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Sample records for 9th power gal

  1. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009) Selected papers from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodssi, Reza; Livermore, Carol; Arnold, David

    2010-10-01

    This special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering presents papers selected from the 9th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2009), which was held in Washington DC, USA from 1-4 December 2009. Since it was first held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the PowerMEMS workshop has focused on small-scale systems that process, convert, or generate macroscopically significant amounts of power, typically with high power density or high energy density. In the workshop's early years, much of the research presented was on small-scale fueled systems, such as micro heat engines and micro fuel cells. The past nine years have seen a dramatic expansion in the range of technologies that are brought to bear on the challenge of high-power, small-scale systems, as well as an increase in the applications for such technologies. At this year's workshop, 158 contributed papers were presented, along with invited and plenary presentations. The papers focused on applications from micro heat engines and fuel cells, to energy harvesting and its enabling electronics, to thermal management and propulsion. Also presented were the technologies that enable these applications, such as the structuring of microscale, nanoscale and biological systems for power applications, as well as combustion and catalysis at small scales. This special section includes a selection of 12 expanded papers representing energy harvesting, chemical and fueled systems, and elastic energy storage at small scales. We would like to express our appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, the Local Organizing Committee, and to the workshop's financial supporters. We are grateful to the referees for their contributions to the review process. Finally, we would like to thank Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, and the staff

  2. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the team from Lafayette County High school in Higginsville, Missouri, designated Lafayette County team #1, races through the course to cross the finish line to win the high school division. The team beat out 26 other teams representing high schools from 9 states. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  3. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. This photograph shows the Cornell #2 team driving their vehicle through the course. The team finished the race in second place in the college division. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle, that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  4. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the New Orleans area schools team #2 from New Orleans, Louisiana maneuvers through an obstacle course. The team captured second place in the high school division competition. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  5. Nuclear Science Symposium, 4th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 9th, San Francisco, Calif., October 19-21, 1977, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the following types of high energy physics instrumentation: drift chambers, multiwire proportional chambers, calorimeters, optical detectors, ionization and scintillation detectors, solid state detectors, and electronic and digital subsystems. Attention is also paid to reactor instrumentation, nuclear medicine instrumentation, data acquisition systems for nuclear instrumentation, microprocessor applications in nuclear science, environmental instrumentation, control and instrumentation of nuclear power generating stations, and radiation monitoring. Papers are also presented on instrumentation for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory.

  6. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. In this photograph, the Cornell #1 team, the collegiate first place winner, maneuvers their vehicle through the course. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a humanpowered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  7. The 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Joan K; Kai, Chieko; Inumaru, Shigeki; Onodera, Takashi

    2012-07-15

    This special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune systems of numerous food animals and wildlife, probing basic immunity and the influence of stress, genetics, nutrition, endocrinology and reproduction. Major presentations addressed defense against pathogens and alternative control and prevention strategies including vaccines, adjuvants and novel biotherapeutics. A special Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme Sponsored Conference on "Vaccination and Diagnosis for Food Safety in Agriculture" highlighted the particular issue of "Immunology in Bovine Paratuberculosis". In April 2010 there was an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the southern part of Japan. This stimulated a special 9th IVIS session on FMD, sponsored by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) of Japan, to discuss improvements of FMD vaccines, their use in FMD control, and risk assessment for decision management. The 9th IVIS was supported by the Veterinary Immunology Committee (VIC) of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) and included workshops for its MHC and Toolkit Committees. Finally VIC IUIS presented its 2010 Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Kazuya Yamanouchi for "outstanding contributions to the veterinary immunology community" and its 2010 Distinguished Veterinary Immunologist Award to Dr. Douglas F. Antczak for "outstanding research on equine immunology". PMID:22766039

  8. Pittsburgh Building "Nation" of 9th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Bitter experience has shown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that if students are going to leave school, they are most likely to do it between the 8th and 9th grades. To combat that problem, the school district has launched a full-on campaign to get its rising freshmen into high school and keep them there. Two weeks before school opened, the district…

  9. 9th Grade, by the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    For big urban districts, it can be slippery work to catch and hold students who are falling off track at a point that derails too many graduations: the transition from 8th to 9th grade. This article reports that the Chicago school district is putting a suite of new data reports into the hands of those who teach and counsel its 30,000 freshmen this…

  10. [Treat Princes in Cordoue (9th-10th centuries)].

    PubMed

    Ricordel, Joëlle

    2016-03-01

    It is proposed, through biographic notes and historical reports, to observe the physicians/power relationships in one hand, and power/medical institutions relationships on the other, in Cordoue, during omeyades' emirate and caliphate, between the 9th and 10th centuries. The gathered information allows to describe the social position of physicians who received marks of favor from princes, but also served the power in place for various responsabilities. These documents are also able to make an evaluation of the role of princes for the development of medico-pharmaceutical subjects and give indications on the health of great figures, on their diseases and the conditions of their death. PMID:27281934

  11. Study Probes Enrollment "Bulge" in 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2004-01-01

    Three decades of mounting academic and testing requirements are snagging growing numbers of students in the 9th grade. "The bulge" is the name education researchers give to the percentage increase in students in the 9th grade over the same period. This article reports on factors that might explain the growing 9th grade bottleneck and sliding…

  12. GAL4/UAS-WGA system as a powerful tool for tracing Drosophila transsynaptic neural pathways.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, K; Sawamoto, K; Suzuki, E; Ozaki, K; Sone, M; Hama, C; Tanifuji-Morimoto, T; Yuasa, Y; Yoshihara, Y; Nose, A; Okano, H

    2000-01-01

    Visualization of specific transsynaptic neural pathways is an indispensable technique for understanding the relationship between structure and function in the nervous system. Here, we demonstrate the application of the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) transgene technique for tracing transsynaptic neural pathways in Drosophila. The intracellular localization of WGA was examined by immunoelectron microscopy. WGA signals were detected in granule-like structures in both the outer photoreceptor cells expressing WGA and the second-order laminar neurons. Misexpression of tetanus toxin (TNT), which inactivates N-synaptobrevin, in the outer photoreceptor cells resulted in the elimination of on/off transients in electroretinogram (ERG) recordings and in a great reduction in WGA transfer into laminar neurons, suggesting that anterograde WGA transsynaptic transfer is dependent mainly on synaptic transmission. Retrograde WGA transfer was also detected upon its forced expression in muscle cells. WGA primarily expressed in muscle cells was taken up by motoneuron axons and transported to their cell bodies in the ventral nerve cord, suggesting that WGA can trace motoneuronal pathways in combination with the muscle-specific GAL4 driver. Thus, the GAL4/UAS-WGA system should facilitate the dissection of the Drosophila neural circuit formation and/or synaptic activity in various regions and at various developmental stages. PMID:10658189

  13. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  14. Help Us Make the 9th Grade Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    New 9th graders reflect on the worries they had as middle school students about moving into high school. They also suggest ways of easing the transition and providing support in 9th grade. Teens want teachers to connect middle school students regularly with high school students, give them more responsibility in middle school, and focus on…

  15. 9th Symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems, Albuqerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Available creep data for the refractory-metal alloys C-103 (Nb/10 percent Hf/1 percent Ti/0.7 percent Zr), ASTAR-811C (Ta/8 percent W/1 percent Re/0.7 percent Hf/0.025 percent C), W-5Re (W/5 percent Re), and W-25Re (W/25 percent Re) were correlated by the Orr-Sherby-Dorn method and extrapolated to 1 percent creep over 10 years. Useful life was specified to be 2 standard estimates of error below the mean surface through the data. Over the temperature range of 1200 to 1800 K, ASTAR-811C was found to be the strongest of these alloys. In particular, ASTAR-811C was found to have at 1800 K the same creep strength as W-25Re at 1420 K. The difference between these results and those of Horak and Booker likely devolves from the comparative lack of long-time data on tungsten alloys.

  16. Gal knockout and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zhong, R

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc (Gal) knockout (k/o) pigs have been developed using genetic cloning technologies. This remarkable achievement has generated great enthusiasm in xenotransplantation studies. This review summarizes the current status of nonhuman primate experiments using Gal k/o pig organs. Briefly, when Gal k/o pig organs are transplanted into primates, hyperacute rejection does not occur. Although graft survival has been prolonged up to a few months in some cases, the overall results were not better than those using Gal-positive pig organs with human complement regulatory protein transgenes. Gal k/o pig kidneys rapidly developed rejection which was associated with increased anti-non-Gal antibodies. Although the precise mechanisms of Gal k/o pig organ rejection are not clear, it could result from incomplete deletion of Gal, up-regulation of new antigen (non-Gal antigen) and/or production of non-Gal antibodies. Future work in xenotransplantation should place emphasis on further modification of donors, such as combining human complement regulatory genes with Gal k/o, deleting non-Gal antigens and adding protective/surviving genes or a gene that inhibits coagulation. Induction of donor-specific T- and B-cell tolerance and promotion of accommodation are also warranted. PMID:17227553

  17. NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Eight of the twelve members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics attending the 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference posed for this photograph at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 23, 1934. Those pictured are (left to right): Brig. Gen. Charles A. Lindbergh, USAFR Vice Admiral Arthur B. Cook, USN Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Joseph S. Ames, Committee Chairman Orville Wright Edward P. Warner Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, USN Eugene L. Vidal, Director, Bureau of Air Commerce.

  18. Report on the 9th European Fusion Physics Workshop* Report on the 9th European Fusion Physics Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Barabaschi, P.; Bécoulet, M.; Federici, G.; Hellsten, T.; Loarte, A.; Pautasso, G.; Wilson, H.

    2003-04-01

    The 9th EFPW took place in December 2001 at Saariselka in Finland, hosted by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and the Helsinki University, and sponsored by the European Commission. Within an overall theme of `transient events, their mitigation and their implications for plasma facing components in ITER', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. In addition, the key issues for the ITER design which are associated with transient events and a review of the JET scientific and technical programme under EFDA were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  19. General view of underground along 9th street. J street segment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of underground along 9th street. J street segment intersects at left, 9th street segment intersects alley at right. View to the east. - Coolot Building, 812 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  20. 1. D Street (south) facade (short side) and 9th Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. D Street (south) facade (short side) and 9th Street (west) facade (long side). North of the D Street facade is the Edward Abner Building (413-415 9th Street) and north of it is the Ferree Building (417 9th Street). - PMI Parking Garage, 403-407 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Introduction to the Proceedings of the 9th ISDH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, V. Michael, Jr.; Riskin, Seth

    2013-02-01

    The Proceedings As co-chairs of the 9th International Symposium on Display Holography, we welcome readers of this collection of papers and posters presented at the event. We hope that both attendees of the event and others pursuing the art, science, and business of holography and 3D imaging will find the authors' contributions of lasting interest and importance. The Event Since its creation at Lake Forest College in 1982 by Professor Tung H Jeong, ISDH has followed a model that differentiates it from other scientific conferences. The 9th ISDH continued this history, fully occupying a floor of the MIT Media Lab for five days. The single-track conference opened with reports on the state of holography in the various nations represented by the attendees, followed by a series of presentations on Education and Holography. One and one-half days of papers on Art and Holography followed, then sessions on Techniques and Materials, Digital Techniques, and Commercial and Applied Holography. A poster session permitted more in-depth discussion between authors and the audience. Two exhibitions of holographic works opened at ISDH: an informal display area at the symposium, and a 15-month-long MIT Museum exhibition, The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography. The success of an event of this sort requires the help of many people and organizations. We wish especially to recognize our Honorary Conference Chairs: Tung H Jeong and Joseph W Goodman; our Technical Program Committee: Hans I Bjelkhagen, Frank Fan, Nasser Peyghambarian, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa; and our Arts and Exhibition Committee: Betsy Connors-Chen, Melissa Crenshaw, John Durant, Dieter Jung, Linda Law, Martin Richardson, Jonathan Ross, and Sally Weber. Betsy also coordinated the on-site exhibition. Kristin Hall at the MIT Media Lab made local arrangements, while registration was handled by MIT Conference Services. We also gratefully acknowledge support from Lake Forest College, holographer.org, and authentibrand

  2. NANOTR9: 9th Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The conference series NanoTR is the major conference on nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey. It brings together leading scientists and engineers in nanotechnology to exchange information on their latest research progress. An exhibition of the companies working in the related field is also organized as a part of the event. With intensive international participation, NanoTR conference series has spread outside the national border and has become an international event in this field. Among international contributions, a wide interest from the countries around Turkey should be emphasized. 9th in the series was organized by Atatürk University in Erzurum-Turkey on June 24-28, 2013 with more than 900 scientists, researchers, private sector representatives from around the world. Conference program included 6 plenary speakers, 35 invited speakers (18 of them were from outside the country), 116 oral presentations, and 340 poster presentations. In addition to 6 plenary sessions, 17 oral and 4 poster sessions created very lively discussion forums covering a vast range of current and emerging sciences from nano-materials, nanoscience, nanofabrication, nano-engineering, nano-electronics, nano-biotechnology, to ethical and social issues of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Also, panel discussions about industrial applications, tutorial sessions have been organized for students, new-comers and company employees.

  3. FOREWORD: 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, Ahmed, Prof

    2015-08-01

    The 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems will be held in London from 5th - 9th September 2015, and as its Chairman, it is my pleasure to welcome you. This series of conferences started in 1999 organised by the Fluid Machinery Group of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) but since 2009 it has been managed by City University London in conjunction with the IMechE and the Institute of Refrigeration, both of which have been very proactive in promoting it. The Organising committee is grateful for their support and continued encouragement. This year, after rigorous reviewing, we have accepted over 80 technical papers for publication, the highest number in the conference history. On behalf of the organising committee I would like to thank the reviewers for their hard work and assistance. In addition to the main technical sessions, this year we have introduced a third day, specifically for Industry, to consider technology, business and market drivers on compressor developments. The traditional series of the short courses is this year continuing prior to the main event with the second short course/forum on Computational Fluid Dynamics in rotating positive displacement machines. I would like to extend my special thanks to our main sponsors, Holroyd PTG, Howden and Kapp Niels for their continuing support for the conference. With their generous contributions we have managed to keep the conference fees at the same level as in 2013, despite extending it to 3 days and holding it outside the University this year. The welcome reception on Sunday 6th September 2015 is dedicated to the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Centre for Positive Displacement Compressors Technology which was formed at City University in 1995 with support from the Royal Academy of Engineering and Holroyd; its main aim being to assist British manufacturers of screw compressors. The Centre has since made a significant impact on the screw compressor world, far beyond

  4. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  5. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  6. Aiming Higher: Is Your 9th Grader on Track for College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A teenager's future starts on 9th grade with the safe and welcoming environment, excellent teachers, and challenging instruction provided at this school. Believe it or not, college begins in 9th grade. If parents dream of their son or daughter going to college, they should not put off planning until their junior or senior year in high school--it…

  7. 9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

    2003-08-24

    The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

  8. General view of underground showing the 9th street segment where ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of underground showing the 9th street segment where it intersect with the east end of the J street segment (on the left). View to the east. - Coolot Building, 812 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  9. Environmental Education in High School 9th-12th Biology Course Curricula Started to Be Implemented in 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Bahar, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze 9th-12th grade Biology Course Curricula started to be implemented in 2007 with regard to concepts and attainments addressing to environmental education. In this regard, 9th-12th grade Biology Course Curricula were analyzed using content-analysis technique, one of the qualitative research methods. 9th-12th grade…

  10. 20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH FLOOR WITH WHITE GLAZED TERRA COTTA SILL AND HEADERS. MULLIONS ARE ORANGE BROWN BRICKS LIKE THE WALLS. BRICKS ARE IN FLEMISH BOND PATTERN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  12. A Chemistry Course for High Ability 8th, 9th, and 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Richard, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course designed, in cooperation with local public school districts, to intellectually challenge a group of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade students. Organic chemistry and biochemistry are integrated into the course (titled Chemistry and Everyday Life) to emphasize practical applications of chemistry. The course syllabus is included.…

  13. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  14. A Summative Program Evaluation of a Comprehensive 9th Grade Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 8th grade to 9th grade is one that is replete with challenges for students, especially for minority students who live in economically disadvantaged communities. One low-income, high minority comprehensive high school in the western United States implemented five separate strategies to create a freshman transition program to aid…

  15. The Effect of Group Work on Misconceptions of 9th Grade Students about Newton's Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergin, Serap

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of group work and traditional method on 9th grade students' misconceptions about Newton Laws was investigated. The study was conducted in three classes in an Anatolian Vocational High School in Ankara/Turkey in the second term of the 2014-2015 academic year. Two of these classes were chosen as the experimental group and…

  16. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  17. 5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. Immediatly to the west lie the Illinois and Michigan Canal, the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, and the Des Plaines River. - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  18. A Comparison of Students' Choices of 9th Grade Physical Education Activities by Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant M.; Cleven, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district and to compare preferences by ethnicity. Results indicated that basketball, football, bowling, softball/baseball, swimming, and volleyball were the most preferred activities. These preferences may be…

  19. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to

  20. The Implementation of Effective Teaching Practices in English Classroom for Grades 8th, 9th, and 10th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; And Others

    This study explored teachers' behavior as related to effective teaching practices in 8th, 9th, and 10th grade English classrooms in Jordan. The study also examined some variables that could predict teachers' implementation of effective teaching practices and aimed at finding an estimate of the percentage of students in 8th, 9th, and 10th grades…

  1. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  2. EDITORIAL: The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Nader Sadeghi,

  1. The Civic Development of 9th- through 12th-Grade Students in the United States: 1996. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Richard G.; Chapman, Chris

    This report provides an extensive picture of factors often thought to be associated with promoting good citizenship among youth. In particular, it focuses on the civic development of 9th- through 12th-grade students. Broadly speaking, student characteristics, family influences, the role of schools, media factors, and the possible benefits of…

  2. Successful Transition to High School: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Barr Model with 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ninth grade is a pivotal year for students. Numerous studies find that academic performance in 9th grade often sets the student's trajectory throughout the high school years, as well as the probability of graduation. The Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) model is a comprehensive approach that addresses developmental, academic, and school…

  3. A Comparison of 9th and 10th Grade Boys' and Girls' Bullying Behaviors in Two States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isernhagen, Jody; Harris, Sandy

    This study examined the incidences of bullying behaviors among male and female 9th and 10th graders in rural Nebraska and suburban Texas schools. Nebraska students were predominantly Caucasion, and Texas students were African American, Hispanic American, and Caucasion. Student surveys examined such issues as how often bullying occurred, where it…

  4. Evaluation of Three Models of Instruction for 9th Grade Turkish Literature Course and Implications for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilav, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which each of the three types of instruction (authentic, where, differentiated) engages 9th grade high school students in achieving language proficiency. The paper examines the features of these models of instructions and teachers? opinion about them. It includes a descriptive research in survey…

  5. 9th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Jeffrey C.; Schmidt, Jeffrey K.; Lemke, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    This is the 9th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District RUSD). Over the past decade, the conditions affecting the district as well as the school outcomes have changed in some ways and remained stable in others. This analysis compares RUSD to nine peer school districts and the state of Wisconsin. RUSD peer…

  6. A Comparison of 9th Grade Male and Female Physical Education Activities Preferences and Support for Coeducational Groupings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant; Cleven, Brian

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district, to identify which activities students felt should be offered in coeducation or gender separate formats, and to determine whether physical education is one of their favorite classes. Results…

  7. 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huajiang

    2011-07-01

    Dear Delegates We would like to welcome you to the 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures. This series of conferences has been held as a biannual event since 1995. The previous venues were Pescara (Italy, 1995), Sheffield (UK, 1997), Dublin (Ireland, 1999), Cardiff (UK, 2001), Southampton (UK, 2003), Gdansk (Poland, 2005), Torino (Italy, 2007) and Beijing (China, 2009). The conference will cover all research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies, and numerical simulations. It has established itself as a major international forum for the above research areas. Typically over 100 papers are presented at each conference. It is thought appropriate to keep the conference at this size to facilitate knowledge exchange. DAMAS Conferences have had support from other learned societies and industry. These include the Technical Division of Vibration and Acoustics of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Society for Strain Measurement, to name a few. There are exhibitors at some conferences. The venue of DAMAS2011, Oxford, is a world-renowned university town. Oxford is also located in the Cotswolds, an area of outstanding natural beauty. And July is arguably the best month of the year in UK. It is hoped that all delegates will enjoy the conference and continue to support DAMAS conferences in the future. Huajiang Ouyang On behalf of the Organising Committee: Professor Huajiang Ouyang, University of Liverpool, UK (Conference Chair) Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, University of Loughborough, UK Professor Fulei Chu, Tsinghua University, China Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Polish Academy of Science, Poland Professor Cecilia Surace, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  8. The PRIME Partnership: 9th Graders, Graduate Students and Integrated, Inquiry-Based Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, A. M.; Miguelez, S.

    2001-12-01

    The PRIME program (Partnership for Research in Inquiry-based Math, science and engineering Education) is a collaboration between the UW Colleges of Education and Engineering and several Seattle-area school districts. This project, funded by the NSF GK-12 program, pairs UW graduate students from math, science and engineering disciplines with local middle school teachers. The graduate student spends a year working with the teacher, on projects designed to meet the needs and interests of the specific partnership and classroom. In the partnership, the graduate student spends 15 hours per week in the classroom, interacting with the students, as well as additional planning time outside of the classroom. Goals of the PRIME program are enriched learning by middle school students, professional development for middle school teachers, improved communication and teaching skills for the graduate students, and strengthened partnerships between the University of Washington and local school districts. The goal of our partnership was to develop an inquiry-based, 9th grade unit that integrates the pre-existing Earth Science and Chemistry units, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching Chemistry in the context of Earth Science. We have observed that students often become engaged and excited when they do hands-on activities that utilize the intrinsic understanding that they have of concepts that draw upon experiences in their daily lives. When science is taught and learned in one such context - in the context of the natural world - the students may gain a more solid fundamental understanding of the science that they learn. The day-to-day activities for this unit vary widely. We started each topic with a question designed to get the students thinking independently and to identify the preconceptions that the students brought into the classroom. Discussions of students' preconceptions served as a justification and springboard for the subsequent activities and experiments. Examples of

  9. The 9th Annual Meeting of the Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery Dammam, Saudi Arabia, 3-5 March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro

    2015-01-01

    The 9th Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery (9th SANS) Annual Meeting was held in the Sheraton Dammam Hotel and Towers, Dammam, Saudi Arabia on March 3-5, 2015, organized by the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Dammam with a theme of “Research is the Bridge to the Future.” The meeting was preceded by a Public Awareness Campaign on March 2, 2015 held at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and several pre-conference workshops that were highly beneficial for neurosurgery today. The scientific program was loaded with innovative and interactive presentations from respected and reputable speakers from different parts of the world. Abstracts were carefully selected and reviewed based on their scientific value and relevance to the clinical, surgical, academic, and research aspects of neurosurgery in the Kingdom, and the world.

  10. Special coverage: 9th Conference on Retroviruses. New drugs, new data hold promise for next decade of HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    2002-05-01

    Antiretroviral research presented recently at the 9th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections demonstrates that investigators and pharmaceutical companies continue to strive for the next highly potent and easily tolerated anti-HIV drug. Among the new approaches are entry inhibitor drug and second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. New studies also looked into potency against multidrug-resistant virus and medication regimens that are simpler to take and have fewer side effects. PMID:12030213

  11. Evaluation of Reading Fluency and Reading Errors of 9th Grade Students with a View to Diagnosing the Sources of Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Üstten, Aliye Uslu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the sources of reading difficulties and to evaluate reading fluency of 9th grade students which aims to improve students' reading and their understanding of complex literary texts. The sample is composed of 120 students selected from 9th grade of 10 different high schools in central province of Ankara…

  12. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  13. The Effectiveness of a Self Regulated Learning-Based Training Program on Improving Cognitive and Metacognitive EFL Reading Comprehension of 9th Graders with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a self regulated learning intervention program on cognitive and metacognitive EFL reading comprehension of 9th graders with reading disabilities. The participants in this study were 40 9th Graders with reading disabilities, selected from two schools located in Baltim Educational Edara. A…

  14. The GALS locomotor screen and disability.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, M J; Linton, S; Dodd, E; Jones, P W; Dawes, P T

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Examination of the locomotor system is frequently neglected. Therefore, the GALS locomotor screen (Gait, Arms, Legs, Spine) has been proposed by Doherty et al as a practical method of identifying functionally important problems. This study was designed to test whether this screen reflects functional impairment, as measured by accepted health status measures. METHODS--Two observers performed the GALS screen in a total of 83 patients with a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. The examination components of GALS were rated by a simple 0 to 3 scale. Physical ability was further assessed by Health Activity Questionnaire (HAQ), Barthel index and Steinbrocker's ARA classification. RESULTS--For the total patient group, Spearman correlations between GALS and the three functional indices were good (r = 0.62 to 0.71, p < 0.001). Correlations were equally good for rheumatoid arthritis patients alone (r = 0.65 to 0.70, p < 0.001), but less good although still significant for the other miscellaneous rheumatic conditions (r = 0.31 to 0.46, p < 0.05). Observed proportional agreement between the two observers for the individual scores was > 70%, with a kappa statistic k = 0.49 to 0.74. CONCLUSIONS--The GALS screen is a reliable and valid measure of functional ability, compared with standard accepted indices in a variety of musculoskeletal diseases. This supports the proposal for its use as a screening test by general practitioners and medical students. PMID:8311541

  15. Acceleration of Wound Healing by α-gal Nanoparticles Interacting with the Natural Anti-Gal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Application of α-gal nanoparticles to wounds and burns induces accelerated healing by harnessing the natural anti-Gal antibody which constitutes ~1% of human immunoglobulins. α-gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R), the carbohydrate ligand of anti-Gal. Studied α-gal nanoparticles were comprised of glycolipids with α-gal epitopes, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Binding of anti-Gal to α-gal nanoparticles in wounds activates the complement cascade, resulting in formation of chemotactic complement cleavage peptides that induce rapid recruitment of many macrophages. The Fc/Fcγ receptors interaction between anti-Gal coating α-gal nanoparticles and the recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines/growth factors that promote wound healing and recruit stem cells. Studies of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles were feasible in α1,3galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs. In contrast to other nonprimate mammals, these mice and pigs lack the α-gal epitope, and thus they are not immunotolerant to it and produce anti-Gal. Treatment of skin wounds and burns with α-gal nanoparticles resulted in 40–60% decrease in healing time in comparison with control wounds treated with saline. This accelerated healing is associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and extensive angiogenesis in wounds, faster regrowth of epidermis, and regeneration of the dermis. The accelerated healing further decreases and may completely eliminate fibrosis and scar formation in wounds. Since healing of internal injuries is mediated by mechanisms similar to those in external wound healing, it is suggested that α-gal nanoparticles treatment may also improve regeneration and restoration of biological function following internal injuries such as surgical incisions, myocardial ischemia following infarction, and nerve injuries. PMID:25922849

  16. Acceleration of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles interacting with the natural anti-Gal antibody.

    PubMed

    Galili, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Application of α-gal nanoparticles to wounds and burns induces accelerated healing by harnessing the natural anti-Gal antibody which constitutes ~1% of human immunoglobulins. α-gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R), the carbohydrate ligand of anti-Gal. Studied α-gal nanoparticles were comprised of glycolipids with α-gal epitopes, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Binding of anti-Gal to α-gal nanoparticles in wounds activates the complement cascade, resulting in formation of chemotactic complement cleavage peptides that induce rapid recruitment of many macrophages. The Fc/Fcγ receptors interaction between anti-Gal coating α-gal nanoparticles and the recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines/growth factors that promote wound healing and recruit stem cells. Studies of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles were feasible in α1,3galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs. In contrast to other nonprimate mammals, these mice and pigs lack the α-gal epitope, and thus they are not immunotolerant to it and produce anti-Gal. Treatment of skin wounds and burns with α-gal nanoparticles resulted in 40-60% decrease in healing time in comparison with control wounds treated with saline. This accelerated healing is associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and extensive angiogenesis in wounds, faster regrowth of epidermis, and regeneration of the dermis. The accelerated healing further decreases and may completely eliminate fibrosis and scar formation in wounds. Since healing of internal injuries is mediated by mechanisms similar to those in external wound healing, it is suggested that α-gal nanoparticles treatment may also improve regeneration and restoration of biological function following internal injuries such as surgical incisions, myocardial ischemia following infarction, and nerve injuries. PMID:25922849

  17. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5. PMID:26741063

  18. Types of alcoholic beverages usually consumed by students in 9th-12th grades--four states, 2005.

    PubMed

    2007-07-27

    Excessive alcohol consumption contributes to approximately 4,500 deaths among underage youths in the United States each year (e.g., from homicides, motor-vehicle crashes, and suicides) and an average of 60 years of life lost per death. However, little is known about the specific types of alcoholic beverages consumed by youths. These data are important because numerous evidence-based strategies for reducing underage drinking rates are beverage-specific, including increasing alcohol excise taxes and increasing restrictions on the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages. To examine types of alcoholic beverages usually consumed by students in 9th-12th grades, CDC analyzed 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data from the four state surveys that included a question on the type of alcohol consumed (Arkansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Wyoming). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that liquor (e.g., bourbon, rum, scotch, vodka, or whiskey) was the most prevalent type of alcoholic beverage usually consumed among students in 9th-12th grades who reported current alcohol use or binge drinking. These findings suggest that considering beverage-specific alcohol consumption by youths is important when developing alcohol-control policies, specifically those related to the price and availability of particular types of alcoholic beverages. PMID:17657207

  19. Three centuries of geomagnetic field intensity changes in Spain (from the 9th to the 12th centuries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Jimenez-Castillo, P.; Perez-Asensio, M.

    2013-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations (at least of ~20 μT/century) interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes by the acquisition of well-dated high-quality archeomagnetic data. In this study we report the archeomagnetic study of Spanish ceramic fragments. The collected fragments belong to 14 superposed stratigraphic levels corresponding to a surface no bigger than 3 m by 7 m. The pottery fragments dates back to the 9th and 11th centuries. The dating was established by 4 radiocarbon dates and by archeological/historical constraints including typological comparisons and well-controlled stratigraphic constrains between the different stratigraphic units. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 79 fragments, twelve new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. Together with previously published high-quality data from Western Europe, the new data provide an improved description of the intensity changes that took place in Spain between the 9th and the 12th centuries. The results confirm that rapid intensity changes took place in Western Europe during the recent history of the Earth.

  20. Proceedings of the 9th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, Annecy, France, 15-18 December 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, F.; Mours, B.

    2005-09-01

    The yearly Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) is now a well established meeting. As usual, the scope of the meeting covered the status of ground-based and space-based detectors, sources and population modelling, detector characterization, event searches, multi-detector analysis and new analysis methods. The 9th GWDAW followed the trend observed in previous years: more presentations that included real data and more sophisticated analysis techniques. However, the biggest change observed was a significant increase in the number of presentations dealing with the analysis of data coming from multiple detectors. Our field needs to combine these data to best extract the astrophysical information. This yearly meeting, bringing together all the worldwide players in the field, is a chance for us to make progress in this direction, and we will certainly see more results in future GWDAW meetings. The importance of the 9th GWDAW meeting can be assessed not only by the record attendance and number of submitted contributions, but also by looking at the work schedules of the various groups. People are now using the GWDAW dates to set deadlines for their activities in order to present their results at the next GWDAW. This special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity contains the most up-to-date papers on the topics covered by the meeting. Besides being a good reference that will fit proudly into the series of previous GWDAW proceedings, it provides valuable details about current work. As organizers of this workshop, we would like to thank not only the sponsors that made this meeting possible, but also all the participants for coming, sharing their results and enjoying the event with us. The following institutions have sponsored the 9th GWDAW: Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP) European Gravitational Observatory (EGO) Université de Savoie Groupement de Recherche: Phénomènes cosmiques de haute énergie (GDR-PCHE) Institut National de

  1. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    PubMed

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań. PMID:26558656

  2. Chunky Gal Melange and its tectonic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Lacazette, A. Jr.; Rast, N.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the Chunky Gal Mafic/Ultramafic Complex of SW North Carolina indicates that the complex is involved in a set of ductile shear zones separating pods of less deformed material. The product is a tectonic mixture of fragments of amphibolites, granites, calc-silicates and ultramafic rocks in the Tallulah Falls Fm. Some inclusions are in different states of metamorphism. Foliation within the amphibolite, migmatite and granite lumps is truncated at their edges. The metasediments show a transposed pervasive late foliation (S/sub 2/.) although the sense of intersection of earlier fabrics is locally determinable. Linear fabric elements plunge east. In the amphibolites, the foliation is folded but not transposed. The zone, therefore, is termed the Chunky Gal Melange. Although syntectonic porphyroblasts suggest that the movement began during the metamorphism, the melange postdates the peak of the main regional metamorphism and separates superposed granulite facies rocks from those of amphibolite facies. A weaker lower amphibolite metamorphism postdates the melange. In the vicinity of Chunky Gal Mountain the melange coincides with the premetamorphic Hayesville Thrust of R. Hatcher. A tectonic model suggested here is that the eastern Blue Ridge represents a poorly to fully developed accretionary prism that was built above an east dipping subduction zone during the closure of a marginal sea. Mafic and ultramafic rocks were incorporated with the metasediments at this time. The Hayesville Thrust itself reflects an early stage of suturing of this terrane with North America.

  3. Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Ryan C; Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael A; Hyseni, Chaz; Edwards, Danielle L; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Ciofi, Claudio; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-11-01

    Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here, we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data were integral in detecting and characterizing this phenomenon. In C. becki, we identified two genetically distinct, morphologically cryptic lineages. Historical reconstructions show that they colonized Wolf Volcano from Santiago Island in two temporally separated events, the first estimated to have occurred ~199 000 years ago. Following arrival of the second wave of colonists, both lineages coexisted for approximately ~53 000 years. Within that time, they began fusing back together, as microsatellite data reveal widespread introgressive hybridization. Interestingly, greater mate selectivity seems to be exhibited by purebred females of one of the lineages. Forward-in-time simulations predict rapid extinction of the early arriving lineage. This study provides a rare example of reticulate evolution in action and underscores the power of population genetics for understanding the past, present and future consequences of evolutionary phenomena associated with lineage fusion. PMID:25223395

  4. A simple and efficient method to identify replacements of P-lacZ by P-Gal4 lines allows obtaining Gal4 insertions in the bithorax complex of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    de Navas, Luis; Foronda, David; Suzanne, Magali; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2006-11-01

    The functional replacement of one gene product by another one is a powerful method to study specificity in development and evolution. In Drosophila, the Gal4/UAS method has been used to analyze in vivo such functional substitutions. To this aim, Gal4 lines that inactivate a gene and reproduce its expression pattern are required, and they can be frequently obtained by replacing pre-existing P-lacZ lines with such characteristics. We have devised a new method to quickly identify replacements of P-lacZ lines by P-Gal4 lines, and applied it successfully to obtain Gal4 insertions in the Ultrabithorax and Abdominal-B Hox genes. We have used these lines to study the functional replacement of a Hox gene by another one. Our experiments confirm that the abdominal-A gene can replace Ultrabithorax in haltere development but that it cannot substitute for Abdominal-B in the formation of the genitalia. PMID:16971094

  5. A Flippase-Mediated GAL80/GAL4 Intersectional Resource for Dissecting Appendage Development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brittany N; Ghazanfari, Arash M; Bohm, Rudolf A; Welch, William P; Zhang, Bing; Masly, John P

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila imaginal discs provide an ideal model to study processes important for cell signaling and cell specification, tissue differentiation, and cell competition during development. One challenge to understanding genetic control of cellular processes and cell interactions is the difficulty in effectively targeting a defined subset of cells in developing tissues in gene manipulation experiments. A recently developed Flippase-induced intersectional GAL80/GAL4 repression method incorporates several gene manipulation technologies in Drosophila to enable such fine-scale dissection in neural tissues. In particular, this approach brings together existing GAL4 transgenes, newly developed enhancer-trap flippase transgenes, and GAL80 transgenes flanked by Flippase recognition target sites. The combination of these tools enables gene activation/repression in particular subsets of cells within a GAL4 expression pattern. Here, we expand the utility of a large collection of these enhancer-trap flippase transgenic insertion lines by characterizing their expression patterns in third larval instar imaginal discs. We screened 521 different enhancer-trap flippase lines and identified 28 that are expressed in imaginal tissues, including two transgenes that show sex-specific expression patterns. Using a line that expresses Flippase in the wing imaginal disc, we demonstrate the utility of this intersectional approach for studying development by knocking down gene expression of a key member of the planar cell polarity pathway. The results of our experiments show that these enhancer-trap flippase lines enable fine-scale manipulation in imaginal discs. PMID:26276385

  6. Control of transcription of gal repressor and isorepressor genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weickert, M J; Adhya, S

    1993-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, Gal repressor and isorepressor, control the expression of the gal and mgl operons in Escherichia coli. The transcription start sites for galR and galS, the genes for the repressor and isorepressor, were determined by primer extension of in vivo transcripts. Study of the promoter-lacZ gene fusions introduced into the chromosome indicated that galS expression was elevated in cells in which the normal galS gene was interrupted, but not in cells in which the galR gene was deleted. When both genes were disrupted, galS expression was further elevated. Expression from the galS promoter was stimulated by the addition of D-fucose, repressed by glucose, and dependent on cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Expression of a similar gene fusion of the galR promoter to lacZ was unregulated. Both galR and galS genes contain two potential operator sites (OE and OI) and a CRP-binding site. The arrangement of OE, OI, and the CRP-binding site in the galS gene is analogous to the arrangement in the gal and mgl promoters, but the arrangement in galR is atypical. The increased concentration of the isorepressor when inducer is present may facilitate early shutoff of the isorepressor-regulated genes of the gal regulon when inducer (substrate) concentration falls. PMID:8416900

  7. Characteristics of α-Gal epitope, anti-Gal antibody, α1,3 galactosyltransferase and its clinical exploitation (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HUAI, GUOLI; QI, PING; YANG, HONGJI; WANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    The α-Gal epitope (Galα1,3Galα1,4GlcNAc-R) is ubiquitously presented in non-primate mammals, marsupials and New World Monkeys, but it is absent in humans, apes and Old World monkeys. However, the anti-Gal antibody (~1% of immunoglobulins) is naturally generated in human, and is found as the immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM and IgA isotypes. Owing to the specific binding of the anti-Gal antibody with the α-Gal epitope, humans have a distinct anti-α-gal reactivity, which is responsible for hyperacute rejection of organs transplanted from α-gal donors. In addition, the α1,3 galactosyltransferases (α1,3GT) can catalyze the synthesis of the α-Gal epitope. Therefore, the α1,3GT gene, which encodes the α1,3GT, is developed profoundly. The distributions of the α-Gal epitope and anti-Gal antibody, and the activation of α1,3GT, reveal that the enzyme of α1,3GT in ancestral primates is ineffective. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the human α1,3-GT pseudogene to the corresponding different species sequence, and according to the evolutionary tree of different species, the results of evolutionary inactivation of the α1,3GT gene in ancestral primates attribute to the mutations under a stronger selective pressure. However, on the basis of the structure, the mechanism and the specificity of the α-Gal epitope and anti-Gal antibody, they can be applied to clinical exploitation. Knocking out the α1,3GT gene will eliminate the xenoantigen, Gal(α1,3)Gal, so that the transplantation of α1,3GT gene knockout pig organ into human becomes a potential clinically acceptable treatment for solving the problem of organ shortage. By contrast, the α-Gal epitope expressed through the application of chemical, biochemical and genetic engineering can be exploited for the clinical use. Targeting anti-Gal-mediated autologous tumor vaccines, which express α-Gal epitope to antigen-presenting cells, would increase their immunogenicity and elicit an immune response, which will be

  8. Isolating 9th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reents, Jennifer Newton

    2002-01-01

    Argues that creating separate schools for ninth-grade students improves their academic and social transition to high school. Supports argument with research results and personal anecdotes. Describes school district experiences in developing and operating ninth-grade centers. (PKP)

  9. The city and the river A reconstruction of the strategical position of early 9th century Dorestad, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosian, Menne; Weerts, Henk; Steur, Roeland; Abrahamse, Jaap-Evert

    2013-04-01

    Why was the Early-medieval trade-port of Dorestad located at a relatively inland position in the Rhine delta and not at the coast, as one would expect? We combined palaeogeographical, environmental-archaeological, geomorphological/geological and laser-altimetry data to propose an answer to this question. Local Dorestad data had to be combined with a regional paleogeographical reconstruction of active river branches in the 9th-century Rhine delta to come to a satisfactory answer. The location of Dorestad on a high natural levee along a relatively stable navigable branch of the Rhine in the central Rhine delta was perfect for trade. The high levee gave protection from the annual river floods. Although this branch of the Rhine was fairly stable in the heydays of Dorestad, the meanders near Dorestad slowly migrated. Excavations at Dorestad show that the harbour works of Dorestad were constantly adapted to this migration, thereby following the meander on which they were located. Ships could reach the port from the sea through at least three navigable Rhine branches: the Lek, the Old Rhine and the Vecht rivers. Dorestad was thus easily accessible and yet far enough from the coast to be safe from storm floods - but was it located at its specific location for these reasons alone? We combined existing geomorphological and geological maps with recent nation-wide laser-altimetry (AHN, General Elevation model of the Netherlands') for a regional palaeogeographical reconstruction of 9th-century active Rhine branches in a GIS. This reconstruction revealed that river connections with the Flemish, French and German hinterland were perfect. Other delta branches ensured safe connections to the Zeeland delta and the open Flemish coast, all the way to Dover Straight to the south and to the open Frisian coast all the way to present Southern Denmark in the North. The dangerously closed coast of Holland without any safe shelter places for storms could thus be avoided by ships coming in

  10. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC. PMID:27512904

  11. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  12. Integrated diagnostics: proceedings from the 9th biennial symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Krestin, G P; Grenier, P A; Hricak, H; Jackson, V P; Khong, P L; Miller, J C; Muellner, A; Schwaiger, M; Thrall, J H

    2012-11-01

    The International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology held its 9th biennial meeting in August 2011. The focus of the programme was integrated diagnostics and massive computing. Participants discussed the opportunities, challenges, and consequences for the discipline of radiology that will likely arise from the integration of diagnostic technologies. Diagnostic technologies are increasing in scope, including advanced imaging techniques, new molecular imaging agents, and sophisticated point-of-use devices. Advanced information technology (IT), which is increasingly influencing the practice of medicine, will aid clinical communication and the development of "population images" that represent the phenotype of particular diseases, which will aid the development of diagnostic algorithms. Integrated diagnostics offer increased operational efficiency and benefits to patients through quicker and more accurate diagnoses. As physicians with the most expertise in IT, radiologists are well placed to take the lead in introducing IT solutions and cloud computing to promote integrated diagnostics. To achieve this, radiologists must adapt to include quantitative data on biomarkers in their reports. Radiologists must also increase their role as participating physicians, collaborating with other medical specialties, not only to avoid being sidelined by other specialties but also to better prepare as leaders in the selection and sequence of diagnostic procedures. Key Points • New diagnostic technologies are yielding unprecedented amounts of diagnostic information.• Advanced IT/cloud computing will aid integration and analysis of diagnostic data.• Better diagnostic algorithms will lead to faster diagnosis and more rapid treatment. PMID:22699871

  13. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  14. Post-seismic deformation of the Mw 6.4 Shonbeh earthquake (south western Iran) of April 9th, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathian Baneh, Aram; Tolomei, Cristiano; Lugari, Alessandro; Trasatti, Elisa; Salvi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The study of post-seismic deformation within a region is of high significance to have a better understanding of the kinematic behavior of a seismogenic fault. We perform the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method to process a large number of X-Band, COSMO-SkyMed images to measure the post-seismic deformation due to the Shonbeh earthquake (Iran) of 9th April 2013 (Mw 6.4). The meizoseismal zone of the earthquake and following aftershocks' epicenters cover an area in the frontal edge of the Zagros Simply Folded Zone, in the southwest of Iran, between Kaki and Kangan anticlines. Exploiting the available dataset of images from the beginning of 2013 to mid 2014, we observe the concentration of the deformation along at least two NW- striking, southwest-dipping fault segments arranged in right-step pattern and parallel to the trend of the folds. The preliminary InSAR results illustrate the migration of the post-seismic deformation and stress relaxation from the southeastern toward the northwestern fault segments.

  15. Computational mediation as factor of motivation and meaningful learning in education of sciences of 9th grade: astronomy topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, F. M.; Furtado, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of using hypertext and pedagogic mediation in search of a Meaningful Learning Process in Sciences. We investigate the usage of hypertext in the teaching and learning methods of Astronomy modules. A survey was conducted with students from the 9th grade of Primary School of a public school in the city of Goiânia, Goiás in Brazil. We have analyzed the possibilities that hypermedia can offer in the teaching and learning process, using as reference David Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Learning. The study was divided into four phases: application of an initial questionnaire on students, development of didactic material (hypertext), six classes held in a computer lab with the use of hypermedia and a final questionnaire applied in the lab after classes. This research indicated that the use of hypertext linked to pedagogical mediation processes is seen as a motivational tool and has potential to foster to Meaningful Learning.

  16. Alpha-gal anaphylaxis: the first case report in Italy.

    PubMed

    Calamari, A M; Poppa, M; Villalta, D; Pravettoni, V

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man who went into anaphylactic shock six hours after eating a meal containing meat. He reported having had several tick bites in months before the reaction. The serum specific IgE showed strong positivity to alpha-gal. This is clearly alpha-gal anaphylaxis with delayed onset after meat ingestion caused by tick bite, confirmed by alpha-gal IgE positivity. PMID:26357002

  17. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ST3GAL4 Gene with VWF Antigen and Factor VIII Activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Jaewoo; Xue, Cheng; Preisser, John S; Cramer, Drake W; Houck, Katie L; Liu, Guo; Folsom, Aaron R; Couper, David; Yu, Fuli; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    VWF is extensively glycosylated with biantennary core fucosylated glycans. Most N-linked and O-linked glycans on VWF are sialylated. FVIII is also glycosylated, with a glycan structure similar to that of VWF. ST3GAL sialyltransferases catalyze the transfer of sialic acids in the α2,3 linkage to termini of N- and O-glycans. This sialic acid modification is critical for VWF synthesis and activity. We analyzed genetic and phenotypic data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ST3GAL4 gene with plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity in 12,117 subjects. We also analyzed ST3GAL4 SNPs found in 2,535 subjects of 26 ethnicities from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project for ethnic diversity, SNP imputation, and ST3GAL4 haplotypes. We identified 14 and 1,714 ST3GAL4 variants in the ARIC GWAS and 1000G databases respectively, with 46% being ethnically diverse in their allele frequencies. Among the 14 ST3GAL4 SNPs found in ARIC GWAS, the intronic rs2186717, rs7928391, and rs11220465 were associated with VWF levels and with FVIII activity after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, ever-smoking status, and ABO. This study illustrates the power of next-generation sequencing in the discovery of new genetic variants and a significant ethnic diversity in the ST3GAL4 gene. We discuss potential mechanisms through which these intronic SNPs regulate ST3GAL4 biosynthesis and the activity that affects VWF and FVIII. PMID:27584569

  18. PREFACE: EUCAS '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009) EUCAS '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzapfel, Bernhard; Schultz, Ludwig; Schlörb, Heike

    2010-03-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains plenary, invited and a selection of contributed oral papers of the four main EUCAS areas: materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications and electronics. The remaining contributed papers that were selected for the conference proceedings will be published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Dresden EUCAS conference, with 712 participants from 43 countries, continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe-based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Among all the high level papers of this issue we particularly want to highlight the plenary contribution of Praveen Chaudhari on grain boundaries in cuprate superconductors. In his paper Praveen discusses the Jc limitation in HTSC tapes and tunnelling spectroscopy in LSCO thin film bicrystals. Just a few weeks ago we received the sad news that Praveen had passed away on 13 January 2010. Already fighting with his serious illness, Praveen spent all his efforts last fall finishing his plenary talk and paper. This paper will remind us always of his contributions to basic and applied aspects of superconductivity in general and especially his important work on HTSC grain boundaries. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and we would especially like to express our gratitude to all the members of the Local Organization

  19. Cancer immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer utilizing α-gal epitope/natural anti-Gal antibody reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tanemura, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Eiji; Nagano, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Hatanaka, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the poorest prognosis of all malignancies and is largely resistant to standard therapy. Novel treatments against PDAC are desperately needed. Anti-Gal is the most abundant natural antibody in humans, comprising about 1% of immunoglobulins and is also naturally produced in apes and Old World monkeys. The anti-Gal ligand is a carbohydrate antigen called “α-gal epitopes” with the structure Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R. These epitopes are expressed as major carbohydrate antigens in non-primate mammals, prosimians, and New World monkeys. Anti-Gal is exploited in cancer vaccines to increase the immunogenicity of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Cancer cells or PDAC tumor lysates are processed to express α-gal epitopes. Vaccination with these components results in in vivo opsonization by anti-Gal IgG in PDAC patients. The Fc portion of the vaccine-bound anti-Gal interacts with Fcγ receptors of APCs, inducing uptake of the vaccine components, transport of the vaccine tumor membranes to draining lymph nodes, and processing and presentation of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Cancer vaccines expressing α-gal epitopes elicit strong antibody production against multiple TAAs contained in PDAC cells and induce activation of multiple tumor-specific T cells. Here, we review new areas of clinical importance related to the α-gal epitope/anti-Gal antibody reaction and the advantages in immunotherapy against PDAC. PMID:26523105

  20. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-11-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  1. The Development of Veteran 9th-Grade Physics Teachers' Knowledge for Using Representations to Teach the Topics of Energy Transformation and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study…

  2. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume II. Bulletin 1690-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the second volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Four instructional areas are profiled in this volume: environmental protection, career information, energy conservation, and agricultural mechanics. The environmental protection unit covers safe use of…

  3. Beating the Odds: How Thirteen NYC Schools Bring Low-Performing 9th-Graders to Timely Graduation and College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol; Maguire, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a follow-up qualitative study, conducted in 2006 by the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, of a small group of New York City high schools that were "beating the odds" in preparing low-performing 9th-grade students for timely high school graduation and college going. The 13 schools included two long-established…

  4. The Impact of a Teaching-Learning Program Based on a Brain-Based Learning on the Achievement of the Female Students of 9th Grade in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabatat, Kawthar; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the impact of teaching-learning program based on a brain-based learning on the achievement of female students of 9th grade in chemistry, to accomplish the goal of this study the researchers designed instruments of: instructional plans, pre achievement and past achievement exams to use them for the study-validity and…

  5. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  6. Influence of Computer-Assisted Roundhouse Diagrams on High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding the Subjects of "Force and Motion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocakaya, F.; Gönen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Main aim of this study is to examine the influence of computer-assisted roundhouse diagrams on high school 9th grade students' academic achievements in the subjects of "Force and Motion". The study was carried out in a public high school in Diyarbakir the province in the Southeast of Turkey. In the study, the…

  7. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry…

  8. PREFACE: Eucas '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains all contributed papers that were accepted for the Conference Proceedings. The Dresden EUCAS conference with 712 participants from 43 countries continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and especially we would like to express our gratitude to all members of the Local Organization Committee. Their enthusiastic and well organized work made this Dresden EUCAS conference a memorable event for all participants. Last but not least we are very grateful to W. Goldacker , S. Haindl, J. Hänisch, R. Hühne, M. Noe, P. Seidel and M. Siegel for their extraordinary help during the proceedings review process. Bernhard Holzapfel Ludwig Schultz Conference Chairmen The IW-SMI 2010 Organizing Committee: Masato Okada (University of Tokyo) Yoshiyuki Kabashima, General Chair (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Shin Ishii (Kyoto University) Jun-ichi Inoue, Publications Chair (Hokkaido University) Kazuyuki Tanaka (Tohoku University) Toshiyuki Tanaka, Vice-General Chair (Kyoto University)

  9. Trends in weight management goals and behaviors among 9th-12th grade students: United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zewditu; Lowry, Richard; Eaton, Danice K; Nihiser, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    To examine trends in weight management goals and behaviors among U.S. high school students during 1999-2009. Data from six biennial cycles (1999-2009) of the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Cross-sectional, nationally representative samples of 9th-12th grade students (approximately 14,000 students/cycle) completed self-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression models adjusted for grade, race/ethnicity, and obesity were used to test for trends in weight management goals and behaviors among subgroups of students. Combined prevalences and trends differed by sex and by race/ethnicity and weight status within sex. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of female students trying to gain weight decreased (7.6-5.7 %). Among female students trying to lose or stay the same weight, prevalences decreased for eating less (69.6-63.2 %); fasting (23.3-17.6 %); using diet pills/powders/liquids (13.7-7.8 %); and vomiting/laxatives (9.5-6.6 %) for weight control. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of male students trying to lose weight increased (26.1-30.5 %). Among male students trying to lose or stay the same weight, the prevalence of exercising to control weight did not change during 1999-2003 and then increased (74.0-79.1 %) while the prevalence of taking diet pills/powders/liquids for weight control decreased (6.9-5.1 %) during 1999-2009. Weight management goals and behaviors changed during 1999-2009 and differed by subgroup. To combat the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors, efforts may be needed to teach adolescents about recommended weight management strategies and avoiding the risks associated with unhealthy methods. PMID:24781877

  10. Neutron absorber inserts for 55-gal drums

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.E.; Kim, Y.S.; Toffer, H.

    2000-07-01

    Transport and temporary storage of more than 200 g of fissile material in 55-gal drums at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have received significant attention during the cleanup mission. This paper discusses successful applications and results of extensive computer studies. Interim storage and movement of fissile material in excess of standard drum limits (200 g) in a safe configuration have been accomplished using special drum inserts. Such inserts have constrained the contents of a drum to two 4-{ell} bottles. The content of the bottles was limited to 600 g Pu or U in solution or a total of 1200 g for the entire drum. The inserts were a simple design constructed of stainless steel, forming a vertical cylindrical pipe into which two bottles, one on top of the other, could be centered in the drum. The remaining drum volume was configured to preclude any additional bottle placement external to the vertical cylinder. Such inserts in drums were successfully used in moving high-concentration solution from one building to another for chemical processing. Concern about the knowledge of fissile material concentration in bottles prompted another study for drum inserts. The past practice had been to load up to fourteen 4-{ell} bottles into 55-gal drums, provided the fissile material concentration was <6 g fissile/{ell}, and the total drum contents of 200 g fissile was not exceeded. Only one determination of the solution concentration was needed. An extensive safety analysis concluded that a single measurement of bottle content could not ensure compliance with double-contingency-criterion requirements. A second determination of the bottle contents was required before bottles could be placed in a 55-gal drum. Al alternative to a dual-measurement protocol, which is for bolstering administrative control, was to develop an engineered safety feature that would eliminate expensive tests and administrative decisions. A drum insert design was evaluated that

  11. Mutations in GAL2 or GAL4 alleviate catabolite repression produced by galactose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez; Flores

    2000-06-01

    Galactose does not allow growth of pyruvate carboxylase mutants in media with ammonium as a nitrogen source, and inhibits growth of strains defective in phosphoglyceromutase in ethanol-glycerol mixtures. Starting with pyc1, pyc2, and gpm1 strains, we isolated mutants that eliminated those galactose effects. The mutations were recessive and were named dgr1-1 and dgr2-1. Strains bearing those mutations in an otherwise wild-type background grew slower than the wild type in rich galactose media, and their growth was dependent on respiration. Galactose repression of several enzymes was relieved in the mutants. Biochemical and genetic evidence showed that dgr1-1 was allelic with GAL2 and dgr2-1 with GAL4. The results indicate that the rate of galactose consumption is critical to cause catabolite repression. PMID:10862881

  12. Shear-wave polarization analysis of the seismic swarm following the July 9th 1998 Faial (Azores) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, N. A.; Matias, L.; Tellez, J.; Senos, L.; Gaspar, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    The Azores Islands, located at a tectonic triple Junction, geodynamically are a highly active place. The seismicity in this region occurs mainly in the form of two types of seismic swarms with tectonic and/or volcanic origins, lasting from hours to years. In some cases the swarm follows a main stronger shock, while in others the more energetic event occurs sometime after the beginning of the swarm. In order to understand the complex phenomena of this region, a multidisciplinary approach is needed, involving geophysical, geological and geochemical studies such as the one being carried under the MASHA project (POCTI/CTA/39158/2001), On July 9th 1998 an Mw=6.2 earthquake stroked the island of Faial, in the central group of the Azores archipelago, followed by a seismic swarm still active today. We will present some preliminary results of the shear-wave polarization analysis of a selected dataset of events of this swarm. These correspond to the 112 best- constrained events, record during the first 2 weeks by the seismic network deployed on the 3 islands surrounding the area of the main shock. The objective was to analyse the behaviour of the S wave polarization and the eventual relationship with the presence of seismic anisotropy under the seismic stations, and to correlate this with the regional structure and origin of the Azores plateau. Two main tectonic features are observable on the islands, one primarily orientated SE-NW and the other crossing it roughly with the WNW-ESE direction. The polarization direction observed in the majority of the seismic stations is not stable, varying from SE-NW to WSW-ENE, and showing also the presence in same cases of shear-wave splitting, indicating the presence of anisotropy. Part of the polarization seems to be coherent with the direction of the local tectonic features, but its instability suggest a more complex seismic anisotropy than that proposed by the model EDA of Crampin. Furthermore, the dataset revealed some limitations to

  13. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  14. Gal/GalNAc specific multiple lectins in marine bivalve Anadara granosa.

    PubMed

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit

    2016-03-01

    Complete lectin mapping of molluscs with their diversified recognition pattern and possible role in lectin-carbohydrate interaction based immune response triggering need much attention. In this communication, Gal/GalNAc specific three lectins AGL-IA (Anadara granosa lectin-IA), AGL-IB (A. granosa lectin-IB) and AGL-IV (A. granosa lectin-IV) and a lectin having hemolytic activity AGL-III (A. granosa lectin-III) were purified from the plasma of A. granosa bivalve by a combination of gel filtration and affinity chromatography. AGL-IA and IB were oligomeric lectins whereas, AGL-III and IV were monomeric. The molecular weight of AGL-IA, IB, III and IV were 375, 260, 45 and 33 kDa respectively. AGL-IA and IV agglutinated both rabbit and pronase treated human erythrocytes, whereas AGL-IB agglutinated only rabbit erythrocytes. AGL-III was found to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, however, it caused hemolysis of pronase treated human erythrocytes. The activity of all four lectins was calcium dependent and maximum at a pH range 7-8. Apart from Gal/GalNAc specific, the four lectins showed substantial differences in their carbohydrate recognition pattern. Moreover, there was a difference in the carbohydrate specificity between AGL-III and other three lectins (AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV) towards polyvalent glycotope. On the one hand, 'cluster glycoside effect' i.e., an enhancement of the activity of a multivalent ligand, was observed for carbohydrate specificities of AGL-IA, AGL-IB, AGL-IV. On the other hand, the effect of multivalent ligands on the carbohydrate specificity of AGL-III was opposite of cluster glycoside effect. The affinity of AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV for ligands can be ranked as follows: glycoproteins > polysaccharide > oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. However, Gal related monosaccharides were the best inhibitors of AGL-III and the inhibitory activity decreased gradually in the following order: monosaccharide > disaccharide > polysaccharide. Thus, the

  15. Distribution of the Galβ1-4Gal Epitope among Birds: Species-Specific Loss of the Glycan Structure in Chicken and Its Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Noriko; Nawa, Daisuke; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Lin, Chia-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The Galβ1-4Gal epitope is rarely found in mammals, and the natural antibody against Galβ1-4Gal is rich in human. In contrast, we have previously demonstrated the presence of Galβ1-4Gal in pigeon and ostrich, and the absence of this epitope in chicken. Here, to further investigate the expression of this glycan among birds, egg white glycoproteins and egg yolk IgG from nine species of birds, namely, chicken, duck, emu, guineafowl, ostrich, peafowl, pigeon, quail, and turkey, were analyzed by western blot using an anti-(Galβ1-4Gal) antibody. The results indicated that some egg white glycoproteins from emu, ostrich, and quail, and heavy chains of IgG from all of the birds, except chicken and quail, were stained with the antibody. The presence of Galβ1-4Gal on N-glycans of IgGs from guineafowl, peafowl, and turkey were confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS), MS/MS, and MSn analyses. In quail, the presence of Galβ1-4Gal was confirmed by detecting the activities of UDP-galactose: β-galactoside β1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT(Gal)) in various tissues, and by detecting Galβ1-4Gal by western blotting. In contrast, bamboo partridge, which is a close relative of chicken, did not show any detectable activities of β4GalT(Gal) or Galβ1-4Gal on glycoproteins. Because quail, peafowl, turkey, chicken, and bamboo partridge belong to the same family, i.e., Phasianidae, expression of Galβ1-4Gal was most likely differentiated within this family. Considering that Galβ1-4Gal is also expressed in ostrich, emu, and pigeon, which are phylogenetically distant relatives within modern birds, Galβ1-4Gal expression appears to be widely distributed among birds, but might have been abolished in the ancestors of chicken and bamboo partridge. PMID:23527153

  16. Distribution of the Galβ1-4Gal epitope among birds: species-specific loss of the glycan structure in chicken and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriko; Nawa, Daisuke; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Lin, Chia-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The Galβ1-4Gal epitope is rarely found in mammals, and the natural antibody against Galβ1-4Gal is rich in human. In contrast, we have previously demonstrated the presence of Galβ1-4Gal in pigeon and ostrich, and the absence of this epitope in chicken. Here, to further investigate the expression of this glycan among birds, egg white glycoproteins and egg yolk IgG from nine species of birds, namely, chicken, duck, emu, guineafowl, ostrich, peafowl, pigeon, quail, and turkey, were analyzed by western blot using an anti-(Galβ1-4Gal) antibody. The results indicated that some egg white glycoproteins from emu, ostrich, and quail, and heavy chains of IgG from all of the birds, except chicken and quail, were stained with the antibody. The presence of Galβ1-4Gal on N-glycans of IgGs from guineafowl, peafowl, and turkey were confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS), MS/MS, and MS(n) analyses. In quail, the presence of Galβ1-4Gal was confirmed by detecting the activities of UDP-galactose: β-galactoside β1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT(Gal)) in various tissues, and by detecting Galβ1-4Gal by western blotting. In contrast, bamboo partridge, which is a close relative of chicken, did not show any detectable activities of β4GalT(Gal) or Galβ1-4Gal on glycoproteins. Because quail, peafowl, turkey, chicken, and bamboo partridge belong to the same family, i.e., Phasianidae, expression of Galβ1-4Gal was most likely differentiated within this family. Considering that Galβ1-4Gal is also expressed in ostrich, emu, and pigeon, which are phylogenetically distant relatives within modern birds, Galβ1-4Gal expression appears to be widely distributed among birds, but might have been abolished in the ancestors of chicken and bamboo partridge. PMID:23527153

  17. Characteristics of α-Gal epitope, anti-Gal antibody, α1,3 galactosyltransferase and its clinical exploitation (Review).

    PubMed

    Huai, Guoli; Qi, Ping; Yang, Hongji; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The α-Gal epitope (Galα1,3Galα1,4GlcNAc‑R) is ubiquitously presented in non-primate mammals, marsupials and New World Monkeys, but it is absent in humans, apes and Old World monkeys. However, the anti-Gal antibody (~1% of immunoglobulins) is naturally generated in human, and is found as the immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM and IgA isotypes. Owing to the specific binding of the anti‑Gal antibody with the α‑Gal epitope, humans have a distinct anti‑α‑gal reactivity, which is responsible for hyperacute rejection of organs transplanted from α‑gal donors. In addition, the α1,3 galactosyltransferases (α1,3GT) can catalyze the synthesis of the α‑Gal epitope. Therefore, the α1,3GT gene, which encodes the α1,3GT, is developed profoundly. The distributions of the α‑Gal epitope and anti‑Gal antibody, and the activation of α1,3GT, reveal that the enzyme of α1,3GT in ancestral primates is ineffective. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the human α1,3‑GT pseudogene to the corresponding different species sequence, and according to the evolutionary tree of different species, the results of evolutionary inactivation of the α1,3GT gene in ancestral primates attribute to the mutations under a stronger selective pressure. However, on the basis of the structure, the mechanism and the specificity of the α‑Gal epitope and anti‑Gal antibody, they can be applied to clinical exploitation. Knocking out the α1,3GT gene will eliminate the xenoantigen, Gal(α1,3)Gal, so that the transplantation of α1,3GT gene knockout pig organ into human becomes a potential clinically acceptable treatment for solving the problem of organ shortage. By contrast, the α‑Gal epitope expressed through the application of chemical, biochemical and genetic engineering can be exploited for the clinical use. Targeting anti‑Gal‑mediated autologous tumor vaccines, which express α‑Gal epitope to antigen‑presenting cells, would increase their immunogenicity and elicit

  18. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  19. Phylogeography of the Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis): a recent arrival to the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bollmer, Jennifer L; Kimball, Rebecca T; Whiteman, Noah Kerness; Sarasola, José Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-04-01

    Galápagos hawks (Buteo galapagoensis) are one of the most inbred bird species in the world, living in small, isolated island populations. We used mitochondrial sequence and nuclear minisatellite data to describe relationships among Galápagos hawk populations and their colonization history. We sampled 10 populations (encompassing the entire current species range of nine islands and one extirpated population), as well as the Galápagos hawk's closest mainland relative, the Swainson's hawk (B. swainsoni). There was little sequence divergence between Galápagos and Swainson's hawks (only 0.42% over almost 3kb of data), indicating that the hawks colonized Galápagos very recently, likely less than 300,000 years ago, making them the most recent arrivals of the studied taxa. There were only seven, closely related Galápagos hawk haplotypes, with most populations being monomorphic. The mitochondrial and minisatellite data together indicated a general pattern of rapid population expansion followed by genetic isolation of hawk breeding populations. The recent arrival, genetic isolation, and phenotypic differentiation among populations suggest that the Galápagos hawk, a rather new species itself, is in the earliest stages of further divergence. PMID:16376110

  20. Amoebiasis vaccine development: A snapshot on E. histolytica with emphasis on perspectives of Gal/GalNAc lectin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Kennedy, John F

    2016-10-01

    Amoebiasis/amebiasis is a gastrointestinal infection caused by an enteric dwelling protozoan, Entamoeba histolytica. The disease is endemic in the developing world and is transmitted mainly via the faecal-oral route (e.g., in water or food) and may or may not be symptomatic. This disease of socio-economic importance worldwide involves parasite adherence and cytolysis of human cells followed by invasion that is mediated by galactose-binding (Gal/GalNAc) surface lectin. Disruption of the mucus layer leads to invasive intestinal and extraintestinal infection. Gal-lectin based vaccinations have conferred protection in various animal models against E. histolytica infections. Keeping in view the pivotal role of Gal/GalNAc lectin in amoebiasis vaccine development, its regulation, genomic view of the parasite involving gene conversion in lectin gene families, current knowledge about involvement of Gal/GalNAc lectin in adherence, pathogenicity, signalling, encystment, generating host immune response, and in turn protozoa escape strategies, and finally its role as effective vaccine candidate has been described. This review will help researchers to explore pathogenesis mechanism along with genomic studies and will also provide a framework for future amoebiasis vaccine development studies. PMID:27181579

  1. Sequence of the Saccharomyces GAL region and its transcription in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Citron, B A; Donelson, J E

    1984-01-01

    In Saccharomyces, the enzymes used to convert galactose to glucose are specified by three coordinately expressed, tightly linked genes, GAL7, GAL10, and GAL1. These genes are induced by galactose and are controlled by the positive regulator gene gal4 and the negative regulator gene gal80. GAL81 mutations, which are known to alter the gal4 protein, produce a constitutive phenotype. We have cloned fragments of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis DNA that span 26.3 kilobases surrounding the three clustered GAL genes. About 5 kilobases of the sequence was determined, which includes the entire GAL1 gene, the two intercistronic regions, and portions of the coding sequences of GAL10 and GAL7. Some amino acid homology between the GAL1 gene product, galactokinase, and the Escherichia coli galactokinase was detected. By using various Saccharomyces DNA fragments, the accumulation of GAL1 and GAL10 RNA in yeast cells after induction with galactose was studied. Our results, using wild-type, gal4-, gal80-, and GAL81-1- yeast cells, support the hypothesis that control is exerted at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:6715281

  2. The Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (α-Gal) epitope: a carbohydrate of unique evolution and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Macher, Bruce A.; Galili, Uri

    2008-01-01

    In 1985, we reported that a naturally occurring human antibody (anti-Gal), produced as the most abundant antibody (1% of immunoglobulins) throughout the life of all individuals, recognizes a carbohydrate epitope Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R (the α-gal epitope). Since that time, an extensive literature has developed on discoveries related to the α-gal epitope and the anti-Gal antibody, including the barrier they form in xenotransplantation and their reciprocity in mammalian evolution. This review covers these topics and new avenues of clinical importance related to this (α-gal epitope/anti-Gal) unique antigen/antibody system in improving the efficacy of viral vaccines and in immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:18047841

  3. GAL3 receptor KO mice exhibit an anxiety-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Susanne M.; Farzi, Aitak; Locker, Felix; Holub, Barbara S.; Drexel, Meinrad; Reichmann, Florian; Lang, Andreas A.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Vilches, Jorge J.; Navarro, Xavier; Lang, Roland; Sperk, Günther; Holzer, Peter; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin (GAL) is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is a modulator of various physiological and pathological processes, and it mediates its effects via three G protein-coupled receptors (GAL1–3 receptors). A role for GAL as a modulator of mood and anxiety was suggested, because GAL and its receptors are highly expressed in limbic brain structures of rodents. In recent years, numerous studies of animal models have suggested an involvement of GAL and GAL1 and GAL2 receptors in anxiety- and depression-related behavior. However, to date, there is sparse literature implicating GAL3 receptors in behavioral functions. Therefore, we studied the behavior of GAL3 receptor-deficient (GAL3-KO) mice to elucidate whether GAL3 receptors are involved in mediating behavior-associated actions of GAL. The GAL3-KO mouse line exhibited normal breeding and physical development. In addition to behavioral tests, phenotypic characterization included analysis of hematology, amino acid profiles, metabolism, and sudomotor function. In contrast to WT littermates, male GAL3-KO mice exhibited an anxiety-like phenotype in the elevated plus maze, open field, and light/dark box tests, and they were less socially affiliated than WT animals to a stranger mouse in a social interaction test. In conclusion, our data suggest involvement of GAL3 receptors in GAL-mediated effects on mood, anxiety, and behavior, making it a possible target for alternative treatment strategies for mood disorders. PMID:24782539

  4. Upstream activation sequence-dependent alteration of chromatin structure and transcription activation of the yeast GAL1-GAL10 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, M J; Kornberg, R D

    1989-01-01

    Conversion of the positioned nucleosome array characteristic of the repressed GAL1-GAL10 promoter region to the more accessible conformation of the induced state was found to depend on the upstream activation sequence, GAL4 protein, a positive regulator of transcription, and galactose, the inducing agent. The effect of the GAL4 protein-upstream activation sequence complex on the structure of adjacent chromatin required no other promoter sequences. Although sequences protected by histones in the repressed state became more accessible to micrococcal nuclease and (methidiumpropyl-EDTA)iron(II) cleavage following induction of transcription, DNA-protein particles containing these sequences retained the electrophoretic mobility of nucleosomes, indicating that the promoter region can be associated with nucleosomes under conditions of transcription activation. Images PMID:2657404

  5. Expression of alpha-GalNAc glycoproteins by breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, S. A.; Leathem, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    The expression of complex carbohydrates recognised by Helix pomatia lectin (HPA, nominal monosaccharide binding specificity alpha-GalNAc) has been shown to predict unfavourable prognosis in breast and other cancers. It has been suggested that the prognostic significance of HPA binding may be through recognition of either Tn epitope (alpha-GalNAc-O-serine/threonine) or blood group A antigen (terminal alpha-1-->3GalNAc attached to the basic H-antigen, Fuc-alpha-1-->2-Gal-beta-1-->4(or 3) GlcNAc-->R). In this study, the expression of glycoproteins terminating in alpha-GalNAc residues was investigated immunohistochemically using HPA and two monoclonal antibodies--BRIC 66 (anti-alpha-GalNAc) and BRIC 111 (anti-Tn). In paraffin sections, 74/87 (85%) of breast cancers expressed HPA-binding ligands, while 28/87 (32%) were positive for BRIC 66 binding and 25/87 (29%) expressed Tn. Distribution of staining patterns were distinctive and different with the three markers. BRIC 66, BRIC 111 and HPA binding to glycoproteins derived from breast cancer homogenates and to blood group A and Tn positive glycoproteins in Western blots confirmed the immunohistochemistry data. The results suggest that the prognostic significance of HPA binding in breast cancer is unlikely to be simply through recognition of blood group A antigen or Tn epitope on cancer cells. Breast cancers may express a complex profile of related but distinct glycans sharing similar terminal immunodominant sugar GalNAc, which may be implicated in aggressive biological behaviour. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7537516

  6. Organization of the GAL1-GAL10 intergenic control region chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, D

    1984-01-01

    A defined, "far upstream" promoter element, the Upstream Activator Sequence (UAS), which mediates the galactose dependent induction of expression of the GAL10 gene in yeast, is the locus of an anomalous, mainly expression independent chromatin structure. The UAS chromatin shows three symmetrical DNase I hypersensitive sites in brief digests, a loss of the 10 bp DNase I ladder pattern in more extensive digests and an enhanced staphylococcal nuclease sensitivity. This anomalous structure is confined to a small region of the UAS. The surrounding chromatin, including the TATA box regions shows a more typical, but expression dependent nucleoprotein, probably nucleosomal, organization. Such an arrangement may be a common feature of eukaryotic genes. Images PMID:6095201

  7. 9th GCC closed forum: CAPA in regulated bioanalysis; method robustness, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, regulatory audit experiences and electronic laboratory notebooks.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Roger; LeLacheur, Richard; Dumont, Isabelle; Couerbe, Philippe; Safavi, Afshin; Islam, Rafiq; Pattison, Colin; Cape, Stephanie; Rocci, Mario; Briscoe, Chad; Cojocaru, Laura; Groeber, Elizabeth; Silvestro, Luigi; Bravo, Jennifer; Shoup, Ron; Verville, Manon; Zimmer, Jennifer; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Khadang, Ardeshir; Bourdage, James; Hughes, Nicola; Fatmi, Saadya; Di Donato, Lorella; Sheldon, Curtis; Keyhani, Anahita; Satterwhite, Christina; Yu, Mathilde; Fiscella, Michele; Hulse, James; Lin, Zhongping John; Garofolo, Wei; Savoie, Natasha; Xiao, Yi Qun; Kurylak, Kai; Harris, Sarah; Saxena, Manju; Buonarati, Mike; Lévesque, Ann; Boudreau, Nadine; Lin, Jenny; Khan, Masood U; Ray, Gene; Liu, Yansheng; Xu, Allan; Soni, Gunjan; Ward, Ian; Kingsley, Clare; Ritzén, Hanna; Tabler, Edward; Nicholson, Bob; Bennett, Patrick; van de Merbel, Nico; Karnik, Shane; Bouhajib, Mohammed; Wieling, Jaap; Mulvana, Daniel; Ingelse, Benno; Allen, Mike; Malone, Michele; Fang, Xinping

    2016-03-01

    The 9th GCCClosed Forum was held just prior to the 2015 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) in Miami, FL, USA on 13 April 2015. In attendance were 58 senior-level participants, from eight countries, representing 38 CRO companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for CRO bioanalytical representatives to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues selected at this year's closed forum include CAPA, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, and ELNs. A summary of the industry's best practices and the conclusions from the discussion of these topics is included in this meeting report. PMID:26916197

  8. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  9. Toxin A from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.C.; Wilkins, T.D.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-08-15

    The binding of Toxin A isolated from Clostridium difficile to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids has been studied. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and toxin-binding glycolipids detected by using /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A in a direct binding overlay technique. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected in rabbit erythrocytes by this method. The results of structural analyses of the major toxin-binding glycolipids were consistent with a pentasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) and a branched decasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3(Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-6)Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) previously identified as the two most abundant glycolipids in rabbit erythrocytes. /sup 125/I-Toxin A binding to these glycolipids could be inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin, monospecific antiserum to the toxin, or by treatment of the glycolipids with alpha-galactosidase. The absence of toxin interaction with isoglobotriaosylceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) isolated from canine intestine suggested that the GlcNAc residue present in the terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GLcNAc sequence common to all known toxin binding glycoconjugates is required for carbohydrate-specific recognition by Toxin A. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate binding specificity of Toxin A for the nonreducing terminal sequence, Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc.

  10. Fotometria superficial BVRI de 18 galáxias fracas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, M. F. O.; Silva, P. R.

    2003-08-01

    Conhecer as propriedades de galáxias a diferentes redshifts é uma questão fundamental para entender o problema da formação e evolução das galáxias, e desde a década passada tem se intensificado fortemente o estudo de galáxias muito distantes. No entanto parece haver um interesse menor em galáxias a distâncias intermediárias, que aparecem como objetos de fundo em imagens de objetos próximos, e que são igualmente importantes. Examinando imagens BVRI de longa exposição, ótimo sinal/ruído, grande campo (46'x46'), das vizinhanças de NGC 7479, detectamos 18 galáxias fracas (18 < B < 21) nessas imagens. Neste trabalho, apresentamos a fotometria superficial desses objetos. Determinamos coordenadas equatoriais, magnitudes e cores integradas, perfis de brilho e de cor, e parâmetros isofotais calculados por ajuste de ellipses, dentro do limite permitido pela baixa resolução espacial dos dados (1,35 segarc/pixel). Nosso objetivo é procurar correlações entre as propriedades das galáxias e, tentativamente, comparar esses dados com aqueles de galáxias de redshift conhecido, disponíveis na literatura, para estimar suas distâncias (a partir da relação cor x redshift) e suas morfologias. Uma análise preliminar nesse sentido mostrou que as cores aparentes B-V, V-R e V-I dos objetos da nossa amostra, a menos de duas exceções, ocupam regiões bem definidas nos diagramas cor-cor, e não apresentam diferenças notáveis em relação às cores típicas de galáxias próximas.

  11. The Influence of Gastric Antral Ulcerations on the Expression of Galanin and GalR1, GalR2, GalR3 Receptors in the Pylorus with Regard to Gastric Intrinsic Innervation of the Pyloric Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal; Sienkiewicz, Waldemar; Franke-Radowiecka, Amelia; Klimczuk, Magdalena; Kaleczyc, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Gastric antrum ulcerations are common disorders occurring in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers disturbs the gastric emptying process, which is precisely controlled by the pylorus. Galanin (Gal) and its receptors are commonly accepted to participate in the regulation of inflammatory processes and neuronal plasticity. Their role in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility is also widely described. However, there is lack of data considering antral ulcerations in relation to changes in the expression of Gal and GalR1, GalR2, GalR3 receptors in the pyloric wall tissue and galaninergic intramural innervation of the pylorus. Two groups of pigs were used in the study: healthy gilts and gilts with experimentally induced antral ulcers. By double immunocytochemistry percentages of myenteric and submucosal neurons expressing Gal-immunoreactivity were determined in the pyloric wall tissue and in the population of gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter (labelled by retrograde Fast Blue neuronal tracer). The percentage of Gal-immunoreactive neurons increased only in the myenteric plexus of the pyloric wall (from 16.14±2.06% in control to 25.5±2.07% in experimental animals), while no significant differences in other neuronal populations were observed between animals of both groups. Real-Time PCR revealed the increased expression of mRNA encoding Gal and GalR1 receptor in the pyloric wall tissue of the experimental animals, while the expression(s) of GalR2 and GalR3 were not significantly changed. The results obtained suggest the involvement of Gal, GalR1 and galaninergic pyloric myenteric neurons in the response of pyloric wall structures to antral ulcerations. PMID:27175780

  12. А new Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus: Structure, tissue specificity, antimicrobial and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Chikalovets, Irina V; Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Litovchenko, Alina P; Molchanova, Valentina I; Pivkin, Mikhail V; Chernikov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a new Gal/GalNAc specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus (designated as MTL) was identified, and its expression levels, both in tissues and toward pathogen stimulation, were then characterized. The MTL primary structure was determined via cDNA sequencing. Deduced sequence of 150 amino acid residues showed 89% similarity to lectins from the mussels Crenomytilus grayanus and Mytilus galloprovincialis that were the first members of a new family of zoolectins. The results indicated that the MTL might be involved in immune response toward pathogen infection, and it might perform different recognition specificity toward bacteria or fungi. PMID:26802895

  13. The gal Genes for the Leloir Pathway of Lactobacillus casei 64H

    PubMed Central

    Bettenbrock, Katja; Alpert, Carl-Alfred

    1998-01-01

    The gal genes from the chromosome of Lactobacillus casei 64H were cloned by complementation of the galK2 mutation of Escherichia coli HB101. The pUC19 derivative pKBL1 in one complementation-positive clone contained a 5.8-kb DNA HindIII fragment. Detailed studies with other E. coli K-12 strains indicated that plasmid pKBL1 contains the genes coding for a galactokinase (GalK), a galactose 1-phosphate-uridyltransferase (GalT), and a UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE). In vitro assays demonstrated that the three enzymatic activities are expressed from pKBL1. Sequence analysis revealed that pKBL1 contained two additional genes, one coding for a repressor protein of the LacI-GalR-family and the other coding for an aldose 1-epimerase (mutarotase). The gene order of the L. casei gal operon is galKETRM. Because parts of the gene for the mutarotase as well as the promoter region upstream of galK were not cloned on pKBL1, the regions flanking the HindIII fragment of pKBL1 were amplified by inverse PCR. Northern blot analysis showed that the gal genes constitute an operon that is transcribed from two promoters. The galKp promoter is inducible by galactose in the medium, while galEp constitutes a semiconstitutive promoter located in galK. PMID:9603808

  14. The alpha gal story: Lessons learned from connecting the dots

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be rapidly progressing and fatal; thus, establishing the etiology of anaphylaxis is pivotal to long-term risk management. Our recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal). IgE to alpha-gal has been associated with two distinct forms of anaphylaxis: i) immediate onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab, and ii) delayed onset anaphylaxis 3–6 hours after ingestion of mammalian food products (e.g., beef and pork). Results of our studies and those of others strongly suggest that tick bites are a cause, if not the only significant cause, of IgE antibody responses to alpha-gal in the southern, eastern and central United States, Europe, Australia and parts of Asia. Typical immune responses to carbohydrates are considered to be T cell-independent, while IgE antibody production is thought to involve sequential class-switching that requires input from T cells. Therefore, establishing the mechanism of the specific IgE antibody response to alpha-gal will be an important aspect to address as this area of research continues. PMID:25747720

  15. In Galápagos … and Uncomfortable with Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, Sehoya; Graczyk, Hannah; Rodríguez Garcia, José Luis; Moore, Randy

    2016-01-01

    In June 2013, the third World Evolution Summit convened on San Cristóbal, hosting scientists from around the world (Paz-y-Miño-C and Espinosa 2013)--neither the first nor likely the last gathering of biologists on these remote islands. Clearly, both locals and an international audience perceive Galápagos as figuring prominently in discourse about…

  16. Toxin a from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with therminal Gal. cap alpha. 1-3Gal. beta. 1-4GlcNaC sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.; Wilkins, T.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Toxin A is one of two clostridial toxins implicated as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis in patients undergoing postoperative antibiotic therapy. Evidence that the carbohydrate binding determinant for this toxin is a glycoconjugate(s) with non-reducing Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc has recently been reported. Specific agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes by Toxin A is inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin and prevented by pretreatment of cells with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the chromatogram overlaid with purified /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected following autoradiography. The major toxin-binding glycolipids were identified as pentasaccharide- and decasaccharide-ceramides expressing terminal Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc sequences. Treatment of the toxin-binding glycolipids with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase abolished binding. Forsmann glycolipid, globoside, Gal..cap alpha..1-4 Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer, and Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer did not bind the toxin. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate specificity of the toxin for the non-reducing terminal sequence, Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc.

  17. Burkitt lymphoma research in East Africa: highlights from the 9th African organization for research and training in cancer conference held in Durban, South Africa in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A one-day workshop on Burkitt lymphoma (BL) was held at the 9th African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) conference in 2013 in Durban, South Africa. The workshop featured 15 plenary talks by delegates representing 13 institutions that either fund or implement research on BL targeting AORTIC delegates primarily interested in pediatric oncology. The main outcomes of the meeting were improved sharing of knowledge and experience about ongoing epidemiologic BL research, BL treatment in different settings, the role of cancer registries in cancer research, and opportunities for African scientists to publish in scientific journals. The idea of forming a consortium of BL to improve coordination, information sharing, accelerate discovery, dissemination, and translation of knowledge and to build capacity, while reducing redundant efforts was discussed. Here, we summarize the presentations and discussions from the workshop. PMID:25686906

  18. Report from the World Health Organization's Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) meeting, Geneva, 7-9th Sep 2015.

    PubMed

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Kaslow, David C; Moorthy, Vasee S

    2016-06-01

    There are more vaccines in development, against a greater number of pathogens, than ever before. A challenge with this exceptional level of activity and investment is how to select and resource the most promising approaches to have the most significant impact on public health. The WHO Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) was established in 2014 to provide strategic advice and recommendations to WHO for vaccines in clinical development that could have a significant impact on public health in low and middle income countries. On 7-9th September 2015, PDVAC was convened for the second time, when the committee reviewed vaccine developments in 24 disease areas. This report summarises the key recommendations from that consultation. PMID:26993336

  19. The DNA binding domain of GAL4 forms a binuclear metal ion complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, T; Coleman, J E

    1990-03-27

    The transcription factor GAL4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires Zn(II) or Cd(II) for specific recognition of the UASG sequence (Pan & Coleman, 1989). An N-terminal fragment consisting of the first 63 amino acid residues of GAL4 [GAL4(63)] has been obtained by partial tryptic proteolysis of a cloned and overproduced N-terminal domain of 149 residues, GAL(149). We show that GAL4(63) contains the minimal GAL4 DNA binding domain. GAL4(63) binds tightly 1-2 mol of Zn(II) or 2 mol of Cd(II). 113Cd NMR of 113Cd(II)-substituted GAL4(63) reveals structural identity between the metal binding domains of GAL4(63) and that of the larger precursor GAL4(149). 113Cd(II) can be substituted for the Zn(II) in GAL4(63), and two 113Cd NMR signals are observed at 706 and 669 ppm, both suggesting coordination of 113Cd(II) to three or four -S- ligands. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine, the only sulfur-containing residues are the six highly conserved cysteines. High-resolution 1H NMR of Zn(II)-GAL4(63) and Cd(II)-GAL4(63) show the two proteins to have almost identical conformations and to be present as monomers in solutions up to millimolar concentration. This leads us to postulate that GAL4 does not possess a TFIIIA-like "Zn-finger" but forms a binuclear metal cluster involving all six cysteines in a "cloverleaf"-like array. GAL4(63) contains about 60% alpha-helix, estimated from circular dichroism. Removal of the native Zn(II) causes substantial unfolding of the secondary structure. Unlike GAL4(149), the resultant apoprotein is not induced to refold by readdition of Zn(II) at low concentrations. PMID:2186803

  20. SAGA is an essential in vivo target of the yeast acidic activator Gal4p

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Sukesh R.; Green, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Despite major advances in characterizing the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery, the function of promoter-specific transcriptional activators (activators) is still not understood. For example, in no case have the direct in vivo targets of a transcriptional activator been unambiguously identified, nor has it been resolved whether activators have a single essential target or multiple redundant targets. Here we address these issues for the prototype acidic activator yeast Gal4p. Gal4p binds to the upstream activating sequence (UAS) of GAL1 and several other GAL genes and stimulates transcription in the presence of galactose. Previous studies have shown that GAL1 transcription is dependent on the yeast SAGA (Spt/Ada/GCN5/acetyltransferase) complex. Using formaldehyde-based in vivo cross-linking, we show that the Gal4p activation domain recruits SAGA to the GAL1 UAS. If SAGA is not recruited to the UAS, the preinitiation complex (PIC) fails to assemble at the GAL1 core promoter, and transcription does not occur. SAGA, but not other transcription components, is also recruited by the Gal4p activation domain to a plasmid containing minimal Gal4p-binding sites. Recruitment of SAGA by Gal4p and stimulation of PIC assembly is dependent on several SAGA subunits but not the SAGA histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) GCN5. Based on these and other results, we conclude that SAGA is an essential target of Gal4p that, following recruitment to the UAS, facilitates PIC assembly and transcription. PMID:11485988

  1. Historical DNA analysis reveals living descendants of an extinct species of Galápagos tortoise

    PubMed Central

    Poulakakis, Nikos; Glaberman, Scott; Russello, Michael; Beheregaray, Luciano B.; Ciofi, Claudio; Powell, Jeffrey R.; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2008-01-01

    Giant tortoises, a prominent symbol of the Galápagos archipelago, illustrate the influence of geological history and natural selection on the diversification of organisms. Because of heavy human exploitation, 4 of the 15 known species (Geochelone spp.) have disappeared. Charles Darwin himself detailed the intense harvesting of one species, G. elephantopus, which once was endemic to the island of Floreana. This species was believed to have been exterminated within 15 years of Darwin's historic visit to the Galápagos in 1835. The application of modern DNA techniques to museum specimens combined with long-term study of a system creates new opportunities for identifying the living remnants of extinct taxa in the wild. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data obtained from museum specimens to show that the population on Floreana was evolutionarily distinct from all other Galápagos tortoise populations. It was demonstrated that some living individuals on the nearby island of Isabela are genetically distinct from the rest of the island's inhabitants. Surprisingly, we found that these “non-native” tortoises from Isabela are of recent Floreana ancestry and closely match the genetic data provided by the museum specimens. Thus, we show that the genetic line of G. elephantopus has not been completely extinguished and still exists in an intermixed population on Isabela. With enough individuals to commence a serious captive breeding program, this finding may help reestablish a species that was thought to have gone extinct more than a century ago and illustrates the power of long-term genetic analysis and the critical role of museum specimens in conservation biology. PMID:18809928

  2. Lithological structure of the Galápagos Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidito, Christopher; Herzberg, Claude; Gazel, Esteban; Geist, Dennis; Harpp, Karen

    2013-10-01

    We have measured Ni, Ca, and Mn in olivine phenocrysts from volcanoes in the Galápagos Archipelago to infer the mantle source lithologies. Results show that peridotite is the dominant source lithology for Fernandina, Floreana, Genovesa, Wolf Island, and Darwin Island. These volcanoes largely characterize the PLUME, WD, FLO, and DUM Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic endmembers of Harpp and White (2001). Volcan Wolf, Alcedo, Marchena, and Cerro Azul, also produced from the melting of peridotite sources, have isotopic compositions that can be defined by mixing of the four isotopic endmembers. Our analysis suggests that peridotite was present in the sources of the volcanoes covered in this study and therefore is the dominant source lithology of the Galápagos plume. Pyroxenite melting is generally focused in two isotopically distinct domains: Roca Redonda, Volcan Ecuador, and Sierra Negra in the enriched western part of the archipelago and Santiago, Santa Cruz, and Santa Fe in the depleted east. One implication of this finding is that the Western and Eastern Pyroxenite Domains represent two separate bodies of recycled crust within the Galápagos mantle plume. Furthermore, both isotopically enriched and depleted domains of the archipelago were generated from mixtures of peridotite and pyroxenite. This suggests that there is no relationship between the source lithology of the Galápagos plume and its isotopic characteristics. The identification of peridotite-source melting in volcanoes with isotopic characteristics that have been attributed to recycled crust points to the importance of mixing in OIB genesis, consistent with studies in the Canary Islands.

  3. Sip1 Is a Catabolite Repression-Specific Negative Regulator of Gal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mylin, L. M.; Bushman, V. L.; Long, R. M.; Yu, X.; Lebo, C. M.; Blank, T. E.; Hopper, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Snflp kinase is required for normal expression of amny genes involved in utilization of non-glucose carbon. Snflp is known to associate with several proteins. One is Sip1p, a protein that becomes phosphorylated in the presence of Snflp and thus is a candidate Snflp kinase substrate. We have isolated the SIP1 gene as a multicopy suppressor of the gal83-associated defect in glucose repression of GAL gene expression. Multicopy SIP1 also suppressed the gal82-associated defect in glucose repression, suggesting that SIP1, GAL83 and GAL82 function interdependently. Multicopy SIP1 gene reduces GAL1, GAL2, GAL7 and GAL10 gene expression three- to fourfold in cells grown in the presence of glucose but has no effect in cells grown on nonrepressing carbon. Sip1-deletion cells exhibited a two- to threefold increase in GAL gene expression compared to wild-type cells when grown on glucose. These studies show that SIP1 is a catabolite repression-specific negative regulator of GAL gene expression. Northern analysis revealed two SIP1 transcripts whose relative abundance changed with carbon source. Western blots revealed that Sip1p abundance is not markedly affected by carbon source, suggesting that Sip1p may be regulated post-translationally. PMID:8088514

  4. Results of Life-Supporting GalT-KO kidneys in Cynomolgus Monkeys Using Two Different Sources of GalT-KO Swine

    PubMed Central

    Sekijima, Mitsuhiro; Waki, Shiori; Sahara, Hisashi; Tasaki, Masayuki; Wilkinson, Robert A.; Villani, Vincenzo; Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Nakano, Kazuaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Fishman, Jay A.; Shimizu, Akira; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Various durations of survival have been observed in the xenotransplantation of life-supporting alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) porcine kidneys into nonhuman primates (NHPs). While others have demonstrated loss of GalT-KO transplanted kidneys within two weeks, we have reported an average survival of 51 days with the co-transplantation of the kidney and vascularized thymus and an average of 29 days with the kidney alone. In order to determine the factors responsible for this difference in survival time, we performed xenogeneic kidney transplantations into cynomolgus monkeys with an anti-CD40L-based regimen using two different strains of GalT-KO swine, one derived from MGH-Miniature swine and the other obtained from Meji University. Materials and Methods Eight cynomolgus moneys received GalT-KO kidneys. Three kidney grafts were from MGH/NIBS GalT-KO pigs and 5 GalT-KO grafts were from MEIJI GalT-KO swine. All cynomolgus recipients were treated identically. Results Recipients of kidneys from the MGH GalT-KO swine, produced by nuclear transfer in Japan, survived an average of 28.7 days, while recipients of MEIJI GalT-KO swine survived an average of 9.2 days. Among the differences between these two groups, one potentially revealing disparity was that the MEIJI swine were positive for porcine-CMV, while the MGH-derived swine were negative. Conclusions This is the first study comparing renal xenotransplantation from two different sources of GalT-KO swine into NHPs at a single center. The results demonstrate that porcine-CMV may be responsible for early loss of GalTKO swine kidney xenografts. PMID:25243512

  5. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population. PMID:25256815

  6. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents. PMID:27563919

  7. The comparison of Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17 and Th22 cytokine profiles in acute and chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Gorenec, Lana; Zidovec Lepej, Snjezana; Grgic, Ivana; Planinic, Ana; Iscic Bes, Janja; Vince, Adriana; Begovac, Josip

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare cytokine expression on both gene and protein levels in acute and chronic phase of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Thirty four patients were enrolled for cytokine expression analysis on protein level in acute and chronic stage of HIV-1 infection. Using PCR array technology, expression of 84 cytokine genes was measured in 3 patients in acute and 3 patients in chronic stage of HIV-1 infection. Bead-based cytometry was used to quantify levels of Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22 cytokines. The results showed statistically significant increase of 13 cytokine gene expression (cd40lg, csf2, ifna5, il12b, il1b, il20, lta, osm, spp1, tgfa, tnfsf 11, 14 and 8) and downregulation of the il12a expression in chronic HIV type 1 infection. Concentrations of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-α were increased in the acute HIV type 1 infection when compared to control group. During chronic HIV type 1 infection there was an increase of IL-10, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-13 and IL-22 levels when compared to control group. Comparison of cytokine expression between two stages of infection showed a significant decrease in IL-9 concentration. This study showed changes in cytokine profiles on both gene and protein levels in different stages of HIV-infection. PMID:27268396

  8. The yeast GAL11 protein binds to the transcription factor IIE through GAL11 regions essential for its in vivo function.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Kim, Y J; Ohishi, T; Kornberg, R D; Fukasawa, T

    1996-01-01

    The GAL11 gene encodes an auxiliary transcription factor required for full expression of many genes in yeast. The GAL11-encoded protein (Gal11p) has recently been shown to copurify with the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase II. Here we report that Gal11p stimulates basal transcription in a reconstituted transcription system composed of recombinant or highly purified transcription factors, TFIIB, TFIIE, TFIIF, TFIIH, and TATA box-binding protein and core RNA polymerase II. We further demonstrate that each of the two domains of Gal11p essential for in vivo function respectively participates in the binding to the small and large subunits of TFIIE. The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II was coprecipitated by anti-hemagglutinin epitope antibody from crude extract of GAL11 wild type yeast expressing hemagglutinintagged small subunit of TFIIE. Such a coprecipitation of the RNA polymerase subunit was seen but in a greatly reduced amount, if extract was prepared from gal11 null yeast. In light of these findings, we suggest that Gal11p stimulates promoter activity by enhancing an association of TFIIE with the preinitiation complex in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790357

  9. Computational studies of H5N1 hemagglutinin binding with SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal

    SciTech Connect

    Li Minyong; Wang Binghe . E-mail: wang@gsu.edu

    2006-09-01

    For influenza H5N1 hemagglutinin, a switch from SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal to SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal receptor specificity is a critical step leading to the conversion from avian-to-human to human-to-human infection. Therefore, the understanding of the binding modes of SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal to H5N1 hemagglutinin will be very important for the examination of possible mutations needed for going from an avian to a human flu virus. Based on the available H5N1 hemagglutinin crystal structure, the binding profiles between H5N1 hemagglutinin and two saccharide ligands, SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal, were investigated by ab initio quantum mechanics, molecular docking, molecular mechanics, and molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal has strong multiple hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions in its trans conformation with H5N1 hemagglutinin, whereas the SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal only shows weak interactions in a different conformation (cis type)

  10. On the Ancestral UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Activity of GalF from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ebrecht, Ana C.; Orlof, Agnieszka M.; Sasoni, Natalia; Figueroa, Carlos M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, UDP-glucose is a central intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism. The enzyme responsible for its synthesis is encoded by the galU gene and its deletion generates cells unable to ferment galactose. In some bacteria, there is a second gene, galF, encoding for a protein with high sequence identity to GalU. However, the role of GalF has been contradictory regarding its catalytic capability and not well understood. In this work we show that GalF derives from a catalytic (UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) ancestor, but its activity is very low compared to GalU. We demonstrated that GalF has some residual UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity by in vitro and in vivo experiments in which the phenotype of a galU- strain was reverted by the over-expression of GalF and its mutant. To demonstrate its evolutionary path of “enzyme inactivation” we enhanced the catalysis by mutagenesis and showed the importance of the quaternary structure. This study provides important information to understand the structural and functional evolutionary origin of the protein GalF in enteric bacteria. PMID:26617591

  11. Characterization of Two UDP-Gal:GalNAc-Diphosphate-Lipid β1,3-Galactosyltransferases WbwC from Escherichia coli Serotypes O104 and O5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Czuchry, Diana; Liu, Bin; Vinnikova, Anna N.; Gao, Yin; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Szarek, Walter A.; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli displays O antigens on the outer membrane that play an important role in bacterial interactions with the environment. The O antigens of enterohemorrhagic E. coli O104 and O5 contain a Galβ1-3GalNAc disaccharide at the reducing end of the repeating unit. Several other O antigens contain this disaccharide, which is identical to the mammalian O-glycan core 1 or the cancer-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen. We identified the wbwC genes responsible for the synthesis of the disaccharide in E. coli serotypes O104 and O5. To functionally characterize WbwC, an acceptor substrate analog, GalNAcα-diphosphate-phenylundecyl, was synthesized. WbwC reaction products were isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, galactosidase and O-glycanase digestion, and anti-TF antibody. The results clearly showed that the Galβ1-3GalNAcα linkage was synthesized, confirming WbwCECO104 and WbwCECO5 as UDP-Gal:GalNAcα-diphosphate-lipid β1,3-Gal-transferases. Sequence analysis revealed a conserved DxDD motif, and mutagenesis showed the importance of these Asp residues in catalysis. The purified enzymes require divalent cations (Mn2+) for activity and are specific for UDP-Gal and GalNAc-diphosphate lipid substrates. WbwC was inhibited by bis-imidazolium salts having aliphatic chains of 18 to 22 carbons. This work will help to elucidate mechanisms of polysaccharide synthesis in pathogenic bacteria and provide technology for vaccine synthesis. PMID:24957618

  12. Decreased specific antibody responses to alpha-Gal-conjugated antigen in animals with preexisting high levels of natural antibodies binding alpha-Gal residues.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, H K; De Vries Reilingh, G; Lammers, A

    2008-05-01

    High levels of natural antibodies (NAb) binding the alpha-Gal residue (Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc) are found in poultry (and humans), which is probably reflected by high levels of natural agglutinating antibodies (Ab) to rabbit red blood cells (RRBC) in plasma from chickens (and humans). Recently, it was shown that alpha-Gal conjugation of proteins induced higher antiprotein Ab responses in alpha-Gal knockout mice, suggesting immune-enhancing features of preexisting Ab binding carbohydrate-protein conjugates. We challenged chickens s.c. with either alpha-Gal-conjugated human serum albumin (HuSA), beta-Gal-conjugated HuSA, or unconjugated ("native") HuSA, respectively, and measured primary and secondary Ab responses to HuSA, including isotype IgM and IgG responses, and cellular immune responses in vitro (lymphoproliferation) to HuSA or concanavalin A. alpha-Gal conjugation, but not beta-Gal conjugation, of HuSA resulted in significantly decreased primary and secondary Ab responses to HuSA, especially IgG isotype responses, as compared with Ab responses to native HuSA. Lymphoproliferation in vitro was also decreased, although not significantly, in birds challenged with alpha-Gal-conjugated HuSA. High levels of agglutinating Ab levels to RRBC and NAb binding porcine thyroglobulin were detected in all birds, as was true for (natural) Ab levels binding alpha-Gal-conjugated HuSA before immunization, whereas low levels of preexisting (natural) antibodies directed to native HuSA were present in plasma before immunization. Levels of RRBC agglutinins and Ab binding thyroglobulin were not affected by immunization with HuSA, alpha-Gal-conjugated HuSA, or beta-Gal-conjugated HuSA. Our data confirm the presence of high levels of (preexisting) NAb in the plasma of chickens directed to the alpha-Gal residue. The decreased responsiveness to alpha-Gal-bearing antigens in the current study shows that, in addition to immune-enhancing features, NAb may also have suppressive effects on

  13. Earthlinks '97: Proceedings of the Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Education Society of Australasia (9th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, January 13-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, John J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 9th Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Society of Australasia. The contents provide a valuable snapshot of the state of environmental education in Australia while moving towards the end of the 20th century. Papers include: (1) "Stand…

  14. Trends of violence among 7th, 8th and 9th grade students in the state of Lara, Venezuela: The Global School Health Survey 2004 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Violence by young people is one of the most visible forms of violence and contributes greatly to the global burden of premature death, injury and disability. Methods The Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), State of Lara, Venezuela (GSHS-Lara) is a school-based surveillance system. It comprises a repeated, cross-sectional, self-administered survey drawn from a representative sample of 7th to 9th grade students, performed in the school years 2003-2004 (GSHS-Lara 2004) and 2007-2008 (GSHS-Lara 2008). It explores, among other things, a general violence indicator such as school absenteeism due to feeling unsafe at school or on the way to or from school for any reason; and more specific indicators of violence such as robbery, bullying, physical fights and use of weapons, as well as exposure to lectures on how to prevent violence. Results are given in terms of prevalence percentage. Results Absenteeism doubled between the two study periods (10.8% to 20.8%). The number of students that were a victim of robbery remained high and without change both outside (14.2% and 14.8%) and inside school (21.7% and 22.0%). The number of victims of bullying was high and increasing (33.4% and 43.6%). Bullying associated with being physically attacked decreased (18.5% to 14.3%). Physical attacks without active participation and not associated with bullying were frequent (21.5%). Physical fighting with active participation prevalence remained high and without change (27.5% and 28.2%). Carrying a weapon almost doubled (4.3% to 7.1%). Less than 65% reported classes for violence prevention. Conclusions The GSHS-Lara shows that violence is an important public health problem that needs to be addressed by the community and its authorities. PMID:22958602

  15. Imaging in pleural mesothelioma: a review of imaging research presented at the 9th International Meeting of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Anna K; Armato, Samuel G; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Yildirim, Huseyin; Francis, Roslyn J

    2010-10-01

    Imaging of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) poses many challenges for imaging specialists and clinicians due to the anatomic location and unique growth pattern of this tumor. Nevertheless, imaging in MPM plays a critical role in diagnosis, prognostication, prediction or measurement of response to therapy, and monitoring of disease recurrence after aggressive surgical management. Imaging-based studies presented at the 9th International Conference of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) in October 2008 sought to further define the current practice and future potential of imaging for the mesothelioma patient. The Imaging Session was dominated by presentations that addressed the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), a clear indication of the expanding role of this modality. These uses included FDG-PET imaging at the point of diagnosis, in prognostication, and in the assessment of response to chemotherapy. Often FDG-PET studies were combined with computed tomography (CT) scans in an attempt to overcome limitations associated with either imaging modality alone. At diagnosis, FDG-PET parameters had a high sensitivity and specificity for differentiation of benign from malignant pleural disease. The use of FDG-PET to extract quantitative features from metabolically active tumor volume was shown to be a significant factor in the prediction of patient survival. The prognostic value of FDG-PET was not confounded by prior talc pleurodesis, despite the inflammatory response associated with the procedure. Metabolic response based on FDG-PET was found to be significantly correlated with progression-free survival. CT-based assessment of mesothelioma was determined to be inconsistent with spherical-model-based criteria so that changes in tumor area, a presumably more complete assessment of tumor burden, exhibited a 46% concordance rate with changes in linear measurements. PMID:20541834

  16. Regulation of the Immune Response to α-Gal and Vector-borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Valdés, James J; Mera, Isabel G Fernández de; Villar, Margarita; de la Fuente, José

    2015-10-01

    Vector-borne diseases (VBD) challenge our understanding of emerging diseases. Recently, arthropod vectors have been involved in emerging anaphylactic diseases. In particular, the immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody response to the carbohydrate Galα1-3Galβ1-(3)4GlcNAc-R (α-gal) following a tick bite was associated with allergies to red meat, cetuximab, and gelatin. By contrast, an anti-α-gal IgM antibody response was shown to protect against mosquito-borne malaria. Herein, we highlight the interplay between the gut microbiota, vectors, transmitted pathogens, and the regulation of the immune response as a model to understand the protective or allergic effect of α-gal. Establishing the source of α-gal in arthropod vectors and the immune response to vector bites and transmitted pathogens will be essential for diagnosing, treating, and ultimately preventing these emerging anaphylactic and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:26433250

  17. Arm-Gal4 inheritance influences development and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Slade, F A; Staveley, B E

    2015-01-01

    The UAS-Gal4 ectopic expression system is a widely used and highly valued tool that allows specific gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. Yeast transcription factor Gal4 can be directed using D. melanogaster transcriptional control elements, and is often assumed to have little effect on the organism. By evaluation of the consequences of maternal and paternal inheritance of a Gal4 transgene under the transcriptional regulation of armadillo control elements (arm-Gal4), we demonstrated that Gal4 expression could be detrimental to development and longevity. Male progeny expressing arm-Gal4 in the presence of UAS-lacZ transgene had reduced numbers and size of ommatidia, compared to flies expressing UAS-lacZ transgene under the control of other Gal4 transgenes. Aged at 25°C, the median life span of male flies with maternally inherited elav-Gal4 was 70 days, without a responding transgene or with UAS-lacZ. The median life span of maternally inherited arm-Gal4 male flies without a responding transgene was 48 days, and 40 days with the UAS-lacZ transgene. A partial rescue of this phenotype was observed with the expression of UAS-lacZ under paternal arm-Gal4 control, having an average median lifespan of 60 days. This data suggests that arm-Gal4 has detrimental effects on Drosophila development and lifespan that are directly dependent upon parental inheritance, and that the benign responder and reporter gene UAS-lacZ may influence D. melanogaster development. These findings should be taken into consideration during the design and execution of UAS-Gal4 expression experiments. PMID:26505429

  18. Expression of Functional Human Sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Soto, Maria Elena; Seibel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Sialyltransferases (STs) are disulfide-containing, type II transmembrane glycoproteins that catalyze the transfer of sialic acid to proteins and lipids and participate in the synthesis of the core structure oligosaccharides of human milk. Sialic acids are found at the outermost position of glycostructures, playing a key role in health and disease. Sialylation is also essential for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins (RTPs). Despite their importance, availability of sialyltransferases is limited due to the low levels of stable, soluble and active protein produced in bacterial expression systems, which hampers biochemical and structural studies on these enzymes and restricts biotechnological applications. We report the successful expression of active human sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in commercial Escherichia coli strains designed for production of disulfide-containing proteins. Fusion of hST3Gal1 with different solubility enhancers and substitution of exposed hydrophobic amino acids by negatively charged residues (supercharging-like approach) were performed to promote solubility and folding. Co-expression of sialyltransferases with the chaperon/foldases sulfhydryl oxidase, protein disulfide isomerase and disulfide isomerase C was explored to improve the formation of native disulfide bonds. Active sialyltransferases fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) were obtained in sufficient amounts for biochemical and structural studies when expressed under oxidative conditions and co-expression of folding factors increased the yields of active and properly folded sialyltransferases by 20%. Mutation of exposed hydrophobic amino acids increased recovery of active enzyme by 2.5-fold, yielding about 7 mg of purified protein per liter culture. Functionality of recombinant enzymes was evaluated in the synthesis of sialosides from the β-d-galactoside substrates lactose, N-acetyllactosamine and benzyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O

  19. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  20. Systems biology of GAL regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat Reddy; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, K V

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary success of an organism depends on its ability to express or adapt to constantly changing environmental conditions. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved an elaborate genetic circuit to regulate the expression of galactose-metabolizing enzymes in the presence of galactose but in the absence of glucose. The circuit possesses molecular mechanisms such as multiple binding sites, cooperativity, autoregulation, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and substrate sensing mechanism. Furthermore, the GAL system consists of two positive (activating) feedback and one negative (repressing) feedback loops. These individual mechanisms, elucidated through experimental approach, can be integrated to obtain a system-wide behavior. Mathematical models in conjunction with guided experiments have demonstrated system-level properties such as ultrasensitivity, memory, noise attenuation, rapid response, and sensitive response arising out of the molecular interactions. These system-level properties allow S. cerevisiae to adapt and grow in a galactose medium under noisy and changing environments. This review focuses on system-level models and properties of the GAL regulon. PMID:20836013

  1. Pollination patterns and plant breeding systems in the Galápagos: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Susana; Heleno, Ruben; Olesen, Jens M.; McMullen, Conley K.; Traveset, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of the Galápagos Islands for the development of central concepts in ecology and evolution, the understanding of many ecological processes in this archipelago is still very basic. One such process is pollination, which provides an important service to both plants and their pollinators. The rather modest level of knowledge on this subject has so far limited our predictive power on the consequences of the increasing threat of introduced plants and pollinators to this unique archipelago. Scope As a first step toward building a unified view of the state of pollination in the Galápagos, a thorough literature search was conducted on the breeding systems of the archipelago's flora and compiled all documented flower–visitor interactions. Based on 38 studies from the last 100 years, we retrieved 329 unique interactions between 123 flowering plant species (50 endemics, 39 non-endemic natives, 26 introduced and eight of unknown origin) from 41 families and 120 animal species from 13 orders. We discuss the emergent patterns and identify promising research avenues in the field. Conclusions Although breeding systems are known for <20 % of the flora, most species in our database were self-compatible. Moreover, the incidence of autogamy among endemics, non-endemic natives and alien species did not differ significantly, being high in all groups, which suggests that a poor pollinator fauna does not represent a constraint to the integration of new plant species into the native communities. Most interactions detected (approx. 90 %) come from a single island (most of them from Santa Cruz). Hymenopterans (mainly the endemic carpenter bee Xylocopa darwinii and ants), followed by lepidopterans, were the most important flower visitors. Dipterans were much more important flower visitors in the humid zone than in the dry zone. Bird and lizard pollination has been occasionally reported in the dry zone. Strong biases were detected in the sampling effort

  2. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  3. PREFACE: 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity and 9th International Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Grinberga, Liga; Sarakovskis, Anatolijs; Rutkis, Martins

    2015-03-01

    The joint International Symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT successfully has united two international events - 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity (RCBJSF-12) and 9th International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2014). The RCBJSF symposium is a continuation of series of meetings on ferroelectricity, the first of which took place in Novosibirsk (USSR) in 1976. FM&NT conferences started in 2006 and have been organized by Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia in Riga. In 2012 the International program committee decided to transform this conference into a traveling Baltic State conference and the FM&NT-2013 was organized by the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia. In 2014 the joint international symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia and was part of Riga - 2014, the European Capital of Culture event. The purpose of the joint Symposium was to bring together scientists, students and high-level experts in solid state physics, materials science, engineering and related disciplines. The number of the registered participants from 26 countries was over 350. During the Symposium 128 high quality scientific talks (5 plenary, 42 invited, 81 oral) and over 215 posters were presented. All presentations were divided into 4 parallel sessions according to 4 main topics of the Symposium: Ferroelectricity, including ferroelectrics and multiferroics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics and actuators, integrated ferroelectrics, relaxors, phase transitions and critical phenomena. Multifunctional Materials, including theory, multiscale and multiphenomenal material modeling and simulation, advanced inorganic, organic and hybrid materials. Nanotechnologies, including progressive methods, technologies and design for production, investigation of nano- particles, composites, structures, thin films and coatings. Energy, including perspective materials and

  4. The development of veteran 9th-grade physics teachers' knowledge for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study was guided by the assumption that there are a limited number of experiences in which teachers engage throughout their career that contribute in significant ways to the development of their knowledge. The primary sources of data were observations of an entire unit of instruction on energy and a series of four stimulated-recall interviews throughout the unit of instruction. The stimulated recall interviews focused on the participants' instruction and knowledge regarding the representations used throughout the energy unit. These data sources were supported by interviews focused on the participants' work history and professional development as well interviews focused on their unit/lesson plans. The results of the phenomenographic analysis revealed that nine categories of experiences informed the development of the three participant's PCK for using representations to teach the energy topics. The categories included: 1) teaching experience, 2) Physics First professional development, 3) other school district-supported professional development 4) collaboration with current colleagues, 5) past collaboration with experienced teachers, 6) academic experiences as a learner of science, 7) school district expectations, 8) collaboration with university faculty and other university professional development, and 9) non-academic life experiences. The analysis also revealed that as a result of engaging in the nine experiences, the participants developed more integrated knowledge for using representations in their instruction, which included understandings regarding the essential features of specific representations, knowledge of barriers to

  5. Human monocytes recognize porcine endothelium via the interaction of galectin 3 and alpha-GAL.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongyu; Greenwald, Allen; Peterson, Mark D; Waddell, Thomas K

    2006-07-15

    Monocytes are one of the key inflammatory cells recruited to xenografts and play an important role in delayed xenograft rejection. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of monocytes to bind to the major xenoantigen Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R; however, the receptor that mediates this interaction has yet to be identified. We provide evidence that it is Galectin-3, a approximately 30-kDa lectin that recognizes beta-galactosides (Gal-beta(1-3/4)GlcNAc) and plays diverse roles in many physiological and pathological events. Human monocyte binding is strikingly increased on porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), which express high levels of Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R, compared with human aortic endothelial cells. Human monocytes obtained from healthy donors bind to Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R at variable intensities. This variation of binding intensity was consistent and reproducible in individual donors. Galectin-3 is mainly expressed in human monocytes, not lymphocytes. Purified Galectin-3 is able to bind directly to Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R. Galectin-3 can also be affinity isolated from monocytes (and not lymphocytes) using an Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R-biotin/streptavidin-bead pull-down system. Soluble Galectin-3 binds preferentially to PAEC vs human aortic endothelial cells, and this binding can be inhibited by lactose, indicating dependence on the carbohydrate recognition domain of Galectin-3. Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R is at least partly responsible for this phenomenon, as binding decreased after digestion of PAEC with alpha-galactosidase. Furthermore, monocytes pretreated with a blocking anti-Galectin-3 Ab show decreased adhesion to PAEC when compared with isotype control in a parallel plate flow chamber perfusion assay. Thus, we conclude that Galectin-3 expressed in human monocytes is a receptor for the major xenoantigen (Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R), expressed on porcine endothelial cells

  6. Probing polypeptide GalNAc-transferase isoform substrate specificities by in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yun; Joshi, Hiren J; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Madsen, Thomas Daugbjerg; Gerken, Thomas A; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric Paul; Levery, Steven B; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc)-type (mucin-type) O-glycosylation is an abundant and highly diverse modification of proteins. This type of O-glycosylation is initiated in the Golgi by a large family of up to 20 homologous polypeptide GalNAc-T isoenzymes that transfer GalNAc to Ser, Thr and possibly Tyr residues. These GalNAc residues are then further elongated by a large set of glycosyltransferases to build a variety of complex O-glycan structures. What determines O-glycan site occupancy is still poorly understood, although it is clear that the substrate specificities of individual isoenzymes and the repertoire of GalNAc-Ts in cells are key parameters. The GalNAc-T isoenzymes are differentially expressed in cells and tissues in principle allowing cells to produce unique O-glycoproteomes dependent on the specific subset of isoforms present. In vitro analysis of acceptor peptide substrate specificities using recombinant expressed GalNAc-Ts has been the method of choice for probing activities of individual isoforms, but these studies have been hampered by biological validation of actual O-glycosylation sites in proteins and number of substrate testable. Here, we present a systematic analysis of the activity of 10 human GalNAc-T isoenzymes with 195 peptide substrates covering known O-glycosylation sites and provide a comprehensive dataset for evaluating isoform-specific contributions to the O-glycoproteome. PMID:25155433

  7. X-gal Staining on Adult Mouse Brain Sections

    PubMed Central

    Kokubu, Hiroshi; Lim, Janghoo

    2016-01-01

    Knowing expression patterns of given proteins is very important to understand their functions. Immunostaining analysis with specific antibodies is commonly used to identify cells or tissues expressing proteins of interest. Although this technique is regularly used, it requires high quality of specific antibodies and there is no good quality of antibody available for certain proteins. Alternatively, X-gal staining is also used to analyze protein expression pattern. It is simple and routinely used to detect expression pattern of any proteins of interest in vivo. In this method, genetically modified animals that express beta-galactosidase under the control of certain regulatory elements will be used to reveal the expression pattern of proteins that use the same regulatory elements.

  8. The DNA binding and activation domains of Gal4p are sufficient for conveying its regulatory signals.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, W V; Johnston, S A

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional activation function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae activator Gal4p is known to rely on a DNA binding activity at its amino terminus and an activation domain at its carboxy terminus. Although both domains are required for activation, truncated forms of Gal4p containing only these domains activate poorly in vivo. Also, mutations in an internal conserved region of Gal4p inactivate the protein, suggesting that this internal region has some function critical to the activity of Gal4p. We have addressed the question of what is the minimal form of Gal4 protein that can perform all of its known functions. A form with an internal deletion of the internal conserved domain of Gal4p is transcriptionally inactive, allowing selection for suppressors. All suppressors isolated were intragenic alterations that had further amino acid deletions (miniGAL4s). Characterization of the most active miniGal4 proteins demonstrated that they possess all of the known functions of full-length Gal4p, including glucose repression, galactose induction, response to deletions of gal11 or gal6, and interactions with other proteins such as Ga180p, Sug1p, and TATA binding protein. Analysis of the transcriptional activities, protein levels, and DNA binding abilities of these miniGal4ps and a series of defined internal mutants compared to those of the full-length Gal4p indicates that the DNA binding and activation domains are necessary and sufficient qualitatively for all of these known functions of Gal4p. Our observations imply that the internal region of Gal4 protein may serve as a spacer to augment transcription and/or may be involved in intramolecular or Gal4p-Gal4p interactions. PMID:9111323

  9. Phylogeography and history of giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Caccone, Adalgisa; Gentile, Gabriele; Gibbs, James P; Frirts, Thomas H; Snell, Howard L; Betts, Jessica; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2002-10-01

    We examined the phylogeography and history of giant Galápagos tortoise populations based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data from 161 individuals from 21 sampling sites representing the 11 currently recognized extant taxa. Molecular clock and geological considerations indicate a founding of the monophyletic Galápagos lineage around 2-3 million years ago, which would allow for all the diversification to have occurred on extant islands. Founding events generally occurred from geologically older to younger islands with some islands colonized more than once. Six of the 11 named taxa can be associated with monophyletic maternal lineages. One, Geochelone porteri on Santa Cruz Island, consists of two distinct populations connected by the deepest node in the archipelago-wide phylogeny, whereas tortoises in northwest Santa Cruz are closely related to those on adjacent Pinzón Island. Volcan Wolf, the northernmost volcano of Isabela Island, consists of both a unique set of maternal lineages and recent migrants from other islands, indicating multiple colonizations possibly due to human transport or multiple colonization and partial elimination through competition. These genetic findings are consistent with the mixed morphology of tortoises on this volcano. No clear genetic differentiation between two taxa on the two southernmost volcanoes of Isabela was evident. Extinction of crucial populations by human activities confounds whether domed versus saddleback carapaces of different populations are mono- or polyphyletic. Our findings revealed a complex phylogeography and history for this tortoise radiation within an insular environment and have implications for efforts to conserve these endangered biological treasures. PMID:12449492

  10. High entomotoxicity and mechanism of the fungal GalNAc/Gal-specific Rhizoctonia solani lectin in pest insects.

    PubMed

    Hamshou, Mohamad; Van Damme, Els J M; Caccia, Silvia; Cappelle, Kaat; Vandenborre, Gianni; Ghesquière, Bart; Gevaert, Kris; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Whole insect assays where Rhizoctonia solani agglutinin (RSA) was fed to larval stages of the cotton leaf-worm Spodoptera littoralis and the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum demonstrated a high concentration-dependent entomotoxicity, suggesting that this GalNAc/Gal-specific fungal lectin might be a good control agent for different pest insects. RSA at 10 mg/g in the solid diet of 2nd-instar caterpillars caused 84% weight reduction after 8 days with none of the caterpillars reaching the 4th-instar stage. In sucking aphids, 50% mortality was achieved after 3 days with 9 μM of RSA in the liquid diet. Feeding of FITC-labeled RSA to both insect pest species revealed strong lectin binding at the apical/luminal side of the midgut epithelium with the brush border zone, suggesting the insect midgut as a primary insecticide target tissue for RSA. This was also confirmed with cell cultures in vitro, where there was high fluorescence binding at the microvillar zone with primary cultures of larval midgut columnar cells of S. littoralis, and also at the surface with the insect midgut CF-203 cell line without lectin uptake in the midgut cells. In vitro assays using insect midgut CF-203 cells, revealed that RSA was highly toxic with an EC50 of 0.3 μM. Preincubation with GalNAc and saponin indicated that this action of RSA was carbohydrate-binding dependent and happened at the surface of the cells. Intoxicated CF-203 cells showed symptoms of apoptosis as nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, and this concurred with an increase of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 activities. Finally, RSA affinity chromatography of membrane extracts of CF-203 cells followed by LC-MS/MS allowed the identification of 5747 unique peptides, among which four putatively glycosylated membrane proteins that are associated with apoptosis induction, namely Fas-associated factor, Apoptosis-linked gene-2, Neuroglian and CG2076, as potential binding targets for RSA. These data are discussed in relation to the

  11. A novel CRE recombinase assay for quantification of GAL10-non coding RNA suppression on transcriptional leakage.

    PubMed

    Zacharioudakis, Ioannis; Tzamarias, Dimitris

    2016-05-13

    Eukaryotic promoters are tightly regulated and often securely repressed. However, recent reports indicated that transcripts originating from the strictly regulated GAL1-10 promoter can be detected by single-yeast cell imaging under repressive conditions. Such leaky, noisy transcription events were suppressed by a long non-coding RNA (GAL10-ncRNA) transcribed within the GAL1-10 locus. It was further suggested that GAL10-ncRNA repression of GAL1-10 promoter leakage tunes the bimodal expression pattern of the GAL network. Independent evidence has indicated that GAL10-ncRNA transcription establishes a repressive chromatin structure through the Set2 histone methyl-transferase and the Rpd3s histone deacetylase complex. In this report we set up a novel, simple genetic Cre recombinase assay in order to readily quantify transcriptional leakage from tightly repressed promoters. By applying this method we demonstrate that GAL10-ncRNA, Set2p and Rpd3p all suppress leaky GAL1-10 driven transcription. However, GAL10-ncRNA repression is not mediated by Set2p or Rpd3p. Moreover, as opposed to GAL10-ncRNA transcription, Set2 and Rpd3 do not influence the bimodal expression of GAL genes, despite their effect on GAL1-10 promoter leakage. We suggest that GAL10-ncRNA tunes the expression of GAL genes by additional mechanisms besides suppressing leaky transcription from the GAL1-10 promoter. PMID:27073161

  12. Natural protection from zoonosis by alpha-gal epitopes on virus particles in xenotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Jung, Woon-Won; Oh, Yu-Kyung; Chun, Taehoon; Park, Hong-Yang; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Han, In-Kwon; Yang, Jai Myung; Kim, Young Bong

    2007-03-01

    Clinical transplantation has become one of the preferred treatments for end-stage organ failure, and one of the novel approaches being pursued to overcome the limited supply of human organs involves the use of organs from other species. The pig appears to be a near ideal animal due to proximity to humans, domestication, and ability to procreate. The presence of Gal-alpha1,3-Gal residues on the surfaces of pig cells is a major immunological obstacle to xenotransplantation. Alpha1,3galactosyltransferase (alpha1,3GT) catalyzes the synthesis of Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc-R (alpha-gal epitope) on the glycoproteins and glycolipids of non-primate mammals, but this does not occur in humans. Moreover, the alpha-gal epitope causes hyperacute rejection of pig organs in humans, and thus, the elimination of this antigen from pig tissues is highly desirable. Recently, concerns have been raised that the risk of virus transmission from such pigs may be increased due to the absence of alpha-gal on their viral particles. In this study, transgenic cells expressing alpha1,3GT were selected using 1.25 mg/ml neomycin. The development of HeLa cells expressing alpha1,3GT now allows accurate studies to be conducted on the function of the alpha-gal epitope in xenotransmission. The expressions of alpha-gal epitopes on HeLa/alpha-gal cells were demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy using cells stained with IB4-fluorescein isothiocyanate lectin. Vaccinia viruses propagated in HeLa/alpha-gal cells also expressed alpha-gal on their viral envelopes and were more sensitive to inactivation by human sera than vaccinia virus propagated in HeLa cells. Moreover, neutralization of vaccinia virus was inhibited in human serum by 10 mm ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethylether)tetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment. Our data indicated that alpha-gal epitopes are one of the major barriers to zoonosis via xenotransmission. PMID:17381684

  13. GalNAc-T14 promotes metastasis through Wnt dependent HOXB9 expression in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ok-Seon; Oh, Ensel; Park, Jeong-Rak; Lee, Ji-Seon; Bae, Gab-Yong; Koo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Hyongbum; Choi, Yoon L; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    While metastasis, the main cause of lung cancer-related death, has been extensively studied, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. A previous clinicogenomic study revealed that expression of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T14), is highly inversely correlated with recurrence-free survival in those with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) has not been determined. Here, we showed that GalNAc-T14 expression was positively associated with the invasive phenotype. Microarray and biochemical analyses revealed that HOXB9, the expression of which was increased in a GalNAc-T14-dependent manner, played an important role in metastasis. GalNAc-T14 increased the sensitivity of the WNT response and increased the stability of the β-catenin protein, leading to induced expression of HOXB9 and acquisition of an invasive phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of β-catenin in GalNAc-T14-expressing cancer cells suppressed HOXB9 expression and invasion. A meta-analysis of clinical genomics data revealed that expression of GalNAc-T14 or HOXB9 was strongly correlated with reduced recurrence-free survival and increased hazard risk, suggesting that targeting β-catenin within the GalNAc-T14/WNT/HOXB9 axis may be a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit metastasis in NSCLC. PMID:26544896

  14. Fotometria de grupos compactos de galáxias no infravermelho próximo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasileiro, F.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos medidas nas bandas J, H e K de cerca de 90 galáxias em 34 grupos compactos. Através da combinação dos novos dados, com dados obtidos na literatura para a banda B, investigamos como as luminosidades, cores, tamanhos e massas das galáxias em grupos compactos foram afetadas por processos dinâmicos, e como essas diferem de galáxias em ambientes menos densos. Uma comparação dos novos valores obtidos com aqueles listados no catálogo 2MASS, mostram que para 50 galáxias estudadas em comum, as diferenças nas magnitudes J, H e K estão dentro dos erros fotométricos. Através da construção dos diagramas de cor (J-H x H-K e B-H x J-K), percebemos que as galáxias em grupos compactos ocupam posições no diagrama diferentes das posições de galáxias em campo ou em aglomerados, sendo mais parecidas com as posições ocupadas por galáxias HII, ou com excesso de poeira, acreditamos que tal deslocamento é derivado do aumento da taxa de formação estelar.

  15. A negative feedback loop at the nuclear periphery regulates GAL gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin M.; Jiang, Ying; Joyner, Ryan; Weis, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The genome is nonrandomly organized within the nucleus, but it remains unclear how gene position affects gene expression. Silenced genes have frequently been found associated with the nuclear periphery, and the environment at the periphery is believed to be refractory to transcriptional activation. However, in budding yeast, several highly regulated classes of genes, including the GAL7-10-1 gene cluster, are known to translocate to the nuclear periphery concurrent with their activation. To investigate the role of gene positioning on GAL gene expression, we monitored the effects of mutations that disrupt the interaction between the GAL locus and the periphery or synthetically tethered the locus to the periphery. Localization to the nuclear periphery was found to dampen initial GAL gene induction and was required for rapid repression after gene inactivation, revealing a function for the nuclear periphery in repressing endogenous GAL gene expression. Our results do not support a gene-gating model in which GAL gene interaction with the nuclear pore ensures rapid gene expression, but instead they suggest that a repressive environment at the nuclear periphery establishes a negative feedback loop that enables the GAL locus to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. PMID:22323286

  16. Proteomic Identification of Non-Gal Antibody Targets After Pig-to-Primate Cardiac Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Davila, Eduardo; Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Gazi, Mozammel H.; McGregor, Hugh C. J.; LaBreche, Peter T.; Davies, William R.; Rao, Vinay P.; Oi, Keiji; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Logan, John S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Experience with non-antigenic galactose α1,3 galactose (αGal) polymers and development of αGal deficient pigs has reduced or eliminated the significance of this antigen in xenograft rejection. Despite these advances, delayed xenograft rejection (DXR) continues to occur most likely due to antibody responses to non-Gal endothelial cell (EC) antigens. Methods To gauge the diversity of the non-Gal antibody response we used antibody derived from CD46 transgenic heterotopic cardiac xenografts performed without T-cell immunosuppression, Group A (n = 4) and Gal knockout (GT-KO) heart transplants under tacrolimus and sirolimus immunosuppression, Group B (n = 8). Non-Gal antibody was measured by flow cytometry and by Western blots using GT-KO EC membrane antigens. A nanoLC/MS/MS analysis of proteins recovered from 2D gels was used to identify target antigens. Results Group A recipients exhibited a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. Group B recipients mainly exhibited classical DXR. Western blot analysis showed a non-Gal antibody response induced by GT+ and GT-KO hearts to an overlapping set of pig aortic EC membrane antigens. Proteomic analysis identified 14 potential target antigens but failed to define several immunodominant targets. Conclusions These experiments indicate that the non-Gal antibody response is directed to a number of stress response and inflammation related pig EC antigens and a few undefined targets. Further analysis of these antibody specificities using alternative methods is required to more fully define the repertoire of non-Gal antibody responses. PMID:18957049

  17. Assessment of musculoskeletal abnormalities in children with mucopolysaccharidoses using pGALS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) often have musculoskeletal (MSK) abnormalities. Paediatric Gait, Arms, Legs, and Spine (pGALS), is a simple MSK assessment validated in school-age children to detect abnormal joints. We aimed to identify MSK abnormalities in children with MPS performing pGALS. Methods Videos of children with a spectrum of MPS performing pGALS were analysed. A piloted proforma to record abnormalities for each pGALS manoeuvre observed in the videos (scored as normal/abnormal/not assessable) was used by three observers blinded to MPS subtype. Videos were scored independently and rescored for intra- and inter-observer consistency. Data were pooled and analysed. Results Eighteen videos of children [12 boys, 6 girls, median age 11 years (4–19)] with MPS (13 type I [5 Hurler, 8 attenuated type I]; 4 type II; 1 mannosidosis) were assessed. The most common abnormalities detected using pGALS were restrictions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, jaw (>75% cases), and fingers (2/3 cases). Mean intra-observer Κ 0.74 (range 0.65–0.88) and inter-observer Κ 0.62 (range 0.51–0.77). Hip manoeuvres were not clearly demonstrated in the videos. Conclusions In this observational study, pGALS identifies MSK abnormalities in children with MPS. Restricted joint movement (especially upper limb) was a consistent finding. Future work includes pGALS assessment of the hip and testing pGALS in further children with attenuated MPS type I. The use of pGALS and awareness of patterns of joint involvement may be a useful adjunct to facilitate earlier recognition of these rare conditions and ultimately access to specialist care. PMID:25110468

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis galE is involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryoma; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Watanabe, Haruo

    2006-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a crucial component of complex plaque biofilms that form in the oral cavity, resulting in the progression of periodontal disease. To elucidate the mechanism of periodontal biofilm formation, we analyzed the involvement of several genes related to the synthesis of polysaccharides in P. gingivalis. Gene knockout P. gingivalis mutants were constructed by insertion of an ermF-ermAM cassette; among these mutants, the galE mutant showed some characteristic phenotypes involved in the loss of GalE activity. As expected, the galE mutant accumulated intracellular carbohydrates in the presence of 0.1% galactose and did not grow in the presence of galactose at a concentration greater than 1%, in contrast to the parental strain. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) analysis indicated that the length of the O-antigen chain of the galE mutant was shorter than that of the wild type. It was also demonstrated that biofilms generated by the galE mutant had an intensity 4.5-fold greater than those of the wild type. Further, the galE mutant was found to be significantly susceptible to some antibiotics in comparison with the wild type. In addition, complementation of the galE mutation led to a partial recovery of the parental phenotypes. We concluded that the galE gene plays a pivotal role in the modification of LPS O antigen and biofilm formation in P. gingivalis and considered that our findings of a relationship between the function of the P. gingivalis galE gene and virulence phenotypes such as biofilm formation may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of pathogenicity in periodontal disease. PMID:16954395

  19. Luxuriant life on the Galápagos seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Marine life found unexpectedly in 1977 in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift has proven to be of considerable interest because of newly discovered growth mechanisms. Among the life forms observed were giant tube worms, clams, mussels, and plantlike animals. If the sizes alone were beyond belief, the hostility of the living environment—noxious, hydrogen sulfide-rich warm pockets—appeared bizarre. Even though life at depths of 2.5 km on the seafloor is known normally to be sparse in comparison with shallow-water biological systems, the heated water pockets seem to account for the localized contradictions. What was difficult to explain was the toxic environment and the apparent lack of nutrients. Furthermore, the tube worms had no mouths, not even digestive systems. Recent reports in Science (November 20, 1981), and by the Smithsonian Institution (Research Reports), describe findings on bivalves studied at the hydrothermal vents and tube worms returned to the laboratory by the U.S. Navy research submersible Alvin. The growth rates are among the highest known for deep-sea life. The way the deep seafloor marine life are understood to ‘eat’ (absorb nutrients would be a better description) involves mechanisms never observed before that breakdown hydrogen sulfide with bacteria.

  20. Characterizing the structure of diffuse emission in Hi-GAL maps

    SciTech Connect

    Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Liu, S. J.; Strafella, F.; Maruccia, Y.; Schneider, N.; Paladini, R.; Vavrek, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.; Traficante, A.; Calzoletti, L.; Natoli, P.; Martin, P.; Fukui, Y.; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) through the Δ-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/submillimeter maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters, which are useful for characterizing different morphological and physical conditions, and better constraining the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey, carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 μm, constitutes a unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2° × 2° Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217° ≲ ℓ ≲ 225°, –2° ≲ b ≲ 0°). The low level of confusion along the line of sight, testified by CO observations, makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values for the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 ≲ β ≲ 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to comparisons with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.

  1. Characterizing the Structure of Diffuse Emission in Hi-GAL Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, D.; Strafella, F.; Schneider, N.; Paladini, R.; Vavrek, R.; Maruccia, Y.; Molinari, S.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Traficante, A.; Schisano, E.; Calzoletti, L.; Pestalozzi, M.; Liu, S. J.; Natoli, P.; Huang, M.; Martin, P.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) through the Δ-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/submillimeter maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters, which are useful for characterizing different morphological and physical conditions, and better constraining the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey, carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 μm, constitutes a unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2° × 2° Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217° <~ l <~ 225°, -2° <~ b <~ 0°). The low level of confusion along the line of sight, testified by CO observations, makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values for the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 <~ β <~ 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to comparisons with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.

  2. Absence of Gal epitope prolongs survival of swine lungs in an ex vivo model of hyperacute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc H.; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Schroeder, Carsten; Buddensick, Thomas; Zhang, Tianshu; Laaris, Amal; Cochrane, Megan; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Sachs, David H.; Allan, James S.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Galactosyl transferase gene knock-out (GalTKO) swine offer a unique tool to evaluate the role of the Gal antigen in xenogenic lung hyperacute rejection. Methods We perfused GalTKO miniature swine lungs with human blood. Results were compared with those from previous studies using wild-type and human decay-accelerating factor-transgenic (hDAF+/+) pig lungs. Results GalTKO lungs survived 132 ± 52 min compared to 10 ± 9 min for wild-type lungs (P = 0.001) and 45 ± 60 min for hDAF+/+ lungs (P = 0.18). GalTKO lungs displayed stable physiologic flow and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) until shortly before graft demise, similar to autologous perfusion, and unlike wild-type or hDAF+/+ lungs. Early (15 and 60 min) complement (C3a) and platelet activation and intrapulmonary platelet deposition were significantly diminished in GalTKO lungs relative to wild-type or hDAF+/+ lungs. However, GalTKO lungs adsorbed cytotoxic anti-non-Gal antibody and elaborated high levels of thrombin; their demise was associated with increased PVR, capillary congestion, intravascular thrombi and strong CD41 deposition not seen at earlier time points. Conclusions In summary, GalTKO lungs are substantially protected from injury but, in addition to anti-non-Gal antibody and complement, platelet adhesion and non-physiologic intravascular coagulation contribute to Gal-independent lung injury mechanisms. PMID:21496117

  3. Amblyomma sculptum tick saliva: α-Gal identification, antibody response and possible association with red meat allergy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ricardo Nascimento; Franco, Paula Ferreira; Rodrigues, Henrique; Santos, Luiza C B; McKay, Craig S; Sanhueza, Carlos A; Brito, Carlos Ramon Nascimento; Azevedo, Maíra Araújo; Venuto, Ana Paula; Cowan, Peter J; Almeida, Igor C; Finn, M G; Marques, Alexandre F

    2016-03-01

    The anaphylaxis response is frequently associated with food allergies, representing a significant public health hazard. Recently, exposure to tick bites and production of specific IgE against α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing epitopes has been correlated to red meat allergy. However, this association and the source of terminal, non-reducing α-Gal-containing epitopes have not previously been established in Brazil. Here, we employed the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mouse (α1,3-GalT-KO) model and bacteriophage Qβ-virus like particles (Qβ-VLPs) displaying Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc (Galα3LN) epitopes to investigate the presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes in the saliva of Amblyomma sculptum, a species of the Amblyomma cajennense complex, which represents the main tick that infests humans in Brazil. We confirmed that the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout animals produce significant levels of anti-α-Gal antibodies against the Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc epitopes displayed on Qβ-virus like particles. The injection of A. sculptum saliva or exposure to feeding ticks was also found to induce both IgG and IgE anti-α-Gal antibodies in α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice, thus indicating the presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes in the tick saliva. The presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes was confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting following removal of terminal α-Gal epitopes by α-galactosidase treatment. These results suggest for the first known time that bites from the A. sculptum tick may be associated with the unknown etiology of allergic reactions to red meat in Brazil. PMID:26812026

  4. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  5. G-TRACE: rapid Gal4-based cell lineage analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Cory J.; Olson, John M.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Kim, Eunha; Lee, Noemi E.; Kuoy, Edward; Patananan, Alexander N.; Sitz, Daniel; Tran, PhuongThao; Do, Minh-Tu; Yackle, Kevin; Cespedes, Albert; Hartenstein, Volker; Call, Gerald B.; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    We combine Gal4/UAS, FLP/FRT and fluorescent reporters to generate cell clones that provide spatial, temporal, and genetic information about the origins of individual cells in Drosophila. We name this combination the Gal4 Technique for Real-time and Clonal Expression (G-TRACE). The approach should allow for screening and the identification of real-time and lineage-traced expression patterns on a genomic scale. PMID:19633663

  6. G-TRACE: rapid Gal4-based cell lineage analysis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cory J; Olson, John M; Ngo, Kathy T; Kim, Eunha; Lee, Noemi E; Kuoy, Edward; Patananan, Alexander N; Sitz, Daniel; Tran, Phuongthao; Do, Minh-Tu; Yackle, Kevin; Cespedes, Albert; Hartenstein, Volker; Call, Gerald B; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-08-01

    We combined Gal4-UAS and the FLP recombinase-FRT and fluorescent reporters to generate cell clones that provide spatial, temporal and genetic information about the origins of individual cells in Drosophila melanogaster. We named this combination the Gal4 technique for real-time and clonal expression (G-TRACE). The approach should allow for screening and the identification of real-time and lineage-traced expression patterns on a genomic scale. PMID:19633663

  7. Adaptive and Background-Aware GAL4 Expression Enhancement of Co-registered Confocal Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Martin; Schulze, Florian; Novikov, Alexey A; Tirian, Laszlo; J Dickson, Barry; Bühler, Katja

    2016-04-01

    GAL4 gene expression imaging using confocal microscopy is a common and powerful technique used to study the nervous system of a model organism such as Drosophila melanogaster. Recent research projects focused on high throughput screenings of thousands of different driver lines, resulting in large image databases. The amount of data generated makes manual assessment tedious or even impossible. The first and most important step in any automatic image processing and data extraction pipeline is to enhance areas with relevant signal. However, data acquired via high throughput imaging tends to be less then ideal for this task, often showing high amounts of background signal. Furthermore, neuronal structures and in particular thin and elongated projections with a weak staining signal are easily lost. In this paper we present a method for enhancing the relevant signal by utilizing a Hessian-based filter to augment thin and weak tube-like structures in the image. To get optimal results, we present a novel adaptive background-aware enhancement filter parametrized with the local background intensity, which is estimated based on a common background model. We also integrate recent research on adaptive image enhancement into our approach, allowing us to propose an effective solution for known problems present in confocal microscopy images. We provide an evaluation based on annotated image data and compare our results against current state-of-the-art algorithms. The results show that our algorithm clearly outperforms the existing solutions. PMID:26743993

  8. Interfering with Gal-1–mediated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Barrientos, Gabriela; Herse, Florian; Thijssen, Victor L. J. L.; Weedon-Fekjær, Susanne M.; Schulz, Herbert; Wallukat, Gerd; Klapp, Burghard F.; Nevers, Tania; Sharma, Surendra; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Dechend, Ralf; Blois, Sandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by sudden onset of hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy (>20 wk). PE is strongly associated with abnormal placentation and an excessive maternal inflammatory response. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a member of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins, has been shown to modulate several processes associated with placentation and to promote maternal tolerance toward fetal antigens. Here, we show that Gal-1 exhibits proangiogenic functions during early stages of pregnancy, promoting decidual vascular expansion through VEGF receptor 2 signaling. Blocking Gal-1–mediated angiogenesis or lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 1 deficiency results in a spontaneous PE-like syndrome in mice, mainly by deregulating processes associated with good placentation and maternal spiral artery remodeling. Consistent with these findings, we observed a down-regulation of Gal-1 in patients suffering from early onset PE. Collectively, these results strengthen the notion that Gal-1 is required for healthy gestation and highlight Gal-1 as a valuable biomarker for early PE diagnosis. PMID:23798433

  9. Mutations in RNA polymerase II enhance or suppress mutations in GAL4.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, L A; Ingles, C J

    1989-01-01

    The activation domains of eukaryotic DNA-binding transcription factors, such as GAL4, may regulate transcription by contacting RNA polymerase II. One potential site on RNA polymerase II for such interactions is the C-terminal tandemly repeated heptapeptide domain in the largest subunit (RPO21). We have changed the number of heptapeptide repeats in this yeast RPO21 C-terminal domain and have expressed these mutant RNA polymerase II polypeptides in yeast cells containing either wild-type or defective GAL4 proteins. Although the number of RPO21 heptapeptide repeats had no effect on the activity of wild-type GAL4, changing the length of the C-terminal domain modified the ability of mutant GAL4 proteins to activate transcription. Shorter or longer RPO21 C-terminal domains enhanced or partially suppressed, respectively, the effects of deletions in the transcriptional-activation domains of GAL4. The same RPO21 mutations also affected transcriptional activation by a GAL4-GCN4 chimera. These data suggest that the activation domains of DNA-binding transcription factors could interact, either directly or indirectly, with the heptapeptide repeats of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:2495535

  10. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  11. Using stylized agent-based models for population-environment research: A case study from the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Breckheimer, Ian; McCleary, Amy L; Guzmán-Ramirez, Liza; Caplow, Susan C; Jones-Smith, Jessica C; Walsh, Stephen J

    2010-05-01

    Agent Based Models (ABMs) are powerful tools for population-environment research but are subject to trade-offs between model complexity and abstraction. This study strikes a compromise between abstract and highly specified ABMs by designing a spatially explicit, stylized ABM and using it to explore policy scenarios in a setting that is facing substantial conservation and development challenges. Specifically, we present an ABM that reflects key Land Use / Land Cover (LULC) dynamics and livelihood decisions on Isabela Island in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. We implement the model using the NetLogo software platform, a free program that requires relatively little programming experience. The landscape is composed of a satellite-derived distribution of a problematic invasive species (common guava) and a stylized representation of the Galápagos National Park, the community of Puerto Villamil, the agricultural zone, and the marine area. The agent module is based on publicly available data and household interviews, and represents the primary livelihoods of the population in the Galápagos Islands - tourism, fisheries, and agriculture. We use the model to enact hypothetical agricultural subsidy scenarios aimed at controlling invasive guava and assess the resulting population and land cover dynamics. Findings suggest that spatially explicit, stylized ABMs have considerable utility, particularly during preliminary stages of research, as platforms for (1) sharpening conceptualizations of population-environment systems, (2) testing alternative scenarios, and (3) uncovering critical data gaps. PMID:20539752

  12. Using stylized agent-based models for population-environment research: A case study from the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Breckheimer, Ian; McCleary, Amy L.; Guzmán-Ramirez, Liza; Caplow, Susan C.; Jones-Smith, Jessica C.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Agent Based Models (ABMs) are powerful tools for population-environment research but are subject to trade-offs between model complexity and abstraction. This study strikes a compromise between abstract and highly specified ABMs by designing a spatially explicit, stylized ABM and using it to explore policy scenarios in a setting that is facing substantial conservation and development challenges. Specifically, we present an ABM that reflects key Land Use / Land Cover (LULC) dynamics and livelihood decisions on Isabela Island in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. We implement the model using the NetLogo software platform, a free program that requires relatively little programming experience. The landscape is composed of a satellite-derived distribution of a problematic invasive species (common guava) and a stylized representation of the Galápagos National Park, the community of Puerto Villamil, the agricultural zone, and the marine area. The agent module is based on publicly available data and household interviews, and represents the primary livelihoods of the population in the Galápagos Islands – tourism, fisheries, and agriculture. We use the model to enact hypothetical agricultural subsidy scenarios aimed at controlling invasive guava and assess the resulting population and land cover dynamics. Findings suggest that spatially explicit, stylized ABMs have considerable utility, particularly during preliminary stages of research, as platforms for (1) sharpening conceptualizations of population-environment systems, (2) testing alternative scenarios, and (3) uncovering critical data gaps. PMID:20539752

  13. HCG induces β1,4-GalT I expression and promotes embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Xie, Yunpeng; Fan, Jianhui; Sui, Linlin; Xu, Yuefei; Zhang, Ningning; Ma, Yanni; Li, Yinghua; Kong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is regarded as a critical physiological process for the success of pregnancy. There are so many reports on the research of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in artificial insemination, but the impact of HCG on endometrial receptivity has not been elucidated. Beta1, 4-Galactosyltransferase-I (β1,4-GalT-I) is ubiquitously expresses in human tissues with the exception of the brain. It not only transfers galactose from UDP-galactoside to GlcNAc to form Galβl,4-GlcNAc, but plays crucial role as cell adhesion molecule by recognizing and adhering other extracellular matrix and galactose of cell surface glycoprotein and glycolipid in cancer cells invasion and migration. The process of the embryos implantation is very similar to tumor invasion, so many biological factors participate in the tumor invasion also play a role in embryo implantation. We hypothesize that β1,4-GalT-I may take part in embryo implantation. In this study, we demonstrated that the over expression of β1,4-GalT-I was induced by HCG in RL95-2 cells. Moreover, the expression of some molecules, such as TIMP-1, LN and MMPs could be regulated by engineered expression of β1,4-GalT-I and therefore lead to the significantly alteration of adhesion capability of RL95-2 cells, even result in reduced adhesive ability between JAR cells and RL95-2 cells. Furthermore, our results indicated that HCG can obviously increase the EGFR signaling pathways-dependent molecular expression through β1,4-GalT-I, HCG also improved the adhesive ability between JAR cells and RL95-2 cells (P<0.01). Taken together, our data suggested that HCG provides a mechanism to bridge embryo to endometrium through β1,4-GalT. PMID:26191157

  14. HCG induces β1,4-GalT I expression and promotes embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lili; Xie, Yunpeng; Fan, Jianhui; Sui, Linlin; Xu, Yuefei; Zhang, Ningning; Ma, Yanni; Li, Yinghua; Kong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is regarded as a critical physiological process for the success of pregnancy. There are so many reports on the research of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in artificial insemination, but the impact of HCG on endometrial receptivity has not been elucidated. Beta1, 4-Galactosyltransferase-I (β1,4-GalT-I) is ubiquitously expresses in human tissues with the exception of the brain. It not only transfers galactose from UDP-galactoside to GlcNAc to form Galβl,4-GlcNAc, but plays crucial role as cell adhesion molecule by recognizing and adhering other extracellular matrix and galactose of cell surface glycoprotein and glycolipid in cancer cells invasion and migration. The process of the embryos implantation is very similar to tumor invasion, so many biological factors participate in the tumor invasion also play a role in embryo implantation. We hypothesize that β1,4-GalT-I may take part in embryo implantation. In this study, we demonstrated that the over expression of β1,4-GalT-I was induced by HCG in RL95-2 cells. Moreover, the expression of some molecules, such as TIMP-1, LN and MMPs could be regulated by engineered expression of β1,4-GalT-I and therefore lead to the significantly alteration of adhesion capability of RL95-2 cells, even result in reduced adhesive ability between JAR cells and RL95-2 cells. Furthermore, our results indicated that HCG can obviously increase the EGFR signaling pathways-dependent molecular expression through β1,4-GalT-I, HCG also improved the adhesive ability between JAR cells and RL95-2 cells (P < 0.01). Taken together, our data suggested that HCG provides a mechanism to bridge embryo to endometrium through β1,4-GalT. PMID:26191157

  15. Human ovarian cancer, lymphoma spleen, and bovine milk GlcNAc:beta1,4Gal/GalNAc transferases: two molecular species in ovarian tumor and induction of GalNAcbeta1,4Glc synthesis by alpha-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Chawda, R; Piskorz, C; Locke, R D; Ta, A; Sharad, G; Odunsi, K; Lele, S; Matta, K L

    2001-08-23

    Affinity Gel-UDP was utilized to purify GlcNAc:beta1,4Gal/GalNAc transferases (Ts) from human lymphoma spleen, ovarian tumor, and ovarian cancer sera. Mn(2+) was found to be an absolute requirement for activity. Two molecular species containing both beta1,4Gal/GalNAc-T activities were discernible when the purified ovarian tumor microsomal enzyme was subjected to Sephacryl S-100 HR column chromatography as well as native polyacylamide gel-electrophoresis. Acceptor specificity studies of the affinity-purified lymphoma spleen and ovarian tumor microsomal enzymes and the conventionally purified, as well as the cloned, bovine milk GlcNAc:beta1,4Gal-Ts using a number of synthetic acceptors showed that the beta(1,6)-linked GlcNAc moiety to alpha-GalNAc was the most efficient acceptor. As compared to the purified milk enzyme, the recombinant form exhibited sixfold GlcNAc:beta1,4 GalNAc-T activity and up to eightfold GlcNAc6SO3beta-:beta1,4Gal-T activity. Further, the recombinant enzyme catalyzed the transfer of GalNAc to the terminal beta-linked GlcNAc6SO3 moiety. Alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) inhibited up to 85%, the transfer of Gal to the GlcNAc moiety linked either to Man or GlcNAc. On the contrary, alpha-LA had no significant influence on the transfer of GalNAc to the above acceptors. alpha-LA had no appreciable effect on the recombinant enzyme, except for the transfer of Gal or GalNAc to Glc. Both alpha- and beta-glucosides, as well as alpha-N-acetylglucosaminide, did not serve as acceptors. PMID:11502266

  16. Direct estimate of cirrus noise in Herschel Hi-GAL images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. G.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Roy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Molinari, S.; Billot, N.; Brunt, C.; Calzoletti, L.; Digiorgio, A. M.; Elia, D.; Faustini, F.; Joncas, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natoli, P.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Robitaille, J. F.; Strafella, F.; Traficante, A.; Veneziani, M.

    2010-07-01

    In Herschel images of the Galactic plane and many star forming regions, a major factor limiting our ability to extract faint compact sources is cirrus confusion noise, operationally defined as the “statistical error to be expected in photometric measurements due to confusion in a background of fluctuating surface brightness”. The histogram of the flux densities of extracted sources shows a distinctive faint-end cutoff below which the catalog suffers from incompleteness and the flux densities become unreliable. This empirical cutoff should be closely related to the estimated cirrus noise and we show that this is the case. We compute the cirrus noise directly, both on Herschel images from which the bright sources have been removed and on simulated images of cirrus with statistically similar fluctuations. We connect these direct estimates with those from power spectrum analysis, which has been used extensively to predict the cirrus noise and provides insight into how it depends on various statistical properties and photometric operational parameters. We report multi-wavelength power spectra of diffuse Galactic dust emission from Hi-GAL observations at 70 to 500 μm within Galactic plane fields at l = 30 °and l = 59 °. We find that the exponent of the power spectrum is about -3. At 250 μm, the amplitude of the power spectrum increases roughly as the square of the median brightness of the map and so the expected cirrus noise scales linearly with the median brightness. For a given region, the wavelength dependence of the amplitude can be described by the square of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the dust emission. Generally, the confusion noise will be a worse problem at longer wavelengths, because of the combination of lower angular resolution and the rising power spectrum of cirrus toward lower spatial frequencies, but the photometric signal to noise will also depend on the relative SED of the source compared to the cirrus. Herschel is an ESA space

  17. The cloning and sequencing of the UDP-galactose 4-epimerase gene (galE) from Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Roodt, Yolande; Bragg, Robert; Albertyn, Jacobus

    2007-08-01

    The putative uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose 4-epimerase encoding gene, galE, was isolated from Avibacterium paragallinarum with the use of degenerate primers, colony hybridization and inverse PCR. The data revealed an open reading frame of 1017 bp encoding a protein of 338 amino acids with a molecular weight of 37 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.5. High sequence homology was obtained with an 87, 91 and 89% sequence identity on protein level towards the galE genes from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza and Pasteurella multocida, respectively. To verify that the cloned galE gene encodes for a UDP-galactose 4-epimeras, this gene was cloned into the pYES-2 expression vector, followed by transformation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gal10 deletion strain. Complementation of the gal10 deletion mutant with the galE gene confirmed that this gene encodes a UDP-galactose 4-epimerase. PMID:17541831

  18. Condições físicas em galáxias HII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Telles, E.; Cuisinier, F.

    2003-08-01

    Galáxias HII são galáxias anãs de baixa luminosidade que apresentam alta taxa de formação estelar. Seus espectros são dominados por intensas linhas de emissão devido à fotoionização pela presença de um grande número de estrelas do tipo O e B. Nós apresentamos um catálogo espectrofotométrico de 111 galáxias HII observadas no telescópio 1.52m do ESO com o espectrógrafo Boller & Chivens. Determinamos propriedades estatísticas da amostra e derivamos condições físicas (temperatura eletrônica, densidade eletrônica) e abundâncias químicas. Para algumas galáxias, fomos também capazes de resolver espacialmente regiões de formação estelar individuais e determinar propriedades espectroscópicas para estas regiões separadamente, o que nos permitiu avaliar as flutuações das condições físico-químicas dentro das galáxias HII. Em particular, vimos que apesar das galáxias HII apresentarem formação estelar espalhada ao longo do corpo da galáxia, são objetos quimicamente homogêneos. A fim de estudar a evolução temporal dos objetos durante o tempo de vida das estrelas ionizantes construimos também alguns diagramas relacionando razões de linhas de emissão com a largura equivalente de Hb (EW(Hb)). Para interpretar tais diagramas utilizamos modelos de fotoionização para populações estelares integradas. Concluímos que as galáxias HII não correspondem a simples idéia de um burst instantâneo envolvido por um gás opaco aos fótons ionizantes e com densidade constante. As relações observadas entre razões de linhas e EW(Hb) podem ser melhor compreendidas se as galáxias HII apresentarem populações estelares mais velhas, que contribuem para o contínuo óptico observado.

  19. Anti-Gal binds to pili of Neisseria meningitidis: the immunoglobulin A isotype blocks complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, R M; Estabrook, M M; Zhou, P; Jarvis, G A; Griffiss, J M

    1995-12-01

    alpha 1,3-Galactosyl antibodies (anti-Gal) are ubiquitous natural human serum and secretory polyclonal antibodies that bind to terminal galactose-alpha 1,3-galactose (alpha-galactosyl) residues. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-Gal can block alternative complement pathway-mediated lysis of representative gram-negative enteric bacteria that bind it to lipopolysaccharide alpha-galactosyl structures, thereby promoting survival of such bacteria in the nonimmune host. We wanted to know whether anti-Gal also could bind to the lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of Neisseria meningitidis. To our surprise, we found that serum and secretory anti-Gal bound to pili but not to LOS of certain strains. This suggested the presence of an immunogenic pilus carbohydrate epitope. Mild periodate oxidation of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated outer membrane preparations from strains that bound anti-Gal followed by labeling of the neoaldehyde groups resulted in the labeling of bands that corresponded to pilin and LOS, confirming that pilin contains carbohydrate structures. A Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin that also binds terminal alpha 1,3-galactosyl residues also bound to pilin. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM anti-Gal as well as colostral secretory IgA anti-Gal bound to pilin, as judged by immunoblotting, and to the pili of intact piliated organisms, as judged by immunoelectron microscopy. Total serum anti-Gal (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and purified serum IgA1 anti-Gal, but not its purified IgG isotype, blocked complement-mediated lysis of a piliated meningococcal strain that bound anti-Gal to its pili. Colostral anti-Gal secretory IgA blocked killing of the same strain. Thus, anti-Gal IgA may promote disease when it binds to the pili of N. meningitidis strains. PMID:7591153

  20. ST6Gal-I expression in ovarian cancer cells promotes an invasive phenotype by altering integrin glycosylation and function

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Daniel R; Shaikh, Faheem M; Lucas, John A; Lucas, John A; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovarian adenocarcinoma is not generally discovered in patients until there has been widespread intraperitoneal dissemination, which is why ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. Though incompletely understood, the mechanism of peritoneal metastasis relies on primary tumor cells being able to detach themselves from the tumor, escape normal apoptotic pathways while free floating, and adhere to, and eventually invade through, the peritoneal surface. Our laboratory has previously shown that the Golgi glycosyltransferase, ST6Gal-I, mediates the hypersialylation of β1 integrins in colon adenocarcinoma, which leads to a more metastatic tumor cell phenotype. Interestingly, ST6Gal-I mRNA is known to be upregulated in metastatic ovarian cancer, therefore the goal of the present study was to determine whether ST6Gal-I confers a similarly aggressive phenotype to ovarian tumor cells. Methods Three ovarian carcinoma cell lines were screened for ST6Gal-I expression, and two of these, PA-1 and SKOV3, were found to produce ST6Gal-I protein. The third cell line, OV4, lacked endogenous ST6Gal-I. In order to understand the effects of ST6Gal-I on cell behavior, OV4 cells were stably-transduced with ST6Gal-I using a lentiviral vector, and integrin-mediated responses were compared in parental and ST6Gal-I-expressing cells. Results Forced expression of ST6Gal-I in OV4 cells, resulting in sialylation of β1 integrins, induced greater cell adhesion to, and migration toward, collagen I. Similarly, ST6Gal-I expressing cells were more invasive through Matrigel. Conclusion ST6Gal-I mediated sialylation of β1 integrins in ovarian cancer cells may contribute to peritoneal metastasis by altering tumor cell adhesion and migration through extracellular matrix. PMID:19014651

  1. The complete mitochondrial genomes of the Galápagos iguanas, Amblyrhynchus cristatus and Conolophus subcristatus.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Amy; Irisarri, Iker; Vences, Miguel; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    The Galápagos iguanas are among the oldest vertebrate lineages on the Galápagos archipelago, and the evolutionary history of this clade is of great interest to biologists. We describe here the complete mitochondrial genomes of the marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus (Genbank accession number: KT277937) and the land iguana Conolophus subcristatus (Genbank accession number: KT277936). The genomes contain 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs genes, as well as a control region (CR). Both species have an identical gene order, which matches that of Iguana iguana. The CR of both Galápagos iguanas features similar tandem repeats units, which are absent in I. iguana. We present a phylogeny of the Iguanidae based on complete mitochondrial genomes, which confirms the sister-group relationship of Galápagos iguanas. These new mitochondrial genomes constitute an important data source for future exploration of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the Galápagos iguanas. PMID:26357924

  2. An overlooked pink species of land iguana in the Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Gabriele; Fabiani, Anna; Marquez, Cruz; Snell, Howard L.; Snell, Heidi M.; Tapia, Washington; Sbordoni, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Despite the attention given to them, the Galápagos have not yet finished offering evolutionary novelties. When Darwin visited the Galápagos, he observed both marine (Amblyrhynchus) and land (Conolophus) iguanas but did not encounter a rare pink black-striped land iguana (herein referred to as “rosada,” meaning “pink” in Spanish), which, surprisingly, remained unseen until 1986. Here, we show that substantial genetic isolation exists between the rosada and syntopic yellow forms and that the rosada is basal to extant taxonomically recognized Galápagos land iguanas. The rosada, whose present distribution is a conundrum, is a relict lineage whose origin dates back to a period when at least some of the present-day islands had not yet formed. So far, this species is the only evidence of ancient diversification along the Galápagos land iguana lineage and documents one of the oldest events of divergence ever recorded in the Galápagos. Conservation efforts are needed to prevent this form, identified by us as a good species, from extinction. PMID:19124773

  3. Evidence for regular ongoing introductions of mosquito disease vectors into the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Cedeño, Virna; Cruz, Marilyn; Eastwood, Gillian; Fonseca, Dina M.; Causton, Charlotte E.; Azuero, Ronal; Loayza, Jose; Martinez, Jose D. Cruz; Goodman, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Wildlife on isolated oceanic islands is highly susceptible to the introduction of pathogens. The recent establishment in the Galápagos Islands of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, a vector for diseases such as avian malaria and West Nile fever, is considered a serious risk factor for the archipelago's endemic fauna. Here we present evidence from the monitoring of aeroplanes and genetic analysis that C. quinquefasciatus is regularly introduced via aircraft into the Galápagos Archipelago. Genetic population structure and admixture analysis demonstrates that these mosquitoes breed with, and integrate successfully into, already-established populations of C. quinquefasciatus in the Galápagos, and that there is ongoing movement of mosquitoes between islands. Tourist cruise boats and inter-island boat services are the most likely mechanism for transporting Culex mosquitoes between islands. Such anthropogenic mosquito movements increase the risk of the introduction of mosquito-borne diseases novel to Galápagos and their subsequent widespread dissemination across the archipelago. Failure to implement and maintain measures to prevent the human-assisted transport of mosquitoes to and among the islands could have catastrophic consequences for the endemic wildlife of Galápagos. PMID:19675009

  4. Divergent and convergent synthesis of GalNAc-conjugated dendrimers using dual orthogonal ligations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Baptiste; Pifferi, Carlo; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Fiore, Michele; Berthet, Nathalie; Renaudet, Olivier

    2015-12-21

    The synthesis of glycodendrimers remains a challenging task. In this paper we propose a protocol based on both oxime ligation (OL) to combine cyclopeptide repeating units as the dendritic core and the copper(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to conjugate peripheral α and β propargylated GalNAc. By contrast with the oxime-based iterative protocol reported in our group, our current strategy can be used in both divergent and convergent routes with similar efficiency and the resulting hexadecavalent glycodendrimers can be easily characterized compared to oxime-linked analogues. A series of glycoconjugates displaying four or sixteen copies of both α and β GalNAc have been prepared and their ability to inhibit the adhesion of the soybean agglutinin (SBA) lectin to polymeric-GalNAc immobilized on microtiter plates has been evaluated. As was anticipated, the higher inhibitory effect (IC50 = 0.46 μM) was measured with the structure displaying αGalNAc with the higher valency (compound 13), which demonstrates that the binding properties of these glycoconjugates are strongly dependent on the orientation and distribution of the GalNAc units. PMID:26464062

  5. Contrasting volcanism in Hawaiʻi and the Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P; Harpp, Karen S.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; d'Ozouville, Noémi; Graham, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The archipelagos of Hawai‘i and the Galápagos originated at mantle hotspots, yet the volcanoes that make up the island chains differ in most respects. Some of the most important differences include the dynamics of magma supply, characteristics of magma storage and transport, morphology, and compositional and structural evolution. Of particular significance in the Galápagos is the lack of well-developed rift zones, which may be related to higher rates of pre-eruptive inflation compared to Hawai‘i, and the absence of widespread flank instability—a common feature of Hawai‘i's volcanoes. The close proximity of the Galápagos to a mid-ocean-ridge system may account for many of the differences between Hawaiian and Galápagos volcanoes. The Galápagos archipelago is built on young, thin oceanic crust, which might allow for contemporaneous growth of numerous volcanoes, and its volcanoes are fed by a mix of plume and asthenospheric melt sources. Hawaiian volcanoes, in contrast, grew in the middle of the Pacific Plate on older, thicker crust, where localized changes in mantle and lithosphere structure and composition did not exert dominant control over volcano evolution.

  6. Invited Commentary: Alpha-Gal Allergy: Tip of the Iceberg to a Pivotal Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2016-09-01

    The syndrome of delayed allergic reactions to the carbohydrate galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose ("alpha-gal") has become increasingly recognized in allergy and immunology clinics regionally throughout the southeastern USA. Due to the increasing awareness of this unique food allergy, cases have been identified in the northeastern and central USA as well as in Central and South America, Europe, Asia, Scandinavia, and Australia. Clinically, alpha-gal allergy is characterized by reactions to non-primate mammalian meat (e.g., beef, pork, lamb) that occur 3-6 h following exposure. The IgE response to alpha-gal is thought to develop after tick bites and can result in the loss of tolerance to foods that have been safely consumed for years. Although the initial description of alpha-gal allergy in 2009 was limited to red meat, this epitope is now identified in an expanded number of products, medications and foods-both labeled and unlabeled. Moreover, we are beginning to recognize that alpha-gal food allergy is the tip of the iceberg for this immune response. PMID:27520937

  7. Glycosyltransferase ST6GAL1 contributes to the regulation of pluripotency in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Stein, Jason W.; Lynch, Candace L.; Tran, Ha T.; Lee, Chia-Yao; Coleman, Ronald; Hatch, Adam; Antontsev, Victor G.; Chy, Hun S.; O’Brien, Carmel M.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Laslett, Andrew L.; Peterson, Suzanne E.; Loring, Jeanne F.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have suggested the significance of glycosyltransferase-mediated macromolecule glycosylation in the regulation of pluripotent states in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Here, we observed that the sialyltransferase ST6GAL1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated hPSCs compared to non-pluripotent cells. A lectin which preferentially recognizes α-2,6 sialylated galactosides showed strong binding reactivity with undifferentiated hPSCs and their glycoproteins, and did so to a much lesser extent with differentiated cells. In addition, downregulation of ST6GAL1 in undifferentiated hPSCs led to a decrease in POU5F1 (also known as OCT4) protein and significantly altered the expression of many genes that orchestrate cell morphogenesis during differentiation. The induction of cellular pluripotency in somatic cells was substantially impeded by the shRNA-mediated suppression of ST6GAL1, partially through interference with the expression of endogenous POU5F1 and SOX2. Targeting ST6GAL1 activity with a sialyltransferase inhibitor during cell reprogramming resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Collectively, our data indicate that ST6GAL1 plays an important role in the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation in hPSCs, and the pluripotent state in human cells can be modulated using pharmacological tools to target sialyltransferase activity. PMID:26304831

  8. Novel UDP-GalNAc Derivative Structures Provide Insight into the Donor Specificity of Human Blood Group Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd K; Pesnot, Thomas; Palcic, Monica M; Jørgensen, Rene

    2015-12-25

    Two closely related glycosyltransferases are responsible for the final step of the biosynthesis of ABO(H) human blood group A and B antigens. The two enzymes differ by only four amino acid residues, which determine whether the enzymes transfer GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc or Gal from UDP-Gal to the H-antigen acceptor. The enzymes belong to the class of GT-A folded enzymes, grouped as GT6 in the CAZy database, and are characterized by a single domain with a metal dependent retaining reaction mechanism. However, the exact role of the four amino acid residues in the specificity of the enzymes is still unresolved. In this study, we report the first structural information of a dual specificity cis-AB blood group glycosyltransferase in complex with a synthetic UDP-GalNAc derivative. Interestingly, the GalNAc moiety adopts an unusual yet catalytically productive conformation in the binding pocket, which is different from the "tucked under" conformation previously observed for the UDP-Gal donor. In addition, we show that this UDP-GalNAc derivative in complex with the H-antigen acceptor provokes the same unusual binding pocket closure as seen for the corresponding UDP-Gal derivative. Despite this, the two derivatives show vastly different kinetic properties. Our results provide a important structural insight into the donor substrate specificity and utilization in blood group biosynthesis, which can very likely be exploited for the development of new glycosyltransferase inhibitors and probes. PMID:26527682

  9. Glycomic and sialoproteomic data of gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing ST3GAL4

    PubMed Central

    Mereiter, Stefan; Magalhães, Ana; Adamczyk, Barbara; Jin, Chunsheng; Almeida, Andreia; Drici, Lylia; Ibáñez-Vea, Maria; Larsen, Martin R.; Kolarich, Daniel; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Reis, Celso A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma MKN45 cells stably transfected with the full-length ST3GAL4 gene were characterised by glycomic and sialoproteomic analysis. Complementary strategies were applied to assess the glycomic alterations induced by ST3GAL4 overexpression. The N- and O-glycome data were generated in two parallel structural analyzes, based on PGC-ESI-MS/MS. Data on glycan structure identification and relative abundance in ST3GAL4 overexpressing cells and respective mock control are presented. The sialoproteomic analysis based on titanium-dioxide enrichment of sialopeptides with subsequent LC-MS/MS identification was performed. This analysis identified 47 proteins with significantly increased sialylation. The data in this article is associated with the research article published in Biochim Biophys Acta “Glycomic analysis of gastric carcinoma cells discloses glycans as modulators of RON receptor tyrosine kinase activation in cancer” [1]. PMID:27077082

  10. GAL4 enhancer traps that can be used to drive gene expression in developing Drosophila spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie M; Monk, Adrian C; Siddall, Nicole A; Johnston, Neisha L; Hime, Gary R

    2012-12-01

    The Drosophila testis has proven to be a valuable model organ for investigation of germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance and differentiation as well as elucidation of the genetic programs that regulate differentiation of daughter spermatogonia. Development of germ cell specific GAL4 driver transgenes has facilitated investigation of gene function in GSCs and spermatogonia but specific GAL4 tools are not available for analysis of postmitotic spermatogonial differentiation into spermatocytes. We have screened publically available pGT1 strains, a GAL4-encoding gene trap collection, to identify lines that can drive gene expression in late spermatogonia and early spermatocytes. While we were unable to identify any germline-specific drivers, we did identify an insertion in the chiffon locus, which drove expression specifically in early spermatocytes within the germline along with the somatic cyst cells of the testis. PMID:22926963

  11. Galápagos land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) as a seed disperser.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Rumeu, Beatriz; Olesen, Jens M; Jaramillo, Patricia; Heleno, Ruben

    2016-05-01

    The role of the most common land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) in the Galápagos Islands as an effective seed disperser is explored in this study. A total of 5705 seeds of 32 plant species were identified from 160 scats, 4545 of which (80%) appeared visually undamaged. Germination trials of 849 seeds from 29 species revealed that at least 10 species remained viable after passing through the iguana's gut, although only a small proportion of those seeds (4%) germinated. In any case, we argue that C. subcristatus exerts an important role on the 7 Galapagos islands where it occurs because of its abundance and capacity to ingest and disperse seeds at long distances. Our results strongly suggest that the Galápagos C. subcristatus plays an important role as a seed disperser of not only of native species but also some introduced plants in the Galápagos Islands. PMID:26748830

  12. Development of selective and differential medium for Shigella sonnei using three carbohydrates (lactose, sorbitol, and xylose) and X-Gal.

    PubMed

    Na, G N; Kim, S A; Kwon, O C; Rhee, M S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new selective and differential medium for isolating Shigella sonnei (designated 3SD medium). The new medium was based on three carbohydrates (lactose, sorbitol, and xylose) and a chromogenic substrate (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside, X-Gal). S. sonnei cannot ferment lactose, sorbitol, or xylose, but can ferment X-Gal, which generates turquoise-blue colonies with rough edges. Other bacteria (54 strains of foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria) produced visually distinct colonies on 3SD medium (colorless or pink-violet colonies), or their growth was inhibited on 3SD medium. The optimum concentration of 50 mg/L X-Gal was selected because it yielded the highest level of morphological discrimination between S. sonnei and other bacteria, and this concentration was cost-effective. Bile salt concentration optimization was performed using healthy, heat-injured, and acid-injured S. sonnei. The recovery rate differed significantly depending on the bile salt concentration; media containing >1.0 g/L bile salt showed significantly lower recovery of stress-injured cells than medium containing 0.5 g/L bile salt (P<0.05). Growth of all Gram-positive bacteria was inhibited on medium containing 0.5 g/L bile salt; therefore, this concentration was used as the optimal concentration. Previous media used to isolate Shigella spp. (MacConkey, xylose lysine desoxycholate, and Salmonella-Shigella agar) showed poor performance when used to support the growth of injured S. sonnei cells, whereas 3SD medium supported a high growth rate of injured and healthy cells (equivalent to that obtained with nutrient-rich tryptic soy agar). To validate the performance of 3SD medium with real specimens, S. sonnei and other bacteria were spiked into samples such as untreated water, carrot, salad, and oyster. 3SD medium showed superior specificity (100%) and sensitivity (100%) for S. sonnei, and yielded no false-positive or false-negative results

  13. Specific contacts of the −35 region of the galP1 promoter by RNA polymerase inhibit GalR-mediated DNA looping repression

    PubMed Central

    Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Le, Phuoc; Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2012-01-01

    The P1 promoter of the galactose operon in Escherichia coli is one of the best studied examples of ‘extended −10’ promoters. Recognition of the P1 promoter does not require specific contacts between RNA polymerase and its poor −35 element. To investigate whether specific recognition of the −35 element would affect the regulation of P1 by GalR, we mutagenized the −35 element of P1, isolated variants of the −35 element and studied the regulation of the mutant promoters by in vitro transcription assays and by mathematical modeling. The results show that the GalR-mediated DNA loop is less efficient in repressing P1 transcription when RNA polymerase binds to the −10 and −35 elements concomitantly. Our results suggest that promoters that lack specific −35 element recognition allow decoupling of local chromosome structure from transcription initiation. PMID:22941635

  14. Specific contacts of the -35 region of the galP1 promoter by RNA polymerase inhibit GalR-mediated DNA looping repression.

    PubMed

    Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Lewis, Dale E A; Le, Phuoc; Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2012-11-01

    The P1 promoter of the galactose operon in Escherichia coli is one of the best studied examples of 'extended -10' promoters. Recognition of the P1 promoter does not require specific contacts between RNA polymerase and its poor -35 element. To investigate whether specific recognition of the -35 element would affect the regulation of P1 by GalR, we mutagenized the -35 element of P1, isolated variants of the -35 element and studied the regulation of the mutant promoters by in vitro transcription assays and by mathematical modeling. The results show that the GalR-mediated DNA loop is less efficient in repressing P1 transcription when RNA polymerase binds to the -10 and -35 elements concomitantly. Our results suggest that promoters that lack specific -35 element recognition allow decoupling of local chromosome structure from transcription initiation. PMID:22941635

  15. No role for phonon entropy in the fcc{yields}fcc volume collapse transition in Ce{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1} at ambient pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M. E.; McQueeney, R. J.; Fultz, B.; Swan-Wood, T.; Delaire, O.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Hults, W. L.; Lashley, J. C.; Osborn, R.; Smith, J. L.; Materials Science Division; LANL; California Inst. of Tech.

    2003-01-01

    Phonon densities of states (DOS) were obtained from inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Ce{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1} at temperatures from 10 to 300 K. The {alpha} phase showed a significant softening of its phonon DOS when heated from 10 to 140 K. Despite the 17% volume collapse, the phonon DOS showed little change between the {gamma} phase at 150 K and the {alpha} phase at 140 K. This is supported by analysis of the magnetic spectra showing that most of the transition entropy can be accounted for with the crystal field and changes in the ground-state spin fluctuations. We argue that the anomalous behavior of the phonon DOS originates with the volume dependence of the ground-state spin fluctuations.

  16. Magnetic field geometry of an unusual cometary cloud Gal 110-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neha, S.; Maheswar, G.; Soam, A.; Lee, C. W.; Tej, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We carried out optical polarimetry of an isolated cloud, Gal 110-13, to map the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field geometry. The main aim of the study is to understand the most plausible mechanism responsible for the unusual cometary shape of the cloud in the context of its magnetic field geometry. Methods: When unpolarized starlight passes through the intervening interstellar dust grains that are aligned with their short axes parallel to the local magnetic field, it gets linearly polarized. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field component can therefore be traced by doing polarization measurements of background stars projected on clouds. Because the light in the optical wavelength range is most efficiently polarized by the dust grains typically found in the outer layers of the molecular clouds, optical polarimetry enables us to trace the magnetic field geometry of the outer layers of the clouds. Results: We made R-band polarization measurements of 207 stars in the direction of Gal 110-13. The distance of Gal 110-13 was determined as ~450 ± 80 pc using our polarization and 2MASS near-infrared data. The foreground interstellar contribution was removed from the observed polarization values by observing a number of stars located in the vicinity of Gal 110-13 which has Hipparcos parallax measurements. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field lines are found to be well ordered and aligned with the elongated structure of Gal 110-13. Using structure function analysis, we estimated the strength of the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field as ~25 μG. Conclusions: Based on our results and comparing them with those from simulations, we conclude that compression by the ionization fronts from 10 Lac is the most plausible cause of the comet-like morphology of Gal 110-13 and of the initiation of subsequent star formation.

  17. Gal4-based enhancer-trapping in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    O'Brochta, David A; Pilitt, Kristina L; Harrell, Robert A; Aluvihare, Channa; Alford, Robert T

    2012-11-01

    Transposon-based forward and reverse genetic technologies will contribute greatly to ongoing efforts to study mosquito functional genomics. A piggyBac transposon-based enhancer-trap system was developed that functions efficiently in the human malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. The system consists of six transgenic lines of Anopheles stephensi, each with a single piggyBac-Gal4 element in a unique genomic location; six lines with a single piggyBac-UAStdTomato element; and two lines, each with a single Minos element containing the piggyBac-transposase gene under the regulatory control of the hsp70 promoter from Drosophila melanogaster. Enhancer detection depended upon the efficient remobilization of piggyBac-Gal4 transposons, which contain the yeast transcription factor gene Gal4 under the regulatory control of a basal promoter. Gal4 expression was detected through the expression of the fluorescent protein gene tdTomato under the regulatory control of a promoter with Gal4-binding UAS elements. From five genetic screens for larval- and adult-specific enhancers, 314 progeny were recovered from 24,250 total progeny (1.3%) with unique patterns of tdTomato expression arising from the influence of an enhancer. The frequency of piggyBac remobilization and enhancer detection was 2.5- to 3-fold higher in female germ lines compared with male germ lines. A small collection of enhancer-trap lines are described in which Gal4 expression occurred in adult female salivary glands, midgut, and fat body, either singly or in combination. These three tissues play critical roles during the infection of Anopheles stephensi by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites. This system and the lines generated using it will be valuable resources to ongoing mosquito functional genomics efforts. PMID:23173082

  18. Evaluation of the C-Terminal Fragment of Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNAc Lectin Intermediate Subunit as a Vaccine Candidate against Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Man, Suqin; Fu, Yongfeng; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal protozoan parasite that causes amoebiasis, including amebic dysentery and liver abscesses. E. histolytica invades host tissues by adhering onto cells and phagocytosing them depending on the adaptation and expression of pathogenic factors, including Gal/GalNAc lectin. We have previously reported that E. histolytica possesses multiple CXXC sequence motifs, with the intermediate subunit of Gal/GalNAc lectin (i.e., Igl) as a key factor affecting the amoeba's pathogenicity. The present work showed the effect of immunization with recombinant Igl on amebic liver abscess formation and the corresponding immunological properties. Methodology/Principal Findings A prokaryotic expression system was used to prepare the full-length Igl and the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal fragments (C-Igl) of Igl. Vaccine efficacy was assessed by challenging hamsters with an intrahepatic injection of E. histolytica trophozoites. Hamsters intramuscularly immunized with full-length Igl and C-Igl were found to be 92% and 96% immune to liver abscess formation, respectively. Immune-response evaluation revealed that C-Igl can generate significant humoral immune responses, with high levels of antibodies in sera from immunized hamsters inhibiting 80% of trophozoites adherence to mammalian cells and inducing 80% more complement-mediated lysis of trophozoites compared with the control. C-Igl was further assessed for its cellular response by cytokine-gene qPCR analysis. The productions of IL-4 (8.4-fold) and IL-10 (2-fold) in the spleen cells of immunized hamsters were enhanced after in vitro stimulation. IL-4 expression was also supported by increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 gene. Conclusions/Significance Immunobiochemical characterization strongly suggests the potential of recombinant Igl, especially the C-terminal fragment, as a vaccine candidate against amoebiasis. Moreover, protection through Th2-cell participation enabled effective

  19. GALS - setup for production and study of multinucleon transfer reaction products: present status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanoy, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Kozulin, E.; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) - JINR, Dubna. GALS is planned to exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the "north-east" region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as 136Xe on 208Pb, are to be captured in a gas cell and selectively laser-ionized in a sextupole (quadrupole) ion guide extraction system.

  20. EzGal: A Flexible Interface for Stellar Population Synthesis Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancone, Conor; Gonzalez, Anthony

    2012-08-01

    EzGal is a flexible Python program which generates observable parameters (magnitudes, colors, and mass-to-light ratios) for arbitrary input stellar population synthesis (SPS) models; it enables simple, direct comparison of different model sets so that the uncertainty introduced by choice of model set can be quantified. EzGal is also capable of generating composite stellar population models (CSPs) for arbitrary input star-formation histories and reddening laws, and can be used to interpolate between metallicities for a given model set.

  1. A 3D Searchable Database of Transgenic Zebrafish Gal4 and Cre Lines for Functional Neuroanatomy Studies.

    PubMed

    Marquart, Gregory D; Tabor, Kathryn M; Brown, Mary; Strykowski, Jennifer L; Varshney, Gaurav K; LaFave, Matthew C; Mueller, Thomas; Burgess, Shawn M; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic methods enable the selective manipulation of neurons for functional mapping of neuronal circuits. Using confocal microscopy, we have imaged the cellular-level expression of 109 transgenic lines in live 6 day post fertilization larvae, including 80 Gal4 enhancer trap lines, 9 Cre enhancer trap lines and 20 transgenic lines that express fluorescent proteins in defined gene-specific patterns. Image stacks were acquired at single micron resolution, together with a broadly expressed neural marker, which we used to align enhancer trap reporter patterns into a common 3-dimensional reference space. To facilitate use of this resource, we have written software that enables searching for transgenic lines that label cells within a selectable 3-dimensional region of interest (ROI) or neuroanatomical area. This software also enables the intersectional expression of transgenes to be predicted, a feature which we validated by detecting cells with co-expression of Cre and Gal4. Many of the imaged enhancer trap lines show intrinsic brain-specific expression. However, to increase the utility of lines that also drive expression in non-neuronal tissue we have designed a novel UAS reporter, that suppresses expression in heart, muscle, and skin through the incorporation of microRNA binding sites in a synthetic 3' untranslated region. Finally, we mapped the site of transgene integration, thus providing molecular identification of the expression pattern for most lines. Cumulatively, this library of enhancer trap lines provides genetic access to 70% of the larval brain and is therefore a powerful and broadly accessible tool for the dissection of neural circuits in larval zebrafish. PMID:26635538

  2. A 3D Searchable Database of Transgenic Zebrafish Gal4 and Cre Lines for Functional Neuroanatomy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Gregory D.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Brown, Mary; Strykowski, Jennifer L.; Varshney, Gaurav K.; LaFave, Matthew C.; Mueller, Thomas; Burgess, Shawn M.; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic methods enable the selective manipulation of neurons for functional mapping of neuronal circuits. Using confocal microscopy, we have imaged the cellular-level expression of 109 transgenic lines in live 6 day post fertilization larvae, including 80 Gal4 enhancer trap lines, 9 Cre enhancer trap lines and 20 transgenic lines that express fluorescent proteins in defined gene-specific patterns. Image stacks were acquired at single micron resolution, together with a broadly expressed neural marker, which we used to align enhancer trap reporter patterns into a common 3-dimensional reference space. To facilitate use of this resource, we have written software that enables searching for transgenic lines that label cells within a selectable 3-dimensional region of interest (ROI) or neuroanatomical area. This software also enables the intersectional expression of transgenes to be predicted, a feature which we validated by detecting cells with co-expression of Cre and Gal4. Many of the imaged enhancer trap lines show intrinsic brain-specific expression. However, to increase the utility of lines that also drive expression in non-neuronal tissue we have designed a novel UAS reporter, that suppresses expression in heart, muscle, and skin through the incorporation of microRNA binding sites in a synthetic 3′ untranslated region. Finally, we mapped the site of transgene integration, thus providing molecular identification of the expression pattern for most lines. Cumulatively, this library of enhancer trap lines provides genetic access to 70% of the larval brain and is therefore a powerful and broadly accessible tool for the dissection of neural circuits in larval zebrafish. PMID:26635538

  3. CDX2 homeoprotein is involved in the regulation of ST6GalNAc-I gene in intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rita; Barros, Rita; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Mesquita, Patricia; da Costa, Luis T; Bennett, Eric P; Almeida, Raquel; David, Leonor

    2015-07-01

    De novo expression of Sialyl-Tn (STn) antigen is one of the most common features of intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric carcinomas, and its biosynthesis has been mostly attributed to ST6GalNAc-I activity. However, the regulation of this glycosyltransferase expression is not elucidated. In IM lesions and in the intestine, CDX2 homeobox transcription factor is co-expressed with STn and ST6GalNAc-I. We therefore hypothesized that CDX2 might induce STn expression by positive regulation of ST6GalNAc-I. We showed that ST6GalNAc-I transcript levels and CDX2 have a coordinated expression upon Caco-2 in vitro differentiation, and overexpression of CDX2 in MKN45 gastric cells increases ST6GalNAc-I transcript levels. Nine putative CDX-binding sites in the ST6GalNAc-I-regulatory sequence were identified and analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation in Caco-2 cells and in IM. The results showed that CDX2 protein is recruited to all regions, being the most proximal sites preferentially occupied in vivo. Luciferase assays demonstrated that CDX2 is able to transactivate ST6GalNac-I-regulatory region. The induction was stronger for the regions mapped in the neighbourhood of ATG start codon and site-directed mutagenesis of these sites confirmed their importance. In conclusion, we show that CDX2 transcriptionally regulates ST6GalNAc-I gene expression, specifically in the preneoplastic IM lesion. PMID:25867765

  4. Histopathologic insights into the mechanism of anti-non-Gal antibody-mediated pig cardiac xenograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Tazelaar, Henry D; Ekser, Burcin; Pierson, Richard N; Robson, Simon C; Cooper, David K C; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of cardiac xenograft rejection has evolved over the last 20 yr with the development of new modalities for limiting antibody-mediated injury, advancing regimens for immune suppression, and an ever-widening variety of new donor genetics. These new technologies have helped us progress from what was once an overwhelming anti-Gal-mediated hyperacute rejection to a more protracted anti-Gal-mediated vascular rejection to what is now a more complex manifestation of non-Gal humoral rejection and coagulation dysregulation. This review summarizes the changing histopathology of Gal- and non-Gal-mediated cardiac xenograft rejection and discusses the contributions of immune-mediated injury, species-specific immune-independent factors, transplant and therapeutic procedures, and donor genetics to the overall mechanism(s) of cardiac xenograft rejection. PMID:25098626

  5. Gastrointestinal Parasites in the Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) of Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo; Sarzosa, María Soledad; Encalada, Edison; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Huyvaert, Kathryn P

    2015-07-01

    Using a fecal flotation technique, we detected three genera of endoparasites in the critically endangered Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) of Galápagos. These genera were Contracaecum, Tetrabothrius, and Cardiocephaloides. Juvenile albatrosses were more likely to be infected than adults, but we found no effect of sex or mass on infection probability. PMID:25919468

  6. The transcriptional regulator GalR self-assembles to form highly regular tubular structures

    PubMed Central

    Agerschou, Emil D.; Christiansen, Gunna; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Madsen, Daniel Jhaf; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Semsey, Szabolcs; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Gal repressor regulates transport and metabolism of D-galactose in Escherichia coli and can mediate DNA loop formation by forming a bridge between adjacent or distant sites. GalR forms insoluble aggregates at lower salt concentrations in vitro, which can be solubilized at higher salt concentrations. Here, we investigate the assembly and disassembly of GalR aggregates. We find that a sharp transition from aggregates to soluble species occurs between 200 and 400 mM NaCl, incompatible with a simple salting-in effect. The aggregates are highly ordered rod-like structures, highlighting a remarkable ability for organized self-assembly. Mutant studies reveal that aggregation is dependent on two separate interfaces of GalR. The highly ordered structures dissociate to smaller aggregates in the presence of D-galactose. We propose that these self-assembled structures may constitute galactose-tolerant polymers for chromosome compaction in stationary phase cells, in effect linking self-assembly with regulatory function. PMID:27279285

  7. Reduced MHC and neutral variation in the Galápagos hawk, an island endemic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are known for high levels of polymorphism maintained by balancing selection. In small or bottlenecked populations, however, genetic drift may be strong enough to overwhelm the effect of balancing selection, resulting in reduced MHC variability. In this study we investigated MHC evolution in two recently diverged bird species: the endemic Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis), which occurs in small, isolated island populations, and its widespread mainland relative, the Swainson's hawk (B. swainsoni). Results We amplified at least two MHC class II B gene copies in each species. We recovered only three different sequences from 32 Galápagos hawks, while we amplified 20 unique sequences in 20 Swainson's hawks. Most of the sequences clustered into two groups in a phylogenetic network, with one group likely representing pseudogenes or nonclassical loci. Neutral genetic diversity at 17 microsatellite loci was also reduced in the Galápagos hawk compared to the Swainson's hawk. Conclusions The corresponding loss in neutral diversity suggests that the reduced variability present at Galápagos hawk MHC class II B genes compared to the Swainson's hawk is primarily due to a founder event followed by ongoing genetic drift in small populations. However, purifying selection could also explain the low number of MHC alleles present. This lack of variation at genes involved in the adaptive immune response could be cause for concern should novel diseases reach the archipelago. PMID:21612651

  8. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Galápagos Endemic Land Snail Naesiotus nux

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Samuel S.; Settles, Matthew L.; New, Daniel D.; Parent, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft mitochondrial genome sequence of Naesiotus nux, a Galápagos endemic land snail species of the genus Naesiotus. The circular genome is 15 kb and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes. PMID:26798085

  9. ERK8 is a negative regulator of O-GalNAc glycosylation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Joanne; Tham, Keit Min; Gill, David James; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie Anne; Bard, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    ER O-glycosylation can be induced through relocalisation GalNAc-Transferases from the Golgi. This process markedly stimulates cell migration and is constitutively activated in more than 60% of breast carcinomas. How this activation is achieved remains unclear. Here, we screened 948 signalling genes using RNAi and imaging. We identified 12 negative regulators of O-glycosylation that all control GalNAc-T sub-cellular localisation. ERK8, an atypical MAPK with high basal kinase activity, is a strong hit and is partially localised at the Golgi. Its inhibition induces the relocation of GalNAc-Ts, but not of KDEL receptors, revealing the existence of two separate COPI-dependent pathways. ERK8 down-regulation, in turn, activates cell motility. In human breast and lung carcinomas, ERK8 expression is reduced while ER O-glycosylation initiation is hyperactivated. In sum, ERK8 appears as a constitutive brake on GalNAc-T relocalisation, and the loss of its expression could drive cancer aggressivity through increased cell motility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01828.001 PMID:24618899

  10. The transcriptional regulator GalR self-assembles to form highly regular tubular structures.

    PubMed

    Agerschou, Emil D; Christiansen, Gunna; Schafer, Nicholas P; Madsen, Daniel Jhaf; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Semsey, Szabolcs; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The Gal repressor regulates transport and metabolism of D-galactose in Escherichia coli and can mediate DNA loop formation by forming a bridge between adjacent or distant sites. GalR forms insoluble aggregates at lower salt concentrations in vitro, which can be solubilized at higher salt concentrations. Here, we investigate the assembly and disassembly of GalR aggregates. We find that a sharp transition from aggregates to soluble species occurs between 200 and 400 mM NaCl, incompatible with a simple salting-in effect. The aggregates are highly ordered rod-like structures, highlighting a remarkable ability for organized self-assembly. Mutant studies reveal that aggregation is dependent on two separate interfaces of GalR. The highly ordered structures dissociate to smaller aggregates in the presence of D-galactose. We propose that these self-assembled structures may constitute galactose-tolerant polymers for chromosome compaction in stationary phase cells, in effect linking self-assembly with regulatory function. PMID:27279285

  11. Tropical Instability Wave Interactions within the Galápagos Archipelago.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the boreal fall of 2005, the effects of tropical instability waves (TIW) appear as oscillations within the sea surface temperature (SST), meridional current (Vy), and thermocline (20°C) in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Within the Galápagos Archipelago, a strong 3-wave succes...

  12. Nine Months to 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enter large comprehensive high schools without having the necessary social and academic skills or understanding of what will be expected of them as they move through the high school curriculum. To help a higher number of students experience success, schools must help them develop academic, social, and self-management skills.…

  13. Delivering the Promise to 9th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Margaret May

    2002-01-01

    Principal describes experience in establishing and operating the Minne Howard School, a separate school for ninth-grade students in Alexandria, Virginia. Describes keys to success: Create a teacher advisor component, eliminate inschool suspension, teach five classes, and institute a school support team. (PKP)

  14. The 9th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with performance and development of various spacecraft components, mechanical devices, and subsystems. Topics discussed include: manipulator arms, the Skylab Parasol, cooling system performance, extendable booms, magnetically suspended reaction wheels, the Skylab Trash Airlock, magnetometers, actuators, life support systems, and technology transfer.

  15. BML-111 Protected LPS/D-GalN-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Liu, Hai-Ling; Yu, Zhong-Jian; Huang, Yong-Hong; Gao, Dian; Hao, Hua; Liao, Shou-Sheng; Xu, Fang-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) display unique pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory functions in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of BML-111 (5(S),6(R),7-trihydroxyheptanoic acid methyl ester), the agonist of lipoxin A4 receptor, in a model of Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and d-Galactosamine (d-GalN) induced acute liver injury, and to explore the mechanisms. Histopathological analyses were carried out to quantify liver injury degree. The activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were examined to evaluate the levels of neutrophil infiltration. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum were detected to evaluate the functions of the liver. The amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were examined using Western blotting. The antioxidant capacity, the activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed with the kits via biochemical analysis. We established the model of acute liver injury with lipopolysaccharide and d-Galactosamine (LPS/d-GalN): (1) histopathological results and MPO activities, with the activities of AST and ALT in serum, consistently demonstrated LPS and d-GalN challenge could cause severe liver damage, but BML-111 could prevent pathological changes, inhibit neutrophil infiltration, and improve the hepatic function; (2) LPS/d-GalN increased TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and IL-10, while decreasing TGF-β1. However, BML-111 could repress LPS/d-GalN -induced TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2, meanwhile increasing the expression levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10; (3) LPS/d-GalN inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and hydroxyl

  16. BML-111 Protected LPS/D-GalN-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Liu, Hai-Ling; Yu, Zhong-Jian; Huang, Yong-Hong; Gao, Dian; Hao, Hua; Liao, Shou-Sheng; Xu, Fang-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) display unique pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory functions in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of BML-111 (5(S),6(R),7-trihydroxyheptanoic acid methyl ester), the agonist of lipoxin A₄ receptor, in a model of Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and d-Galactosamine (d-GalN) induced acute liver injury, and to explore the mechanisms. Histopathological analyses were carried out to quantify liver injury degree. The activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were examined to evaluate the levels of neutrophil infiltration. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum were detected to evaluate the functions of the liver. The amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were examined using Western blotting. The antioxidant capacity, the activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed with the kits via biochemical analysis. We established the model of acute liver injury with lipopolysaccharide and d-Galactosamine (LPS/d-GalN): (1) histopathological results and MPO activities, with the activities of AST and ALT in serum, consistently demonstrated LPS and d-GalN challenge could cause severe liver damage, but BML-111 could prevent pathological changes, inhibit neutrophil infiltration, and improve the hepatic function; (2) LPS/d-GalN increased TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and IL-10, while decreasing TGF-β1. However, BML-111 could repress LPS/d-GalN -induced TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2, meanwhile increasing the expression levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10; (3) LPS/d-GalN inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and hydroxyl

  17. Preparation of low galactose yogurt using cultures of Gal(+) Streptococcus thermophilus in combination with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Anbukkarasi, Kaliyaperumal; UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Nanda, Dhiraj Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important lactic starter used in the production of yogurt. Most strains of S. thermophilus are galactose negative (Gal(-)) and are able to metabolize only glucose portion of lactose and expel galactose into the medium. This metabolic defect leads to the accumulation of free galactose in yogurt, resulting in galactosemia among consumers. Hence there is an absolute need to develop low galactose yogurt. Therefore, in this study, three galactose positive (Gal(+)) S. thermophilus strains from National Collection of Dairy Cultures (NCDC) viz. NCDC 659 (AJM), NCDC 660 (JM1), NCDC 661 (KM3) and a reference galactose negative (Gal(-)) S. thermophilus NCDC 218 were used for preparation of low galactose yogurt. In milk fermented using S. thermophilus isolates alone, NCDC 659 released less galactose (0.27 %) followed by NCDC 661 (0.3 %) and NCDC 660 (0.45 %) after 10 h at 42 °C. Milk was fermented in combination with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04, in which NCDC 659 released least galactose upto 0.49 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %) and NCDC 660 (0.60 %) than reference Gal(-) NCDC 218(0.79 %). Low galactose yogurt was prepared following standard procedure using Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates and Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04 in 1:1 ratio. Among which low galactose yogurt by NCDC 659 combination contained less galactose 0.37 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %), NCDC 660 (0.65 %) and reference Gal(-) NCDC 218 (0.98 %) after 4 h of fermentation. This study clearly reveals that Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates can be paired with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus for developing low galactose yogurt. PMID:25190881

  18. População nuclear e extranuclear em rádio-galáxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimann, D. I.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Quintana, H.; Alloin, D.; Hunstead, R.; Wisotzki, L.

    2003-08-01

    A natureza do contínuo UV/ótico em rádio-galáxias é muito importante para o seu entendimento. Em baixos redshifts existem evidências de que muitas delas são dominadas no ótico por luz de estrelas velhas, características de galáxias early-type e em altos redshifts a característica dominante é um excesso de luz no UV, freqüentemente associado com estruturas que estão alinhadas aos eixos das estruturas rádio em grande escala. Inicialmente esse excesso foi interpretado como devido a episódios intensos de formação estelar nas galáxias hospedeiras. Entretanto, as descobertas dos alinhamentos entre as estruturas UV e rádio modificaram essa idéia. Foi proposto que a formação estelar é iniciada pela passagem do jato rádio através do meio interestelar das galáxias hospedeiras. A natureza do excesso UV começou a ser compreendida em um estudo detalhado do continuo ótico da 3C321, onde se concluiu que o contínuo desta galáxia tem origem multicomponente, com contribuições de populações velhas e intermediárias, de luz espalhada oriunda de um quasar obscurecido e do contínuo nebular. No presente trabalho estudamos a população nuclear e extranuclear de uma amostra de 24 rádio-galáxias, utilizando espectros óticos de fenda longa, com alta razão sinal/ruído. Através do método de síntese espectral de populações estelares, foram estimadas as contribuições de populações estelares de diferentes idades (e de um contínuo tipo lei de potência devido a um AGN, FC) para a luz integrada das galáxias, em 4020Å. As principais conclusões deste trabalho são: apenas quatro dos objetos estudados têm contribuições significativas (maiores do que 10%) das populações de 100 milhões de anos ou mais jovens (ou de FC) ao longo da região espacial estudada (6 kpc centrais); nenhuma das rádio-galáxias de tipo FRI estudadas tem contribuição significativa destas populações ao longo desta região; duas (de oito) de tipo FRII tem contribui

  19. Origin and evolutionary relationships of giant Galápagos tortoises

    PubMed Central

    Caccone, Adalgisa; Gibbs, James P.; Ketmaier, Valerio; Suatoni, Elizabeth; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Perhaps the most enduring debate in reptile systematics has involved the giant Galápagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra), whose origins and systematic relationships captivated Charles Darwin and remain unresolved to this day. Here we report a phylogenetic reconstruction based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from Galápagos tortoises and Geochelone from mainland South America and Africa. The closest living relative to the Galápagos tortoise is not among the larger-bodied tortoises of South America but is the relatively small-bodied Geochelone chilensis, or Chaco tortoise. The split between G. chilensis and the Galápagos lineage probably occurred 6 to 12 million years ago, before the origin of the oldest extant Galápagos island. Our data suggest that the four named southern subspecies on the largest island, Isabela, are not distinct genetic units, whereas a genetically distinct northernmost Isabela subspecies is probably the result of a separate colonization. Most unexpectedly, the lone survivor of the abingdoni subspecies from Pinta Island (“Lonesome George”) is very closely related to tortoises from San Cristóbal and Española, the islands farthest from the island of Pinta. To rule out a possible recent transplant of Lonesome George, we sequenced DNA from three tortoises collected on Pinta in 1906. They have sequences identical to Lonesome George, consistent with his being the last survivor of his subspecies. This finding may provide guidance in finding a mate for Lonesome George, who so far has failed to reproduce. PMID:10557302

  20. Two functionally divergent UDP-Gal nucleotide sugar transporters participate in phosphoglycan synthesis in Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; Barron, Tamara; Dobson, Deborah E; Turco, Salvatore J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2007-05-11

    In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, abundant surface and secreted molecules, such as lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and proteophosphoglycans (PPGs), contain extensive galactose in the form of phosphoglycans (PGs) based on (Gal-Man-PO(4)) repeating units. PGs are synthesized in the parasite Golgi apparatus and require transport of cytoplasmic nucleotide sugar precursors to the Golgi lumen by nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs). GDP-Man transport is mediated by the LPG2 gene product, and here we focused on transporters for UDP-Gal. Data base mining revealed 12 candidate NST genes in the L. major genome, including LPG2 as well as a candidate endoplasmic reticulum UDP-glucose transporter (HUT1L) and several pseudogenes. Gene knock-out studies established that two genes (LPG5A and LPG5B) encoded UDP-Gal NSTs. Although the single lpg5A(-) and lpg5B(-) mutants produced PGs, an lpg5A(-)/5B(-) double mutant was completely deficient. PG synthesis was restored in the lpg5A(-)/5B(-) mutant by heterologous expression of the human UDP-Gal transporter, and heterologous expression of LPG5A and LPG5B rescued the glycosylation defects of the mammalian Lec8 mutant, which is deficient in UDP-Gal uptake. Interestingly, the LPG5A and LPG5B functions overlap but are not equivalent, since the lpg5A(-) mutant showed a partial defect in LPG but not PPG phosphoglycosylation, whereas the lpg5B(-) mutant showed a partial defect in PPG but not LPG phosphoglycosylation. Identification of these key NSTs in Leishmania will facilitate the dissection of glycoconjugate synthesis and its role(s) in the parasite life cycle and further our understanding of NSTs generally. PMID:17347153

  1. Low MHC variation in the endangered Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus).

    PubMed

    Bollmer, Jennifer L; Vargas, F Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2007-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most polymorphic regions of the genome, likely due to balancing selection acting to maintain alleles over time. Lack of MHC variability has been attributed to factors such as genetic drift in small populations and relaxed selection pressure. The Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus), endemic to the Galápagos Islands, is the only penguin that occurs on the equator. It relies upon cold, nutrient-rich upwellings and experiences severe population declines when ocean temperatures rise during El Niño events. These bottlenecks, occurring in an already small population, have likely resulted in reduced genetic diversity in this species. In this study, we used MHC class II exon 2 sequence data from a DRB1-like gene to characterize the amount of genetic variation at the MHC in 30 Galápagos penguins, as well as one Magellanic penguin (S. magellanicus) and two king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), and compared it to that in five other penguin species for which published data exist. We found that the Galápagos penguin had the lowest MHC diversity (as measured by number of polymorphic sites and average divergence among alleles) of the eight penguin species studied. A phylogenetic analysis showed that Galápagos penguin MHC sequences are most closely related to Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) sequences, its putative sister species based on other loci. An excess of non-synonymous mutations and a pattern of trans-specific evolution in the neighbor-joining tree suggest that selection is acting on the penguin MHC. PMID:17457582

  2. Integrative View of α2,3-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal) Molecular and Functional Evolution in Deuterostomes: Significance of Lineage-Specific Losses

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Daniel; Teppa, Elin; Mir, Anne-Marie; Vicogne, Dorothée; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Filloux, Cyril; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Sialyltransferases are responsible for the synthesis of a diverse range of sialoglycoconjugates predicted to be pivotal to deuterostomes’ evolution. In this work, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the metazoan α2,3-sialyltransferases family (ST3Gal), a subset of sialyltransferases encompassing six subfamilies (ST3Gal I–ST3Gal VI) functionally characterized in mammals. Exploration of genomic and expressed sequence tag databases and search of conserved sialylmotifs led to the identification of a large data set of st3gal-related gene sequences. Molecular phylogeny and large scale sequence similarity network analysis identified four new vertebrate subfamilies called ST3Gal III-r, ST3Gal VII, ST3Gal VIII, and ST3Gal IX. To address the issue of the origin and evolutionary relationships of the st3gal-related genes, we performed comparative syntenic mapping of st3gal gene loci combined to ancestral genome reconstruction. The ten vertebrate ST3Gal subfamilies originated from genome duplication events at the base of vertebrates and are organized in three distinct and ancient groups of genes predating the early deuterostomes. Inferring st3gal gene family history identified also several lineage-specific gene losses, the significance of which was explored in a functional context. Toward this aim, spatiotemporal distribution of st3gal genes was analyzed in zebrafish and bovine tissues. In addition, molecular evolutionary analyses using specificity determining position and coevolved amino acid predictions led to the identification of amino acid residues with potential implication in functional divergence of vertebrate ST3Gal. We propose a detailed scenario of the evolutionary relationships of st3gal genes coupled to a conceptual framework of the evolution of ST3Gal functions. PMID:25534026

  3. A hitchhikers guide to the Galápagos: co-phylogeography of Galápagos mockingbirds and their parasites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parasites are evolutionary hitchhikers whose phylogenies often track the evolutionary history of their hosts. Incongruence in the evolutionary history of closely associated lineages can be explained through a variety of possible events including host switching and host independent speciation. However, in recently diverged lineages stochastic population processes, such as retention of ancestral polymorphism or secondary contact, can also explain discordant genealogies, even in fully co-speciating taxa. The relatively simple biogeographic arrangement of the Galápagos archipelago, compared with mainland biomes, provides a framework to identify stochastic and evolutionary informative components of genealogic data in these recently diverged organisms. Results Mitochondrial DNA sequences were obtained for four species of Galápagos mockingbirds and three sympatric species of ectoparasites - two louse and one mite species. These data were complemented with nuclear EF1α sequences in selected samples of parasites and with information from microsatellite loci in the mockingbirds. Mitochondrial sequence data revealed differences in population genetic diversity between all taxa and varying degrees of topological congruence between host and parasite lineages. A very low level of genetic variability and lack of congruence was found in one of the louse parasites, which was excluded from subsequent joint analysis of mitochondrial data. The reconciled multi-species tree obtained from the analysis is congruent with both the nuclear data and the geological history of the islands. Conclusions The gene genealogies of Galápagos mockingbirds and two of their ectoparasites show strong phylogeographic correlations, with instances of incongruence mostly explained by ancestral genetic polymorphism. A third parasite genealogy shows low levels of genetic diversity and little evidence of co-phylogeny with their hosts. These differences can mostly be explained by variation in life

  4. Practical Recommendations for the Use of the GeneSwitch Gal4 System to Knock-Down Genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Scialo, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Stefanatos, Rhoda; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a popular research model organism thanks to its’ powerful genetic tools that allow spatial and temporal control of gene expression. The inducible GeneSwitch Gal4 system (GS) system is a modified version of the classic UAS/GAL4 system which allows inducible regulation of gene expression and eliminates background effects. It is widely acknowledged that the GS system is leaky, with low level expression of UAS transgenes in absence of the inducer RU-486 (the progesterone analog that activates the modified GAL4 protein). However, in the course of our experiments, we have observed that the extent of this leak depends on the nature of the transgene being expressed. In the absence of RU-486, when strong drivers are used to express protein coding transgenes, leaky expression is low or negligible, however expression of RNA interference (RNAi) transgenes results in complete depletion of protein levels. The majority of published studies, using the GS system and RNAi transgenes validate knock-down efficiency by comparing target gene mRNA levels between induced and non-induced groups. Here, we demonstrate that this approach is lacking and that both additional control groups and further validation is required at the protein level. Unfortunately, this experimental limitation of the GS system eliminates “the background advantage”, but does offer the possibility of performing more complex experiments (e.g. studying depletion and overexpression of different proteins in the same genetic background). The limitations and new possible applications of the GS system are discussed in detail. PMID:27570965

  5. Practical Recommendations for the Use of the GeneSwitch Gal4 System to Knock-Down Genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Scialo, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Stefanatos, Rhoda; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a popular research model organism thanks to its' powerful genetic tools that allow spatial and temporal control of gene expression. The inducible GeneSwitch Gal4 system (GS) system is a modified version of the classic UAS/GAL4 system which allows inducible regulation of gene expression and eliminates background effects. It is widely acknowledged that the GS system is leaky, with low level expression of UAS transgenes in absence of the inducer RU-486 (the progesterone analog that activates the modified GAL4 protein). However, in the course of our experiments, we have observed that the extent of this leak depends on the nature of the transgene being expressed. In the absence of RU-486, when strong drivers are used to express protein coding transgenes, leaky expression is low or negligible, however expression of RNA interference (RNAi) transgenes results in complete depletion of protein levels. The majority of published studies, using the GS system and RNAi transgenes validate knock-down efficiency by comparing target gene mRNA levels between induced and non-induced groups. Here, we demonstrate that this approach is lacking and that both additional control groups and further validation is required at the protein level. Unfortunately, this experimental limitation of the GS system eliminates "the background advantage", but does offer the possibility of performing more complex experiments (e.g. studying depletion and overexpression of different proteins in the same genetic background). The limitations and new possible applications of the GS system are discussed in detail. PMID:27570965

  6. Removal of alpha-Gal epitopes from porcine aortic valve and pericardium using recombinant human alpha galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongsik; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Yong-Jin

    2009-12-01

    It has been reported that the immune response due to alpha-Gal epitopes is an important factor in tissue valve failure. The elimination of the interaction between the natural anti-Gal antibodies and alpha-gal epitopes on the xenografts is a prerequisite to the success of xenografts in humans. Previously, we reported that the green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase could remove all alpha-Gal epitopes from cell surface of porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue, but it has limitations on cost effectiveness. In this study we wanted to know whether the recently produced recombinant human alpha-galactosidase A has the same effective enzymatic activity as green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase in removing alpha-Gal epitopes from the same tissues. After treating fresh porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue with recombinant alpha-galactosidase A, each sample was stained with Griffonia simplicifolia type I isolectin B4 indirect immunoperoxidase avidin-biotin technique. We then examined whether the alpha-Gal epitopes were reduced or abolished in each consecutive concentration of recombinant alpha-galactosidase A by comparing the degree of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 staining. As a result, the recombinant alpha-galactosidase A could remove cell surface alpha-Gals on porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue as effectively as green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. PMID:19949670

  7. Retargeting pre-existing human antibodies to a bacterial pathogen with an alpha-Gal conjugated aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Sascha A.; Hwang, John H.; Hall, Bradley; Leire, Emma; Iacomini, John; Old, Robert; Galili, Uri; Roberts, Charles; Mullis, Kary B.; Westby, Mike; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing threat of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections has spurred renewed interest in alternative approaches to classical antibiotic therapy. In contrast to other mammals, humans do not express the galactose-α-1,3-galactosyl-β-1,4-N-acetyl-glucosamine (α-Gal) epitope. As a result of exposure of humans to α-Gal in the environment, a large proportion of circulating antibodies are specific for the trisaccharide. In this study, we examine whether these anti-Gal antibodies can be recruited and redirected to exert anti-bacterial activity. We show that a specific DNA aptamer conjugated to an α-Gal epitope at its 5′ end, herein termed an alphamer, can bind to group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria by recognition of a conserved region of the surface-anchored M protein. The anti-GAS alphamer was shown to recruit anti-Gal antibodies to the streptococcal surface in an α-Gal-specific manner, elicit uptake and killing of the bacteria by human phagocytes, and slow growth of invasive GAS in human whole blood. These studies provide a first in vitro proof of concept that alphamers have the potential to redirect pre-existing antibodies to bacteria in a specific manner and trigger an immediate antibacterial immune response. Further validation of this novel therapeutic approach of applying α-Gal technology in in vivo models of bacterial infection is warranted. PMID:25940316

  8. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans. PMID:25939779

  9. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  10. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  11. Validation of the GALS musculoskeletal screening exam for use in primary care: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Karen A; Bobba, Raja; Bayoumi, Imaan; Chan, David; Schabort, Inge; Boulos, Pauline; Kean, Walter; Obeid, Joyce; McCallum, Ruth; Ioannidis, George; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Cividino, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Background As the proportion of the Canadian population ≥65 grows, so too does the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions. Approximately 20% of visits to family physicians occur as a result of MSK complaints. The GALS (Gait, Arms, Legs, and Spine) screening examination was developed to assist in the detection of MSK abnormalities. Although MSK exams are primarily performed by rheumatologists or other MSK specialists, expanding their use in primary health care may improve the detection of MSK conditions allowing for earlier treatment. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the use of the GALS locomotor screen in primary care by comparing the results of assessments of family physicians with those of rheumatologists. The secondary goal was to examine the incidence of MSK disorders and assess the frequency with which new diagnoses not previously documented in patients' charts were identified. Methods Patients ≥65 years old recruited from an academic family health centre were examined by a rheumatologist and a family physician who recorded the appearance of each participant's gait and the appearance and movement of the arms, legs and spine by deeming them normal or abnormal. GALS scores were compared between physicians with the proportion of observed (Pobs), positive (Ppos) and negative (Pneg) agreement being the primary outcomes. Kappa statistics were also calculated. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the number of "new" diagnoses by comparing rheumatologists' findings with each patient's family practice chart. Results A total of 99 patients consented to participate (92 with previously diagnosed MSK conditions). Results showed reasonable agreement between family physicians and rheumatologists; Pobs = 0.698, Ppos = 0.614 and Pneg = 0.752. The coefficient of agreement (estimated Kappa) was 0.3675 for the composite GALS score. For individual components of the GALS exam, the highest agreement between family physicians and rheumatologists was

  12. EzGal: A Flexible Interface for Stellar Population Synthesis Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancone, Conor L.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2012-06-01

    We present EzGal, a flexible Python program designed to easily generate observable parameters (magnitudes, colors, and mass-to-light ratios) for arbitrary input stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. As has been demonstrated by various authors, for many applications the choice of input SPS models can be a significant source of systematic uncertainty. A key strength of EzGal is that it enables simple, direct comparison of different model sets so that the uncertainty introduced by choice of model set can be quantified. Its ability to work with new models will allow EzGal to remain useful as SPS modeling evolves to keep up with the latest research (such as varying IMFs). EzGal is also capable of generating composite stellar population models (CSPs) for arbitrary input star-formation histories and reddening laws, and it can be used to interpolate between metallicities for a given model set. To facilitate use, we have created an online interface to run EzGal and quickly generate magnitude and mass-to-light ratio predictions for a variety of star-formation histories and model sets. We make many commonly used SPS models available from the online interface, including the canonical Bruzual & Charlot models, an updated version of these models, the Maraston models, the BaSTI models, and the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis (FSPS) models. We use EzGal to compare magnitude predictions for the model sets as a function of wavelength, age, metallicity, and star-formation history. From this comparison we quickly recover the well-known result that the models agree best in the optical for old solar-metallicity models, with differences at the ~0.1 mag level. Similarly, the most problematic regime for SPS modeling is for young ages (lsim2 Gyr) and long wavelengths (λ gsim 7500 Å), where thermally pulsating AGB stars are important and scatter between models can vary from 0.3 mag (Sloan i) to 0.7 mag (Ks). We find that these differences are not caused by one discrepant model

  13. Novel UDP-GalNAc Derivative Structures Provide Insight into the Donor Specificity of Human Blood Group Glycosyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gerd K.; Pesnot, Thomas; Palcic, Monica M.; Jørgensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Two closely related glycosyltransferases are responsible for the final step of the biosynthesis of ABO(H) human blood group A and B antigens. The two enzymes differ by only four amino acid residues, which determine whether the enzymes transfer GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc or Gal from UDP-Gal to the H-antigen acceptor. The enzymes belong to the class of GT-A folded enzymes, grouped as GT6 in the CAZy database, and are characterized by a single domain with a metal dependent retaining reaction mechanism. However, the exact role of the four amino acid residues in the specificity of the enzymes is still unresolved. In this study, we report the first structural information of a dual specificity cis-AB blood group glycosyltransferase in complex with a synthetic UDP-GalNAc derivative. Interestingly, the GalNAc moiety adopts an unusual yet catalytically productive conformation in the binding pocket, which is different from the “tucked under” conformation previously observed for the UDP-Gal donor. In addition, we show that this UDP-GalNAc derivative in complex with the H-antigen acceptor provokes the same unusual binding pocket closure as seen for the corresponding UDP-Gal derivative. Despite this, the two derivatives show vastly different kinetic properties. Our results provide a important structural insight into the donor substrate specificity and utilization in blood group biosynthesis, which can very likely be exploited for the development of new glycosyltransferase inhibitors and probes. PMID:26527682

  14. P1 Trisaccharide (Galα1,4Galβ1,4GlcNAc) Synthesis by Enzyme Glycosylation Reactions Using Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziye; Lu, Yuquan; Zhang, Jianbo; Pardee, Keith; Wang, Peng George

    2003-01-01

    The frequency of Escherichia coli infection has lead to concerns over pathogenic bacteria in our food supply and a demand for therapeutics. Glycolipids on gut cells serve as receptors for the Shiga-like toxin produced by E. coli. Oligosaccharide moiety analogues of these glycolipids can compete with receptors for the toxin, thus acting as antibacterials. An enzymatic synthesis of the P1 trisaccharide (Galα1,4Galβ1,4GlcNAc), one of the oligosaccharide analogues, was assessed in this study. In the proposed synthetic pathway, UDP-glucose was generated from sucrose with an Anabaena sp. sucrose synthase and then converted with an E. coli UDP-glucose 4-epimerase to UDP-galactose. Two molecules of galactose were linked to N-acetylglucosamine subsequently with a Helicobacter pylori β-l,4-galactosyltransferase and a Neisseria meningitidis α-1,4-galactosyltransferase to produce one molecule of P1 trisaccharide. The four enzymes were coexpressed in a single genetically engineered E. coli strain that was then permeabilized and used to catalyze the enzymatic reaction. P1 trisaccharide was accumulated up to 50 mM (5.4 g in a 200-ml reaction volume), with a 67% yield based on the consumption of N-acetylglucosamine. This study provides an efficient approach for the preparative-scale synthesis of P1 trisaccharide with recombinant bacteria. PMID:12676690

  15. WebWise 2.0: The Power of Community. WebWise Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World Proceedings (9th, Miami Beach, Florida, March 5-7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2009-01-01

    Since it was coined by Tim O'Reilly in formulating the first Web 2.0 Conference in 2004, the term "Web 2.0" has definitely caught on as a designation of a second generation of Web design and experience that emphasizes a high degree of interaction with, and among, users. Rather than simply consulting and reading Web pages, the Web 2.0 generation is…

  16. A cryptic taxon of Galápagos tortoise in conservation peril

    PubMed Central

    Russello, Michael A; Glaberman, Scott; Gibbs, James P; Marquez, Cruz; Powell, Jeffrey R; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2005-01-01

    As once boldly stated, ‘bad taxonomy can kill’, highlighting the critical importance of accurate taxonomy for the conservation of endangered taxa. The concept continues to evolve almost 15 years later largely because most legal protections aimed at preserving biological diversity are based on formal taxonomic designations. In this paper we report unrecognized genetic divisions within the giant tortoises of the Galápagos. We found three distinct lineages among populations formerly considered a single taxon on the most populous and accessible island of Santa Cruz; their diagnosability, degree of genetic divergence and phylogenetic placement merit the recognition of at least one new taxon. These results demonstrate the fundamental importance of continuing taxonomic investigations to recognize biological diversity and designate units of conservation, even within long-studied organisms such as Galápagos tortoises, whose evolutionary heritage and contribution to human intellectual history warrant them special attention. PMID:17148189

  17. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms. PMID:26105791

  18. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 4: The global-database manager GAL-DBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Mary A.; Regelbrugge, Marc E.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fourth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language CLAMP, the command language interpreter CLIP, and the data manager GAL. Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 4 describes the nominal-record data management component of the NICE software. It is intended for all users.

  19. Functionality of the GAL4/UAS system in Tribolium requires the use of endogenous core promoters

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum has developed into an insect model system second only to Drosophila. Moreover, as a coleopteran it represents the most species-rich metazoan taxon which also includes many pest species. The genetic toolbox for Tribolium research has expanded in the past years but spatio-temporally controlled misexpression of genes has not been possible so far. Results Here we report the establishment of the GAL4/UAS binary expression system in Tribolium castaneum. Both GAL4Δ and GAL4VP16 driven by the endogenous heat shock inducible promoter of the Tribolium hsp68 gene are efficient in activating reporter gene expression under the control of the Upstream Activating Sequence (UAS). UAS driven ubiquitous tGFP fluorescence was observed in embryos within four hours after activation while in-situ hybridization against tGFP revealed expression already after two hours. The response is quick in relation to the duration of embryonic development in Tribolium - 72 hours with segmentation being completed after 24 hours - which makes the study of early embryonic processes possible using this system. By comparing the efficiency of constructs based on Tribolium, Drosophila, and artificial core promoters, respectively, we find that the use of endogenous core promoters is essential for high-level expression of transgenic constructs. Conclusions With the established GAL4/UAS binary expression system, ectopic misexpression approaches are now feasible in Tribolium. Our results support the contention that high-level transgene expression usually requires endogenous regulatory sequences, including endogenous core promoters in Tribolium and probably also other model systems. PMID:20482875

  20. New GlcNAc/GalNAc-specific lectin from the ascidian Didemnum ternatanum.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Valentina; Chikalovets, Irina; Li, Wei; Kobelev, Stanislav; Kozyrevskaya, Svetlana; Bogdanovich, Raisa; Howard, Eric; Belogortseva, Natalia

    2005-05-25

    Previously we isolated GlcNAc-specific lectin (DTL) from the ascidian Didemnum ternatanum by affinity chromatography on cross-linked ovalbumin. Here we report the purification and characterization of new D-GlcNAc/D-GalNAc-specific lectin DTL-A from the same ascidian. This lectin was isolated from non-bound cross-linked ovalbumin fraction and further was purified by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B, affinity chromatography on GlcNAc-agarose and gel filtration on Superdex 200. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration of purified lectin on Sepharose CL-4B indicates that it exists as large aggregates in the native state. Investigations of the carbohydrate specificity of DTL-A by enzyme-linked lectin assay suggest the multi-specificity of this lectin. DTL-A binds BSM, asialo-BSM as well as heparin and dextran sulfate. The binding of DTL-A to BSM was inhibited by monosaccharides D-GlcNAc and D-GalNAc, their alpha- but not beta-anomers. Among polysaccharides and glycoconjugates, DTL-A binding to BSM was effectively inhibited by BSM, asialo-BSM, pronase-treated BSM and synthetic alpha-D-GalNAc-PAA. Fetuin and asialofetuin showed a much lower inhibitory potency, heparin and dextran sulfate were noninhibitory. On the other hand, DTL-A binding to heparin was effectively inhibited by dextran sulfate, fucoidan, whereas BSM showed insignificantly inhibitory effect. DTL-A binding to heparin was not inhibited by D-GlcNAc and D-GalNAc. PMID:15784180

  1. Coral reef recovery in the Galápagos Islands: the northernmost islands (Darwin and Wenman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Peter W.; Riegl, Bernhard; Purkis, Samuel; Kerr, Jeremy M.; Smith, Tyler B.

    2015-06-01

    The remote northernmost Galápagos Islands, Darwin and Wenman, exhibited well-developed coral communities in 1975, which were severely degraded during the 1982-1983 El Niño warming event. Mapping of the coral reef at Darwin, herein Wellington Reef, shows it presently to be the largest known structural reef in the Galápagos. It consists of numerous 1- to 3-m-high Porites framework towers or stacks and overlies a carbonate (coral/calcareous sediments) basement. Pre-disturbance Wellington Reef was constructed chiefly by Porites lobata and Pocillopora elegans, and Wenman coral cover was dominated by Pavona clavus and Porites lobata. Subsequent surveys in 2012 have demonstrated robust recovery in spite of ENSO thermal shock events, involving both high and low stressful temperatures that have caused tissue bleaching and mortality. No losses of coral species have been observed. Radiocarbon dating of 1- to 3-m-high poritid framework stacks, from their peaks to bases, revealed modern ages of up to 690 yr. Incremental stack growth rates ranged from 0.15-0.39 to 1.04-2.40 cm yr-1. The former are equivalent to framework accretion rates of 1.5-3.9 m Kyr-1, the latter to coral skeletal growth rates of 1.0-2.4 cm yr-1. Coral recovery in the central and southern Galápagos has been nonexistent to low compared with the northern islands, due chiefly to much higher population densities and destructive grazing pressure of the echinoid Eucidaris galapagensis. Thus, coral reef resistance to ENSO perturbations and recovery potential in the Galápagos are influenced by echinoid bioerosion that varies significantly among islands.

  2. Purification and characterization of D-Gal-6-sulfurylase from Eucheuma striatum.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojuan; Ma, Chaoyang; Lou, Zaixiang; Wang, Aimei; Wang, Hongxin

    2013-07-01

    D-Gal-6-sulfurylase catalyzing the conversion of μ-carrageenan into κ-carrageenan was extracted from Eucheuma striatum and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of about 65 kDa as shown in SDS-PAGE. The maximum activity of the enzyme was observed at pH 7.0 and temperature 40°C. Km value for μ-carrageenan was 4.31 mM, and the corresponding Vmax was 0.17 mM min(-1). The carrageenan treated with 10 U of the purified enzyme exhibited 7.1-fold increase in gel strength with a removal of 30% sulfate groups. (1)H NMR spectral analysis of the control and enzyme treated carrageenan confirmed the conversion of μ- into κ-carrageenan and highlighted the specificity of Gal-6-sulfurylase for μ-carrageenan. This Gal-6-sulfurylase provides an eco-friendly and alternative for alkali treatment method to produce high gel strength κ-carrageenan. PMID:23688448

  3. Cryptic differentiation in the endemic micromoth Galagete darwini (Lepidoptera, Autostichidae) on Galápagos volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Patrick; Cibois, Alice; Landry, Bernard

    2008-10-27

    To gain insight into the early stages of speciation, we reconstructed a DNA-based phylogeny, using combined mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II: 1008 bp) and nuclear (elongation factor 1-alpha and wingless: 1062 bp) markers of populations of the moth Galagete darwini endemic to the Galápagos, which belongs to an insular radiation similar in size to that of Darwin's finches. Adults of G. darwini were collected in the arid lowlands of 11 of the Galápagos Islands (Baltra, Española, Fernandina, Floreana, Isabela, Pinta, Pinzón, San Cristobal, Santa Cruz, Santiago and Seymour) and the humid highlands of a subset of 5 of them (Fernandina, Floreana, Isabela, Santa Cruz and Santiago). The combined phylogeographic analysis surprisingly revealed that G. darwini populations at higher elevation on the western islands (Fernandina, Isabela and Santiago) represent a distinct lineage from the one in the low arid zones of these same islands. This is the first reported case in the archipelago of genetic cryptic differentiation correlated with elevation on the western Galápagos volcanoes. PMID:18765358

  4. West Nile Virus Vector Competency of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes in the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Gillian; Kramer, Laura D.; Goodman, Simon J.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The mosquito-transmitted pathogen West Nile virus (WNV) is not yet present in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. However, concern exists for fragile endemic island fauna after population decreases in several North American bird species and pathology in certain reptiles. We examined WNV vector competency of a Galápagos strain of mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus Say). Field specimens were tested for their capacity to transmit the WN02-1956 strain of WNV after incubation at 27°C or 30°C. Rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission all increased with days post-exposure to WNV, and the highest rates were observed at 28 days. Infection rates peaked at 59% and transmission rates peaked at 44% (of mosquitoes tested). Vector efficiency increased after day 14. Rates of infection but not of transmission were significantly influence by temperature. No vertical transmission was detectable. We demonstrate that Galápagos Cx. quinquefasciatus are competent WNV vectors, and therefore should be considered an animal and public health risk for the islands and controlled wherever possible. PMID:21896799

  5. Method for predicting water demand for crop uses in New Jersey in 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020, and for estimating water use for livestock and selected sectors of the food-processing industry in New Jersey in 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawges, R.M.; Titus, E.O.

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to predict water demand for crop uses in New Jersey. A separate method was developed to estimate water use for livestock and selected sectors of the food-processing industry in 1987. Predictions of water demand for field- grown crops in New Jersey were made for 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020 under three climatological scenarios: (1) wet year, (2) average year, and (3) drought year. These estimates ranged from 4.10 times 10 to the 9th power to 16.82 times 10 to the 9th power gal (gallons). Irrigation amounts calculated for the three climatological scenarios by using a daily water-balance model were multiplied by predicted numbers of irrigated acreage. Irrigated acreage was predicted from historical crop-irrigation data and from predictions of harvested acreage produced by using a statistical model relating population to harvested acreage. Predictions of water demand for cranberries and container-grown nursery crops also were made for 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. Predictions of water demand under the three climatological scenarios were made for container- grown nursery crops, but not for cranberries, because water demand for cranberries varies little in response to climatological factors. Water demand for cranberries was predicted to remain constant at 4.43 times 10 to the 9th power gal through the year 2020. Predictions of water demand for container-grown nursery crops ranged from 1.89 times 10 to the 9th power to 3.63 times 10 to the 9th power gal. Water-use for livestock in 1987 was estimated to be 0.78 times 10 to the 9th power gal, and water use for selected sectors of the food-processing industry was estimated to be 3.75 times 10 to the 9th power gal.

  6. TIM-3/Gal-9 interaction induces IFNγ-dependent IDO1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia blast cells.

    PubMed

    Folgiero, Valentina; Cifaldi, Loredana; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Goffredo, Bianca Maria; Vinti, Luciana; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-01-01

    NK cells expressing TIM-3 show a marked increase in IFNγ production in response to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blast cells that endogenously express Gal-9. Herein, we demonstrate that NK cell-mediated production of IFNγ, induced by TIM-3/Gal-9 interaction and released in bone marrow microenvironment, is responsible for IDO1 expression in AML blasts. IDO1-expressing AML blasts consequently down-regulate NK cell degranulation activity, by sustaining leukemia immune escape. Furthermore, the blocking of TIM-3/Gal-9 interaction strongly down-regulates IFNγ-dependent IDO1 activity. Thus, the inhibition of TIM-3/Gal-9 immune check point, which affects NK cell-dependent IFNγ production and the consequent IDO1 activation, could usefully integrate current chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25886742

  7. Expressions of Iba1 and galectin-3 (Gal-3) in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute rat liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Juniantito, Vetnizah; Golbar, Hossain M; Fujisawa, Kae; Tanaka, Miyuu; Ichikawa, Chisa; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2013-09-01

    Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) is associated with membrane ruffling and motility of cells. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside binding animal lectin, and regulates fibrogenesis probably through transforming growth factor-β1. To evaluate macrophage properties, expressions of Iba1 and Gal-3 were investigated, in relation to macrophages expressing CD68 (ED1; reflecting increased phagocytosis) and CD163 (ED2; implying proinflammatory factor productions) in centrilobular lesions induced in rat livers with thioacetamide (TAA; 300 mg/kg body weight, once intraperitoneally). In agreement with expression patterns of CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages, cells reacting to Iba1 and Gal-3 were increased in numbers on post-injection (PI) days 1-5, peaking on day 2; thereafter, the positive cells gradually decreased to control levels until PI days 7 and 10. The increased expressions of Iba1 and Gal-3 were confirmed at mRNA levels by the RT-PCR. Double immunofluorescence staining on PI days 2 and 3 demonstrated Iba1 expression in 15-46% of CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages, and Gal-3 expression in 65-82% of CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages; Gal-3 expression was observed in 84-93% of Iba1(+) cells. Interestingly, Gal-3 was also expressed in a small number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts in fibrotic lesions developed in injured centrilobular areas. These findings indicate that macrophages with various functions can participate in development of liver lesions and resultant fibrosis. Besides CD68 and CD163, Iba1 and Gal-3 immunohistochemistry for macrophages would be useful to analyze the pathogenesis behind developing hepatotoxicity. PMID:23265716

  8. Screening a limited structure-based library identifies UDP-GalNAc-specific mutants of alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tumbale, Percy; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K Ravi; Brew, Keith

    2008-12-01

    Complex glycans have important roles in biological recognition processes and considerable pharmaceutical potential. The synthesis of novel glycans can be facilitated by engineering glycosyltransferases to modify their substrate specificities. The choice of sites to modify requires the knowledge of the structures of enzyme-substrate complexes while the complexity of protein structures necessitates the exploration of a large array of multisite mutations. The retaining glycosyltransferase, alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the alpha-Gal epitope, has strict specificity for UDP-galactose as a donor substrate. Based on the structure of a complex of UDP-galactose with alpha3GT, the specificity for the galactose moiety can be partly attributed to residues that interact with the galactose 2-OH group, particularly His280 and Ala282. With the goal of engineering a variant of bovine alpha3GT with GalNAc transferase activity, we constructed a limited library of 456 alpha3GT mutants containing 19 alternative amino acids at position 280, two each at 281 and 282 and six at position 283. Clones (1500) were screened by assaying partially purified bacterially expressed variants for GalNAc transferase activity. Mutants with the highest levels of GalNAc transferase activity, AGGL or GGGL, had substitutions at all four sites. The AGGL mutant had slightly superior GalNAc transferase activity amounting to about 3% of the activity of the wild-type enzyme with UDP-Gal. This mutant had a low activity with UDP-Gal; its crystallographic structure suggests that the smaller side chains at residues 280-282 form a pocket to accommodate the larger acetamido group of GalNAc. Mutational studies indicate that Leu283 is important for stability in this mutant. PMID:18782853

  9. Gradiente radial de [Mg/Fe] em duas galáxias elípticas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A.; Capelato, H.

    2003-08-01

    Basicamente, são propostos dois cenários de evolução quí mio-dinâmico para os sistemas esferoidais: (i) o hierárquico através da fusão e/ou acresção de sub-sistemas com ou sem surtos de formação estelar, e (ii) o colapso monolí tico dissipativo com formação estelar interrompida por um vento galáctico. Ambos, dentro de certos limites, conseguem explicar os gradientes internos de metalicidade estelar presentes nas galáxias elí pticas bem como a relação observada entre a metalicidade central e a massa (Mg20 vs. log sv0). No entanto, nenhum prevê uma variação interna para a razão de abundâncias Mg/Fe que indiretamente define a escala temporal da formação estelar. Empregamos a espectroscopia óptica de fenda longa com a finalidade de recuperar as histórias de formação estelar, de enriquecimento quí mico e da dinâmica dentro de determinadas regiões das galáxias. Os espectros de média resolução (FWHM = 7,1 Å) e escala angular de 1,092 arcsec/pixel foram coletados com o telescópio 1,60m do OPD/LNA. Comparamos nossas medidas de linhas de absorção com resultados espectrofotométricos de modelos de populações estelares simples - mais especificamente os í ndices do Sistema Lick como Mg2, Mg b, < Fe > e Hb - a fim de se investigar as variações internas de [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe] e idade. Para duas galáxias elí pticas, NGC 1052 e NGC 7796, pertencentes a ambientes de baixa densidade, encontramos uma variação radial da razão Mg/Fe decrescente do centro para fora em regiões de 0,6 e 1 raio efetivo respectivamente. Discutimos alguns cenários de enriquecimento quí mico para estas duas galáxias.

  10. The Temporal Evolution of the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province (NGVP), located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered near the 90°50'W Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF) of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC), hosts a complex set of islands, seamount chains, and ridges. Magmatism in this region is thought to represent the interaction between the Galápagos hotspot, the overlying lithosphere, and the GSC. To better understand the evolution of the ridge-hotspot interaction, we present an integration of new with existing 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating age data from submarine lavas. The section of the NGVP on the Nazca Plate south and west of the GTF is dominated by three volcanic lineaments (the largest of which is the Wolf-Darwin Lineament or WDL), two east-west trending pseudofaults, and the islands of Pinta and Marchena. Eruption ages of lavas along the WDL range from recent (e.g., 0.1 Ma) to 2.3 × 0.4 (2 sigma) Ma with no discernible spatial pattern. Lavas recovered from the flanks of Pinta and Marchena vary from recent to 1.4 × 0.4 Ma. The more northern pseudofault is younger (3.4 × 0.3 Ma) than the ridge to the south (4.7 × 0.1 Ma); these observations are generally consistent with model ages for the crust near the volcanic lineaments. East of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, the dominant features are several linear ridges with up to 1km of relief and a few scattered seamounts. The age of recovered lavas range from 0.4 × 0.7 Ma to 3.4 × 0.5 Ma with no real spatial pattern, with the exception that the oldest seamount is located in the northeastern corner of the sampling area. These relatively young ages of compositionally enriched lavas indicate intraplate magmatism on the Cocos Plate provide insight into the distribution of plume material beneath the NGVP.

  11. Giardia Cyst Wall Protein 1 Is a Lectin That Binds to Curled Fibrils of the GalNAc Homopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Carpentieri, Andrea; Ratner, Daniel M.; Bullitt, Esther; Costello, Catherine E.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    The infectious and diagnostic stage of Giardia lamblia (also known as G. intestinalis or G. duodenalis) is the cyst. The Giardia cyst wall contains fibrils of a unique β-1,3-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) homopolymer and at least three cyst wall proteins (CWPs) composed of Leu-rich repeats (CWPLRR) and a C-terminal conserved Cys-rich region (CWPCRR). Our goals were to dissect the structure of the cyst wall and determine how it is disrupted during excystation. The intact Giardia cyst wall is thin (∼400 nm), easily fractured by sonication, and impermeable to small molecules. Curled fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer are restricted to a narrow plane and are coated with linear arrays of oval-shaped protein complex. In contrast, cyst walls of Giardia treated with hot alkali to deproteinate fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer are thick (∼1.2 µm), resistant to sonication, and permeable. The deproteinated GalNAc homopolymer, which forms a loose lattice of curled fibrils, is bound by native CWP1 and CWP2, as well as by maltose-binding protein (MBP)-fusions containing the full-length CWP1 or CWP1LRR. In contrast, neither MBP alone nor MBP fused to CWP1CRR bind to the GalNAc homopolymer. Recombinant CWP1 binds to the GalNAc homopolymer within secretory vesicles of Giardia encysting in vitro. Fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer are exposed during excystation or by treatment of heat-killed cysts with chymotrypsin, while deproteinated fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer are degraded by extracts of Giardia cysts but not trophozoites. These results show the Leu-rich repeat domain of CWP1 is a lectin that binds to curled fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer. During excystation, host and Giardia proteases appear to degrade bound CWPs, exposing fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer that are digested by a stage-specific glycohydrolase. PMID:20808847

  12. Elucidation of a novel lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA transferase gene (rgtF) from Mesorhizobium loti: Heterologous expression of rgtF causes Rhizobium etli to synthesize lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dusty B; Muszynski, Artur; Carlson, Russell W

    2013-05-01

    An unusual α-(1,1)-galacturonic acid (GalA) lipid A modification has been reported in the lipopolysaccharide of a number of interesting Gram-negative bacteria, including the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum, Mesorhizobium huakuii and M. loti, the stalk-forming bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. However, the α-(1,1)-GalA transferase (GalAT) gene, which we have named RgtF, was not identified. Species of the Rhizobium genera produce lipid A with α-(1,4')-GalA but not α-(1,1)-GalA. The Rhizobium GalAT, RgtD, is the lipid A α-(1-4')-GalAT which utilizes the lipid donor dodecaprenyl-phosphate GalA (Dod-P-GalA) for GalA transfer. An additional Rhizobium GalAT, RgtE, is required for the biosynthesis of Dod-P-GalA. We predicted candidate rgtF genes in bacterial species known to produce lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA. In order to determine the predicted rgtF gene function, we cloned the M. loti rgtF gene into an expression plasmid and introduced that plasmid into Rhizobium etli strains that do not contain the rgtF gene nor produce lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis combined with NMR studies revealed that the lipid As from these rgtF-complemented strains were modified with an additional α-(1,1)-GalA attached to the proximal glucosamine. PMID:23283001

  13. Elucidation of a novel lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA transferase gene (rgtF) from Mesorhizobium loti: Heterologous expression of rgtF causes Rhizobium etli to synthesize lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dusty B; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W

    2013-01-01

    An unusual α-(1,1)-galacturonic acid (GalA) lipid A modification has been reported in the lipopolysaccharide of a number of interesting Gram-negative bacteria, including the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum, Mesorhizobium huakuii and M. loti, the stalk-forming bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. However, the α-(1,1)-GalA transferase (GalAT) gene, which we have named RgtF, was not identified. Species of the Rhizobium genera produce lipid A with α-(1,4′)-GalA but not α-(1,1)-GalA. The Rhizobium GalAT, RgtD, is the lipid A α-(1–4′)-GalAT which utilizes the lipid donor dodecaprenyl-phosphate GalA (Dod-P-GalA) for GalA transfer. An additional Rhizobium GalAT, RgtE, is required for the biosynthesis of Dod-P-GalA. We predicted candidate rgtF genes in bacterial species known to produce lipid A with α-(1,1)-GalA. In order to determine the predicted rgtF gene function, we cloned the M. loti rgtF gene into an expression plasmid and introduced that plasmid into Rhizobium etli strains that do not contain the rgtF gene nor produce lipid A α-(1,1)-GalA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis combined with NMR studies revealed that the lipid As from these rgtF-complemented strains were modified with an additional α-(1,1)-GalA attached to the proximal glucosamine. PMID:23283001

  14. Populações estelares do bojo galáctico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, A. V.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.

    2003-08-01

    Os estudos mais recentes do bojo galáctico têm enfocado essencialmente as abundâncias químicas de elementos pesados, como o ferro, obtidos a partir das estrelas nas regiões centrais da galáxia. Elementos leves, como hélio, nitrogênio, oxigênio e argônio ainda são pouco estudados nestas regiões, devido à difícil determinação de suas abundâncias a partir de estrelas. Nestas condições as nebulosas planetárias desempenham um importante papel, pois permitem a determinação de abundâncias destes elementos usando técnicas de espectroscopia nebular. Neste trabalho, reportamos a análise das abundâncias químicas de uma nova amostra de nebulosas planetárias do bojo, bem como os resultados preliminares de um código numérico destinado a modelar a evolução química desta região. Usamos como vínculos observacionais os resultados obtidos das nebulosas planetárias, bem como de abundâncias estelares da região do bojo, obtidas da literatura. A partir deste modelo da evolução química e dos vínculos observacionais foi possível fazer um diagnóstico mais preciso das populações que constituem o bojo galáctico. O estudo destas populações que compõem a região central de nossa galáxia é de extrema importância para o maior entendimento da evolução química e dinâmica da galáxia como um todo. Por isto, verificamos a importância dos modelos de formação simples e mista utilizados para explicar características da população da região central da galáxia. Algumas destas características são: uma grande dispersão nos valores das abundâncias químicas e um grande espalhamento nas correlações entre as abundâcias de nitrogênio e oxigênio. Estas peculiaridades são dificilmente reproduzidas por modelos de formação simples, e portanto são importantes indícios da validade dos modelos de formação mista, tais como um rápido colapso do bojo seguido de uma evolução secular. (FAPESP, CNPq)

  15. Geochemistry of Intra-Transform Lavas from the Galápagos Transform Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Galápagos plume has profoundly affected the development and evolution of the nearby (<250 km) Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF), a ~100km right-stepping offset in the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC). The GTF can be divided into two sections that represent different stages of transform evolution: the northern section exhibits fully developed transform fault morphology, whereas the southern section is young, and deformation is more diffuse. Both segments are faulted extensively and include numerous small (<0.5km3) monogenetic volcanic cones, though volcanic activity is more common in the south. To examine the composition of the mantle source and melting conditions responsible for the intra-transform lavas, as well as the influence of the plume on GTF evolution, we present major element, trace element, and radiogenic isotope analysis of samples collected during SON0158, EWI0004, and MV1007 cruises. Radiogenic isotope ratio variations in the Galápagos Archipelago require four distinct mantle reservoirs across the region: PLUME, DM, FLO, and WD. We find that Galápagos Transform lavas are chemically distinct from nearby GSC lavas and neighboring seamounts. They have radiogenic isotopic compositions that lie on a mixing line between DM and PLUME, with little to no contribution from any other mantle reservoirs despite their geographic proximity to WD-influenced lavas erupted along the GSC and at nearby (<50km away) seamounts. Within the transform, lavas from the northern section are more enriched in radiogenic isotopes than lavas sampled in the southern section. Transform lavas are anomalously depleted in incompatible trace elements (ITEs) relative to GSC lavas, suggesting unique melting conditions within the transform. Isotopic variability along the transform axis indicates that mantle sources and/or melting mechanisms vary between the northern and southern sections, which may relate to their distances from the plume or the two-stage development and evolution of

  16. The EGD1 product, a yeast homolog of human BTF3, may be involved in GAL4 DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Parthun, M R; Mangus, D A; Jaehning, J A

    1992-01-01

    A variety of techniques, including filter binding, footprinting, and gel retardation, can be used to assay the transcriptional activator GAL4 (Gal4p) through the initial steps of its purification from yeast cells. Following DNA affinity chromatography, Gal4p still bound DNA selectively when assayed by filter binding or footprinting. However, the affinity-purified protein was no longer capable of forming a stable complex with DNA, as assayed by gel retardation. Mixing the purified Gal4p with the flowthrough fraction from the DNA affinity column restored gel retardation complex formation. Gel retardation assays were used to monitor the purification of a heat-stable Gal4p-DNA complex stabilization activity from the affinity column flowthrough. The activity coeluted from the final purification step with polypeptides of 21 and 27 kDa. The yeast gene encoding the 21-kDa protein was cloned on the basis of its N-terminal amino acid sequence. The gene, named EGD1 (enhancer of GAL4 DNA binding), encodes a highly basic protein (21% lysine and arginine) with a predicted molecular mass of 16.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of the EGD1 product, Egd1p, is highly similar to that of the human protein BTF3 (X. M. Zheng, D. Black, P. Chambon, and J. M. Egly, Nature [London] 344:556-559, 1990). Although an egd1 null mutant was viable and Gal+, induction of the galactose-regulated genes in the egd1 mutant strain was significantly reduced when cells were shifted from glucose to galactose. Images PMID:1448098

  17. The Cellular Architecture of the Larval Zebrafish Tectum, as Revealed by Gal4 Enhancer Trap Lines

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ethan K.; Baier, Herwig

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a Gal4 enhancer trap screen in zebrafish, and have generated 184 stable transgenic lines with interesting expression patterns throughout the nervous system. Of these, three display clear expression in the tectum, each with a distinguishable and stereotyped distribution of Gal4 expressing cells. Detailed morphological analysis of single cells, using a genetic “Golgi-like” labelling method, revealed four common cell types (superficial, periventricular, shallow periventricular, and radial glial), along with a range of other less common neurons. The shallow periventricular (PV) and a subset of the PV neurons are tectal efferent neurons that target various parts of the reticular formation. We find that it is specifically PV neurons with dendrites in the deep tectal neuropil that target the reticular formation. This indicates that these neurons receive the tectum's highly processed visual information (which is fed from the superficial retinorecipient layers), and relay it to premotor regions. Our results show that the larval tectum, both broadly and at the single cell level, strongly resembles a miniature version of its adult counterpart, and that it has all of the necessary anatomical characteristics to inform motor responses based on sensory input. We also demonstrate that mosaic expression of GFP in Gal4 enhancer trap lines can be used to describe the types and abundance of cells in an expression pattern, including the architectures of individual neurons. Such detailed anatomical descriptions will be an important part of future efforts to describe the functions of discrete tectal circuits in the generation of behavior. PMID:19862330

  18. Galápagos mockingbirds tolerate introduced parasites that affect Darwin's finches.

    PubMed

    Knutie, Sarah A; Owen, Jeb P; McNew, Sabrina M; Bartlow, Andrew W; Arriero, Elena; Herman, Jordan M; DiBlasi, Emily; Thompson, Michael; Koop, Jennifer A H; Clayton, Dale H

    2016-04-01

    Introduced parasites threaten native host species that lack effective defenses. Such parasites increase the risk of extinction, particularly in small host populations like those on islands. If some host species are tolerant to introduced parasites, this could amplify the risk of the parasite to vulnerable host species. Recently, the introduced parasitic nest fly Philornis downsi has been implicated in the decline of Darwin's finch populations in the Galápagos Islands. In some years, 100% of finch nests fail due to P. downsi; however, other common host species nesting near Darwin's finches, such as the endemic Galápagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus), appear to be less affected by P. downsi. We compared effects of P. downsi on mockingbirds and medium ground finches (Geospiza fortis) on Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos. We experimentally manipulated the abundance of P. downsi in nests of mockingbirds and finches to measure the direct effect of the parasite on the reproductive success of each species of host. We also compared immunological and behavioral responses by each species of host to the fly. Although nests of the two host species had similar parasite densities, flies decreased the fitness of finches but not mockingbirds. Neither host species had a significant antibody-mediated immune response to P. downsi. Moreover, finches showed no significant increase in begging, parental provisioning, or plasma glucose levels in response to the flies. In contrast, parasitized mockingbird nestlings begged more than nonparasitized mockingbird nestlings. Greater begging was correlated with increased parental provisioning behavior, which appeared to compensate for parasite damage. The results of our study suggest that finches are negatively affected by P. downsi because they do not have such behavioral mechanisms for energy compensation. In contrast, mockingbirds are capable of compensation, making them tolerant hosts, and a possible indirect threat to Darwin's finches

  19. Neuronal expression of GalNAc transferase is sufficient to prevent the age-related neurodegenerative phenotype of complex ganglioside-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Denggao; McGonigal, Rhona; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cappell, Joanna; Cunningham, Madeleine E; Meehan, Gavin R; Fewou, Simon N; Edgar, Julia M; Rowan, Edward; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi; Brophy, Peter J; Willison, Hugh J

    2014-01-15

    Gangliosides are widely expressed sialylated glycosphingolipids with multifunctional properties in different cell types and organs. In the nervous system, they are highly enriched in both glial and neuronal membranes. Mice lacking complex gangliosides attributable to targeted ablation of the B4galnt1 gene that encodes β-1,4-N-acetylegalactosaminyltransferase 1 (GalNAc-transferase; GalNAcT(-/-)) develop normally before exhibiting an age-dependent neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by marked behavioral abnormalities, central and peripheral axonal degeneration, reduced myelin volume, and loss of axo-glial junction integrity. The cell biological substrates underlying this neurodegeneration and the relative contribution of either glial or neuronal gangliosides to the process are unknown. To address this, we generated neuron-specific and glial-specific GalNAcT rescue mice crossed on the global GalNAcT(-/-) background [GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial)] and analyzed their behavioral, morphological, and electrophysiological phenotype. Complex gangliosides, as assessed by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry, GalNAcT enzyme activity, and anti-ganglioside antibody (AgAb) immunohistology, were restored in both neuronal and glial GalNAcT rescue mice. Behaviorally, GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) retained a normal "wild-type" (WT) phenotype throughout life, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) resembled GalNAcT(-/-) mice, exhibiting progressive tremor, weakness, and ataxia with aging. Quantitative electron microscopy demonstrated that GalNAcT(-/-) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) nerves had significantly increased rates of axon degeneration and reduced myelin volume, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and WT appeared normal. The increased invasion of the paranode with juxtaparanodal Kv1.1, characteristically seen in GalNAcT(-/-) and attributed to a breakdown of the axo-glial junction, was normalized in GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) but remained present in Gal

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hi-Gal sources distance determination (Russeil+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russeil, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Mottram, J. C.; Bontemps, S.; Anderson, L. D.; Zavagno, A.; Beltran, M. T.; Bally, J.; Brand, J.; Brunt, C.; Cesaroni, R.; Joncas, G.; Marshall, D.; Martin, P.; Massi, F.; Molinari, S.; Moore, T.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Olmi, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Wienen, M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2011-05-01

    We obtain velocities along the line of sight to Hi-GAL sources, where possible, using CO data observed with the SEQUOIA receiver on the FCRAO 14m telescope. In the l=30 ° region we use the 13CO J=1-0 data from the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey (GRS, Jackson et al., 2006ApJS..163..145J) while in the l=59° region we use 13CO and C18O J=1-0 observations obtained as part of the Exeter-FCRAO CO Galactic Plane Survey (Brunt et al., in prep.). (2 data files).

  1. Characterization of a double-CRD-mutated Gal-8 recombinant protein that retains co-stimulatory activity on antigen-specific T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matías Nicolás; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Carabelli, Julieta; André-Leroux, Gwenaëlle; Caramelo, Julio Javier; Cattaneo, Valentina; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Galectins (Gals) constitute a family of mammalian lectins with affinity for β-galactosides, characterized by the presence of conserved CRDs (carbohydrate-recognition domains). We have found previously that Gal-8, from the tandem-repeat group with two linked CRDs, exerts two separate actions on CD4(+)T-cells: antigen-independent proliferation and, at lower concentration, antigen-specific co-stimulation. Whereas proliferation can be ascribed to the pro-inflammatory role of Gal-8, the co-stimulatory activity of borderline T-cell-specific responses allows the proposal of Gal-8 as an adjuvant in vaccination. To study the relevance of glycan-lectin interaction to these T-cell activities, we generated a double-mutated protein (Gal-8mut) by replacing canonical arginine residues on each CRD, so as to abolish sugar-binding capacity. As expected, Gal-8mut was unable to bind to lactosyl-Sepharose, confirming that lactose recognition was precluded; however, preservation of lectin activity was still evident since Gal-8mut displayed haemoagglutinatory effects and binding capacity to the T-cell surface. To search for glycan affinity, a glycan microarray analysis was conducted which revealed that Gal-8mut lost most low- and intermediate-, but retained high-, affinity interactions, mainly to polylactosamines and blood group antigens. These findings were supported further by molecular modelling. Regarding biological activity, Gal-8mut was unable to induce T-cell proliferation, but efficiently co-stimulated antigen-specific responses, bothin vitroandin vivo.Therefore Gal-8mut represents a useful tool to dissect the specificities of lectin-glycan interactions underlying distinctive Gal-8 activities on T-cell biology. Moreover, given its distinguishing properties, Gal-8mut could be used to enhance borderline immune responses without the non-specific pro-inflammatory activity or other potential adverse effects. PMID:26795039

  2. Galectin CvGal2 from the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Displays Unique Specificity for ABH Blood Group Oligosaccharides and Differentially Recognizes Sympatric Perkinsus Species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chiguang; Ghosh, Anita; Amin, Mohammed N; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Tasumi, Satoshi; Pasek, Marta; Banerjee, Aditi; Shridhar, Surekha; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bianchet, Mario A; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2015-08-01

    Galectins are highly conserved lectins that are key to multiple biological functions, including pathogen recognition and regulation of immune responses. We previously reported that CvGal1, a galectin expressed in phagocytic cells (hemocytes) of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), is hijacked by the parasite Perkinsus marinus to enter the host, where it causes systemic infection and death. Screening of an oyster hemocyte cDNA library revealed a novel galectin, which we designated CvGal2, with four tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Phylogentic analysis of the CvGal2 CRDs suggests close relationships with homologous CRDs from CvGal1. Glycan array analysis, however, revealed that, unlike CvGal1 which preferentially binds to the blood group A tetrasaccharide, CvGal2 recognizes both blood group A and B tetrasaccharides and related structures, suggesting that CvGal2 has broader binding specificity. Furthermore, SPR analysis demonstrated significant differences in the binding kinetics of CvGal1 and CvGal2, and structural modeling revealed substantial differences in their interactions with the oligosaccharide ligands. CvGal2 is homogeneously distributed in the hemocyte cytoplasm, is released to the extracellular space, and binds to the hemocyte surface. CvGal2 binds to P. marinus trophozoites in a dose-dependent and β-galactoside-specific manner. Strikingly, negligible binding of CvGal2 was observed for Perkinsus chesapeaki, a sympatric parasite species mostly prevalent in the clams Mya arenaria and Macoma balthica. The differential recognition of Perkinsus species by the oyster galectins is consistent with their relative prevalence in oyster and clam species and supports their role in facilitating parasite entry and infectivity in a host-preferential manner. PMID:26158802

  3. Gal4-gene-dependent alterations of embryo development and cell growth in primary culture of sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, V P; Odintsova, N A; Plotnikov, S V; Kiselev, K V; Zacharov, E V; Zhuravlev, Y N

    2002-10-01

    Primary cell cultures from sea urchins have a low proliferative level that prevents the establishment of long-term cultures. To increase expression levels of the genes regulating cell growth in sea urchins, and thus enhance cell growth, we used the transcriptional activator gene Gal4 found earlier in yeast. Sea urchin embryos were treated with plasmid DNA containing the Gal4 gene. Expression of the transgene was confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. When the fully functional gene was used, embryos effectively formed teratoma-like structures after 50 to 55 hours of cultivation. In contrast, the Gal4 gene, devoid of acidic activating regions, possessed little activity as a teratogen. The Gal4-treated cells in blastula-derived culture showed higher DNA synthesis and higher proliferative activity than control cells. We suggest that formation of the teratoma-like structures in embryos, activation of DNA synthesis, and significant increase of cell number in embryo-derived cell cultures could be attributed to Gal4 gene action. PMID:14961241

  4. GalNAc-T4 putatively modulates the estrogen regulatory network through FOXA1 glycosylation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Niang, Bachir; Jin, Liyuan; Chen, Xixi; Guo, Xiaohan; Zhang, Hongshuo; Wu, Qiong; Padhiar, Arshad Ahmed; Xiao, Min; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    GALNT4 belongs to a family of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases, which catalyze the transfer of GalNAc to Serine or Threonine residues in the initial step of mucin-type O-linked protein glycosylation. This glycosylation type is the most complex post-translational modification of proteins, playing important roles during cellular differentiation and in pathological disorders. Most of the breast cancer subtypes are estrogen receptor positive, and hence, the estrogen pathway represents a key regulatory network. We investigated the expression of GalNAc-T4 in a panel of mammary epithelial cell lines and found its expression is associated with the estrogen status of the cells. FOXA1, a key transcription factor, functions to promote estrogen responsive gene expression by acting as a cofactor to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but all the aspects of this regulatory mechanism are not fully explored. This study found that knockdown of GALNT4 expression in human breast cancer cells attenuated the protein expression of ERα, FOXA1, and Cyclin D1. Further, our immunoprecipitation assays depicted the possibility of FOXA1 to undergo O-GalNAc modifications with a decrease of GalNAc residues in the GALNT4 knockdown cells and also impairment in the FOXA1-ERα association. Rescuing GALNT4 expression could restore the interaction as well as the glycosylation of FOXA1. Together, these findings suggest a key role for GalNAc-T4 in the estrogen pathway through FOXA1 glycosylation. PMID:26541755

  5. pGALS – paediatric Gait Arms Legs and Spine: a simple examination of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We describe pGALS (paediatric Gait, Arms, Legs and Spine) – a simple quick musculoskeletal assessment to distinguish abnormal from normal joints in children and young people. The use of pGALS is aimed at the non-specialist in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine as a basic clinical skill to be used in conjunction with essential knowledge about red flags, normal development and awareness of patterns of musculoskeletal pathologies. pGALS has been validated in school-aged children and also in the context of acute general paediatrics to detect abnormal joints. We propose that pGALS is an important part of basic clinical skills to be acquired by all doctors who may be involved in the care of children. The learning of pGALS along with basic knowledge is a useful way to increase awareness of joint disease, facilitate early recognition of joint problems and prompt referral to specialist teams to optimise clinical outcomes. We have compiled this article as a resource that can be used by the paediatric rheumatology community to facilitate teaching. PMID:24219838

  6. Galectin-8 binds to LFA-1, blocks its interaction with ICAM-1 and is counteracted by anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies isolated from lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Vicuña, Lucas; Pardo, Evelyn; Curkovic, Cristóbal; Döger, Remziye; Oyanadel, Claudia; Metz, Claudia; Massardo, Loreto; González, Alfonso; Soza, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Galectin-8 belongs to a family of mammalian lectins that recognize glycoconjugates present on different cell surface components and modulate a variety of cellular processes. A role of Gal-8 in the immune system has been proposed based on its effects in immune cells, including T and B lymphocytes, as well as the presence of anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies in the prototypic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have previously described that Gal-8 induces apoptosis in activated T cells interacting with certain β1 integrins and this effect is counteracted by the anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies. Given that Gal-8 can potentially interact with several glycoproteins, here we analyzed the β2 integrin Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1), which is involved in leukocyte cell adhesion and immunological synapses. We show by GST-pull down assays that Gal-8 interacts with LFA-1 and this interaction is inhibited by anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies isolated from SLE patients. In cell adhesion assays, Gal-8 precluded the interaction of LFA-1 with its ligand Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1). These results suggest that Gal-8 can exert immunosuppressive action not only by inducing apoptosis in activated T cells but also by negatively modulating the crucial function of LFA-1 in the immune system, while function-blocking autoantibodies counteract these effects. PMID:24346075

  7. Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P; Jerath, Maya R; Cox, Kelly; Erickson, Loren D; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity refers to immune reactions that can be rapidly progressing and, in the case of anaphylaxis, are occasionally fatal. To that end, identification of the associated allergen is important for facilitating both education and allergen avoidance that are essential to long-term risk reduction. As the number of known exposures associated with anaphylaxis is limited, discovery of novel causative agents is crucial to evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Within the last 10 years several apparently separate observations were recognized to be related, all of which resulted from the development of antibodies to a carbohydrate moiety on proteins. Interestingly, the exposure differed from airborne allergens but was nevertheless capable of producing anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions. Our recent work has identified these responses as being due to a novel IgE antibody directed against a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose ("alpha-gal"). This review will present the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discuss the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as current goals and directions of our research programs. PMID:26666477

  8. Phylogeographic History and Gene Flow Among Giant Galápagos Tortoises on Southern Isabela Island

    PubMed Central

    Ciofi, Claudio; Wilson, Gregory A.; Beheregaray, Luciano B.; Marquez, Cruz; Gibbs, James P.; Tapia, Washington; Snell, Howard L.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    Volcanic islands represent excellent models with which to study the effect of vicariance on colonization and dispersal, particularly when the evolution of genetic diversity mirrors the sequence of geological events that led to island formation. Phylogeographic inference, however, can be particularly challenging for recent dispersal events within islands, where the antagonistic effects of land bridge formation and vicariance can affect movements of organisms with limited dispersal ability. We investigated levels of genetic divergence and recovered signatures of dispersal events for 631 Galápagos giant tortoises across the volcanoes of Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul on the island of Isabela. These volcanoes are among the most recent formations in the Galápagos (<0.7 million years), and previous studies based on genetic and morphological data could not recover a consistent pattern of lineage sorting. We integrated nested clade analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences, to infer historical patterns of colonization, and a novel Bayesian multilocus genotyping method for recovering evidence of recent migration across volcanoes using eleven microsatellite loci. These genetic studies illuminate taxonomic distinctions as well as provide guidance to possible repatriation programs aimed at countering the rapid population declines of these spectacular animals. PMID:16387883

  9. Effects of the Jessica oil spill on artisanal fisheries in the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Born, Abraham F; Espinoza, Eduardo; Murillo, Juan Carlos; Nicolaides, Francis; Edgar, Graham J

    2003-01-01

    In contrast to local perceptions, the impact on the local Galápagos artisanal fishery of the 16 January 2001 grounding of the Jessica and subsequent oil spill was relatively minor. No significant changes in fishing effort, total fishing catches or catch-per-unit effort were detected after the spill based on analyses of fisheries monitoring data. Nevertheless, large boats tended to move away from sites near the path of the spill following the grounding in 2001, with no fishing recorded from the oil-affected regions of Floreana and southern Isabela in February 2001. The total fishing effort of small boats operating from the Jessica-grounding island of San Cristóbal also declined immediately after the spill, probably in part because such boats were used in clean up operations. During 2001, prices paid to fishers remained stable at levels higher than in 2000, with the notable anomaly that prices fell precipitously to 30% of previous levels during a 1-2 week period in early February 2001. Fish exports remained at similar levels for the years 2000 and 2001; however, as in the previous year, little fish product was exported from Galápagos in the month following the spill, with most fish product dried and stored for up to two months prior to transport to the continent. PMID:12810096

  10. Island tameness: an altered cardiovascular stress response in Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Maren N; Romero, L Michael; Tarlow, Elisa; Cyr, Nicole E; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-03-30

    Island tameness is a widely documented phenomenon in which island species, particularly those that have evolved with no or few natural predators, show a greatly reduced behavioral response when faced with unfamiliar predators. This insufficient anti-predator response has led to widespread population declines among many island species exposed to novel predators, and has become a serious conservation problem. Despite its prevalence, the underlying physiology of island tameness is not known. Here we report that although Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) initiated flight from an evolutionarily recent and unfamiliar potential predator (humans), they failed to show the cardiovascular stress response that facilitates successful escape, even after a prior capture experience. In contrast, when approached by a native predator (the Galápagos hawk; Buteo galapagoensis), marine iguanas show markedly increased heart rate independent of initiating escape movement. The secretion of catecholamines appears to be central to the initiation of escape behavior: naïve animals remotely injected with epinephrine immediately increased flight initiation distance, whereas those injected with corticosterone did not. Our results provide the first evidence that muted escape behavior in predator-naïve species is indicative of both a cognitive deficit in recognizing potential predators and a catecholamine deficit in response. Understanding how the response to predators differs in predator-naïve species could enable the design of maximally effective techniques for inducing an anti-predator response in these vulnerable species. PMID:20109476

  11. Imaging rapidly deforming ocean island volcanoes in the western Galápagos archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Ruiz, Mario; Belachew, Manahloh

    2014-01-01

    Using local body wave arrival-time tomography methods to determine 3-D seismic velocity structure, we imaged the plumbing system of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galápagos. This hot spot volcanic chain includes some of the fastest deforming volcanoes in the world, making this an ideal location to study shield volcano plumbing systems. We inverted P and S wave arrivals recorded on a 15-station temporary array between July 2009 and June 2011 using an a priori 1-D velocity model constrained by offshore refraction studies. With local seismicity from nearby volcanoes as well as the ring fault system, the model resolution is good between depths of 3 and 15.5 km. The propagation of S waves throughout this volume argues against any large high-melt accumulations, although a shallow melt sill may exist above 5 km. We image a broad low-velocity region (>25 km laterally) below Sierra Negra at depths ~8-15 km. No large, regional velocity increase is found within the limits of good resolution, suggesting that crust is thicker than 15 km beneath the western Galápagos archipelago. Our results are consistent with crustal accretion of mafic cumulates from a large-volume magma chamber that may span the boundary between preplume and accreted crust. The similarity between our results and those of Hawaii leave open the possibility that the crust has also been thickened by under-plating.

  12. El nuevo panorama de la Dinámica Galáctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovaroff, Michael James

    En general, la tendencia imperante en Dinámica Galáctica ha sido considerar que los movimientos estelares son básicamente regulares y que el caos no tiene mayor relevancia en los sistemas estelares. Sin embargo, en el último lustro se vienen acumulando pruebas de la importancia del movimiento caótico en ciertos sistemas estelares que existen en la naturaleza. Por una parte, sobre todo el grupo de David Merritt, lo ha mostrado en los casos de galaxias elípticas con concentraciones centrales de materia; por otra parte, en nuestro propio grupo, lo hemos mostrado para el caso de los satélites galácticos. Las consecuencias de estos hallazgos son tanto de tipo técnico, por la necesidad de construir modelos que contengan órbitas caóticas, como astrofísico, por los efectos del caos sobre la estacionariedad y evolución de los sistemas estelares en los que se presenta.

  13. Hybridization masks speciation in the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Amy; Rodríguez, Ariel; Vences, Miguel; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; García, Carolina; Trillmich, Fritz; Gentile, Gabriele; Caccone, Adalgisa; Quezada, Galo; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2015-06-22

    The effects of the direct interaction between hybridization and speciation-two major contrasting evolutionary processes--are poorly understood. We present here the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and reveal a case of incipient within--island speciation, which is paralleled by between-island hybridization. In-depth genome-wide analyses suggest that Amblyrhynchus diverged from its sister group, the Galápagos land iguanas, around 4.5 million years ago (Ma), but divergence among extant populations is exceedingly young (less than 50,000 years). Despite Amblyrhynchus appearing as a single long-branch species phylogenetically, we find strong population structure between islands, and one case of incipient speciation of sister lineages within the same island--ostensibly initiated by volcanic events. Hybridization between both lineages is exceedingly rare, yet frequent hybridization with migrants from nearby islands is evident. The contemporary snapshot provided by highly variable markers indicates that speciation events may have occurred throughout the evolutionary history of marine iguanas, though these events are not visible in the deeper phylogenetic trees. We hypothesize that the observed interplay of speciation and hybridization might be a mechanism by which local adaptations, generated by incipient speciation, can be absorbed into a common gene pool, thereby enhancing the evolutionary potential of the species as a whole. PMID:26041359

  14. Survey of savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) in Southeastern Sénégal.

    PubMed

    Pruetz, J D; Marchant, L F; Arno, J; McGrew, W C

    2002-09-01

    A survey of the western subspecies of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) was conducted from 1 February to 9 April 2000 in Sénégal, West Africa, by the Miami Assirik Pan Project (MAPP). In addition to the Assirik area of the Parc National du Niokolo Koba (PNNK), areas south and east of the park were surveyed. Nests made by chimpanzees were used to estimate chimpanzee distribution and densities. Within the PNNK, chimpanzees were estimated to occur at an average of 0.13 individuals/km(2). Chimpanzee nests were recorded in nine of 10 locales surveyed outside of the PNNK, as well as within the park. Data on 994 nests made by chimpanzees were recorded outside the PNNK, while 736 nests were recorded inside the park. Nest density in areas surveyed outside the PNNK, such as Bandafassi, Tomboronkoto, and Segou, was comparable to that of Assirik in habitats where nests were concentrated (i.e., evergreen gallery forest). The purpose of MAPP was to initiate long-term research of chimpanzees in southeastern Sénégal, as a follow-up to the Stirling African Primate Project (SAPP) of the 1970s. We sought to replicate the standards set by the SAPP project, except when technological innovations allowed improvement in data collection procedures (e.g., the global positioning system (GPS)). PMID:12325117

  15. Application of PINS and GNAT to the assay of 55-gal containers of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Watts, K.D.; Staples, D.R.; Akers, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    The Portable Isotropic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) and Gamma Neutron Assay Technique (GNAT) assay systems that were developed with funding from the office of Research and Development (NN20), were taken to the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and applied to the assay of surrogate and Rocky Flats Plant waste contained in 55-gal drums. PINS, a portable prompt {gamma} neutron activation analysis technique, was able to identify key elements in both the surrogate and real waste so that three-main waste categories: metal, combustible material, and cemented chlorinated sludge wastes could be identified. GNAT, a {gamma}, neutron assay technique for the identification and quantification of fissioning isotopes, was able to identify {sup 240}Pu in surrogate waste in which nine 1-g nuclear accident dosimeters were inserted. GNAT was also able to identify {sup 24O}Pu in real 55-gal waste drums containing 15- and 40-g of plutonium even in the presence of high activity concentrations of {sup 241}Am.

  16. Órbitas caóticas en satelites galácticos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, D. D.; Muzzio, J. C.; Vergne, M. M.; Wachlin, F. C.

    En trabajos anteriores investigamos las órbitas de estrellas que forman los satelites galácticos utilizando análisis de frecuencias. Su uso estaba plenamente justificado por su velocidad y la gran información que brinda, amén de haber dado resultados muy concordantes con los exponentes de Liapunov. Sin embargo, más recientemente, encontramos algunos problemas en la utilización del análisis de frecuencias en sistemas de referencia rotantes (como se utilizan para los satélites), por lo que en este trabajo rehicimos nuestras investigaciones previas utilizando exclusivamente exponentes de Liapunov. Algunas conclusiones anteriores se han confirmado, en tanto que otras deben modificarse. Además, los nuevos resultados muestran que las escalas de tiempo de los procesos caóticos en los satélites galácticos son comparables a, o más cortas que, las escalas de tiempo de otros procesos dinámicos característicos de estos objetos.

  17. Morphometrics parallel genetics in a newly discovered and endangered taxon of Galápagos tortoise.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Ylenia; Hyseni, Chaz; Fritts, Tom H; Glaberman, Scott; Marquez, Cruz; Gibbs, James P; Claude, Julien; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2009-01-01

    Galápagos tortoises represent the only surviving lineage of giant tortoises that exhibit two different types of shell morphology. The taxonomy of Galápagos tortoises was initially based mainly on diagnostic morphological characters of the shell, but has been clarified by molecular studies indicating that most islands harbor monophyletic lineages, with the exception of Isabela and Santa Cruz. On Santa Cruz there is strong genetic differentiation between the two tortoise populations (Cerro Fatal and La Reserva) exhibiting domed shell morphology. Here we integrate nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial data with statistical analyses of shell shape morphology to evaluate whether the genetic distinction and variability of the two domed tortoise populations is paralleled by differences in shell shape. Based on our results, morphometric analyses support the genetic distinction of the two populations and also reveal that the level of genetic variation is associated with morphological shell shape variation in both populations. The Cerro Fatal population possesses lower levels of morphological and genetic variation compared to the La Reserva population. Because the turtle shell is a complex heritable trait, our results suggest that, for the Cerro Fatal population, non-neutral loci have probably experienced a parallel decrease in variability as that observed for the genetic data. PMID:19609441

  18. Hybridization masks speciation in the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amy; Rodríguez, Ariel; Vences, Miguel; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; García, Carolina; Trillmich, Fritz; Gentile, Gabriele; Caccone, Adalgisa; Quezada, Galo; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the direct interaction between hybridization and speciation—two major contrasting evolutionary processes—are poorly understood. We present here the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and reveal a case of incipient within-island speciation, which is paralleled by between-island hybridization. In-depth genome-wide analyses suggest that Amblyrhynchus diverged from its sister group, the Galápagos land iguanas, around 4.5 million years ago (Ma), but divergence among extant populations is exceedingly young (less than 50 000 years). Despite Amblyrhynchus appearing as a single long-branch species phylogenetically, we find strong population structure between islands, and one case of incipient speciation of sister lineages within the same island—ostensibly initiated by volcanic events. Hybridization between both lineages is exceedingly rare, yet frequent hybridization with migrants from nearby islands is evident. The contemporary snapshot provided by highly variable markers indicates that speciation events may have occurred throughout the evolutionary history of marine iguanas, though these events are not visible in the deeper phylogenetic trees. We hypothesize that the observed interplay of speciation and hybridization might be a mechanism by which local adaptations, generated by incipient speciation, can be absorbed into a common gene pool, thereby enhancing the evolutionary potential of the species as a whole. PMID:26041359

  19. Biogeography of Parasitic Nematode Communities in the Galápagos Giant Tortoise: Implications for Conservation Management.

    PubMed

    Fournié, Guillaume; Goodman, Simon J; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Vélez, Alberto; Patiño, Leandro; Millins, Caroline; Gibbons, Lynda M; Fox, Mark T; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The Galápagos giant tortoise is an icon of the unique, endemic biodiversity of Galápagos, but little is known of its parasitic fauna. We assessed the diversity of parasitic nematode communities and their spatial distributions within four wild tortoise populations comprising three species across three Galápagos islands, and consider their implication for Galápagos tortoise conservation programmes. Coprological examinations revealed nematode eggs to be common, with more than 80% of tortoises infected within each wild population. Faecal samples from tortoises within captive breeding centres on Santa Cruz, Isabela and San Cristobal islands also were examined. Five different nematode egg types were identified: oxyuroid, ascarid, trichurid and two types of strongyle. Sequencing of the 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene from adult nematodes passed with faeces identified novel sequences indicative of rhabditid and ascaridid species. In the wild, the composition of nematode communities varied according to tortoise species, which co-varied with island, but nematode diversity and abundance were reduced or altered in captive-reared animals. Evolutionary and ecological factors are likely responsible for the variation in nematode distributions in the wild. This possible species/island-parasite co-evolution has not been considered previously for Galápagos tortoises. We recommend that conservation efforts, such as the current Galápagos tortoise captive breeding/rearing and release programme, be managed with respect to parasite biogeography and host-parasite co-evolutionary processes in addition to the biogeography of the host. PMID:26332126

  20. Using avian surveillance in Ecuador to assess the imminence of West Nile virus incursion to Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J; Hilgert, Nancy; Cruz, Marilyn; Kramer, Laura D; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Infectious disease emergence represents a global threat to human, agricultural animal and wildlife health. West Nile virus (WNV) first emerged in the Americas in 1999 following its introduction to New York from the Old World. This flavivirus rapidly spread across much of North America, causing human, equine and avian mortalities and population declines of multiple wild bird species. It has now spread to Central and South America, and there is concern that the virus will reach the Galápagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage Site famous for its unique biodiversity, with potentially catastrophic results. Here, we use wild bird surveillance to examine the current WNV status in the Galapagos Islands and around the Ecuadorian city of Guayaquil (the main air and sea port serving Galápagos). We conducted serosurveys of wild birds on three Galápagos Islands (Baltra, San Cristobal and Santa Cruz) with direct transport links to the South American continent. In addition, dead birds killed by car collisions on Santa Cruz were tested for WNV infection. On mainland Ecuador, serosurveys of wild birds were conducted at three sites around Guayaquil. No evidence of WNV seropositivity or infection was detected. Although wider testing is recommended on the mainland, the study highlights a limit of WNV spread within South America. Our results indicate the continued absence of WNV on Galápagos and suggest the current likelihood of human-mediated transport of WNV to Galápagos to be low. The risk of emergence will almost certainly increase over time, however, and stringent biosecurity and surveillance measures should be put in place to minimise the risk of the introduction of WNV (and other alien pathogens) to Galápagos. PMID:24796792

  1. Biogeography of Parasitic Nematode Communities in the Galápagos Giant Tortoise: Implications for Conservation Management

    PubMed Central

    Fournié, Guillaume; Goodman, Simon J.; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Vélez, Alberto; Patiño, Leandro; Millins, Caroline; Gibbons, Lynda M.; Fox, Mark T.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    The Galápagos giant tortoise is an icon of the unique, endemic biodiversity of Galápagos, but little is known of its parasitic fauna. We assessed the diversity of parasitic nematode communities and their spatial distributions within four wild tortoise populations comprising three species across three Galápagos islands, and consider their implication for Galápagos tortoise conservation programmes. Coprological examinations revealed nematode eggs to be common, with more than 80% of tortoises infected within each wild population. Faecal samples from tortoises within captive breeding centres on Santa Cruz, Isabela and San Cristobal islands also were examined. Five different nematode egg types were identified: oxyuroid, ascarid, trichurid and two types of strongyle. Sequencing of the 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene from adult nematodes passed with faeces identified novel sequences indicative of rhabditid and ascaridid species. In the wild, the composition of nematode communities varied according to tortoise species, which co-varied with island, but nematode diversity and abundance were reduced or altered in captive-reared animals. Evolutionary and ecological factors are likely responsible for the variation in nematode distributions in the wild. This possible species/island-parasite co-evolution has not been considered previously for Galápagos tortoises. We recommend that conservation efforts, such as the current Galápagos tortoise captive breeding/rearing and release programme, be managed with respect to parasite biogeography and host-parasite co-evolutionary processes in addition to the biogeography of the host. PMID:26332126

  2. BUDDA (Bulge/Disk Decomposition Analysis) - um novo programa para análise estrutural de galáxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, D. A.; de Souza, R. E.; Dos Anjos, S.

    2003-08-01

    Tem sido prática comum nos últimos anos estudar a distribuição de luminosidade em galáxias fazendo uso da informação contida em toda a imagem da galáxia, já que esta técnica tem se mostrado muito mais confiável do que o simples ajuste de perfis radiais de luminosidade. Através destes estudos bidimensionais, melhores resultados tem sido obtidos na análise e.g. do Plano Fundamental, de correlações entre os parâmetros estruturais de galáxias, de sub-estruturas como barras e anéis nucleares etc. Apresentamos um novo código bidimensional, o BUDDA, de análise estrutural de galáxias, que será disponibilizado para a comunidade. Desenvolvido por nós, o código determina os parâmetros estruturais de galáxias de forma prática e robusta, e pode ser aplicado genericamente em qualquer estudo sobre a formação, evolução e estrutura de galáxias. O programa ainda permite a avaliação direta de sub-estruturas, através de imagens residuais que são obtidas ao se subtrair, das imagens originais, bojo e disco sintéticos que melhor representam essas componentes da galáxia sob consideração. Será apresentada a forma de utilização do código, bem como séries de testes que atestam a sua funcionalidade. Além disso, os resultados da aplicação do código em uma amostra de 51 galáxias serão expostos como exemplo prático, e do seu enorme potencial de uso.

  3. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  4. The Tumor-Associated Glycosyltransferase ST6Gal-I Regulates Stem Cell Transcription Factors and Confers a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Matthew J; Holdbrooks, Andrew T; Chakraborty, Asmi; Grizzle, William E; Landen, Charles N; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Conner, Michael G; Arend, Rebecca C; Yoon, Karina J; Klug, Christopher A; Bullard, Daniel C; Kesterson, Robert A; Oliver, Patsy G; O'Connor, Amber K; Yoder, Bradley K; Bellis, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    The glycosyltransferase ST6Gal-I, which adds α2-6-linked sialic acids to substrate glycoproteins, has been implicated in carcinogenesis; however, the nature of its pathogenic role remains poorly understood. Here we show that ST6Gal-I is upregulated in ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas, enriched in metastatic tumors, and associated with reduced patient survival. Notably, ST6Gal-I upregulation in cancer cells conferred hallmark cancer stem-like cell (CSC) characteristics. Modulating ST6Gal-I expression in pancreatic and ovarian cancer cells directly altered CSC spheroid growth, and clonal variants with high ST6Gal-I activity preferentially survived in CSC culture. Primary ovarian cancer cells from patient ascites or solid tumors sorted for α2-6 sialylation grew as spheroids, while cells lacking α2-6 sialylation remained as single cells and lost viability. ST6Gal-I also promoted resistance to gemcitabine and enabled the formation of stably resistant colonies. Gemcitabine treatment of patient-derived xenograft tumors enriched for ST6Gal-I-expressing cells relative to pair-matched untreated tumors. ST6Gal-I also augmented tumor-initiating potential. In limiting dilution assays, subcutaneous tumor formation was inhibited by ST6Gal-I knockdown, whereas in a chemically induced tumor initiation model, mice with conditional ST6Gal-I overexpression exhibited enhanced tumorigenesis. Finally, we found that ST6Gal-I induced expression of the key tumor-promoting transcription factors, Sox9 and Slug. Collectively, this work highlighted a previously unrecognized role for a specific glycosyltransferase in driving a CSC state. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3978-88. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216178

  5. Archipelago-Wide Island Restoration in the Galápagos Islands: Reducing Costs of Invasive Mammal Eradication Programs and Reinvasion Risk

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Victor; Donlan, C. Josh; Campbell, Karl J.; Lavoie, Christian; Cruz, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Invasive alien mammals are the major driver of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation on islands. Over the past three decades, invasive mammal eradication from islands has become one of society's most powerful tools for preventing extinction of insular endemics and restoring insular ecosystems. As practitioners tackle larger islands for restoration, three factors will heavily influence success and outcomes: the degree of local support, the ability to mitigate for non-target impacts, and the ability to eradicate non-native species more cost-effectively. Investments in removing invasive species, however, must be weighed against the risk of reintroduction. One way to reduce reintroduction risks is to eradicate the target invasive species from an entire archipelago, and thus eliminate readily available sources. We illustrate the costs and benefits of this approach with the efforts to remove invasive goats from the Galápagos Islands. Project Isabela, the world's largest island restoration effort to date, removed >140,000 goats from >500,000 ha for a cost of US$10.5 million. Leveraging the capacity built during Project Isabela, and given that goat reintroductions have been common over the past decade, we implemented an archipelago-wide goat eradication strategy. Feral goats remain on three islands in the archipelago, and removal efforts are underway. Efforts on the Galápagos Islands demonstrate that for some species, island size is no longer the limiting factor with respect to eradication. Rather, bureaucratic processes, financing, political will, and stakeholder approval appear to be the new challenges. Eradication efforts have delivered a suite of biodiversity benefits that are in the process of revealing themselves. The costs of rectifying intentional reintroductions are high in terms of financial and human resources. Reducing the archipelago-wide goat density to low levels is a technical approach to reducing reintroduction risk in the short-term, and is being

  6. Archipelago-wide island restoration in the Galápagos Islands: reducing costs of invasive mammal eradication programs and reinvasion risk.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Victor; Donlan, C Josh; Campbell, Karl J; Lavoie, Christian; Cruz, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Invasive alien mammals are the major driver of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation on islands. Over the past three decades, invasive mammal eradication from islands has become one of society's most powerful tools for preventing extinction of insular endemics and restoring insular ecosystems. As practitioners tackle larger islands for restoration, three factors will heavily influence success and outcomes: the degree of local support, the ability to mitigate for non-target impacts, and the ability to eradicate non-native species more cost-effectively. Investments in removing invasive species, however, must be weighed against the risk of reintroduction. One way to reduce reintroduction risks is to eradicate the target invasive species from an entire archipelago, and thus eliminate readily available sources. We illustrate the costs and benefits of this approach with the efforts to remove invasive goats from the Galápagos Islands. Project Isabela, the world's largest island restoration effort to date, removed >140,000 goats from >500,000 ha for a cost of US$10.5 million. Leveraging the capacity built during Project Isabela, and given that goat reintroductions have been common over the past decade, we implemented an archipelago-wide goat eradication strategy. Feral goats remain on three islands in the archipelago, and removal efforts are underway. Efforts on the Galápagos Islands demonstrate that for some species, island size is no longer the limiting factor with respect to eradication. Rather, bureaucratic processes, financing, political will, and stakeholder approval appear to be the new challenges. Eradication efforts have delivered a suite of biodiversity benefits that are in the process of revealing themselves. The costs of rectifying intentional reintroductions are high in terms of financial and human resources. Reducing the archipelago-wide goat density to low levels is a technical approach to reducing reintroduction risk in the short-term, and is being

  7. Investigation of E-W Trending Parallel Ridges North of the Galápagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, C.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Geist, D.; Fornari, D. J.; Soule, S.; R/v Melville Mv1007 Flamingo Cruise Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    In 2010, the R/V Melville MV1007 cruise collected EM122 multibeam bathymetry, MR1 sidescan sonar reflectivity data, and seafloor rock samples from an area surrounding the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) in the vicinity of the Galápagos Islands. The GSC is cut by a large, N-S trending transform fault at 90°50’W. The Nazca Plate (west of the transform) is dominated by volcanic seamounts, most of which are aligned in NW-SE trending lineaments. In contrast, the Cocos Plate (east of the transform) is heavily faulted and features four major ridges that trend 90° to 110°. In comparison to the surrounding seafloor, the ridges are strongly fractured with faults that strike sub-parallel to the GSC. To the west, the ridges wrap into the transform and trend more NW-SE. These ridges are unusual and suggest complications to our current understanding of the tectonic history of the region. The faulted ridges extend to the transform and appear to be cut and deformed by it; therefore, they may be linked to the opening of the transform through a series of discrete ridge jumps. Moreover, the ridges’ roughly symmetrical topographic profiles mirror bathymetric profiles at abandoned spreading centers such as Mathematician Ridge, and are dissimilar to the asymmetric profiles of abyssal hills. Waning magma supplies at well-documented abandoned ridges yield differentiated rocks similar to the icelandites dredged from our study area, which exhibit SiO2 ~55-65% wt.%, and major element variations that indicate substantial removal of CPX and plagioclase. Incompatible trace element ratios (e.g., Nb/La) reveal the presence of Galápagos plume material throughout the tectonized region. Trace element ratios are similar to those in axial GSC lavas and suggest the faulted ridges may have originated at the active spreading center. Volcanic seamounts complicate the interpretation of the faulted ridges as being simple abandoned spreading centers, however, and may necessitate further

  8. Physical properties of Galactic Planck cold cores revealed by the Hi-GAL survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahorecz, S.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Wang, K.; Testi, L.; Tóth, L. V.; Molinari, S.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Previous studies of the initial conditions of massive star and star cluster formation have mainly targeted infrared-dark clouds (or IRDCs) toward the inner Galaxy. This is because IRDCs were first detected in absorption against the bright mid-infrared (IR) background of the inner Galaxy, requiring a favorable location to be observed. By selection, IRDCs therefore represent only a fraction of the Galactic clouds capable of forming massive stars and star clusters. Owing their low dust temperatures, however, IRDCs are bright in the far-IR and millimeter and, thus, observations at these wavelengths have the potential to provide a complete sample of star-forming massive clouds across the Galaxy. Aims: Our aim is to identify the clouds at the initial conditions of massive star and star cluster formation across the Galaxy and compare their physical properties as a function of Galactic longitude and Galactocentric distance. Methods: We have examined the physical properties of a homogeneous Galactic cold core sample obtained with the Planck satellite across the Galactic plane. With the use of Herschel Hi-GAL observations, we characterized the internal structure of the most reliable Galactic cold clumps within the Early Cold Core (ECC) Planck catalog. By using background-subtracted Herschel images, we derived the H2 column density and dust temperature maps for 48 Planck clumps covered by the Herschel Hi-GAL survey. We calculated and analyzed the basic physical parameters (size, mass, and average dust temperature) of these clumps as a function of location within the Galaxy. We also compared these properties with the empirical relation for massive star formation previously derived. Results: Most of the Planck clumps contain signs of star formation. About 25% of the clumps are massive enough to form high-mass stars and star clusters since they exceed the empirical threshold for massive star formation. Planck clumps toward the Galactic center region show higher peak

  9. Experimental studies of rapid bioerosion of coral reefs in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaka-Kudla, M. L.; Feingold, J. S.; Glynn, W.

    1996-06-01

    Experimental carbonate blocks of coral skeleton, Porites lobata (PL), and cathedral limestone (LS) were deployed for 14.8 months at shallow (5 6 m) and deep (11 13m) depths on a severely bioeroded coral reef, Champion Island, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. Sea urchins ( Eucidaris thouarsii) were significantly more abundant at shallow versus deep sites. Porites lobata blocks lost an average of 25.4 kg m-2yr-1 (23.71 m-2yr-1 or 60.5% decrease yr-1). Losses did not vary significantly at depths tested. Internal bioeroders excavated an average of 2.6 kg m-2 yr-1 (2.41 m-2 yr-1 or 0.6% decrease yr-1), while external bioeroders removed an average of 22.8 kg m-2 yr-1). (21.31 m-2 yr-1). or 59.9% decrease yr-1). few encrusting organisms were observed on the PL blocks. Cathedral limestone blocks lost an average of 4.1 kg m-2 yr-1). (1.81 m-2 yr-1). or 4.6% decrease yr-'), also with no relation to depth. Internal bioeroders excavated an average of 0.6 kg m-2 yr-1). (0.31 m-2 yr-1). or 0.7% decrease yr-1). and external bioeroders removed an average of 3.5 kg m-2 yr-1). (1.51 m-2 yr-1). or 3.9% decrease yr-1). from the LS blocks. Most (57.6%) encrustation occurred on the bottom of LS blocks, and there was more accretion on block bottoms in deep (61.4 mg cm-2 yr-1). versus shallow (35.0 mg cm-2 yr-1) sites. External bioerosion reduced the average height of the reef framework by 0.2 cm yr-1). for hard substrata (represented by LS) and 2.3 cm yr-1). for soft substrata (represented by PL). The results of this study suggest that coral reef frameworks in the Galápagos Islands are in serious jeopardy. If rates of coral recruitment do not increase, and if rates of bioerosion do not decline, coral reefs in the Galápagos Islands could be eliminated entirely.

  10. Assaying ATE1 Activity in Yeast by β-Gal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Kashina, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    In 1980s it was found that addition of N-terminal Arg to proteins induces their ubiquitination and degradation by the N-end rule pathway. While this mechanism applies only to the proteins which also have other features of the N-degron (including a closely adjacent Lys that is accessible for ubiquitination), several test substrates have been found to follow this mechanism very efficiently after ATE1-dependent arginylation. Such property enabled researchers to test ATE1 activity in cells indirectly by assaying for the degradation of such arginylation-dependent substrates. The most commonly used substrate for this assay is E. coli beta galactosidase (beta-Gal) because its activity can be easily measured using standardized colorimetric assays. Here we describe this method, which has served as a quick and easy way to characterize ATE1 activity during identification of arginyltransferases in different species. PMID:26285881

  11. Relation of intracellular signal levels and promoter activities in the gal regulon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sandeep; Orosz, László; Sneppen, Kim; Adhya, Sankar; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2009-08-28

    Transcription of many genes is regulated by combinations of multiple signals. In Escherichia coli, combinatorial control is typical in the case of operons related to utilization of different sugars in the absence of glucose. To understand regulation of the transport and metabolic pathways in the galactose system, we measured activities of the six gal regulon promoters simultaneously, using an in vitro transcription system containing purified components. Input functions were computed on the basis of the experimental measurements. We observed four different shapes of input functions. From the results, we can conclude that the structure of the regulatory network is insufficient for the determination of signal integration. It is the actual structure of the promoter and regulatory region, the mechanism of transcription regulation, and the interplay between transcription factors that shape the input function to be suitable for adaptation. PMID:19559028

  12. Bird-flower visitation networks in the Galápagos unveil a widespread interaction release.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Jaramillo, Patricia; Antolín, Elena; Trigo, María Mar; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Owing to food scarcity and to the high densities that vertebrates often reach on islands, typical insect- and seed-eaters widen their feeding niche and interact with a greater fraction of species than their mainland counterparts. This phenomenon, coined here 'interaction release', has been previously reported for single species but never for an entire community. During 4 years, we gathered data on bird-flower visitation on 12 Galápagos islands. We show that all sampled land birds exploit floral resources and act as potential pollinators across the entire archipelago, in all major habitats and all year round. Although species and link composition varies among islands, strong interaction release takes place on all islands, making their bird-flower network highly generalized. Interaction release is crucial to the survival of native birds but simultaneously threatens the unique biodiversity of this archipelago, as the birds also visit invading plants, likely facilitating their integration into pristine native communities. PMID:25757227

  13. Infrared emission of young HII regions: a Herschel/Hi-GAL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Pestalozzi, M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Hoare, M. G.; Molinari, S.; Olmi, L.; Smith, M. D.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Testi, L.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Investigating the relationship between radio and infrared emission of Hii regions may help shed light on the nature of the ionizing stars and the formation mechanism of early-type stars in general. Aims: We have taken advantage of recent unbiased surveys of the Galactic plane such as Herschel/Hi-GAL and VLA/CORNISH to study a bona fide sample of young Hii regions located in the Galactic longitude range 10°-65° by comparing the mid- and far-IR continuum emission to the radio free-free emission at 5 GHz. Methods: We have identified the Hi-GAL counterparts of 230 CORNISH Hii regions and reconstructed the spectral energy distributions of 204 of these by complementing the Hi-GAL fluxes with ancillary data at longer and shorter wavelengths. Using literature data, we obtained a kinematical distance estimate for 200 Hii regions with Hi-GAL counterparts and determined their luminosities by integrating the emission of the corresponding spectral energy distributions. We have also estimated the mass of the associated molecular clumps from the (sub)millimeter flux densities. Results: Our main finding is that for ~1/3 of the Hii regions the Lyman continuum luminosity appears to be greater than the value expected for a zero-age main-sequence star with the same bolometric luminosity. This result indicates that a considerable fraction of young, embedded early-type stars presents a "Lyman excess" possibly due to UV photons emitted from shocked material infalling onto the star itself and/or a circumstellar disk. Finally, by comparing the bolometric and Lyman continuum luminosities with the mass of the associated clump, we derive a star formation efficiency of 5%. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that accretion may still be present during the early stages of the evolution of Hii regions, with important effects on the production of ionizing photons and thus on the circumstellar environment. More reliable numerical models describing the accretion process onto massive

  14. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53.

    PubMed

    Piskacek, Martin; Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina; Knight, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  15. Lineage identification and genealogical relationships among captive Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael; Boyer, Donal; Wiese, Robert J; Kajdacsi, Brittney; Marquez, Lady; Garrick, Ryan; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2012-01-01

    Genetic tools have become a critical complement to traditional approaches for meeting short- and long-term goals of ex situ conservation programs. The San Diego Zoo (SDZ) harbors a collection of wild-born and captive-born Galápagos giant tortoises (n = 22) of uncertain species designation and unknown genealogical relationships. Here, we used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic data and nuclear microsatellite genotypic data to identify the evolutionary lineage of wild-born and captive-born tortoises of unknown ancestry, to infer levels of relatedness among founders and captive-born tortoises, and assess putative pedigree relationships assigned by the SDZ studbook. Assignment tests revealed that 12 wild-born and five captive-born tortoises represent five different species from Isabela Island and one species from Santa Cruz Island, only five of which were consistent with current studbook designations. Three wild-born and one captive-born tortoise were of mixed ancestry. In addition, kinship analyses revealed two significant first-order relationship pairs between wild-born and captive-born tortoises, four second-order relationships (half-sibling) between wild-born and captive tortoises (full-sibs or parent-offspring), and one second-order relationship between two captive-born tortoises. Of particular note, we also reconstructed a first-order relationship between two wild-born individuals, violating the founder assumption. Overall, our results contribute to a worldwide effort in identifying genetically important Galápagos tortoises currently in captivity while revealing closely related founders, reconstructing genealogical relationships, and providing detailed management recommendations for the SDZ tortoises. PMID:21674601

  16. Volcanic evolution in the Galápagos: The dissected shield of Volcan Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Dennis; White, William M.; Albarede, Francis; Harpp, Karen; Reynolds, Robert; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Kurz, Mark D.

    2002-10-01

    Volcan Ecuador, a young, active shield volcano at the northwest tip of Isabela Island, Galápagos, experienced at least one sector collapse event that removed its western half. The compositions of lavas exposed in the old caldera wall and fault scarps dissecting the outer shield together with young post-collapse lavas provide insights into the history of this volcano. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmogenic 3He dating reveal that sector collapse occurred at <100 Ka. Prior to sector collapse most magma erupted from circumferential dikes that fed the summit carapace and other dikes that fed vents on the caldera floor. Almost all of the erupted magmas cooled and underwent fractional crystallization in the lower crust or upper mantle, where clinopyroxene crystallization dominated. Magmas then rose to a small (˜0.1 km3), steady state, subcaldera magma chamber where plagioclase, along with lesser amounts of olivine and clinopyroxene, crystallized. Sector collapse perturbed the plumbing system in a way that now allows some magmas, particularly those erupted on the East Rift, to bypass the magma chamber. Sector collapse also opened new pathways to the surface that enabled magma to erupt at low elevation, effectively cutting the magma supply to the summit. The paucity of summit eruptions over the past 100,000 years accounts for the old, eroded appearance of the shield. Subtle variations in isotopic and trace element composition occurred over the past 100,000 years, with the net change being toward slightly more depleted compositions. These variations most likely reflect small-scale (<5 km) heterogeneity superimposed on more regular regional patterns of mantle composition beneath the Galápagos. Overall, however, the compositional variation at Volcan Ecuador has been minimal, suggesting that, unlike Hawaii, the compositions of magmas do not substantially change while the volcano is in its shield-building phase.

  17. Strong sea surface cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and implications for Galápagos Penguin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, K. B.; Jenouvrier, S.; Brown, C. W.; Murtugudde, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Galápagos is a flourishing yet fragile ecosystem whose health is particularly sensitive to regional and global climate variations. The distribution of several species, including the Galápagos Penguin, is intimately tied to upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water along the western shores of the archipelago. Here we show, using reliable, high-resolution sea surface temperature observations, that the Galápagos cold pool has been intensifying and expanding northward since 1982. The linear cooling trend of 0.8°C/33 yr is likely the result of long-term changes in equatorial ocean circulation previously identified. Moreover, the northward expansion of the cold pool is dynamically consistent with a slackening of the cross-equatorial component of the regional trade winds—leading to an equatorward shift of the mean position of the Equatorial Undercurrent. The implied change in strength and distribution of upwelling has important implications for ongoing and future conservation measures in the Galápagos.

  18. Historical isolation of the Galápagos carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Rumeu, Beatriz; Heleno, Ruben H; Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Colonization across the Galápagos Islands by the carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) was reconstructed based on distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes (cytochrome oxidase II (COII) sequences) and haplotype lineages. A total of 12 haplotypes were found in 118 individuals of X. darwini. Distributional, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses suggest early colonization of most islands followed by historical isolation in two main groups: eastern and central-western islands. Evidence of recurrent inter-island colonization of haplotypes is largely lacking, despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude of the species. Recent palaeogeographic data suggest that several of the current islands were connected in the past and thus the isolation pattern may have been even more pronounced. A contrast analysis was also carried out on 10 animal groups of the Galápagos Islands, and on haplotype colonization of seven animal and plant species from several oceanic archipelagos (the Galápagos, Azores, Canary Islands). New colonization metrics on the number of potential vs. inferred colonization events revealed that the Galápagos carpenter bee shows one of the most significant examples of geographic isolation. PMID:25807496

  19. Historical Isolation of the Galápagos Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa darwini) despite Strong Flight Capability and Ecological Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Colonization across the Galápagos Islands by the carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) was reconstructed based on distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes (cytochrome oxidase II (COII) sequences) and haplotype lineages. A total of 12 haplotypes were found in 118 individuals of X. darwini. Distributional, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses suggest early colonization of most islands followed by historical isolation in two main groups: eastern and central-western islands. Evidence of recurrent inter-island colonization of haplotypes is largely lacking, despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude of the species. Recent palaeogeographic data suggest that several of the current islands were connected in the past and thus the isolation pattern may have been even more pronounced. A contrast analysis was also carried out on 10 animal groups of the Galápagos Islands, and on haplotype colonization of seven animal and plant species from several oceanic archipelagos (the Galápagos, Azores, Canary Islands). New colonization metrics on the number of potential vs. inferred colonization events revealed that the Galápagos carpenter bee shows one of the most significant examples of geographic isolation. PMID:25807496

  20. Molecular and immunological analysis of hen's egg yolk allergens with a focus on YGP42 (Gal d 6).

    PubMed

    De Silva, Chamika; Dhanapala, Pathum; Doran, Tim; Tang, Mimi L K; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2016-03-01

    Allergy to hen's (Gallus domesticus) egg white is one of the most common forms of food allergy. Allergy to hen's yolk also exists however, to a lesser extent when compared to egg white allergy. Two minor allergens from the hen's egg yolk known as α-livetin (Gal d 5) and YGP42 (Gal d 6) were discovered recently. In this study, we investigated whether sensitization to egg white is associated with reactivity to egg yolk as well. Sera obtained from 25 patients with allergy to egg white were tested for specific IgE binding for egg yolk proteins through western immunoblotting. 36% of patients were found with true IgE-sensitization against egg yolk proteins. It was found that most of the IgE reactive yolk proteins were fragments of major precursor proteins of hen; vitellogenin-1 (VTG-1), vitellogenin-2 (VTG-2) and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). The egg yolk allergen Gal d 6 is the C-terminal part of VTG-1 and was found to be allergenic in significant percentage of egg white allergy patients. These results highlight the significance of Gal d 6 as an important allergen of egg yolk. Therefore, the secondary aim of this study involved developing a recombinant version of YGP42 in an Escherichia coli expression system. Recombinant Gal d 6 (rGal d6) was expressed as a fusion peptide with a 6 × His tag and purified using metal chelating resin. The inhibition ELISA results showed that rYGP42 was IgE reactive and was able to inhibit IgE binding to crude egg yolk (CEY) by up to 30%. Traditionally, it was thought that allergy to egg yolk occurred independently from sensitization to egg white. This study underlies the importance of concomitant sensitization to egg yolk proteins in patients allergic to egg white. Evidence reported in this study strongly suggests that egg yolk has potentially undiscovered allergens and therefore warrants further investigation. Furthermore, IgE reactive Gal d 6 presented in this study has the potential to be used in diagnosis and immunotherapy to treat egg

  1. Overexpression of ST3Gal-I promotes migration and invasion of HCCLM3 in vitro and poor prognosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Shi, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Hai-Jian; Song, Qing-Jie; Yang, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Wei-Dong; Mei, Guang-Lin; Chen, Xi; Mao, Qin-Sheng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Excessive ST3Gal-I levels predict a poor outcome for patients with several types of tumors. This study aims to investigate the role of ST3Gal-I in determining the invasive and metastatic potential of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and clinical prognosis for patients with HCC. Methods We compared the expression of ST3Gal-I in various HCC cell lines and in 20 pairs of tumor and peritumor tissue samples using Western blot analysis. Changes in the degree of invasiveness and migration were determined before and after small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of ST3Gal-I using a Transwell matrigel invasion assay and scratch wound assay. The correlation between ST3Gal-I expression and prognosis was determined in a large HCC patient cohort (n=273). Results ST3Gal-I expression was higher in metastatic HCCLM3 cells and tumor tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Following the ST3Gal-I knockdown, the invasiveness and migration of HCCLM3 cells were markedly reduced. ST3Gal-I expression in HCC correlated closely with tumor thrombus (P<0.001), tumor size (>5.0 cm, P=0.032), tumor node metastasis stages II–III (P=0.002), and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stages B–C (P<0.001). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that ST3Gal-I is an independent predictor of prognosis in patients with HCC, and related to disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.464, P=0.037) and overall survival (hazard ratio =1.662, P=0.012). Conclusion ST3Gal-I might contribute to the invasiveness and metastatic nature of HCC and, thus, could be an independent predictor of recurrence and a suitable pharmaceutical target in patients with HCC. PMID:27143918

  2. The Galectin CvGal1 from the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Binds to Blood Group A Oligosaccharides on the Hemocyte Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chiguang; Ghosh, Anita; Amin, Mohammed N.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Shridhar, Surekha; Banerjee, Aditi; Fernández-Robledo, José A.; Bianchet, Mario A.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2013-01-01

    The galectin CvGal1 from the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), which possesses four tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains, was previously shown to display stronger binding to galactosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine relative to d-galactose. CvGal1 expressed by phagocytic cells is “hijacked” by the parasite Perkinsus marinus to enter the host, where it proliferates and causes systemic infection and death. In this study, a detailed glycan array analysis revealed that CvGal1 preferentially recognizes type 2 blood group A oligosaccharides. Homology modeling of the protein and its oligosaccharide ligands supported this preference over type 1 blood group A and B oligosaccharides. The CvGal ligand models were further validated by binding, inhibition, and competitive binding studies of CvGal1 and ABH-specific monoclonal antibodies with intact and deglycosylated glycoproteins, hemocyte extracts, and intact hemocytes and by surface plasmon resonance analysis. A parallel glycomic study carried out on oyster hemocytes (Kurz, S., Jin, C., Hykollari, A., Gregorich, D., Giomarelli, B., Vasta, G. R., Wilson, I. B. H., and Paschinger, K. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288,) determined the structures of oligosaccharides recognized by CvGal1. Proteomic analysis of the hemocyte glycoproteins identified β-integrin and dominin as CvGal1 “self”-ligands. Despite strong CvGal1 binding to P. marinus trophozoites, no binding of ABH blood group antibodies was observed. Thus, parasite glycans structurally distinct from the blood group A oligosaccharides on the hemocyte surface may function as potentially effective ligands for CvGal1. We hypothesize that carbohydrate-based mimicry resulting from the host/parasite co-evolution facilitates CvGal1-mediated cross-linking to β-integrin, located on the hemocyte surface, leading to cell activation, phagocytosis, and host infection. PMID:23824193

  3. The galectin CvGal1 from the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) binds to blood group A oligosaccharides on the hemocyte surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chiguang; Ghosh, Anita; Amin, Mohammed N; Giomarelli, Barbara; Shridhar, Surekha; Banerjee, Aditi; Fernández-Robledo, José A; Bianchet, Mario A; Wang, Lai-Xi; Wilson, Iain B H; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2013-08-23

    The galectin CvGal1 from the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), which possesses four tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains, was previously shown to display stronger binding to galactosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine relative to d-galactose. CvGal1 expressed by phagocytic cells is "hijacked" by the parasite Perkinsus marinus to enter the host, where it proliferates and causes systemic infection and death. In this study, a detailed glycan array analysis revealed that CvGal1 preferentially recognizes type 2 blood group A oligosaccharides. Homology modeling of the protein and its oligosaccharide ligands supported this preference over type 1 blood group A and B oligosaccharides. The CvGal ligand models were further validated by binding, inhibition, and competitive binding studies of CvGal1 and ABH-specific monoclonal antibodies with intact and deglycosylated glycoproteins, hemocyte extracts, and intact hemocytes and by surface plasmon resonance analysis. A parallel glycomic study carried out on oyster hemocytes (Kurz, S., Jin, C., Hykollari, A., Gregorich, D., Giomarelli, B., Vasta, G. R., Wilson, I. B. H., and Paschinger, K. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288) determined the structures of oligosaccharides recognized by CvGal1. Proteomic analysis of the hemocyte glycoproteins identified β-integrin and dominin as CvGal1 "self"-ligands. Despite strong CvGal1 binding to P. marinus trophozoites, no binding of ABH blood group antibodies was observed. Thus, parasite glycans structurally distinct from the blood group A oligosaccharides on the hemocyte surface may function as potentially effective ligands for CvGal1. We hypothesize that carbohydrate-based mimicry resulting from the host/parasite co-evolution facilitates CvGal1-mediated cross-linking to β-integrin, located on the hemocyte surface, leading to cell activation, phagocytosis, and host infection. PMID:23824193

  4. Host selection and parasite infection in Aedes taeniorhynchus, endemic disease vector in the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fournié, Guillaume; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Parker, Patricia G; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2012-12-01

    Host selection in blood-sucking arthropods has important evolutionary and ecological implications for the transmission dynamics, distribution and host-specificity of the parasites they transmit. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedemann) is distributed throughout tropical to temperate coastal zones in the Americas, and continental populations are primarily mammalphilic. It is the only indigenous mosquito in the Galápagos Islands, having colonised the archipelago around 200,000 years ago, potentially adapting its host selection, and in the process, altering the dynamics of vector mediated pathogen interactions in the archipelago. Here, we use blood-meal analysis and PCR-based parasite screening approach to determine the blood-feeding patterns of A. taeniorhynchus in the Galápagos Islands and identify potential parasite transmission with which this mosquito could be involved. Our results show that A. taeniorhynchus feeds equally on mammals and reptiles, and only one avian sample was observed in 190 successful PCR amplifications from blood meals. However, we detected endemic filarial worms and Haemoproteus parasites known to infect various Galápagos bird species in mosquito thoraces, suggesting that feeding on birds must occur at low frequency, and that A. taeniorhynchus may play a role in maintaining some avian vector-borne pathogens, although more work is needed to explore this possibility. We also isolated three different DNA sequences corresponding to hemogregarine parasites of the genus Hepatozoon from mosquito and iguana blood samples, suggesting that more than one species of Hepatozoon parasites are present in Galápagos. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatozoon 18sRNA sequences indicates that A. taeniorhynchus may have facilitated a recent breakdown in host-species association of formerly isolated Hepatozoon spp. infecting the reptile populations in the Galápagos Islands. PMID:22921730

  5. La formación de la Nube de Oort y el entorno galáctico primitivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J. A.

    Se analizan las condiciones de formación de la nube de Oort en el medio galáctico primitivo, bajo la suposición de que los objetos que alcanzaron la nube fueron planetesimales residuales eyectados por los planetas gigantes durante las etapas finales de su acreción. Los objetos que adquieren órbitas cuasiparabólicas están sujetos a las perturbaciones de estrellas vecinas y al potencial del disco galáctico, las que desacoplan sus perihelios de la región planetaria, dando a los objetos una larga estabilidad dinámica. Se demuestra que un entorno galáctico como el presente pudo, sin embargo, no ser suficiente para formar un reservorio cometario con una vida dinámica comparable a la vida del sistema solar. La existencia de la nube de Oort después de 4600 millones de años es, pues, una fuerte indicación de que el sistema solar se formó en un entorno galáctico mucho mas denso que el presente, tal vez en una nube molecular y/o un cúmulo abierto, que es el modo de producción de la mayoría de las estrellas. Se encuentra que un campo perturbador externo mas intenso, producto de un entorno galáctico mas denso, sería capaz de formar una nube de Oort mas compacta, con un radio del orden de 103- 104 UA. El campo externo mas intenso cesó de actuar una vez que la nube molecular y/o el cúmulo abierto se disiparon, previniendo entonces que ese mismo campo externo disolviera el reservorio cometario.

  6. Targeted delivery of DNA using YEE(GalNAcAH)3, a synthetic glycopeptide ligand for the asialoglycoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Merwin, J R; Noell, G S; Thomas, W L; Chiou, H C; DeRome, M E; McKee, T D; Spitalny, G L; Findeis, M A

    1994-01-01

    In vivo gene therapy shows promise as a treatment for both genetic and acquired disorders. The hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPr) binds asialoorosomucoid-polylysine-DNA (ASOR-PL-DNA) complexes and allows targeted delivery to hepatocytes. The tris(N-acetylgalactosamine aminohexyl glycoside) amide of tyrosyl(glutamyl) glutamate [YEE(GalNAcAH)3] has been previously reported to have subnanomolar affinity for the ASGPr. We have used an iodinated derivative of YEE(GalNAcAH)3 linked to polylysine and complexed to the luciferase gene (pCMV-Luc) in receptor-binding experiments to establish the feasibility of substituting ASOR with the synthetic glycopeptide for gene therapy. Scatchard analyses revealed similar Kd values for both ASOR and the glycopeptide. Binding and internalization of 125I-Suc-YEE(GalNAcAH)3 were competitively inhibited with either unlabeled ASOR or glycopeptide. The reverse was also true; 125I-ASOR binding was competed with unlabeled YEE(GalNAcAH)3 suggesting specific binding to the ASGPr by both compounds. Examination of in vivo delivery revealed that the 125I-labeled glycopeptide complex mimicked previous results observed with 125I-ASOR-PL-DNA. CPM in the liver accounted for 96% of the radioactivity recovered from the five major organs (liver, spleen, kidney, heart, and lungs). Cryoautoradiography displayed iodinated glycopeptide complex bound preferentially to hepatocytes rather than nonparenchymal cells. In vitro, as well as in vivo, transfections using the glycopeptide-polylysine-pCMV-luciferase gene complex (YG3-PL-Luc) resulted in expression of the gene product. These data demonstrate that the YEE(GalNAcAH)3 synthetic glycopeptide can be used as a ligand in targeted delivery of DNA to the liver-specific ASGPr. PMID:7873664

  7. Increased levels of anti-non-Gal IgG following pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation correlate with failure of engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fan; Wamala, Isaac; Scalea, Joseph; Tena, Aseda; Cormack, Taylor; Pratts, Shannon; Struuck, Raimon Duran; Elias, Nahel; Hertl, Martin; Huang, Christene A.; Sachs, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of genetically modified pigs which lack the expression of alpha 1–3 galactosyl transferase, (GalT-KO pigs) has facilitated the xenogeneic transplantation of porcine organs and tissues into primates by avoiding hyperacute rejection due to pre-existing antibodies against the Gal epitope. However, antibodies against other antigens (anti-non-Gal antibodies), are found at varying levels in the pre-transplant sera of most primates. We have previously found that baboons with high levels of pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG, conditioned with a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen, failed to engraft following pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation [8]. Two baboons with low levels of pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG, conditioned with the same regimen, showed porcine bone marrow progenitors at 28 days following transplantation, suggesting engraftment. These baboons also showed evidence of donor-specific hypo-responsiveness. This observation led us to investigate the hypothesis that selecting for baboon recipients with low pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG levels might improve engraftment levels following GalT-KO pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation. Methods Five baboons, with low pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG levels, received transplantation of bone marrow cells (1–5 × 10^9/kg of recipient weight) from GalT-KO pigs. They received a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of low-dose total body irradiation (150cGy), thymic irradiation (700cGy), anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and tacrolimus. In addition, two baboons received Rituximab and Bortezomib (Velcade) treatment as well as extra-corporeal immunoadsorption using GalT-KO pig livers. Bone marrow engraftment was assessed by porcine-specific PCR on colony forming units (CFU) of day 28 bone marrow aspirates. Anti-non-Gal antibody levels were assessed by serum binding towards GalT-KO PBMC using flow cytometry (FACS). Peripheral macro-chimerism was measured by FACS using pig and

  8. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  9. Supercritical biodiesel production and power cogeneration: technical and economic feasibilities.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Anitescu, G; Rice, P A; Tavlarides, L L

    2010-03-01

    An integrated supercritical fluid technology with power cogeneration to produce biodiesel fuels, with no need for the costly separations involved with the conventional technology, is proposed, documented for technical and economic feasibility, and preliminarily designed. The core of the integrated system consists of the transesterification of various triglyceride sources (e.g., vegetable oils and animal fats) with supercritical methanol/ethanol. Part of the reaction products can be combusted by a diesel power generator integrated in the system which, in turn, provides the power needed to pressurize the system and the heat of the exhaust gases necessary in the transesterification step. The latter energy demand can also be satisfied by a fired heater, especially for higher plant capacities. Different versions of this system can be implemented based on the main target of the technology: biodiesel production or diesel engine applications, including power generation. The process options considered for biodiesel fuel production estimate break-even processing costs of biodiesel as low as $0.26/gal ($0.07/L) with a diesel power generator and $0.35/gal ($0.09/L) with a fired heater for a plant capacity of 15,000 gal/day (56,775 L/day). Both are significantly lower than the current processing costs of approximately $0.51/gal ($0.13/L) of biodiesel produced by conventional catalytic methods. A retail cost of biodiesel produced by the proposed method is likely to be competitive with the prices of diesel fuels. PMID:19939671

  10. Development of a high-throughput β-Gal-based neutralization assay for quantitation of herpes simplex virus-neutralizing antibodies in human samples.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Amy; Cooney, Michael; Blevins, Tamara P; Morrison, Lynda A; Larson, Shane; Skoberne, Mojca; Belshe, Robert B; Flechtner, Jessica B; Long, Deborah

    2016-07-19

    Measurement of neutralizing antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is important for evaluation of candidate vaccines. The established plaque-reduction neutralization assay is time consuming, labor intensive, and difficult to validate and transfer. Here, we describe the characterization of a HSV-neutralization assay based on the expression of a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (β-Gal). Using previously constructed HSV-β-Gal recombinant viruses, HSV-2/Gal and HSV-1/tk12, we developed a colorimetric β-Gal-based neutralization assay that is sensitive and highly reproducible, and performed in less than 48h. HSV-1 and HSV-2 neutralizing titers measured by the β-Gal-based neutralization assay were equivalent to those obtained by a plaque reduction neutralization assay. Intra- and inter-assay precision studies demonstrated that the β-Gal-based assay was repeatable and yielded low and acceptable variation. In addition, comparison of HSV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers measured in two independent laboratories by two unique β-Gal-based assays showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.9499, p<0.0001) between the two assays. The new assay will serve as an important tool both for preclinical and clinical trials of new HSV vaccines. PMID:27265458

  11. Ecosystem Resilience and Threshold Response in the Galápagos Coastal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Alistair W. R.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Milne, Glenn A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a conservative estimate on rates of sea-level rise of 3.8 mm yr−1 at the end of the 21st century, which may have a detrimental effect on ecologically important mangrove ecosystems. Understanding factors influencing the long-term resilience of these communities is critical but poorly understood. We investigate ecological resilience in a coastal mangrove community from the Galápagos Islands over the last 2700 years using three research questions: What are the ‘fast and slow’ processes operating in the coastal zone? Is there evidence for a threshold response? How can the past inform us about the resilience of the modern system? Methodology/Principal Findings Palaeoecological methods (AMS radiocarbon dating, stable carbon isotopes (δ13C)) were used to reconstruct sedimentation rates and ecological change over the past 2,700 years at Diablas lagoon, Isabela, Galápagos. Bulk geochemical analysis was also used to determine local environmental changes, and salinity was reconstructed using a diatom transfer function. Changes in relative sea level (RSL) were estimated using a glacio-isostatic adjustment model. Non-linear behaviour was observed in the Diablas mangrove ecosystem as it responded to increased salinities following exposure to tidal inundations. A negative feedback was observed which enabled the mangrove canopy to accrete vertically, but disturbances may have opened up the canopy and contributed to an erosion of resilience over time. A combination of drier climatic conditions and a slight fall in RSL then resulted in a threshold response, from a mangrove community to a microbial mat. Conclusions/Significance Palaeoecological records can provide important information on the nature of non-linear behaviour by identifying thresholds within ecological systems, and in outlining responses to ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ environmental change between alternative stable states. This study

  12. Crustal accretion and deformation processes above the Galápagos hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Davidge, L.; Ruiz, M. C.; Bagnardi, M.; Amelung, F.; Tepp, G.; Cote, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean island volcanoes initiate and grow as plates move over mantle upwellings, producing chains of volcanoes with long-lived magmatic plumbing systems that store mantle melts. Pressure changes that accompany the arrival of new batches of melt into the magma chamber, or the release of magma to surface eruptions and/or dikes, cause surface deformation, and changes in state-of-stress in the overlying rocks. Nowhere are these surface variations more pronounced than along the chain of 7 active volcanoes in the western Galápagos, each of which has a large, deep summit caldera. Our aim is to evaluate the relative importance of magma intrusion, circumferential and intra-caldera faulting, radial dike intrusions, and sill emplacement to volcano deformation during inter-eruption periods. The SIGNET 2009-11 seismic array on Isabela Island, Galápagos recorded nearly 2000 local earthquakes that provide constraints on magma storage and fault systems accommodating the rapid volcano inflation. Seismicity largely is restricted to the uppermost 2 km of Sierra Negra, excepting the pipe-like zone beneath the eastern side of the caldera; depths of earthquakes on Alcedo and the shallow platform outside the array are poorly constrained. Seismicity is localized around the caldera ring fault system and the sinuous ridge within the caldera. The orientation of reverse fault mechanisms suggest that the intra-caldera ridge formed through compression of the > 2 km-thick lid above the magma chamber, consistent with slip along inward-dipping ring faults. Swarms of seismicity coincide with aligned chains of cinder cones and vents between Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul, between Sierra Negra and Alcedo, between Sierra Negra and Santa Cruz volcanoes, and along the southern flank of Isabela Island, suggesting ongoing dike intrusion and/or degassing. Migrating swarms of seismicity initiating in the caldera may mark small volume radial dike intrusions. Deformation is not restricted to the ring fault

  13. Evolução química de galáxias HII anãs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraresi, M., Jr.; Cuisinier, F.; Telles, E.

    2003-08-01

    Galáxias HII anãs são galáxias de baixa massa, com alto conteúdo de gás, e se encontram em uma fase intensa de formação estelar. A taxa de formação estelar está tão alta nestas galáxias que não pode ter se mantido durante sua vida inteira. O tempo máximo de duração do episódio atual de formação estelar deve ser no máximo de algumas dezenas de milhões de anos, bem inferior à idade destas galáxias. Isto leva naturalmente a idéia de que já aconteceram surtos anteriores. Abundâncias químicas oferecem uma ferramenta poderosa para investigar a história evolutiva destas galáxias, porque aumentam de geração em geração estelar. O hidrogênio, o oxigênio, o nitrogênio produzem algumas das linhas mais importantes em um gás foto-ionizado, permitindo a determinação das abundâncias destes elementos facilmente. A dispersão das abundâncias em oxigênio e nitrogênio é significativa, sendo maior que os erros observacionais. O oxigênio é produzido em estrelas massivas, que explodem quase instâneamente, enquanto o nitrogênio é produzido em estrelas de massa intermediária, que só o liberam depois de um atraso de @ 500 mihões de anos. Construímos um modelo de evolução química semi-analítico, utilizando rendimentos empíricos baseados nas abundâncias observadas destes dois elementos. Conseguimos através deste modelo rudimentar explicar nas galáxias de mais baixas metalicidades as abundâncias de oxigênio e de nitrogênio, assim como a dispersão dos dados observacionais devida a formação estelar descontínua, e isto com um número baixo de surtos (1 ou 2, no máximo 3).

  14. Phase I study to evaluate toxicity and feasibility of intratumoral injection of α-gal glycolipids in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Mark R; Ranheim, Erik A; Zuleger, Cindy L; Sondel, Paul M; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Bridges, Alan; Newton, Michael A; McFarland, Thomas; Collins, Jennifer; Clements, Erin; Henry, Mary Beth; Neuman, Heather B; Weber, Sharon; Whalen, Giles; Galili, Uri

    2016-08-01

    Effective uptake of tumor cell-derived antigens by antigen-presenting cells is achieved pre-clinically by in situ labeling of tumor with α-gal glycolipids that bind the naturally occurring anti-Gal antibody. We evaluated toxicity and feasibility of intratumoral injections of α-gal glycolipids as an autologous tumor antigen-targeted immunotherapy in melanoma patients (pts). Pts with unresectable metastatic melanoma, at least one cutaneous, subcutaneous, or palpable lymph node metastasis, and serum anti-Gal titer ≥1:50 were eligible for two intratumoral α-gal glycolipid injections given 4 weeks apart (cohort I: 0.1 mg/injection; cohort II: 1.0 mg/injection; cohort III: 10 mg/injection). Monitoring included blood for clinical, autoimmune, and immunological analyses and core tumor biopsies. Treatment outcome was determined 8 weeks after the first α-gal glycolipid injection. Nine pts received two intratumoral injections of α-gal glycolipids (3 pts/cohort). Injection-site toxicity was mild, and no systemic toxicity or autoimmunity could be attributed to the therapy. Two pts had stable disease by RECIST lasting 8 and 7 months. Tumor nodule biopsies revealed minimal to no change in inflammatory infiltrate between pre- and post-treatment biopsies except for 1 pt (cohort III) with a post-treatment inflammatory infiltrate. Two and four weeks post-injection, treated nodules in 5 of 9 pts exhibited tumor cell necrosis without neutrophilic or lymphocytic inflammatory response. Non-treated tumor nodules in 2 of 4 evaluable pts also showed necrosis. Repeated intratumoral injections of α-gal glycolipids are well tolerated, and tumor necrosis was seen in some tumor nodule biopsies after tumor injection with α-gal glycolipids. PMID:27207605

  15. Identification of gangliosides recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies in bovine spinal motor neurons and motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiide; Ariga, Toshio; Suzuki, Akemi; Yu, Robert K; Miyatake, Tadashi

    2008-08-28

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-type antibodies to the ganglioside, N-acetylgalactosaminyl GD1a (GalNAc-GD1a), is closely associated with the pure motor type of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). In the present study, we isolated disialogangliosides from the motor neurons and motor nerves of bovine spinal cords by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The disialoganglioside fraction contained GD1a, GD2, GD1b, and three gangliosides, designated X1, X2 and X3. Serum from a patient with axonal GBS with IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody yielded positive immunostaining with X1, X2, and X3. When isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography (TLC), X1 migrated at the same position as GalNAc-GD1a from Tay-Sachs brain, suggesting that X1 is GalNAc-GD1a containing N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc). TLC of isolated X2 revealed that it migrated between GD1a and GD2. On the other hand, X3 had a migratory rate on TLC between and GD1b and GT1b. Since both X2 and X3 were recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody, the results suggest that X2 is a GalNAc-GD1a species containing a mixture containing a NeuAc-and an N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) species, and X3 is a GalNAc-GD1a species with two NeuGc. This evidence indicating the specific localization of GalNAc-GD1a and its isomers in spinal motor neurons should be useful in elucidating the pathogenic role of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody in pure motor-type GBS. PMID:18598683

  16. Phylogenetic-Derived Insights into the Evolution of Sialylation in Eukaryotes: Comprehensive Analysis of Vertebrate β-Galactoside α2,3/6-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal and ST6Gal).

    PubMed

    Teppa, Roxana E; Petit, Daniel; Plechakova, Olga; Cogez, Virginie; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface of eukaryotic cells is covered with a wide variety of sialylated molecules involved in diverse biological processes and taking part in cell-cell interactions. Although the physiological relevance of these sialylated glycoconjugates in vertebrates begins to be deciphered, the origin and evolution of the genetic machinery implicated in their biosynthetic pathway are poorly understood. Among the variety of actors involved in the sialylation machinery, sialyltransferases are key enzymes for the biosynthesis of sialylated molecules. This review focus on β-galactoside α2,3/6-sialyltransferases belonging to the ST3Gal and ST6Gal families. We propose here an outline of the evolutionary history of these two major ST families. Comparative genomics, molecular phylogeny and structural bioinformatics provided insights into the functional innovations in sialic acid metabolism and enabled to explore how ST-gene function evolved in vertebrates. PMID:27517905

  17. Phylogenetic-Derived Insights into the Evolution of Sialylation in Eukaryotes: Comprehensive Analysis of Vertebrate β-Galactoside α2,3/6-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal and ST6Gal)

    PubMed Central

    Teppa, Roxana E.; Petit, Daniel; Plechakova, Olga; Cogez, Virginie; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface of eukaryotic cells is covered with a wide variety of sialylated molecules involved in diverse biological processes and taking part in cell–cell interactions. Although the physiological relevance of these sialylated glycoconjugates in vertebrates begins to be deciphered, the origin and evolution of the genetic machinery implicated in their biosynthetic pathway are poorly understood. Among the variety of actors involved in the sialylation machinery, sialyltransferases are key enzymes for the biosynthesis of sialylated molecules. This review focus on β-galactoside α2,3/6-sialyltransferases belonging to the ST3Gal and ST6Gal families. We propose here an outline of the evolutionary history of these two major ST families. Comparative genomics, molecular phylogeny and structural bioinformatics provided insights into the functional innovations in sialic acid metabolism and enabled to explore how ST-gene function evolved in vertebrates. PMID:27517905

  18. Genetic analysis of a successful repatriation programme: giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed Central

    Milinkovitch, Michel C.; Monteyne, Daniel; Gibbs, James P.; Fritts, Thomas H.; Tapia, Washington; Snell, Howard L.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    2004-01-01

    As natural populations of endangered species dwindle to precarious levels, remaining members are sometimes brought into captivity, allowed to breed and their offspring returned to the natural habitat. One goal of such repatriation programmes is to retain as much of the genetic variation of the species as possible. A taxon of giant Galápagos tortoises on the island of Española has been the subject of a captive breeding-repatriation programme for 33 years. Core breeders, consisting of 12 females and three males, have produced more than 1200 offspring that have been released on Española where in situ reproduction has recently been observed. Using microsatellite DNA markers, we have determined the maternity and paternity of 132 repatriated offspring. Contributions of the breeders are highly skewed. This has led to a further loss of genetic variation that is detrimental to the long-term survival of the population. Modifications to the breeding programme could alleviate this problem. PMID:15101691

  19. Microsatellite analysis of genetic divergence among populations of giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Gibbs, James P; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2002-11-01

    Giant Galápagos tortoises represent an interesting model for the study of patterns of genetic divergence and adaptive differentiation related to island colonization events. Recent mitochondrial DNA work elucidated the evolutionary history of the species and helped to clarify aspects of nomenclature. We used 10 microsatellite loci to assess levels of genetic divergence among and within island populations. In particular, we described the genetic structure of tortoises on the island of Isabela, where discrimination of different taxa is still subject of debate. Individual island populations were all genetically distinct. The island of Santa Cruz harboured two distinct populations. On Isabela, populations of Volcan Wolf, Darwin and Alcedo were significantly different from each other. On the other hand, Volcan Wolf showed allelic similarity with the island of Santiago. On Southern Isabela, lower genetic divergence was found between Northeast Sierra Negra and Volcan Alcedo, while patterns of gene flow were recorded among tortoises of Cerro Azul and Southeast Sierra Negra. These tortoises have endured heavy exploitation during the last three centuries and recently attracted much concern due to the current number of stochastic and deterministic threats to extant populations. Our study complements previous investigation based on mtDNA diversity and provides further information that may help devising tortoise management plans. PMID:12406238

  20. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation. PMID:26104283

  1. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Olesen, Jens M.; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  2. Invaders of pollination networks in the Galápagos Islands: emergence of novel communities

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Heleno, Ruben; Chamorro, Susana; Vargas, Pablo; McMullen, Conley K.; Castro-Urgal, Rocío; Nogales, Manuel; Herrera, Henri W.; Olesen, Jens M.

    2013-01-01

    The unique biodiversity of most oceanic archipelagos is currently threatened by the introduction of alien species that can displace native biota, disrupt native ecological interactions, and profoundly affect community structure and stability. We investigated the threat of aliens on pollination networks in the species-rich lowlands of five Galápagos Islands. Twenty per cent of all species (60 plants and 220 pollinators) in the pooled network were aliens, being involved in 38 per cent of the interactions. Most aliens were insects, especially dipterans (36%), hymenopterans (30%) and lepidopterans (14%). These alien insects had more links than either endemic pollinators or non-endemic natives, some even acting as island hubs. Aliens linked mostly to generalized species, increasing nestedness and thus network stability. Moreover, they infiltrated all seven connected modules (determined by geographical and phylogenetic constraints) of the overall network, representing around 30 per cent of species in two of them. An astonishingly high proportion (38%) of connectors, which enhance network cohesiveness, was also alien. Results indicate that the structure of these emergent novel communities might become more resistant to certain type of disturbances (e.g. species loss), while being more vulnerable to others (e.g. spread of a disease). Such notable changes in network structure as invasions progress are expected to have important consequences for native biodiversity maintenance. PMID:23486435

  3. Recovery of a nearly extinct Galápagos tortoise despite minimal genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Kanitz, Ricardo; Tiedemann, Ralph; Tapia, Washington; Llerena, Fausto; Caccone, Adalgisa; Gibbs, James P; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    A species of Galápagos tortoise endemic to Española Island was reduced to just 12 females and three males that have been bred in captivity since 1971 and have produced over 1700 offspring now repatriated to the island. Our molecular genetic analyses of juveniles repatriated to and surviving on the island indicate that none of the tortoises sampled in 1994 had hatched on the island versus 3% in 2004 and 24% in 2007, which demonstrates substantial and increasing reproduction in situ once again. This recovery occurred despite the parental population having an estimated effective population size <8 due to a combination of unequal reproductive success of the breeders and nonrandom mating in captivity. These results provide guidelines for adapting breeding regimes in the parental captive population and decreasing inbreeding in the repatriated population. Using simple morphological data scored on the sampled animals, we also show that a strongly heterogeneous distribution of tortoise sizes on Española Island observed today is due to a large variance in the number of animals included in yearly repatriation events performed in the last 40 years. Our study reveals that, at least in the short run, some endangered species can recover dramatically despite a lack of genetic variation and irregular repatriation efforts. PMID:23467700

  4. Lake or bog? Reconstructing baseline ecological conditions for the protected Galápagos Sphagnum peatbogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Emily E. D.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper documents the first 10,000 year old plant macrofossil record of vegetation changes on the central island of Santa Cruz, providing information on Sphagnum bog vegetation patterns, local extinction of key taxa, and temporal successions in the Galápagos humid highlands. Vegetation change is reconstructed through examination of Holocene sedimentary sequences obtained from three Sphagnum bogs located within volcanic caldera forming the high elevation central ridge system of Santa Cruz Island. Results indicate that these specialized Sphagnum bog ecosystems are dynamic and have undergone considerable changes in vegetation composition, transitioning from diverse hygrophilous herbs and submerged aquatic ecosystems to drier Sphagnum/Pteridium bog systems, during the last 10,000 cal yr BP. Additionally a new aquatic genus previously undocumented on the islands, Elatine, was discovered at two of the study sites, but it is now extinct on the archipelago. Some of the observed vegetation successions may have been driven by climatic shifts occurring within the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP). Other drivers including anthropogenic change are also considered significant over the last hundred years, placing strain on this naturally dynamic system. This study helps reveal patterns of change in the humid highlands over the last 10,000 cal yr BP regarding vegetation variability, climatic shifts, the historical influence of fire, tortoise disturbance, and recent anthropogenic impacts on the island.

  5. In vivo labeling of zebrafish motor neurons using an mnx1 enhancer and Gal4/UAS.

    PubMed

    Zelenchuk, Taras A; Brusés, Juan L

    2011-07-01

    The zebrafish spinal cord primary motor neurons are commonly used as an experimental model to study the molecular mechanisms that regulate axonal pathfinding and neuromuscular junction formation, and for the modeling of human neurodegenerative disorders. This study characterized a 125-bp mnx1 enhancer to direct gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons. A promoter containing three copies of the 125-bp mnx1 enhancer was generated in a Tol2 vector and used to drive enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression either directly or in combination with the Gal4/UAS transcriptional activation system. Both methods induced protein expression for up to 5 days after fertilization, allowing the observation of the dendritic tree and axonal arborization of single motor neurons within a somitic segment in fixed and live animals. The use of the 125-bp mnx1 promoter for transient transgenic expression or for the generation of stable transgenic fish lines will facilitate the study of motor neuron development and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21538811

  6. Widespread uplift and 'trapdoor' faulting on Galápagos volcanoes observed with radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Amelung, F; Jónsson, S; Zebker, H; Segall, P

    2000-10-26

    Volcanic uplift, caused by the accumulation of magma in subsurface reservoirs, is a common precursor to eruptions. But, for some volcanoes, uplift of metres or more has not yet led to an eruption. Here we present displacement maps of volcanoes in the Galápagos Islands, constructed using satellite radar interferometry, that might help explain this dichotomy. We show that all but one of the seven volcanoes on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina deformed during 1992-99. Cerro Azul and Fernandina erupted during the observation period and show evidence of inflation, co-eruptive deflation and shallow dyke intrusion. In contrast, the largest volcano, Sierra Negra, has not erupted, yet exhibits spatially and temporally variable deformation, with a maximum uplift of 2.7 m between 1992 and 1999, which can be modelled by a shallow inflating sill. Inflation during 1997-98, however, was accompanied by 'trapdoor' faulting on a steeply dipping fracture system within the caldera. Repeated trapdoor faulting over geological time has formed an arcuate intra-caldera ridge within Sierra Negra and may have acted to relax stresses above the magma chamber, inhibiting summit eruptions. Similar processes may help explain large uplift unaccompanied by eruptive activity at other volcanoes. PMID:11069176

  7. Galápagos coral reef persistence after ENSO warming across an acidification gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, D.; Enochs, I.; Bruckner, A.; Renaud, P.; Kolodziej, G.; Budd, D. A.; Carlton, R.; Glynn, P.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is causing warming and ocean acidification. Coral reefs are being severelyimpacted, yet confusion lingers regarding how reefs will respond to these stressors over this century. Sincethe 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation warming event, the persistence of reefs around the GalápagosIslands has differed across an acidification gradient. Reefs disappeared where pH<8.0 and aragonitesaturation state (Ωarag) ≤ 3 and have not recovered, whereas one reef has persisted where pH>8.0 andΩarag>3. Where upwelling is greatest, calcification by massive Porites is higher than predicted by a publishedrelationship with temperature despite high CO2, possibly due to elevated nutrients. However, skeletal P/Ca, aproxy for phosphate exposure, negatively correlates with density (R = -0.822, p<0.0001). We propose thatelevated nutrients have the potential to exacerbate acidification by depressing coral skeletal densities andfurther increasing bioerosion already accelerated by low pH.

  8. Galápagos coral reef persistence after ENSO warming across an acidification gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, Derek P.; Enochs, Ian C.; Bruckner, Andrew; Renaud, Philip G.; Kolodziej, Graham; Budd, David A.; Carlton, Renée.; Glynn, Peter W.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is causing warming and ocean acidification. Coral reefs are being severely impacted, yet confusion lingers regarding how reefs will respond to these stressors over this century. Since the 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation warming event, the persistence of reefs around the Galápagos Islands has differed across an acidification gradient. Reefs disappeared where pH < 8.0 and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) ≤ 3 and have not recovered, whereas one reef has persisted where pH > 8.0 and Ωarag > 3. Where upwelling is greatest, calcification by massive Porites is higher than predicted by a published relationship with temperature despite high CO2, possibly due to elevated nutrients. However, skeletal P/Ca, a proxy for phosphate exposure, negatively correlates with density (R = -0.822, p < 0.0001). We propose that elevated nutrients have the potential to exacerbate acidification by depressing coral skeletal densities and further increasing bioerosion already accelerated by low pH.

  9. TEMPO-mediated oxidation on galactomannan: Gal/Man ratio and chain flexibility dependence.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Lucyszyn, Neoli; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    Guar (GG) and locust bean (LBG) galactomannans (GMs) oxidation at C-6 was performed with catalyst TEMPO, in which the reaction progress was monitored by consume of NaOH solution. The products were characterized by spectroscopic analysis, infrared, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, confirming the presence of aldehydes groups as intermediate of reaction to carboxylic acid. From high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection Man/Gal molar ratio was determined and demonstrated a preference to oxidize Man during the reaction on both GMs, following a first order kinetics of oxidation. The comparative macromolecular behavior of native and oxidized GMs was obtained through the analysis by high performance size exclusion chromatography, and the persistence length (Lp) was 6nm and 4nm to native LBG and GG, respectively. A more accessible OH-6 at mannose residue in LBG could be related with a two times faster reaction than GG. The selective oxidation with catalyst TEMPO proved to be efficient to increase the flexibility of the GMs during oxidation. Short reaction time and β-elimination process were mainly observed to LBG, probably due to a more favorable oxidation access to the polysaccharide main chain. PMID:27561508

  10. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M.; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation. PMID:26104283

  11. Automatic Segmentation of Drosophila Neural Compartments Using GAL4 Expression Data Reveals Novel Visual Pathways.

    PubMed

    Panser, Karin; Tirian, Laszlo; Schulze, Florian; Villalba, Santiago; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; Bühler, Katja; Straw, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Identifying distinct anatomical structures within the brain and developing genetic tools to target them are fundamental steps for understanding brain function. We hypothesize that enhancer expression patterns can be used to automatically identify functional units such as neuropils and fiber tracts. We used two recent, genome-scale Drosophila GAL4 libraries and associated confocal image datasets to segment large brain regions into smaller subvolumes. Our results (available at https://strawlab.org/braincode) support this hypothesis because regions with well-known anatomy, namely the antennal lobes and central complex, were automatically segmented into familiar compartments. The basis for the structural assignment is clustering of voxels based on patterns of enhancer expression. These initial clusters are agglomerated to make hierarchical predictions of structure. We applied the algorithm to central brain regions receiving input from the optic lobes. Based on the automated segmentation and manual validation, we can identify and provide promising driver lines for 11 previously identified and 14 novel types of visual projection neurons and their associated optic glomeruli. The same strategy can be used in other brain regions and likely other species, including vertebrates. PMID:27426516

  12. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben H; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  13. Genetic Status and Timing of a Weevil Introduction to Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Successful invasive species can overcome or circumvent the potential genetic loss caused by an introduction bottleneck through a rapid population expansion and admixture from multiple introductions. We explore the genetic makeup and the timing of a species introduction to Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos archipelago. We investigate the presence of processes that can maintain genetic diversity in populations of the broad-nosed weevil Galapaganus howdenae howdenae. Analyses of combined genotypes for 8 microsatellite loci showed evidence of past population size reductions through moment and likelihood-based estimators. No evidence of admixture through multiple introductions was found, but substantial current population sizes (N0 298, 95% credible limits 50–2300), genetic diversity comparable with long-established endemics (Mean number of alleles = 3.875), and lack of genetic structure across the introduced range (F ST = 0.01359) could suggest that foundations are in place for populations to rapidly recover any loss of genetic variability. The time estimates for the introduction into Santa Cruz support an accidental transfer during the colonization period (1832–1959) predating the spurt in human population growth. Our evaluation of the genetic status of G. h. howdenae suggests potential for population growth in addition to our field observations of a concurrent expansion in range and feeding preferences towards protected areas and endemic host plants. PMID:24399746

  14. Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Cox, Kelly; Erickson, Loren D.; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity refers to immune reactions that can be rapidly progressing and, in the case of anaphylaxis, are occasionally fatal. To that end, identification of the associated allergen is important for facilitating both education and allergen avoidance that are essential to long-term risk reduction. As the number of known exposures associated with anaphylaxis is limited, discovery of novel causative agents is crucial to evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Within the last 10 years several apparently separate observations were recognized to be related, all of which resulted from the development of antibodies to a carbohydrate moiety on proteins. Interestingly, the exposure differed from airborne allergens but was nevertheless capable of producing anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions. Our recent work has identified these responses as being due to a novel IgE antibody directed against a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (“alpha-gal”). This review will present the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discuss the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as current goals and directions of our research programs. PMID:26666477

  15. Serine versus threonine glycosylation with α-O-GalNAc: unexpected selectivity in their molecular recognition with lectins.

    PubMed

    Madariaga, David; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Somovilla, Víctor J; García-García, Laura; Berbis, M Álvaro; Valero-Gónzalez, Jessika; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Asensio, Juan L; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Avenoza, Alberto; Busto, Jesús H; Corzana, Francisco; Peregrina, Jesús M

    2014-09-22

    The molecular recognition of several glycopeptides bearing Tn antigen (α-O-GalNAc-Ser or α-O-GalNAc-Thr) in their structure by three lectins with affinity for this determinant has been analysed. The work yields remarkable results in terms of epitope recognition, showing that the underlying amino acid of Tn (serine or threonine) plays a key role in the molecular recognition. In fact, while Soybean agglutinin and Vicia villosa agglutinin lectins prefer Tn-threonine, Helix pomatia agglutinin shows a higher affinity for the glycopeptides carrying Tn-serine. The different conformational behaviour of the two Tn biological entities, the residues of the studied glycopeptides in the close proximity to the Tn antigen and the topology of the binding site of the lectins are at the origin of these differences. PMID:25111627

  16. A new model for the growth of basaltic shields based on deformation of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Space-geodetic measurements of surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina – the most frequently erupting volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago – reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from a shallow magma reservoir. This includes eruptions from fissures that are oriented both radially and circumferentially with respect to the summit caldera. A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image acquired 1–2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galápagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, and this assumption has guided models of the origin of the eruptive fissure geometry and overall development of the volcanoes. Our findings allow us to reinterpret the internal structure and evolution of Galápagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields. Furthermore, we note that stress changes generated by the emplacement of subhorizontal sills feeding one type of eruption may control the geometry of subsequent eruptive fissures. Specifically, circumferential fissures tend to open within areas uplifted by sill intrusions that initiated previous radial fissure eruptions. This mechanism provides a possible explanation for the pattern of eruptive fissures that characterizes all the western Galápagos volcanoes, as well as the alternation between radial and circumferential fissure eruptions at Fernandina. The same model suggests that the next eruption of Fernandina will be from a circumferential fissure in the area uplifted by the 2009 sill intrusion, just southwest of the caldera rim.

  17. Recycled crust in the Galápagos Plume source at 70 Ma: Implications for plume evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, Jarek; Vidito, Christopher; Gazel, Esteban; Herzberg, Claude; Class, Cornelia; Whalen, William; Jicha, Brian; Bizimis, Michael; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2015-09-01

    Galápagos plume-related lavas in the accreted terranes of the Caribbean and along the west coast of Costa Rica and Panama provide evidence on the evolution of the Galápagos mantle plume, specifically its mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and dynamics. Here we provide new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions, and high-precision olivine analyses for samples from the Quepos terrane (Costa Rica) to closely examine the transitional phase of the Galápagos Plume from Large Igneous Province (LIP) to ocean island basalt (OIB) forming stages. The new ages indicate that the record of Quepos volcanism began at 70 Ma and persisted for 10 Ma. Petrological evidence suggests that the maximum mantle potential temperature (Tp) of the plume changed from ∼1650° to ∼1550 °C between 90-70 Ma. This change correlates with a dominant pyroxenite component in the Galapagos source as indicated by high Ni and Fe/Mn and low Ca olivines relative to those that crystallized in normal peridotite derived melts. The decrease in Tp also correlates with an increase in high-field strength element enrichments, e.g., Nb/Nb*, of the erupted lavas. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Nd-Pb) suggest that the Quepos terrane samples have intermediate (Central Domain) radiogenic signatures. The Galápagos plume at 70 Ma represents elevated pyroxenite melt productivity relative to peridotite in a cooling lithologically heterogeneous mantle.

  18. Disease ecology in the Galápagos Hawk (Buteo galapagoensis): host genetic diversity, parasite load and natural antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Noah Kerness; Matson, Kevin D; Bollmer, Jennifer L; Parker, Patricia G

    2005-01-01

    An increased susceptibility to disease is one hypothesis explaining how inbreeding hastens extinction in island endemics and threatened species. Experimental studies show that disease resistance declines as inbreeding increases, but data from in situ wildlife systems are scarce. Genetic diversity increases with island size across the entire range of an extremely inbred Galápagos endemic bird, providing the context for a natural experiment examining the effects of inbreeding on disease susceptibility. Extremely inbred populations of Galápagos hawks had higher parasite abundances than relatively outbred populations. We found a significant island effect on constitutively produced natural antibody (NAb) levels and inbred populations generally harboured lower average and less variable NAb levels than relatively outbred populations. Furthermore, NAb levels explained abundance of amblyceran lice, which encounter the host immune system. This is the first study linking inbreeding, innate immunity and parasite load in an endemic, in situ wildlife population and provides a clear framework for assessment of disease risk in a Galápagos endemic. PMID:16618672

  19. Structural basis for binding the TREX2 complex to nuclear pores, GAL1 localisation and mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Jani, Divyang; Valkov, Eugene; Stewart, Murray

    2014-06-01

    The conserved Sac3:Thp1:Sem1:Sus1:Cdc31 (TREX2) complex binds to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and, in addition to integrating mRNA nuclear export with preceding steps in the gene expression pathway, facilitates re-positioning of highly regulated actively transcribing genes (such as GAL1) to NPCs. Although TREX2 is thought to bind NPC protein Nup1, defining the precise role of this interaction has been frustrated by the complex pleiotropic phenotype exhibited by nup1Δ strains. To provide a structural framework for understanding the binding of TREX2 to NPCs and its function in the gene expression pathway, we have determined the structure of the Nup1:TREX2 interaction interface and used this information to engineer a Sac3 variant that impairs NPC binding while not compromising TREX2 assembly. This variant inhibited the NPC association of both de-repressed and activated GAL1 and also produced mRNA export and growth defects. These results indicate that the TREX2:Nup1 interaction facilitates the efficient nuclear export of bulk mRNA together with the re-positioning of GAL1 to NPCs that is required for transcriptional control that is mediated by removal of SUMO from repressors by NPC-bound Ulp1. PMID:24705649

  20. Differentiation with drift: a spatio-temporal genetic analysis of Galápagos mockingbird populations (Mimus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Hoeck, Paquita E. A.; Bollmer, Jennifer L.; Parker, Patricia G.; Keller, Lukas F.

    2010-01-01

    Small and isolated island populations provide ideal systems to study the effects of limited population size, genetic drift and gene flow on genetic diversity. We assessed genetic diversity within and differentiation among 19 mockingbird populations on 15 Galápagos islands, covering all four endemic species, using 16 microsatellite loci. We tested for signs of drift and gene flow, and used historic specimens to assess genetic change over the last century and to estimate effective population sizes. Within-population genetic diversity and effective population sizes varied substantially among island populations and correlated strongly with island size, suggesting that island size serves as a good predictor for effective population size. Genetic differentiation among populations was pronounced and increased with geographical distance. A century of genetic drift did not change genetic diversity on an archipelago-wide scale, but genetic drift led to loss of genetic diversity in small populations, especially in one of the two remaining populations of the endangered Floreana mockingbird. Unlike in other Galápagos bird species such as the Darwin's finches, gene flow among mockingbird populations was low. The clear pattern of genetically distinct populations reflects the effects of genetic drift and suggests that Galápagos mockingbirds are evolving in relative isolation. PMID:20194174

  1. Disease ecology in the Galápagos Hawk (Buteo galapagoensis): host genetic diversity, parasite load and natural antibodies.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Noah Kerness; Matson, Kevin D; Bollmer, Jennifer L; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-04-01

    An increased susceptibility to disease is one hypothesis explaining how inbreeding hastens extinction in island endemics and threatened species. Experimental studies show that disease resistance declines as inbreeding increases, but data from in situ wildlife systems are scarce. Genetic diversity increases with island size across the entire range of an extremely inbred Galápagos endemic bird, providing the context for a natural experiment examining the effects of inbreeding on disease susceptibility. Extremely inbred populations of Galápagos hawks had higher parasite abundances than relatively outbred populations. We found a significant island effect on constitutively produced natural antibody (NAb) levels and inbred populations generally harboured lower average and less variable NAb levels than relatively outbred populations. Furthermore, NAb levels explained abundance of amblyceran lice, which encounter the host immune system. This is the first study linking inbreeding, innate immunity and parasite load in an endemic, in situ wildlife population and provides a clear framework for assessment of disease risk in a Galápagos endemic. PMID:16618672

  2. Modulation of Ultrafast Conformational Dynamics in Allosteric Interaction of Gal Repressor Protein with Different Operator DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Naiya, Gitashri; Singh, Priya; Lemmens, Peter; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Although all forms of dynamical behaviour of a protein under allosteric interaction with effectors are predicted, little evidence of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of a combined approach involving picosecond-resolved FRET and polarisation-gated fluorescence for the exploration of ultrafast dynamics in the allosteric interaction of the Gal repressor (GalR) protein dimer with DNA operator sequences OE and OI . FRET from the single tryptophan residue to a covalently attached probe IAEDANS at a cysteine residue in the C-terminal domain of GalR shows structural perturbation and conformational dynamics during allosteric interaction. Polarisation-gated fluorescence spectroscopy of IAEDANS and another probe (FITC) covalently attached to the operator directly revealed the essential dynamics for cooperativity in the protein-protein interaction. The ultrafast resonance energy transfer from IAEDANS in the protein to FITC also revealed different dynamic flexibility in the allosteric interaction. An attempt was made to correlate the dynamic changes in the protein dimers with OE and OI with the consequent protein-protein interaction (tetramerisation) to form a DNA loop encompassing the promoter segment. PMID:26914958

  3. Aedes Taeniorhynchus Vectorial Capacity Informs A Pre-Emptive Assessment Of West Nile Virus Establishment In Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    Increased connectivity with the mainland has led to the arrival of many invasive species to the Galápagos Islands, including novel pathogens, threatening the archipelago's unique fauna. Here we consider the potential role of the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus in maintaining the flavivirus West Nile virus [WNV] should it reach the islands. We report on three components of vectorial capacity - vector competency, distributional abundance and host-feeding. In contrast to USA strains, Galápagos A. taeniorhynchus is a competent and efficient WNV vector, capable of transmission at 5 days post-exposure. Based on 25 blood-meals, mammalian feeding suggests a potential bridge vector role should contact with key amplification taxa occur. Vector population abundance is driven primarily by climatic factors, peaking between January and March. As a ubiquitous competent vector, A. taeniorhynchus may facilitate future WNV establishment, therefore it is vital to ensure the biosecurity of Galápagos to prevent introductions of pathogens such as WNV. PMID:23519190

  4. Histone H3 K4 demethylation during activation and attenuation of GAL1 transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Edwards, Chris; Lee, Min Gyu; Lee, Jung Shin; Schultz, David C; Shilatifard, Ali; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Berger, Shelley L

    2007-11-01

    In mammalian cells, histone lysine demethylation is carried out by two classes of enzymes, the LSD1/BHC110 class and the jumonji class. The enzymes of the jumonji class in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have recently also been shown to have lysine demethylation activity. Here we report that the protein encoded by YJR119c (termed KDM5), coding for one of five predicted jumonji domain proteins in yeast, specifically demethylates trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3), H3K4me2, and H3K4me1 in vitro. We found that loss of KDM5 increased mono-, di-, and trimethylation of lysine 4 during activation of the GAL1 gene. Interestingly, cells deleted of KDM5 also displayed a delayed reduction of K4me3 upon reestablishment of GAL1 repression. These results indicate that K4 demethylation has two roles at GAL1, first to establish appropriate levels of K4 methylation during gene activation and second to remove K4 trimethylation during the attenuation phase of transcription. Thus, analysis of lysine demethylation in yeast provides new insight into the physiological roles of jumonji demethylase enzymes. PMID:17875926

  5. Disposition and Pharmacology of a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO Targeting Human Lipoprotein (a) in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Graham, Mark J; Post, Noah; Riney, Stan; Zanardi, Thomas; Hall, Shannon; Burkey, Jennifer; Shemesh, Colby S; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Geary, Richard S; Wang, Yanfeng; Henry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3)-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have greatly improved potency via receptor-mediated uptake. In the present study, the in vivo pharmacology of a 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified ASO conjugated with GalNAc3 (ISIS 681257) together with its unmodified congener (ISIS 494372) targeting human apolipoprotein (a) (apo(a)), were studied in human LPA transgenic mice. Further, the disposition kinetics of ISIS 681257 was studied in CD-1 mice. ISIS 681257 demonstrated over 20-fold improvement in potency over ISIS 494372 as measured by liver apo(a) mRNA and plasma apo(a) protein levels. Following subcutaneous (SC) dosing, ISIS 681257 cleared rapidly from plasma and distributed to tissues. Intact ISIS 681257 was the major full-length oligonucleotide species in plasma. In tissues, however, GalNAc sugar moiety was rapidly metabolized and unconjugated ISIS 681257 accounted > 97% of the total exposure, which was then cleared slowly from tissues with a half-life of 7-8 days, similar to the half-life in plasma. ISIS 681257 is highly bound to plasma proteins (> 94% bound), which limited its urinary excretion. This study confirmed dose-dependent exposure to the parent drug ISIS 681257 in plasma and rapid conversion to unconjugated ASO in tissues. Safety data and the extended half-life support its further development and weekly dosing in phase 1 clinical studies. PMID:27138177

  6. Catabolite repression and induction time effects for a temperature-sensitive GAL-regulated yeast expression system.

    PubMed

    Napp, S J; Da Silva, N A

    1994-02-28

    The effects of residual catabolite repression and the importance of induction timing were determined for a temperature-sensitive (ts) GAL-regulated stable yeast expression system. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain employed carries a reg1 mutation inhibiting catabolite repression, and a ts mutation enabling induction of the regulated GAL promoters by a temperature shift to 35 degrees C. Despite the reg1 mutation and induction method, glucose depressed lacZ expression from a GAL1 promoter during batch culture. beta-Galactosidase specific activity was consistently lower at higher initial glucose concentrations in both SDC (semi-defined) and YPDa (complex) media; decreases of 18-36% were observed as glucose concentration was increased between 1, 3, 5, and 10 g l-1. However, the reductions in beta-galactosidase specific activity due to residual catabolite repression were more than balanced by substantial improvements in biomass yield at higher glucose levels. Therefore, productivity rose with increasing glucose concentration; in YPDa medium, increasing initial glucose from 1 to 10 g l-1 resulted in a 2.6-fold increase in beta-galactosidase volumetric activity. Due to the negative effects of shifting temperature to 35 degrees C, the trade-offs between optimum growth and a lengthy induction period were also evaluated. Delaying the time of induction reduced final specific activities but improved cell yield, and waiting 14 h into batch culture to induce lacZ expression provided modest 9-15% improvements in overall productivity. PMID:7764717

  7. Present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylidae: Phyllodactylus) stems from three independent colonization events.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Rodríguez-Guerra, Andrea; Chaves, Jaime A

    2016-10-01

    We re-examined the biogeography of the leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus) endemic to the Galápagos Islands by analyzing for the first time samples of P. gilberti, a species endemic to Wolf island, in a phylogenetic framework. Our aim was to test the three-colonizations scenario previously proposed for these lizards and estimate the age of each colonization event. To achieve this we estimated simultaneously a species tree and divergence times with Bayesian methods. Our results supported the three-colonizations scenario. Similar to a previous hypothesis, the species tree obtained here showed that most species of Phyllodactylus are nested in a single clade with an age between 5.49 and 13.8Ma, whereas a second independent colonization corresponding to P. darwini from San Cristóbal island occurred 3.03Ma ago. The species from Wolf island, P. gilberti, stems from a more recent colonization event (0.69Ma). Thus, present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos stems from three independent, asynchronous colonization events. As with other Galápagos organisms, the Pacific coast of South America seems to be the source for the founders of P. gilberti. PMID:27400628

  8. Gallic acid-l-leucine (GAL) conjugate enhances macrophage phagocytosis via inducing leukotriene B4 12-hydroxydehydrogenase (LTB4DH) expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Tse, Hung-Fat; Li, Xuechen; Han, Yifan; Rong, Jianhui

    2016-06-01

    Timely clearance of apoptotic cells is an important step in the resolution of ongoing inflammation and the restoration of tissue integrity and function after acute myocardial infarction. Natural products gallic acid and l-leucine are well-documented for anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects. We synthesized gallic acid-l-leucine (GAL) conjugate via direct coupling gallic acid and l-leucine. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of GAL conjugate on the phagocytotic activity of macrophages. By using murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 as an in vitro model, we evaluated the effect of GAL conjugate on the phagocytic uptake of fluorescently labeled latex beads and apoptotic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. We found that GAL conjugate enhanced the phagocytic activity of macrophage RAW264.7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the effect of GAL conjugate on macrophage phagocytosis was positively correlated with the up-regulation of leukotriene B4 12-hydroxydehydrogenase (LTB4DH) expression at both mRNA and protein levels. By ESI-MS based lipidomics profiling, GAL conjugate increased the enzymatic activities of LTB4DH, leading to the formation of lipid metabolites including 12-oxo-LTB4, 13,14-dh-oxo-PGE2 and 13,14-dh-oxo-PGF2α. Interestingly, GAL conjugate failed to increase macrophage phagocytosis upon silencing of LTB4DH by specific siRNA. Moreover, it appeared that GAL conjugate induced LTB4DH expression via activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. After Nrf-2 was silenced by specific siRNA, GAL conjugate no longer induced LTB4DH expression in the Nrf2-siRNA transfected cells. Taken together, our results suggest that GAL enhances macrophage phagocytosis via sequentially activating Nrf2 and up-regulating LTB4DH expression. Thus, GAL conjugate may serve as a lead compound for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:27148819

  9. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of a tandem-repeat galectin (PoGal2) from the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D C; Hu, Y T; Guo, H Y; Cui, S G; Su, T F; Jiang, S G

    2011-01-01

    Galectins can recognize and specifically bind to β-galactoside residues, playing crucial roles in innate immune responses of vertebrates and invertebrates. We cloned the cDNA of a tandem-repeat galectin from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata (designated as PoGal2). PoGal2 cDNA is 1347 bp long and consists of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 3 bp, a 3'-UTR of 297 bp with one cytokine RNA instability motif (ATTTA), and an open reading frame of 1047 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 349 amino acids, with an estimated molecular mass of 38.1 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 8.5. PoGal2 contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs); both have the conserved carbohydrate-binding motifs H-NPR and WG-EE. PoGal2 shares 50.6 and 50.9% identity with those of abalone (Haliotis discus) and the Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the tandem-repeat galectins formed two clades for the different species. Molluscan tandem-repeat galectins were clustered into a single clade, and nematode tandem-repeat galectins were clustered into another single clade. In both clades, CRD-N and CRD-C were divided into different groups. PoGal2 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues analyzed, and the expression level of PoGal2 mRNA was found to be significantly up-regulated in digestive glands, gills and hemocytes after Vibrio alginolyticus stimulation/infection. Expression profile analysis showed that the expression level of PoGal2 mRNA was significantly up-regulated at 8, 12 and 24 h after V. alginolyticus infection. These results suggest that PoGal2 is a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein involved in the innate immune response of pearl oysters. PMID:21948759

  10. Regulation of the gut-specific carboxypeptidase: a study using the binary Gal4/UAS system in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Kokoza, Vladimir A; Saha, Tusar T; Wang, Stephanie; Roy, Sourav; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2014-11-01

    Pathogen transmission by mosquitoes is tightly linked to blood feeding which, in turn, is required for egg development. Studies of these processes would greatly benefit from genetic methods, such as the binary Gal4/UAS system. The latter has been well established for model organisms, but its availability is limited for mosquitoes. The objective of this study was to develop the blood-meal-activated, gut-specific Gal4/UAS system for the yellow-fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and utilize it to investigate the regulation of gut-specific gene expression. A 1.1-kb, 5(') upstream region of the carboxypeptidase A (CP) gene was used to genetically engineer the CP-Gal4 driver mosquito line. The CP-Gal4 specifically activated the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) reporter only after blood feeding in the gut of the CP-Gal4 > UAS-EGFP female Ae. aegypti. We used this system to study the regulation of CP gene expression. In vitro treatments with either amino acids (AAs) or insulin stimulated expression of the CP-Gal4 > UAS-EGFP transgene; no effect was observed with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) treatments. The transgene activation by AAs and insulin was blocked by rapamycin, the inhibitor of the Target-of-Rapamycin (TOR) kinase. RNA interference (RNAi) silence of the insulin receptor (IR) reduced the expression of the CP-Gal4 > UAS-EGFP transgene. Thus, in vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that insulin and TOR pathways control expression of the digestive enzyme CP. In contrast, 20E, the major regulator of post-blood-meal vitellogenic events in female mosquitoes, has no role in regulating the expression of this gene. This novel CP-Gal4/UAS system permits functional testing of midgut-specific genes that are involved in blood digestion and interaction with pathogens in Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. PMID:25152428

  11. Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Galápagos Hotspot from Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, D. R.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    To understand plume-lithosphere interaction in a near-ridge setting, we present a surface wave tomographic study of the upper mantle beneath the Galápagos Archipelago. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by a network of 10 broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA experiment and the GSN station PAYG. We analyze waves in 12 separate frequency bands (8-50 mHz), which are sensitive to shear wave velocity (Vs) structure in the upper 150 km. To account for non-great-circle propagation caused by multipathing we use the two-plane-wave approximation of Forsyth and others. Two-dimensional models of phase velocity obtained at each frequency are inverted for three-dimensional variations in Vs. Average one-dimensional phase velocities are 1-2% slower than for 0-4 My-old Pacific mantle, and phase velocities vary laterally by ±3%. Inversions of phase velocities reveal that Vs varies regionally from 3.7 to 4.1 km/s, 3-15% slower than predicted along a 1300° C adiabat, and that there are two volumes of pronounced low velocity (>10% Vs reduction). Neither anomaly can be attributed to temperature alone; instead they require increased amounts of partial melt. The first anomaly, located beneath the volcanoes of the southwestern archipelago that erupt large volumes of enriched magmas, is most pronounced above 40 km depth and its magnitude increases toward the surface. This anomaly lies above an area of thinner-than-normal mantle transition zone and a cylindrical low-velocity body imaged by P and S wave tomography at depths of 100 to 250 km. This first anomaly may be the result of melt accumulation above a region of decompression melting driven by plume upwelling. The second low-velocity volume underlies the central archipelago, including the islands of Santiago and Marchena, and appears to be concentrated between 50 and 80 km depth. This anomaly is less pronounced near the surface, underlies a region that produces MORB, and coincides with a region of apparent

  12. Colonization history, ecological shifts and diversification in the evolution of endemic Galápagos weevils.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, A S; Lanteri, A A; Albelo, L Roque; Bhattacharya, S; Sijapati, M

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data were obtained for eight species of flightless Galapaganus endemic weevils and one winged close relative in order to study their colonization history and modes of diversification in the Galápagos Archipelago. Contrary to most other insular radiations, the phylogeny estimates we recovered for Galapaganus do not follow the progression rule of island biogeography. The penalized likelihood age estimates of colonization of the archipelago exceed the age of the emerged islands and underscore the potential role of now sunken seamounts for the early evolution of Galapaganus. The phylogeny proposes one intra-island origin for Galapaganus endemics, but monophyly tests suggest a larger contribution of in-situ speciation on older islands. Generalist habitat preferences were reconstructed as ancestral while shifts to highland habitats were reconstructed as having evolved independently on different islands. Magnitudes and patterns of diversification rate were found to differ between older and younger islands. Our analyses reveal that the colonization sequence of islands and timing of colonization of Galapaganus could be linked with the geological and volcanic history of the islands in a rather complex scenario. Even though most islands appear to have been colonized soon after their emergence, there are notable deviations from the pattern of sequential colonization expected under the progression rule when considering only the extant emerged islands. Patterns of diversification rate variation on older and younger islands correspond to the volcanic activity or remnants of such activity, while the pattern of independent evolution of restricted habitat preferences in different islands suggests that habitat shifts could also have contributed to species diversity in Galapaganus. PMID:18261050

  13. Using PCR-RFLP for sexing of the endangered Galápagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia).

    PubMed

    Patiño, L; Cruz, M; Martínez, P; Cedeño-Escobar, V

    2013-01-01

    Pterodroma phaeopygia is a critically endangered avian species of the Galápagos Islands. This bird is sexually monomorphic, making it difficult to identify the sex. This information, however, is relevant to studies of behavior, ecology, and management of wild or captive populations. Here, we aimed to implement a molecular approach for determining sex in this petrel. DNA was extracted from the blood and the feathers of 24 adult P. phaeopygia, with samples from a female and a male Gallus gallus for comparison. We amplified the cromo-helicase DNA binding protein 1 (CHD-1) gene by PCR, using primers P2 and P8. Allele CHD-1W is unique to females and CHD-1Z occurs in both sexes. We then digested these PCR products using the restriction enzyme HaeIII. The PCR amplified a 400-bp product for both alleles. The digestion of the G. gallus, amplicons split the CHD-1Z allele into two fragments (of 320 and 80 bp), while CHD-1W remained intact. Thus, the male exhibited two bands (digested CHD- 1Z) and the female three bands (undigested CHD-1W and digested CHD-1Z). Applying this RFLP method on DNA derived from blood, 9 of the 24 petrels were found to be male, while 15 were females. The same results were obtained using feathers as the source of DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular method for sexing this species. The potential of sexing this petrel from feathers is remarkable as it minimizes blood sampling induced stress. This method could be used to reinforce the conservation efforts for this bird, to investigate population sex ratios and to develop new conservation strategies. PMID:24222251

  14. Metamorphosed oceanic lithosphere from the Chunky Gal Mountain complex, Blue Ridge province, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ranson, W.A.; Garihan, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Closely associated dunite and layered troctolite, gabbro, and anorthosite from the Chunky Gal Mountain mafic-ultramafic complex suggest a related ocean floor origin for these lithologies, with regional emplacement by the pre-metamorphic Hayesville-Fries thrust of Taconic age. Anhydrous mineral assemblages of dunitic and troctolitic rocks were more resistant to granulite and upper amphibolite metamorphic episodes, retaining much of their original mineralogy. Dunite consists of fresh polycrystalline olivine with local development of anthophyllite, serpentine, and talc along fractures. Dunite adjacent to mafic amphibolites of the complex contains distinctive cm-scale bands or layers of recrystallized plagioclase( ) of uncertain affinity, possibly veins or rhythmic layers. Troctolitic rocks display reaction textures around fresh olivine and plagioclase. Orthopyroxene growing normal to olivine grain boundaries forms an inner corona, in turn surrounded by a complex symplectite of Cpx + Plag [+-] Grt [+-] Spl. Gabbroic rocks show nearly complete replacement of original mafic minerals. Orthopyroxene survives in a few gabbros but mostly has been replaced by emerald green alumino-magnesio-hornblende. Calcic plagioclase is abundant as subhedral crystals or as oval, polycrystalline clots and pink corundum constitutes an accessory phase. A possible reaction resulting in the observed aluminous assemblage is: Na-Plag + Opx + Di + Spl + fluid = Mg-Hbl + Crn + Ca-Plag. Anorthosites occur as layers 10--50 cm in width within layered troctolites and consist of beautifully recrystallized plagioclase with seriate texture and minor amounts of alumino-magnesio hornblende occurring as fine-grained clots. Contacts between anorthosite and troctolite display the same sort of symplectite formed as an outer corona around olivine in the troctolite.

  15. Comparative Genetic Structure and Demographic History in Endemic Galápagos Weevils

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Courtney C.; Sijapati, Manisha; Roque Albelo, Lázaro

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of maintaining genetic diversity within populations can be exacerbated for island endemics if they display population dynamics and behavioral attributes that expose them to genetic drift without the benefits of gene flow. We assess patterns of the genetic structure and demographic history in 27 populations of 9 species of flightless endemic Galápagos weevils from 9 of the islands and 1 winged introduced close relative. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA reveals a significant population structure and moderately variable, though demographically stable, populations for lowland endemics (FST = 0.094–0.541; π: 0.014–0.042; Mismatch P = 0.003–0.026; and D(Tajima) = −0.601 to 1.203), in contrast to signals of past contractions and expansions in highland specialists on 2 islands (Mismatch P = 0.003–0.026 and D(Tajima) = −0.601 to 1.203). We interpret this series of variable and highly structured population groups as a system of long-established, independently founded island units, where structuring could be a signal of microallopatric differentiation due to patchy host plant distribution and poor dispersal abilities. We suggest that the severe reduction and subsequent increase of a suitably moist habitat that accompanied past climatic variation could have contributed to the observed population fluctuations in highland specialists. We propose the future exploration of hybridization between the introduced and highland endemic species on Santa Cruz, especially given the expansion of the introduced species into the highlands, the sensitivity to past climatic variation detected in highland populations, and the potentially threatened state of single-island endemics. PMID:22174444

  16. Blood gases, biochemistry and haematology of Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    Lewbart, Gregory A; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Brothers, J Roger; Muñoz-Pérez, Juan Pablo; Denkinger, Judith; Vinueza, Luis; García, Juan; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    The marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus, is an iconic lizard endemic to the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador, but surprisingly little information exists on baseline health parameters for this species. We analysed blood samples drawn from 35 marine iguanas captured at three locations on San Cristóbal Island. A portable blood analyser (iSTAT) was used to obtain near-immediate field results for pH, lactate, partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), percentage O2 saturation, haematocrit, haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium and glucose. Parameter values affected by temperature were auto-corrected by the iSTAT. Standard laboratory haematology techniques were employed for differential white blood cell counts and haematocrit determination; resulting values were also compared with the haematocrit values generated by the iSTAT. Body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and body measurements were also recorded. Body length was positively correlated with several blood chemistry values (HCO3 (-) and glucose) and two haematology parameters (haemoglobin and manually determined haematocrit). A notable finding was the unusually high blood sodium level; the mean value of 178 mg/dl is among the highest known for any reptile. This value is likely to be a conservative estimate because some samples exceeded the maximal value the iSTAT can detect. For haematocrit determination, the iSTAT blood analyser yielded results significantly lower than those obtained with high-speed centrifugation. The values reported in this study provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among marine iguanas affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic threats. The findings might also be helpful in future efforts to demonstrate associations between specific biochemical parameters and disease. PMID:27293719

  17. Evidence for a Dying Magma Chamber at Rábida Island, Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, H.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.; Almeida, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rábida Island in the Galapagos has experienced both explosive and effusive volcanism. It is located to the east of the most active volcanoes of the Galapagos, and previously determined ages range from 0.9 to 1.1 Ma. An unusually curved escarpment cuts the western sector of the island, which might be part of a caldera wall, although its radius of curvature is much greater than that of the island. Lavas range from basalt to rhyolite, and there are also several intermediate compositions, which are unique in the archipelago. A welded ignimbrite crops out in northeast sector, the only such deposit known in the entire region. The volumetric proportion of evolved rocks is unusually high; 25% of the rocks in our comprehensive sample set are intermediate to felsic. The siliceous rocks occur in two clusters in the southern and southwestern sections of the island, suggesting two separate sources. The intermediate rocks are concentrated in the center and northwestern parts of the island. Despite these foci of more siliceous lavas, basalt is the most widespread rock type across the island. It is notable that Rabida is immediately east of Volcan Alcedo, which is the only active Galápagos volcano that has also erupted rhyolite, and south of Santiago Island, which erupted the trachyte dome observed by Charles Darwin in 1835. These observations, in conjunction with the cumulate xenoliths observed in Rábida explosive deposits, are consistent with the evolved rocks resulting from fractional crystallization of a dying magma chamber, as the volcano is carried away from the hotspot.

  18. Large-scale latitude distortions of the inner Milky Way disk from the Herschel/Hi-GAL Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bally, J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Elia, D.; Schisano, E.; Plume, R.; Swinyard, B.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pezzuto, S.; Benedettini, M.; Testi, L.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We use the Herschel Hi-GAL survey data to study the spatial distribution in Galactic longitude and latitude of the interstellar medium (ISM) and of dense, star-forming clumps in the inner Galaxy. Methods: We assemble a complete mosaic of the inner Galaxy between l = -70° and +68° in the far-infrared continuum from Hi-GAL. The peak position and width of the latitude distribution of the dust column density is analysed by fitting a polynomial function to the diffuse IR surface brightness in 1° longitude bins, and the result is compared to MIPSGAL 24-μm data. The latitude distribution of the number density of compact sources from the band-merged Hi-GAL photometric catalogues is also analysed as a function of longitude. Results: The width of the diffuse dust column density traced by the Hi-GAL 500-μm emission varies across the inner Galaxy with a mean value of 1.̊2-1.̊3, similar to the distribution of MIPSGAL 24-μm sources and of Hi-GAL sources with a 250-μm counterpart. Hi-GAL sources with a 70-μm counterpart define a much thinner disk with a mean FWHM ~ 0.̊75, which is in excess of the result obtained by the ATLASGAL submillimetre survey. The discrepancy with the 250-μm source distribution can be explained by relatively higher confusion in the Herschel data in the midplane region. The peak of the average latitude distribution of Hi-GAL sources is at b ~ -0.̊06, coincident with the results from ATLASGAL. The detailed latitude distribution as a function of longitude shows clear modulations both for the diffuse emission and for the compact sources. The displacements are mostly towards negative latitudes with excursions of ~0.̊2 below the midplane at l ~ + 40°, +12°, -25°, and -40°. The only positive bend peaks at l ~ -5°. No such modulations can be found in the MIPSGAL 24 μm or WISE 22 μm data when the entire source samples are considered. Modulations that are in part similar to the ones exhibited by the Herschel sources appear when the mid

  19. A systematic analysis of acceptor specificity and reaction kinetics of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases: Product inhibition studies illustrate reaction mechanism for ST3Gal-I.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rohitesh; Matta, Khushi L; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-15

    Sialyltransferases (STs) catalyze the addition of sialic acids to the non-reducing ends of glycoproteins and glycolipids. In this work, we examined the acceptor specificity of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases, namely ST3Gal -I, -II, -III, -IV and -VI. KM values for each of these enzymes is presented using radioactivity for acceptors containing Type-I (Galβ1,3GlcNAc), Type-II (Galβ1,4GlcNAc), Type-III (Galβ1,3GalNAc) and Core-2 (Galβ1,3(GlcNAcβ1,6)GalNAc) reactive groups. Several variants of acceptors inhibited ST3Gal activity emphasizing structural role of acceptor in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In some cases, mass spectrometry was performed for structural verification. The results demonstrate human ST3Gal-I catalysis towards Type-III and Core-2 acceptors with KM = 5-50 μM and high VMax values. The KM for ST3Gal-I and ST3Gal-II was 100 and 30-fold lower, respectively, for Type-III compared to Type-I acceptors. Variants of Type-I and Type-II structures characterized ST3Gal-III, -IV and -VI for their catalytic specificity. This manuscript also estimates KM for human ST3Gal-VI using Type-I and Type-II substrates. Together, these findings built a platform for designing inhibitors of STs having therapeutic potential. PMID:26692484

  20. Imaging magma storage reservoirs beneath Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, G.; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Seats, K.; Ruiz, M. C.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean island volcanoes initiate and grow through repeated eruptions and intrusions of primarily basaltic magma that thicken the oceanic crust above melt production zones within the mantle. The movement of oceanic plates over the hot, melt-rich upwellings produces chains of progressively younger basaltic volcanoes, as in the Galapagos Islands. Rates of surface deformation along the chain of 7 active volcanoes in the western Galápagos are some of the most rapid in the world, yet little is known of the subsurface structure of the active volcanic systems. The 16-station SIGNET array deployed between July 2009 and June 2011 provides new insights into the time-averaged structure beneath Sierra Negra, Cerro Azul, and Alcedo volcanoes, and the ocean platform. We use wavespeed tomography to image volcanic island structure, with focus on the magmatic plumbing system beneath Sierra Negra volcano, which has a deep, ~10 km-wide caldera and last erupted in 2005. We compare our results to those of ambient noise tomography. Our 120 x 100 km grid has a variable mesh of 2.5 - 10 km. We have good resolution at depths between 3 and 15 km, with poorer resolution beneath Cerro Azul volcano. Events from Alcedo volcano, which is just outside our array, cause some N-S smearing. Results from wavespeed tomography provide insights into the major island building processes: accretion through extrusive magmatism, magma chamber geometry and depth, radial dike intrusions, and magmatic underplating/sill emplacement. The wide caldera of Sierra Negra is underlain by high velocity (~7 %) material from depths of 5 - 15, and the flanks correspond to low velocity material at all depths. A high velocity zone corresponds to Cerro Azul (~3%). Aligned chains of eruptive centers correlate with elongate high velocity zones, suggesting that radial dikes are the sites of repeated dike intrusions. These chains are preferentially located along ridges linking nearby volcanoes. A comparison of well-resolved zones

  1. Espectroscopia infravermelha de núcleos ativos de galáxias: resultados adicionais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ardila, A.; Viegas, S.; Pastoria, M. G.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos resultados parciais de um levantamento espectroscópico na região do infravermelho próximo (NIR) realizado em 30 núcleos ativos de galáxias (AGN), incluindo vários objetos selecionados do catálogo PG com z de até 0.55. O objetivo é estudar a natureza do contínuo observado e as condições físicas do gas emissor. Todas as fontes de tipo 1 apresentam uma mudança na inclinação do contínuo na região de 1.2mm, associada ao término da contribuição do contínuo emitido pelo AGN e ao início da contribuição do contínuo emitido pela poeira quente atribuída ao tórus que rodeia a fonte central. O índice espectral associado à segunda contribuição varia apreciavelmente de objeto para objeto. Este resultado é comparado com distribuições espectrais de energia preditas por modelos de toroides para testar a validez do modelo unificado. A partir das linhas de FeII observado nos espectros deriva-se, pela primeira vez nessa região espectral, um template empírico de FeII para estudar a intensidade e a origem dessa emissão. A intensidade do FeII é estudada em conjunto com aquela da região visível e comparada às predições de modelos teóricos que incluem fluorescência de Lya, excitação colisional e auto-fluorescência como mecanismos dominantes de exitação. Encontra-se que os dois primeiros processos dominam na formação do espectro de FeII observado. Indicadores de avermelhamento, entre eles Brg/Pab, Pab/Pag, Pab/Pad e [FeII] 1.257/1.644 mm são utilizados para mapear a distribuição de poeira nas regiões emissoras de linhas. Encontra-se valores de extinção Av~3 associados ao último indicador e valores significativamente menores (Av~1.5) para os restantes, o que sugere que o [FeII] se forma em uma região separada da maior parte do gás emissor de linhas estreitas.

  2. Critical role of evolutionarily conserved glycosylation at Asn211 in the intracellular trafficking and activity of sialyltransferase ST3Gal-II.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Fernando M; Vilcaes, Aldo A; Iglesias-Bartolomé, Ramiro; Daniotti, José L

    2015-07-01

    ST3Gal-II, a type II transmembrane protein, is the main mammalian sialyltransferase responsible for GD1a and GT1b ganglioside biosynthesis in brain. It contains two putative N-glycosylation sites (Asn(92) and Asn(211)). Whereas Asn(92) is only conserved in mammalian species, Asn(211) is highly conserved in mammals, birds and fish. The present study explores the occupancy and relevance for intracellular trafficking and enzyme activity of these potential N-glycosylations in human ST3Gal-II. We found that ST3Gal-II distributes along the Golgi complex, mainly in proximal compartments. By pharmacological, biochemical and site-directed mutagenesis, we observed that ST3Gal-II is mostly N-glycosylated at Asn(211) and that this co-translational modification is critical for its exit from the endoplasmic reticulum and proper Golgi localization. The individual N-glycosylation sites had different effects on ST3Gal-II enzymatic activity. Whereas the N-glycan at position Asn(211) seems to negatively influence the activity of the enzyme using both glycolipid and glycoprotein as acceptor substrates, the single N-glycan mutant at Asn(92) had only a moderate effect. Lastly, we demonstrated that the N-terminal ST3Gal-II domain containing the cytosolic, transmembrane and stem region (amino acids 1-51) is able to drive a protein reporter out of the endoplasmic reticulum and to retain it in the Golgi complex. This suggests that the C-terminal domain of ST3Gal-II depends on N-glycosylation to attain an optimum conformation for proper exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, but it does not represent an absolute requirement for Golgi complex retention of the enzyme. PMID:25916169

  3. Distribution of Thelastomatoid Nematodes (Nematoda: Oxyurida) in Endemic and Introduced Cockroaches on the Galápagos Island Archipelago, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Devinn; Carreno, Ramon A; Herrera, Henri

    2015-08-01

    The thelastomatoid pinworm fauna (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) was surveyed in 3 endemic species and 6 introduced species of cockroach hosts (Insecta: Blattaria) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. A total of 658 host specimens were examined from preserved collections that had been collected between 1966 and 2003 from 7 islands in the archipelago. Eight species of pinworms were identified from these cockroach hosts, including the dominant species Cephalobellus ovumglutinosus and a Severianoia sp. as well as Leidynema appendiculata, Hammerschmidtiella diesingi, an unidentified Cephalobellus species resembling Cephalobellus magalhaesi, an unidentified Protrellus species closely resembling Protrellus shamimi, and an undescribed Blattophila sp. Five new host records are identified for C. ovumglutinosus including the endemic Galápagos cockroaches Chorisoneura carpenteri, Ischnoptera snodgrassii, and Ischnoptera santacruzensis. These endemics were also infected with an undescribed Blatticola sp. Other species recorded resemble known pinworms from other hosts around the world. Prevalence between islands and between host species was variable, but total prevalence for individual pinworm species was consistently low (<10%). A single host specimen examined was infected with more than 1 pinworm species; otherwise only a single species was observed in each infected host. At least 1 introduced pinworm species carried to the islands via invasive cockroach hosts was present in endemic host species, but several globally widespread introduced pinworm species were absent from endemic cockroaches. Santa Cruz was inhabited by the greatest number of pinworm species, likely due to a higher rate of invasive host introduction. This survey, the first from this region, showed that the distribution and transmission of pinworms in the Galápagos Islands is complex and may provide future models of invertebrate dispersal and speciation in an ecosystem already rich with examples of

  4. Expression of scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein as a targeted DNA-carrier in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyu; Luo, Jian; Xu, Lining; Zeng, Jianping; Cao, Limin; Dong, Jiahong; Cai, Shouwang

    2013-12-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy has become a promising treatment for many liver diseases. In this study, we constructed a multi-functional targeting molecule, which maintains targeting, endosome-escaping, and DNA-binding abilities for gene delivery. Two single oligonucleotide chains of Melittin (M) were synthesized. The full-length cDNA encoding anti-hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor scFv C1 (C1) was purified from C1/pIT2. The GAL4 (G) gene was amplified from pSW50-Gal4 by polymerase chain reaction. M, C1 and G were inserted into plasmid pGC4C26H to product the recombinant plasmid pGC-C1MG. The fused gene C1MG was subsequently subcloned into plasmid pET32c to product the recombinant plasmid C1MG/pET32c and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein (C1MG) was purified with a Ni(2+) chelating HiTrap HP column. The fusion protein C1MG of roughly 64 kD was expressed in inclusion bodies; 4.5 mg/ml C1MG was prepared with Ni(2+) column purification. Western blot and immunohistochemistry showed the antigen-binding ability of C1MG to the cell surface of the liver-derived cell line and liver tissue slices. Hemolysis testing showed that C1MG maintained membrane-disrupting activity. DNA-binding capacity was substantiated by luciferase assay, suggesting that C1MG could deliver the DNA into cells efficiently on the basis of C1MG. Successful expression of C1MG was achieved in E. coli, and C1MG recombinant protein confers targeting, endosome-escaping and DNA-binding capacity, which makes it probable to further study its liver-specific DNA delivery efficacy in vivo. PMID:23508530

  5. Genetic variation in the invasive avian parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera, Muscidae) on the Galápagos archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Dudaniec, Rachael Y; Gardner, Michael G; Donnellan, Steve; Kleindorfer, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the dispersal and genetic structure of invasive insects across islands is important for designing management plans that are appropriate at spatial and temporal scales. For invasive parasites, population dynamics are largely determined by the distribution and density of their host species. The introduced parasitic fly, Philornis downsi, parasitises nestlings of endemic birds on all major islands of the Galápagos archipelago. The fly's high mortality and fitness impacts are of conservation concern for vulnerable and declining species of Darwin's finches. Using microsatellite data in Bayesian clustering and landscape genetic analyses, we examine gene flow and dispersal in P. downsi between three islands and across habitats (highlands, lowlands) and examine for the presence of population bottlenecks. We also examine variation at the mitochondrial gene CO1 across islands to establish if cryptic species were present. Results Both the mitochondrial and microsatellite data were consistent with there being a single species across islands. We found low genetic differentiation between islands and strong evidence for inter-island gene flow, or shared recent ancestry among individuals. Landscape genetic analysis identified two genetic clusters: one encompassing Santa Cruz and Isabela, and one on Floreana Island. There was no evidence of genetic differentiation between habitats and molecular variance was mainly attributable to within individuals. The combined P. downsi population was found to have undergone a population bottleneck. Conclusion Philornis downsi populations have high connectivity within and between islands, with low levels of genetic differentiation between Floreana and the other two islands examined. The genetic bottleneck found across islands suggests there was a small founding population or few introduction events of P. downsi. The high dispersal capacity and wide habitat use of P. downsi highlights the significant threat that this

  6. Microrefugia and species persistence in the Galápagos highlands: a 26,000-year paleoecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aaron F; Bush, Mark B; Sachs, Julian P

    2013-01-01

    The Galápagos Islands are known to have experienced significant drought during the Quaternary. The loss of mesophytic upland habitats has been suggested to underlie the relatively lower endemism of upland compared with lowland plant assemblages. A fossil pollen record spanning the last 26,000 years from an upland bog on Santa Cruz Island, revealed the persistent presence of highland pollen and spore types during the last glacial maximum and a millennial-scale series of droughts in the mid Holocene. The absence of lowland taxa and presence of mesic taxa led to the conclusion that the highland flora of the Galápagos persisted during both these periods. The resiliency of the highland flora of the Galápagos to long-term drought contradicts an earlier hypothesis that an extinction of highland taxa occurred during the last glacial maximum and that rapid Holocene speciation created the modern plant assemblage within the last 10,000 years. Based on the palynological data, we suggest that, even during the height of glacial and Holocene droughts, cool sea-surface temperatures and strong trade-wind activity would have promoted persistent ground level cloudiness that provided the necessary moisture inputs to maintain microrefugia for mesophytic plants. Although moist conditions were maintained, the lack of precipitation caused the loss of open water habitat during such events, and accounts for the known extinctions of species such as Azolla sp., and Elatine sp., while other moisture dependent taxa, i.e., Cyathea weatherbyana, persisted. PMID:24348520

  7. Microrefugia and species persistence in the Galápagos highlands: a 26,000-year paleoecological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Aaron F.; Bush, Mark B.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2013-01-01

    The Galápagos Islands are known to have experienced significant drought during the Quaternary. The loss of mesophytic upland habitats has been suggested to underlie the relatively lower endemism of upland compared with lowland plant assemblages. A fossil pollen record spanning the last 26,000 years from an upland bog on Santa Cruz Island, revealed the persistent presence of highland pollen and spore types during the last glacial maximum and a millennial-scale series of droughts in the mid Holocene. The absence of lowland taxa and presence of mesic taxa led to the conclusion that the highland flora of the Galápagos persisted during both these periods. The resiliency of the highland flora of the Galápagos to long-term drought contradicts an earlier hypothesis that an extinction of highland taxa occurred during the last glacial maximum and that rapid Holocene speciation created the modern plant assemblage within the last 10,000 years. Based on the palynological data, we suggest that, even during the height of glacial and Holocene droughts, cool sea-surface temperatures and strong trade-wind activity would have promoted persistent ground level cloudiness that provided the necessary moisture inputs to maintain microrefugia for mesophytic plants. Although moist conditions were maintained, the lack of precipitation caused the loss of open water habitat during such events, and accounts for the known extinctions of species such as Azolla sp., and Elatine sp., while other moisture dependent taxa, i.e., Cyathea weatherbyana, persisted. PMID:24348520

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: R-band polarisation of stars in Gal 110-13 direction (Neha+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neha, S.; Maheswar, G.; Soam, A.; Lee, C. W.; Tej, A.

    2016-06-01

    The optical linear polarization observations of the region associated with Gal 110-13 were carried out with the ARIES IMaging POLarimeter (AIMPOL), mounted at the f/13 Cassegrain focus of the 104-cm Sampurnanand telescope of ARIES, Nainital, India. It consists of a field lens in combination with the camera lens (85mm, f/1.8); in between them, an achromatic, rotatable half-wave plate (HWP) are used as modulator and a Wollaston prism beam-splitter as analyzer. We used a standard Johnson RKC filter (λeff=0.760um) photometric band for the polarimetric observations. (1 data file).

  9. Amount Effect, Altitude, and Moisture Source Influences on Precipitation Isotopic Variability in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. J.; Conroy, J. L.; Noone, D. C.; Cobb, K. M.; Konecky, B. L.; Rea, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how climate processes facilitate water isotope variability in precipitation over time and space is critical to interpreting isotope-based paleoclimate proxies, particularly in the eastern tropical Pacific where stable water isotope observations from precipitation (δ18Op and δDp) are sparse. Here we present a new 28-month record of daily δ18Op and δDp from Santa Cruz, Galápagos. With a prior 13-year record of monthly averaged precipitation isotope data from the island, these new data reveal valuable information on how meteorology, altitude, and source region characteristics influence the stable isotopic composition of precipitation in the region. Two sampling locations on Santa Cruz Island exhibit distinct local meteoric water lines; the drier, low elevation site (7m a.s.l.) has a significantly lower slope than the humid highland site (180m a.s.l.), likely resulting from greater reevaporation of falling rain. An altitude effect is also apparent, based on daily precipitation and δ18Op measurements across a 35 km transect of the island, with δ18Op decreasing by 0.2‰/100m elevation. HYSPLIT backward trajectory modeling shows air parcels producing rain events with the lowest δ18Op values originated over warmer waters to the north of the Galápagos; rain events with the highest δ18Op originated to the east. This difference provides a mechanism for changes in seasonal mean isotope ratios and shifts in isotope ratios due to systematic circulation changes, such as in association with ENSO phases. Daily δ18Op near sea level was significantly correlated with precipitation amount, as was monthly, amount-weighted δ18Op and precipitation at sea level and 180 m. However, accounting for the non-normality of the data substantially reduces the strength of the correlation between δ18Op and precipitation on monthly timescales while the δ18Op-precipitation relationship on daily timescales remained strong. Overall, we observe a stronger daily, rather than

  10. Evolução química em galáxias compactas azuis (BCGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfranchi, G. A.; Matteucci, F.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho, a formação estelar e evolução quí mica em galáxias Compactas Azuis (Blue Compact Galaxies - BCGs) foram estudadas através da comparação de previsões de modelos de evolução quí mica a várias razões de abundância quí mica observadas nestas galáxias. Modelos detalhados com recentes dados de nucleossí ntese e que levam em consideração o papel desempenahdo por supernovas de ambos os tipos (II e Ia) na evolução galáctica foram desenvolvidos para as BCGs permitindo seguir a evolução de vários elementos quí micos (H, D, He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, e Fe). O modelo é caracterizado pelas prescrições adotadas para a formação estelar, a qual ocorre em vários surtos de atividade separados por longos perí odos quiescentes. Após ajustar os melhores modelos aos dados observacionais, as previsões destes modelos foram comparadas também a razões de abundância observadas em sistemas Damped Lyman alpha (DLAs) e a origem do N (primária ou secundária) foi discutida. Alguns dos resultados obtidos são: i) as razões de abundância observadas nas BCGs são reproduzidas por modelos com 2 a 7 surtos de formação estelar com eficiência entre n = 0.2-0.9 Gano-1; ii) os baixos valores de N/O observados nestas galáxias são um resultado natural de uma formação estelar em surtos; iii) os modelos para BCGs podem reproduzir os dados dos DLAs, iv) uma quantidade "baixa" de N primário produzido em estrelas de alta massa pode ser uma explicação para os baixos valores de [N/a] observados em DLAs.

  11. Synergistic effect of phosphorothioate, 5'-vinylphosphonate and GalNAc modifications for enhancing activity of synthetic siRNA.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Thazha P; Kinberger, Garth A; Murray, Heather M; Chappell, Alfred; Riney, Stan; Graham, Mark J; Lima, Walt F; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2016-06-15

    Chemical modifications are essential to improve metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of siRNA to enable their systemic delivery. We investigated the effect of combing the phosphorothioate (PS) modification with metabolically stable phosphate analog (E)-5'-vinylphosphonate and GalNAc cluster conjugation on the activity of fully 2'-modified siRNA in cell culture and mice. Our data suggest that integrating multiple chemical approaches in one siRNA molecule improved potency 5-10 fold and provide a roadmap for developing more efficient siRNA drugs. PMID:27161280

  12. Lewis Acid Induced Anomerization of Se-Glycosides. Application to Synthesis of α-Se-GalCer.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Anthony W; Mahon, Mary F; Murphy, Paul V

    2016-02-01

    The TiCl4 induced anomerization of selenium glycosides of galacturonic acid derivatives is reported. The reaction was successful for galacturonic acid when various alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, saccharide, steroid, and lipid groups were attached to the anomeric Se atom. An increased amount of TiCl4 and/or higher temperature were needed to ensure completion of the reaction in some cases. Yields were higher for reactions carried out at higher dilution. The reaction was applied to the synthesis of Se-based mimics of the potent immunostimulant α-GalCer (KRN7000). PMID:26794638

  13. Targeted expression in zebrafish primordial germ cells by Cre/loxP and Gal4/UAS systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Feng; Wei, Zhi-Qiang; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Sun, Yong-Hua

    2013-10-01

    In zebrafish and other vertebrates, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are a population of embryonic cells that give rise to sperm and eggs in adults. Any type of genetically manipulated lines have to be originated from the germ cells of the manipulated founders, thus it is of great importance to establish an effective technology for highly specific PGC-targeted gene manipulation in vertebrates. In the present study, we used the Cre/loxP recombinase system and Gal4/UAS transcription system for induction and regulation of mRFP (monomer red fluorescent protein) gene expression to achieve highly efficient PGC-targeted gene expression in zebrafish. First, we established two transgenic activator lines, Tg(kop:cre) and Tg(kop:KalTA4), to express the Cre recombinases and the Gal4 activator proteins in PGCs. Second, we generated two transgenic effector lines, Tg(kop:loxP-SV40-loxP-mRFP) and Tg(UAS:mRFP), which intrinsically showed transcriptional silence of mRFP. When Tg(kop:cre) females were crossed with Tg(kop:loxP-SV40-loxP-mRFP) males, the loxP flanked SV40 transcriptional stop sequence was 100 % removed from the germ cells of the transgenic hybrids. This led to massive production of PGC-specific mRFP transgenic line, Tg(kop:loxP-mRFP), from an mRFP silent transgenic line, Tg(kop:loxP-SV40-loxP-mRFP). When Tg(kop:KalTA4) females were crossed with Tg(UAS:mRFP) males, the hybrid embryos showed PGC specifically expressed mRFP from shield stage till 25 days post-fertilization (pf), indicating the high sensitivity, high efficiency, and long-lasting effect of the Gal4/UAS system. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the transcriptional amplification efficiency of the Gal4/UAS system in PGCs can be about 300 times higher than in 1-day-pf embryos. More importantly, when the UAS:mRFP-nos1 construct was directly injected into the Tg(kop:KalTA4) embryos, it was possible to specifically label the PGCs with high sensitivity, efficiency, and persistence. Therefore, we have established two

  14. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and plasma exchange do not prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO pig kidney xenografts in baboons.

    PubMed

    Le Bas-Bernardet, S; Tillou, X; Branchereau, J; Dilek, N; Poirier, N; Châtelais, M; Charreau, B; Minault, D; Hervouet, J; Renaudin, K; Crossan, C; Scobie, L; Takeuchi, Y; Diswall, M; Breimer, M E; Klar, N; Daha, M R; Simioni, P; Robson, S C; Nottle, M B; Salvaris, E J; Cowan, P J; d'Apice, A J F; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K; Lagutina, I; Duchi, R; Perota, A; Lazzari, G; Galli, C; Cozzi, E; Soulillou, J-P; Vanhove, B; Blancho, G

    2015-02-01

    Galactosyl-transferase KO (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2-3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 and 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n = 2) that lost their grafts on days 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of porcine endogenous retrovirus transmission but some showed evidence of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  15. Protective effects of protostemonine on LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure: Roles of increased hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Yue, Ling; Zhao, Wenhao; Yang, Xinzhou; Shu, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    Here, we explored protective effects of protostemonine (PSN), on mouse acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). PSN dose-dependently declined LPS/GalN-induced lethality of mice as well as increase of ALT/AST activities in their serum. Hepatoprotective effects of PSN were also supported by liver histopathological examinations. After LPS/GalN treatment, severe oxidative stresses in the liver could be detected by boosted MDA and ROS as well as decreased GSH. Moreover, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, were sharply elevated. These symptoms were dose-dependently ameliorated by PSN. Mechanistically, PSN promoted the transcription and translation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in hepatocytes and liver Kupffer cells. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor contributing to the expression of HO-1. PSN elevated Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2/HO-1 promoter interaction. Suppressing enzyme activity of HO-1 by co-treating mice with HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP abolished protective effects of PSN. ZnPP also abrogated alleviative impacts of PSN on LPS/GalN-mediated hepatic oxidative stresses and inflammatory responses. Finally, we showed that PSN exhibited undetectable toxic effects on vital organs of mice. Our findings suggested that PSN is able to attenuate LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure and upregulating HO-1 expression is implicated in its hepatoprotective activity. PMID:26363973

  16. A TIM-3/Gal-9 Autocrine Stimulatory Loop Drives Self-Renewal of Human Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells and Leukemic Progression.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Yuda, Junichiro; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Shima, Takahiro; Takayanagi, Shin-ichiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Yurino, Ayano; Miyawaki, Kohta; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Akashi, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Signaling mechanisms underlying self-renewal of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are poorly understood, and identifying pathways specifically active in LSCs could provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention. T-cell immunoglobin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the surface of LSCs in many types of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for LSC self-renewal and development of human AML. Serum Gal-9 levels were significantly elevated in AML patients and in mice xenografted with primary human AML samples, and neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML. Gal-9-mediated stimulation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, pathways known to promote LSC self-renewal. These changes were further associated with leukemic transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders and together highlight that targeting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop could be a useful strategy for treating myeloid leukemias. PMID:26279267

  17. Missing history (16 71 Ma) of the Galápagos hotspot: Implications for the tectonic and biological evolution of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoernle, Kaj; van den Bogaard, Paul; Werner, Reinhard; Lissinna, Britta; Hauff, Folkmar; Alvarado, Guillermo; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2002-09-01

    We present the results of volcanological, geochemical, and geochronological studies of volcanic rocks from Malpelo Island on the Nazca plate (15.8 17.3 Ma) belonging to the Galápagos hotspot tracks, and igneous complexes (20.8 71.3 Ma) along the Pacific margin of Costa Rica and Panama. The igneous complexes consist of accreted portions of ocean island and seamount volcanoes and aseismic ridges, representing the missing (primarily subducted) history of the Galápagos hotspot. The age and geochemical data directly link the Galápagos hotspot tracks on the Pacific Ocean floor to the Caribbean large igneous province (ca. 72 95 Ma), confirming a Pacific origin for the Caribbean oceanic plateau from the Galápagos hotspot. We propose that emplacement of this oceanic plateau between the Americas and interaction of the Galápagos hotspot tracks with the Central American Arc played a fundamental role in the formation of land bridges between the Americas in Late Cretaceous Paleocene and Pliocene-Holocene time. The land bridges allowed the exchange of terrestrial faunas (e.g., dinosaurs, mastodons, saber-tooth cats, and ground sloths) between the Americas and served as barriers for the exchange of marine organisms between the central Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and the central Atlantic Ocean.

  18. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and Plasma Exchange Do Not Prolong the Survival of Multi-transgenic GalT-KO Pig Kidney Xenografts in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bas-Bernardet S.; Tillou, X.; Branchereau, J.; Dilek, N.; Poirier, N.; Châtelais, M.; Charreau, B.; Minault, D.; Hervouet, J.; Renaudin, K.; Crossan, C.; Scobie, L.; Takeuchi, Y.; Diswall, M.; Breimer, M.E.; Klar, N.; Daha, M.R.; Simioni, P.; Robson, S.C.; Nottle, M.B.; Salvaris, E.J.; Cowan, P.J.; d’Apice, A.J.F.; Sachs, D.H.; Yamada, K.; Lagutina, I.; Duchi, R.; Perota, A.; Lazzari, G.; Galli, C.; Cozzi, E.; Soulillou, J.-P.; B., Vanhove; Blancho, G.

    2014-01-01

    Galactosyl-transferase knock-out (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 Inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2–3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 to 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n=2) which lost their grafts on day 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of PERV transmission but some showed evidence of PCMV replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  19. Rejection of Cardiac Xenografts Transplanted from α 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Gene-Knockout (GalT-KO) Pigs to Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Hisashi, Y.; Yamada, K.; Kuwaki, K.; Tseng, Y.-L; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Houser, S. L; Robson, S. C.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Sachs, D. H.; Colvin, R. B.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of α 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) swine donors in discordant xenotransplantation has extended the survival of cardiac xenografts in baboons following transplantation. Eight baboons received heterotopic cardiac xenografts from GalT-KO swine and were treated with a chronic immunosuppressive regimen. The pathologic features of acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR), acute cellular xenograft rejection (ACXR) and chronic rejection were assessed in the grafts. No hyperacute rejection developed and one graft survived up to 6 months after transplantation. However, all GalT-KO heart grafts underwent graft failure with AHXR, ACXR and/or chronic rejection. AHXR was characterized by interstitial hemorrhage and multiple thrombi in vessels of various sizes. ACXR was characterized by TUNEL+ graft cell injury with the infiltration of T cells (including CD3 and TIA-1+ cytotoxic T cells), CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, macrophages and a small number of B and NK cells. Chronic xenograft vasculopathy, a manifestation of chronic rejection, was characterized by arterial intimal thickening with TUNEL+ dead cells, antibody and complement deposition, and/or cytotoxic T-cell infiltration. In conclusion, despite the absence of the Gal epitope, acute and chronic antibody and cell-mediated rejection developed in grafts, maintained by chronic immunosupression, presumably due to de novo responses to non-Gal antigens. PMID:19032222

  20. The acidic transcription activator Gcn4 binds the mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 using a simple protein interface forming a fuzzy complex.

    PubMed

    Brzovic, Peter S; Heikaus, Clemens C; Kisselev, Leonid; Vernon, Robert; Herbig, Eric; Pacheco, Derek; Warfield, Linda; Littlefield, Peter; Baker, David; Klevit, Rachel E; Hahn, Steven

    2011-12-23

    The structural basis for binding of the acidic transcription activator Gcn4 and one activator-binding domain of the Mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 was examined by NMR. Gal11 activator-binding domain 1 has a four-helix fold with a small shallow hydrophobic cleft at its center. In the bound complex, eight residues of Gcn4 adopt a helical conformation, allowing three Gcn4 aromatic/aliphatic residues to insert into the Gal11 cleft. The protein-protein interface is dynamic and surprisingly simple, involving only hydrophobic interactions. This allows Gcn4 to bind Gal11 in multiple conformations and orientations, an example of a "fuzzy" complex, where the Gcn4-Gal11 interface cannot be described by a single conformation. Gcn4 uses a similar mechanism to bind two other unrelated activator-binding domains. Functional studies in yeast show the importance of residues at the protein interface, define the minimal requirements for a functional activator, and suggest a mechanism by which activators bind to multiple unrelated targets. PMID:22195967

  1. Health Status of Galápagos Sea Lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on San Cristóbal Island Rookeries Determined by Hematology, Biochemistry, Blood Gases, and Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Páez-Rosas, Diego; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Deresienski, Diane; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The Galápagos sea lion, Zalophus wollebaeki, is an endemic and endangered species subject to population decline associated with environmental variability, such as El Niño events, constant feeding stress, and exposure to diseases through contact with introduced species. Reference blood parameter intervals have been published for some pinniped species, but baseline biochemical and blood gas values are lacking from Z. wollebaeki. We analyzed blood samples from 30 juvenile Galápagos sea lions (19 females, 11 males) captured in two rookeries on San Cristóbal Island. A portable blood analyzer (iSTAT) was used to obtain near-immediate field results for pH, partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin, Na, K, ionized Ca, and glucose, and blood lactate was measured using a portable Lactate Plus(TM) analyzer. Average heart rate, biochemistry, and hematology parameters were comparable with healthy individuals of other pinniped species. Hemoglobin was significantly correlated with body condition of juvenile Galápagos sea lions. When compared with available blood values of clinically healthy California sea lions, Galápagos sea lions had higher total protein and Hct and lower Ca and K levels. Our results provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among Galápagos sea lions. PMID:26528574

  2. Neuroarchitecture and neuroanatomy of the Drosophila central complex: A GAL4-based dissection of protocerebral bridge neurons and circuits.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Tanya; Iyer, Nirmala A; Rubin, Gerald M

    2015-05-01

    Insects exhibit an elaborate repertoire of behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. The central complex plays a key role in combining various modalities of sensory information with an insect's internal state and past experience to select appropriate responses. Progress has been made in understanding the broad spectrum of outputs from the central complex neuropils and circuits involved in numerous behaviors. Many resident neurons have also been identified. However, the specific roles of these intricate structures and the functional connections between them remain largely obscure. Significant gains rely on obtaining a comprehensive catalog of the neurons and associated GAL4 lines that arborize within these brain regions, and on mapping neuronal pathways connecting these structures. To this end, small populations of neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster central complex were stochastically labeled using the multicolor flip-out technique and a catalog was created of the neurons, their morphologies, trajectories, relative arrangements, and corresponding GAL4 lines. This report focuses on one structure of the central complex, the protocerebral bridge, and identifies just 17 morphologically distinct cell types that arborize in this structure. This work also provides new insights into the anatomical structure of the four components of the central complex and its accessory neuropils. Most strikingly, we found that the protocerebral bridge contains 18 glomeruli, not 16, as previously believed. Revised wiring diagrams that take into account this updated architectural design are presented. This updated map of the Drosophila central complex will facilitate a deeper behavioral and physiological dissection of this sophisticated set of structures. PMID:25380328

  3. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Saiga, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  4. The GalNAc-type O-Glycoproteome of CHO Cells Characterized by the SimpleCell Strategy*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhang; Halim, Adnan; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Jitendra Joshi, Hiren; Steentoft, Catharina; Gram Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch; Alder Schulz, Morten; Sealover, Natalie R.; Kayser, Kevin J.; Paul Bennett, Eric; Levery, Steven B.; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Clausen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) is the major host cell factory for recombinant production of biological therapeutics primarily because of its “human-like” glycosylation features. CHO is used for production of several O-glycoprotein therapeutics including erythropoietin, coagulation factors, and chimeric receptor IgG1-Fc-fusion proteins, however, some O-glycoproteins are not produced efficiently in CHO. We have previously shown that the capacity for O-glycosylation of proteins can be one limiting parameter for production of active proteins in CHO. Although the capacity of CHO for biosynthesis of glycan structures (glycostructures) on glycoproteins are well established, our knowledge of the capacity of CHO cells for attaching GalNAc-type O-glycans to proteins (glycosites) is minimal. This type of O-glycosylation is one of the most abundant forms of glycosylation, and it is differentially regulated in cells by expression of a subset of homologous polypeptide GalNAc-transferases. Here, we have genetically engineered CHO cells to produce homogeneous truncated O-glycans, so-called SimpleCells, which enabled lectin enrichment of O-glycoproteins and characterization of the O-glycoproteome. We identified 738 O-glycoproteins (1548 O-glycosites) in cell lysates and secretomes providing the first comprehensive insight into the O-glycosylation capacity of CHO (http://glycomics.ku.dk/o-glycoproteome_db/). PMID:25092905

  5. 5'-(E)-Vinylphosphonate: A Stable Phosphate Mimic Can Improve the RNAi Activity of siRNA-GalNAc Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Rubina; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Liu, Jingxuan; Foster, Donald J; Brigham, Benjamin; Theile, Christopher S; Charisse, Klaus; Akinc, Akin; Guidry, Erin; Pei, Yi; Strapps, Walter; Cancilla, Mark; Stanton, Matthew G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Manoharan, Muthiah; Meyers, Rachel; Maier, Martin A; Jadhav, Vasant

    2016-06-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing requires siRNA loading into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Presence of 5'-phosphate (5'-P) is reported to be critical for efficient RISC loading of the antisense strand (AS) by anchoring it to the mid-domain of the Argonaute2 (Ago2) protein. Phosphorylation of exogenous duplex siRNAs is thought to be accomplished by cytosolic Clp1 kinase. However, although extensive chemical modifications are essential for siRNA-GalNAc conjugate activity, they can significantly impair Clp1 kinase activity. Here, we further elucidated the effect of 5'-P on the activity of siRNA-GalNAc conjugates. Our results demonstrate that a subset of sequences benefit from the presence of exogenous 5'-P. For those that do, incorporation of 5'-(E)-vinylphosphonate (5'-VP), a metabolically stable phosphate mimic, results in up to 20-fold improved in vitro potency and up to a threefold benefit in in vivo activity by promoting Ago2 loading and enhancing metabolic stability. PMID:27121751

  6. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool. PMID:26416237

  7. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters.

    PubMed

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Ten Hove, Colette A; Saiga, Shunsuke; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-06-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  8. Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery Davis

    2011-09-09

    The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

  9. PREFACE: 9th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitmann, Christoph; David, Christian; Nolting, Frithjof; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Conference logo This volume compiles the contributions to the International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM2008) held on 20-25 July 2008 in Zurich, Switzerland. The conference was the ninth in a series which started in Göttingen in 1984. Over the years the XRM conference series has served as a forum bringing together all relevant players working on the development of methods, building instrumentation, and applying x-ray microscopy to challenging issues in materials science, condensed matter research, environmental science and biology. XRM2008 was attended by about 300 participants who followed 44 oral presentations and presented 220 posters. Conference photograph Figure 1: Participants of the XRM2008 conference gathered in front of the main building of the ETH-Zurich. The conference showed that x-ray microscopy has become a mature field resting on three pillars. The first are workhorse instruments available even to non-specialist users. These exist at synchrotron sources world-wide as well as in laboratories. They allow the application of established microscopy methods to solve scientific projects in areas as diverse as soil science, the investigation of cometary dust particles, magnetic materials, and the analysis of ancient parchments. Examples of all of these projects can be found in this volume. These instruments have become so well understood that now they are also commercially available. The second pillar is the continued development of methods. Methods like stroboscopic imaging, wet cells or high and low temperature environments add versatility to the experiments. Methods like phase retrieval and ptychographic imaging allow the retrieval of information which hitero was thought to be inaccessible. The third pillar is the extension of such instruments and methods to new photon sources. With x-ray free electron lasers on the horizon the XRM community is working to transfer their know-how to these novel sources which will offer unprecedented brightness and time structure, but which at the same time require unprecedented effort to perform the experiment and to extract meaningful information from the data. Resting on these three pillars, the XRM community seems well prepared to solve the scientific questions of today and to help solve even more challenging scientific questions in the future. Many people contributed to the success of XRM2008, first and foremost were the participants with their excellent contributions and through their lively discussions. Organizing the event was made possible due to many helping hands and brains at the organizing institution, the Paul Scherrer Institut. It is our pleasure to thank all of these people. Financial support was given by the Gold Sponsor, XRADIA, by the European Round Table for Synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers, the Center for Imaging Science and Technology at Zurich, and by the Swiss National Science Foundation. The conference was kindly hosted by ETH Zurich which provided a perfect setting for this venue. We thank all the participants of XRM2008, everybody who helped in the organization and all financial supporters and are looking forward to hearing about further progress during XRM2010 which will be organized by Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. C Quitmann, C David, F Nolting, F Pfeiffer and M Stampanoni Proceedings Editors Conference photograph Figure 2 View over Zurich and into the alps from the terrace of the ETHZ main building during the XRM2008 reception. Conference photograph Figure 3 Flag tosser and Alphorn blowers in front of the ETH Zurich main building during the XRM2008 opening reception. Conference photograph Figure 4 Industry exhibition in the entrance hall of the ETHZ main building. Conference photograph Figure 5 Lively discussions amongst the conference participants took place during the two poster sessions. Conference photograph Figure 6 Lecture hall with the participants busily discussing between talks. Conference photograph Figure 7 Past and present winners of the Werner Meyer-Ilse Award are joined by Andrea Meyer-Ilse, the wife of the deceased x-ray microscopy pioneer Werner Meyer-Ilse. From left to right: Weilun Chao (winner 2005), Ann Sakdinawat (winner 2008), Piere Thibault (winner 2008), Andrea Meyer-Ilse and M Feser (winner 2002). Conference photograph Figure 8 Reception in the court of Schloss Rapperswil during the XRM2008 conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 9 Conference participants walking towards the castle of Rapperswil during the conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 10 Accompanying persons group gathered in the port of Lucerne.

  10. The Illinois 9th Grade Adolescent Health Survey. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    A survey was conducted in Illinois to identify the risk of certain health problems among adolescents; to determine the health status of Illinois youth in relation to the Surgeon General's "Healthy People 2000 Objectives" and monitor progress toward national and state goals; and to help those working at national, state, and local levels develop…

  11. NASA Space Biology Program: 9th Annual Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered include plant and animal gravity receptors and transduction; the role of gravity in growth and development of plants and animals; biological support structures and the role of calcium; mechanisms and responses of gravity sensitive systems; and mechanisms of plant responses to gravity.

  12. Indiana's Academic Standards: 9th Grade English/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This booklet of academic standards spells out what students should be able to do in Grade 9 English/Language Arts. The booklet gives examples to help students understand what is required to meet the standards and comes accompanied with a list of 10 things parents can do to help their child get a good education. It outlines the following seven…

  13. Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Papers are reported which were presented at the conference in the areas of displays, ride qualities and handling, driving and psychomotor skills, control, system identification and signal detection, electrophysiological and systems analysis, and modelling.

  14. 9th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    This conference provides papers related to strata control in underground mining environments. The bulk of these text are directly applicable to coal mining although some are applied to hard rock minerals. Performance testing of roof bolts, trusses, and other support devices are discussed. Information on computer software for stress and stability analyses are also provided. Case studies and discussions on mine roadway safety is provided.

  15. AUDIOVISUAL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE (9TH, LAKE OKOBOJI, 1963) SUMMARY REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A CONFERENCE HELD TO ANALYZE LEARNING THEORY AS IT RELATES TO NEW MEDIA AND THE LEARNER IS PRESENTED. THE INVITATIONAL CONFERENCE WAS ATTENDED BY REPRESENTATIVES FROM PUBLIC SCHOOLS, UNIVERSITIES, STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION, EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES, AND INDUSTRY. THE KNOWLEDGE EXPLOSION COUPLED WITH THE CURRENT REVOLUTION IN…

  16. Introduction to Marketing for 9th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotosky, Paul; Johnson, Jeannie G.

    Designed to enable students to develop knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses and to be able to understand the relationship of these characteristics to educational and vocational choices, this guide presents an introductory program on vocations using a thematic interdisciplinary approach to career awareness. It is suggested that the…

  17. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  18. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  19. Synthesis of 1,2-cis-homoiminosugars derived from GlcNAc and GalNAc exploiting a β-amino alcohol skeletal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Blériot, Yves; Auberger, Nicolas; Jagadeesh, Yerri; Gauthier, Charles; Prencipe, Giuseppe; Tran, Anh Tuan; Marrot, Jérôme; Désiré, Jérôme; Yamamoto, Arisa; Kato, Atsushi; Sollogoub, Matthieu

    2014-11-01

    The synthesis of 1,2-cis-homoiminosugars bearing an NHAc group at the C-2 position is described. The key step to prepare these α-D-GlcNAc and α-D-GalNAc mimics utilizes a β-amino alcohol skeletal rearrangement applied to an azepane precursor. This strategy also allows access to naturally occurring α-HGJ and α-HNJ. The α-D-GlcNAc-configured iminosugar was coupled to a glucoside acceptor to yield a novel pseudodisaccharide. Preliminary glycosidase inhibition evaluation indicates that the α-D-GalNAc-configured homoiminosugar is a potent and selective α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase inhibitor. PMID:25330411

  20. Mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by short- and long-range glycopeptide substrate recognition that varies among members of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family.

    PubMed

    Revoredo, Leslie; Wang, Shengjun; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik; Moremen, Kelley W; Jarvis, Donald L; Ten Hagen, Kelly G; Tabak, Lawrence A; Gerken, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    A large family of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) initiates and defines sites of mucin-type Ser/Thr-O-GalNAc glycosylation. Family members have been classified into peptide- and glycopeptide-preferring subfamilies, although both families possess variable activities against glycopeptide substrates. All but one isoform contains a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding lectin domain whose roles in modulating glycopeptide specificity is just being understood. We have previously shown for several peptide-preferring isoforms that the presence of a remote Thr-O-GalNAc, 6-17 residues from a Ser/Thr acceptor site, may enhance overall catalytic activity in an N- or C-terminal direction. This enhancement varies with isoform and is attributed to Thr-O-GalNAc interactions at the lectin domain. We now report on the glycopeptide substrate utilization of a series of glycopeptide (human-ppGalNAc-T4, T7, T10, T12 and fly PGANT7) and peptide-preferring transferases (T2, T3 and T5) by exploiting a series of random glycopeptide substrates designed to probe the functions of their catalytic and lectin domains. Glycosylation was observed at the -3, -1 and +1 residues relative to a neighboring Thr-O-GalNAc, depending on isoform, which we attribute to specific Thr-O-GalNAc binding at the catalytic domain. Additionally, these glycopeptide-preferring isoforms show remote lectin domain-assisted Thr-O-GalNAc enhancements that vary from modest to none. We conclude that the glycopeptide specificity of the glycopeptide-preferring isoforms predominantly resides in their catalytic domain but may be further modulated by remote lectin domain interactions. These studies further demonstrate that both domains of the ppGalNAc-Ts have specialized and unique functions that work in concert to control and order mucin-type O-glycosylation. PMID:26610890

  1. A transgenic line with Gal4 insertion useful to study morphogenesis of craniofacial perichondrium, vascular endothelium-associated cells, floor plate, and dorsal midline radial glia during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Sohei; Ikenaga, Takanori; Kawakami, Koichi; Ono, Fumihito; Hatta, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish is a good model for studying vertebrate development because of the availability of powerful genetic tools. We are interested in the study of the craniofacial skeletal structure of the zebrafish. For this purpose, we performed a gene trap screen and identified a Gal4 gene trap line, SAGFF(LF)134A. We then analyzed the expression pattern of SAGFF(LF)134A;Tg(UAS:GFP) and found that GFP was expressed not only in craniofacial skeletal elements but also in the vascular system, as well as in the nervous system. In craniofacial skeletal elements, strong GFP expression was detected not only in chondrocytes but also in the perichondrium. In the vascular system, GFP was expressed in endothelium-associated cells. In the spinal cord, strong GFP expression was found in the floor plate, and later in the dorsal radial glia located on the midline. Taking advantage of this transgenic line, which drives Gal4 expression in specific tissues, we crossed SAGFF(LF)134A with several UAS reporter lines. In particular, time-lapse imaging of photoconverted floor-plate cells of SAGFF(LF)134A;Tg(UAS:KikGR) revealed that the floor-plate cells changed their shape within 36 hours from cuboidal/trapezoidal to wine glass shaped. Moreover, we identified a novel mode of association between axons and glia. The putative paths for the commissural axons, including pax8-positive CoBL interneurons, were identified as small openings in the basal endfoot of each floor plate. Our results indicate that the transgenic line would be useful for studying the morphogenesis of less-well-characterized tissues of interest, including the perichondrium, dorsal midline radial glia, late-stage floor plate, and vascular endothelium-associated cells. PMID:22348745

  2. Towards 1 MilliGal Global Marine Gravity Accuracy from CryoSat, Envisat, and Jason-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Garcia, E. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of the global marine gravity field depends primarily on two factors - spatial track density and altimeter range precision. Recently three new non-repeat altimeter data sets are becoming available. (1) CryoSat has been collecting data over the world's oceans for the past 2.5 years. While its main mission is to map the changing topography of the ice sheets it is also revolutionizing our understanding of marine gravity. (2) In October 2010, the Envisat radar altimeter was placed in a new partly drifting phase orbit to conserve fuel. Although the spacecraft failed in April 2012, it was able to collect 1.5 years of data along this new ground track. (3) In May of 2012, the Jason-1 radar altimeter was maneuvered from its 10-day repeat track to a 406 day repeat track to begin its new geodetic mission phase. The largest error source in the construction of marine gravity models from satellite altimetry is due to errors in picking the arrival time of the return radar echo. We have developed a new approach to retracking altimeter waveforms by assuming that rise-time parameter, which represents the roughness of the ocean surface from ocean swell (SWH), varies smoothly along the satellite ground track. The results of the 20 Hz range precision for all the non-repeat altimeters are provided in the Table below. Note the improved range precision of the newer altimeters on Envisat and CryoSat with respect to the older altimeters on Geosat and ERS-1. These improvements in range precision combined with the increased track density are resulting in dramatic improvements in the accuracy of the marine gravity field. A blind test of the altimeter-derived gravity was performed by ConocoPhillips using their proprietary terrestrial gravity measurements. The rms difference between 1.4 million data points from the northern Gulf of Mexico is 1.83 mGal. The rms difference over an area of semi-permanent ice cover is 3.77 mGal. Most of the error at lower latitude is due to errors in the

  3. A re-appraisal of the stratigraphy and volcanology of the Cerro Galán volcanic system, NW Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folkes, Christopher B.; Wright, Heather M.; Cas, Ray A.F.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Lesti, Chiara; Viramonte, Jose G.

    2011-01-01

    From detailed fieldwork and biotite 40Ar/39Ar dating correlated with paleomagnetic analyses of lithic clasts, we present a revision of the stratigraphy, areal extent and volume estimates of ignimbrites in the Cerro Galán volcanic complex. We find evidence for nine distinct outflow ignimbrites, including two newly identified ignimbrites in the Toconquis Group (the Pitas and Vega Ignimbrites). Toconquis Group Ignimbrites (~5.60–4.51 Ma biotite ages) have been discovered to the southwest and north of the caldera, increasing their spatial extents from previous estimates. Previously thought to be contemporaneous, we distinguish the Real Grande Ignimbrite (4.68 ± 0.07 Ma biotite age) from the Cueva Negra Ignimbrite (3.77 ± 0.08 Ma biotite age). The form and collapse processes of the Cerro Galán caldera are also reassessed. Based on re-interpretation of the margins of the caldera, we find evidence for a fault-bounded trapdoor collapse hinged along a regional N-S fault on the eastern side of the caldera and accommodated on a N-S fault on the western caldera margin. The collapsed area defines a roughly isosceles trapezoid shape elongated E-W and with maximum dimensions 27 × 16 km. The Cerro Galán Ignimbrite (CGI; 2.08 ± 0.02 Ma sanidine age) outflow sheet extends to 40 km in all directions from the inferred structural margins, with a maximum runout distance of ~80 km to the north of the caldera. New deposit volume estimates confirm an increase in eruptive volume through time, wherein the Toconquis Group Ignimbrites increase in volume from the ~10 km3 Lower Merihuaca Ignimbrite to a maximum of ~390 km3 (Dense Rock Equivalent; DRE) with the Real Grande Ignimbrite. The climactic CGI has a revised volume of ~630 km3 (DRE), approximately two thirds of the commonly quoted value.

  4. Mutation in the LPS outer core biosynthesis gene, galU, affects LPS interaction with the RTX toxins ApxI and ApxII and cytolytic activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Cox, Andrew D; Hancock, Mark A; Mourez, Michael; Labrie, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Jacques, Mario

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and Apx toxins are major virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, a pathogen of the respiratory tract of pigs. Here, we evaluated the effect of LPS core truncation in haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of this microorganism. We previously generated a highly attenuated galU mutant of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 that has an LPS molecule lacking the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I outer core residues. Our results demonstrate that this mutant exhibits wild-type haemolytic activity but is significantly less cytotoxic to porcine alveolar macrophages. However, no differences were found in gene expression and secretion of the haemolytic and cytotoxic toxins ApxI and ApxII, both secreted by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. This suggests that the outer core truncation mediated by the galU mutation affects the toxins in their cytotoxic activities. Using both ELISA and surface plasmon resonance binding assays, we demonstrate a novel interaction between LPS and the ApxI and ApxII toxins via the core oligosaccharide. Our results indicate that the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I trisaccharide of the outer core is fundamental to mediating LPS/Apx interactions. The present study suggests that a lack of binding between LPS and ApxI/II affects the cytotoxicity and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:18713318

  5. Datação do disco galáctico pela nucleocosmocronologia do [Th/Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Peloso, E. F.; da Silva, L.; Arany-Prado, L. I.

    2003-08-01

    A nucleocosmocronologia emprega abundâncias de nuclídeos radioativos na datação de escalas de tempo astrofísicas. O 232Th é um nuclídeo radioativo com meia-vida de 14 Gano, enquanto que os dois isótopos mais abundantes do Eu são estáveis. O decaimento radioativo do Th modifica as razões de abundâncias [Th/Eu], fornecendo assim um meio de sondar a escala de formação das populações estelares. O objetivo deste trabalho é averiguar a possibilidade de estimar uma idade para o disco Galáctico através da nucleocosmocronologia do [Th/Eu] e investigar o nível de incerteza associado a esta estimativa. Para tanto, foi selecionada uma amostra de 20 estrelas anãs ou subgigantes de tipos espectrais F5 a G9, com -1,00 £ [Fe/H] £ +0,30 e idade(Gano) £ 13. As abundâncias de Th e Eu foram obtidas por síntese espectral das linhas localizadas em 4019,1 Å e 4129,7 Å, respectivamente. Uma comparação destas abundâncias com outros resultados da literatura demonstra que nossos valores apresentam dispersão 2 a 3 vezes menor que qualquer trabalho anterior. Os parâmetros atmosféricos e abundâncias dos elementos que contaminam as regiões espectrais destas linhas foram determinados por nós, de maneira totalmente autoconsistente, através de análise espectral detalhada diferencial em relação ao Sol. As idades estelares individuais foram determinadas através de curvas isócronas teóricas no diagrama HR. Foi realizada, então, uma análise cronológica dos gráficos [Th/Eu] vs. [Fe/H] e [Th/Eu] vs. idade. Os dados estelares foram comparados a curvas calculadas para 3 idades do disco Galáctico - 9, 12, 15 Gano - e foi estudada a sensibilidade à idade assumida no cálculo do ajuste destas curvas aos dados. Estas curvas foram calculadas com base num modelo analítico de evolução química da Galáxia que leva em consideração a formação de refugos, que são compostos pelos remanescentes da evolução estelar, pelos resíduos da formação de estrelas de

  6. A volcano bursting at the seams: Inflation, faulting, and eruption at Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Geist, Dennis J.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Poland, Michael P.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Meertens, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    The results of geodetic monitoring since 2002 at Sierra Negra volcano in the Galápagos Islands show that the filling and pressurization of an ∼2-km-deep sill eventually led to an eruption that began on 22 October 2005. Continuous global positioning system (CGPS) monitoring measured >2 m of accelerating inflation leading up to the eruption and contributed to nearly 5 m of total uplift since 1992, the largest precursory inflation ever recorded at a basaltic caldera. This extraordinary uplift was accommodated in part by repeated trapdoor faulting, and coseismic CGPS data provide strong constraints for improved deformation models. These results highlight the feedbacks between inflation, faulting, and eruption at a basaltic volcano, and demonstrate that faulting above an intruding magma body can relieve accumulated strain and effectively postpone eruption.

  7. Ecological drift and local exposures drive enteric bacterial community differences within species of Galápagos iguanas.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Emily W; Hong, Pei-Ying; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-04-01

    Diet strongly influences the intestinal microbial communities through species sorting. Alternatively, these communicates may differ because of chance variation in local microbial exposures or species losses among allopatric host populations (i.e. ecological drift). We investigated how these forces shape enteric communities of Galápagos marine and land iguanas. Geographically proximate populations shared more similar communities within a host ecotype, suggesting a role for ecological drift during host colonization of the islands. Additionally, evidence of taxa sharing between proximate heterospecific host populations suggests that contemporary local exposures also influence the gut community assembly. While selective forces such as host-bacterial interactions or dietary differences are dominant drivers of intestinal community differences among hosts, historical and contemporary processes of ecological drift may lead to differences in bacterial composition within a host species. Whether such differences in community structure translate into geographic variation in benefits derived from these intimate microbial communities remains to be explored. PMID:22369350

  8. Receiver function imaging of lithospheric structure and the onset of melting beneath the Galápagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2014-02-01

    The Galápagos Archipelago represents an opportunity to investigate the properties of young oceanic lithosphere, the effects of a hotspot anomaly on lithospheric thickness, and melting dynamics in a hotspot-ridge interaction. Here we use data recorded by the SIGNET array and permanent station PAYG on the Islands Santa Cruz and Isabela, respectively. We used P-to-S (Ps) and S-to-P (Sp) receiver functions to constrain crust and mantle structure. A simultaneous deconvolution method was used to constrain 1-D structure and also for the modeling of robust features. A migrated extended multitaper method was used to investigate 3-D structural variations. Ps images a velocity increase with depth at 11±7 km, probably the base of the pre-plume crust, or old Moho. Sp imaging and modeling images a second, deeper velocity increase at 37±7 km depth. A velocity decrease with depth is imaged on average at 75±12 km likely associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This discontinuity is imaged deeper, 82 km, in the southwest and shallower, 66 km, in the northeast near the spreading ridge. Although the trend is consistent with lithospheric thickening with age, the thickness is much larger than predicted by conductive cooling models of 0-10 My oceanic lithosphere. We infer a compositional contribution to velocity variations. Finally, a velocity increase with depth is imaged at ˜125 to 145±15 km depth that is likely associated with the onset of melting. The discontinuity is imaged deeper in 3 sectors of the Galápagos platform-ridge region, all coincident with the slowest surface wave shear velocity anomalies in the upper 100 km. One is located in the southwest in a hypothesized plume location. The other two are to the northwest and northeast, possibly illuminating multiple plume diversions related to complex plume-ridge interactions.

  9. LTR-Retrotransposons in R. exoculata and Other Crustaceans: The Outstanding Success of GalEa-Like Copia Elements

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Caroline; Graça, Paula; Higuet, Dominique; Bonnivard, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements are major constituents of eukaryote genomes and have a great impact on genome structure and stability. They can contribute to the genetic diversity and evolution of organisms. Knowledge of their distribution among several genomes is an essential condition to study their dynamics and to better understand their role in species evolution. LTR-retrotransposons have been reported in many diverse eukaryote species, describing a ubiquitous distribution. Given their abundance, diversity and their extended ranges in C-values, environment and life styles, crustaceans are a great taxon to investigate the genomic component of adaptation and its possible relationships with TEs. However, crustaceans have been greatly underrepresented in transposable element studies. Using both degenerate PCR and in silico approaches, we have identified 35 Copia and 46 Gypsy families in 15 and 18 crustacean species, respectively. In particular, we characterized several full-length elements from the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata that is listed as a model organism from hydrothermal vents. Phylogenic analyses show that Copia and Gypsy retrotransposons likely present two opposite dynamics within crustaceans. The Gypsy elements appear relatively frequent and diverse whereas Copia are much more homogeneous, as 29 of them belong to the single GalEa clade, and species- or lineage-dependent. Our results also support the hypothesis of the Copia retrotransposon scarcity in metazoans compared to Gypsy elements. In such a context, the GalEa-like elements present an outstanding wide distribution among eukaryotes, from fishes to red algae, and can be even highly predominant within a large taxon, such as Malacostraca. Their distribution among crustaceans suggests a dynamics that follows a “domino days spreading” branching process in which successive amplifications may interact positively. PMID:23469217

  10. Neuroarchitecture and neuroanatomy of the Drosophila central complex: A GAL4-based dissection of protocerebral bridge neurons and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Tanya; Iyer, Nirmala A; Rubin, Gerald M

    2015-01-01

    Insects exhibit an elaborate repertoire of behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. The central complex plays a key role in combining various modalities of sensory information with an insect's internal state and past experience to select appropriate responses. Progress has been made in understanding the broad spectrum of outputs from the central complex neuropils and circuits involved in numerous behaviors. Many resident neurons have also been identified. However, the specific roles of these intricate structures and the functional connections between them remain largely obscure. Significant gains rely on obtaining a comprehensive catalog of the neurons and associated GAL4 lines that arborize within these brain regions, and on mapping neuronal pathways connecting these structures. To this end, small populations of neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster central complex were stochastically labeled using the multicolor flip-out technique and a catalog was created of the neurons, their morphologies, trajectories, relative arrangements, and corresponding GAL4 lines. This report focuses on one structure of the central complex, the protocerebral bridge, and identifies just 17 morphologically distinct cell types that arborize in this structure. This work also provides new insights into the anatomical structure of the four components of the central complex and its accessory neuropils. Most strikingly, we found that the protocerebral bridge contains 18 glomeruli, not 16, as previously believed. Revised wiring diagrams that take into account this updated architectural design are presented. This updated map of the Drosophila central complex will facilitate a deeper behavioral and physiological dissection of this sophisticated set of structures. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:997–1037, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25380328

  11. Equivalency of Galápagos giant tortoises used as ecological replacement species to restore ecosystem functions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Elizabeth A; Gibbs, James P; Cayot, Linda J; Tapia, Washington

    2013-08-01

    Loss of key plant-animal interactions (e.g., disturbance, seed dispersal, and herbivory) due to extinctions of large herbivores has diminished ecosystem functioning nearly worldwide. Mitigating for the ecological consequences of large herbivore losses through the use of ecological replacements to fill extinct species' niches and thereby replicate missing ecological functions has been proposed. It is unknown how different morphologically and ecologically a replacement can be from the extinct species and still provide similar functions. We studied niche equivalency between 2 phenotypes of Galápagos giant tortoises (domed and saddlebacked) that were translocated to Pinta Island in the Galápagos Archipelago as ecological replacements for the extinct saddlebacked giant tortoise (Chelonoidis abingdonii). Thirty-nine adult, nonreproductive tortoises were introduced to Pinta Island in May 2010, and we observed tortoise resource use in relation to phenotype during the first year following release. Domed tortoises settled in higher, moister elevations than saddlebacked tortoises, which favored lower elevation arid zones. The areas where the tortoises settled are consistent with the ecological conditions each phenotype occupies in its native range. Saddlebacked tortoises selected areas with high densities of the arboreal prickly pear cactus (Opuntia galapageia) and mostly foraged on the cactus, which likely relied on the extinct saddlebacked Pinta tortoise for seed dispersal. In contrast, domed tortoises did not select areas with cactus and therefore would not provide the same seed-dispersal functions for the cactus as the introduced or the original, now extinct, saddlebacked tortoises. Interchangeability of extant megaherbivores as replacements for extinct forms therefore should be scrutinized given the lack of equivalency we observed in closely related forms of giant tortoises. Our results also demonstrate the value of trial introductions of sterilized individuals to test

  12. Insights into the Galápagos plume from uranium-series isotopes of recently erupted basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Berlo, Kim; Beier, Christoph; Saal, Alberto E.

    2011-09-01

    Uranium-series isotopes (238U-230Th-226Ra-210Pb), major element, trace element, and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for recent (<60 years old) Galápagos archipelago basalts. Volcanic rocks from all centers studied (Fernandina, Cerro Azul, Sierra Negra, and Wolf Volcano) display 230Th excesses (4%-15%) and steep rare earth element (REE) patterns indicative of residual garnet during partial melting of their mantle source. Rare earth element modeling suggests that only a few percent of garnet is involved. Correlations between (238U/232Th), radiogenic isotopes and Nb/Zr ratio suggest that the U/Th ratio of these Galápagos volcanic rocks is primarily controlled by geochemical source variations and not fractionation during partial melting. The lowest (230Th/238U) ratio is not observed at Fernandina (the supposed center of the plume) but at the more geochemically "depleted" Wolf Volcano, further to the north. Small radium excesses are observed for all samples with (226Ra/230Th) ranging from 1.107 to 1.614. The 226Ra-230Th disequilibria do not correlate with other uranium-series parent-daughter nuclide pairs or geochemical data, suggesting modification at shallow levels on timescales relevant to the half-life of 226Ra (1600 years). The combination of 226Ra and 210Pb excesses is inconsistent with interaction of magma with cumulate material unless decoupling of 210Pb (or an intermediate daughter, such as 222Rn) occurs prior to modification of Ra-Th disequilibria. An intriguing correlation of (210Pb/226Ra)0 with Nb/Zr and radiogenic isotopes requires further investigation but suggests possible control via magmatic degassing and accumulation that may somehow be related to source heterogeneities.

  13. On the concentration and size distribution of sub-micron aerosol in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribas, M.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Cuevas, C. A.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, F.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the CHARLEX campaign in the Galápagos Islands, a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer was deployed on San Cristobal Island in July-August 2011 to carry out size-resolved measurements of the concentration of submicron aerosols. To our knowledge these are the first measurements of aerosol concentrations in this unique environment. The particles with marine origin displayed a tri-modal number size distribution with peak diameters of 0.016 μm, 0.050 μm and 0.174 μm and a cloud-processed intermodal minimum at 0.093 μm. The mean total aerosol number concentration for the marine contribution was 470 ± 160 cm-3. A low particle concentration of 70 ± 50 cm-3 for the nucleation size range was measured, but no evidence of new particle production in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) was observed. The concentration of the Aitken size mode was found to be related to aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere off the coast of Chile followed by transport within the MBL to the Galápagos Islands. Cloud processing may activate the particles in the Aitken size range, growing through 'in-cloud' sulphate production and increasing the particle concentration in the accumulation size range. The 0.093 μm cloud processed minima suggests that the critical supersaturation at which the particle is activated to a cloud droplet is in the 0.14-0.21% range. The daytime marine particle background concentration was influenced by human activity around the sampling site, as well as by new particle formation triggered by biogenic emissions from the vegetation cover of the island's semiarid lowlands. Effective CCN formation may play a role in the formation and properties of the stratus clouds, which permanently cover the top of the windward side of the islands and establish one of their characteristic climatic bands.

  14. Bioactive phytochemicals of leaf essential oils of Cinnamomum osmophloeum prevent lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine (LPS/D-GalN)-induced acute hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Huang, Chi-Chang; Ho, Shang-Tse; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lin, Chien-Tsong; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2011-08-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioactive phytochemicals of leaf essential oils of Cinnamomum osmophloeum on lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine (LPS/D-GalN)-induced acute hepatitis. The results revealed that post-treatment with 100 μmol/kg trans-cinnamaldehyde, (-)-aromadendrene, T-cadinol, or α-cadinol significantly decreased the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels in serum. Moreover, both T-cadinol and α-cadinol treatments decreased the expressions of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) in the liver tissues when compared with the LPS/D-GalN group. Liver histopathology also showed that silymarin, trans-cinnamaldehyde, (-)-aromadendrene, T-cadinol, or α-cadinol significantly reduced the incidence of liver lesions induced by LPS/D-GalN. These results suggest that the above phytochemicals exhibit potent hepatoprotection against LPS/D-GalN-induced liver damage in mice, and their hepatoprotective effects may be due to the modulation of anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:21699244

  15. SELECTION KINETICS DURING SERIAL CELL CULTURE PASSAGE OF MIXTURES OF WILD TYPE AUTOGRAPHA CALIFORNICA NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS AND ITS RECOMBINANT AC360-B-GAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed analysis of the selection process in serial co-infections of cell cultures by wild type Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcNPV/E2, and Ac36O-B-gal, a "genetically engineered" strain, shows that the unaltered strain was clearly dominant even when it bega...

  16. The immune response to group B streptococcus type III capsular polysaccharide is directed to the -Glc-GlcNAc-Gal- backbone epitope.

    PubMed

    Safari, Dodi; Dekker, Huberta A T; Rijkers, Ger T; van der Ende, Arie; Kamerling, Johannis P; Snippe, Harm

    2011-12-01

    The structures of the branched capsular polysaccharides of group B streptococcus type III (GBSIIIPS) and Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 (Pn14PS) are identical apart from the (α2→3)-linked sialic acid in the side chains of GBSIIIPS. The present study tries to determine the minimal epitope in GBSIIIPS, using both a panel of anti-Pn14PS mouse sera and sera of humans vaccinated with either Pn14PS or GBSIIIPS. Type-specific Pn14PS antibodies that recognize the branched structure of Pn14PS have a low affinity for the native GBSIIIPS. Desialylation of GBSIIIPS results in dramatically higher affinity of anti-Pn14PS antibodies. Epitope specific anti-Pn14PS mouse antibodies and human sera of PCV7 vaccinees only recognized structures with the branching element -Glc-(Gal-)GlcNAc-, in particular -Gal-Glc-(Gal-)GlcNAc- in Pn14PS. On the other hand anti-GBSIIIPS human antibodies recognize predominantly the linear structure in the backbone of Pn14PS or GBSIIIPS, i.e., -Glc-GlcNAc-Gal-. This difference in antigenicity of Pn14PS and GBSIIIPS is in agreement with the difference in flexibility of the two polysaccharides caused by the presence or absence of sialic acid. PMID:21984010

  17. The Relation of the Level of Serum Anti-TF, -Tn and -Alpha-Gal IgG to Survival in Gastrointestinal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Smorodin, Eugeniy; Sergeyev, Boris; Klaamas, Kersti; Chuzmarov, Valentin; Kurtenkov, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relation of the level of serum anti-TF, -Tn and -αGal carbohydrate antibodies to survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Methods: The level of anti-TF (Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen), -Tn and -αGal IgG was analysed in the serum of patients with gastric (n = 83) and colorectal (n = 51) cancers in the long-term follow-up, using ELISA with polyacrylamide glycoconjugates. To evaluate overall survival and the risk of death, the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model were used in the univariate analysis of patients groups. Results: A significantly better survival was observed: (1) in patients with an increased level of anti-TF antibodies (all, stage III, T2-4, N1-2 and G3; P = 0.004-0.038, HR = 0.16-0.46); and (2) in patients with an increased level of anti-Tn antibodies (G1-2 tumors; P = 0.034-0.042, HR = 0.34-0.47). A significantly worse survival was observed in gastrointestinal, gastric and colorectal groups with an increased level of serum anti-αGal antibodies. This association depended on the patho-morphology of tumors (all, stages I-II, III, T2-4, N0, N1-2 and G1-2; P = 0.006-0.048, HR = 1.99-2.33). In the combined assessment of the anti-TF and -αGal antibodies level of the whole gastrointestinal group (n = 53), P = 0.002, HR = 0.25, 95% CI 0.094-0.655. In the follow-up, the survival time was shorter in patients whose level of anti-αGal antibodies rose (P = 0.009-0.040, HR = 2.18-4.27). The level of anti-TF antibodies inversely correlated with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR, r = - 0.401, P = 0.004, n = 49). Patients with a higher level of anti-αGal antibodies and NLR values demonstrated a significantly worse survival (P = 0.009, HR = 2.98, n = 48). Conclusions: The preoperative levels of anti-TF, -Tn and -αGal antibodies and their dynamics are of prognostic significance. The method for the determination of circulating anti-carbohydrate antibodies may be a useful supplement in clinical outcome assessment

  18. The αGal Epitope of the Histo-Blood Group Antigen Family Is a Ligand for Bovine Norovirus Newbury2 Expected to Prevent Cross-Species Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zakhour, Maha; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Charpilienne, Annie; Langpap, Brigitte; Poncet, Didier; Peters, Thomas; Bovin, Nicolai; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Among Caliciviridae, the norovirus genus encompasses enteric viruses that infect humans as well as several animal species, causing gastroenteritis. Porcine strains are classified together with human strains within genogroup II, whilst bovine norovirus strains represent genogroup III. Various GI and GII human strains bind to carbohydrates of the histo-blood group family which may be shared among mammalian species. Genetic relatedness of human and animal strains as well as the presence of potentially shared ligands raises the possibility of norovirus cross-species transmission. In the present study, we identified a carbohydrate ligand for the prototype bovine norovirus strain Bo/Newbury2/76/UK (NB2). Attachment of virus-like particles (VLPs) of the NB2 strain to bovine gut tissue sections showed a complete match with the staining by reagents recognizing the Galα1,3 motif. Alpha-galactosidase treatment confirmed involvement of a terminal alpha-linked galactose. Specific binding of VLPs to the αGal epitope (Galα3Galβ4GlcNAcβ-R) was observed. The binding of Galα3GalαOMe to rNB2 VLPs was characterized at atomic resolution employing saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments. Transfection of human cells with an α1,3galactosyltransferase cDNA allowed binding of NB2 VLPs, whilst inversely, attachment to porcine vascular endothelial cells was lost when the cells originated from an α1,3galactosyltransferase KO animal. The αGal epitope is expressed in all mammalian species with the exception of the Hominidaea family due to the inactivation of the α1,3galactosyltransferase gene (GGTA1). Accordingly, the NB2 carbohydrate ligand is absent from human tissues. Although expressed on porcine vascular endothelial cells, we observed that unlike in cows, it is not present on gut epithelial cells, suggesting that neither man nor pig could be infected by the NB2 bovine strain. PMID:19578439

  19. The use of zircon crystals as tracers for pre-eruptive magmatic processes at Cerro Galán caldera, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, C. B.; de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.; Cas, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Zircon crystal ages provide useful constraints on the pre-eruptive evolution and dynamics of large-volume silicic ignimbrites. We perform new SIMS U-Pb dating on zircon crystals from multiple ignimbrite eruptions from the Cerro Galán caldera, NW Argentina. This system in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes has erupted at least nine crystal-rich rhyodacitic ignimbrites from ~6 to 2 Ma, which all have nearly identical bulk-rock and mineral geochemistries. We show that each ignimbrite magma contains a young population of zircon ‘phenocrysts’ with a range in crystallization ages (up to 500 kyr) older than their corresponding eruption ages. This suggests that zircon crystallization was a protracted event, with gradual crystallization up to 500 kyr prior to the final eruption of each ignimbrite. This supports the theorized long residence times (> 100 kyr) of crystal ‘mushes’ in the upper crust that are thought to be the pre-eruptive storage regions for crystal-rich ignimbrites. Furthermore, many of the Galán ignimbrites include a population of zircon crystals with ages that correspond to eruption ages of earlier ignimbrites within the same magmatic system. These ‘antecrysts’ are preserved either as whole crystals or as cores of zircon crystals that have been overgrown with rims that crystallized from a new magma batch. We suggest that these crystals represent a common process in the Galán system of magmatic recycling of residual non-erupted, solidified material left behind following an ignimbrite eruption. Rare zircon crystals of Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician age (540 to 510 Ma) in the ignimbrites provide direct evidence for the involvement of crustal material into the Galán magmas. The ages of these ‘xenocrysts’ are consistent with basement outcrops found around the Galán caldera, material that was potentially assimilated from chamber walls during growth of the storage region. These crystal types show there has been a long

  20. The influence of melt flux and crustal processing on Re-Os isotope systematics of ocean island basalts: Constraints from Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Dale, C. W.; Geist, D. J.; Day, J. A.; Brügmann, G.; Harpp, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    New rhenium-osmium data for high-MgO (>9 wt.%) basalts from the Galápagos Archipelago reveal a large variation in 187Os/188Os (0.1304 to 0.173), comparable with the range shown by primitive global ocean island basalts (OIBs). Basalts with the least radiogenic 187Os/188Os occur closest to the Galápagos plume stem: those in western Galápagos have low 187Os/188Os, moderate 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb and high 3He/4He whereas basalts in the south also have low 187Os/188Os but more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb and 3He/4He. Our new Os isotope data are consistent with the previously established spatial zonation of the common global isotopic mantle reservoir "C" and ancient recycled oceanic crust in the mantle plume beneath western and southern parts of Galápagos, respectively. Galápagos basalts with the most radiogenic 187Os/188Os (up to 0.1875) typically have moderate MgO (7-9 wt.%) and low Os (<50 pg g-1) but have contrastingly unenriched Sr, Nd and Pb isotope signatures. We interpret this decoupling of chalcophile and lithophile isotopic systems as due to assimilation of young Pacific lower crust during crystal fractionation. Mixing models show the assimilated crust must have higher contents of Re and Os, and more radiogenic 187Os/188Os (0.32), than previously proposed for oceanic gabbros. We suggest the inferred, exceptionally-high radiogenic 187Os of the Pacific crust may be localised and due to sulfides precipitated from hydrothermal systems established at the Galápagos Spreading Centre. High 187Os/188Os Galápagos basalts are found where plume material is being dispersed laterally away from the plume stem to the adjacent spreading centre (i.e. in central and NE parts of the archipelago). The extent to which crustal processing influences 187Os/188Os appears to be primarily controlled by melt flux: as distance from the stem of the Galápagos plume increases, the melt flux decreases and crustal assimilation becomes proportionally

  1. The Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen and alphaGal-specific human IgG glycoforms: concanavalin A reactivity and relation to survival of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kodar, Kristel; Kurtenkov, Oleg; Klaamas, Kersti

    2009-01-01

    Glycan structures of IgG strongly influence the affinity for Fcgamma receptors and antibody effector functions. However, no particular attention has been paid yet to the glycosylation of tumor antigen-specific IgG. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate the concanavalin A lectin (ConA) reactivity of human anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) and anti-alphaGal specific IgG in gastric cancer patients and healthy controls and (ii) to evaluate whether the ConA-reactivity of anti-TF and anti-alphaGal specific IgG is associated with the survival rate of patients with cancer. Total IgG was purified from the sera of patients with gastric cancer and healthy blood donors. The anti-TF and anti-alphaGal glycotope specific IgG were detected with ELISA using synthetic saccharide-polyacrylamide conjugates as antigen. In parallel plate, the ConA reactivity of the anti-TF or anti-alphaGal IgG was determined and the ConA index was calculated. Results show that serum anti-TF specific IgG antibodies of patients with cancer contain significantly higher content of ConA positive IgG glycoform compared to IgG of controls. No correlation between the ConA reactivity of anti-TF IgG and anti-alphaGal IgG was observed. High level of anti-TF IgG ConA reactivity was associated with a significantly lower survival rate of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:19860583

  2. Identification and transcriptional analysis of two types of lectins (SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1) from mollusk Solen grandis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Yang, Dinglong; Xu, Jie; Fang, Jinghui; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2012-08-01

    C-type lectin and galectin are two types of animal carbohydrate-binding proteins which serve as pathogen recognition molecules and play crucial roles in the innate immunity of invertebrates. In the present study, a C-type lectin (designated as SgCTL-1) and galectin (designated as SgGal-1) were identified from mollusk Solen grandis, and their expression patterns, both in tissues and toward three pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) stimulation were characterized. The full-length cDNA of SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 was 1280 and 1466 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 519 and 1218 bp, respectively. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed high similarity to other members of C-type lectin and galectin superfamily, respectively. SgCTL-1 encoded a single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), and the motif of Ca(2+)-binding site 2 was EPN (Glu(135)-Pro(136)-Asn(137)). While SgGal-1 encoded two CRDs, and the amino acid residues constituted the carbohydrate-binding motifs were well conserved in CRD1 but partially conserved in CRD2. Although SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 exhibited different tissue expression pattern, they were both constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, including hemocytes, gonad, mantle, muscle, gill and hepatopancreas, and they were both highly expressed in hepatopancreas and gill. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of two lectins in hemocytes was significantly (P < 0.01) up-regulated with different levels after S. grandis were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) or β-1,3-glucan. Our results suggested that SgCTL-1 and SgGal-1 from razor clam were two novel members of animal lectins, and they might function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) taking part in the process of pathogen recognition. PMID:22565020

  3. Structures of complexes of a metal-independent glycosyltransferase GT6 from Bacteroides ovatus with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) and its hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram T K; Stinson, Brittany; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2014-03-21

    Mammalian members of glycosyltransferase family 6 (GT6) of the CAZy database have a GT-A fold containing a conserved Asp-X-Asp (DXD) sequence that binds an essential metal cofactor. Bacteroides ovatus GT6a represents a GT6 clade found in more than 30 Gram-negative bacteria that is similar in sequence to the catalytic domains of mammalian GT6, but has an Asn(95)-Ala-Asn(97) (NXN) sequence substituted for the DXD motif and metal-independent catalytic activity. Co-crystals of a low activity mutant of BoGT6a (E192Q) with UDP-GalNAc contained protein complexes with intact UDP-GalNAc and two forms with hydrolysis products (UDP plus GalNAc) representing an initial closed complex and later open form primed for product release. Two cationic residues near the C terminus of BoGT6a, Lys(231) and Arg(243), interact with the diphosphate moiety of UDP-GalNAc, but only Lys(231) interacts with the UDP product and may function in leaving group stabilization. The amide group of Asn(95), the first Asn of the NXN motif, interacts with the ribose moiety of the substrate. This metal-independent GT6 resembles its metal-dependent homologs in undergoing conformational changes on binding UDP-GalNAc that arise from structuring the C terminus to cover this substrate. It appears that in the GT6 family, the metal cofactor functions specifically in binding the UDP moiety in the donor substrate and transition state, actions that can be efficiently performed by components of the polypeptide chain. PMID:24459149

  4. Structures of Complexes of a Metal-independent Glycosyltransferase GT6 from Bacteroides ovatus with UDP-N-Acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) and Its Hydrolysis Products*

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tram T. K.; Stinson, Brittany; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian members of glycosyltransferase family 6 (GT6) of the CAZy database have a GT-A fold containing a conserved Asp-X-Asp (DXD) sequence that binds an essential metal cofactor. Bacteroides ovatus GT6a represents a GT6 clade found in more than 30 Gram-negative bacteria that is similar in sequence to the catalytic domains of mammalian GT6, but has an Asn95-Ala-Asn97 (NXN) sequence substituted for the DXD motif and metal-independent catalytic activity. Co-crystals of a low activity mutant of BoGT6a (E192Q) with UDP-GalNAc contained protein complexes with intact UDP-GalNAc and two forms with hydrolysis products (UDP plus GalNAc) representing an initial closed complex and later open form primed for product release. Two cationic residues near the C terminus of BoGT6a, Lys231 and Arg243, interact with the diphosphate moiety of UDP-GalNAc, but only Lys231 interacts with the UDP product and may function in leaving group stabilization. The amide group of Asn95, the first Asn of the NXN motif, interacts with the ribose moiety of the substrate. This metal-independent GT6 resembles its metal-dependent homologs in undergoing conformational changes on binding UDP-GalNAc that arise from structuring the C terminus to cover this substrate. It appears that in the GT6 family, the metal cofactor functions specifically in binding the UDP moiety in the donor substrate and transition state, actions that can be efficiently performed by components of the polypeptide chain. PMID:24459149

  5. Expression and prognostic value of GalNAc-T3 in patients with completely resected small (≤2 cm) peripheral lung adenocarcinoma after IASLC/ATS/ERS classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shilei; Guo, Tao; Li, Jinxiu; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Guan, Hongwei; Deng, Wuguo; Gu, Chundong

    2015-01-01

    Background GalNAc-T3 catalyzes initial glycosylation of mucin-type O-linked protein involved in proliferation, adhesion, and migration of tumor cells. This study was performed to explore the relationships of the expression of GalNAc-T3 in small peripheral lung adenocarcinoma, especially as an indicator of prognosis. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis of the patients with small peripheral lung lesions, including 106 adenocarcinoma and two precancerous lesions (atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma in situ) after complete surgical resection, was launched. Expression of GalNAc-T3 was examined using immunohistochemistry staining on primary tumor specimens, and the tumors were reclassified in light of the IASLC/ATS/ERS (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society) adenocarcinoma classifications followed by grading and scoring. Moreover, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to study the expression of GalNAc-T3 in vivo. Results The low expression of GalNAc-T3 was found in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 56 of 108 patients (51.9%) and was associated with IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of high risk groups (P=0.007), high Sica score (P=0.036), poorly differentiated tumor (P=0.023), poor tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.007), pleural invasion (P=0.007), and vascular invasion (P<0.001) by Pearson’s chi-squared test, but not with sex, age, smoking status, concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen, and lymph node metastasis. In logistic regression analysis, low GalNAc-T3 expression was only correlated with high-ranking TNM stage (odds ratio [OR] =8.975, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.797–44.661), vascular invasion (OR =5.668, 95% CI: 1.827–17.578), and the higher risk grade (low risk grade: OR =0.141, 95% CI: 0.027–0.719; moderate risk grade: OR =0.122, 95% CI: 0.017–40.871). The low expression of the GalNAc-T3 usually in adenocarcinoma

  6. Identification and expression of a sialyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of disialylgalactosylgloboside in normal and malignant kidney cells: downregulation of ST6GalNAc VI in renal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Senda, Motohiro; Ito, Akihiro; Tsuchida, Akiko; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Kaneda, Tsuguhiro; Nakamura, Yoko; Kasama, Kenji; Kiso, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Yoko; Ono, Yoshinari; Ogiso, Manabu; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Keiko; Oshima, Shinichi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Although disialyl glycosphingolipids such as GD3 and GD2 have been considered to be associated with malignant tumours, whether branched-type disialyl glycosphingolipids show such an association is not well understood. We investigated the sialyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of DSGG (disialylgalactosylgloboside) from MSGG (monosialylgalactosylgloboside). Among six GalNAc:α2,6-sialyltransferases cloned to date, we focused on ST6GalNAc III, V and VI, which utilize sialylglycolipids as substrates. In vitro enzyme analyses revealed that ST6GalNAc III and VI generated DSGG from MSGG with Vmax/Km values of 1.91 and 4.16 respectively. Transfection of the cDNA expression vectors for these enzymes resulted in DSGG expression in a renal cancer cell line. Although both ST6GalNAc III and VI genes were expressed in normal kidney cells, the expression profiles of ST6GalNAc VI among 20 renal cancer cell lines correlated clearly with those of DSGG, suggesting that the sialyltransferase involved in the synthesis of DSGG in the kidney is ST6GalNAc-VI. ST6GalNAc-VI and DSGG were found in proximal tubule epithelial cells in normal kidney tissues, while they were downregulated in renal cancer cell lines and cancer tissues. All these findings indicated that DSGG was suppressed during the malignant transformation of the proximal tubules as a maturation arrest of glycosylation. PMID:17123352

  7. The young stellar cluster [DBS2003] 157 associated with the H II region GAL 331.31-00.34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Abraham, Z.; Copetti, M. V. F.; Ortiz, R.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D. A.; Roman-Lopes, A.

    2012-07-01

    We report a study of the stellar content of the near-infrared (NIR) cluster [DBS2003] 157 embedded in the extended H II region GAL 331.31-00.34, which is associated with the IRAS source 16085-5138. JHK photometry was carried out in order to identify potential ionizing candidates, and the follow-up NIR spectroscopy allowed the spectral classification of some sources, including two O-type stars. A combination of NIR photometry and spectroscopy data was used to obtain the distance of these two stars, with the method of spectroscopic parallax: IRS 298 (O6 V, 3.35 ± 0.61 kpc) and IRS 339 (O9 V, 3.24 ± 0.56 kpc). Adopting the average distance of 3.29 ± 0.58 kpc and comparing the Lyman continuum luminosity of these stars with that required to account for the radio continuum flux of the H II region, we conclude that these two stars are the ionizing sources of GAL 331.31-00.34. Young stellar objects (YSOs) were searched by using our NIR photometry and mid-infrared (MIR) data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey. The analysis of NIR and MIR colour-colour diagrams resulted in 47 YSO candidates. The GLIMPSE counterpart of IRAS 16085-5138, which presents IRAS colour indices compatible with an ultracompact H II region, has been identified. The analysis of its spectral energy distribution between 2 and ?m revealed that this source shows a spectral index α= 3.6 between 2 and ?m, which is typical of a YSO immersed in a protostellar envelope. Lower limits to the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the embedded protostar have been estimated as L= 7.7 × 103 L⊙ and M= 10 M⊙, respectively, which correspond to a B0-B1 V zero-age main sequence star. Based on observations carried at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) observatory, a joint project of the Ministério de Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (MCTI) of the República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the

  8. Geochemical and Depth Variations at the Galápagos 93.25˚W Propagating Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotella, M.; Sinton, J.; Mahoney, J.; Chazey, W.

    2006-12-01

    The 93.25°W propagating rift on the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) differs markedly from the better-known propagator at 95.5°W in having the morphology of a classic overlapping spreading center (~24 km of overlap and 7.5 km of offset). It has a higher propagation rate (70 vs 48 mm/yr) [Wilson & Hey, JGR v. 100, 1995] and is breaking through younger crust (260 vs 910 ka); overall magma supply is ~20% greater, as the area is closer to the Galápagos hotspot. The overlapping limbs lack pronounced bathymetric lows, instead they are up to 150 m shallower than the surrounding axial ridges away from the offset. Lavas are T-MORB; failing rift lavas show a slight increase in Mg within the overlap zone but propagating rift lavas lack the strong fractionation anomaly that characterizes the propagating limb at 95.5°W and many other propagating rifts. New major and trace element data on 28 samples from 24 dredge stations along a 175 km section of the GSC spanning the 93.25°W offset indicate significant, systematic variations in mantle sources and melting processes on each limb of the system. Fractionation-corrected ratios of highly to moderately incompatible elements (e.g. La/Yb, Sm/Yb, Zr/Y) show constant values along the propagating rift east of 93.2°W, but within the overlap zone these ratios increase sharply up to a factor of 1.5, then gradually decline to the west. In contrast, the failing rift shows constant to moderately increasing ratios as the overlap zone is approached from the west, with lower overall ratios within the zone. These variations could be interpreted to reflect a counter-intuitive relationship of gradually increasing extent of partial melting with progressive failure of the dying rift, consistent with the striking shoaling of the failing limb, or melting of incompatible-element depleted mantle. Variations along the eastern, propagating rift suggest either a sharp decrease in extent of melting or tapping of a more incompatible

  9. A teoria da percolação aplicada às galáxias aneladas peculiares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, P. C. R.; Martin, V. A. F.; de Medeiros, N. G. F.; Faúndez-Abans, M.; Oliveira-Abans, M.

    2003-08-01

    Formulado no final da década de 50, o modelo de percolação concentra-se em descrever o meio poroso, que será visto neste trabalho como uma rede de canais aleatórios, por onde escoa um fluido determinístico. Se o número de canais for suficientemente grande, então eles estarão ligados e o meio se tornará permeável à passagem do fluido. Neste caso, dizemos que houve a percolação do fluido. Reformulando o modelo acima, podemos escrever um código particularmente adaptado para simulações em Galáxias, onde iremos supor que os canais formam um reticulado, e que cada sítio da rede representa um poro que será interpretado como uma região ativa de formação estelar. Para cada elo teremos um pequeno canal ligando dois sítios vizinhos, que poderá, após um tempo "t", induzir ou não a formação de uma região ativa no poro vizinho. Para simular a passagem desta região ativa através dos poros, diremos que um elo está aberto com probabilidade p e fechado com probabilidade 1-p. Dessa forma, passamos a imaginar configurações de elos abertos e fechados, onde cada configuração ocorre com uma certa probabilidade, dada por p|A|(1-p)|F|, onde |A| é o número de elos abertos e |F| o número de elos fechados da configuração. A expressão anterior só tem importância física se |A| e |F| forem ambos finitos, pois, caso contrário, a probabilidade de ocorrência de uma dada configuração será sempre nula. Neste trabalho, foram considerados dados cinemáticos publicados na literatura bem como aqueles obtidos pelos autores a partir de observações fotométricas realizadas no Observatório de Las Campanãs, em 1994, para a Galáxia Anelada Peculiar HRG 03401. Mostraremos que para certos valores de p, situados entre 0,5 e 0,6, os clusters assim formados irão simular, de maneira coerente, o referido objeto.

  10. The peak electromagnetic power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Guo, C.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the peak electromagnetic (EM) power radiated by return strokes have been made by integrating the Poynting vector of measured fields over an imaginary hemispherical surface that is centered on the lightning source, assuming that ground losses are negligible. Values of the peak EM power from first and subsequent strokes have means and standard deviations of 2 + or - 2 x 10 to the 10th and 3 + or - 4 x 10 to the 9th W, respectively. The average EM power that is radiated by subsequent strokes, at the time of the field peak, is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical power that is radiated by these strokes in the wavelength interval from 0.4 to 1.1 micron; hence an upper limit to the radiative efficiency of a subsequent stroke is of the order of 1 percent or less at this time.

  11. High-temperature emplacement of the Cerro Galán and Toconquis Group ignimbrites (Puna plateau, NW Argentina) determined by TRM analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesti, Chiara; Porreca, Massimiliano; Giordano, Guido; Mattei, Massimo; Cas, Raymond A. F.; Wright, Heather M. N.; Folkes, Chris B.; Viramonte, Josè

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of pyroclastic flow emplacement temperatures in the Cerro Galán ignimbrite and Toconquis Group ignimbrites were determined using thermal remanent magnetization of lithic clasts embedded within the deposits. These ignimbrites belong to the Cerro Galán volcanic system, one of the largest calderas in the world, in the Puna plateau, NW Argentina. Temperature estimates for the 2.08-Ma Cerro Galán ignimbrite are retrieved from 40 sites in 14 localities (176 measured clasts), distributed at different distances from the caldera and different stratigraphic heights. Additionally, temperature estimates were obtained from 27 sample sites (125 measured clasts) from seven ignimbrite units forming the older Toconquis Group (5.60-4.51 Ma), mainly outcropping along a type section at Rio Las Pitas, Vega Real Grande. The paleomagnetic data obtained by progressive thermal demagnetization show that the clasts of the Cerro Galán ignimbrite have one single magnetic component, oriented close to the expected geomagnetic field at the time of emplacement. Results show therefore that most of the clasts acquired a new magnetization oriented parallel to the magnetic field at the moment of the ignimbrite deposition, suggesting that the clasts were heated up to or above the highest blocking temperature ( T b) of the magnetic minerals ( T b = 580°C for magnetite; T b = 600-630°C for hematite). We obtained similar emplacement temperature estimations for six out of the seven volcanic units belonging to the Toconquis Group, with the exception of one unit (Lower Merihuaca), where we found two distinct magnetic components. The estimation of emplacement temperatures in this latter case is constrained at 580-610°C, which are lower than the other ignimbrites. These estimations are also in agreement with the lowest pre-eruptive magma temperatures calculated for the same unit (i.e., 790°C; hornblende-plagioclase thermometer; Folkes et al. 2011b). We conclude that the Cerro Gal

  12. Phylogeography of the Vermilion Flycatcher species complex: Multiple speciation events, shifts in migratory behavior, and an apparent extinction of a Galápagos-endemic bird species.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Ore; Witt, Christopher C; Jaramillo, Alvaro; Dumbacher, John P

    2016-09-01

    The Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) is a widespread species found in North and South America and the Galápagos. Its 12 recognized subspecies vary in degree of geographic isolation, phenotypic distinctness, and migratory status. Some authors suggest that Galápagos subspecies nanus and dubius constitute one or more separate species. Observational reports of distinct differences in song also suggest separate species status for the austral migrant subspecies rubinus. To evaluate geographical patterns of diversification and taxonomic limits within this species complex, we carried out a molecular phylogenetic analysis encompassing 10 subspecies and three outgroup taxa using mitochondrial (ND2, Cyt b) and nuclear loci (ODC introns 6 through 7, FGB intron 5). We used samples of preserved tissues from museum collections as well as toe pad samples from museum skins. Galápagos and continental clades were recovered as sister groups, with initial divergence at ∼1mya. Within the continental clade, North and South American populations were sister groups. Three geographically distinct clades were recovered within South America. We detected no genetic differences between two broadly intergrading North American subspecies, mexicanus and flammeus, suggesting they should not be recognized as separate taxa. Four western South American subspecies were also indistinguishable on the basis of loci that we sampled, but occur in a region with patchy habitat, and may represent recently isolated populations. The austral migrant subspecies, rubinus, comprised a monophyletic mitochondrial clade and had many unique nuclear DNA alleles. In combination with its distinct song, exclusive song recognition behavior, different phenology, and an isolated breeding range, our data suggests that this taxon represents a separate species from other continental populations. Mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, morphology, and behavior suggest that Galápagos forms should be elevated to two

  13. Detecção inesperada de efeitos de lentes fracas em grupos de galáxias pouco luminosos em raios-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, R.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Sodrã©, L., Jr.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Cypriano, E. S.; Lengruber, L. L.; Cuevas, H.; Ramirez, A.

    2003-08-01

    Obtivemos, como parte do programa de verificação científica do GMOS Sul, imagens profundas de três grupos de galáxias: G97 e G102 (z~0,4) e G124 (z = 0,17). Esses alvos foram selecionados a partir do catálogo de fontes extensas de Vikhlinin (1998), por terem luminosidades em raios X menores que 3´1043 ergs s-1, valor cerca de uma ou duas ordens de grandeza inferior ao de aglomerados de galáxias. O objetivo primário dessas observações é o estudo da evolução de galáxias em grupos. Grupos são ambientes menos densos que aglomerados, contêm a grande maioria das galáxias do Universo mas que, até o momento, foram estudados detalhadamente apenas no Universo local (z~0). Com esses dados efetuamos uma análise estatística da distorção na forma das galáxias de fundo (lentes gravitacionais fracas) como forma de inferir o conteúdo e a distribuição de massa nesses grupos apesar de que, em princípio, esse efeito não deveria ser detectado uma vez que os critérios de seleção adotados previlegiam sistemas de baixa massa. De fato, para G124 obtivemos apenas um limite superior para sua massa que é compatível com sua luminosidade em raios X. De modo contrário e surpreendente, os objetos G102 e G097, aparentam ter massas que resultariam em dispersões de velocidade maiores que 1000 km s-1, muito maiores do que se espera para grupos de galáxias. Com efeito, para G097 obtivemos, a partir de dados do satélite XMM, uma estimativa para a temperatura do gás intragrupo de kT = 2,6 keV, que é tipica de sistemas com dispersões de velocidade de ~ 600 km s-1, bem característica de grupos. Essas contradições aparentes entre lentes fracas e raios X podem ser explicadas de dois modos: i) a massa obtida por lentes estaria sobreestimada devido à superposição de estruturas massivas ao longo da linha de visada ou ii) a temperatura do gás do meio intra-grupo reflete o potencial gravitacional de estruturas menores que estariam se fundindo para formar uma

  14. Galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GalT) gene: A novel positive regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bijina; Chen, Wyman; Tang, Manshu; Huang, Xiaoping; Cakici, Didem Demirbas; Siddiqi, Anwer; Berry, Gerard; Lai, Kent

    2016-01-29

    The vital importance of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism has been repeatedly demonstrated by various uni-/multicellular model organisms, as well human patients who have inherited deficiencies of the key GAL enzymes. Yet, other than the obvious links to the glycolytic pathway and glycan biosynthetic pathways, little is known about how this metabolic pathway interacts with the rest of the metabolic and signaling networks. In this study, we compared the growth and the expression levels of the key components of the PI3K/Akt growth signaling pathway in primary fibroblasts derived from normal and galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GalT)-deficient mice, the latter exhibited a subfertility phenotype in adult females and growth restriction in both sexes. The growth potential and the protein levels of the pAkt(Thr308), pAkt(Ser473), pan-Akt, pPdk1, and Hsp90 proteins were significantly reduced by 62.5%, 60.3%, 66%, 66%, and 50%, respectively in the GalT-deficient cells. Reduced expression of phosphorylated Akt proteins in the mutant cells led to diminished phosphorylation of Gsk-3β (-74%). Protein expression of BiP and pPten were 276% and 176% higher respectively in cells with GalT-deficiency. Of the 24 genes interrogated using QIAGEN RT(2) Profiler PCR Custom Arrays, the mRNA abundance of Akt1, Pdpk1, Hsp90aa1 and Pi3kca genes were significantly reduced at least 2.03-, 1.37-, 2.45-, and 1.78-fold respectively in mutant fibroblasts. Both serum-fasted normal and GalT-deficient cells responded to Igf-1-induced activation of Akt phosphorylation at +15 min, but the mutant cells have lower phosphorylation levels. The steady-state protein abundance of Igf-1 receptor was also significantly reduced in mutant cells. Our results thus demonstrated that GalT deficiency can effect down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt growth signaling pathway in mouse fibroblasts through distinct mechanisms targeting both gene and protein expression levels. PMID:26773505

  15. Recurrent cis-SAGe chimeric RNA, D2HGDH-GAL3ST2, in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fujun; Song, Zhenguo; Chang, Maxwell; Song, Yansu; Frierson, Henry; Li, Hui

    2016-09-28

    Neighboring genes transcribing in the same direction can form chimeric RNAs via cis-splicing (cis-SAGe). Previously, we reported 16 novel cis-SAGe chimeras in prostate cancer cell lines, and performed in silico validation on 14 pairs of normal and tumor samples from Chinese patients. However, whether these fusions exist in different populations, as well as their clinical implications, remains unclear. To investigate, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline using modified Spliced Transcripts Alignment to a Reference (STAR) to quantify these fusion RNAs simultaneously in silico. From RNA-Seq data of 100 paired normal and prostate cancer samples from TCGA, we find that most fusions are not specific to cancer. However, D2HGDH-GAL3ST2 is more frequently seen in cancer samples, and seems to be enriched in the African American group. Further validation with our own collection as well as from commercial sources did not detect this fusion RNA in 29 normal prostate samples, but in 19 of 93 prostate cancer samples. It is more frequently detected in late stage cancer, suggesting a role in cancer progression. Consistently, silencing this fusion resulted in dramatic reduction of cell proliferation rate and cell motility. PMID:27322736

  16. Galápagos hydroclimate of the Common Era from paired microalgal and mangrove biomarker 2H/1H values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2016-03-01

    Tropical maritime precipitation affects global atmospheric circulation, influencing storm tracks and the size and location of subtropical deserts. Paleoclimate evidence suggests centuries-long changes in rainfall in the tropical Pacific over the past 2,000 y, but these remain poorly characterized across most of the ocean where long, continuous proxy records capable of resolving decadal-to-centennial climate changes are still virtually nonexistent despite substantial efforts to develop them. Here we apply a new climate proxy based on paired hydrogen isotope ratios from microalgal and mangrove-derived sedimentary lipids in the Galápagos to reconstruct maritime precipitation changes during the Common Era. We show that increased rainfall during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (∼1400-1850 CE) was likely caused by a southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and that this shift occurred later than previously recognized, coeval with dynamically linked precipitation changes in South America and the western tropical Pacific. Before the LIA, we show that drier conditions at the onset of the Medieval Warm Period (∼800-1300 CE) and wetter conditions ca. 2 ka were caused by changes in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Collectively, the large natural variations in tropical rainfall we detect, each linked to a multicentury perturbation of either ENSO-like variability or the ITCZ, imply a high sensitivity of tropical Pacific rainfall to climate forcings.

  17. Inhibition of Sophocarpine on Poly I: C/D-GalN-Induced Immunological Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yin-Qiu; Li, Peng-Yan; Wang, Jia-Bo; Zhou, Hou-Qin; Yang, Zhi-Rui; Yang, Rui-Chuang; Bai, Zhao-Fang; Wang, Li-Fu; Li, Jian-Yu; Liu, Hong-Hong; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of human immunological liver injury (ILI). Previous studies have demonstrated that Sophocarpine exerts activity in immune modulation. It also has a therapeutic effect on liver protection in that it can alleviate liver fibrosis by suppressing both the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the proliferation of the activated hepatic stellate cells. However, whether Sophocarpine protects the liver by regulating NK cell activity remains unclear. In this study, the modulating effect of Sophocarpine on NK cells in the liver was investigated. The results showed that Sophocarpine dramatically decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and attenuated the liver injury induced by Poly I: C/D-GalN in C57BL/6- mice. More importantly, Sophocarpine pre-treatment significantly suppressed NK cell activation and downregulated the expression of NKG2D, a receptor responsible for NK cell activation. Moreover, the protein levels of DAP12, ZAP76 and Syk decreased, as did their corresponding mRNA levels. Overall, our study demonstrates that Sophocarpine inhibits NK cell activity, thus making it a promising therapy for ILI. PMID:27570511

  18. Space-geodetic evidence for multiple magma reservoirs and subvolcanic lateral intrusions at Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk

    2012-10-01

    Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements of the surface deformation at Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos (Ecuador), acquired between January 2003 and September 2010, we study the structure and the dynamics of the shallow magmatic system of the volcano. Through the analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the measured line-of-sight displacement we identify multiple sources of deformation beneath the summit and the southern flank. At least two sources are considered to represent permanent zones of magma storage given their persistent or recurrent activity. Elastic deformation models indicate the presence of a flat-topped magma reservoir at ˜1.1 km below sea level and an oblate-spheroid cavity at ˜4.9 km b.s.l. The two reservoirs are hydraulically connected. This inferred structure of the shallow storage system is in agreement with previous geodetic studies and previous petrological analysis of both subaerial and submarine lavas. The almost eight-year-long observation interval provides for the first time geodetic evidence for two subvolcanic lateral intrusions from the central storage system (in December 2006 and August 2007). Subvolcanic lateral intrusions could provide the explanation for enigmatic volcanic events at Fernandina such as the rapid uplift at Punta Espinoza in 1927 and the 1968 caldera collapse without significant eruption.

  19. Impacts of climate variability and human colonization on the vegetation of the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Alejandra; Colinvaux, Paul; Bush, Mark; Correa-Metrio, Alexander; Conroy, Jessica; Gardener, Mark R; Jaramillo, Patricia; Steinitz-Kannan, Miriam; Overpeck, Jonathan

    2012-08-01

    A high-resolution (2-9 year sampling interval) fossil pollen record from the Galápagos Islands, which spans the last 2690 years, reveals considerable ecosystem stability. Vegetation changes associated with independently derived histories of El Niño Southern Oscillation variability provided evidence of shifts in the relative abundance of individual species rather than immigration or extinction. Droughts associated with the Medieval Climate Anomaly induced rapid ecological change that was followed by a reversion to the previous state. The paleoecological data suggested nonneutral responses to climatic forcing in this ecosystem prior to the period of human influence. Human impacts on the islands are evident in the record. A marked decline in long-term codominants of the pollen record, Alternanthera and Acalypha, produced a flora without modern analogue before 1930. Intensified animal husbandry after ca. 1930 may have induced the local extinction of Acalypha and Alternanthera. Reductions in populations of grazing animals in the 1970s and 1980s did not result in the return of the native flora, but in invasions by exotic species. After ca. 1970 the trajectory of habitat change accelerated, continuously moving the ecosystem away from the observed range of variability in the previous 2690 years toward a novel ecosystem. The last 40 years of the record also suggest unprecedented transport of lowland pollen to the uplands, consistent with intensified convection and warmer wet seasons. PMID:22928414

  20. Dynamic regulation of FGF23 by Fam20C phosphorylation, GalNAc-T3 glycosylation, and furin proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Engel, James L.; Wiley, Sandra E.; Xiao, Junyu; Gonzalez, David J.; Nidumanda Appaiah, Hitesh; Koller, Antonius; Nizet, Victor; White, Kenneth E.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2014-01-01

    The family with sequence similarity 20, member C (Fam20C) has recently been identified as the Golgi casein kinase. Fam20C phosphorylates secreted proteins on Ser-x-Glu/pSer motifs and loss-of-function mutations in the kinase cause Raine syndrome, an often-fatal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia. Fam20C is potentially an upstream regulator of the phosphate-regulating hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), because humans with FAM20C mutations and Fam20C KO mice develop hypophosphatemia due to an increase in full-length, biologically active FGF23. However, the mechanism by which Fam20C regulates FGF23 is unknown. Here we show that Fam20C directly phosphorylates FGF23 on Ser180, within the FGF23 R176XXR179/S180AE subtilisin-like proprotein convertase motif. This phosphorylation event inhibits O-glycosylation of FGF23 by polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GalNAc-T3), and promotes FGF23 cleavage and inactivation by the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Collectively, our results provide a molecular mechanism by which FGF23 is dynamically regulated by phosphorylation, glycosylation, and proteolysis. Furthermore, our findings suggest that cross-talk between phosphorylation and O-glycosylation of proteins in the secretory pathway may be an important mechanism by which secreted proteins are regulated. PMID:24706917

  1. Inhibition of Sophocarpine on Poly I: C/D-GalN-Induced Immunological Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin-Qiu; Li, Peng-Yan; Wang, Jia-Bo; Zhou, Hou-Qin; Yang, Zhi-Rui; Yang, Rui-Chuang; Bai, Zhao-Fang; Wang, Li-Fu; Li, Jian-Yu; Liu, Hong-Hong; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of human immunological liver injury (ILI). Previous studies have demonstrated that Sophocarpine exerts activity in immune modulation. It also has a therapeutic effect on liver protection in that it can alleviate liver fibrosis by suppressing both the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the proliferation of the activated hepatic stellate cells. However, whether Sophocarpine protects the liver by regulating NK cell activity remains unclear. In this study, the modulating effect of Sophocarpine on NK cells in the liver was investigated. The results showed that Sophocarpine dramatically decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and attenuated the liver injury induced by Poly I: C/D-GalN in C57BL/6- mice. More importantly, Sophocarpine pre-treatment significantly suppressed NK cell activation and downregulated the expression of NKG2D, a receptor responsible for NK cell activation. Moreover, the protein levels of DAP12, ZAP76 and Syk decreased, as did their corresponding mRNA levels. Overall, our study demonstrates that Sophocarpine inhibits NK cell activity, thus making it a promising therapy for ILI. PMID:27570511

  2. Galápagos hydroclimate of the Common Era from paired microalgal and mangrove biomarker 2H/1H values.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daniel B; Sachs, Julian P

    2016-03-29

    Tropical maritime precipitation affects global atmospheric circulation, influencing storm tracks and the size and location of subtropical deserts. Paleoclimate evidence suggests centuries-long changes in rainfall in the tropical Pacific over the past 2,000 y, but these remain poorly characterized across most of the ocean where long, continuous proxy records capable of resolving decadal-to-centennial climate changes are still virtually nonexistent despite substantial efforts to develop them. Here we apply a new climate proxy based on paired hydrogen isotope ratios from microalgal and mangrove-derived sedimentary lipids in the Galápagos to reconstruct maritime precipitation changes during the Common Era. We show that increased rainfall during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (∼1400-1850 CE) was likely caused by a southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and that this shift occurred later than previously recognized, coeval with dynamically linked precipitation changes in South America and the western tropical Pacific. Before the LIA, we show that drier conditions at the onset of the Medieval Warm Period (∼800-1300 CE) and wetter conditions ca. 2 ka were caused by changes in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Collectively, the large natural variations in tropical rainfall we detect, each linked to a multicentury perturbation of either ENSO-like variability or the ITCZ, imply a high sensitivity of tropical Pacific rainfall to climate forcings. PMID:26976574

  3. Nice Guys and Gals Finish Last? Not in Early Adolescence When Empathic, Accepted, and Popular Peers are Desirable.

    PubMed

    Bower, Andrew R; Nishina, Adrienne; Witkow, Melissa R; Bellmore, Amy

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about attributes that elicit romantic desirability in early adolescence. The current study, with a sample of 531 sixth-grade students (45% boys) attending ethnically diverse middle schools, used a resource control framework to explore which self-reported behaviors (e.g., empathy and aggression) and peer-reported status (e.g., acceptance and perceived popularity) predict the likelihood of being considered romantically desirable (i.e., receiving at least one "crush" nomination from an opposite sex grademate). Self-reported empathy was positively associated with students' romantic desirability (primarily for those with high peer acceptance), whereas self-reported aggression on its own did not. Both peer-acceptance and popularity also were positively associated with students' romantic desirability, and aggressive behavior reduced popularity's effect. Although aggression may be integral for obtaining high peer status across cultures, prosocial behaviors were romantically valued. Our findings suggest that peer-vetted social status elicits romantic interest and during early adolescence, nice guys and gals really do not finish last. PMID:26316305

  4. Habitat selection and ecological speciation in Galápagos warbler finches (Certhidea olivacea and Certhidea fusca).

    PubMed

    Tonnis, Brandon; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Petren, Kenneth

    2005-04-22

    We investigated phylogeographic divergence among populations of Galápagos warble finches. Their broad distribution, lack of phenotypic differentiation and low levels of genetic divergence make warbler finches an appropriate model to study speciation in allopatry. A positive relationship between genetic and geographical distance is expected for island taxa. Warbler finches actually showed a negative isolation by distance relationship, causing us to reject the hypothesis of distance-limited dispersal. An alternative hypothesis, that dispersal is limited by habitat similarity, was supported. We found a positive correlation between genetic distances and differences in maximum elevation among islands, which is an indicator of ecological similarity. MtDNA sequence variation revealed monophyletic support for two distinct species. Certhidea olivacea have recently dispersed among larger central islands, while some Certhidea fusca have recently dispersed to small islands at opposite ends of the archipelago. We conclude that females have chosen to breed on islands with habitats similar to their natal environment. Habitat selection is implicated as an important component of speciation of warbler finches, which is the earliest known divergence of the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches. These results suggest that small populations can harbour cryptic but biologically meaningful variation that may affect longer term evolutionary processes. PMID:15940826

  5. Ecological and evolutionary influences on body size and shape in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    Chiari, Ylenia; Glaberman, Scott; Tarroso, Pedro; Caccone, Adalgisa; Claude, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Oceanic islands are often inhabited by endemic species that have undergone substantial morphological evolutionary change due to processes of multiple colonizations from various source populations, dispersal, and local adaptation. Galápagos marine iguanas are an example of an island endemic exhibiting high morphological diversity, including substantial body size variation among populations and sexes, but the causes and magnitude of this variation are not well understood. We obtained morphological measurements from marine iguanas throughout their distribution range. These data were combined with genetic and local environmental data from each population to investigate the effects of evolutionary history and environmental conditions on body size and shape variation and sexual dimorphism. Our results indicate that body size and shape are highly variable among populations. Sea surface temperature and island perimeter, but not evolutionary history as depicted by phylogeographic patterns in this species, explain variation in body size among populations. Conversely, evolutionary history, but not environmental parameters or island size, was found to influence variation in body shape among populations. Finally, in all populations except one, we found strong sexual dimorphism in body size and shape in which males are larger, with higher heads than females, while females have longer heads than males. Differences among populations suggest that plasticity and/or genetic adaptation may shape body size and shape variation in marine iguanas. This study will help target future investigations to address the contribution of plasticity versus genetic adaptation on size and shape variation in marine iguanas. PMID:27041683

  6. Salmonella Strains Isolated from Galápagos Iguanas Show Spatial Structuring of Serovar and Genomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Lankau, Emily W.; Cruz Bedon, Lenin; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2012-01-01

    It is thought that dispersal limitation primarily structures host-associated bacterial populations because host distributions inherently limit transmission opportunities. However, enteric bacteria may disperse great distances during food-borne outbreaks. It is unclear if such rapid long-distance dispersal events happen regularly in natural systems or if these events represent an anthropogenic exception. We characterized Salmonella enterica isolates from the feces of free-living Galápagos land and marine iguanas from five sites on four islands using serotyping and genomic fingerprinting. Each site hosted unique and nearly exclusive serovar assemblages. Genomic fingerprint analysis offered a more complex model of S. enterica biogeography, with evidence of both unique strain pools and of spatial population structuring along a geographic gradient. These findings suggest that even relatively generalist enteric bacteria may be strongly dispersal limited in a natural system with strong barriers, such as oceanic divides. Yet, these differing results seen on two typing methods also suggests that genomic variation is less dispersal limited, allowing for different ecological processes to shape biogeographical patterns of the core and flexible portions of this bacterial species' genome. PMID:22615968

  7. Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species found in mainland Ecuador and on the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Portero Barahona, Patricia; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-04-01

    Seven strains representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Kazachstania were found at several collection sites on both mainland Ecuador (Yasuní National Park) and the Galápagos (Santa Cruz Island). Two strains (CLQCA 20-132(T) and CLQCA 24SC-045) were isolated from rotten wood samples, two further strains (CLQCA 20-280 and CLQCA 20-348) were isolated from soil samples, and three strains (CLQCA 20-198, CLQCA 20-374 and CLQCA 20-431) were isolated from decaying fruits. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to Kazachstania servazzii and Kazachstania unispora. Although the strains could not be distinguished from one another based upon their differing geographical origins, they could be differentiated according to their isolation source (fruit, soil or wood) by ITS sequencing. The species name Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with CLQCA 20-132(T) ( = CBS 13946(T) = NCYC 4008(T)) designated the type strain. PMID:25644482

  8. Behavioral and physiological adjustments to new predators in an endemic island species, the Galápagos marine iguana.

    PubMed

    Berger, Silke; Wikelski, Martin; Romero, L Michael; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Rödl, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    For the past 5 to 15 million years, marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), endemic to the Galápagos archipelago, experienced relaxed predation pressure and consequently show negligible anti-predator behavior. However, over the past few decades introduced feral cats and dogs started to prey on iguanas on some of the islands. We investigated experimentally whether behavioral and endocrine anti-predator responses changed in response to predator introduction. We hypothesized that flight initiation distances (FID) and corticosterone (CORT) concentrations should increase in affected populations to cope with the novel predators. Populations of marine iguanas reacted differentially to simulated predator approach depending on whether or not they were previously naturally exposed to introduced predators. FIDs were larger at sites with predation than at sites without predation. Furthermore, the occurrence of new predators was associated with increased stress-induced CORT levels in marine iguanas. In addition, age was a strong predictor of variation in FID and CORT levels. Juveniles, which are generally more threatened by predators compared to adults, showed larger FIDs and higher CORT baseline levels as well as higher stress-induced levels than adults. The results demonstrate that this naive island species shows behavioral and physiological plasticity associated with actual predation pressure, a trait that is presumably adaptive. However, the adjustments in FID are not sufficient to cope with the novel predators. We suggest that low behavioral plasticity in the face of introduced predators may drive many island species to extinction. PMID:17904141

  9. RegR, a Global LacI/GalR Family Regulator, Modulates Virulence and Competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Ogunniyi, A. David; Diallo, Nicole; Huet, Yvette; Desnottes, Jean-François; Paton, James C.; Escaich, Sonia; Trombe, Marie-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The homolactic and catalase-deficient pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only tolerant to oxygen but requires the activity of its NADH oxidase, Nox, to develop optimal virulence and competence for genetic transformation. In this work, we show that the global regulator RegR is also involved in these traits. Genetic dissection revealed that RegR regulates competence and the expression of virulence factors, including hyaluronidase. In bacteria grown in vitro, RegR represses hyaluronidase. At neutral pH, it increases adherence to A549 epithelial cells, and at alkaline pH, it acts upstream of the CiaRH two-component signaling system to activate competence. These phenotypes are not associated with changes in antibiotic resistance, central metabolism, and carbohydrate utilization. Although the RegR0 (where 0 indicates the loss of the protein) mutation is sufficient to attenuate experimental virulence of strain 23477 in mice, the introduction of an additional hyl0 (where 0 indicates the loss of function) mutation in the RegR0 strain 23302 dramatically reduces its virulence. This indicates that residual virulence of the RegR0 Hyl+ derivative is due to hyaluronidase and supports the dual role of RegR in virulence. This LacI/GalR regulator, not essential for in vitro growth in rich media, is indeed involved in the adaptive response of the pneumococcus via its control of competence, adherence, and virulence. PMID:12704136

  10. [Influence of the activator of transcription GAL4 on growth and development of embryos and embryonic cells in primary cultures of sand dollar].

    PubMed

    Odintsova, N A; Kiselev, K V; Bulgakov, V P; Kol'tsova, E A; Iakovlev, K V

    2003-01-01

    In order to solve many tasks of biotechnology, constant lines of the cells of marine invertebrates with a high growth potential are required, which are absent at present. We used the universal activator of transcription gal4 to change the degree of expression of genes of growth factors in embryonic sea urchin cells and, thereby, increase their proliferative activity. The fertilized sea urchin eggs and dissociated embryonic cells at the blastula stage were treated with plasmids containing both the functional gene gal4 and the gene devoid of the regions encoding the activator domain. The transfection of embryonic sea urchin eggs with the functional gene led to cell dedifferentiation and formation of tumor-like structures in the embryos or increased number of embryonic cells in culture. In the cells obtained from the transfected embryos, the pigments were found within two months of cultivation, whose absorption spectrum coincided with that of echinochrome. PMID:12942737

  11. Attempted detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in environmental waters using a simple approach to evaluate the potential for waterborne transmission in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Verant, Michelle L; d'Ozouville, Noemi; Parker, Patricia G; Shapiro, Karen; VanWormer, Elizabeth; Deem, Sharon L

    2014-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a health concern for wildlife and humans, particularly in island ecosystems. In the Galápagos Islands, exposure to Toxoplasma gondii has been found in marine avifauna on islands with and without domestic cats. To evaluate potential waterborne transmission of T. gondii, we attempted to use filtration and epifluorescent microscopy to detect autofluorescent T. gondii oocysts in fresh and estuarine surface water samples. T. gondii oocyst-like structures were microscopically visualized but were not confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analyses. Further research is needed to refine environmental pathogen screening techniques and to evaluate disease risk of waterborne zoonoses such as T. gondii for wildlife and humans, particularly in the Galápagos and other naive island ecosystems. PMID:24306552

  12. Mitogenic activity of CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zedong; Kim, Daekyung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    An N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific Ca(2+)-dependent lectin (C-type lectin), isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), CEL-I, showed potent mitogenic activity toward normal mouse spleen cells. The mitogenic activity of CEL-I, which reached a maximum at 100 microg/ml, was inhibited by GalNAc in a concentration-dependent manner. The mitogenic effect of CEL-I at 10 microg/ml on T cell- enriched splenocytes was at a similar level due to a well-known T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), at 10 microg/ml. Furthermore, CEL-I evoked a mitogenic response from nude mouse spleen cells, while no significant effects of Con A on this cell population were observed over a wide range of concentrations. These results suggest that CEL-I is a potent mitogenic lectin with the ability to stimulate both T and B cells. PMID:20699569

  13. Homolog of the maize beta-glucosidase aggregating factor from sorghum is a jacalin-related GalNAc-specific lectin but lacks protein aggregating activity.

    PubMed

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Yu, Hyun Young; Bevan, David R; Esen, Asim

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we identified the maize beta-glucosidase aggregating factor (BGAF) as a jacalin-related lectin (JRL) and showed that its lectin domain is responsible for beta-glucosidase aggregation. By searching for BGAF homologs in sorghum, we identified and obtained an EST clone and determined its complete sequence. The predicted protein had the same modular structure as maize BGAF, shared 67% sequence identity with it, and revealed the presence of two potential carbohydrate-binding sites (GG...ATYLQ, site I and GG...GVVLD, site II). Maize BGAF1 is the only lectin from a class of modular JRLs containing an N-terminal dirigent and a C-terminal JRL domain, whose sugar specificity and beta-glucosidase aggregating activity have been studied in detail. We purified to homogeneity a BGAF homolog designated as SL (Sorghum lectin) from sorghum and expressed its recombinant version in Escherichia coli. The native protein had a molecular mass of 32 kD and was monomeric. Both native and recombinant SL-agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, and inhibition assays indicated that SL is a GalNAc-specific lectin. Exchanging the GG...GVVLD motif in SL with that of maize BGAF1 (GG...GIAVT) had no effect on GalNAc-binding, whereas binding to Man was abolished. Substitution of Thr(293) and Gln(296) in site I to corresponding residues (Val(294) and Asp(297)) of maize BGAF1 resulted in the loss of GalNAc-binding, indicating that site I is responsible for generating GalNAc specificity in SL. Gel-shift and pull-down assays after incubating SL with maize and sorghum beta-glucosidases showed no evidence of interaction nor were any SL-protein complexes detected in sorghum tissue extracts, suggesting that the sorghum homolog does not participate in protein-protein interactions. PMID:19056785

  14. Cocos Plate Seamounts offshore NW Costa Rica and SW Nicaragua: Implications for large-scale distribution of Galápagos plume material in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Antje; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Hauff, Folkmar; Bogaard, Paul v. d.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The origin of intraplate volcanism not directly part of a hotspot track, such as diffuse seamount provinces, and the extent of mantle plume influence on the upper mantle remain enigmatic. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar age data and geochemical (major and trace-element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic) data from seamounts on the Cocos Plate presently located offshore of NW Costa Rica and SW Nicaragua. The seamounts (~ 7-24 Ma) require mixing of an enriched ocean island basalt composition, similar to that of the Northern Galápagos Domain, with two depleted components. One of the depleted components is similar to East Pacific Rise normal mid-ocean ridge basalt and the other has more depleted incompatible elements, either reflecting secondary melting of MORB or a depleted Galápagos plume component. Seamounts with ages significantly younger than the ocean crust formed in an intraplate setting and can be explained by northward transport of Galápagos plume material along the base of the Cocos Plate up to 900 km away from the hotspot and 250-500 km north of the Galápagos hotspot track. We propose that melting occurs due to decompression as the mantle upwells to shallower depth as it flows northwards, either due to changes in lithospheric thickness or as a result of upwelling at the edge of a viscous plug of accumulated plume material at the base of the lithosphere. The tholeiitic to alkaline basalt compositions of the Cocos Plate Seamounts compared to the more silica under-saturated compositions of Hawaiian rejuvenated and arch (alkali basalts to nephelinites) lavas are likely to reflect the significant difference in age (< 25 vs ~ 90 Ma) and thus thickness of the lithosphere on which the lavas were erupted.

  15. Effect of ST3GAL 4 and FUT 7 on sialyl Lewis X synthesis and multidrug resistance in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongye; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Peng; Song, Xiaobo; Miao, Xiaoyan; Li, Yanping; Jia, Li

    2014-09-01

    Sialyl Lewis X (sLe X, CD15s) is a key antigen produced on tumor cell surfaces during multidrug resistance (MDR) development. The present study investigated the effect of α1, 3 fucosyltransferase VII (FucT VII) and α2, 3 sialyltransferase IV (ST3Gal IV) on sLe X oligosaccharides synthesis as well as their impact on MDR development in acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML). FUT7 and ST3GAL4 were overexpressed in three AML MDR cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) of AML patients with MDR by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A close association was found between the expression levels of FUT7 and ST3GAL4 and the amount of sLe X oligosaccharides, as well as the phenotypic variation of MDR of HL60 and HL60/ADR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Manipulation of these two genes' expression modulated the activity of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, thereby regulating the proportionally mutative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), both of which are known to be involved in MDR. Blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway by its specific inhibitor LY294002 or Akt