulgaria and the world is the subject of research study in this report. Geoecological structuring of topics, concepts and categories can be done in different signs. In terms of their scope are local, national or regional, and global. Matter and interdisciplinary approach, which is to reveal the unity of the "man-society-nature" to clarify the complexity of their character with a view to forming a harmonious personality with high Geoecological consciousness and culture, and the activities carried out in their study.

  5. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents. PMID:27563919

  6. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-08-24

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents.

  7. Positive predictive value of ICD-9th codes for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzzi, C; Troncon, M G; Agostinis, L; García Rodríguez, L A

    1999-06-01

    We identified patients whose records in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database in the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia showed a code of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and perforation according to codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9th revision. The validity of site- and lesion-specific codes (531 to 534) and nonspecific codes (5780, 5781, and 5789) was ascertained through manual review of hospital clinical records. The initial group was made of 1779 potential cases of UGIB identified with one of these codes recorded. First, the positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated in a random sample. As a result of the observed high PPV of 531 and 532 codes, additional hospital charts were solely requested for all remaining potential cases with 533, 534, and 578 ICD-9 codes. The overall PPV reached a high of 97% for 531 and 532 site-specific codes, 84% for 534 site-specific codes, and 80% for 533 lesion-specific codes, and a low of 59% for nonspecific codes. These data suggest a considerable research potential for this new computerized health care database in Southern Europe.

  8. Organ/Tissue absorbed doses measured with a human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle-Mir Mission (STS-91).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Komiyama, T; Fujitaka, K

    1999-09-01

    Organ/Tissue absorbed doses were measured with a life-size human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle/Mir Mission (STS-91) from June 2 to 12, 1998. This is the first attempt to measure directly organ/tissue doses over a whole human body in space. The absorbed dose was measured by combination of two integrating detectors: thermo- luminescent dosemeter of Mg2SiO4: Tb (TDMS) and plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD). Both detectors were calibrated on ground using high-energy charged-particle beams. The detectors were packed in 59 cases of tissue-equivalent resin; and put into the positions of radiologically important organs and tissues in the phantom. Efficiency reductions of TDMS for high-LET particles were corrected based on the LET-differential particle fluence of space radiation measured with PNTDs. The accumulated absorbed doses during this 9.8-days mission at low-earth orbit (400 km x 51.6 degrees) ranged from 1.6 mGy at colon to 2.6 mGy at bone surface (shoulder) with a variation factor of 1.6. The absorbed doses at some internal organs were higher than the skin dose. This fact is important from the viewpoint of radiological protection for astronauts.

  9. Coordination and management tasks for the IEA solar heating and cooling program and CCMS solar energy pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, S B; Kennish, W J

    1980-10-01

    The objective of the project entitled, Coordination/Management Tasks for the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program and CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study, was to provide support to DOE in connection with the afore-named multilateral cooperative projects. The work included both management assistance for the overall IEA and CCMS projects and technical involvement in IEA Task I, particularly the solar system performance validation effort. The final report, covering the period March 15, 1979 - September 30, 1980, provides an overview of the accomplishments under this contract and gives conclusions and recommendations for future work. Also included in this document is the final project status report for the period May 15, 1980 to September 30, 1980.

  10. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop.

  11. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  12. Solar education project workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.

    1980-10-31

    A summary of proceedings of the Solar Education Project Workshop is presented. The workshop had as its focus the dissemination of curriculum materials developed by the Solar Energy Project of the New York State Department of Education under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. It includes, in addition to presentations by speakers and workshop leaders, specific comments from participants regarding materials available and energy-related activities underway in their respective states and suggested strategies from them for ongoing dissemination efforts.

  13. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    2000-01-31

    The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

  14. IEA Agreement on the Production and utilization of hydrogen: 1998 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    1999-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including its guiding principles. The Chairman's report section includes highlights of the agreement for 1998. Annex reports are given on various tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage. Lastly, a feature article by Karsten Wurr, E3M Material Consulting, GmbH, Hamburg Germany, is included titled 'Hydrogen in Material Science and Technology: State of the Art and New Tendencies'.

  15. Recurring issues in the IEA, the discipline and the profession of ergonomics/human factors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John R

    2012-01-01

    Although the past 25 years have seen many apparently new challenges for the academic discipline and the professional practice of ergonomics/human factors, and for the International Ergonomics Association, many issues in fact have recurred over the period. This paper takes the relevant decades and de3scribes the internal and external priorities of the IEA at the time, the main developments for researchers and practitioners, and the author's own professional interests at the time..Such an admittedly partial description of events and priorities could feed into current attempts to strengthen the position of ergonomics/ human factors for this and subsequent decades.

  16. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  17. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) for IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2010-12-01

    This final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports, Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). Subtask 1 discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. Subtask 2 included here, is the larger of the two volumes and contains five chapters that cover background information and objectives of Subtask 2 and results from each of the four phases of the project.

  18. IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Carolyn C.

    2001-12-01

    The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

  19. 5th Austrian Hungarian workshop on celestial mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süli, Áron

    2011-06-01

    The 5th Hungarian-Austrian Workshop on Celestial Mechanics took place from 9th until the 10th of April 2010 in Vienna, Austria. The workshop was held in the Institute for Astronomy of Vienna University. From the Eötvös University and from the host institute experts and PhD students gathered together to discuss the challenges and new results of the actual problems of celestial mechanics. The workshop was held in the meeting room at the Sternwarte of the Vienna University located in a magnificent park in the heart of Vienna. Following the themes of the four previous events the focus for this workshop ranged from the Trojan problem, dynamics in binary star systems and exoplanetray systems. We were pleased to acknowledge the support of the host university. The talks were characterized by a large spectrum, which is typical of the workshops on celestial mechanics. Several talks discussed different aspects of the trojan problem, such as the three Trojan Problem, dynamics of trojan-like planets in binary stars, the frequencies of their motion around the triangular lagrangian points, etc. Several speakers focused on the formation of planetary systems and on the field of exoplanetary systems, like exoplanetary systems in higher order mean motion resonances, formation of planets in binary systems, stability of exomoons etc. Some of the presentation used sophisticated mathematical tools in order to understand mean motion resonances, the Sitnikov problem applying the KAM and the Nekhoroshev theorem. The theme of a number of talks was the motion of Solar System bodies: dynamics of the newly discovered moons of Pluto and of near-Earth asteroids. General problems were also addressed, among others chaos in Hamiltonian systems, adaptive Lie-integration method and iterative solution approximation to the generalised Sitnikov problem.

  20. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  1. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  2. Fermilab Cryogenic Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W. V.

    1980-06-18

    A workshop to discuss recent pressing problems experienced in the operation of helium refrigerators at the national laboratories was proposed by DOE. Early in 1980 it was decided that the workshop should be held at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The reasoning behind the selection of Fermilab included the proposed initial tests of the Central Liquefier, the recently experienced problems with refrigeration systems at Fermilab, and the fact that a previous workshop had been held at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, which, at present, would be the other logical choice for the workshop.

  3. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  4. Trends of violence among 7th, 8th and 9th grade students in the state of Lara, Venezuela: The Global School Health Survey 2004 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Violence by young people is one of the most visible forms of violence and contributes greatly to the global burden of premature death, injury and disability. Methods The Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), State of Lara, Venezuela (GSHS-Lara) is a school-based surveillance system. It comprises a repeated, cross-sectional, self-administered survey drawn from a representative sample of 7th to 9th grade students, performed in the school years 2003-2004 (GSHS-Lara 2004) and 2007-2008 (GSHS-Lara 2008). It explores, among other things, a general violence indicator such as school absenteeism due to feeling unsafe at school or on the way to or from school for any reason; and more specific indicators of violence such as robbery, bullying, physical fights and use of weapons, as well as exposure to lectures on how to prevent violence. Results are given in terms of prevalence percentage. Results Absenteeism doubled between the two study periods (10.8% to 20.8%). The number of students that were a victim of robbery remained high and without change both outside (14.2% and 14.8%) and inside school (21.7% and 22.0%). The number of victims of bullying was high and increasing (33.4% and 43.6%). Bullying associated with being physically attacked decreased (18.5% to 14.3%). Physical attacks without active participation and not associated with bullying were frequent (21.5%). Physical fighting with active participation prevalence remained high and without change (27.5% and 28.2%). Carrying a weapon almost doubled (4.3% to 7.1%). Less than 65% reported classes for violence prevention. Conclusions The GSHS-Lara shows that violence is an important public health problem that needs to be addressed by the community and its authorities. PMID:22958602

  5. Using Self-Assembled Monolayers to Model Cell Adhesion to the 9th and 10th Type III Domains of Fibronectin†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Most mammalian cells must adhere to the extracellular matrix (ECM) to maintain proper growth and development. Fibronectin is a predominant ECM protein that engages integrin cell receptors through its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) peptide binding sites. To study the roles these motifs play in cell adhesion, proteins derived from the 9th (containing PHSRN) and 10th (containing RGD) type III fibronectin domains were engineered to be in frame with cutinase, a serine esterase that forms a site-specific, covalent adduct with phosphonate ligands. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that present phosphonate ligands against an inert background of tri(ethylene glycol) groups were used as model substrates to immobilize the cutinase-fibronectin fusion proteins. Baby hamster kidney cells attached efficiently to all protein surfaces, but only spread efficiently on protein monolayers containing the RGD peptide. Cells on RGD-containing protein surfaces also displayed defined focal adhesions and organized cytoskeletal structures compared to cells on PHSRN-presenting surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were shown to be unaffected by the presence of PHSRN when compared to RGD alone on SAMs presenting higher densities of protein, but PHSRN supported an increased efficiency in cell attachment when presented at low protein densities with RGD. Treatment of suspended cells with soluble RGD or PHSRN peptides revealed that both peptides were able to inhibit the attachment of FN10 surfaces. These results support a model wherein PHSRN and RGD bind competitively to integrins―rather than a two-point synergistic interaction―and the presence of PHSRN serves to increase the density of ligand on the substrate and therefore enhance the sticking probability of cells during attachment. PMID:20560553

  6. Earthlinks '97: Proceedings of the Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Education Society of Australasia (9th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, January 13-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, John J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 9th Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Society of Australasia. The contents provide a valuable snapshot of the state of environmental education in Australia while moving towards the end of the 20th century. Papers include: (1)…

  7. Material Analysis and Processing Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The teacher developed curriculum guide provides the industrial education teacher with the objectives, equipment lists, material, supplies, references, and activities necessary to teach students of the 9th and/or 10th grade the concepts of interrelationships between material analysis and processing systems. Career information and sociological…

  8. Power Conversion and Transmission Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The document is a guide to a 9th and 10th grade industrial education course investigating the total system of power--how man controls, converts, transmits, and uses energy; the rationale is that if one is to learn of the total system of industry, the subsystem of power must be investigated. The guide provides a "body of knowledge" chart…

  9. Proceedings of the IEA working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) working group consist- ng of researchers from Japan, the European Union (EU), and the United States, met at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 16 February 1995 to continue planning a collaborative test program on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications. Plates from a 5-ton, a 1-ton, and three 150 kg heats of reduced-activation martensitic steels have been melted and processed to 7.5- and 15-mm plates in Japan. Plates were delivered in 1994 to the three parties that will participate in the test program. A second 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H steel was produced in Japan in late 1994, and it was processed into 15- and 25-mm plates, which are to be shipped in February, 1995. Weldments will be produced on plates from this heat, and they will be shipped in April, 1995. At the ORNL meeting, a detailed test program and schedule was presented by the EU representatives, and less detailed programs were presented by the Japanese and US representatives. Detailed program schedules are required from the latter two programs to complete the program planning stage. A meeting is planned for 19--20 September 1995 in Switzerland to continue the planning and coordination of the test program and to present the preliminary results obtained in the collaboration.

  10. Productivity Workshop Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewes, Donald W.

    This document presents a plan for conducting productivity workshops sponsored by state vocational education agencies for state agency staff, field vocational educators, and representatives of businesses and industry. The rationale is discussed, and workshop goals and objectives are stated. Suggested procedures are described for the attainment of…

  11. Workshop in Translating Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Michael; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A workshop dealing with literature in translation took place in 1974 at the German Department of the University of Cincinnati. This is a report on its procedures and methods. The workshop dealt with discussion of texts, translation of texts, critique of existing translations and interpretation of content. (TL)

  12. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  13. Sensors Workshop summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A review of the efforts of three workshops is presented. The presentation describes those technological developments that would contribute most to sensor subsystem optimization and improvement of NASA's data acquisition capabilities, and summarizes the recommendations of the sensor technology panels from the most recent workshops.

  14. 76 FR 60505 - Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of... M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop entitled...

  15. Torsten Husén--A Co-Founder and Chairman of IEA from 1962 to 1978

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genova, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the work and contribution of one of the most influential comparativists in education--Torsten Husén in the period when he was a co-founder and chairman of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in the 60 and 70 decades of the 20th century. At that particular time, the first major…

  16. Student Achievement Study, 1970-1974. The IEA Six-Subject Data Bank [machine-readable data file].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, Stockholm (Sweden).

    The "Student Achievement Study" machine-readable data files (MRDF) (also referred to as the "IEA Six-Subject Survey") are the result of an international data collection effort during 1970-1974 by 21 designated National Centers, which had agreed to cooperate. The countries involved were: Australia, Belgium, Chile, England-Wales,…

  17. IEA's TIMSS 2003 International Report on Achievement in the Mathematics Cognitive Domains: Findings from a Developmental Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Foy, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the process undertaken to produce scales in three cognitive domains: knowing, applying, and reasoning. Included are the final scales showing differences among countries, as well as within countries. TIMSS 2003 is the third and most recently completed round of IEA's Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, a…

  18. Comparing Civic Competence among European Youth: Composite and Domain-Specific Indicators Using IEA Civic Education Study Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Bryony Louise; Barber, Carolyn; Van Nijlen, Daniel; Villalba, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the European Union monitoring of civic competence, this article presents a composite indicator of civic competence and four domain indicators. The data used are from the 1999 IEA Civic Education study of 14-year-olds in school. The results demonstrate the complexity of the various influences on the development of civic competencies…

  19. Early Childhood Settings in 15 Countries: What Are Their Structural Characteristics? The IEA Preprimary Project, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmsted, Patricia P., Ed.; Montie, Jeanne, Ed.

    This is the second of four monographs reporting the findings of Phase 2 of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Preprimary Project, which presents data on the physical characteristics of children's early childhood settings. Early childhood settings were documented in the following 15 countries: (1)…

  20. International Workshop on Glasses and Ceramics, Hybrids and Nanocomposites from Gels (9th); Sol-Gel 󈨥 Held in Centre for Glass Research, The University of Sheffield, UK on 31 August-5 September 1997

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    MRAP in solution from 5.05 (which is the pKi of MR in solution) to 3.30. This shift is an outcome of the inability to form zwitterionic forms of the...indicators assume a hydrophilic zwitterionic form (Schemes A, B and C) which is there- fore more prone to leaching problems. The somewhat higher...leaching rate for the pMR may reflect the en- hanced stabilization of the zwitterionic form due to its total molecular motion into the hydrophilic zone

  1. PREFACE: 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity and 9th International Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Grinberga, Liga; Sarakovskis, Anatolijs; Rutkis, Martins

    2015-03-01

    The joint International Symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT successfully has united two international events - 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity (RCBJSF-12) and 9th International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2014). The RCBJSF symposium is a continuation of series of meetings on ferroelectricity, the first of which took place in Novosibirsk (USSR) in 1976. FM&NT conferences started in 2006 and have been organized by Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia in Riga. In 2012 the International program committee decided to transform this conference into a traveling Baltic State conference and the FM&NT-2013 was organized by the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia. In 2014 the joint international symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia and was part of Riga - 2014, the European Capital of Culture event. The purpose of the joint Symposium was to bring together scientists, students and high-level experts in solid state physics, materials science, engineering and related disciplines. The number of the registered participants from 26 countries was over 350. During the Symposium 128 high quality scientific talks (5 plenary, 42 invited, 81 oral) and over 215 posters were presented. All presentations were divided into 4 parallel sessions according to 4 main topics of the Symposium: Ferroelectricity, including ferroelectrics and multiferroics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics and actuators, integrated ferroelectrics, relaxors, phase transitions and critical phenomena. Multifunctional Materials, including theory, multiscale and multiphenomenal material modeling and simulation, advanced inorganic, organic and hybrid materials. Nanotechnologies, including progressive methods, technologies and design for production, investigation of nano- particles, composites, structures, thin films and coatings. Energy, including perspective materials and

  2. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  3. Soil Moisture Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L. (Editor); Moore, D. G. (Editor); Schmugge, T. J. (Editor); Friedman, D. B. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Workshop was held at the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Maryland on January 17-19, 1978. The objectives of the Workshop were to evaluate the state of the art of remote sensing of soil moisture; examine the needs of potential users; and make recommendations concerning the future of soil moisture research and development. To accomplish these objectives, small working groups were organized in advance of the Workshop to prepare position papers. These papers served as the basis for this report.

  4. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  5. Measurement of radiation intensity on the IEA SSPS/CRS solar tower plant in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinner, A.

    1985-06-01

    The Kendall MK 9 radiometer was selected to measure the radiation intensity on the IEA SSPS/CRS solar tower plant in Spain. The measuring signal was applied to calibrate a video camera used for measurement of power density distribution in the aperture of the solar absorber. The measurement results were used to show a relationship between the gray values of a video picture of the ASR receiver under radiation and the absolute radiation intensity measured at three points so as to calculate the absolute irradiation in MW. The tests show good reproducibility and high accuracy. The conversion factors were applied to calculate the flux distribution, the maximal flux, and the ASR receiver efficiency.

  6. Urban Waters Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page will house information leading up to the 2017 Urban Waters National Training Workshop. The agenda, hotel and other quarterly updates will be posted to this page including information about how to register.

  7. Workshop: Teaching Primitive Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordison, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concrete and spiritual aspects of teaching workshops on survival skills or primitive arts. Gives details on lostproofing, or ways to teach a child not to get lost in the outdoors; building a survival shelter; and wilderness cooking. (CDS)

  8. The Career Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    This article describes a career planning workshop for managers and its purpose is to support and accelerate the process of individual development without organizational coercion or manipulation. (Author/RK)

  9. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  10. Colorado Model Rocketry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindez, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Describes a summer workshop course in rocketry offered to educators and sponsored by industry. The participants built various model rockets and equipment and worked on challenging practical problems and activities. (GA)

  11. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  12. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  13. ISIS Workshops Using Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    ISIS workshops are now using virtualization technology to improve the user experience and create a stable, consistent and useful ISIS installation for educational purposes as well as future processing needs.

  14. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  15. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  16. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  17. Characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    The management of radioactive waste ensures safety to human health and the environment nowadays and for the future, without overwhelming the upcoming generations. The primary characterization of radioactive waste is one of the main steps in the management of radioactive waste. This step permits to choose the best treatment for the radioactive waste before forwarding it to its final disposal. The aim of the present work is the primary characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor utilizing gamma-ray spectrometry, and the method of Monte Carlo for calibration. The IEA-R1 is located in the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN - CNEN) in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Cartridge filters are used for purification of the cooling water that is pumped through the core of the pool type nuclear research reactors. Once worn out, these filters are replaced and then become radioactive waste. Determination of the radioactive inventory is of paramount importance in the management of such radioactive waste, and one of the main methods for doing so is the gamma-ray spectrometry, which can identify and quantify high energy photon emitters. The technique chosen for the characterization of radioactive waste in the present work is the gamma-ray spectrometry with High purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. From the energy identified in the experimental spectrum, three radioisotopes were identified in the cartridge filter: {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 60}Co. For the estimated activity of the filter, the calibration in efficiency was made utilizing the MCNP4C code of the Monte Carlo method. Such method was chosen because there is no standard source available in the same geometry of the cartridge filter, therefore a simulation had to be developed in order to reach a calibration equation, necessary to estimate the activity of the radioactive waste. The results presented an activity value in the order of MBq for all radioisotopes. (authors)

  18. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  19. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop to discuss the state of drive systems technology needed for space exploration. The Workshop was held Thursday, November 2, 2000. About 70 space mechanisms experts shared their experiences from working in this field and considered technology development that will be needed to support future space exploration in the next 10 to 30 years.

  20. OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Wright, Robert L.; Badi, Deborah; Findlay, John T.

    1988-01-01

    This publication summarizes the software needs and available analysis tools presented at the OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop held at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia on June 21 to 22, 1988. The objective of the workshop was to identify available spacecraft system (and subsystem) analysis and engineering design tools, and mission planning and analysis software that could be used for various NASA Office of Exploration (code Z) studies, specifically lunar and Mars missions.

  1. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop on Tuesday, May 14, 2002, to discuss space mechanisms technology. The theme for this workshop was 'Working in the Cold,' a focus on space mechanisms that must operate at low temperatures. We define 'cold' as below -60C (210 K), such as would be found near the equator of Mars. However, we are also concerned with much colder temperatures such as in permanently dark craters of the Moon (about 40 K).

  2. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  3. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  4. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 1: Issues, Impacts, and Economics of Wind and Hydropower Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  5. Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Ela, E.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R&D Task 25 on “Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power” produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

  6. Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems, Results of IEA Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.; Ela, E.

    2008-01-01

    There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R and D Task 25 on 'Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power' produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

  7. The QED Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  8. t4 Workshop Report*

    PubMed Central

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  9. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy compliance life cycle. A learning lunch... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice Announcing Public Workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy...

  10. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public...

  11. IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor: 58 Years of Operating Experience and Utilization for Research, Teaching and Radioisotopes Production

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel; Filho, Tufic Madi; Saxena, Rajendra; Filho, Walter Ricci

    2015-07-01

    IEA-R1 research reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Nuclear and Energy Research Institute) IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil is the largest power research reactor in Brazil, with a maximum power rating of 5 MWth. It is being used for basic and applied research in the nuclear and neutron related sciences, for the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, and for providing services of neutron activation analysis, real time neutron radiography, and neutron transmutation doping of silicon. IEA-R1 is a swimming pool reactor, with light water as the coolant and moderator, and graphite and beryllium as reflectors. The reactor was commissioned on September 16, 1957 and achieved its first criticality. It is currently operating at 4.5 MWth with a 60-hour cycle per week. In the early sixties, IPEN produced {sup 131}I, {sup 32}P, {sup 198}Au, {sup 24}Na, {sup 35}S, {sup 51}Cr and labeled compounds for medical use. During the past several years, a concerted effort has been made in order to upgrade the reactor power to 5 MWth through refurbishment and modernization programs. One of the reasons for this decision was to produce {sup 99}Mo at IPEN. The reactor cycle will be gradually increased to 120 hours per week continuous operation. It is anticipated that these programs will assure the safe and sustainable operation of the IEA-R1 reactor for several more years, to produce important primary radioisotopes {sup 99}Mo, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm and {sup 192}Ir. Currently, all aspects of dealing with fuel element fabrication, fuel transportation, isotope processing, and spent fuel storage are handled by IPEN at the site. The reactor modernization program is slated for completion by 2015. This paper describes 58 years of operating experience and utilization of the IEA-R1 research reactor for research, teaching and radioisotopes production. (authors)

  12. Conducting Effective Staff Development Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kay; Janczak, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Staff development workshops conducted by library media specialists can assist teachers to integrate information literacy skills and technology into their curricula. Guidelines are presented on the planning and implementation of such workshops.

  13. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  14. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  15. Skylab Orbiter Workshop Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the characteristics and basic elements of the Skylab Orbiter Workshop (OWS). The OWS was divided into two major compartments. The lower level provided crew accommodations for sleeping, food preparation and consumption, hygiene, waste processing and disposal, and performance of certain experiments. The upper level consisted of a large work area and housed water storage tanks, a food freezer, storage vaults for film, scientific airlocks, mobility and stability experiment equipment, and other experimental equipment. The compartment below the crew quarters was a container for liquid and solid waste and trash accumulated throughout the mission. A solar array, consisting of two wings covered on one side with solar cells, was mounted outside the workshop to generate electrical power to augment the power generated by another solar array mounted on the solar observatory. Thrusters were provided at one end of the workshop for short-term control of the attitude of the space station.

  16. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  17. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  18. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  19. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  20. In-House EVM Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Government Accounting • Management Information System • Workshop Recommendations EVM In- House Workshop Findings • EVM implementation within DoD...Management Command Mr. William “Bill” Gibson Mr. Dominic A. “Chip” Thomas IN- HOUSE ( GOVERNMENT ) EVMS WORKSHOP VALIDATION & SURVEILLANCE D:\\PPT...2Defense Contract Management Command IN- HOUSE ( GOVERNMENT ) EVMS WORKSHOP VALIDATION • WHY VALIDATE/CERTIFY • WHO PAYS THE COST • FACILITY

  1. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  2. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: ANIMATED ORBITS OF PLANETS AND MOONS: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. SOLAR SYSTEM COLLISIONS: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. ORBITAL SIMULATIONS: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP BULLETIN BOARD: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  3. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  4. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  5. The Dacum Workshop. Dacum 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Barbara J.

    This booklet, the second in a series of four volumes on the Designing a Curriculum (Dacum) process, is intended to familiarize prospective Dacum workshop participants with the goals and procedures of the workshop. The first section of the booklet comprises a description of a Dacum workshop as a means of bringing together educators and employers to…

  6. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  7. Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1998-03-31

    This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that

  8. In vivo comparison of free coronary grafts using the inferior epigastric (IEA), the gastroepiploic (GEA) and the internal thoracic artery (ITA).

    PubMed

    Cremer, J; Liesmann, T; Wimmer-Greinecker, G; Abraham, C; Mügge, A; Haverich, A

    1994-01-01

    The validity of alternative arterial conduits for myocardial revascularization in comparison to internal thoracic artery (ITA) has not been sufficiently defined. Evaluation of the functional in vivo vascular properties of the different conduits may be appropriate to give a perspective on long-term graft qualities. The intraoperative function of single free grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was compared in inferior epigastric (IEA, n = 13), internal thoracic (ITA, n = 12) and gastroepiploic artery (GEA, n = 12) conduits. Graft flows were measured at four points of time, 1) in situ free flow after distal dissection (IEA: 42.2 ml/min, ITA: 68.8 ml/min, GEA: 61.1 ml/min), 2) free flow following proximal grafting to the aorta (IEA: 48.1 ml/min, ITA: 63.7 ml/min, GEA: 84.2 ml/min), 3) selective graft flow after distal attachment to the LAD (IEA: 52.6 ml/min, ITA: 77.5 ml/min, GEA: 102.8 ml/min), and 4) selective LAD graft flow following paraverine (Pap) stimulation (IEA: 98.4 ml/min, ITA: 128.0 ml/min, GEA: 142.9 ml/min). Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation was evaluated by examination of the intraluminal graft pressures at mechanically controlled constant flow rates. Following stimulation with substance P (SP), the change of intraluminal pressure (dp) was similar in IEA (dp: -20.0 mmHg) and GEA grafts (dp: -21.1 mmHg). Only ITA conduits were less reactive to SP (-9.7 mmHg). The response to acetylcholine (ACh) could only be assessed in ITA (dp: -16.0 mmHg) and IEA (dp: -10.7 mmHg) grafts. Gastroepiploic arteries did not react on ACh stimulation (dp: +0.4 mmHg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Information Power Implementation Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Librarians, Chicago, IL.

    The materials in this collection were used at workshops designed to assist school library media specialists and learning resources center professionals in making effective use of "Information Power," a recent joint publication of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) and the American Association of School Librarians…

  10. World without Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkley, William M.

    1985-01-01

    The author examines the history of segregation for blind and handicapped persons and the relationship of segregation to social attitudes and opportunities. He also questions the relevance of sheltered workshops today. The El Paso Lighthouse "enclave with industry" program is presented as one model for moving toward a "natural proportion"…

  11. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  12. MOVES Workshops and Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA held a three-day workshop including EPA presentations on MOVES 2010 algorithms and default data, information on ways to use MOVES more efficiently for various purposes, and discussion of ideas and plans for MOVES future development.

  13. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third…

  14. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  15. African Outreach Workshop 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    This report discusses the 1974 African Outreach Workshop planned and coordinated by the African Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Its major aim was to assist teachers in developing curriculum units on African using materials available in their local community. A second aim was for the African Studies Program to…

  16. Mentoring. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scallan-Berl, Patricia; Moguil, Leslie; Nyman, Sessy I.; Mercado, Miriam Mercado

    2003-01-01

    This workshop presents information on mentoring relationships within child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Mentoring Teachers...A Partnership in Learning" (Patricia Scallan-Berl); (2) "The Potential Gains of Peer Mentoring among Children" (Leslie Moguil); (3) "Mentoring Advocates in the Context of Early Childhood…

  17. Physics Teachers Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, DaNel; Calhoun, John; Palmer, Alyson; Thorpe, Steve; Vanderveen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    INL is looking for the nation's top high school physics teachers to attend our July workshop in Idaho Falls. Participants get to learn from nuclear researchers, tour facilities including a research reactor and interact with peers from across the country. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  18. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  19. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  20. Course/Workshop Complementarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Dan

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the law-related studies provided in a human ecology degree program. The studies involve workshops which are project-oriented experiences and courses which provide skills and knowledge. The program emphasizes law relating to land use management, small business enterprises, consumer protection, real estate, and family. (MR)

  1. Physics Teachers Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    Huggins, DaNel; Calhoun, John; Palmer, Alyson; Thorpe, Steve; Vanderveen, Anne

    2016-07-12

    INL is looking for the nation's top high school physics teachers to attend our July workshop in Idaho Falls. Participants get to learn from nuclear researchers, tour facilities including a research reactor and interact with peers from across the country. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  2. Synthetic Vision Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The second NASA sponsored Workshop on Synthetic/Enhanced Vision (S/EV) Display Systems was conducted January 27-29, 1998 at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for interested parties to discuss topics in the Synthetic Vision (SV) element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program and to encourage those interested parties to participate in the development, prototyping, and implementation of S/EV systems that enhance aviation safety. The SV element addresses the potential safety benefits of synthetic/enhanced vision display systems for low-end general aviation aircraft, high-end general aviation aircraft (business jets), and commercial transports. Attendance at this workshop consisted of about 112 persons including representatives from industry, the FAA, and other government organizations (NOAA, NIMA, etc.). The workshop provided opportunities for interested individuals to give presentations on the state of the art in potentially applicable systems, as well as to discuss areas of research that might be considered for inclusion within the Synthetic Vision Element program to contribute to the reduction of the fatal aircraft accident rate. Panel discussions on topical areas such as databases, displays, certification issues, and sensors were conducted, with time allowed for audience participation.

  3. Pump Operation Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed as an extension of training for water and wastewater treatment personnel. The course consists of lecture-discussions and hands-on activities. Each of the lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that…

  4. Preventive Maintenance Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to upgrade the knowledge of experienced water and wastewater treatment plant operators. The course consists of lecture-discussions and hands-on activities. Each of the lessons has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing a topic.…

  5. Technology Leadership Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Innovations in Education, Rapid City, SD.

    This Technology & Innovations in Education (TIE) workshop, presented in Kansas City, Missouri, on May 2, 1997, was designed to help participants gain a valid big picture of current school technology change issues, acquire current materials, clarify their beliefs, vision, and needs for their district's technology efforts, learn strategies for…

  6. Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C. (Editor); Englert, P. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides are compiled. The major topic areas covered include: new techniques for measuring nuclides such as tandem accelerator and resonance mass spectrometry; solar modulation of cosmic rays; pre-irradiation histories of extraterrestrial materials; terrestrial studies; simulations and cross sections; nuclide production rate calculations; and meteoritic nuclides.

  7. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  8. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  9. Workshop on Molecular Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular evolution has become the nexus of many areas of biological research. It both brings together and enriches such areas as biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, population genetics, systematics, developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, in vitro evolution, and molecular ecology. The Workshop provides an important contribution to these fields in that it promotes interdisciplinary research and interaction, and thus provides a glue that sticks together disparate fields. Due to the wide range of fields addressed by the study of molecular evolution, it is difficult to offer a comprehensive course in a university setting. It is rare for a single institution to maintain expertise in all necessary areas. In contrast, the Workshop is uniquely able to provide necessary breadth and depth by utilizing a large number of faculty with appropriate expertise. Furthermore, the flexible nature of the Workshop allows for rapid adaptation to changes in the dynamic field of molecular evolution. For example, the 2003 Workshop included recently emergent research areas of molecular evolution of development and genomics.

  10. [Cutaneous surgery workshop].

    PubMed

    Purim, Kátia Sheylla Malta

    2010-08-01

    The training of physician request knowledge, skills and attitudes for the effective exercise of professional practice. The training of basic surgical techniques, used in outpatient procedures, will prepare students to work in different scenarios. This work presents a proposal for teaching through workshops for cutaneous surgery in an experimental model.

  11. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  12. Evaluation of advanced sodium receiver losses during operation of the IEA/SSPS central receiver system

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, R.; Rosa, F.; Jacobs, H.; Sanchez, M.

    1989-02-01

    This article presents the measurements and experiments conducted on the external receiver: the so-called Advanced Sodium Receiver (ASR) of the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Project of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in southern Spain. The basis of this experiment was to provide loss measurements for later use in determining receiver performance. The tests to evaluate thermal losses consisted in operating the receiver with the doors open and circulating the sodium in normal and reverse flow without providing any incident power from the heliostat field (flux-off technique). In this way, total thermal losses are calculated as the energy lost by the sodium. Radiative losses have been calculated based on theoretical calculations and some results have been compared with infrared thermography measurements. Conductive losses are small and have been estimated by flux-off experiments with the receiver doors closed. Convective losses were evaluated subtracting radiative and conductive losses from the total thermal losses. Optical losses were assessed using absorptance measurements of the receiver coating. A simplified analytical model has been developed to calculate losses and ASR efficiency during operation. In spite of the method's simplicity, the results are very similar to those found by other investigators, verified simulation programs and test results.

  13. The IEA contribution to the transition of Ergonomics from research to practice.

    PubMed

    Caple, David C

    2010-10-01

    The future growth of ergonomics as a scientific discipline will require a greater focus on methods to transition research findings into practice. Whilst the International Ergonomics Association (IEA) and the Federated Ergonomics Societies provide opportunities to promote exchange on ergonomics research and collaboration in research programs, the future sustainability of the domain will be dependent on the provision of ongoing educational opportunities in ergonomics and the transitioning of the research findings into practice. This transition will require greater external focus outside the ergonomics profession in working in collaboration and partnership with other professional associations, governments and international agencies. Practical tools that are targeted towards particular user groups within the community, workplace, and governments will enhance the opportunities for the transition of ergonomics research into practice. Focus on extramural initiatives such as Ergonomics Checkpoints, integration of the ergonomics design process into the International Organisation for Standardization Guidelines, and the incorporation of ergonomics into the World Health Organisation research programs will ensure that the positioning of ergonomics will continue at an international level.

  14. World spherical torus (ST) research as coordinated by the IEA ST Implementing Agreement (IA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.; Takase, Y.; Lloyd, B.

    2012-10-01

    Since the establishment of the IEA ST IA in 2007, the world ST research community has grown to 24 ST experiments in seven countries. For the second 5 years of the IA, major upgrades of the NSTX (USA) and MAST (UK) are or will soon be underway aiming to start enhanced experimental research in 2015. Major tests of solenoid-free start-up are addressed by experiments in Japan including QUEST (Kyushu U.), TST-2 (U. Tokyo), and LATE (Kyoto U.), Pegasus (U. Wisconsin), and SUNIST (Tsinghua U., PRC). These aim to develop database to minimize/remove the central solenoid and enable truly compact fusion energy devices. Lithium-only PFCs are tested in LTX (PPPL). The community is considering low to modest-Q applications to fusion energy R&D. These range from small size (R˜0.5m) volume neutron sources delivering several MW fusion neutrons, to medium size (R˜1.0m, 50-MW) fusion science and technology experimental facilities to enable critical R&D needed to develop database for a fusion DEMO and other energy applications. Progress and remaining ST R&D will be summarized.

  15. Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 - A Study of the Preparing for Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Filho, Tufic Madi; Ricci, Walter; Martins, Mauro Onofre; Pereira, Maria da Conceicao

    2015-07-01

    The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), Sao Paulo, according to the assignments given by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), enabled the development of this study, especially operational reports about refurbishing carried out on 2013, involving the production of radioisotopes and research in the areas of Radiochemistry and Nuclear Physics. These reports are made in accordance with established standard procedures to meet the requirements of CNEN (National Nuclear Energy Commission, the regulator the nuclear area activities in Brazil) and IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). This study presents an assessment of the procedures and methods of treatments for decontamination of the refrigeration primary circuit and changes parts, equipment and tubes of the of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor, pool type, power between 3,5 and 4,5 MW. In order to have a sequence in the work, the well-known contaminant radioisotopes were evaluated firstly, using Geiger- Muller equipment. In the second phase, the decontamination was done manually together with the ultrasound cleaning and washing equipment. From the several water solutions of citric acid assessment, the concentration with better confidence was obtained; in order to achieve the best results for decontamination. This study intends to define the best process for decontamination with low taxes of waste and without expensive costs. (authors)

  16. Rotor equivalent wind speed for power curve measurement - comparative exercise for IEA Wind Annex 32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Cañadillas, B.; Clifton, A.; Feeney, S.; Nygaard, N.; Poodt, M.; St. Martin, C.; Tüxen, E.; Wagenaar, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    A comparative exercise has been organised within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Annex 32 in order to test the Rotor Equivalent Wind Speed (REWS) method under various conditions of wind shear and measurement techniques. Eight organisations from five countries participated in the exercise. Each member of the group has derived both the power curve based on the wind speed at hub height and the power curve based on the REWS. This yielded results for different wind turbines, located in diverse types of terrain and where the wind speed profile was measured with different instruments (mast or various lidars). The participants carried out two preliminary steps in order to reach consensus on how to implement the REWS method. First, they all derived the REWS for one 10 minute wind speed profile. Secondly, they all derived the power curves for one dataset. The main point requiring consensus was the definition of the segment area used as weighting for the wind speeds measured at the various heights in the calculation of the REWS. This comparative exercise showed that the REWS method results in a significant difference compared to the standard method using the wind speed at hub height in conditions with large shear and low turbulence intensity.

  17. AASTRA Leadership Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.

    1998-05-01

    American Astronomical Society Teacher Resource Agent Institutes were held in the summers of 1994-1996. From the 215 Agents, sixteen were selected to attend a follow-up leadership workshop for three weeks in July, 1997 at University of Texas at Austin. The workshop followed the recommendations of both the AASTRA formative evaluator and the National Science Education Standards in allowing the participants time to reflect on their practice as teachers and as teacher-leaders. At no financial charge to the project, the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory contributed three workshops of three hours each. These workshops, plus one given by the PI, were taken from "Facilitating Systemic Change in Science and Mathematics Education : A Toolkit for Professional Developers" [ISBN 1-878234-08-0]. In addition, McDonald Observatory contributed six nights of telescope time on the 30-inch telescope with a CCD prime focus camera. In Austin, several astronomers lectured on their research; most of the lectures correlated with the research projects in progress at the Observatory during the teachers' observing run. Several observers allowed the teachers to participate in their observing sessions on the larger telescopes. Participant evaluation of the Leadership Workshop was very positive, both in terms of enhancing their self-image as leaders, enriching their repertoire of activities to use within their classrooms, and introducing them to modern astronomical research techniques. AASTRA is supported by NSF under grant ESI 93- 53377 and the AAS. Additional support is provided by Loyola University of Chicago, Northern Arizona University of Flagstaff, University of Maryland at College Park, and the University of Texas at Austin.

  18. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuykendall, Tommie G.; Allsop, Jacob Lee; Anderson, Benjamin Robert; Boumedine, Marc; Carter, Cedric; Galvin, Seanmichael Yurko; Gonzalez, Oscar; Lee, Wellington K.; Lin, Han Wei; Morris, Tyler Jake; Nauer, Kevin S.; Potts, Beth A.; Ta, Kim Thanh; Trasti, Jennifer; White, David R.

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses are designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.

  19. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  20. Geoengineering design parameters workshop

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, C.M. and Associates, Grand Junction, CO ); Kim, Kunsoo . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1985-12-12

    A one-day workshop on the subject of the geotechnical design parameters, in situ stress and rock mass strength, for a nuclear waste repository in basalt was held in Rapid City, South Dakota, on June 25, 1989. A panel comprised of five widely recognized experts in the field of rock mechanics, met to discuss the state of stress at the Hanford Site and the strength of a basalt rock mass. This report summarizes the discussions that took place and presents a set of final position statements developed collaboratively by the panel and the workshop moderator. The report concludes with a set of specific recommendations for future actions considered necessary to adequately define the in situ stress and the rock mass strength at the Hanford Site and to document the position of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project in respect to these two critical design parameters.

  1. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  2. Mars Surface Mission Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, M. B. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A workshop was held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute on September 4-5, 1997, to address the surface elements of the Mars Reference Mission now being reviewed by NASA. The workshop considered the current reference mission and addressed the types of activities that would be expected for science and resource exploration and facilities operations. A set of activities was defined that can be used to construct "vignettes" of the surface mission. These vignettes can form the basis for describing the importance of the surface mission, for illustrating aspects of the surface mission, and for allowing others to extend and revise these initial ideas. The topic is rich with opportunities for additional conceptualization. It is recommended that NASA consider supporting university design teams to conduct further analysis of the possibilities.

  3. Summary of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Workshop on the ''RHIC'' Performance was held at the Collider Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, from March 21 to 26, 1988. The Workshop had three major goals: To check the validity and soundness of the methods described in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, May 1986), in order to ensure the performance proposed there. To initiate and study techniques that increase the luminosity in the second stage of RHIC by a factor of twenty beyond the CDR values, and to reduce the interactive region to a rms length of less than 20 cm. To investigate possible limits on beam intensity and dimensions, and their impact on RHIC hardware. Conclusions and recommendations on these topics are discussed in this paper. 5 tabs.

  4. Actinide Spectroscopy Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Shuh, D.K.

    2004-12-05

    Actinide materials present an extreme scientific challenge to the materials research community. The complex electronic structures of actinide materials result in many unusual and unique properties that have yet to be fully understood. The difficulties in handling, preparing, and characterizing actinide materials has frequently precluded investigations and has the limited the detailed understanding of these relevant, complex materials. However, modern experiments with actinide materials have the potential to provide key, fundamental information about many long-standing issues concerning actinide materials. This workshop focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by actinide materials and the potential that synchrotron radiation approaches available at the ALS can contribute to improving the fundamental understanding of actinides materials. Fundamental experimental approaches and results, as well as theoretical modeling and computational simulations, were part of the workshop program.

  5. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop was held July 25-26, 1995 at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the workshop was to foster timely exchange of information and expertise acquired by researchers and users of laser based Rayleigh scattering diagnostics for aerospace flow facilities and other applications. This Conference Publication includes the 12 technical presentations and transcriptions of the two panel discussions. The first panel was made up of 'users' of optical diagnostics, mainly in aerospace test facilities, and its purpose was to assess areas of potential applications of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. The second panel was made up of active researchers in Rayleigh scattering diagnostics, and its purpose was to discuss the direction of future work.

  6. Magnet measurement workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    This report covers the deliberations of the participants the workshop and some subsequent contributions. Section III, the report of the rotating coil group, includes a summary table of the major measuring systems in use today, with separate sections on each. Section IV is the summary report of the group that addressed other measuring techniques. Because one of the limits of all the techniques being considered is electronic data acquisition, Section V addresses this topic. A set of issues relevant to magnetic field measurements of SSC dipoles was raised and addressed during the workshop. These are included as Section VI. Section VII includes a complete list of attendees with their addresses and a separate list of the members of the two working groups.

  7. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  8. Modified Composite Materials Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The reduction or elimination of the hazard which results from accidental release of graphite fibers from composite materials was studied at a workshop. At the workshop, groups were organized to consider six topics: epoxy modifications, epoxy replacement, fiber modifications, fiber coatings and new fibers, hybrids, and fiber release testing. Because of the time required to develop a new material and acquire a design data base, most of the workers concluded that a modified composite material would require about four to five years of development and testing before it could be applied to aircraft structures. The hybrid working group considered that some hybrid composites which reduce the risk of accidental fiber release might be put into service over the near term. The fiber release testing working group recommended a coordinated effort to define a suitable laboratory test.

  9. Discovery management workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Two dozen participants assembled under the direction of the NASA Solar System Exploration Division (SEED) April 13-15, 1993. Participants supported the goals of cheaper and faster solar system exploration. The workshop concluded that the Discovery Program concept and goals are viable. Management concerns are articulated in the final report. Appendix A includes lists of participants in alphabetical order, by functional area, and by organization type. Appendix B includes the agenda for the meeting.

  10. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-10-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested in large university survey courses, as well as smaller classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. It has also been used in High School and Junior High School science classes. Below are some tools in the Astronomy Workshop. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Planetary Calculators (New!): Calculate a simple formula, e.g. the escape velocity, simultaneously for all planets and moons in the Solar System. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Build Your Own Solar System (New!): Choose the masses of up to four planets, and their orbital sizes and shapes, and explore the prospects for life in your creation. Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  11. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  12. Applied Reverberation Modeling Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...Later, Zhou [3] and others extended their work to reverberation. ASPM/ ASTRAL agreed reasonably well with the energy flux model reverberation and...simulation and training requirements. RELATED PROJECTS The ONR-SPAWAR Reverberation Modeling Workshop is a closely related project that was intended

  13. Applied Reverberation Modeling Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation Modeling Workshop 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...included both propagation and reverberation with the receiver on a transect perpendicular to the wedge (3-D effects were ignored). The ASTRAL /ASPM...by the PI. The interest was in determining how the operational models ( ASTRAL /ASPM) performed in a sloping environment. ASTRAL is extremely fast

  14. Applied Surface Analysis Workshop.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    field of surface analysis attended the Workshop. The list of participants follows. 5! A, I Charles Anderson Albert L. Botkin Case Western Reserve...Louis, MO 63166 University of Dayton 300 College Park Richard Chase Dayton, OH 45469 Case Western Reserve University University Circle Brian E. P...Dayton, OH 45469 300 College Park Dayton, OH 45469 Richard W. Hoffman Case Western Reserve University Martin Kordesch Cleveland, OH 44106 Case Western

  15. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Altimeter Sea Ice Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Science Fax- 164513 Chalmers University of TechnologyI S-41296 Goteborg, Sweden 5 Altimeter Sea Ice Workshop Presentation Summary Hawkins: Present U.S...into the ground. A large tent slides over the top of the pond for solar shading and inclement weather protection. A mobile gantry, which spans the width...tracks can covering the pond to protect the growing ice from weather when necessary. A walkway mounted on the tracks serves as a mobile base on which the

  17. Workshop II: Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Renee; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Physics Education Workshop at the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics heard about, among other topics, a study exploring why students have difficulty with concepts related to magnetism (and whether explicitly evoking gender affects the results), work in Europe to develop materials to help teachers implement inquiry-based science education, and the use of peer instruction and online collaboration to help teacher-candidates develop questioning skills.

  18. Exozodiacal Dust Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, D. E. (Editor); Caroff, L. J. (Editor); Sandford, S. A. (Editor); Wooden, D. H. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to understand what effect circumstellar dust clouds will have on NASA's proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission's ability to search for terrestrial-sized planets orbiting stars in the solar neighborhood. The workshop participants reviewed the properties of TPF, summarized what is known about the local zodiacal cloud and about exozodiacal clouds, and determined what additional knowledge must be obtained to help design TPF for maximum effectiveness within its cost constraint. Recommendations were made for ways to obtain that additional knowledge, at minimum cost. The workshop brought together approximately 70 scientists, from four different countries. The active participants included astronomers involved in the study of the local zodiacal cloud, in the formation of stars and planetary systems, and in the technologies and techniques of ground- and space-based infrared interferometry. During the course of the meeting, 15 invited talks and 20 contributed poster papers were presented, and there were four working sessions. This is a collection of the invited talks, contributed poster papers, and summaries of the working sessions.

  19. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Malayeri, M. L.; Pahlevan, K. M. A.; Jacobson, W. C.

    2004-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses, classes for undergraduate majors, and High Schools. Here we briefly describe a few of the more popular tools. The Life of the Sun (New!): The history of the Sun is animated as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve in time. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbital motions of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country of impact (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  20. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2005-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses, classes for undergraduate majors, and High Schools. Here we briefly describe a few of the more popular tools. The Life of the Sun (New!): The history of the Sun is animated as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve in time. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbital motions of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country of impact (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by a NASA EPO grant.

  1. Carbon emissions from manufacturing energy use in 13 IEA countries: long-term trends through 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, Lee; Murtishaw, Scott; Khrushch, Marta; Ting, Michael; Karbuz, Sohbet; Unander, Fridtjof

    2000-12-01

    This paper analyses the evolution of carbon emissions from the manufacturing sectors of 13 IEA countries, based on national data at the 2 or 3 sector ISIC level of disaggregation. We carry out an Adaptive-Weighting-Divisia decomposition of changes into factors representing sub-sectoral branch energy intensities, output mix or structure, final fuel mix, and utility fuel mix. We also carry out a detailed comparison of emissions by country and sub-sector for 1994. We find that by the mid-1990s, emissions from manufacturing in most countries were close to their 1973 levels. The main reasons were lower branch energy intensities and in some countries changes in utility fuel mix. Changes in the mix of output had small downward effects in a few large countries (Japan and the United States), while these shifts increased emissions in others (Australia, Norway, Netherlands). Fuel mix changes lowered emissions slightly, principally through moves away from coal and oil towards gas. The comparison o f countries shows that after overall output, energy intensities explain most of the differences in per capita emissions from manufacturing. Fuel mix and utility fuel mix play an important role for some countries with very CO2 -- free power sectors (Sweden, Norway, France) or CO2 intensive power sectors (Australia). Some of the differences in energy intensities, however, arise because of hidden sub-sectoral mix effects that cannot be resolved at the 3-digit ISIC level of disaggregation. Emissions have been rising since 1990, largely because energy intensities are not falling as fast as they did before 1990. What this means for the Kyoto Accord and other concerns related to global carbon emissions remains to be seen.

  2. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, John

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  3. Serotonin regulates voltage-dependent currents in type I(e(A)) and I(i) interneurons of Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nan Ge; Crow, Terry

    2011-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has both direct and modulatory actions on central neurons contributing to behavioral arousal and cellular-synaptic plasticity in diverse species. In Hermissenda, 5-HT produces changes in intrinsic excitability of different types of identified interneurons in the circumesophageal nervous system. Using whole cell patch-clamp techniques we have examined membrane conductance changes produced by 5-HT that contribute to intrinsic excitability in two identified classes of interneurons, types I(i) and I(eA). Whole cell currents were examined before and after 5-HT application to the isolated nervous system. A 4-aminopyridine-sensitive transient outward K(+) current [I(K(A))], a tetraethylammonium-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current [I(K(V))], an inward rectifier K(+) current [I(K(IR))], and a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) were characterized. 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(A)) and I(K(V)) in both type I(i) and I(eA) interneurons. However, differences in 5-HT's effects on the activation-inactivation kinetics were observed in different types of interneurons. 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve of I(K(V)) and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of I(K(A)) in type I(i) interneurons. In contrast, 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of both I(K(V)) and I(K(A)) in type I(eA) interneurons. In addition, 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(IR)) in type I(i) interneurons and increased the amplitude of I(h) in type I(eA) interneurons. These results indicate that 5-HT-dependent changes in I(K(A)), I(K(V)), I(K(IR)), and I(h) contribute to multiple mechanisms that synergistically support modulation of increased intrinsic excitability associated with different functional classes of identified type I interneurons.

  4. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  5. Urban guideway transit workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, H. )

    1992-03-01

    On March 20--21, 1991, EPRI sponsored a workshop on urban guideway transit. The purpose of this workshop was to provide utility managers with increased knowledge about urban guideway transit options, public policy regarding transit, and the effect of transit options on utility operations. With this information utilities should be better prepared to make decisions about transit development in their service areas. The workshop also provided EPRI with ideas and information for developing an R D project plan for urban guideway transit.

  6. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  7. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007–2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vitina, Aisma; Lüers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabø, Lief I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arántegui, Roberto; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan H; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems (IEA Wind) Task 26—The Cost of Wind Energy represents an international collaboration dedicated to exploring past, present and future cost of wind energy. This report provides an overview of recent trends in wind plant technology, cost, and performance in those countries that are currently represented by participating organizations in IEA Wind Task 26: Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, and the United States as well as the European Union.

  8. Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Bagby, John (Editor); Race, Margaret (Editor); Rummel, John (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol (QP) Workshop was convened to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent uncontrolled release of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of live organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. During the first part of the Workshop, several tutorials were presented on topics related to the workshop in order to give all participants a common basis in the technical areas necessary to achieve the objectives of the Workshop.

  9. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  10. Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power, First Results of IEA Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; Van Hulle, F.; Ensslin, C.; Hofmann, L.; McCann, J.; Pierik, J.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Soder, L.; Strbac, G.; Parsons, B.; Smith, J. C.; Lemstrom, B.

    2006-01-01

    An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. The task 'Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power' will analyse existing case studies from different power systems. There are a multitude of studies made and ongoing related to cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. This paper summarizes the results from 10 countries and outlines the studies made at European Wind Energy Association and the European system operators UCTE and ETSO. A more in-depth review of the studies is needed to draw conclusions on the range of integration costs for wind power. A state-of-the art review process of the new IEA collaboration will seek reasons behind the wide range of results for costs of wind integration - definitions for wind penetration, reserves and costs; different power system and load characteristics and operational rules; underlying assumptions on variability and uncertainty of wind, etc.

  11. Workshop on injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    At a workshop in Dhaka on February 10, 1994, district and thana level managers discussed the problems associated with a project that delivers injectable contraceptives to the doorsteps of clients. The workshop, which was organized by the Bangladesh government and the Maternal and Child Health-Family Planning (MCH-FP) Extension Project of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), identified lack of appropriate training, inefficient supervision, and inadequate knowledge about and facilities for the disposal of used syringes and needles as problems. There was agreement among participants that use of the injectables, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN), had led to increases in contraceptive use. The 6-month old project had been initiated in 8 thanas by the Directorate of Family Planning of the government of Bangladesh, with the technical assistance of the MCH-FP Extension Project, after ICDDR,B noticed that the rates of use for all types of contraceptives had increased in the rural areas of Matlab, Abhoynagar, and Sirajganj with doorstep delivery by field workers. During the same period, use of injectables that were offered by female paramedics at static centers had remained low. At the workshop, Dr. Rushikesh Maru of the Extension Project spoke about the effective administration of the injectables within 15 days before or after the due date. Mr. AKM Rafiquz Zaman, former director general of Family Planning, government of Bangladesh, requested further expansion in at least 1 thana of each district and in all municipalities and urban slums.

  12. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  13. Design for Security Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    volume of ICs at the cost needed. Such trends have raised concerns regarding the reliance of U.S. defense systems 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...concerns regarding the reliance of U.S. defense systems on high-performance ICs and the potential vulnerabilities of these systems if fabricated and/or...increase the security of a system has not received equal attention. This workshop discussed how to incorporate security as a first-rate metric during the

  14. Image Registration Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Automatic image registration has often been considered as a preliminary step for higher-level processing, such as object recognition or data fusion. But with the unprecedented amounts of data which are being and will continue to be generated by newly developed sensors, the very topic of automatic image registration has become and important research topic. This workshop presents a collection of very high quality work which has been grouped in four main areas: (1) theoretical aspects of image registration; (2) applications to satellite imagery; (3) applications to medical imagery; and (4) image registration for computer vision research.

  15. Melioidosis Diagnostic Workshop, 20131

    PubMed Central

    AuCoin, David; Baccam, Prasith; Baggett, Henry C.; Baird, Rob; Bhengsri, Saithip; Blaney, David D.; Brett, Paul J.; Brooks, Timothy J.G.; Brown, Katherine A.; Chantratita, Narisara; Cheng, Allen C.; Dance, David A.B.; Decuypere, Saskia; Defenbaugh, Dawn; Gee, Jay E.; Houghton, Raymond; Jorakate, Possawat; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Merlin, Toby L.; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Norton, Robert; Peacock, Sharon J.; Rolim, Dionne B.; Simpson, Andrew J.; Steinmetz, Ivo; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Stokes, Martha M.; Sue, David; Tuanyok, Apichai; Whistler, Toni; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Walke, Henry T.

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe disease that can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical manifestations and a lack of adequate diagnostic capabilities for suspected cases. There is broad interest in improving detection and diagnosis of this disease not only in melioidosis-endemic regions but also outside these regions because melioidosis may be underreported and poses a potential bioterrorism challenge for public health authorities. Therefore, a workshop of academic, government, and private sector personnel from around the world was convened to discuss the current state of melioidosis diagnostics, diagnostic needs, and future directions. PMID:25626057

  16. Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    On May 16, 1991, the NASA Headquarters Propulsion, Power, and Energy Division and the NASA Lewis Research Center Low Thrust Propulsion Branch hosted a workshop attended by key experts in magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters and associated sciences. The scope was limited to high power MPD thrusters suitable for major NASA space exploration missions, and its purpose was to initiate the process of increasing the expectations and prospects for MPD research, primarily by increasing the level of cooperation, interaction, and communication between parties within the MPD community.

  17. Martian Clouds Data Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steven (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The major topics covered were a discussion of the structure of relational data base systems and features of the Britton Lee Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS); a discussion of the workshop's objectives, approach, and research scenarios; and an overview of the Atmospheres Node User's Guide, which details the datasets stored on the Britton Lee, the structure of the query and data analysis system, and examples of the exact menu screens encountered. Also discussed were experience with the system, review of the system performance, and a strategy to produce queries and performance data retrievals of mutual interest. The goals were defined as examining correlations between cloud occurrence, water vapor abundance, and surface properties.

  18. Craniofacial morphogenesis workshop report.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Murray, J

    1994-05-01

    The following report highlights the discussions and interaction at the workshop on craniofacial morphogenesis, sponsored by The Human Frontier Science Program, held in April 1993 at the University of Iowa. A brief summary of selected sessions is included to exemplify the benefits of bringing together individuals from various disciplines and backgrounds in order to establish a unified theory of craniofacial morphogenesis. The synthesis of information and experience of a wide range of approaches made the 4-day period an invaluable experience for the participants from nine different countries.

  19. Space Weather Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop will focus on what space weather is about and its impact on society. An overall picture will be "painted" describing the Sun's influence through the solar wind on the near-Earth space environment, including the aurora, killer electrons at geosynchronous orbit, million ampere electric currents through the ionosphere and along magnetic field lines, and the generation of giga-Watts of natural radio waves. Reference material in the form of Internet sites will be provided so that teachers can discuss space weather in the classroom and enable students to learn more about this topic.

  20. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  1. Marketing Cooperative Education. A Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosser, John W.; Rea, Peter J.

    This document is a guide for a workshop on marketing college cooperative education programs. The guide takes the reader/workshop participant through the marketing process, from defining needs and resources to planning a marketing campaign, implementing it, and evaluating its success. Samples and sources also are provided. Topics covered in the…

  2. New technology integration planning workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the Workshop was to provide guidance, reflecting electric utility industry viewpoints, for developing and directing its research and development program structures to facilitate the integration of new energy technologies into electric utility systems. The Workshop was structured to directly elicit the positions and viewpoints representative of electric utility companies.

  3. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. The KIND Workshop Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirch, Willow Ann

    The National Association for Humane and Environmental Education (NAHEE) produces this workshop guide which offers a scripted workshop with handouts for elementary educators interested in sharing curriculum-based activities dedicated to helping young people develop values of kindness and respect toward people, animals, and the Earth. This guide…

  5. Pre-Industrial Training Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amarillo Coll., TX.

    Participant materials are provided from a workshop to acquaint women with nontraditional careers in the skilled trades and to help them become more knowledgeable about their options in making informed career decisions. The agendas for five day-long sessions outline the scope of the workshop that emphasizes basic math skills, hands-on experiences…

  6. School-Wide Literacy Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    A population of students attending a rural elementary school (grades one to five) in the state of Washington participated in literacy workshops for ten weeks. The literacy workshops took place during school time from 1:25 to 2:25, Monday through Thursday. There were a total of 21 groups (based on ability and age) ranging in size from 11 to 27…

  7. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    {\\bf The Astronomy Workshop} (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe a few of the available tools. {\\bf Solar Systems Visualizer}: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. {\\bf Solar System Calculators}: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed. {\\bf Stellar Evolution}: The "Life of the Sun" tool animates the history of the Sun as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve over billions of years. In "Star Race," the user selects two stars of different masses and watches their evolution in a split-screeen format that emphasizes the great differences in stellar lifetimes and fates.

  8. NASA Discovery Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review concepts for Discover-class missions that would follow the first two missions (MESUR-Pathfinder and NEAR) of this new program. The concepts had been generated by scientists involved in NASA's Solar System Exploration Program to carry out scientifically important investigations within strict guidelines -- $150 million cap on development cost and 3 year cap on development schedule. Like the Astrophysics Small Explorers (SMEX), such 'faster and cheaper' missions could provide vitality to solar system exploration research by returning high quality data more frequently and regularly and by involving many more young researchers than normally participate directly in larger missions. An announcement of opportunity (AO) to propose a Discovery mission to NASA is expected to be released in about two years time. One purpose of the workshop was to assist Code SL in deciding how to allocate its advanced programs resources. A second, complimentary purpose was to provide the concept proposers with feedback to allow them to better prepare for the AO.

  9. Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Gilbert J. (Editor); Greenberg, Paul S. (Editor); Piltch, Nancy D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) of the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at NASA Headquarters, a program entitled, Advanced Technology Development (ATD) was promulgated with the objective of providing advanced technologies that will enable the development of future microgravity science and applications experimental flight hardware. Among the ATD projects one, Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics (MCD), has the objective of developing advanced diagnostic techniques and technologies to provide nonperturbing measurements of combustion characteristics and parameters that will enhance the scientific integrity and quality of microgravity combustion experiments. As part of the approach to this project, a workshop was held on July 28 and 29, 1987, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A small group of laser combustion diagnosticians met with a group of microgravity combustion experimenters to discuss the science requirements, the state-of-the-art of laser diagnostic technology, and plan the direction for near-, intermediate-, and long-term programs. This publication describes the proceedings of that workshop.

  10. WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2002-11-06

    Based on this workshop, a plan for upgrading polarized proton acceleration in the AGS was developed. The construction of a strong partial Siberian snake was initiated. Although in principle this single device would avoid all sources of depolarization in the AGS its construction, installation and commissioning will take several years. Also mismatch of the polarization direction at injection into the AGS will cause some depolarization. Plan 1 outlined above will be pursued in the meantime. A warm helical partial Siberian snake will replace the present solenoid snake. It will avoid the coupling resonances and can also be used in the future to avoid injection mismatch with the strong partial snake. Existing quadrupoles will be moved to locations where they can be used to suppress the weak intrinsic resonances as discussed at this workshop by Andreas Lehrach. This approach should give maximum polarization from the AGS as soon as possible and also provide a long term solution that is operationally simple and offers additional polarization improvements if the rf dipole method shows residual depolarization.

  11. IEA Civic Education Study Phase I: The United States, Volume III. Responses to the Four Core International Framing Questions g-q.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Carole L.; Dilworth, Paulette Patterson; Hughes, Michael; Sen, Trisha

    This document is the third of four prepared for Phase 1 of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Civics Education Study. The more than 20 countries that participated were asked to gather data to answer four Core International Framing Questions (CIFQs). Volume 2 explains the process from which the CIFQs…

  12. An International Perspective on Active Citizenship among Lower Secondary Students. Concepts and Measures Developed for the IEA Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    The new IEA "International Civic and Citizenship Education Study" (ICCS) will investigate the extent to which young people are prepared to undertake their roles as citizens across a range of countries. ICCS will survey 13-to-14-year old students in over 30 countries in the year 2009. The ICCS outcome data will be obtained from representative…

  13. The Second IEA International Research Conference: Proceedings of the IRC-2006. Volume 1: Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagemaker, Paula, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    As part of its mission, the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) is committed to the development of the community of researchers who work in the area of assessment both nationally and internationally. The association also has a commitment to provide policymakers with the types of data and analyses that will…

  14. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the third containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  15. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the second volume of the summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume.

  16. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  17. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the first of three containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  18. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  19. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D. C. October 25-29, 1993 The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, October 25-26 (the summaries for this workshop appear in this volume, Volume 1); The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TMIS) workshop, on October 27 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2); and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, October 28-29 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3).

  20. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This is volume 2 of a three volume set of publications that contain the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  1. Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin in intact and hypophysectomized rats: effects of rhGH and testosterone alone or combined.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, A E; Locatelli, L; Cella, S G; Bonomo, S M; Giunta, M; Molinari, F; Sartorio, A; Müller, E E

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin and mechano-growth factor (MGF), an isoform of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), are two important regulators of muscle hypertrophy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and/or testosterone on muscle MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin expression in intact and hypophysectomized rats treated for 15 d with 1) saline or rhGH, 2) sesame oil or testosterone, 3) saline+sesame oil, or rhGH+testosterone (first experiment) or for 7 d with saline or rhGH (second experiment). Animals were killed by decapitation 24 h or 4 d after the last injection (first or second experiment, respectively). Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin were determined by RT-PCR. A significant increase in the weight of gastrocnemius muscle was observed only in hypophysectomized rats treated with rhGH alone or in combination with testosterone. Administration of rhGH to hypophysectomized rats caused a marked increase in both MGF and IGF-IEa muscle mRNA levels (without any change in the muscle expression of myostatin), an effect that was abolished when testosterone was combined with rhGH. Conversely, in intact rats rhGH increased myostatin muscle mRNA levels without affecting those of MGF and IGF-IEa. Testosterone, alone or combined with rhGH, induced an inhibition of myostatin expression in the muscle of intact rats, but did not change muscle paradigms of hypophysectomized rats. In conclusion, rhGH and/or testosterone anabolic effects in the muscle are mediated by a different expression of MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin, which is related to the pituitary function.

  2. Nine Months to 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enter large comprehensive high schools without having the necessary social and academic skills or understanding of what will be expected of them as they move through the high school curriculum. To help a higher number of students experience success, schools must help them develop academic, social, and self-management skills.…

  3. Government Contract Law (9th Edition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    their continuarce in office with the evident pur- businr,’o. For this reason a knowledge of the pose of securing them and their ccurts In Indepen...an integral part of its unified and specified commands, and other orgaiization, the Defense Logistics Agency. This Department of Defense agencies. The...effective even though the offeree does riot have exceptions, such as where an option has been actual knowledge of it. paid for by the offeree. 4-12

  4. 9th Annual UC Systemwide Bioengineering Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Cylindrical Wells Facilitate Single-Molecule Enzymology of Bovine a-Chymotrypsin. Angela Y. Chen , A.S. Jani, L. Zheng, P.J. Burke and James P. Brody...1. Andrew McCammon, Lei Yu , Stephen B. Howell and David A. Gough, UCSDlNitto Denko Technology Corporation • Genentech 3rd Place Award ($250) o A...Shadi Mahjoob UC Riverside Zhenshan Chen UC Riverside Mariela Anguelov Winchester Associates Inc Entcho Anguelov Winchester Associates Inc

  5. The 9th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with performance and development of various spacecraft components, mechanical devices, and subsystems. Topics discussed include: manipulator arms, the Skylab Parasol, cooling system performance, extendable booms, magnetically suspended reaction wheels, the Skylab Trash Airlock, magnetometers, actuators, life support systems, and technology transfer.

  6. "Creating Unity from Diversity: Finding Our Commonalities, Respecting Our Differences." Presenter Abstracts of the Annual National Conference of the National Multicultural Institute (9th, Washington, D.C., May 19-22, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Multicultural Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is primarily a collection of abstracts for training workshops for professionals in the field of multicultural education. The abstracts are: (1) "An Exploration of the Unspoken: A Group Relations Approach to Multicultural Dialogue" (Zachary G. Green); (2) "Exploring Our Cultural Assumptions" (Daniel Rivera); (3)…

  7. Size of the Planets, Pluto and the Sun and the Distances Between Them: Students' Understanding and Low-Cost Educational Workshop to Elaborate this Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Marcos Antônio Paz; Rodrigues, Micaías Andrade

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigated the understanding of elementary school students, in multi-seriate class with 22 students from 5th to 9th grade, about the dimensions of the bodies of the solar system and the distances between them. A pre-test (questionnaire) was applied to find what they knew about the Solar System. After that, these contents were explained and an educational workshop was held, in which students in groups built representations of the planets, Pluto and the Sun, in scale consulting tables, using accessible materials. Finally, the students answered the questionnaire again and the result was very positive, because there was a significant advance in understanding the covered content. We believe that the answers to the questionnaire would be similar in other schools, therefore, this workshop can be an interesting and effective way to address issues that, in most cases, are not adequately addressed in classrooms and textbooks.

  8. Mars 2005 Sample Return Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Convened at the request of Dr. Jurgen Rahe of the NASA Office of Space Science, the purpose of this workshop was to reexamine the science issues that will determine how an optimum sample return mission would be carried out in 2005 given the new context that has emerged for Mars exploration since the last such workshop was held (in 1987). The results and summary of discussion that took place at the meeting are contained in this volume. The community was invited to participate in the preparation of the final written report by browsing through the agenda and reading the text and viewgraphs provided by workshop participants and submitting comments for that section.

  9. Summary of Cumulus Parameterization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David OC.; Hou, Arthur; Newman, Paul; Sud, Yogesh

    2002-01-01

    A workshop on cumulus parameterization took place at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from December 3-5, 2001. The major objectives of this workshop were (1) to review the problem of representation of moist processes in large-scale models (mesoscale models, Numerical Weather Prediction models and Atmospheric General Circulation Models), (2) to review the state-of-the-art in cumulus parameterization schemes, and (3) to discuss the need for future research and applications. There were a total of 31 presentations and about 100 participants from the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, France and South Korea. The specific presentations and discussions during the workshop are summarized in this paper.

  10. Seals Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler); Liang, Anita D. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1995 industrial code (INDSEAL) release include ICYL, GCYLT, IFACE, GFACE, SPIRALG, SPIRALI, DYSEAL, and KTK. The scientific code (SCISEAL) release includes conjugate heat transfer and multidomain with rotordynamic capability. Several seals and bearings codes (e.g., HYDROFLEX, HYDROTRAN, HYDROB3D, FLOWCON1, FLOWCON2) are presented and results compared. Current computational and experimental emphasis includes multiple connected cavity flows with goals of reducing parasitic losses and gas ingestion. Labyrinth seals continue to play a significant role in sealing with face, honeycomb, and new sealing concepts under investigation for advanced engine concepts in view of strict environmental constraints. The clean sheet approach to engine design is advocated with program directions and anticipated percentage SFC reductions cited. Future activities center on engine applications with coupled seal/power/secondary flow streams.

  11. Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop was held on November 18 19, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio. It was sponsored by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) under the Vehicle Systems Program (VSP) and the Ultra- Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The objectives were to build a sound foundation for a comprehensive particulate research roadmap and to provide a forum for discussion among U.S. stakeholders and researchers. Presentations included perspectives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, and United States airports. There were five interactive technical sessions: sampling methodology, measurement methodology, particle modeling, database, inventory and test venue, and air quality. Each group presented technical issues which generated excellent discussion. The five session leads collaborated with their members to present summaries and conclusions to each content area.

  12. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  13. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  14. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  15. Turbulence Modeling Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R. (Editor); Rumsey, C. L. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor); Thomas, J. L. (Editor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advances in turbulence modeling are needed in order to calculate high Reynolds number flows near the onset of separation and beyond. To this end, the participants in this workshop made the following recommendations. (1) A national/international database and standards for turbulence modeling assessment should be established. Existing experimental data sets should be reviewed and categorized. Advantage should be taken of other efforts already under-way, such as that of the European Research Community on Flow, Turbulence, and Combustion (ERCOFTAC) consortium. Carefully selected "unit" experiments will be needed, as well as advances in instrumentation, to fill the gaps in existing datasets. A high priority should be given to document existing turbulence model capabilities in a standard form, including numerical implementation issues such as grid quality and resolution. (2) NASA should support long-term research on Algebraic Stress Models and Reynolds Stress Models. The emphasis should be placed on improving the length-scale equation, since it is the least understood and is a key component of two-equation and higher models. Second priority should be given to the development of improved near-wall models. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) would provide valuable guidance in developing and validating new Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. Although not the focus of this workshop, DNS, LES, and hybrid methods currently represent viable approaches for analysis on a limited basis. Therefore, although computer limitations require the use of RANS methods for realistic configurations at high Reynolds number in the foreseeable future, a balanced effort in turbulence modeling development, validation, and implementation should include these approaches as well.

  16. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  17. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2a (Sterilization)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Brunch, Carl W. (Editor); Setlow, Richard B. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Studies Board of the National Research Council provided a series of recommendations to NASA on planetary protection requirements for future Mars sample return missions. One of the Board's key findings suggested, although current evidence of the martian surface suggests that life as we know it would not tolerate the planet's harsh environment, there remain 'plausible scenarios for extant microbial life on Mars.' Based on this conclusion, all samples returned from Mars should be considered potentially hazardous until it has been demonstrated that they are not. In response to the National Research Council's findings and recommendations, NASA has undertaken a series of workshops to address issues regarding NASA's proposed sample return missions. Work was previously undertaken at the Mars Sample Handling and Protocol Workshop 1 (March 2000) to formulate recommendations on effective methods for life detection and/or biohazard testing on returned samples. The NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened the Mars Sample Sterilization Workshop, the third in the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series, on November 28-30, 2000 at the Holiday Inn Rosslyn Westpark, Arlington, Virginia. Because of the short timeframe between this Workshop and the second Workshop in the Series, which was convened in October 2000 in Bethesda, Maryland, they were developed in parallel, so the Sterilization Workshop and its report have therefore been designated as '2a'). The focus of Workshop 2a was to make recommendations for effective sterilization procedures for all phases of Mars sample return missions, and to answer the question of whether we can sterilize samples in such a way that the geological characteristics of the samples are not significantly altered.

  18. Third Program Plan for DOE's participation in the IEA Working Party on Energy-Conservation Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The Plan documents the projects currently being conducted by the working party in which DOE is participating and the projects proposed by DOE for consideration by other IEA member nations. Chapter 1 reviews current and planned DOE commitments to existing implementing agreements: buildings and community systems; energy conservation in building complexes; energy cascading; heat pumps with thermal storage; advanced heat pumps; combustion; heat transfer and heat exchangers; energy storage; cement manufacturer; and high-temperature materials for automotive propulsion systems. Chapter 2 reviews planned DOE commitments to new implementing agreements: combustion; pulp and paper; iron and steel; food processing; urban waste; and alcohol additives to fuel. Appendix A discusses the mechanisms for establishing implementing agreements and annexes. Appendix B lists working party members and Appendix C describes the evaluation methodology.

  19. IEA solar: Working toward greater cost-effectiveness, report of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, S.

    1986-02-01

    This is the 1985 Annual Report of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Program. The format of the report has been changed substantially from that of previous years. In addition, the report has been given a special theme: Working Toward Greater Cost-Effectiveness. Section 2 of this report, the special theme chapter, discusses the contributions of the cooperative activities to achieving more cost-effective solar heating and cooling systems. A report on the progress and accomplishments during 1985 of the current tasks is found in Section 3. Section 4, Appendix, contains a description of each of the tasks as background information for those unfamiliar with all or parts of the program. Finally, the Appendix also contains information on IEA SHC reports, meetings, Executive Committee Members and task technical participants.

  20. Measurement of radiation intensity at the solar tower plant SSPS/CRS of the IEA in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Kendall MK9 radiometer was selected to measure the radiation intensity on the IEA SSPS/CRS solar tower plant in Spain. The measuring signal was applied to calibrate a video camera used for measurement of power density distribution in the aperture of the solar absorber. The measurement results were used to show a relationship between the gray values of a video picture of the ASR receiver under radiation and the absolute radiation intensity measured at three points so as to calculate the absolute irradiation in MW. The tests show good reproducibility and high accuracy. The conversion factors were applied to calculate the flux distribution, the maximum flux and the ASR receiver efficiency.

  1. Utility solar water heating workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

  2. Brain-Computer Interface Workshop

    NASA Video Gallery

    At a g.tec-sponsored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) workshop at the National Institute of Aerospace in Hampton, Va., volunteers were able to spell out words on a computer screen using using a g.tec...

  3. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Project is an approved Discovery-class mission that will place a lander and rover on the surface of the Red Planet in July 1997. The Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop was designed to allow the Mars scientific community to provide input as to where to land Pathfinder on Mars. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from around the United States and from Europe. Over 20 landing sites were proposed at the workshop, and the scientific questions and problems concerning each were addressed. The workshop and the discussion that occured during and afterward have significantly improved the ability to select a scientifically exciting but safe landing site on Mars.

  4. Systematic Review Workshop (August 2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The goal for this workshop is to receive scientific input regarding approaches for different steps within a systematic review, such as evaluating individual studies, synthesizing evidence within a particular discipline, etc.

  5. Workshop on Mars Telescopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. F., III (Editor); Moersch, J. E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop, held August 14-15, 1995, at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was organized and planned with two primary goals in mind: The first goal was to facilitate discussions among and between amateur and professional observers and to create a workshop environment fostering collaborations and comparisons within the Mars observing community. The second goal was to explore the role of continuing telescopic observations of Mars in the upcoming era of increased spacecraft exploration. The 24 papers presented at the workshop described the current NASA plans for Mars exploration over the next decade, current and recent Mars research being performed by professional astronomers, and current and past Mars observations being performed by amateur observers and observing associations. The workshop was divided into short topical sessions concentrating on programmatic overviews, groundbased support of upcoming spacecraft experiments, atmospheric observations, surface observations, modeling and numerical studies, and contributions from amateur astronomers.

  6. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  7. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  8. Stabilization and Economic Growth Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-25

    Clifford Zinnes, senior fellow, IRIS Center (formerly Institutional Reform and the Informal Sector ), Economics Department, University of Maryland, and...Gregoire, Professor, Economic Development, U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute Paper: Capture of the Informal Sector ...of FM 3-07 in a whole-of-government context. The first workshop, on security sector reform, was held on 16 October 2008. The second workshop, on

  9. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  10. Workshop on NASA workstation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    RIACS hosted a workshop which was designed to foster communication among those people within NASA working on workstation related technology, to share technology, and to learn about new developments and futures in the larger university and industrial workstation communities. Herein, the workshop is documented along with its conclusions. It was learned that there is both a large amount of commonality of requirements and a wide variation in the modernness of in-use technology among the represented NASA centers.

  11. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains papers from the 1997 Thermal Barrier Coatings Workshop, sponsored by the TBC Interagency Coordination Committee. The Workshop was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, May 19-21, 1997. The papers cover the topics of heat transfer and conductivity of thermal barrier coatings, failure mechanisms and characterization of the coatings as well as characterization of coating deposition methods. Speakers included research, development and user groups in academia, industry and government.

  12. Workshop on the Archean Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Workshop on the Archaen mantle considers and discusses evidence for the nature of earth's Archaen mantle, including its composition, age and structure, influence on the origin and evolution of earth's crust, and relationship to mantle and crustal evolution of the other terrestrial planets. The summaries of presentations and discussions are based on recordings made during the workshop and on notes taken by those who agreed to serve as summarizers.

  13. IFPA Meeting 2008 Workshops Report

    PubMed Central

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.; Crocker, I.; Dantzer, V.; Desoye, G.; Drewlo, S.; Fazleabas, A.; Jansson, T.; Keating, S.; Kliman, H.J.; Lang, I.; Mayhew, T.; Meiri, H.; Miller, R.K.; Nelson, D.M.; Pfarrer, C.; Roberts, C.; Samar, M.; Sharma, S.; Shiverick, K.; Strunk, D.; Turner, M.A.; Huppertz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast subpopulations; placental pathology; placental toxicology; stereology; placental transport of fatty acids; placental mesenchymal stem cells; comparative placentation; trophoblast and neoplasia; trophoblast differentiation. This report is a summary of the various topics covered. PMID:19084270

  14. Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Bryan

    2002-12-05

    OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

  15. Approach to outcome measurement in the prevention of thrombosis in surgical and medical patients: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Eikelboom, John W; Gould, Michael K; Garcia, David A; Crowther, Mark; Murad, M Hassan; Kahn, Susan R; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Francis, Charles W; Lansberg, Maarten G; Akl, Elie A; Hirsh, Jack

    2012-02-01

    This article provides the rationale for the approach to making recommendations primarily used in four articles of the Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines: orthopedic surgery, nonorthopedic surgery, nonsurgical patients, and stroke. Some of the early clinical trials of antithrombotic prophylaxis with a placebo or no treatment group used symptomatic VTE and fatal PE to measure efficacy of the treatment. These trials suggest a benefit of thromboprophylaxis in reducing fatal PE. In contrast, most of the recent clinical trials comparing the efficacy of alternative anticoagulants used a surrogate outcome, asymptomatic DVT detected at mandatory venography. This outcome is fundamentally unsatisfactory because it does not allow a trade-off with serious bleeding; that trade-off requires knowledge of the number of symptomatic events that thromboprophylaxis prevents. In this article, we review the merits and limitations of four approaches to estimating reduction in symptomatic thrombosis: (1) direct measurement of symptomatic thrombosis, (2) use of asymptomatic events for relative risks and symptomatic events from randomized controlled trials for baseline risk, (3) use of baseline risk estimates from studies that did not perform surveillance and relative effect from asymptomatic events in randomized controlled trials, and (4) use of available data to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic events that will become symptomatic. All approaches have their limitations. The optimal choice of approach depends on the nature of the evidence available.

  16. Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the

  17. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  18. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986 to 1990. The reliability photovoltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warrantees available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  19. Chromosome 5 workshop.

    PubMed

    Crowe, R R; Vieland, V

    1998-01-01

    In schizophrenia, evidence consistent with linkage in the 5q23.3-q31.1 region emerged from three independent samples. In addition, a moderately retarded woman with schizophrenia with an interstitial deletion overlapping this region was reported at the workshop. A second region of interest for schizophrenia is the 5p14.1-p13.1 region, where lod scores as high as 4.37 were found in one pedigree. Chromosome 5p15 gave a non-parametric linkage (NPL) score of 2.18 (p < 0.02) in one study. Several genome scans have not found evidence of excess allele sharing in these regions, although in most cases the genome scans did not include the markers that had resulted in provisional evidence of linkage. A large pedigree of bipolar illness has shown provisional evidence of linkage at, or near, the dopamine transporter locus at 5p15.3; the maximum lod score obtained was 2.72 at D5S417. In other regions, a genome scan of bipolar disorder gave NPL scores of 2.98 at D5S812 and 3.76 at D5S423. The third disorder of interest is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) because two studies have reported an association with the 480 bp allele at the dopamine transporter locus. A poster presented at the Congress reported a failure to replicate the association in a sample with considerable power to detect the effect size previously reported.

  20. 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The following compilation of documents includes a list of the 66 attendees, a copy of the viewgraphs presented, and a summary of the discussions held after each session at the 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, adjacent to the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio on December 12-13, 1996. The workshop was organized by H. Joseph Gladden and Steven A. Hippensteele of NASA Lewis Research Center. Participants in this workshop included Coolant Flow Management team members from NASA Lewis, their support service contractors, the turbine engine companies, and the universities. The participants were involved with research projects, contracts and grants relating to: (1) details of turbine internal passages, (2) computational film cooling capabilities, and (3) the effects of heat transfer on both sides. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble the team members, along with others who work in gas turbine cooling research, to discuss needed research and recommend approaches that can be incorporated into the Center's Coolant Flow Management program. The workshop was divided into three sessions: (1) Internal Coolant Passage Presentations, (2) Film Cooling Presentations, and (3) Coolant Flow Integration and Optimization. Following each session there was a group discussion period.

  1. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  2. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Race Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for missions to Mars that will involve the return of samples to Earth, it will be necessary to prepare for the receiving, handling, testing, distributing, and archiving of martian materials here on Earth. Previous groups and committees have studied selected aspects of sample return activities, but specific detailed protocols for the handling and testing of returned samples must still be developed. To further refine the requirements for sample hazard testing and to develop the criteria for subsequent release of sample materials from quarantine, the NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened a series of workshops in 2000-2001. The overall objective of the Workshop Series was to produce a Draft Protocol by which returned martian sample materials can be assessed for biological hazards and examined for evidence of life (extant or extinct) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination. This report also provides a record of the proceedings of Workshop 4, the final Workshop of the Series, which was held in Arlington, Virginia, June 5-7, 2001. During Workshop 4, the sub-groups were provided with a draft of the protocol compiled in May 2001 from the work done at prior Workshops in the Series. Then eight sub-groups were formed to discuss the following assigned topics: Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Physical/Chemical Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Life Detection Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Biohazard Testing Environmental and Health/Monitoring and Safety Issues Requirements of the Draft Protocol for Facilities and Equipment Contingency Planning for Different Outcomes of the Draft Protocol Personnel Management Considerations in Implementation of the Draft Protocol Draft Protocol Implementation Process and Update Concepts This report provides the first complete presentation of the Draft Protocol for Mars Sample Handling to meet planetary protection needs. This Draft Protocol

  3. Conclusions of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    During this Workshop, it was concluded that a Proton-Proton Collider with an energy of 100 TeV per beam and a luminosity of about 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible. The most important technical requirement for the realization of such a project is a large bending field. For instance, a field of 13 Tesla would be desirable. This is twice the field of the SSC superconducting magnets, which very likely may be achieved in a non-too-far future by extrapolation of the present technology. The design of this Collider would follow very closely the methods used for the design of the SSC and of the LHC, with the major noticeable difference that, because of the larger bending field and the larger beam energy, the performance is determined by the effects of the Synchrotron Radiation in the similar manner they affect the performance of an electron-positron collider. This fact has considerable beneficial consequences since it allows the attainment of large luminosity by reducing the beam dimensions at collision and by requiring, to some degree, less number of particles per beam. On the other end, the losses to synchrotron radiation are to be absorbed by the cryogenic system, and the vacuum system should be capable to cope with them. A more significant rf system may also be required. The cost is overwhelmingly important for a project of this size. It is possible to make an estimate of the cost of the collider alone, excluding the injector complex, by extrapolating from the experience acquired with the RHIC and SSC magnets. Thus, the cost estimate is more difficult, but it is not expected to exceed 10 billion dollars. This is only the technical cost of the components, to which other burden costs, of engineering, architectural and administrative nature, are to be added.

  4. Summaries of the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop January 12-16, 1998. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 12-16, 1998. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops, and each workshop has a volume as follows: (1) Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Workshop; (2) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop; and (3) Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Workshop. This Volume 1 publication contains 58 papers taken from the AVIRIS workshop.

  5. Targeted Workshops Improve Marketing Knowledge and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaskerud, George

    1995-01-01

    Most of the 201 agricultural producers who attended 2-day targeted workshops learned marketing concepts and changed their attitudes about marketing. Refresher workshops were recommended to help them use the marketing techniques learned. (SK)

  6. Li'l Red Schoolhouse workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists at Stennis conduct staff development workshops for elementary and secondary teachers of math, science and technology and other subjects as well as specialized workshops conducted in the NASA Li'l Red Schoolhouse.

  7. Exploration Enterprise Workshop - Q&A

    NASA Video Gallery

    Q&A session from May 25, 2010, at the end of Day 1 of NASA's Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to present NASA's initial plans for the potentia...

  8. Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

    PubMed

    Rayevskaya, G; Pilipenko, V G; Tkáciková, L; Spivak, N Y; Mikula, I; Chumak, R M

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.

  9. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey; Neary, Vincent Sinclair; Lawon, Michael J.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Weber, Jochem

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 13–14, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to numerically and experimentally model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. large ocean storms) and to suggest how national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry. More than 30 U.S. and European WEC experts from industry, academia, and national research institutes attended the workshop, which consisted of presentations from W EC developers, invited keynote presentations from subject matter experts, breakout sessions, and a final plenary session .

  10. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Over the years, NASA has experienced a number of troublesome mechanism anomalies. Because of this, the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance initiated a workshop to evaluate the current space mechanism state-of-the-art and to determine the obstacles that will have to be met in order to achieve NASA's future missions goals. Seventy experts in the field attended the workshop. The experts identified current and perceived future space mechanisms obstacles. For each obstacle, the participants identified technology deficiencies, the current state-of-the-art, and applicable NASA, DOD, and industry missions. In addition, the participants at the workshop looked at technology needs for current missions, technology needs for future missions, what new technology is needed to improve the reliability of mechanisms, what can be done to improve technology development and the dissemination of information, and what do we do next.

  11. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986--1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  12. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given.

  13. NASA Workshop on Biological Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily (Editor); Tischler, Marc (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A workshop was convened to review the current program in Space Biology Biological Adaptation Research and its objectives and to identify future research directions. Two research areas emerged from these deliberations: gravitational effects on structures and biomineralization and gravity affected regulatory mechanisms. The participants also recommended that research concentrate on rapidly growing animals, since gravity effects may be more pronounced during growth and development. Both research areas were defined and future research directions were identified. The recommendations of the workshop will assist the Life Sciences Division of NASA in it assessment and long-range planning of these areas of space biology. Equally important, the workshop was intended to stimulate thought and research among those attending so that they would, in turn, interest, excite, and involve other members of the academic community in research efforts relevant to these programs.

  14. GLOBE Hydrology Workshop SEIP program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Matt Krigbaum (left), a teacher at Mitchell Elementary in Ann Arbor, Mich., pours water from the Pearl River into a turbidity tube to measure the river's light penetration. Krigbaum, along with Lois Williams, principal at Elizabeth Courville Elementary in Detroit, Mich.; and Carolyn Martin and Arlene Wittmer, teachers at Elizabeth Courville Elementary; conducted the experiment during a GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) hydrology workshop. GLOBE is a worldwide, hands-on science education program in which teachers can become certified to implement the program at their schools after taking hydrology, land cover/biology, atmosphere/climate and soil protocol workshops. Twelve teachers from across the country attended the recent weeklong GLOBE training at SSC, offered through its Educator Resource Center and the NASA Explorer Schools program. All workshops are free and offer continuing education units.

  15. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, Bill

    1999-03-15

    On March 15, 1999, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hosted a workshop focused on energy efficiency in Cleanroom facilities. The workshop was held as part of a multiyear effort sponsored by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the California Energy Commission. It is part of a project that concentrates on improving energy efficiency in Laboratory type facilities including cleanrooms. The project targets the broad market of laboratory and cleanroom facilities, and thus cross-cuts many different industries and institutions. This workshop was intended to raise awareness by sharing case study success stories, providing a forum for industry networking on energy issues, contributing LBNL expertise in research to date, determining barriers to implementation and possible solutions, and soliciting input for further research.

  16. 2nd International Heliophysical Year - SCIDA Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    planetarium which was installed in the venue throughout the week especially for the workshop. The planetarium , from Rice University, was brought by...the GIFT workshop organizers for a GIFT workshop demonstration. At the end of the workshop the planetarium was donated to the University of Zambia...which makes Zambia the second country, next to Ethiopia, in Africa that has a portable scientific planetarium dome. Several of the scientists and

  17. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Race, Margaret S. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is the report resulting from the first workshop of the series on development of the criteria for a Mars sample handling protocol. Workshop 1 was held in Bethesda, Maryland on March 20-22, 2000. This report serves to document the proceedings of Workshop 1; it summarizes relevant background information, provides an overview of the deliberations to date, and helps frame issues that will need further attention or resolution in upcoming workshops. Specific recommendations are not part of this report.

  18. Did dead animals really spew from the IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 monitoring and storage project?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostron, B. J.; IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project, T.; Theme Leaders: IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring; Storage Project

    2011-12-01

    The IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 monitoring and storage project was initiated in 2000 to study the geological storage of CO2 as part of a CO2-EOR project in the Weyburn Field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial injection of CO2 began in October 2000, and continues to date, with more than 18 Mtonnes of anthropogenic CO2 stored in the Weyburn reservoir. In January 2011, a local landowner supported by a consultant's soil gas survey, claimed they had conclusive proof that the "source of the high concentrations of CO2 in soils ... is clearly the anthropogenic CO2 injected into the Weyburn reservoir". These claims quickly attracted local, provincial, national, and international media attention alerting the world to the "leakage" at the Weyburn CO2-EOR project and furthermore calling into question the safety of geological CO2 sequestration in general. A careful look at the data reveals a different story. Twenty six soil gas samples were collected in August 2010, from shallow (< 1m) drill holes and analyzed for CO2 concentrations and short-chain hydrocarbons. Six samples were analyzed for concentrations of stable isotopes of carbon, and four water samples from shallow dugouts were sampled for BTEX and hydrocarbons. Measured CO2 concentrations ranged from approximately 1 to 11%, methane concentrations ranged from approximately 1.2 to 24 ppm, and 13C/12C isotope concentrations ranged from -21.5 to -22.9 per mil. Hydrocarbons and BTEX in the water samples were below detection limits. Volumes of data collected by more than 80 international researchers in the IEA-GHG Weyburn-Midale research project, do not support the claim(s) of anthropogenic CO2 leakage from the Weyburn reservoir. A comprehensive geological, geophysical, hydrogeological, and geochemical site characterization combined with background and on-site soil gas monitoring, integrated with numerical simulations of CO2 movement has not detected any evidence of migration of CO2 above the regional subsurface seal. Shallow

  19. Selling to Industry for Sheltered Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Intended for staffs of sheltered workshops for handicapped individuals, the guide presents a plan for selling the workshop idea to industry, hints on meeting obstacles, and ideas for expanding and upgrading workshop contract promotion. Brief sections cover the following topics (example subtopics are in parentheses): finding work contract prospects…

  20. Summative Evaluation of Workshops. Summer, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perritt, Lea J., Ed.; Mertens, Donna M., Ed.

    A series of nine workshops delivered via satellite under the Appalachian Education Satellite Project (AESP) during the summer of 1977 was evaluated in terms of participant characteristics and workshop effectiveness. Workshop topics included special education, child abuse, diagnostic and prescriptive reading instruction, cardiovascular physical…

  1. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  2. Plans for Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Ballmann, Josef; Bhatia, Kumar; Blades, Eric; Boucke, Alexander; Chwalowski, Pawel; Dietz, Guido; Dowell, Earl; Florance, Jennifer P.; Hansen, Thorsten; Mani, Mori; Marvriplis, Dimitri; Perry, Boyd, III; Ritter, Markus; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn; Taylor, Paul; Whiting, Brent; Wieseman, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. For each case chosen, the wind tunnel testing was conducted using forced oscillation of the model at specified frequencies

  3. OAST Space Theme Workshop 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Papers that provide a technical foundation including research and technology base candidates for each of six space themes - space power, space industrialization, search for extraterrestrial intelligence, exploration of the solar system, global service, and advanced transportation systems - are presented. The material is mainly intended for further use by workshop participants and NASA elements concerned with space research and technology. While the data presented do not represent official plans or positions, they are part of the process of evolving such plans and positions. The information contained reflects the efforts of workshop participants and should be an aid in the successful implementation and execution of the Agency's near- and far-term advanced technology program.

  4. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  5. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  6. Nonepileptic seizures treatment workshop summary☆

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, W. Curt; Alper, Kenneth; Babcock, Debra; Barry, John J.; Benbadis, Selim; Caplan, Rochelle; Gates, John; Jacobs, Margaret; Kanner, Andres; Martin, Roy; Rundhaugen, Lynn; Stewart, Randy; Vert, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In May 2005, an international, interdisciplinary group of researchers gathered in Bethesda, MD, USA, for a workshop to discuss the development of treatments for patients with nonepileptic seizures (NES). Specific subgroup topics that were covered included: pediatric NES; presenting the diagnosis of NES, outcome measures for NES trials; classification of NES subtypes; and pharmacological treatment approaches and psychotherapies. The intent was to develop specific research strategies that can be expanded to involve a large segment of the epilepsy and psychiatric treatment communities. Various projects have resulted from the workshop, including the initial development of a prospective randomized clinical trial for NES. PMID:16540377

  7. Pu Workshop Letter

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Schwartz, A J; Fluss, M

    2006-03-06

    In preparation for the upcoming Pu Workshop in Livermore, CA, USA, during July 14 and 15, 2006, we have begun to give some thought as to how the meeting will be structured and what will be discussed. Below, you will find our first proposal as to the agenda and contents of the meeting. From you, we need your feedback and suggestions concerning the desirability of each aspect of our proposal. Hopefully, we will be able to converge to a format that is acceptable to all parties. First, it now appears that we will be limited to three main sessions, Friday morning (July 14), Friday afternoon (July 14) and Saturday morning (July 15). The Pu Futures Meeting will conclude on Thursday, July 13. Following a social excursion, the Russian participants will be transported from Monterey Bay to their hotel in Livermore. We anticipate that the hotel will be the Residence Inn at 1000 Airway Blvd in Livermore. However, the hotel arrangements still need to be confirmed. We expect that many of our participants will begin their travels homeward in the afternoon of Saturday, July 15 and the morning of Sunday, July 16. Associated with the three main sessions, we propose that there be three main topics. Each session will have an individual focus. Because of the limited time available, we will need to make some judicious choices concerning the focus and the speakers for each session. We will also have a poster session associated with each session, to facilitate discussions, and a rotating set of Lab Tours, to maximize participation in the tour and minimize the disruption of the speaking schedule. Presently, we are planning a tour of the Dynamical Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) facilities, but this is still in a preliminary stage. We estimate that for each session and topic, there will be time for five (5) speakers. We propose that, typically, there be three (3) Russian and two (2) American speakers per session. We also propose that each session have a chair (or two chairs), who

  8. Proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This document is the proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop, convened May 1-3, 2002 at NASA's Ames Research Center. Sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Science (OSS), this programmatic workshop is held periodically by NASA to discuss the current state of knowledge in the interdisciplinary field of laboratory astrophysics and to identify the science priorities (needs) in support of NASA's space missions. An important goal of the Workshop is to provide input to OSS in the form of a white paper for incorporation in its strategic planning. This report comprises a record of the complete proceedings of the Workshop and the Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper drafted at the Workshop.

  9. Energy Simulation studies in IEA/SHC Task 18 advanced glazing and associated materials for solar and building applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.; Lyons, P.

    1995-04-01

    Researchers participating in IEA/SHC Task 18 on advanced glazing materials have as their primary objective the development of new innovative glazing products such as high performance glazings, wavelength selective glazings, chromogenic optical switching devices, and light transport mechanisms that will lead to significant energy use reductions and increased comfort in commercial and residential buildings. Part of the Task 18 effort involves evaluation of the energy and comfort performance of these new glazings through the use of various performance analysis simulation tools. Eleven countries (Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) are contributing to this multi-year simulation study to better understand the complex heat transfer interactions that determine window performance. Each country has selected particular simulation programs and identified the following items to guide the simulation tasks: (1) geographic locations; (2) building types; (3) window systems and control strategies; and (4) analysis parameters of interest. This paper summarizes the results obtained thus far by several of the research organizations.

  10. Automatic Extraction of Optimal Endmembers from Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery Using Iterative Error Analysis (IEA) and Spectral Discrimination Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ahram; Chang, Anjin; Choi, Jaewan; Choi, Seokkeun; Kim, Yongil

    2015-01-01

    Pure surface materials denoted by endmembers play an important role in hyperspectral processing in various fields. Many endmember extraction algorithms (EEAs) have been proposed to find appropriate endmember sets. Most studies involving the automatic extraction of appropriate endmembers without a priori information have focused on N-FINDR. Although there are many different versions of N-FINDR algorithms, computational complexity issues still remain and these algorithms cannot consider the case where spectrally mixed materials are extracted as final endmembers. A sequential endmember extraction-based algorithm may be more effective when the number of endmembers to be extracted is unknown. In this study, we propose a simple but accurate method to automatically determine the optimal endmembers using such a method. The proposed method consists of three steps for determining the proper number of endmembers and for removing endmembers that are repeated or contain mixed signatures using the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) images obtained from Iterative Error Analysis (IEA) and spectral discrimination measurements. A synthetic hyperpsectral image and two different airborne images such as Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Application (AISA) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data were tested using the proposed method, and our experimental results indicate that the final endmember set contained all of the distinct signatures without redundant endmembers and errors from mixed materials. PMID:25625907

  11. IEA-Task 31 WAKEBENCH: Towards a protocol for wind farm flow model evaluation. Part 2: Wind farm wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Gancarski, Pawel; Chuchfield, Matthew; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Hansen, Kurt S.; Machefaux, Ewan; Maguire, Eoghan; Castellani, Francesco; Terzi, Ludovico; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Ueda, Yuko

    2014-06-01

    Researchers within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 31: Wakebench have created a framework for the evaluation of wind farm flow models operating at the microscale level. The framework consists of a model evaluation protocol integrated with a web-based portal for model benchmarking (www.windbench.net). This paper provides an overview of the building-block validation approach applied to wind farm wake models, including best practices for the benchmarking and data processing procedures for validation datasets from wind farm SCADA and meteorological databases. A hierarchy of test cases has been proposed for wake model evaluation, from similarity theory of the axisymmetric wake and idealized infinite wind farm, to single-wake wind tunnel (UMN-EPFL) and field experiments (Sexbierum), to wind farm arrays in offshore (Horns Rev, Lillgrund) and complex terrain conditions (San Gregorio). A summary of results from the axisymmetric wake, Sexbierum, Horns Rev and Lillgrund benchmarks are used to discuss the state-of-the-art of wake model validation and highlight the most relevant issues for future development.

  12. Automatic extraction of optimal endmembers from airborne hyperspectral imagery using iterative error analysis (IEA) and spectral discrimination measurements.

    PubMed

    Song, Ahram; Chang, Anjin; Choi, Jaewan; Choi, Seokkeun; Kim, Yongil

    2015-01-23

    Pure surface materials denoted by endmembers play an important role in hyperspectral processing in various fields. Many endmember extraction algorithms (EEAs) have been proposed to find appropriate endmember sets. Most studies involving the automatic extraction of appropriate endmembers without a priori information have focused on N-FINDR. Although there are many different versions of N-FINDR algorithms, computational complexity issues still remain and these algorithms cannot consider the case where spectrally mixed materials are extracted as final endmembers. A sequential endmember extraction-based algorithm may be more effective when the number of endmembers to be extracted is unknown. In this study, we propose a simple but accurate method to automatically determine the optimal endmembers using such a method. The proposed method consists of three steps for determining the proper number of endmembers and for removing endmembers that are repeated or contain mixed signatures using the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) images obtained from Iterative Error Analysis (IEA) and spectral discrimination measurements. A synthetic hyperpsectral image and two different airborne images such as Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Application (AISA) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data were tested using the proposed method, and our experimental results indicate that the final endmember set contained all of the distinct signatures without redundant endmembers and errors from mixed materials.

  13. IEA/WHO toolkit for WMSDs prevention: criteria and practical tools for a step by step approach.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    When studying WMSDs, several determinants and their interrelationship are considered as relevant. Hence the necessity of an "holistic" approach to prevention, especially when preparing technical rules and strategic plans. There is a strong request, from OSH agencies and operators, for developing "simple" tools for risk assessment and management. In this context WHO asked IEA to develop a "Toolkit for WMSD prevention". The paper presents one of the main contribution to this WHO project, focused on selecting tools at different level for hazard identification, risk estimation and management. Proposals are based on two essential criteria: Acting on a step-by-step approach; Taking into account the presence of multiple influencing factors. The proposals consider: A Basic Step devoted to hazard identification by operative "key-enter" questions, that can be operated also by non-experts. A First Step, (quick assessment), for identifying 3 possible conditions: acceptable; high risk present; more detailed analysis (via tools presented at second step) necessary. This step can be operated by non-experts with only some specific training. A Second Step, where recognized (i.e. from international standards or guidelines) tools for risk estimation are used. This step can be operated only by persons with some specific training.

  14. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  15. Mars exploration study workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B.; Budden, Nancy Ann

    1993-01-01

    A year-long NASA-wide study effort has led to the development of an innovative strategy for the human exploration of Mars. The latest Mars Exploration Study Workshop 2 advanced a design reference mission (DRM) that significantly reduces the perceived high costs, complex infrastructure, and long schedules associated with previous Mars scenarios. This surface-oriented philosophy emphasizes the development of high-leveraging surface technologies in lieu of concentrating exclusively on space transportation technologies and development strategies. As a result of the DRM's balanced approach to mission and crew risk, element commonality, and technology development, human missions to Mars can be accomplished without the need for complex assembly operations in low-Earth orbit. This report, which summarizes the Mars Exploration Study Workshop held at the Ames Research Center on May 24-25, 1993, provides an overview of the status of the Mars Exploration Study, material presented at the workshop, and discussions of open items being addressed by the study team. The workshop assembled three teams of experts to discuss cost, dual-use technology, and international involvement, and to generate a working group white paper addressing these issues. The three position papers which were generated are included in section three of this publication.

  16. Object Oriented Risk Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, M. Güell I.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of the RISET Project (Interfaculty Network of Support to Education and Technology) an educational tool for introducing risk analysis has been developed. This workshop enables to carry a group of students (role-play game) through a step-by-step process of risk identification and quantification. The aim is to assess risk in a characteristic alpine village regarding natural hazards (rockfall, snow avalanche, flooding…) and is oriented to affected objects such as buildings, infrastructures... The workshop contains the following steps: 1.- Planning of the study and definition of stakeholders 2.- Hazard identification 3.- Risk analysis 4.- Risk assessment 5.- Proposition of mitigation measures 6- Risk management and cost-benefit analysis. During the process, information related to past events and useful concepts are provided in order to bring up discussion and decision making. The Risk Matrix and other graphical tools allow having a visual representation of the risk level and help to prioritize counter measures. At the end of the workshop, there is the possibility to compare the results between different groups and print out a summarizing report. This approach provides a rapid and comprehensible risk evaluation. The workshop is accessible from the internet and will be used for educational purposes at bachelor and master level as well as for external persons dealing with risk analysis.

  17. The 1975 GSFC Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1975 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop are presented. The major topics of discussion were nickel cadmium batteries and, to a lesser extent, nickel hydrogen batteries. Battery design, manufacturing techniques, testing programs, and electrochemical characteristics were considered. The utilization of these batteries for spacecraft power supplies was given particular attention.

  18. An Outdoor Workshop: Raku Firing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siver, David

    1978-01-01

    The process of building and firing a raku kiln is a memorable happening. The cost is low and students learn to appreciate the work involved in firing a kiln while the pots are a pleasant reminder of an outdoor workshop. (Author/RK)

  19. Workshop Training Kits. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Ted; And Others

    Presented in the second of a two volume series are six workshop training kits for development of teacher skills to be used with learning disabled (LD) children. The first section of each kit contains a leader's guide which gives activity, objectives, teacher prerequisites, time required, materials needed, step-by-step procedures, a discussion…

  20. Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L. (Editor); Bell, J. F., III (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop E convened in Tucson, Arizona, in October 1997 by popular demand slightly over two years following the first successful Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop, held in Ithaca, New York, in August 1995. Experts on Mars from the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, and the United States were present. Twenty-eight oral presentations were made and generous time allotted for useful discussions among participants. The goals of the workshop were to (1) summarize active groundbased observing programs and evaluate them in the context of current and future space missions to Mars, (2) discuss new technologies and instrumentation in the context of changing emphasis of observations and theory useful for groundbased observing, and (3) more fully understand capabilities of current and planned Mars missions to better judge which groundbased observations are and will continue to be of importance to our overall Mars program. In addition, the exciting new discoveries presented from the Pathfinder experiments and the progress report from the Mars Global Surveyor infused the participants with satisfaction for the successes achieved in the early stages of these missions. Just as exciting was the enthusiasm for new groundbased programs designed to address new challenges resulting from mission science results. We would like to thank the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as well as Dr. David Black, director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, and the staff of the Institute's Publications and Program Services Department for providing logistical, administrative, and publication support services for this workshop.

  1. PERT and CPM: Workshop Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burroughs Corp., Detroit, MI.

    This is a workbook containing problems in PERT (program evaluation review technique). It is intended to be used in a workshop or classroom to train management personnel in the basic methodology and capability of PERT. This material is not adequate in depth to create an expert in these techniques, but it is felt that the material is adequate to…

  2. Social Technologies in Shipbuilding Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    oriented ( behavior modification ) approaches. Process discussions covered topics ranging from preconditions to undertaking a change project, to start...quality circles, quality of work life, 2) work redesign or sociotechnical systems (autonomous work groups, multi-skilled workers), and 3) behavior ... modification (human performance engineering, performance management). The overall objective of the workshop was to examine both the process and content

  3. The Playwrights-Directors Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amor, Edward

    The playwrights-directors workshop at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) allows students of directing and playwriting to meet jointly to explore and solve problems in the creation and production of original one-act scripts. At the heart of the program is the belief that both playwriting and directing students profit from producing their efforts…

  4. Activated Sludge Process Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to upgrade the knowledge of experienced wastewater treatment plant operators. Each of the lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: types and factors…

  5. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  6. Second Workshop on Spacecraft Glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr. (Editor); Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of space glow were considered. Results of a workshop held on May 6 to 7, 1985, at the Space Science Laboratory of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama are presented. The topics of discussion are divided as follows: (1) in situ observations; (2) theoretical calculations; (3) laboratory measurements; and (4) future experiments.

  7. The 1987 Ground Vortex Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margason, Richard J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the current understanding of the ground vortex phenomena and their effects on aircraft, and to establish directions for further research on advanced, high-performance aircraft designs, particularly those concepts utilizing powered-lift systems; e.g., V/STOL. ASTOVL, and STOL aircraft.

  8. Organizing a Study Skills Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Myrna; Hussey, Ruth

    This study skills workshop guide, for the college level, is designed to help students assess their study skills and personal behavior goals for becoming academically effective and confident. Seven consecutive, 2-hour, weekly sessions emphasize learning as an active process and concentrate on specific skills: objectives and goals; time management;…

  9. PROCEEDINGS: MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENT REACTIVITY WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of technical papers and visual aids presented by representatives of industry, academia, and government agencies at a workshop on multipollutant sorbent reactivity that was held at EPA's Environmental Research Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, on Ju...

  10. Work Measurement in Rehabilitation Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Ronald R.; Lamb, Auburn J.

    Partially funded by a research grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, this technical monograph is the first of a series to be published on production-management aspects of vocational rehabilitation workshops. In order to meet information needs in this area, selected techniques used by industrial profit-making enterprises…

  11. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.; Freeman, Ginger L.; Jacobs, James; Parkin, Don M.

    1997-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 96, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on October 27-30, 1996. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  12. Simultaneous analysis of T helper subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Tfh, Tr1 and Tregs) markers expression in periapical lesions reveals multiple cytokine clusters accountable for lesions activity and inactivity status

    PubMed Central

    ARAUJO-PIRES, Ana Claudia; FRANCISCONI, Carolina Favaro; BIGUETTI, Claudia Cristina; CAVALLA, Franco; ARANHA, Andreza Maria Fabio; LETRA, Ariadne; TROMBONE, Ana Paula Favaro; FAVERI, Marcelo; SILVA, Renato Menezes; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators determines the stable or progressive nature of periapical granulomas by modulating the balance of the osteoclastogenic factor RANKL and its antagonist OPG. However, the cytokine networks operating in the development of periapical lesions are quite more complex than what the simple pro- versus anti-inflammatory mediators' paradigm suggests. Here we simultaneously investigated the patterns of Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Thf, Tr1 and Tregs cytokines/markers expression in human periapical granulomas. Methods The expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL23, IL21, IL-33, IL-10, IL-4, IL-9, IL-22, FOXp3 markers (via RealTimePCR array) was accessed in active/progressive (N=40) versus inactive/stable (N=70) periapical granulomas (as determined by RANKL/OPG expression ratio), and also to compare these samples with a panel of control specimens (N=26). A cluster analysis of 13 cytokine levels was performed to examine possible clustering between the cytokines in a total of 110 granulomas. Results The expression of all target cytokines was higher in the granulomas than in control samples. TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21 mRNA levels were significantly higher in active granulomas, while in inactive lesions the expression levels of IL-4, IL-9, IL-10, IL-22 and FOXp3 were higher than in active granulomas. Five clusters were identified in inactive lesion groups, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-17, IL-10, FOXp3, IFN-γ, IL-9, IL-33 and IL-4 statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Three clusters were identified in active lesions, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-22, IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-33, FOXp3, IL-21 and RANKL statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Conclusion There is a clear dichotomy in the profile of cytokine expression in inactive and active periapical lesions. While the widespread cytokine expression seems to be a feature of chronic lesions

  13. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and

  14. Proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I to VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    This DVD collection includes the complete proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I through VI. Titles include Minnowbrook I - 1993 Workshop on End-Stage Boundary Layer Transition (NASA/CP-2007-214667, CASI ID 20070038942), Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines (NASA/CP-1998-206958, CASI ID 19980206205), Minnowbrook III - 2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flow (NASA/CP-2001-210888, CASI ID 20020067662), Minnowbrook IV - 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows (NASA TM-2004-212913, CASI ID 20040121174), Minnowbrook V - 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery (NASA/CP-2006-214484, CASI ID 20070024781), and Minnowbrook VI - 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (NACA/CP-2010-216112, CASI ID 20100018557).

  15. Lunar Regolith Biomining: Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Roberto, Frank F.

    2008-01-01

    On May 5th and 6th, 2007, NASA Ames Research Center hosted a workshop entitled 'Lunar Regolith Biomining'. The workshop addressed the feasibility of biologically-based mining of the lunar regolith along with identification of views and concepts for moving this topic forward to NASA. Workshop presentations provided background in topics of interest that served as the foundation for discussion in the subsequent breakout sessions. The first topical area included the history, status, and issues with biomining on Earth to familiarize all attendees with current activities. These presentations related the primary considerations in existing biomining, e.g., microbes of choice, pH of reactions, time and temperature, specific mining applications and locations, and benefits and/or limitations of biomining. The second area reviewed existing research efforts addressing biomining of planetary surfaces (Mars, Moon), including microbial considerations, and chemical necessities in biomining and biofuel production. The last element pertained to other non-biological considerations and influences in biomining efforts on the lunar surface such as radiation fluxes and effects, and the application of small satellite experiments to learn more about the lunar and Martian surfaces. Following the presentations, the workshop attendees divided into three breakout sessions to discuss areas of interest in greater detail and to define next steps in determining the feasibility of lunar regolith biomining. Topics for each of the three breakout sessions included: 1) bio-communities of choice, target product(s), and suggested ground studies; 2) physical/environmental issues and ground studies; and 3) the development of reference experiments for the Astrobiology Small payloads Workshop. The results of the breakout sessions are summarized and a list of participants is included.

  16. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, dreissenid mussels have yet to be detected in the northwestern part of the United States and western Canada. Infestation of one of the jurisdictions within the mussel-free Pacific Northwest would likely have significant economic, soci­etal and environmental implications for the entire region. Understanding the biology and environmental tolerances of dreissenid mussels, and effectiveness of various man­agement strategies, is key to prevention.On November 4-5, 2015, the Aquatic Bioinvasion Research and Policy Institute and the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs at Portland State University, the US Geological Survey, and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, convened a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of the workshop was to review dreissenid research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters, reassess those priorities, incorporate new information and emerging trends, and develop priorities to strategically focus research efforts on zebra and quagga mussels in the Pacific Northwest and ensure that future research is focused on the highest priorities. It is important to note that there is some repetition among dreissenid research priority categories (e.g., prevention, detection, control, monitoring, and biology).Workshop participants with research experience in dreissenid mussel biology and management were identified by a literature review. State and federal agency managers were also invited to the workshop to ensure relevancy and practicality of the work­shop outcomes. A total of 28 experts (see sidebar) in mussel biology, ecology, and management attended the workshop.

  17. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  18. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5. The summaries are contained in Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

  19. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26, whose summaries appear in Volume 1; The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27, whose summaries appear in Volume 2; and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29, whose summaries appear in this volume, Volume 3.

  20. Genetic Engineering Workshop Report, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J; Slezak, T

    2010-11-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies (TMT) program. The high-level goal of TMT is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve this goal, there is a need to assess the genetic engineering (GE) approaches, potential application as well as detection and mitigation strategies. LLNL was tasked to coordinate a workshop to determine the scope of investments that DTRA should make to stay current with the rapid advances in genetic engineering technologies, so that accidental or malicious uses of GE technologies could be adequately detected and characterized. Attachment A is an earlier report produced by LLNL for TMT that provides some relevant background on Genetic Engineering detection. A workshop was held on September 23-24, 2010 in Springfield, Virginia. It was attended by a total of 55 people (see Attachment B). Twenty four (44%) of the attendees were academic researchers involved in GE or bioinformatics technology, 6 (11%) were from DTRA or the TMT program management, 7 (13%) were current TMT performers (including Jonathan Allen and Tom Slezak of LLNL who hosted the workshop), 11 (20%) were from other Federal agencies, and 7 (13%) were from industries that are involved in genetic engineering. Several attendees could be placed in multiple categories. There were 26 attendees (47%) who were from out of the DC area and received travel assistance through Invitational Travel Orders (ITOs). We note that this workshop could not have been as successful without the ability to invite experts from outside of the Beltway region. This workshop was an unclassified discussion of the science behind current genetic engineering capabilities. US citizenship was not required for attendance. While this may have limited some discussions concerning risk, we felt that it was more important for this first workshop to focus on the scientific state of the

  1. Summary and report on four national environmental workshops

    SciTech Connect

    House, Peter W.

    1980-07-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for the summaries of four workshops held during the last two years: (1) Integrated Assessment for Energy Related Environmental Standards Workshop - Berkeley, California, November 1978; (2) National Ecological Assessment Workshop - Savannah, Georgia, January 1979; (3) National/Regional Modelling Workshop - Reston, Virginia, May 1979; (4) Groundwater Workshop - Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 1980. (JGB)

  2. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor); Kovacs, Gregory T. A. (Editor); Race, Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous NASA reports and studies have identified Planetary Protection (PP) as an important part of any Mars sample return mission. The mission architecture, hardware, on-board experiments, and related activities must be designed in ways that prevent both forward- and back-contamination and also ensure maximal return of scientific information. A key element of any PP effort for sample return missions is the development of guidelines for containment and analysis of returned sample(s). As part of that effort, NASA and the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Research Council (NRC) have each assembled experts from a wide range of scientific fields to identify and discuss issues pertinent to sample return. In 1997, the SSB released its report on recommendations for handling and testing of returned Mars samples. In particular, the NRC recommended that: a) samples returned from Mars by spacecraft should be contained and treated as potentially hazardous until proven otherwise, and b) rigorous physical, chemical, and biological analyses [should] confirm that there is no indication of the presence of any exogenous biological entity. Also in 1997, a Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol workshop was convened at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent 'uncontrolled release' of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. In 1999, a study by NASA's Mars Sample Handling and Requirements Panel (MSHARP) addressed three other specific areas in anticipation of returning samples from Mars: 1) sample collection and transport back to Earth; 2) certification of the samples as non-hazardous; and 3) sample receiving, curation, and distribution. To further refine the requirements for sample

  3. Nuclear thermal propulsion workshop overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is planning an Exploration Technology Program as part of the Space Exploration Initiative to return U.S. astronauts to the moon, conduct intensive robotic exploration of the moon and Mars, and to conduct a piloted mission to Mars by 2019. Nuclear Propulsion is one of the key technology thrust for the human mission to Mars. The workshop addresses NTP (Nuclear Thermal Rocket) technologies with purpose to: assess the state-of-the-art of nuclear propulsion concepts; assess the potential benefits of the concepts for the mission to Mars; identify critical, enabling technologies; lay-out (first order) technology development plans including facility requirements; and estimate the cost of developing these technologies to flight-ready status. The output from the workshop will serve as a data base for nuclear propulsion project planning.

  4. Universal Interconnection Technology Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, P.; Lemar, P.; Honton, E. J.; Kime, E.; Friedman, N. R.; Kroposki, B.; Galdo, J.

    2002-10-01

    The Universal Interconnection Technology (UIT) Workshop - sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability (DEER) Program, and Distribution and Interconnection R&D - was held July 25-26, 2002, in Chicago, Ill., to: (1) Examine the need for a modular universal interconnection technology; (2) Identify UIT functional and technical requirements; (3) Assess the feasibility of and potential roadblocks to UIT; (4) Create an action plan for UIT development. These proceedings begin with an overview of the workshop. The body of the proceedings provides a series of industry representative-prepared papers on UIT functions and features, present interconnection technology, approaches to modularization and expandability, and technical issues in UIT development as well as detailed summaries of group discussions. Presentations, a list of participants, a copy of the agenda, and contact information are provided in the appendices of this document.

  5. Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of 120 papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 18-20, 1999. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from at least eight international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for the Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  6. NASA Formal Methods Workshop, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The workshop brought together researchers involved in the NASA formal methods research effort for detailed technical interchange and provided a mechanism for interaction with representatives from the FAA and the aerospace industry. The workshop also included speakers from industry to debrief the formal methods researchers on the current state of practice in flight critical system design, verification, and certification. The goals were: define and characterize the verification problem for ultra-reliable life critical flight control systems and the current state of practice in industry today; determine the proper role of formal methods in addressing these problems, and assess the state of the art and recent progress toward applying formal methods to this area.

  7. Sixth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    2001-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Sixth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 22-24, 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  8. SSC workshop on environmental radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1986-01-09

    The Superconducting Super Collider is a 20 TeV-on-20 TeV proton beam collider where two 20-TeV proton accelerators whose beams, rotating in opposite senses, are brought into collision to provide 40 TeV in the center of mass. The scale of the project is set by the 6.6 tesla magnet guide field for the protons which results in a roughly circular machine with a circumference of 83 km (51.5 mi.). The energy scale of the proton beams and the physical scale of the machine are an order of magnitude greater than for any presently operating or contemplated proton accelerator yet the facility must be operated within the same strict radiological guidelines as existing accelerators in the US and Europe. To ensure that the facility conforms to existing and projected guidelines both in design and operation, the Workshop was charged to review the experience and practices of existing accelerator laboratories, to determine the relevant present and projected regulatory requirements, to review particle production and shielding data from accelerators and cosmic rays, to study the design and operational specifications of the Collider, to examine the parameters set forth in the Siting Parameters Document, and to evaluate the computational tools available to model the radiation patterns arising under various operational and failure scenarios. This report summarizes the extensive and intensive presentations and discussions of the Workshop. A great deal of material, much of it in the form of internal reports from the various laboratories and drafts of works in preparation, was provided by the participants for the various topics. This material, including the viewgraphs used by the presenters, forms the background and basis for the conclusions of the Workshop and, as such, is an important part of the Workshop. An introduction to the material and a catalog by topic are presented as section 6 of this report.

  9. Astrobiology Workshop: Leadership in Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, D. (Editor); Briggs, G.; Cohen, M.; Cuzzi, J.; DesMarais, D.; Harper, L.; Morrison, D.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    Astrobiology is defined in the 1996 NASA Strategic Plan as 'The study of the living universe.' At NASA's Ames Research Center, this endeavor encompasses the use of space to understand life's origin, evolution, and destiny in the universe. Life's origin refers to understanding the origin of life in the context of the origin and diversity of planetary systems. Life's evolution refers to understanding how living systems have adapted to Earth's changing environment, to the all-pervasive force of gravity, and how they may adapt to environments beyond Earth. Life's destiny refers to making long-term human presence in space a reality, and laying the foundation for understanding and managing changes in Earth's environment. The first Astrobiology Workshop brought together a diverse group of researchers to discuss the following general questions: Where and how are other habitable worlds formed? How does life originate? How have the Earth and its biosphere influenced each other over time? Can terrestrial life be sustained beyond our planet? How can we expand the human presence to Mars? The objectives of the Workshop included: discussing the scope of astrobiology, strengthening existing efforts for the study of life in the universe, identifying new cross-disciplinary programs with the greatest potential for scientific return, and suggesting steps needed to bring this program to reality. Ames has been assigned the lead role for astrobiology by NASA in recognition of its strong history of leadership in multidisciplinary research in the space, Earth, and life sciences and its pioneering work in studies of the living universe. This initial science workshop was established to lay the foundation for what is to become a national effort in astrobiology, with anticipated participation by the university community, other NASA centers, and other agencies. This workshop (the first meeting of its kind ever held) involved life, Earth, and space scientists in a truly interdisciplinary sharing

  10. Free report from Liquefaction Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The technical report Proceedings From the 2nd U.S.-Japan Workshop on Liquefaction, Large Ground Deformation and Their Effects on Lifelines is available free of charge from the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, headquartered at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The 499-page proceedings contain more than 30 reports on case studies of liquefaction and earthquake-induced ground deformation from previous earthquakes in the U.S. and Japan.

  11. National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    This document summarizes the presentations and suggestions put forth by officials, industry experts and policymakers in their efforts to come together to develop a roadmap for America''s clean energy future and outline the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision. The National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop was held April 2-3, 2002. These proceedings were compiled into a formal report, The National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, which is also available online.

  12. Reuse in Practice Workshop Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    FUNDING NUMERS Reuse in Practice Workshop Summary MDA 903 89 C 0003 T-R2-597.2 6. AUTHOR (S) James Baldo, Jr. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...written by the author , summaries of working groups written by the chairpersons and rapporteurs, and a collection of position papers submitted by the...Software Engineering Institute (SEI), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), or the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). The author

  13. Workshop summary: Space environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1991-01-01

    The workshop on Space Environmental Effects is summarized. The underlying concern of the group was related to the question of how well laboratory tests correlate with actual experience in space. The discussion ranged over topics pertaining to tests involving radiation, atomic oxygen, high voltage plasmas, contamination in low earth orbit, and new environmental effects that may have to be considered on arrays used for planetary surface power systems.

  14. Thermosphere Dynamics Workshop, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G. (Editor); Miller, N. J. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Atmospheric observations reported on include recent measurements of thermospherical composition, gas temperatures, auroral emissions, ion-neutral collisional coupling, electric fields, and plasma convection. Theoretical studies reported on include model calculations of thermospherical general circulation, thermospheric tides, thermospheric tidal coupling to the lower atmosphere, interactions between thermospheic chemistry and dynamics and thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The abstracts provide details given in each talk but the figures represent the fundamental information exchanged within the workshop

  15. Proceedings of the TOUGH workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1990-09-01

    A workshop on applications and enhancements of the TOUGH/MULKOM family of multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation programs was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on September 13--14, 1990. The workshop was attended by 62 scientists from seven countries with interests in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste isolation, unsaturated zone hydrology, environmental problems, and laboratory and field experimentation. The meeting featured 21 technical presentations, extended abstracts of which are reproduced in the present volume in unedited form. Simulator applications included processes on a broad range of space scales, from centimeters to kilometers, with transient times from seconds to geologic time scales. A number of code enhancements were reported that increased execution speeds for large 3-D problems by factors of order 20, reduced memory requirements, and improved user-friendliness. The workshop closed with an open discussion session that focussed on future needs and means for interaction in the TOUGH user community. Input from participants was gathered by means of a questionnaire that is reproduced in the appendix. 171 refs., 91 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-07-12

    The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

  17. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  18. Compact stars and accretion disks: Workshop summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    1998-07-01

    A workshop on `Compact Stars and Accretion Disks' was held on 11-12 August 1997 at the Australian National University. The workshop was opened by Professor Jeremy Mould, the Director of Mount Stromlo Observatory. The workshop was organised to coincide with visits to the ANU Astrophysical Theory Centre by Professor Ron Webbink from the University of Illinois, Professor Rainer Wehrse from the University of Heidelberg and Dr Chris Tout from the University of Cambridge. The workshop attracted over 25 participants nationwide. Participants included members of the Special Research Centre for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Sydney, led by Professor Don Melrose, Professor Dick Manchester from the ATNF, Professor Ravi Sood from ADFA, Dr John Greenhill from the University of Tasmania and Dr Rosemary Mardling from Monash University. Dr Helen Johnston from AAO and Dr Kurt Liffman from AFDL also attended the workshop. The abstracts of twelve of the workshop papers are presented in this summary.

  19. Determination of 63Ni and 59Ni in spent ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M H T; Macacini, J F; Vicente, R; Marumo, J T; Sakata, S K; Terremoto, L A A

    2013-07-01

    A radiochemical method has been adapted to determine (59)Ni and (63)Ni in samples of radioactive wastes from the water cleanup system of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. The process includes extraction chromatographic resin with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as a functional group. Activity concentrations of (59)Ni and (63)Ni were measured, respectively, by X-ray spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting, whereas the chemical yield was determined by ICP-OES. The average ratio of measured activity concentrations of (63)Ni and (59)Ni agree well with theory.

  20. BEATRIX-II Program, January 1989--December 1989: ANNEX-III to IEA implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on radiation damage in fusion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1990-10-01

    BEATRIX-II is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored collaborative experiment among Japan, Canada, and the United States. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast neutron environment. To do this, an in-situ tritium recovery experiment is being conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington, together with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are responsible for conducting the experiment.

  1. 1997 Spacecraft Contamination and Coatings Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T. (Compiler); Benner, Steve M. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the presentation charts of talks given at the "1997 Spacecraft Contamination and Coatings Workshop," held July 9-10, 1997, in Annapolis, Maryland. The workshop was attended by representatives from NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Department of Defense, industry, and universities concerned with the the spacecraft contamination engineering and thermal control coatings. The workshop provided a forum for exchanging new developments in spacecraft contamination and coatings.

  2. Solar Terrestrial Observatory Space Station Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    In response to a need to develop and document requirements of the Solar Terrestrial Observatory at an early time, a mini-workshop was organized and held on June 6, 1985. The participants at this workshop set as their goal the preliminary definition of the following areas: (1) instrument descriptions; (2) placement of instrumentation on the IOC Space Station; (3) servicing and repair assessment; and (4) operational scenarios. This report provides a synopsis of the results of that workshop.

  3. The USRA workshop report: Electrostatic fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The Workshop was held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, on February 1-2, 1983. The Workshop was attended by seventeen experts in the scientific fields of fog and cloud physics, charged-particle electrodynamics, atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric electricity, and electro-gasdynamics. The major objective of the Workshop was to assess the scientific merits and scientific basis of the proposed system and to assess its potential for operational application.

  4. Nuclear Energy Innovation Workshops. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd; Jackson, John; Hildebrandt, Phil; Baker, Suzy

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear energy innovation workshops were organized and conducted by INL on March 2-4, 2015 at the five NUC universities and Boise State University. The output from these workshops is summarized with particular attention to final summaries that were provided by technical leads at each of the workshops. The current revision includes 3-4 punctuation corrections and a correction of the month of release from May to June.

  5. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-25

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  6. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville,...

  7. 78 FR 33849 - Battery-Powered Medical Devices Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities; Public Workshop; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... No. FDA-2013-N-0580] Battery-Powered Medical Devices Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities; Public... entitled ``Battery-Powered Medical Devices Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities''. The purpose of this workshop is to create awareness of the challenges related to battery-powered medical devices...

  8. Mars Atmospheric Chemistry and Astrobiology Workshop Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M.; Wennberg, P.

    2002-09-01

    The Mars Atmospheric Chemistry and Astrobiology (MACA) Workshop was held on the California Institute of Technology campus December 17-18, 2001. The prime objective of the workshop was to consider whether extant life beneath the surface, if it exists, would be in contact with the atmosphere and introduce a detectable signature in the atmosphere. To answer this question, the workshop also explored how well we understood the abiotic chemistry of the current atmosphere and other drivers of atmospheric composition (volcanoes, surface-atmosphere interactions, escape). The conclusions from this workshop will be presented.

  9. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  10. The Second NASA Formal Methods Workshop 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C. (Compiler); Holloway, C. Michael (Compiler); Butler, Ricky W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the workshop was to bring together formal methods researchers and aerospace industry engineers to investigate new opportunities for applying formal methods to aerospace problems. The first part of the workshop was tutorial in nature. The second part of the workshop explored the potential of formal methods to address current aerospace design and verification problems. The third part of the workshop involved on-line demonstrations of state-of-the-art formal verification tools. Also, a detailed survey was filled in by the attendees; the results of the survey are compiled.

  11. A Death Awareness Workshop: Theory, Application, and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, W. Michael; Warren, William M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experimental death awareness workshop based on Kubler-Ross' theory. The effects of the workshop reveal cognitive and emotional changes indicating participants in the workshop to be moving towards an acceptance of death. (Author)

  12. INTERIOR OF THE WORKSHOP, LOOKING SOUTH. (On the counter of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF THE WORKSHOP, LOOKING SOUTH. (On the counter of the workshop are instructions and supplies for artificially inseminating pigs.) - Jenne Farm, Workshop, 538 Engle Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  13. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman

  14. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  15. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow.

  16. Workshop on Atmospheric Transmission Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    trans- mission modeling. The workshop was divided into a morning rsession in which paper’s relating to the topic were pre- sented and an afternoon...a quantitative sense until Rosell’s work referenced above, Here it became clear that the work done by Johnson related the number of line pairs of a...needs to be adjusted according to the gaussian form shown in Fig. 2. Here the value of 50 percent probability is related to a normalized value of 1.0

  17. Rudolph Koenig's workshop of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantalony, David A.

    2004-05-01

    Rudolph Koenig's workshop was a busy meeting place for instruments, ideas, experiments, demonstrations, craft traditions, and business. Starting around 1860 it was also the place in Paris where people discovered the new science of sound emerging from the studies of Hermann von Helmholtz in Germany. Koenig built Helmholtz's ideas into apparatus, created new instruments, and spread them throughout the scientific and musical world. Through his own research, he also became Helmholtz's strongest critic. This paper looks at the activities of this unique space, and, in particular, how it contributed to the protracted disputes over an elusive acoustical phenomenon called the combination tone. Many of these instruments became standard teaching and demonstration apparatus.

  18. Gamified Design for Health Workshop.

    PubMed

    Giunti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Increasing lifespans for chronic disease sufferers means a population of young patients who require lifestyle intervention from an early age. For multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, social problems begin with the decline of cognitive skills and their quality of life is affected. In this workshop, organizers will propose participants to work on different gamification design approachs to solve MS patients' engagement problem. Participants will obtain skills that can be extrapolated to other conditions that require patients change to adopt a different behavior. At the end, participants will present their proposed gamification design and discuss and comment each solution, assessing potential unintended outcomes and advantages.

  19. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  20. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.