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Sample records for 9th power gal

  1. Mathematics 9th Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The Materials in this bulletin indicate suggested teaching procedures needed to implement the teaching of "mathematics, 9th Year" as outlined in Curriculum Bulletin No. 3, 1958-59 series, Course of Study Mathematics 7-8-9. Whereas the course of study suggests the application of mathematical principles such as commutativity,…

  2. Power Conversion and Transmission Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The document is a guide to a 9th and 10th grade industrial education course investigating the total system of power--how man controls, converts, transmits, and uses energy; the rationale is that if one is to learn of the total system of industry, the subsystem of power must be investigated. The guide provides a "body of knowledge" chart…

  3. Nuclear Science Symposium, 4th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 9th, San Francisco, Calif., October 19-21, 1977, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the following types of high energy physics instrumentation: drift chambers, multiwire proportional chambers, calorimeters, optical detectors, ionization and scintillation detectors, solid state detectors, and electronic and digital subsystems. Attention is also paid to reactor instrumentation, nuclear medicine instrumentation, data acquisition systems for nuclear instrumentation, microprocessor applications in nuclear science, environmental instrumentation, control and instrumentation of nuclear power generating stations, and radiation monitoring. Papers are also presented on instrumentation for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory.

  4. BEAMS 92. Proceedings of the International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams (9th) Held in Washington, DC on May 25-29 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-Il and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew...la shows the machine prior to final assembly, while Figure lb shuws the front - end after aLsembly. This nodule has becn designed and built to be a...Bremsstrahlung load with a 70 ns power pulsewidth. - 336 - 1 (a). Prototype module 1 (PM 1) prior to final 1 WL. Front end of PM1 after assembly. assembly. PM 1

  5. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. This photograph shows the Cornell #2 team driving their vehicle through the course. The team finished the race in second place in the college division. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle, that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  6. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the team from Lafayette County High school in Higginsville, Missouri, designated Lafayette County team #1, races through the course to cross the finish line to win the high school division. The team beat out 26 other teams representing high schools from 9 states. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  7. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the New Orleans area schools team #2 from New Orleans, Louisiana maneuvers through an obstacle course. The team captured second place in the high school division competition. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  8. 9th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. In this photograph, the Cornell #1 team, the collegiate first place winner, maneuvers their vehicle through the course. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a humanpowered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  9. Pittsburgh Building "Nation" of 9th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Bitter experience has shown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that if students are going to leave school, they are most likely to do it between the 8th and 9th grades. To combat that problem, the school district has launched a full-on campaign to get its rising freshmen into high school and keep them there. Two weeks before school opened, the district…

  10. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  11. Positive Feedback Genetic Circuit Incorporating a Constitutively Active Mutant Gal3 into Yeast GAL Induction System.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Shintaro; Ishii, Jun; Matsuno, Toshihide; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Matsubara, Daiki; Tominaga, Masahiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-27

    The GAL expression system is the most frequently used induction technique in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a simple but powerful genetic circuit for use with the GAL induction system. Briefly, an artificial positive feedback circuit was incorporated into the GAL regulatory network. We selected green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter of GAL1 induction, and designed a strain that expressed a constitutively active Gal3 mutant protein (Gal3(c)) under control of the GAL10 promoter. In the resulting strain, GAL1 and GAL10 promoters regulate the expression of GFP and GAL3(c), respectively. Because Gal3(c) sequesters the Gal80 repressor away from the Gal4 transcriptional activator in the same manner as the galactose-bound Gal3, the expressed Gal3(c) protein provokes further expression of GFP and Gal3(c), yielding further enhancement of GAL induction. Thus, this GAL3(c)-mediated positive feedback circuit permits substantially enriched induction of a target gene at extremely low concentrations, or even in the absence, of galactose, while maintaining the strict glucose-mediated repression of the target.

  12. Former 9th and possible future 9th planet in the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    4 terrestrial planets and 4 giant planets were formed in the Solar system. The Main asteroid belt is located between them, and the Kuiper belt and Oort cloud are located beyond the giant planets. Therefore, the planetary system is surrounded by a swarm of rocky-icy bodies up to a distance of 105 AU. The former 9th planet in the Solar system, Pluto, is the first known object of the Kuiper Belt. Due to data from the spacecraft "New Horizons" we made significant progress in the study of the physical characteristics of the object and its surface. Numerous observations have shown that the Kuiper belt itself is dynamically stable. And the source of cometary nuclei is a disk scattered by the gravitational perturbation of the giant planets more than 4 billion years ago. Recently, it was reported on indirect evidence of the existence of a new 9th planet in the Solar system with a mass 10 times greater than the mass of the Earth, a distance from the Sun ∼200 AU at perihelion, 600-1200 AU at aphelion, and an orbital period of ∼15000 years. These conclusions are based on the calculation of the orbits of 6 presently known objects of the scattered disc. We pay attention that, in moments close to their discovery, they were located near the perihelion, had a maximum brightness and a maximum orbital velocity. On the basis of probabilistic assumptions, we estimated that the probable number of the same bodies with eccentric orbits should be estimated at many thousands rather than at a few. For the initial evaluation, we used observational data from the Infrared Space Telescope "WISE". They showed that any Saturn's analog has not been registered at distances up to 30 000 AU. Therefore, a super-Earth with a radius of <11000 km (with a mass of ∼10 Earth masses) would have been seen at a distance up to 1000 AU. Thus, either unknown 9th planet is now at a greater distance, or these results cannot be directly scaled to the super-Earth with a disproporti! onately lower internal heat

  13. 9th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2015-08-31

    DOE OFES supported the 9th International Conference on Z-Pinches (DZP 2014) held in Napa, CA in August 2014. Funds were used to support travel for several US students, and to disseminate information through the publication of a proceedings volume.

  14. The Ethnic Context and Attitudes toward 9th Grade Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Sandra; Morales-Chicas, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the relations between ethnic context and attitudes about 9th grade math in youth from different ethnic groups who had recently transitioned to high school. The large sample comprised African American, Latino, White, and Asian youth (n = 2,265, 55% girls, M[subscript age] = 14.6 yrs.) A new questionnaire was developed…

  15. The Impact of Having 9th Graders "Do History"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlmeier, Jada

    2005-01-01

    The views of the author's students about history caused her to reflect on her teaching, specifically, what she was lacking in her attempts to teach civic competence through history. This process led her to research historical thinking and design a study in which she exposed her students to the rigors of history. Grant's (2001) study of 9th grade…

  16. CCD observations of Phoebe, 9th satellite of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienga, A.; Arlot, J.-E.; Baron, N.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Crochot, A.; Emelyanov, N.; Thuillot, W.

    2002-08-01

    In 1998 and 1999, we started observations of the 9th satellite of Saturn. We made 163 observations using the 120 cm-telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. We used the USNO A2 catalogue of stars for the astrometric reduction. With the help of observations of optical counterparts of ICRF sources, a zonal correction to the USNO A2.0 catalogue was computed and applied to the Phoebe positions. A comparison with the most recent theories was made.

  17. NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Eight of the twelve members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics attending the 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference posed for this photograph at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 23, 1934. Those pictured are (left to right): Brig. Gen. Charles A. Lindbergh, USAFR Vice Admiral Arthur B. Cook, USN Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Joseph S. Ames, Committee Chairman Orville Wright Edward P. Warner Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, USN Eugene L. Vidal, Director, Bureau of Air Commerce.

  18. Review of the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop

    DOE PAGES

    Piron, Robin; Gilleron, Franck; Aglitskiy, Yefim; ...

    2017-02-24

    Here, we review the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop, which was held in the Jussieu campus, Paris, from November 30th to December 4th, 2015. This time, the workshop was mainly focused on a systematic investigation of iron NLTE steady-state kinetics and emissivity, over a broad range of temperature and density. Through these comparisons, topics such as modeling of the dielectronic processes, density effects or the effect of an external radiation field were addressed. The K-shell spectroscopy of iron plasmas was also addressed, notably through the interpretation of tokamak and laser experimental spectra.

  19. On a possible origin of the 9th planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doultsinou, V.; Varvoglis, H.

    2017-03-01

    In order to interpret some observational evidence in the bodies of the external Solar System (Kuiper Belt Objects - KBOs), it has been recently hypothesized that there exists a so-called 9th planet in the outskirts of our Solar System. Based on this assumption, we have decided to study a new scenario on the possible origin of this body. Instead of assuming that it originates from the Solar System, we will attempt to show that there can be a non-trivial possibility that the 9th planet was originally a free-floating planet (FFP) which, after a close encounter with the Solar System, was either gravitationally captured or flew by, affecting certain orbital elements, ω, Ω and π, as well as the position and orientation in physical space of certain KBOs. We have used a rather simple toy-model based on gravitational scattering in the general 3-dimensional 3-body problem, with the KBOs initially on a circular orbit around the Sun. Promising results serve as indications on this being a plausible scenario, and so this effort could be used as a springboard for a more involved study, based on a more realistic model.

  20. Introduction to the Proceedings of the 9th ISDH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, V. Michael, Jr.; Riskin, Seth

    2013-02-01

    The Proceedings As co-chairs of the 9th International Symposium on Display Holography, we welcome readers of this collection of papers and posters presented at the event. We hope that both attendees of the event and others pursuing the art, science, and business of holography and 3D imaging will find the authors' contributions of lasting interest and importance. The Event Since its creation at Lake Forest College in 1982 by Professor Tung H Jeong, ISDH has followed a model that differentiates it from other scientific conferences. The 9th ISDH continued this history, fully occupying a floor of the MIT Media Lab for five days. The single-track conference opened with reports on the state of holography in the various nations represented by the attendees, followed by a series of presentations on Education and Holography. One and one-half days of papers on Art and Holography followed, then sessions on Techniques and Materials, Digital Techniques, and Commercial and Applied Holography. A poster session permitted more in-depth discussion between authors and the audience. Two exhibitions of holographic works opened at ISDH: an informal display area at the symposium, and a 15-month-long MIT Museum exhibition, The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography. The success of an event of this sort requires the help of many people and organizations. We wish especially to recognize our Honorary Conference Chairs: Tung H Jeong and Joseph W Goodman; our Technical Program Committee: Hans I Bjelkhagen, Frank Fan, Nasser Peyghambarian, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa; and our Arts and Exhibition Committee: Betsy Connors-Chen, Melissa Crenshaw, John Durant, Dieter Jung, Linda Law, Martin Richardson, Jonathan Ross, and Sally Weber. Betsy also coordinated the on-site exhibition. Kristin Hall at the MIT Media Lab made local arrangements, while registration was handled by MIT Conference Services. We also gratefully acknowledge support from Lake Forest College, holographer.org, and authentibrand

  1. NANOTR9: 9th Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The conference series NanoTR is the major conference on nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey. It brings together leading scientists and engineers in nanotechnology to exchange information on their latest research progress. An exhibition of the companies working in the related field is also organized as a part of the event. With intensive international participation, NanoTR conference series has spread outside the national border and has become an international event in this field. Among international contributions, a wide interest from the countries around Turkey should be emphasized. 9th in the series was organized by Atatürk University in Erzurum-Turkey on June 24-28, 2013 with more than 900 scientists, researchers, private sector representatives from around the world. Conference program included 6 plenary speakers, 35 invited speakers (18 of them were from outside the country), 116 oral presentations, and 340 poster presentations. In addition to 6 plenary sessions, 17 oral and 4 poster sessions created very lively discussion forums covering a vast range of current and emerging sciences from nano-materials, nanoscience, nanofabrication, nano-engineering, nano-electronics, nano-biotechnology, to ethical and social issues of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Also, panel discussions about industrial applications, tutorial sessions have been organized for students, new-comers and company employees.

  2. FOREWORD: 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, Ahmed, Prof

    2015-08-01

    The 9th International Conference on Compressors and their Systems will be held in London from 5th - 9th September 2015, and as its Chairman, it is my pleasure to welcome you. This series of conferences started in 1999 organised by the Fluid Machinery Group of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) but since 2009 it has been managed by City University London in conjunction with the IMechE and the Institute of Refrigeration, both of which have been very proactive in promoting it. The Organising committee is grateful for their support and continued encouragement. This year, after rigorous reviewing, we have accepted over 80 technical papers for publication, the highest number in the conference history. On behalf of the organising committee I would like to thank the reviewers for their hard work and assistance. In addition to the main technical sessions, this year we have introduced a third day, specifically for Industry, to consider technology, business and market drivers on compressor developments. The traditional series of the short courses is this year continuing prior to the main event with the second short course/forum on Computational Fluid Dynamics in rotating positive displacement machines. I would like to extend my special thanks to our main sponsors, Holroyd PTG, Howden and Kapp Niels for their continuing support for the conference. With their generous contributions we have managed to keep the conference fees at the same level as in 2013, despite extending it to 3 days and holding it outside the University this year. The welcome reception on Sunday 6th September 2015 is dedicated to the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Centre for Positive Displacement Compressors Technology which was formed at City University in 1995 with support from the Royal Academy of Engineering and Holroyd; its main aim being to assist British manufacturers of screw compressors. The Centre has since made a significant impact on the screw compressor world, far beyond

  3. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  4. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  5. Aiming Higher: Is Your 9th Grader on Track for College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A teenager's future starts on 9th grade with the safe and welcoming environment, excellent teachers, and challenging instruction provided at this school. Believe it or not, college begins in 9th grade. If parents dream of their son or daughter going to college, they should not put off planning until their junior or senior year in high school--it…

  6. 9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

    2003-08-24

    The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

  7. A Summative Program Evaluation of a Comprehensive 9th Grade Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 8th grade to 9th grade is one that is replete with challenges for students, especially for minority students who live in economically disadvantaged communities. One low-income, high minority comprehensive high school in the western United States implemented five separate strategies to create a freshman transition program to aid…

  8. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  9. The Effect of Group Work on Misconceptions of 9th Grade Students about Newton's Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergin, Serap

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of group work and traditional method on 9th grade students' misconceptions about Newton Laws was investigated. The study was conducted in three classes in an Anatolian Vocational High School in Ankara/Turkey in the second term of the 2014-2015 academic year. Two of these classes were chosen as the experimental group and…

  10. 5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. West side of State Steeet looking down 9th Steeet. Immediatly to the west lie the Illinois and Michigan Canal, the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, and the Des Plaines River. - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  11. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  12. The Relationship between Mathematics Teachers' Teaching Approaches and 9th Grade Students' Mathematics Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briede, Liene

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between the teaching approach adopted by mathematics teachers and their 9th grade students' mathematical self. The study searched for the answers on three research questions, namely, about 1) the approaches prevailing in mathematics teachers' beliefs about effective teaching and self-reports…

  13. The Evaluation of Health Education Program (HEP) of 9th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Polat; Gürol, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of evaluation is to improve the quality of program. So, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the Health Education Program of 9th graders (HEP) with Educational Criticism Model of Eisner. The study was conducted with the qualitative research method. A holistic single case design was employed in this study. The typical case…

  14. A Comparison of Students' Choices of 9th Grade Physical Education Activities by Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant M.; Cleven, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district and to compare preferences by ethnicity. Results indicated that basketball, football, bowling, softball/baseball, swimming, and volleyball were the most preferred activities. These preferences may be…

  15. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  16. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to

  17. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  18. The Implementation of Effective Teaching Practices in English Classroom for Grades 8th, 9th, and 10th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; And Others

    This study explored teachers' behavior as related to effective teaching practices in 8th, 9th, and 10th grade English classrooms in Jordan. The study also examined some variables that could predict teachers' implementation of effective teaching practices and aimed at finding an estimate of the percentage of students in 8th, 9th, and 10th grades…

  19. The Effect of Conceptual Change Approach to Eliminate 9th Grade High School Students' Misconceptions about Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbas, Yavuz; Gencturk, Ebru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of teaching based on conceptual change overcome misconceptions of 9th grade high school students about the subject of air pressure. The sampling of the study was formed with two classes of 9th grade students from a general high school in the city-center of Trabzon. A quasi-experimental…

  20. FOREWORD: 9th Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering International Conference 2014 (CUTSE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieng Chen, Vincent Lee

    2015-04-01

    A very warm welcome to all participants of the 9th Curtin University Technology, Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference 2014. This annual conference dates back to 2006 when the first Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference was held in Curtin University, Miri Sarawak. CUTSE Conference was initially intended for Curtin's undergraduates such that they are able to experience the presentation of their work in a conference environment. As time passes and following the urge of knowledge dissemination, CUTSE Conference is hence open to public. This year the Department of Mechanical Engineering has been given the honour to organize the 9th CUTSE Conference. It has been a pleasure to watch CUTSE grow from strength to strength over the years. This year, our theme is "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". We hope that it is in this spirit that CUTSE participants may align their respective work, such that we all aim for a greater and better implementation of "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". The 9th CUTSE Conference 2014 is an excellent avenue for researchers, engineers, scientists, academicians, professionals from industry and students to share their research findings and initiate further collaborations in their respective fields. Parallel sessions in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Civil and Chemical engineering as well as the sciences will be hosted over a period of two days. Each year, the conference attracts participation from a number of countries in addition to Malaysia and Australia. In addition, student participants will get the opportunity to present their research projects and gain valuable feedback from industry professionals. This year the Conference will be organised by the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Curtin Sarawak's School of Engineering and Science in collaboration with The Institute of Engineers Malaysia, Miri Branch. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank this year

  1. 9th Circuit to reconsider earlier ruling in religious rights case.

    PubMed

    1999-11-26

    The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will re-examine a ruling that allows landlords with strongly held religious beliefs to refuse to rent to unmarried persons. In [name removed] v. Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, the court ruled that landlords did not have to comply with local and State statutes forbidding discrimination on the basis of marital status. An appeals panel had ruled that landlords had a valid claim to First Amendment and Fifth Amendment protection. The court is expected either to reverse on the issue of standing or to find that the hybrid rights doctrine was misused in the case.

  2. Multidisciplinary molecular diagnostics: the 9th European meeting on molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loonen, Anne J M; Schuurman, Rob; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2016-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the 9th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, 14-16 October 2015. This 3-day conference covered many relevant topics in the field of molecular diagnostics in humans, including infectious disease, oncology, outbreak management, population-based cancer screening, standardization and quality control, chronic diseases and pharmacogenetics. Beyond these different areas, shared values are new technologies and novel technical and clinical applications. Approximately 450 participants, the majority coming from European countries, attended the meeting. Besides high quality scientific presentations, more than 35 diagnostic companies presented their latest innovations, altogether in an informal and inspiring scientific ambience.

  3. NADP Regulates the Yeast GAL Induction System

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar,P.; Yao, Y.; Sternglanz, R.; Johnston, S.; Joshua-Tor, L.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the galactose-metabolizing genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three core proteins: Gal4p, the transcriptional activator that binds to upstream activating DNA sequences (UASGAL); Gal80p, a repressor that binds to the carboxyl terminus of Gal4p and inhibits transcription; and Gal3p, a cytoplasmic transducer that, upon binding galactose and adenosine 5'-triphosphate, relieves Gal80p repression. The current model of induction relies on Gal3p sequestering Gal80p in the cytoplasm. However, the rapid induction of this system implies that there is a missing factor. Our structure of Gal80p in complex with a peptide from the carboxyl-terminal activation domain of Gal4p reveals the existence of a dinucleotide that mediates the interaction between the two. Biochemical and in vivo experiments suggests that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) plays a key role in the initial induction event.

  4. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  5. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: `Intermolecular Forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-05-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students’ understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student’s alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight 9th grade students were stratified by cognitive levels and then randomly assigned to experimental (PBL, 40 students) and control (lecture-style teaching, 38 students) groups. Following a preparatory lesson where activation and remediation of existing knowledge occur, a pre-test was given, and no significant difference was found between the two groups of students ( p > .05). After the instruction was completed, a post-test and also a questionnaire related to the quality of the problem, the teacher’s role and group functioning were administered. Results from the post-test of both groups ( p < .05) and questionnaire showed that PBL is affective on students’ achievement, remedying formation of alternate conceptions and also social skills.

  6. Summary of the 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology (SIV) comprised seven plenary sessions focused on: General virology and viral genetics; Virus-Host interaction and pathogenesis; Viral oncology; Emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne, and environmental pathways of transmission; Viral immunology and vaccines; Medical virology and antiviral therapy; Viral biotechnologies and gene therapy. Moreover, four hot topics were discussed in special lectures: the Pioneer in human virology lecture regarding the control of viral epidemics with particular emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Pioneer in plant virology lecture focused on cell responses to plant virus infection, a Keynote lecture on the epidemiology and genetic diversity of Crimea-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus, and the G.B. Rossi lecture on the molecular basis and clinical implications of human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported.

  7. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment (IWAA06)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, B.,; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    The 9th International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment (IWAA06) took place at SLAC from September 25th to 29th of 2006. On Monday many participants registered for the event and took part in an ice-breaker reception sponsored by FARO Technologies. Following this, four days of talks and discussion began with status reports and presentations from various accelerators or similar laboratories around the world. Subsequent talks ranged from large-scale metrology, integrating and adjusting survey data, survey instrumentation and presentations on monitoring systems. This event included ongoing poster displays and a vendor exhibition. In these proceedings the presentations, papers and posters of the IWAA06 participants are available for online review.

  8. Preliminary results of the solar corona spectroscopic observation of 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungging Mumpuni, Emanuel; Zamzam Nurzaman, Muhamad; Suryana, Nana

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopy observation of solar corona has been carried out from 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse expedition in Maba, East Halmahera. Due to limitation by the weather condition during the observation, the obtained data were not favorable. Because of the low signal to noise ratio, the wavelength calibration was not straightforward. To obtain the optimum results, steps for data reduction were performed as the following: selecting the finest data, extracting the 1D spectrum from 2D spectrum, and calibrating spectrum wavelength (including careful interpolation). In this preliminary result, we discuss the instrumentation, the data under investigation, the extraction process of spectrum, and the polynomial interpolation that has been used for extracting information from our data.

  9. Identification of moon craters and solar corona during total solar eclipse on 9th March 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthfiandari; Ekawanti, N.; Purwati, F. G.; Herdiwijaya, D.

    2016-11-01

    Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) is a rare natural event in which the positions of Sun, Moon, and Earth are perfectly aligned. In the past by using this phenomenon, many researches have been done to understand characteristic of the corona. In this paper we carried out the study of TSE which crossed over Indonesia from West to East on 9th March 2016. We observed TSE which occured in Palembang (2.9883° S 104.7513° E), Indonesia. The aim of this research is to understand the effect of moon craters on the appearance of solar corona and identification of solar active regions during TSE. This research was done using Canon SX170 IS camera with ND 5 sun-filter. Although the sky was cloudy during the totality of the phase, coronal video was still taken. Camera also took solar images of partial eclipse phase. Coronal images for every frame were then extracted from the video. Image processing of coronal images was done using RegiStax and PhotoScape freewares. To study solar corona, images from Virtual Moon Atlas, Hinode XRT, and SOHO-LASCO were compared with the result of oriented coronal image. Wider and many more moon craters were found having positive correlation with the brighter effect on solar corona as shown at westward coronal streamer. Those craters are represented by Bel'kovich crater, the biggest one. We also found that only the eastward coronal streamer was correlated with active region, sunspot number 12519, from behind solar limb.

  10. F/A-18 1/9th scale model tail buffet measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. A.; Glaister, M. K.; Maclaren, L. D.; Meyn, L. A.; Ross, J.

    1991-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on a 1/9th scale model of the F/A-18 at high angles of attack to investigate the characteristics of tail buffet due to bursting of the wing leading edge extension (LEX) vortices. The tests were carried out at the Aeronautical Research Laboratory low-speed wind tunnel facility and form part of a collaborative activity with NASA Ames Research Center, organized by The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). Information from the program will be used in the planning of similar collaborative tests, to be carried out at NASA Ames, on a full-scale aircraft. The program covered the measurement of unsteady pressures and fin vibration for cases with and without the wing LEX fences fitted. Fourier transform methods were used to analyze the unsteady data, and information on the spatial and temporal content of the vortex burst pressure field was obtained. Flow visualization of the vortex behavior was carried out using smoke and a laser light sheet technique.

  11. Obsessional Disorders in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2015-07-15

    Some argue that the earliest case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) was reported by Robert Burton in his compendium The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) and that only in the 19th century did modern concepts of OCD evolve, differentiating it from other types of mental illness. In this paper, we aim to reveal an even earlier presentation of the malady we now call OCD based on the 9th century work, Sustenance of the Body and Soul, written by Abu Zayd al-Balkhi during the Islamic Golden Era. Discovery of this manuscript reveals that Abu Zayd al-Balkhi should be credited with differentiating OCD from other forms of mental illnesses nearly a millennium earlier than is currently claimed by anthologies documenting the history of mental illness. Particular attention is paid to al-Balkhi's classifications, symptom descriptions, predisposing factors, and the treatment modalities for obsessional disorders. Analysis of this manuscript in light of the DSM-5 and modern scientific discoveries reveals transcultural diagnostic consistency of OCD across many centuries. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  12. Stellar background observation during Total Solar Eclipse March 9th 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumtahana, Farahhati; Timur Jaelani, Anton; Muhamad, Johan; Sutastio, Heri

    2016-11-01

    We report observation and an early analysis of stellar background from total solar eclipse in Ternate, Indonesia. The eclipse phenomena which occurred on March, 9th 2016 was observed with certain portable instruments in order to obtain the stars behind the Sun in particular field of view and resolution. From our observation site in Ternate city, solar eclipse occurred in the late morning when the weather was unfortunately cloudy. However, during the darkness of totality, we obtained several point source objects between the gaps of the moving clouds and we suspected them as very faint stars due to their appearance in several frames. Those so called stars have been identified and measured with respect to their positions toward the center of the Sun. The main purpose of this research is to revisit strong lensing calculation of the Sun during total solar eclipse by measuring the deflection angle of the background stars as it had been calculated by Einstein and proved by Eddington at a total solar eclipse in 1919. To accomplish this aim, we need to conduct another observation to measure position of the same stars in the next period when those stars appear in the night sky.

  13. Survey of Oral Health Awareness in Neuchâtel 9th Graders.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Klaus W; Müller, Magali E; Lussi, Adrian

    The oral health habits of pupils had not yet been analyzed for the canton of Neuchâtel. A questionnaire was provided to 9th grade high school pupils (final year) of the three schools located in the Neuchâtel area to asses both oral health knowledge and habits in this connection. The average age was 15.5±0.8 years, and 78.1% of the questionnaires were returned. The prophylaxis program was conducted for a total of 4.5 h during pupils’ entire time at school. The results showed that both knowledge and oral health habits could be improved. As a positive outcome, 99% of the pupils brush their teeth before going to bed. Comparisons with similar 10-year-old studies from other cantons (Bern, Vaud) showed major differences in knowledge, for example on the importance of fluoridation. Only 54% of the pupils in Neuchâtel knew that fluoride offers some protection against caries, in spite of the fact that 89% thought that brushing with fluoridated toothpaste protects against caries. Most of the pupils used a fluoridated toothpaste. Furthermore, we found that self-reported sugar consumption was correlated with caries experience, but brushing frequency was not. We recommend introducing a review course for pupils in their last school year, in order to practice interdental cleaning, redefine appropriate, tooth-friendly snacks, and emphasize the importance of regular dental check-ups.

  14. The 9th Grade Shock and the High School Dropout Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Hirschman, Charles; Willhoft, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective questions on educational attainment in national surveys and censuses tend to over-estimate high school graduation rates by 15 to 20 percentage points relative to administrative records. Administrative data on educational enrollment are, however, only available at the aggregate level (state, school district, and school levels) and the recording of inter-school transfers are generally incomplete. With access to linked individual-level administrative records from a very large “West Coast metropolitan school district” we track patterns of high school attrition and on-time high school graduation of individual students. Even with adjustments for the omission of out-of-district transfers (estimates of omission are presented), the results of this study show that failure in high school, as indexed by retention and attrition, are almost as common as on-time high school graduation. In addition to the usual risk factors of disadvantaged background, we find that the “9th grade shock”—an unpredicted decline in academic performance upon entering high school—is a key mechanism behind the continuing crisis of high school attrition. PMID:23017804

  15. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  16. Scientific Tools and Techniques: An Innovative Introduction to Planetary Science / Astronomy for 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2014-11-01

    Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA) offers instruction in planetary science and astronomy to gifted 9th grade students within a program called "Scientific Tools and Techniques" (STT). Although STT provides a semester long overview of all sciences, the planetary science / astronomy section is innovative since students have access to instruction in the Center's Zeiss planetarium and observatory, which includes a 0.9 m cassegrain telescope. The curriculum includes charting the positions of planets in planetarium the sky; telescopic observations of the Moon and planets; hands-on access to meteorites and tektites; and an introduction to planetary spectroscopy utilizing LPI furnished ALTA reflectance spectrometers. In addition, students have the opportunity to watch several full dome planetary themed planetarium presentations, including "Back to the Moon for Good" and "Ring World: Cassini at Saturn." An overview of NASA's planetary exploration efforts is also considered, with special emphasis on the new Orion / Space Launch System for human exploration of the solar system. A primary goal of our STT program is to not only engage but encourage students to pursue careers in the field of science, with the hope of inspiring future scientists / leaders in the field of planetary science.

  17. 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huajiang

    2011-07-01

    Dear Delegates We would like to welcome you to the 9th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures. This series of conferences has been held as a biannual event since 1995. The previous venues were Pescara (Italy, 1995), Sheffield (UK, 1997), Dublin (Ireland, 1999), Cardiff (UK, 2001), Southampton (UK, 2003), Gdansk (Poland, 2005), Torino (Italy, 2007) and Beijing (China, 2009). The conference will cover all research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies, and numerical simulations. It has established itself as a major international forum for the above research areas. Typically over 100 papers are presented at each conference. It is thought appropriate to keep the conference at this size to facilitate knowledge exchange. DAMAS Conferences have had support from other learned societies and industry. These include the Technical Division of Vibration and Acoustics of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Society for Strain Measurement, to name a few. There are exhibitors at some conferences. The venue of DAMAS2011, Oxford, is a world-renowned university town. Oxford is also located in the Cotswolds, an area of outstanding natural beauty. And July is arguably the best month of the year in UK. It is hoped that all delegates will enjoy the conference and continue to support DAMAS conferences in the future. Huajiang Ouyang On behalf of the Organising Committee: Professor Huajiang Ouyang, University of Liverpool, UK (Conference Chair) Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, University of Loughborough, UK Professor Fulei Chu, Tsinghua University, China Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Polish Academy of Science, Poland Professor Cecilia Surace, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  18. Evaluation of Three Models of Instruction for 9th Grade Turkish Literature Course and Implications for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilav, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which each of the three types of instruction (authentic, where, differentiated) engages 9th grade high school students in achieving language proficiency. The paper examines the features of these models of instructions and teachers? opinion about them. It includes a descriptive research in survey…

  19. A Comparison of 9th and 10th Grade Boys' and Girls' Bullying Behaviors in Two States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isernhagen, Jody; Harris, Sandy

    This study examined the incidences of bullying behaviors among male and female 9th and 10th graders in rural Nebraska and suburban Texas schools. Nebraska students were predominantly Caucasion, and Texas students were African American, Hispanic American, and Caucasion. Student surveys examined such issues as how often bullying occurred, where it…

  20. Successful Transition to High School: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Barr Model with 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ninth grade is a pivotal year for students. Numerous studies find that academic performance in 9th grade often sets the student's trajectory throughout the high school years, as well as the probability of graduation. The Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) model is a comprehensive approach that addresses developmental, academic, and school…

  1. A Comparison of 9th Grade Male and Female Physical Education Activities Preferences and Support for Coeducational Groupings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant; Cleven, Brian

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district, to identify which activities students felt should be offered in coeducation or gender separate formats, and to determine whether physical education is one of their favorite classes. Results…

  2. Novel Gal3 proteins showing altered Gal80p binding cause constitutive transcription of Gal4p-activated genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Blank, T E; Woods, M P; Lebo, C M; Xin, P; Hopper, J E

    1997-01-01

    Gal4p-mediated activation of galactose gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae normally requires both galactose and the activity of Gal3p. Recent evidence suggests that in cells exposed to galactose, Gal3p binds to and inhibits Ga180p, an inhibitor of the transcriptional activator Gal4p. Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of novel mutant forms of Gal3p that can induce Gal4p activity independently of galactose. Five mutant GAL3(c) alleles were isolated by using a selection demanding constitutive expression of a GAL1 promoter-driven HIS3 gene. This constitutive effect is not due to overproduction of Gal3p. The level of constitutive GAL gene expression in cells bearing different GAL3(c) alleles varies over more than a fourfold range and increases in response to galactose. Utilizing glutathione S-transferase-Gal3p fusions, we determined that the mutant Gal3p proteins show altered Gal80p-binding characteristics. The Gal3p mutant proteins differ in their requirements for galactose and ATP for their Gal80p-binding ability. The behavior of the novel Gal3p proteins provides strong support for a model wherein galactose causes an alteration in Gal3p that increases either its ability to bind to Gal80p or its access to Gal80p. With the Gal3p-Gal80p interaction being a critical step in the induction process, the Gal3p proteins constitute an important new reagent for studying the induction mechanism through both in vivo and in vitro methods. PMID:9111326

  3. The PRIME Partnership: 9th Graders, Graduate Students and Integrated, Inquiry-Based Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, A. M.; Miguelez, S.

    2001-12-01

    The PRIME program (Partnership for Research in Inquiry-based Math, science and engineering Education) is a collaboration between the UW Colleges of Education and Engineering and several Seattle-area school districts. This project, funded by the NSF GK-12 program, pairs UW graduate students from math, science and engineering disciplines with local middle school teachers. The graduate student spends a year working with the teacher, on projects designed to meet the needs and interests of the specific partnership and classroom. In the partnership, the graduate student spends 15 hours per week in the classroom, interacting with the students, as well as additional planning time outside of the classroom. Goals of the PRIME program are enriched learning by middle school students, professional development for middle school teachers, improved communication and teaching skills for the graduate students, and strengthened partnerships between the University of Washington and local school districts. The goal of our partnership was to develop an inquiry-based, 9th grade unit that integrates the pre-existing Earth Science and Chemistry units, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching Chemistry in the context of Earth Science. We have observed that students often become engaged and excited when they do hands-on activities that utilize the intrinsic understanding that they have of concepts that draw upon experiences in their daily lives. When science is taught and learned in one such context - in the context of the natural world - the students may gain a more solid fundamental understanding of the science that they learn. The day-to-day activities for this unit vary widely. We started each topic with a question designed to get the students thinking independently and to identify the preconceptions that the students brought into the classroom. Discussions of students' preconceptions served as a justification and springboard for the subsequent activities and experiments. Examples of

  4. Yeast Gal4: a transcriptional paradigm revisited

    PubMed Central

    Traven, Ana; Jelicic, Branka; Sopta, Mary

    2006-01-01

    During the past two decades, the yeast Gal4 protein has been used as a model for studying transcriptional activation in eukaryotes. Many of the properties of transcriptional regulation first demonstrated for Gal4 have since been shown to be reiterated in the function of several other eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. Technological advances based on the transcriptional properties of this factor—such as the two-hybrid technology and Gal4-inducible systems for controlled gene expression—have had far-reaching influences in fields beyond transcription. In this review, we provide an updated account of Gal4 function, including data from new technologies that have been recently applied to the study of the GAL network. PMID:16670683

  5. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism.

    PubMed

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-11-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th-10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today's Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the 'Great Moravian Empire' in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions.

  6. The 9th Annual Meeting of the Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery Dammam, Saudi Arabia, 3-5 March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro

    2015-01-01

    The 9th Saudi Association of Neurological Surgery (9th SANS) Annual Meeting was held in the Sheraton Dammam Hotel and Towers, Dammam, Saudi Arabia on March 3-5, 2015, organized by the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Dammam with a theme of “Research is the Bridge to the Future.” The meeting was preceded by a Public Awareness Campaign on March 2, 2015 held at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and several pre-conference workshops that were highly beneficial for neurosurgery today. The scientific program was loaded with innovative and interactive presentations from respected and reputable speakers from different parts of the world. Abstracts were carefully selected and reviewed based on their scientific value and relevance to the clinical, surgical, academic, and research aspects of neurosurgery in the Kingdom, and the world.

  7. Accelerated healing of skin burns by anti-Gal/alpha-gal liposomes interaction.

    PubMed

    Galili, Uri; Wigglesworth, Kim; Abdel-Motal, Ussama M

    2010-03-01

    Topical application of alpha-gal liposomes on burns results in rapid local recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages. Recruited macrophages are pivotal for healing of burns because they secrete cytokines/growth factors that induce epidermis regeneration and tissue repair. alpha-Gal liposomes have glycolipids with alpha-gal epitopes (Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc-R) which bind anti-Gal, the most abundant natural antibody in humans constituting approximately 1% of immunoglobulins. Interaction of alpha-gal liposomes with anti-Gal within the fluid film formed on burns, activates complement and generates chemotactic complement cleavage peptides which effectively recruit neutrophils and macrophages. Anti-Gal IgG coating alpha-gal liposomes further binds to Fcgamma receptors on macrophages and activates them to secrete cytokines/growth factors. Efficacy of alpha-gal liposomes treatment in accelerating burn healing is demonstrated in the experimental model of alpha1,3galactosyltransferase knockout mice. These mice are the only available nonprimate mammals that can produce anti-Gal in titers similar to those in humans. Pairs of burns in mice were covered either with a spot bandage coated with 10mg alpha-gal liposomes, or with a control spot bandage coated with saline. On Day 3 post-treatment, the alpha-gal liposomes treated burns contained approximately 5-fold as many neutrophils as control burns, whereas macrophages were found only in alpha-gal liposomes treated burns. On Day 6, 50-100% of the surface area of alpha-gal liposomes treated burns were covered with regenerating epidermis (re-epithelialization), whereas almost no epidermis was found in control burns. The extensive recruitment of macrophages by anti-Gal/alpha-gal liposomes interaction was further demonstrated in vivo with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge discs containing alpha-gal liposomes, implanted subcutaneously. Since anti-Gal is abundant in all humans, it is suggested that treatment with alpha-gal liposomes

  8. PREFACE: 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebner, Richard

    2004-05-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains invited and contributed papers presented at the 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego, California, on 24-26 September, 2003, and it was organized by General Atomics. As has been the tradition at the last four meetings of this series, the programme was sub-divided into six topics. For each topic there was an invited talk whose purpose was to give an overview of the topic, based on contributed papers presented at the meeting and on external results. These talks were followed by discussion periods, which were used for extended question and answer sessions for the invited speakers or for additional short presentations by contributing speakers. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, of which there were about 70. The topics were: Structure and dynamics of internal transport barriers Structure and dynamics of the H-mode pedestal Understanding transport barriers through modelling Control of transport barriers Transport within transport barriers: theorist's view of the future Diagnostic and analysis issues for transport barriers The topics were focused on the physics of edge and core transport barriers. Similar to the previous meeting, held in Toki, Japan, the universality of this physics in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric machines was featured. In addition, the physics of transport barriers in relation to burning plasma experiments was emphasized. In particular, one of the hopes and goals of the participants is that the physics of transport barriers can be used to enhance the prospects for burning plasmas. Because this meeting occurred approximately 21 years after the discovery of the H-mode in 1982, a special session was held to commemorate more than 20 years of research on transport barriers. In this session, Dr R Stambaugh and Professor K Itoh presented personal views on the

  9. Using TI-92 in the 9th-Grade of Austrian Grammar Schools--Hypotheses, Experiences, Results, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurnig, Otto

    This paper reports the results of student use of a TI-92 graphing calculator to solve algebra and analytic geometry problems in 9th grade Austrian classes. Students who had been trained in using the TI-92 were asked to compute x, given that a right-angled triangle had sides x, x+3, and x+6 in at least three ways, and to document their solution…

  10. The Effectiveness of a Self Regulated Learning-Based Training Program on Improving Cognitive and Metacognitive EFL Reading Comprehension of 9th Graders with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a self regulated learning intervention program on cognitive and metacognitive EFL reading comprehension of 9th graders with reading disabilities. The participants in this study were 40 9th Graders with reading disabilities, selected from two schools located in Baltim Educational Edara. A…

  11. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  12. Evaluation of Reading Fluency and Reading Errors of 9th Grade Students with a View to Diagnosing the Sources of Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Üstten, Aliye Uslu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the sources of reading difficulties and to evaluate reading fluency of 9th grade students which aims to improve students' reading and their understanding of complex literary texts. The sample is composed of 120 students selected from 9th grade of 10 different high schools in central province of Ankara in…

  13. Generalized adjustment by least squares ( GALS).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elassal, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The least-squares principle is universally accepted as the basis for adjustment procedures in the allied fields of geodesy, photogrammetry and surveying. A prototype software package for Generalized Adjustment by Least Squares (GALS) is described. The package is designed to perform all least-squares-related functions in a typical adjustment program. GALS is capable of supporting development of adjustment programs of any size or degree of complexity. -Author

  14. GalPot: Galaxy potential code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Paul J.

    2016-11-01

    GalPot finds the gravitational potential associated with axisymmetric density profiles. The package includes code that performs transformations between commonly used coordinate systems for both positions and velocities (the class OmniCoords), and that integrates orbits in the potentials. GalPot is a stand-alone version of Walter Dehnen's GalaxyPotential C++ code taken from the falcON code in the NEMO Stellar Dynamics Toolbox (ascl:1010.051).

  15. α-Gal Nanoparticles in Wound and Burn Healing Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages may accelerate wound healing. Such accelerated healing was observed in wounds and burns of experimental animals treated with α-gal nanoparticles. Recent Advances: α-Gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R). α-Gal nanoparticles applied to wounds bind anti-Gal (the most abundant antibody in humans) and generate chemotactic complement peptides, which rapidly recruit macrophages. Fc/Fc receptor interaction between anti-Gal coating the α-gal nanoparticles and recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines that accelerate healing. α-Gal nanoparticles applied to burns and wounds in mice and pigs producing anti-Gal, decreased healing time by 40–60%. In mice, this accelerated healing avoided scar formation. α-Gal nanoparticle-treated wounds, in diabetic mice producing anti-Gal, healed within 12 days, whereas saline-treated wounds became chronic wounds. α-Gal nanoparticles are stable for years and may be applied dried, in suspension, aerosol, ointments, or within biodegradable materials. Critical Issues: α-Gal nanoparticle therapy can be evaluated only in mammalian models producing anti-Gal, including α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs or Old World primates. Traditional experimental animal models synthesize α-gal epitopes and lack anti-Gal. Future Directions: Since anti-Gal is naturally produced in all humans, it is of interest to determine safety and efficacy of α-gal nanoparticles in accelerating wound and burn healing in healthy individuals and in patients with impaired wound healing such as diabetic patients and elderly individuals. In addition, efficacy of α-gal nanoparticle therapy should be studied in healing and regeneration of internal injuries such as surgical incisions, ischemic myocardium following myocardial infarction, and injured nerves. PMID:28289553

  16. Improvement of the ephemerides of Phoebe, 9th satellite of Saturn, from new observations made from 1995 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, J.-E.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Fienga, A.; Baron, N.

    2003-11-01

    In order to improve the model used for the ephemerides of Phoebe, the 9th satellite of Saturn, we started observations in 1998. We made 135 observations in 1998 and 39 observations in 1999 using the 120 cm-telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. We used a numerical integration in order to calculate new initial conditions and to be able to build new ephemerides. We also used some precise observations made from 1995 to 2000 together with old observations for that purpose. The result is a decrease in the uncertainties on Phoebe's orbit. Based in part on observations made at observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France.

  17. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, Keisuke; Cerny, Ronald L.; Tanouchi, Aki; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Saibara, Toshiji; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane bound proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins, and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues, and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely to be involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha transducing activity polypeptide 1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1, and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers. PMID:21625220

  18. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, K; Cerny, R L; Tanouchi, A; Kohno, K; Kotani, N; Honke, K; Saibara, T; Hollingsworth, M A

    2011-12-08

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane-bound proteins have an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine the nucleotide-binding protein, α-transducing activity polypeptide-1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1 and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers.

  19. A modern conceptualization of phobia in al-Balkhi's 9th century treatise: Sustenance of the Body and Soul.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Morbid fears and phobias have been mentioned in religious, philosophical and medical manuscripts since ancient times. Despite early insights by the Greeks, phobias did not appear as a separate clinical phenomenon in Western medicine until the 17th century and has evolved substantially since. However, robust investigations attempting to decipher the clinical nature of phobias emerged in pre-modern times during the oft-overlooked Islamic Golden Era (9th-12th centuries); which overlapped with Europe's medieval period. An innovative attempt was made by the 9th century Muslim scholar, Abu Zayd al-Balkhi, in his medical manuscript "Sustenance of the Body and Soul," to define phobias as a separate diagnostic entity. Al-Balkhi was one of the earliest to cluster psychological and physical symptoms of phobias under one category, "al-Fazaá", and outline a specific management plan. We analyze al-Balkhi's description of phobias, according to the modern understanding of psychiatric classifications and symptomatology as described in the DSM-5.

  20. Three centuries of geomagnetic field intensity changes in Spain (from the 9th to the 12th centuries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Jimenez-Castillo, P.; Perez-Asensio, M.

    2013-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations (at least of ~20 μT/century) interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes by the acquisition of well-dated high-quality archeomagnetic data. In this study we report the archeomagnetic study of Spanish ceramic fragments. The collected fragments belong to 14 superposed stratigraphic levels corresponding to a surface no bigger than 3 m by 7 m. The pottery fragments dates back to the 9th and 11th centuries. The dating was established by 4 radiocarbon dates and by archeological/historical constraints including typological comparisons and well-controlled stratigraphic constrains between the different stratigraphic units. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 79 fragments, twelve new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. Together with previously published high-quality data from Western Europe, the new data provide an improved description of the intensity changes that took place in Spain between the 9th and the 12th centuries. The results confirm that rapid intensity changes took place in Western Europe during the recent history of the Earth.

  1. Proceedings of the 9th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, Annecy, France, 15-18 December 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, F.; Mours, B.

    2005-09-01

    The yearly Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) is now a well established meeting. As usual, the scope of the meeting covered the status of ground-based and space-based detectors, sources and population modelling, detector characterization, event searches, multi-detector analysis and new analysis methods. The 9th GWDAW followed the trend observed in previous years: more presentations that included real data and more sophisticated analysis techniques. However, the biggest change observed was a significant increase in the number of presentations dealing with the analysis of data coming from multiple detectors. Our field needs to combine these data to best extract the astrophysical information. This yearly meeting, bringing together all the worldwide players in the field, is a chance for us to make progress in this direction, and we will certainly see more results in future GWDAW meetings. The importance of the 9th GWDAW meeting can be assessed not only by the record attendance and number of submitted contributions, but also by looking at the work schedules of the various groups. People are now using the GWDAW dates to set deadlines for their activities in order to present their results at the next GWDAW. This special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity contains the most up-to-date papers on the topics covered by the meeting. Besides being a good reference that will fit proudly into the series of previous GWDAW proceedings, it provides valuable details about current work. As organizers of this workshop, we would like to thank not only the sponsors that made this meeting possible, but also all the participants for coming, sharing their results and enjoying the event with us. The following institutions have sponsored the 9th GWDAW: Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP) European Gravitational Observatory (EGO) Université de Savoie Groupement de Recherche: Phénomènes cosmiques de haute énergie (GDR-PCHE) Institut National de

  2. Neutron Diffraction Study On Gamma To Alpha Phase Transition In Ce0.9th0.1 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, Jason C1; Heffner, Robert H; Llobet, A; Darling, T W; Jeong, I K

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive neutron diffraction measurements were performed to study the isostructural {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} phase transition in Ce{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1} alloy. Using Rietveld refinements, we obtained lattice and thermal parameters as a function of temperature. From the temperature slope of the thermal parameters, we determined Debye temperatures {Theta}{sup {gamma}}{sub D} = 133(1) K and {Theta}{sup {alpha}}{sub D} = 140(1) K for the {gamma} phase and the {alpha} phase, respectively. This result implies that the vibrational entropy change is not significant at the {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {alpha} transition, contrary to that from elemental Cerium [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105702, 2004].

  3. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    PubMed

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań.

  4. Rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages by anti-Gal/α-Gal liposome interaction accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, Kim M; Racki, Waldemar J; Mishra, Rabinarayan; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva; Greiner, Dale L; Galili, Uri

    2011-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal in promoting wound healing. We hypothesized that topical application of liposomes with glycolipids that carry Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R epitopes (α-gal liposomes) on wounds may accelerate the healing process by rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages in wounds. Immune complexes of the natural anti-Gal Ab (constituting ∼1% of Ig in humans) bound to its ligand, the α-gal epitope on α-gal liposomes would induce local activation of complement and generation of complement chemotactic factors that rapidly recruit macrophages. Subsequent binding of the Fc portion of anti-Gal coating α-gal liposomes to FcγRs on recruited macrophages may activate macrophage genes encoding cytokines that mediate wound healing. We documented the efficacy of this treatment in α1,3galactosyltrasferase knockout mice. In contrast to wild-type mice, these knockout mice lack α-gal epitopes and can produce the anti-Gal Ab. The healing time of excisional skin wounds treated with α-gal liposomes in these mice is twice as fast as that of control wounds. Moreover, scar formation in α-gal liposome-treated wounds is much lower than in physiologic healing. Additional sonication of α-gal liposomes resulted in their conversion into submicroscopic α-gal nanoparticles. These α-gal nanoparticles diffused more efficiently in wounds and further increased the efficacy of the treatment, resulting in 95-100% regeneration of the epidermis in wounds within 6 d. The study suggests that α-gal liposome and α-gal nanoparticle treatment may enhance wound healing in the clinic because of the presence of high complement activity and high anti-Gal Ab titers in humans.

  5. Acceleration of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles interacting with the natural anti-Gal antibody.

    PubMed

    Galili, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Application of α-gal nanoparticles to wounds and burns induces accelerated healing by harnessing the natural anti-Gal antibody which constitutes ~1% of human immunoglobulins. α-gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R), the carbohydrate ligand of anti-Gal. Studied α-gal nanoparticles were comprised of glycolipids with α-gal epitopes, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Binding of anti-Gal to α-gal nanoparticles in wounds activates the complement cascade, resulting in formation of chemotactic complement cleavage peptides that induce rapid recruitment of many macrophages. The Fc/Fcγ receptors interaction between anti-Gal coating α-gal nanoparticles and the recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines/growth factors that promote wound healing and recruit stem cells. Studies of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles were feasible in α1,3galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs. In contrast to other nonprimate mammals, these mice and pigs lack the α-gal epitope, and thus they are not immunotolerant to it and produce anti-Gal. Treatment of skin wounds and burns with α-gal nanoparticles resulted in 40-60% decrease in healing time in comparison with control wounds treated with saline. This accelerated healing is associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and extensive angiogenesis in wounds, faster regrowth of epidermis, and regeneration of the dermis. The accelerated healing further decreases and may completely eliminate fibrosis and scar formation in wounds. Since healing of internal injuries is mediated by mechanisms similar to those in external wound healing, it is suggested that α-gal nanoparticles treatment may also improve regeneration and restoration of biological function following internal injuries such as surgical incisions, myocardial ischemia following infarction, and nerve injuries.

  6. Molecular simulation and docking studies of Gal1p and Gal3p proteins in the presence and absence of ligands ATP and galactose: implication for transcriptional activation of GAL genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sanjay K.; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U.

    2012-07-01

    The Gal4p mediated transcriptional activation of GAL genes requires the interaction between Gal3p bound with ATP and galactose and Gal80p. Though numerous studies suggest that galactose and ATP activate Gal3p/Gal1p interaction with Gal80p, neither the mechanism of activation nor the interacting surface that binds to Gal80p is well understood. In this study we investigated the dynamics of Gal3p and Gal1p in the presence and absence of ligands ATP and galactose to understand the role played by dynamics in the function of these proteins through molecular dynamics simulation and protein-protein docking studies. We performed simulations totaling to 510 ns on both Gal1p and Gal3p proteins in the presence and absence of ligands ATP and galactose. We find that, while binding of ligands ATP and galactose to Gal3p/Gal1p do not affect the global conformation of proteins, some local conformational changes around upper-lip helix including insertion domain are observed. We observed that only in the presence of ATP and galactose, Gal3p displays opening and closing motion between the two domains. And because of this motion, a binding interface, which is largely hydrophobic, opens up on the surface of Gal3p and this surface can bind to Gal80p. From our simulation studies we infer probable docking sites for Gal80p on Gal3p/Gal1p, which were further ascertained by the docking of Gal80p on to ligand bound Gal1p and Gal3p proteins, and the residues at the interface between Gal3p and Gal80p are identified. Our results correlate quite well with the existing body of literature on functional and dynamical aspects of Gal1p and Gal3p proteins.

  7. GalR Acts as a Transcriptional Activator of galKT in the Presence of Galactose in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    We explored the regulatory mechanism of Leloir pathway genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of galKT is galactose dependent. By microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR, we further show the role of the transcriptional regulator GalR, present upstream of galKT, as a transcriptional activator of galKT in the presence of galactose. Moreover, we predict a 19-bp regulatory site (5'-GATAGTTTAGTAAAATTTT-3') for the transcriptional regulator GalR in the promoter region of galK, which is also highly conserved in other streptococci. Growth comparison of D39 ΔgalK with the D39 wild type grown in the presence of galactose shows that galK is required for the proper growth of S. pneumoniae on galactose.

  8. Genetic dissection of neural circuits by Tol2 transposon-mediated Gal4 gene and enhancer trapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Suster, Maximiliano L; Mizusawa, Kanta; Nagayoshi, Saori; Kotani, Tomoya; Urasaki, Akihiro; Kishimoto, Yasuyuki; Hibi, Masahiko; Kawakami, Koichi

    2008-01-29

    Targeted gene expression is a powerful approach to study the function of genes and cells in vivo. In Drosophila, the P element-mediated Gal4-UAS method has been successfully used for this purpose. However, similar methods have not been established in vertebrates. Here we report the development of a targeted gene expression methodology in zebrafish based on the Tol2 transposable element and its application to the functional study of neural circuits. First, we developed gene trap and enhancer trap constructs carrying an engineered yeast Gal4 transcription activator (Gal4FF) and transgenic reporter fish carrying the GFP or the RFP gene downstream of the Gal4 recognition sequence (UAS) and showed that the Gal4FF can activate transcription through UAS in zebrafish. Second, by using this Gal4FF-UAS system, we performed large-scale screens and generated a large collection of fish lines that expressed Gal4FF in specific tissues, cells, and organs. Finally, we developed transgenic effector fish carrying the tetanus toxin light chain (TeTxLC) gene downstream of UAS, which is known to block synaptic transmission. We crossed the Gal4FF fish with the UAS:TeTxLC fish and analyzed double transgenic embryos for defects in touch response. From this analysis, we discovered that targeted expression of TeTxLC in distinct populations of neurons in the brain and the spinal cord caused distinct abnormalities in the touch response behavior. These studies illustrate that our Gal4FF gene trap and enhancer trap methods should be an important resource for genetic analysis of neuronal functions and behavior in vertebrates.

  9. Herschel Hi-GAL imaging of massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, F. A.; Hoare, M. G.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Clay, S. J.; de Wit, W.-J.; Rafiq, I.; Pezzuto, S.; Molinari, S.

    2015-05-01

    We used Herschel Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey) data to determine whether massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) are resolved at 70 μm and to study their envelope density distribution. Our analysis of three relatively isolated sources in the l = 30° and 59° Galactic fields show that the objects are partially resolved at 70 μm. The Herschel Hi-GAL survey data have a high scan velocity which makes unresolved and partially resolved sources appear elongated in the 70 μm images. We analysed the two scan directions separately and examine the intensity profile perpendicular to the scan direction. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer models with a power-law density distribution were used to study the circumstellar matter distribution. Single dish submm data were also included to study how different spatial information affects the fitted density distribution. The density distribution which best fits both the 70 μm intensity profile and spectral energy distribution has an average index of ˜0.5. This index is shallower than expected and is probably due to the dust emission from bipolar outflow cavity walls not accounted for in the spherical models. We conclude that 2D axisymmetric models and Herschel images at low scan speeds are needed to better constrain the matter distribution around MYSOs.

  10. Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Ryan C; Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael A; Hyseni, Chaz; Edwards, Danielle L; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Ciofi, Claudio; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-11-01

    Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here, we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data were integral in detecting and characterizing this phenomenon. In C. becki, we identified two genetically distinct, morphologically cryptic lineages. Historical reconstructions show that they colonized Wolf Volcano from Santiago Island in two temporally separated events, the first estimated to have occurred ~199 000 years ago. Following arrival of the second wave of colonists, both lineages coexisted for approximately ~53 000 years. Within that time, they began fusing back together, as microsatellite data reveal widespread introgressive hybridization. Interestingly, greater mate selectivity seems to be exhibited by purebred females of one of the lineages. Forward-in-time simulations predict rapid extinction of the early arriving lineage. This study provides a rare example of reticulate evolution in action and underscores the power of population genetics for understanding the past, present and future consequences of evolutionary phenomena associated with lineage fusion.

  11. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  12. Computational mediation as factor of motivation and meaningful learning in education of sciences of 9th grade: astronomy topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, F. M.; Furtado, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of using hypertext and pedagogic mediation in search of a Meaningful Learning Process in Sciences. We investigate the usage of hypertext in the teaching and learning methods of Astronomy modules. A survey was conducted with students from the 9th grade of Primary School of a public school in the city of Goiânia, Goiás in Brazil. We have analyzed the possibilities that hypermedia can offer in the teaching and learning process, using as reference David Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Learning. The study was divided into four phases: application of an initial questionnaire on students, development of didactic material (hypertext), six classes held in a computer lab with the use of hypermedia and a final questionnaire applied in the lab after classes. This research indicated that the use of hypertext linked to pedagogical mediation processes is seen as a motivational tool and has potential to foster to Meaningful Learning.

  13. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  14. The flash flood of the Bisagno Creek on 9th October 2014: An "unfortunate" combination of spatial and temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, F.; Rebora, N.; Giannoni, F.; Cavallo, A.; Ferraris, L.

    2016-10-01

    On the 9th October, 2014 a strong event hit the central part of Liguria Region producing disastrous consequences to the city of Genoa where the Bisagno Creek flooded causing one death and lots of damage. The precipitation pattern responsible for the event had peculiar spatial and temporal characteristics that led to an unexpected flash flood. The temporal sequence of rainfall intensities and the particular severity of rainfall showers at small temporal scale, together with the size of the sub-basin hit by the most intense part of the rainfall were the unfortunate concurrent ingredients that led to an "almost perfect" flash flood. The peak flow was estimated to be a 100-200 years order return period. The effects of the spatial and temporal scales of the precipitation pattern were investigated by coupling a rainfall downscaling model with a hydrological model setting up an experiment that follows a probabilistic approach. Supposing that the correct volume of precipitation at different spatial and temporal scales is known, the experiment provided the probability of generating events with similar effects in terms of streamflow. Furthermore, the study gives indications regarding the goodness and reliability of the forecasted rainfall field needed, not only in terms of total rainfall volume, but even in spatial and temporal pattern, to produce the observed ground effects in terms of streamflow.

  15. Post-seismic deformation of the Mw 6.4 Shonbeh earthquake (south western Iran) of April 9th, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathian Baneh, Aram; Tolomei, Cristiano; Lugari, Alessandro; Trasatti, Elisa; Salvi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The study of post-seismic deformation within a region is of high significance to have a better understanding of the kinematic behavior of a seismogenic fault. We perform the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method to process a large number of X-Band, COSMO-SkyMed images to measure the post-seismic deformation due to the Shonbeh earthquake (Iran) of 9th April 2013 (Mw 6.4). The meizoseismal zone of the earthquake and following aftershocks' epicenters cover an area in the frontal edge of the Zagros Simply Folded Zone, in the southwest of Iran, between Kaki and Kangan anticlines. Exploiting the available dataset of images from the beginning of 2013 to mid 2014, we observe the concentration of the deformation along at least two NW- striking, southwest-dipping fault segments arranged in right-step pattern and parallel to the trend of the folds. The preliminary InSAR results illustrate the migration of the post-seismic deformation and stress relaxation from the southeastern toward the northwestern fault segments.

  16. UDP-GlcNAc: Gal beta 3GalNAc-mucin: (GlcNAc----GalNAc) beta 6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase and UDP-GlcNAc: Gal beta 3(GlcNAc beta 6) GalNAc-mucin (GlcNAc----Gal)beta 3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase from swine trachea epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Sivakami, S; Mendicino, J

    1991-03-13

    Two specific beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases involved in the branching and elongation of mucin oligosaccharide chains, namely, a beta 1,6 N-acetylglucosaminylsaminyltransferase that transfers N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to Gal beta 3GalNAc-mucin to yield Gal beta 3(GlcNAc beta 6)GalNAc-Mucin and a beta 3-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase that transfers N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to Gal beta 3(GlcNAc beta 6)GalNAc-mucin to yield GlcNAc beta 3Gal beta 3 (GlcNAc beta 6)GalNAc-Mucin were purified from the microsomal fraction of swine trachea epithelium. The beta 1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase was purified about 21,800-fold by procedures which included affinity chromatography on DEAE columns containing bound asialo Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein with Gal beta 1,3GalNAc side chains. The apparent molecular weight estimated by gel filtration was found to be about 60 Kd. The purified enzyme showed a high specificity for Gal beta 1,3GalNAc chains and the most active substrates were mucin glycoproteins containing these chains. The apparent Km of the beta 6-glucosaminyltrans-ferase for Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein containing Gal beta 1,3GalNAc chains was 0.53 microM; for UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, 12 microM; and for Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha NO2 phi, 4 mM. The activity of the beta 6-glucosaminyltransferase was dependent on the extent of glycosylation of the Gal beta 3GalNAc chains in Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein. The best substrate for the partially purified beta 3-Glucosaminyltransferase was Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein containing Gal beta 1,3(GlcNAc beta 6)GalNAc side chains. This enzyme showed little or no activity with intact sialylated Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein or derivatives of this glycoprotein containing GalNAc or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc side chains. The radioactive oligosaccharides formed by these enzymes in large scale reaction mixtures were released from the mucin glycoproteins by treatment with

  17. A Flippase-Mediated GAL80/GAL4 Intersectional Resource for Dissecting Appendage Development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brittany N; Ghazanfari, Arash M; Bohm, Rudolf A; Welch, William P; Zhang, Bing; Masly, John P

    2015-08-13

    Drosophila imaginal discs provide an ideal model to study processes important for cell signaling and cell specification, tissue differentiation, and cell competition during development. One challenge to understanding genetic control of cellular processes and cell interactions is the difficulty in effectively targeting a defined subset of cells in developing tissues in gene manipulation experiments. A recently developed Flippase-induced intersectional GAL80/GAL4 repression method incorporates several gene manipulation technologies in Drosophila to enable such fine-scale dissection in neural tissues. In particular, this approach brings together existing GAL4 transgenes, newly developed enhancer-trap flippase transgenes, and GAL80 transgenes flanked by Flippase recognition target sites. The combination of these tools enables gene activation/repression in particular subsets of cells within a GAL4 expression pattern. Here, we expand the utility of a large collection of these enhancer-trap flippase transgenic insertion lines by characterizing their expression patterns in third larval instar imaginal discs. We screened 521 different enhancer-trap flippase lines and identified 28 that are expressed in imaginal tissues, including two transgenes that show sex-specific expression patterns. Using a line that expresses Flippase in the wing imaginal disc, we demonstrate the utility of this intersectional approach for studying development by knocking down gene expression of a key member of the planar cell polarity pathway. The results of our experiments show that these enhancer-trap flippase lines enable fine-scale manipulation in imaginal discs.

  18. Trends in weight management goals and behaviors among 9th-12th grade students: United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zewditu; Lowry, Richard; Eaton, Danice K; Nihiser, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    To examine trends in weight management goals and behaviors among U.S. high school students during 1999-2009. Data from six biennial cycles (1999-2009) of the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Cross-sectional, nationally representative samples of 9th-12th grade students (approximately 14,000 students/cycle) completed self-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression models adjusted for grade, race/ethnicity, and obesity were used to test for trends in weight management goals and behaviors among subgroups of students. Combined prevalences and trends differed by sex and by race/ethnicity and weight status within sex. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of female students trying to gain weight decreased (7.6-5.7 %). Among female students trying to lose or stay the same weight, prevalences decreased for eating less (69.6-63.2 %); fasting (23.3-17.6 %); using diet pills/powders/liquids (13.7-7.8 %); and vomiting/laxatives (9.5-6.6 %) for weight control. During 1999-2009, the prevalence of male students trying to lose weight increased (26.1-30.5 %). Among male students trying to lose or stay the same weight, the prevalence of exercising to control weight did not change during 1999-2003 and then increased (74.0-79.1 %) while the prevalence of taking diet pills/powders/liquids for weight control decreased (6.9-5.1 %) during 1999-2009. Weight management goals and behaviors changed during 1999-2009 and differed by subgroup. To combat the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors, efforts may be needed to teach adolescents about recommended weight management strategies and avoiding the risks associated with unhealthy methods.

  19. PREFACE: Eucas '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains all contributed papers that were accepted for the Conference Proceedings. The Dresden EUCAS conference with 712 participants from 43 countries continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and especially we would like to express our gratitude to all members of the Local Organization Committee. Their enthusiastic and well organized work made this Dresden EUCAS conference a memorable event for all participants. Last but not least we are very grateful to W. Goldacker , S. Haindl, J. Hänisch, R. Hühne, M. Noe, P. Seidel and M. Siegel for their extraordinary help during the proceedings review process. Bernhard Holzapfel Ludwig Schultz Conference Chairmen The IW-SMI 2010 Organizing Committee: Masato Okada (University of Tokyo) Yoshiyuki Kabashima, General Chair (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Shin Ishii (Kyoto University) Jun-ichi Inoue, Publications Chair (Hokkaido University) Kazuyuki Tanaka (Tohoku University) Toshiyuki Tanaka, Vice-General Chair (Kyoto University)

  20. The Development of Veteran 9th-Grade Physics Teachers' Knowledge for Using Representations to Teach the Topics of Energy Transformation and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify the experiences that informed the development of three veteran (15+ years of teaching experience) 9th grade physics teachers' specialized knowledge, or PCK, for using representations to teach the topics of energy transformation and transfer. Through the lens of phenomenography, the study…

  1. The Impact of a Teaching-Learning Program Based on a Brain-Based Learning on the Achievement of the Female Students of 9th Grade in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabatat, Kawthar; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the impact of teaching-learning program based on a brain-based learning on the achievement of female students of 9th grade in chemistry, to accomplish the goal of this study the researchers designed instruments of: instructional plans, pre achievement and past achievement exams to use them for the study-validity and…

  2. Influence of Computer-Assisted Roundhouse Diagrams on High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding the Subjects of "Force and Motion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocakaya, F.; Gönen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Main aim of this study is to examine the influence of computer-assisted roundhouse diagrams on high school 9th grade students' academic achievements in the subjects of "Force and Motion". The study was carried out in a public high school in Diyarbakir the province in the Southeast of Turkey. In the study, the "pre-test-post-test…

  3. Alcohol, Tobacco, & Other Drug Use by 9th-12th Grade Students: Results from the 1993 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikow, Victoria A.

    This survey examined the behaviors associated with the six leading causes of death or disability in one state's high school youth. Participants were 2,439 9th-12th grade students. Results identified alcohol as the drug most frequently used by high school students, with over half of students having used alcohol by their senior year and almost half…

  4. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry courses. A…

  5. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  6. The Pacific Child: Investing in the Future. Conference Evaluation. Annual Pacific Educational Conference (9th, Pago Pago, August 3-5, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Diane

    Proceedings of the Pacific Region Educational Laboratory's (PREL) 9th Annual Pacific Educational Conference, held August 3-5, 1992, in Pago Pago, American Samoa are evaluated in this document. Data were collected from an overall conference evaluation survey, individual workshop surveys, workshop program information, anecdotal information, and…

  7. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ST3GAL4 Gene with VWF Antigen and Factor VIII Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jaewoo; Xue, Cheng; Preisser, John S.; Cramer, Drake W.; Houck, Katie L.; Liu, Guo; Folsom, Aaron R.; Couper, David; Yu, Fuli; Dong, Jing-fei

    2016-01-01

    VWF is extensively glycosylated with biantennary core fucosylated glycans. Most N-linked and O-linked glycans on VWF are sialylated. FVIII is also glycosylated, with a glycan structure similar to that of VWF. ST3GAL sialyltransferases catalyze the transfer of sialic acids in the α2,3 linkage to termini of N- and O-glycans. This sialic acid modification is critical for VWF synthesis and activity. We analyzed genetic and phenotypic data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ST3GAL4 gene with plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity in 12,117 subjects. We also analyzed ST3GAL4 SNPs found in 2,535 subjects of 26 ethnicities from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project for ethnic diversity, SNP imputation, and ST3GAL4 haplotypes. We identified 14 and 1,714 ST3GAL4 variants in the ARIC GWAS and 1000G databases respectively, with 46% being ethnically diverse in their allele frequencies. Among the 14 ST3GAL4 SNPs found in ARIC GWAS, the intronic rs2186717, rs7928391, and rs11220465 were associated with VWF levels and with FVIII activity after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, ever-smoking status, and ABO. This study illustrates the power of next-generation sequencing in the discovery of new genetic variants and a significant ethnic diversity in the ST3GAL4 gene. We discuss potential mechanisms through which these intronic SNPs regulate ST3GAL4 biosynthesis and the activity that affects VWF and FVIII. PMID:27584569

  8. A purified truncated form of yeast Gal4 expressed in Escherichia coli and used to functionalize poly(lactic acid) nanoparticle surface is transcriptionally active in cellulo.

    PubMed

    Legaz, Sophie; Exposito, Jean-Yves; Borel, Agnès; Candusso, Marie-Pierre; Megy, Simon; Montserret, Roland; Lahaye, Vincent; Terzian, Christophe; Verrier, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Gal4/UAS system is a powerful tool for the analysis of numerous biological processes. Gal4 is a large yeast transcription factor that activates genes including UAS sequences in their promoter. Here, we have synthesized a minimal form of Gal4 DNA sequence coding for the binding and dimerization regions, but also part of the transcriptional activation domain. This truncated Gal4 protein was expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. A structured and active form of this recombinant protein was purified and used to cover poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles. In cellulo, these Gal4-vehicles were able to activate the expression of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene under the control of UAS sequences, demonstrating that the decorated Gal4 variant can be delivery into cells where it still retains its transcription factor capacities. Thus, we have produced in E. coli and purified a short active form of Gal4 that retains its functions at the surface of PLA-nanoparticles in cellular assay. These decorated Gal4-nanoparticles will be useful to decipher their tissue distribution and their potential after ingestion or injection in UAS-GFP recombinant animal models.

  9. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  10. Cancer immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer utilizing α-gal epitope/natural anti-Gal antibody reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tanemura, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Eiji; Nagano, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Hatanaka, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the poorest prognosis of all malignancies and is largely resistant to standard therapy. Novel treatments against PDAC are desperately needed. Anti-Gal is the most abundant natural antibody in humans, comprising about 1% of immunoglobulins and is also naturally produced in apes and Old World monkeys. The anti-Gal ligand is a carbohydrate antigen called “α-gal epitopes” with the structure Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R. These epitopes are expressed as major carbohydrate antigens in non-primate mammals, prosimians, and New World monkeys. Anti-Gal is exploited in cancer vaccines to increase the immunogenicity of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Cancer cells or PDAC tumor lysates are processed to express α-gal epitopes. Vaccination with these components results in in vivo opsonization by anti-Gal IgG in PDAC patients. The Fc portion of the vaccine-bound anti-Gal interacts with Fcγ receptors of APCs, inducing uptake of the vaccine components, transport of the vaccine tumor membranes to draining lymph nodes, and processing and presentation of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Cancer vaccines expressing α-gal epitopes elicit strong antibody production against multiple TAAs contained in PDAC cells and induce activation of multiple tumor-specific T cells. Here, we review new areas of clinical importance related to the α-gal epitope/anti-Gal antibody reaction and the advantages in immunotherapy against PDAC. PMID:26523105

  11. The binary response of the GAL/MEL genetic switch of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is critically dependent on Gal80p-Gal4p interaction.

    PubMed

    Das Adhikari, Akshay Kumar; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL/MEL genetic switch have revealed that its bistability is dependent on ultrasensitivity that can be altered or abolished by disabling different combinations of nested feedback loops. In contrast, we have previously demonstrated that weakening of the interaction between Gal80p and Gal4p alone is sufficient to abolish the ultrasensitivity (Das Adhikari et al. 2014). Here, we demonstrate that altering the epistatic interaction between Gal80p and Gal4p also abolishes the bistability, and the switch response to galactose becomes graded instead of binary. However, the GAL/MEL switch of wild-type and epistatically altered strains responded in a graded fashion to melibiose. The properties of the epistatically altered strain resemble Kluyveromyces lactis, which separated from the Saccharomyces lineage 100 mya before whole-genome duplication (WGD). Based on the results reported here, we propose that epistatic interactions played a crucial role in the evolution of the fine regulation of S. cerevisiae GAL/MEL switch following WGD.

  12. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  14. Distribution of the Galβ1-4Gal epitope among birds: species-specific loss of the glycan structure in chicken and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriko; Nawa, Daisuke; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Lin, Chia-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The Galβ1-4Gal epitope is rarely found in mammals, and the natural antibody against Galβ1-4Gal is rich in human. In contrast, we have previously demonstrated the presence of Galβ1-4Gal in pigeon and ostrich, and the absence of this epitope in chicken. Here, to further investigate the expression of this glycan among birds, egg white glycoproteins and egg yolk IgG from nine species of birds, namely, chicken, duck, emu, guineafowl, ostrich, peafowl, pigeon, quail, and turkey, were analyzed by western blot using an anti-(Galβ1-4Gal) antibody. The results indicated that some egg white glycoproteins from emu, ostrich, and quail, and heavy chains of IgG from all of the birds, except chicken and quail, were stained with the antibody. The presence of Galβ1-4Gal on N-glycans of IgGs from guineafowl, peafowl, and turkey were confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS), MS/MS, and MS(n) analyses. In quail, the presence of Galβ1-4Gal was confirmed by detecting the activities of UDP-galactose: β-galactoside β1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT(Gal)) in various tissues, and by detecting Galβ1-4Gal by western blotting. In contrast, bamboo partridge, which is a close relative of chicken, did not show any detectable activities of β4GalT(Gal) or Galβ1-4Gal on glycoproteins. Because quail, peafowl, turkey, chicken, and bamboo partridge belong to the same family, i.e., Phasianidae, expression of Galβ1-4Gal was most likely differentiated within this family. Considering that Galβ1-4Gal is also expressed in ostrich, emu, and pigeon, which are phylogenetically distant relatives within modern birds, Galβ1-4Gal expression appears to be widely distributed among birds, but might have been abolished in the ancestors of chicken and bamboo partridge.

  15. Metabolic glycoengineering through the mammalian GalNAc salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Pouilly, Sabrina; Piller, Véronique; Piller, Friedrich

    2012-02-01

    GalNAc is the initial sugar of mucin-type O-glycans, and is a component of several tumor antigens. The aim of this work was to determine whether synthetic GalNAc analogs could be taken up from the medium and incorporated into complex cellular O-glycans. The cell line employed was CHO ldlD, which can only use GalNAc and Gal present in the medium for the synthesis of its glycans. All GalNAc analogs with modified N-acyl groups (N-formyl, N-propionyl, N-glycolyl, N-azidoacetyl, N-bromoacetyl, and N-chloroacetyl) were incorporated into cellular O-glycans, although to different extents. The GalNAc analogs linked to Ser or Thr could be extended by the β3-galactosyltransferase glycoprotein-N-acetylgalactosamine 3β-galactosyl transferase 1 in vitro and in vivo and by α6-sialyltransferase α-N-acetylgalactosaminide-α-2,6-sialyltransferase 1. At the surface of CHO ldlD cells, all analogs were incorporated into sialylated O-glycan structures like those present on wild-type CHO cells, indicating that the GalNAc analogs do not change the overall structure of core-1 O-glycans. In addition, this study shows that the unnatural synthetic GalNAc analogs can be incorporated into human tumor cells, and that a tumor antigen modified by an analog can be readily detected by a specific antiserum. GalNAc analogs are therefore potential targets for tumor immunotherapy.

  16. Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference (9th) Held in Tsukuba, Japan on 4-8 April 2005. Book of Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Plasma Interference with High Voltage Electrode Array for Space Power Application (095lwa) Denis Payan - CNES Charging of Coaxial Lines with Floating ... floating probe signal(099tlu) Noriyoshi Onodera - Mitsubishi Electric Corporation ao9ono) Robust Design of Satellite Systems Against Spacecraft Charging...Probabilistic Analysis of ISS Plasma Interaction (119red) Brandon Reddell - Boeing Floating Potential Measurement Unit Langmuir Probe Testing and Data

  17. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  18. Phylogeography of the Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis): a recent arrival to the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bollmer, Jennifer L; Kimball, Rebecca T; Whiteman, Noah Kerness; Sarasola, José Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-04-01

    Galápagos hawks (Buteo galapagoensis) are one of the most inbred bird species in the world, living in small, isolated island populations. We used mitochondrial sequence and nuclear minisatellite data to describe relationships among Galápagos hawk populations and their colonization history. We sampled 10 populations (encompassing the entire current species range of nine islands and one extirpated population), as well as the Galápagos hawk's closest mainland relative, the Swainson's hawk (B. swainsoni). There was little sequence divergence between Galápagos and Swainson's hawks (only 0.42% over almost 3kb of data), indicating that the hawks colonized Galápagos very recently, likely less than 300,000 years ago, making them the most recent arrivals of the studied taxa. There were only seven, closely related Galápagos hawk haplotypes, with most populations being monomorphic. The mitochondrial and minisatellite data together indicated a general pattern of rapid population expansion followed by genetic isolation of hawk breeding populations. The recent arrival, genetic isolation, and phenotypic differentiation among populations suggest that the Galápagos hawk, a rather new species itself, is in the earliest stages of further divergence.

  19. 9th GCC closed forum: CAPA in regulated bioanalysis; method robustness, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, regulatory audit experiences and electronic laboratory notebooks.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Roger; LeLacheur, Richard; Dumont, Isabelle; Couerbe, Philippe; Safavi, Afshin; Islam, Rafiq; Pattison, Colin; Cape, Stephanie; Rocci, Mario; Briscoe, Chad; Cojocaru, Laura; Groeber, Elizabeth; Silvestro, Luigi; Bravo, Jennifer; Shoup, Ron; Verville, Manon; Zimmer, Jennifer; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Khadang, Ardeshir; Bourdage, James; Hughes, Nicola; Fatmi, Saadya; Di Donato, Lorella; Sheldon, Curtis; Keyhani, Anahita; Satterwhite, Christina; Yu, Mathilde; Fiscella, Michele; Hulse, James; Lin, Zhongping John; Garofolo, Wei; Savoie, Natasha; Xiao, Yi Qun; Kurylak, Kai; Harris, Sarah; Saxena, Manju; Buonarati, Mike; Lévesque, Ann; Boudreau, Nadine; Lin, Jenny; Khan, Masood U; Ray, Gene; Liu, Yansheng; Xu, Allan; Soni, Gunjan; Ward, Ian; Kingsley, Clare; Ritzén, Hanna; Tabler, Edward; Nicholson, Bob; Bennett, Patrick; van de Merbel, Nico; Karnik, Shane; Bouhajib, Mohammed; Wieling, Jaap; Mulvana, Daniel; Ingelse, Benno; Allen, Mike; Malone, Michele; Fang, Xinping

    2016-03-01

    The 9th GCCClosed Forum was held just prior to the 2015 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) in Miami, FL, USA on 13 April 2015. In attendance were 58 senior-level participants, from eight countries, representing 38 CRO companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for CRO bioanalytical representatives to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues selected at this year's closed forum include CAPA, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, and ELNs. A summary of the industry's best practices and the conclusions from the discussion of these topics is included in this meeting report.

  20. [Native or not? Isotope analysis of a female skeleton on the 9th century A.D. from Elsau, Canton Zurich, Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tütken, Thomas; Langenegger, Elisabeth; Wild, Werner

    2008-03-01

    At Elsau near Winterthur (CH), a 9th century AD grave with a female skeleton was found in 2003. This grave was reopened one to six years after burial. After manipulating the partially decayed skeleton, the grave was filled with a layer of rocks and a claw of a sea eagle as well as the paw of a fox was placed on top. At least from this time onwards, the grave was situated in the annex of a church. Because of this special burial site for the 42 year old woman, who suffered from different severe illnesses, it is thought that she belonged to the upper class. The postmortal changes at the grave are exceptional and even after thorough research, no equivalent burial procedures are known from this area. To investigate the possibility if the woman migrated to the region of Elsau, the oxygen and strontium isotope composition of several teeth and one long bone of her skeleton was analysed. The results indicate a certain but restricted mobility within the northern Alpine foreland and as a result changes of the isotope composition of the food and drinking water during her childhood. Immigration from regions in which similar burial customs to those used for the woman persisted into the 9th century AD can be largely excluded based on the isotope composition of her skeletal remains. The mobility in the pre-Alpine region supports the interpretation that the woman belonged to the upper class, whose properties where widely distributed.

  1. Presence and elimination of the xenoantigen gal (alpha1, 3) gal in tissue-engineered heart valves.

    PubMed

    Kasimir, Marie-Theres; Rieder, Erwin; Seebacher, Gernot; Wolner, Ernst; Weigel, Guenter; Simon, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Tissue engineering of heart valves promises to create functional autologous tissue with the potential for regeneration and growth without the limitations of current heart valve prostheses. The appropriate valve matrix is essential. Porcine heart valves are attractive because of their anatomical similarity. Decellularization is used for antigen reduction. The efficacy of published protocols varies, however. The absence of a specific immunological or unspecific inflammatory reaction is mandatory. The porcine cell-specific alpha-Gal epitope is known to be responsible for hyperacute rejection in xenotransplantation. In tissue engineering residual alpha-Gal epitope may induce severe inflammation in humans and may lead to graft failure. In this study porcine pulmonary conduits were decellularized with Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, Igepal CA-630, and ribonuclease treatment and were compared with specimens of the commercially available porcine decellularized SynerGraft regarding cell removal and elimination of the alpha-Gal epitope. In addition, samples of a porcine bioprosthesis were examined for the presence of the alpha-Gal epitope. In conclusion, we describe for the first time the presence of the alpha-Gal epitope in clinically used porcine bioprostheses and the first generation of a commercial tissue-engineered heart valve. In contrast, complete cell and alpha-Gal removal was achieved by a decellularization procedure developed by our group.

  2. Beams 92. Proceedings of the International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams (9th) held in Washington, DC on May 25-29 1992. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    supply of the plasma source material must be more sophis - ticated to get more controllability easily. All of these are expected toward the more...transports the light 45 m to a remote screen room. There the light is injected into a 1-m Czerny- Turner spectrograph with a streak camera located in the...nitrogen was introduced through a leak valve in the diode end of the experiment. -917- 0 0--- 5O O005O2O 0 0 50 100 150 200 t (ns) 00 < ( 0 50 100

  3. Proceedings of the Air Power Symposium on the Role of Airpower in Low Intensity Conflict (9th) Held at Maxwell AFB, Alabama on 11-13 March 1985,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    the United States had air superiority in Viet-Nam and Viet-Nam was lost; Samoza had air superiority in Nicaragua and lost Nicaragua ; and, the Soviet...provided to Mali. And then this paragraph: "In 1968, the Wing sent UC-123 spray aircraft to Nicaragua and Panama to support the indigenous Air Forces...posture free from conventional mind sets, but there must be political resolve and national will -ithin the nod/ po! tLc that is enduring and persistent in

  4. Beams 92. Proceedings of the International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams (9th) held in Washington, DC on May 25-29 1992, Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    analytically ; instead, we decided to take a phenomenological approach. We modeled the circuit without regard to the cavity Qs. Shown in Fig. 4 is a plot of...computational and analytical predictions. Electron beam optics through a magnetic cusp was also studied with ISIS and MERLIN, and verified experimentally...subsequent studies to assess the performance degradations whict might result from accommodating experimentally achievable conditions, such as a wider cathode

  5. Burkitt lymphoma research in East Africa: highlights from the 9th African organization for research and training in cancer conference held in Durban, South Africa in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A one-day workshop on Burkitt lymphoma (BL) was held at the 9th African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) conference in 2013 in Durban, South Africa. The workshop featured 15 plenary talks by delegates representing 13 institutions that either fund or implement research on BL targeting AORTIC delegates primarily interested in pediatric oncology. The main outcomes of the meeting were improved sharing of knowledge and experience about ongoing epidemiologic BL research, BL treatment in different settings, the role of cancer registries in cancer research, and opportunities for African scientists to publish in scientific journals. The idea of forming a consortium of BL to improve coordination, information sharing, accelerate discovery, dissemination, and translation of knowledge and to build capacity, while reducing redundant efforts was discussed. Here, we summarize the presentations and discussions from the workshop. PMID:25686906

  6. Report from the World Health Organization's Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) meeting, Geneva, 7-9th Sep 2015.

    PubMed

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Kaslow, David C; Moorthy, Vasee S

    2016-06-03

    There are more vaccines in development, against a greater number of pathogens, than ever before. A challenge with this exceptional level of activity and investment is how to select and resource the most promising approaches to have the most significant impact on public health. The WHO Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) was established in 2014 to provide strategic advice and recommendations to WHO for vaccines in clinical development that could have a significant impact on public health in low and middle income countries. On 7-9th September 2015, PDVAC was convened for the second time, when the committee reviewed vaccine developments in 24 disease areas. This report summarises the key recommendations from that consultation.

  7. Long term persistence of inflammation in children vaccinated with Salmonella conjugate vaccine is associated with augmented Th9-Th17 cytokine.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Chinnasamy; Kevinkumar, Vijayakumar; Aravindhan, Vivekanandhan

    2017-03-01

    Vaccine induced serum cytokines not only serves as a biomarker of immunity but also serves as a reliable measure of inflammation. Long term persistence of inflammation can lead to metabolic derangement. Towards this end, in the present study, we measured levels of cytokines along with hormones (insulin, leptin and adiponectin) in children who have been vaccinated with Salmonella typhi Vi conjugate vaccine, 30months after vaccination. Vaccinated children showed a unique cytokine profile with suppressed Th1-Th2 and increased Th9-Th17 cytokines indicating immune polarization which was associated with decreased serum adiponectin (but not insulin or leptin) levels. The study gains major importance since it is a longitudinal study which reports vaccine induced long term persistence of inflammation for the first time in the high risk ethnic population.

  8. The HUPO Brain Proteome project wish list--summary of the 9(th) HUPO BPP Workshop 9-10 January 2008, Barbados.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Eisenacher, Martin; Tribl, Florian; Stephan, Christian; Marcus, Katrin; Hardt, Tanja; Wiltfang, Jens; Martens, Lennart; Desiderio, Dominic; Gutstein, Howard; Park, Young Mok; Meyer, Helmut E

    2008-06-01

    The Human Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) aims at advancing knowledge and the understanding of neurodiseases and aging with the purpose of identifying prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, as well as to push new diagnostic approaches and medications. The participating groups meet in semi-annual workshops to discuss the progress, as well as the needs, within the field of proteomics. The 9(th) HUPO BPP workshop took place in Barbados from 9-10 January, 2008. Discussing the future HUPO BPP Roadmap, the attendees drafted the so called HUPO BPP wish list containing timelines, suggestions and missions. This wish list will be updated regularly and will serve as a guideline for the next phase.

  9. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation and Chromosome Structural Arrangement by GalR in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhong; Trostel, Andrei; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Lee, Sang Jun; He, Ximiao; Stringer, Anne M.; Wade, Joseph T.; Schneider, Thomas D.; Durfee, Tim; Adhya, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory protein, GalR, is known for controlling transcription of genes related to D-galactose metabolism in Escherichia coli. Here, using a combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we identify novel GalR binding sites upstream of several genes whose function is not directly related to D-galactose metabolism. Moreover, we do not observe regulation of these genes by GalR under standard growth conditions. Thus, our data indicate a broader regulatory role for GalR, and suggest that regulation by GalR is modulated by other factors. Surprisingly, we detect regulation of 158 transcripts by GalR, with few regulated genes being associated with a nearby GalR binding site. Based on our earlier observation of long-range interactions between distally bound GalR dimers, we propose that GalR indirectly regulates the transcription of many genes by inducing large-scale restructuring of the chromosome. PMID:27900321

  10. Two-level inhibition of galK expression by Spot 42: Degradation of mRNA mK2 and enhanced transcription termination before the galK gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Ji, Sang Chun; Jeon, Heung Jin; Lee, Yonho; Lim, Heon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gal operon has the structure Pgal-galE-galT-galK-galM. During early log growth, a gradient in gene expression, named type 2 polarity, is established, as follows: galE > galT > galK > galM. However, during late-log growth, type 1 polarity is established in which galK is greater than galT, as follows: galE > galK > galT > galM. We found that type 2 polarity occurs as a result of the down-regulation of galK, which is caused by two different molecular mechanisms: Spot 42-mediated degradation of the galK-specific mRNA, mK2, and Spot 42-mediated Rho-dependent transcription termination at the end of galT. Because the concentration of Spot 42 drops during the transition period of the polarity type switch, these results demonstrate that type 1 polarity is the result of alleviation of Spot 42-mediated galK down-regulation. Because the Spot 42-binding site overlaps with a putative Rho-binding site, a molecular mechanism is proposed to explain how Spot 42, possibly with Hfq, enhances Rho-mediated transcription termination at the end of galT. PMID:26045496

  11. Interaction between transcriptional activator protein LAC9 and negative regulatory protein GAL80.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Langdon, S D; Johnston, S A

    1989-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcriptional activation mediated by the GAL4 regulatory protein is repressed in the absence of galactose by the binding of the GAL80 protein, an interaction that requires the carboxy-terminal 28 amino acids of GAL4. The homolog of GAL4 from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC9, activates transcription in S. cerevisiae and is highly similar to GAL4 in its carboxyl terminus but is not repressed by wild-type levels of GAL80 protein. Here we show that GAL80 does repress LAC9-activated transcription in S. cerevisiae if overproduced. We sought to determine the molecular basis for the difference in the responses of the LAC9 and GAL4 proteins to GAL80. Our results indicate that this difference is due primarily to the fact that under wild-type conditions, the level of LAC9 protein in S. cerevisiae is much higher than that of GAL4, which suggests that LAC9 escapes GAL80-mediated repression by titration of GAL80 protein in vivo. The difference in response to GAL80 is not due to amino acid sequence differences between the LAC9 and GAL4 carboxyl termini. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of galactose metabolism regulation in S. cerevisiae and K. lactis. Images PMID:2550790

  12. Evolutionary age of the Galápagos iguanas predates the age of the present Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Rassmann, K

    1997-04-01

    New geological findings suggest that volcanoes existed over the Galápagos hotspot long before today's islands emerged less than 5 million years ago. The evolution of some of Galápagos' biota might have taken place on these former islands. This study investigates the evolutionary history of two of the archipelagos' older vertebrate taxa, the endemic Galápagos marine and land iguana (genera Amblyrhynchus and Conolophus). Mitochondrial rDNA sequences (in total about one kilobase of the 12S and 16S genes) were obtained from all extant genera of the family Iguanidae and the outgroup Oplurus. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that the Galápagos iguanas are sister taxa. Rate comparisons between the iguanid sequences and a corresponding set of sequences from ungulates with known fossil ages date their separation time at 10 million years, or more. The results strengthen the hypothesis that extended speciation times in the Galápagos are possible and provide an estimate of the minimum time inhabited islands of the archipelago may have existed.

  13. Cultural turnover among Galápagos sperm whales

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Rendell, Luke

    2016-01-01

    While populations may wax and wane, it is rare for an entire population to be replaced by a completely different set of individuals. We document the large-scale relocation of cultural groups of sperm whale off the Galápagos Islands, in which two sympatric vocal clans were entirely replaced by two different ones. Between 1985 and 1999, whales from two clans (called Regular and Plus-One) defined by cultural dialects in coda vocalizations were repeatedly photo-identified off Galápagos. Their occurrence in the area declined through the 1990s; by 2000, none remained. We reassessed Galápagos sperm whales in 2013–2014, identifying 463 new females. However, re-sighting rates were low, with no matches with the Galápagos 1985–1999 population, suggesting an eastward shift to coastal areas. Their vocal repertoires matched those of two other clans (called Short and Four-Plus) found across the Pacific but previously rare or absent around Galápagos. The mechanisms behind this cultural turnover may include large-scale environmental regime shifts favouring clan-specific foraging strategies, and a response to heavy whaling in the region involving redistribution of surviving whales into high-quality habitats. The fall and rise of sperm whale cultures off Galápagos reflect the structuring of the Pacific population into large, enduring clans with dynamic ranges. Long-lasting clan membership illustrates how culture can be bound up in the structure and dynamics of animal populations and so how tracking cultural traits can reveal large-scale population shifts. PMID:27853582

  14. Cultural turnover among Galápagos sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Mauricio; Whitehead, Hal; Gero, Shane; Rendell, Luke

    2016-10-01

    While populations may wax and wane, it is rare for an entire population to be replaced by a completely different set of individuals. We document the large-scale relocation of cultural groups of sperm whale off the Galápagos Islands, in which two sympatric vocal clans were entirely replaced by two different ones. Between 1985 and 1999, whales from two clans (called Regular and Plus-One) defined by cultural dialects in coda vocalizations were repeatedly photo-identified off Galápagos. Their occurrence in the area declined through the 1990s; by 2000, none remained. We reassessed Galápagos sperm whales in 2013-2014, identifying 463 new females. However, re-sighting rates were low, with no matches with the Galápagos 1985-1999 population, suggesting an eastward shift to coastal areas. Their vocal repertoires matched those of two other clans (called Short and Four-Plus) found across the Pacific but previously rare or absent around Galápagos. The mechanisms behind this cultural turnover may include large-scale environmental regime shifts favouring clan-specific foraging strategies, and a response to heavy whaling in the region involving redistribution of surviving whales into high-quality habitats. The fall and rise of sperm whale cultures off Galápagos reflect the structuring of the Pacific population into large, enduring clans with dynamic ranges. Long-lasting clan membership illustrates how culture can be bound up in the structure and dynamics of animal populations and so how tracking cultural traits can reveal large-scale population shifts.

  15. Constitutive expression in gal7 mutants of Kluyveromyces lactis is due to internal production of galactose as an inducer of the Gal/Lac regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, G; Vollenbroich, V; Jeon, M S; de Graaf, A A; Hollenberg, C P

    1997-01-01

    The induction process of the galactose regulon has been intensively studied, but until now the nature of the inducer has remained unknown. We have analyzed a delta gal7 mutant of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, which lacks the galactotransferase activity and is able to express the genes of the Gal/Lac regulon also in the absence of galactose. We found that this expression is semiconstitutive and undergoes a strong induction during the stationary phase. The gal1-209 mutant, which has a reduced kinase activity but retains its positive regulatory function, also shows a constitutive expression of beta-galactosidase, suggesting that galactose is the inducer. A gal10 deletion in delta gal7 or gal1-209 mutants reduces the expression to under wild-type levels. The presence of the inducer could be demonstrated in both delta gal7 crude extracts and culture medium by means of a bioassay using the induction in gal1-209 cells. A mutation in the transporter gene LAC12 decreases the level of induction in gal7 cells, indicating that galactose is partly released into the medium and then retransported into the cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of crude extracts from delta gal7 cells revealed the presence of 50 microM galactose. We conclude that galactose is the inducer of the Gal/Lac regulon and is produced via UDP-galactose through a yet-unknown pathway. PMID:9032299

  16. Fotometria superficial BVRI de 18 galáxias fracas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, M. F. O.; Silva, P. R.

    2003-08-01

    Conhecer as propriedades de galáxias a diferentes redshifts é uma questão fundamental para entender o problema da formação e evolução das galáxias, e desde a década passada tem se intensificado fortemente o estudo de galáxias muito distantes. No entanto parece haver um interesse menor em galáxias a distâncias intermediárias, que aparecem como objetos de fundo em imagens de objetos próximos, e que são igualmente importantes. Examinando imagens BVRI de longa exposição, ótimo sinal/ruído, grande campo (46'x46'), das vizinhanças de NGC 7479, detectamos 18 galáxias fracas (18 < B < 21) nessas imagens. Neste trabalho, apresentamos a fotometria superficial desses objetos. Determinamos coordenadas equatoriais, magnitudes e cores integradas, perfis de brilho e de cor, e parâmetros isofotais calculados por ajuste de ellipses, dentro do limite permitido pela baixa resolução espacial dos dados (1,35 segarc/pixel). Nosso objetivo é procurar correlações entre as propriedades das galáxias e, tentativamente, comparar esses dados com aqueles de galáxias de redshift conhecido, disponíveis na literatura, para estimar suas distâncias (a partir da relação cor x redshift) e suas morfologias. Uma análise preliminar nesse sentido mostrou que as cores aparentes B-V, V-R e V-I dos objetos da nossa amostra, a menos de duas exceções, ocupam regiões bem definidas nos diagramas cor-cor, e não apresentam diferenças notáveis em relação às cores típicas de galáxias próximas.

  17. 9th Annual Safar Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    residents, medical students, nursing, pharmacy, and undergraduate trainees. Each trainee presentation was judged by an august group of faculty and a total...Environmental Enrichment-Mediated Functional Improvement After Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury." 62 Megan Miller, BS - " COMT Gene Variant

  18. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  19. Multiple mechanisms mediate glucose repression of the yeast GAL1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lamphier, M S; Ptashne, M

    1992-01-01

    Several mechanisms contribute to the glucose repression of the GAL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that one mechanism involves the transcriptional down-regulation of the GAL4 gene and a second requires the GAL80 gene. We also examine the contribution of cis-acting negative elements in the GAL1 promoter to glucose repression. In an otherwise wild-type strain disruption of any one of these three mechanisms alleviates repression of GAL1 only 2- to 4-fold. However, in the absence of the other two mechanisms the transcriptional down-regulation of GAL4 is sufficient to repress GAL1 expression 40- to 60-fold and the GAL80-dependent mechanism is sufficient to repress GAL1 expression 20- to 30-fold. These first two mechanisms constitute a functionally redundant system of repression and both must be disrupted in order to abolish glucose repression of GAL1. In contrast, negative elements in the GAL1 promoter are effective in repressing GAL1 expression 2- to 4-fold in glucose medium only when at least one of the other two mechanisms of repression is present. Thus, glucose repression of GAL1 is mediated primarily by the first two mechanisms, whereas the third mechanism supplements repression severalfold. PMID:1631075

  20. In Galápagos … and Uncomfortable with Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, Sehoya; Graczyk, Hannah; Rodríguez Garcia, José Luis; Moore, Randy

    2016-01-01

    In June 2013, the third World Evolution Summit convened on San Cristóbal, hosting scientists from around the world (Paz-y-Miño-C and Espinosa 2013)--neither the first nor likely the last gathering of biologists on these remote islands. Clearly, both locals and an international audience perceive Galápagos as figuring prominently in discourse about…

  1. Characterization of the Rat GAL2R Promoter: Positive Role of ETS-1 in Regulation of the Rat GAL2R Gene in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Liu, Li; Luo, Hanjiang; Li, Yueting; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-06-27

    Galanin receptor 2 (GAL2R) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the neuropeptide galanin that regulates many important physiological functions and pathological processes. To investigate the molecular mechanism governing GAL2R gene transcription, the rat GAL2R promoter was isolated and analyzed. We found that the region from -320 to -300 of the GAL2R promoter contains two putative ETS-1 elements and plays an important role in regulating GAL2R promoter activity. We also showed that transcription factor ETS-1 bound to this region in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of ETS-1 significantly increased GAL2R promoter activity and transcription of the GAL2R gene, whereas knockdown of ETS-1 produced the opposite effects. In addition, we showed that ETS-1 recruited co-activator p300 to the GAL2R promoter. These data indicate a role for ETS-1 in the control of the GAL2R gene expression and provide a basis for understanding the transcriptional regulation of the GAL2R gene.

  2. Vaccination-induced IgG response to Galα1-3GalNAc glycan epitopes in lambs protected against Haemonchus contortus challenge infection

    PubMed Central

    van Stijn, Caroline M.W.; van den Broek, Marloes; Vervelde, Lonneke; Alvarez, Richard A.; Cummings, Richard D.; Tefsen, Boris; van Die, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Lambs vaccinated with Haemonchus contortus excretory/secretory (ES) glycoproteins in combination with the adjuvant Alhydrogel are protected against H. contortus challenge infection. Using glycan microarray analysis we showed that serum from such vaccinated lambs contains IgG antibodies that recognize the glycan antigen Galα1-3GalNAc-R and GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R. Our studies revealed that H. contortus glycoproteins contain Galα1-3Gal-R as well as significant levels of Galα1-3GalNAc-R, which has not been previously reported. Extracts from H. contortus adult worms contain a galactosyltransferase acting on glycan substrates with a terminal GalNAc, indicating that the worms possess the enzymatic potential to synthesize terminal Gal-GalNAc moieties. These data illustrate that glycan microarrays constitute a promising technology for fast and specific analysis of serum anti-glycan antibodies in vaccination studies. In addition, this approach facilitates the discovery of novel, antigenic parasite glycan antigens that may have potential for developing glycoconjugate vaccines or utilization in diagnostics. PMID:19695255

  3. Cytokine Profile Associated with Selective Removal of Natural Anti-αGal Antibodies in a Sepsis Model in Gal-KO Mice.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Bello-Gil, Daniel; Costa, Cristina; Mañez, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Selective depletion of natural anti-Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc (so-called anti-αGal) antibodies is achieved in α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (Gal-KO) mice by administration of the soluble glycoconjugate of αGal GAS914. This molecule removed up to 90% of natural circulating anti-αGal antibodies without causing unspecific production of cytokines in wild-type (CBA) and Gal-KO mice. However, the removal of anti-αGal antibodies in Gal-KO mice with GAS914 in the context of sepsis after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was associated with a significant increase in the production of leptin, CXLC1, CXLC13, and TIMP-1 cytokines compared to vehicle (PBS)-treated controls. Despite the current lack of understanding of the underlying mechanism, our data suggest a putative role of natural anti-αGal antibodies in the regulation of some cytokines during sepsis.

  4. State of the art and clinical recommendations in periapical implant lesions. 9th Mozo-Grau Ticare Conference in Quintanilla, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Blaya-Tárraga, Juan-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the statements and clinical recommendations in periapical implant lesions, as per the state of the art and expert opinion agreement among the participants in the 9th Mozo-Grau Conference 2016 held in Quintanilla (Valladolid, Spain). The current status of the concept, frequency, etiology, diagnosis, clinical classification, surgical procedure and prognosis are described. If following implant placement localized pain develops in the periapical area, with or without radiographic changes, the diagnosis of periapical implant lesion should be suspected. It is important to monitor the condition in order to identify any change in its evolution. Radiological changes in the periapical radiographs are not always manifest in the early stages, and in this regard small-volume cone beam computed tomography can help us visualize such peri-implant changes. The early diagnosis of periapical implant lesions during the osseointegration phase and the provision of early treatment result in increased implant survival rates, thereby avoiding the need for implant extraction. Key words:Apical peri-implantitis, retrograde peri-implantitis, inflammatory peri-implantitis lesion. PMID:28298994

  5. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population.

  6. Climate Change, Risks and Natural Resources didactic issues of educational content geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermendzhieva, Stela; Nejdet, Semra

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to follow "Climate change, risks and Natural Resources" in the curriculum of Geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade and to interpret some didactic aspects. Analysis of key themes, concepts and categories related to the environment, events and approaches to environmental protection and the environmentally sound development of sectors of the economy is didikticheski targeted. Considering the emergence and development of geo-ecological issues, their scope and their importance to the environment, systematize some species and some approaches to solving them. Geography education in grade 9 and 10 involves acquiring knowledge, developing skills and composing behaviors of objective perception and assessment of the reality of globed, regional and local aspect. The emerging consumer and individualistic culture snowballing globalization, are increasingly occurring global warming, declining biodiversity form new realities which education must respond appropriately. The objective, consistency, accessibility and relevance in real terms are meaningful, logical accents. Whether and how reproduced in the study of Geography of Bulgaria and the world is the subject of research study in this report. Geoecological structuring of topics, concepts and categories can be done in different signs. In terms of their scope are local, national or regional, and global. Matter and interdisciplinary approach, which is to reveal the unity of the "man-society-nature" to clarify the complexity of their character with a view to forming a harmonious personality with high Geoecological consciousness and culture, and the activities carried out in their study.

  7. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents. PMID:27563919

  8. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Roberts, Paul; Dawson, Drew; Ferguson, Sally; Meuleners, Lynn; Brook, Libby; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-08-24

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on various aspects of public health. First, the Special Issue highlights the fact that working long shifts and/or night shifts can affect not only cognitive functioning, but also physical health. In particular, three papers examined the potential relationships between shiftwork and different aspects of health, including the cardiovascular system, sleep disordered breathing, and eating behaviour. Second, the Special Issue highlights the move away from controlling fatigue through prescriptive hours of service rules and toward the application of risk management principles. In particular, three papers indicated that best-practice fatigue risk management systems should contain multiple redundant layers of defense against fatigue-related errors and accidents.

  9. Positive predictive value of ICD-9th codes for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzzi, C; Troncon, M G; Agostinis, L; García Rodríguez, L A

    1999-06-01

    We identified patients whose records in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database in the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia showed a code of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and perforation according to codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9th revision. The validity of site- and lesion-specific codes (531 to 534) and nonspecific codes (5780, 5781, and 5789) was ascertained through manual review of hospital clinical records. The initial group was made of 1779 potential cases of UGIB identified with one of these codes recorded. First, the positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated in a random sample. As a result of the observed high PPV of 531 and 532 codes, additional hospital charts were solely requested for all remaining potential cases with 533, 534, and 578 ICD-9 codes. The overall PPV reached a high of 97% for 531 and 532 site-specific codes, 84% for 534 site-specific codes, and 80% for 533 lesion-specific codes, and a low of 59% for nonspecific codes. These data suggest a considerable research potential for this new computerized health care database in Southern Europe.

  10. Organ/Tissue absorbed doses measured with a human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle-Mir Mission (STS-91).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Komiyama, T; Fujitaka, K

    1999-09-01

    Organ/Tissue absorbed doses were measured with a life-size human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle/Mir Mission (STS-91) from June 2 to 12, 1998. This is the first attempt to measure directly organ/tissue doses over a whole human body in space. The absorbed dose was measured by combination of two integrating detectors: thermo- luminescent dosemeter of Mg2SiO4: Tb (TDMS) and plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD). Both detectors were calibrated on ground using high-energy charged-particle beams. The detectors were packed in 59 cases of tissue-equivalent resin; and put into the positions of radiologically important organs and tissues in the phantom. Efficiency reductions of TDMS for high-LET particles were corrected based on the LET-differential particle fluence of space radiation measured with PNTDs. The accumulated absorbed doses during this 9.8-days mission at low-earth orbit (400 km x 51.6 degrees) ranged from 1.6 mGy at colon to 2.6 mGy at bone surface (shoulder) with a variation factor of 1.6. The absorbed doses at some internal organs were higher than the skin dose. This fact is important from the viewpoint of radiological protection for astronauts.

  11. Validation of a model of the GAL regulatory system via robustness analysis of its bistability characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiæ, structural bistability generates a bimodal expression of the galactose uptake genes (GAL) when exposed to low and high glucose concentrations. This indicates that yeast cells can decide between using either the limited amount of glucose or growing on galactose under changing environmental conditions. A crucial requirement for any plausible mechanistic model of this system is that it reproduces the robustness of the bistable response observed in vivo against inter-individual parametric variability and fluctuating environmental conditions. Results We show how a control-theoretic analysis of the robustness of a model of the GAL regulatory network may be used to establish the model’s plausibility in characterizing the persistent memory of different carbon sources, without the need for extensive simulations. Chemical Reaction Network Theory is used to establish that the proposed network model is compatible with structural bistability. The robustness of each of the two operative conditions against fluctuations of the species concentrations is demonstrated by studying the Domains of Attraction of the corresponding equilibrium points. Finally, we use a global robustness analysis method based on Semi-Definite Programming to evaluate the modification of the bistable steady states induced by multiple parametric variations throughout bounded regions of the parameter space. Conclusions Our analysis provides convincing evidence for the robustness, and hence plausibility, of the GAL regulatory network model. The proposed workflow also demonstrates the power of analytical methods from control theory to provide a direct quantitative characterization of the dynamics of multistable biomolecular regulatory systems without recourse to extensive computer simulations. PMID:23680044

  12. Historical DNA analysis reveals living descendants of an extinct species of Galápagos tortoise.

    PubMed

    Poulakakis, Nikos; Glaberman, Scott; Russello, Michael; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Ciofi, Claudio; Powell, Jeffrey R; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2008-10-07

    Giant tortoises, a prominent symbol of the Galápagos archipelago, illustrate the influence of geological history and natural selection on the diversification of organisms. Because of heavy human exploitation, 4 of the 15 known species (Geochelone spp.) have disappeared. Charles Darwin himself detailed the intense harvesting of one species, G. elephantopus, which once was endemic to the island of Floreana. This species was believed to have been exterminated within 15 years of Darwin's historic visit to the Galápagos in 1835. The application of modern DNA techniques to museum specimens combined with long-term study of a system creates new opportunities for identifying the living remnants of extinct taxa in the wild. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data obtained from museum specimens to show that the population on Floreana was evolutionarily distinct from all other Galápagos tortoise populations. It was demonstrated that some living individuals on the nearby island of Isabela are genetically distinct from the rest of the island's inhabitants. Surprisingly, we found that these "non-native" tortoises from Isabela are of recent Floreana ancestry and closely match the genetic data provided by the museum specimens. Thus, we show that the genetic line of G. elephantopus has not been completely extinguished and still exists in an intermixed population on Isabela. With enough individuals to commence a serious captive breeding program, this finding may help reestablish a species that was thought to have gone extinct more than a century ago and illustrates the power of long-term genetic analysis and the critical role of museum specimens in conservation biology.

  13. Anti-Gal-C antibody in autoimmune neuropathies subsequent to mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S; Chiba, A; Hitoshi, S; Takizawa, H; Kanazawa, I

    1995-04-01

    Four of 82 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and 1 of 12 with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), who previously had had Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, had serum antibody to galactocerebroside (Gal-C). Two patients with GBS without mycoplasma infection also had anti-Gal-C antibody, whereas none of the normal or the disease controls had it. As Gal-C is a major glycolipid antigen in myelin, anti-Gal-C antibody may function in the pathogenesis of autoimmune demyelinative neuropathies. Mycoplasma pneumoniae appears to be an important preceding infectious agent in autoimmune neuropathies with anti-Gal-C antibody.

  14. Analysis of the advantages of cis reporters in optimized FACS-Gal.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Luengo, Miguel Ángel; Rovira, Miguel; Serrano, Manuel; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo Jose; Martinez, Lola

    2017-04-04

    Flow cytometry is a powerful multiparametric technology, widely used for the identification, quantification, and isolation of defined populations of cells based on the expression of target proteins. It also allows for the use of surrogate reporters, either enzymatic or fluorescent, to indirectly monitor the expression of these target proteins. In this work, we optimised the dissociation protocol for the detection of the enzymatic reporter LacZ using the FACS-Gal detection system with the fluorogenic substrate FDG to compare cis- versus trans-positioned reporters efficiency. Particularly, for the FACS-Gal optimization, we studied lung and haematopoietic tissues, focusing on cell recovery, viability, FDG loading conditions and distribution of cellular populations. Reporter genes such as LacZ can be placed together with the gene of interest in the same polycistronic mRNA (in cis), or in independent alleles (in trans), which can strongly affect the correlation with the reporter readout. To address this issue, we generated a mouse model containing both types of reporters for the same gene, and compared them. Our results clearly indicate that trans-positioned reporters can be misleading, and that using a reporter gene in cis rather than trans is a much more specific method to sort for cells undergoing Cre-mediated recombination. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Trends of violence among 7th, 8th and 9th grade students in the state of Lara, Venezuela: The Global School Health Survey 2004 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Violence by young people is one of the most visible forms of violence and contributes greatly to the global burden of premature death, injury and disability. Methods The Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), State of Lara, Venezuela (GSHS-Lara) is a school-based surveillance system. It comprises a repeated, cross-sectional, self-administered survey drawn from a representative sample of 7th to 9th grade students, performed in the school years 2003-2004 (GSHS-Lara 2004) and 2007-2008 (GSHS-Lara 2008). It explores, among other things, a general violence indicator such as school absenteeism due to feeling unsafe at school or on the way to or from school for any reason; and more specific indicators of violence such as robbery, bullying, physical fights and use of weapons, as well as exposure to lectures on how to prevent violence. Results are given in terms of prevalence percentage. Results Absenteeism doubled between the two study periods (10.8% to 20.8%). The number of students that were a victim of robbery remained high and without change both outside (14.2% and 14.8%) and inside school (21.7% and 22.0%). The number of victims of bullying was high and increasing (33.4% and 43.6%). Bullying associated with being physically attacked decreased (18.5% to 14.3%). Physical attacks without active participation and not associated with bullying were frequent (21.5%). Physical fighting with active participation prevalence remained high and without change (27.5% and 28.2%). Carrying a weapon almost doubled (4.3% to 7.1%). Less than 65% reported classes for violence prevention. Conclusions The GSHS-Lara shows that violence is an important public health problem that needs to be addressed by the community and its authorities. PMID:22958602

  16. Using Self-Assembled Monolayers to Model Cell Adhesion to the 9th and 10th Type III Domains of Fibronectin†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Most mammalian cells must adhere to the extracellular matrix (ECM) to maintain proper growth and development. Fibronectin is a predominant ECM protein that engages integrin cell receptors through its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) peptide binding sites. To study the roles these motifs play in cell adhesion, proteins derived from the 9th (containing PHSRN) and 10th (containing RGD) type III fibronectin domains were engineered to be in frame with cutinase, a serine esterase that forms a site-specific, covalent adduct with phosphonate ligands. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that present phosphonate ligands against an inert background of tri(ethylene glycol) groups were used as model substrates to immobilize the cutinase-fibronectin fusion proteins. Baby hamster kidney cells attached efficiently to all protein surfaces, but only spread efficiently on protein monolayers containing the RGD peptide. Cells on RGD-containing protein surfaces also displayed defined focal adhesions and organized cytoskeletal structures compared to cells on PHSRN-presenting surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were shown to be unaffected by the presence of PHSRN when compared to RGD alone on SAMs presenting higher densities of protein, but PHSRN supported an increased efficiency in cell attachment when presented at low protein densities with RGD. Treatment of suspended cells with soluble RGD or PHSRN peptides revealed that both peptides were able to inhibit the attachment of FN10 surfaces. These results support a model wherein PHSRN and RGD bind competitively to integrins―rather than a two-point synergistic interaction―and the presence of PHSRN serves to increase the density of ligand on the substrate and therefore enhance the sticking probability of cells during attachment. PMID:20560553

  17. Earthlinks '97: Proceedings of the Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Education Society of Australasia (9th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, January 13-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, John J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 9th Biennial National Conference of the Australian Association for Environmental Education and the Marine Society of Australasia. The contents provide a valuable snapshot of the state of environmental education in Australia while moving towards the end of the 20th century. Papers include: (1)…

  18. Material Analysis and Processing Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The teacher developed curriculum guide provides the industrial education teacher with the objectives, equipment lists, material, supplies, references, and activities necessary to teach students of the 9th and/or 10th grade the concepts of interrelationships between material analysis and processing systems. Career information and sociological…

  19. Lithological structure of the Galápagos Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidito, Christopher; Herzberg, Claude; Gazel, Esteban; Geist, Dennis; Harpp, Karen

    2013-10-01

    We have measured Ni, Ca, and Mn in olivine phenocrysts from volcanoes in the Galápagos Archipelago to infer the mantle source lithologies. Results show that peridotite is the dominant source lithology for Fernandina, Floreana, Genovesa, Wolf Island, and Darwin Island. These volcanoes largely characterize the PLUME, WD, FLO, and DUM Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic endmembers of Harpp and White (2001). Volcan Wolf, Alcedo, Marchena, and Cerro Azul, also produced from the melting of peridotite sources, have isotopic compositions that can be defined by mixing of the four isotopic endmembers. Our analysis suggests that peridotite was present in the sources of the volcanoes covered in this study and therefore is the dominant source lithology of the Galápagos plume. Pyroxenite melting is generally focused in two isotopically distinct domains: Roca Redonda, Volcan Ecuador, and Sierra Negra in the enriched western part of the archipelago and Santiago, Santa Cruz, and Santa Fe in the depleted east. One implication of this finding is that the Western and Eastern Pyroxenite Domains represent two separate bodies of recycled crust within the Galápagos mantle plume. Furthermore, both isotopically enriched and depleted domains of the archipelago were generated from mixtures of peridotite and pyroxenite. This suggests that there is no relationship between the source lithology of the Galápagos plume and its isotopic characteristics. The identification of peridotite-source melting in volcanoes with isotopic characteristics that have been attributed to recycled crust points to the importance of mixing in OIB genesis, consistent with studies in the Canary Islands.

  20. GAL promoter-driven heterologous gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δ strain at anaerobic alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jungoh; Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Hongweon; Son, Yeo-Jin; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2013-02-01

    The removal of Gal80 protein by gene disruption turned into efficient GAL promoter-driven heterologous gene expression under anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using lipase B from Candida antarctica as a reporter, the relative strength of GAL10 promoter (P(GAL10) ) in Δgal80 mutant that does not require galactose as an inducer was compared to those of ADH1, PDC1, and PGK promoters, which have been known to work well anaerobically in actively fermenting yeast cells under high glucose concentration. P(GAL10) in the Δgal80 mutant showed 0.8-fold (ADH1), fourfold (PDC1), and 50-fold (PGK) in promoter strength.

  1. Results of gal-knockout porcine thymokidney xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griesemer, A D; Hirakata, A; Shimizu, A; Moran, S; Tena, A; Iwaki, H; Ishikawa, Y; Schule, P; Arn, J S; Robson, S C; Fishman, J A; Sykes, M; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K

    2009-12-01

    Clinical transplantation for the treatment of end-stage organ disease is limited by a shortage of donor organs. Successful xenotransplantation could immediately overcome this limitation. The development of homozygous alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pigs removed hyperacute rejection as the major immunologic hurdle to xenotransplantation. Nevertheless, GalT-KO organs stimulate robust immunologic responses that are not prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. Murine studies show that recipient thymopoiesis in thymic xenografts induces xenotolerance. We transplanted life-supporting composite thymokidneys (composite thymus and kidneys) prepared in GalT-KO miniature swine to baboons in an attempt to induce tolerance in a preclinical xenotransplant model. Here, we report the results of seven xenogenic thymokidney transplants using a steroid-free immunosuppressive regimen that eliminated whole-body irradiation in all but one recipient. The regimen resulted in average recipient survival of over 50 days. This was associated with donor-specific unresponsiveness in vitro and early baboon thymopoiesis in the porcine thymus tissue of these grafts, suggesting the development of T-cell tolerance. The kidney grafts had no signs of cellular infiltration or deposition of IgG, and no grafts were lost due to rejection. These results show that xenogeneic thymus transplantation can support early primate thymopoiesis, which in turn may induce T-cell tolerance to solid organ xenografts.

  2. Results of Gal-Knockout porcine thymokidney xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Griesemer, Adam D.; Hirakata, Atsushi; Shimizu, Akira; Moran, Shannon; Tena, Aseda; Iwaki, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Schule, Patrick; Arn, J. Scott; Robson, Simon C.; Fishman, Jay A.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Clinical transplantation for the treatment of end-stage organ disease is limited by a shortage of donor organs. Successful xenotransplantation could immediately overcome this limitation. The development of homozygous α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pigs removed hyperacute rejection as the major immunologic hurdle to xenotransplantation. Nevertheless, GalT-KO organs stimulate robust immunologic responses that are not prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. Murine studies show that recipient thymopoiesis in thymic xenografts induces xenotolerance. We transplanted life-supporting composite thymokidneys prepared in GalT-KO miniature swine to baboons in an attempt to induce tolerance in a pre-clinical xenotransplant model. Here, we report the results of 7 xenogenic thymokidney transplants using a steroid-free immunosuppressive regimen that eliminated whole body irradiation in all but 1 recipient. The regimen resulted in average recipient survival of over 50 days. This was associated with donor-specific unresponsiveness in vitro and early baboon thymopoiesis in the porcine thymus tissue of these grafts, suggesting the development of T cell tolerance. The kidney grafts had no signs of cellular infiltration or deposition of IgG, and no grafts were lost due to rejection. These results show that xenogeneic thymus transplantation can support early human thymopoiesis, which in turn may induce T cell tolerance to solid organ xenografts. PMID:19845583

  3. Tantalizing tortoises and the Darwin-Galápagos legend.

    PubMed

    Sulloway, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    During his historic Galápagos visit in 1835, Darwin spent nine days making scientific observations and collecting specimens on Santiago (James Island). In the course of this visit, Darwin ascended twice to the Santiago highlands. There, near springs located close to the island's summit, he conducted his most detailed observations of Galápagos tortoises. The precise location of these springs, which has not previously been established, is here identified using Darwin's own writings, satellite maps, and GPS technology. Photographic evidence from excursions to the areas where Darwin climbed, including repeat photography over a period of four decades, offers striking evidence of the deleterious impact of feral mammals introduced after Darwin's visit. Exploring the impact that Darwin's Santiago visit had on his thinking--especially focusing on his activities in the highlands--raises intriguing questions about the depth of his understanding of the evolutionary evidence he encountered while in the Galápagos. These questions and related insights provide further evidence concerning the timing of Darwin's conversion to the theory of evolution, which, despite recent claims to the contrary, occurred only after his return to England.

  4. The phylogenetic position of the Galápagos Cormorant.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Martyn; Valle, Carlos A; Spencer, Hamish G

    2009-10-01

    The endangered Galápagos Cormorant, Phalacrocorax harrisi, is unique among the species of the Phalacrocoracidae in being flightless and sequentially polyandrous. It has had a vexed taxonomic history, variously being lumped with all the species in Phalacrocorax, being accorded its own genus, Nannopterum, or being included in Leucocarbo or Compsohalieus. Different authorities have similarly suggested a number of different species as being its closest relative. Here we use novel mitochondrial DNA sequence data to show that the Galápagos Cormorant is related to the sister pair of the mainland Americas, the Double-crested Cormorant, P. auritus, and the Neotropic Cormorant, P. brasilianus. This trio of species has high statistical support (Bayesian posterior probability of 1.00; NJ bootstrap 98%; MP bootstrap 91%). The Galápagos Cormorant is thus a relatively recent offshoot of the mainland form, which has subsequently evolved flightlessness. Until the phylogeny of the cormorants is more clearly resolved, we recommend the continued use of Phalacrocorax for all species.

  5. The commonly used eye-specific sev-GAL4 and GMR-GAL4 drivers in Drosophila melanogaster are expressed in tissues other than eyes also.

    PubMed

    Ray, Mukulika; Lakhotia, Subhash C

    2015-09-01

    The binary GAL4-UAS system of conditional gene expression is widely used by Drosophila geneticists to target expression of the desired transgene in tissue of interest. In many studies, a preferred target tissue is the Drosophila eye, for which the sev-GAL4 and GMR-GAL4 drivers are most widely used since they are believed to be expressed exclusively in the developing eye cells. However, several reports have noted lethality following expression of certain transgenes under these GAL4 drivers notwithstanding the fact that eye is not essential for survival of the fly. Therefore, to explore the possibility that these drivers may also be active in tissues other than eye, we examined the expression of UAS-GFP reporter driven by the sev-GAL4 or GMR-GAL4 drivers. We found that both these drivers are indeed expressed in additional tissues, including a common set of specific neuronal cells in larval and pupal ventral and cerebral ganglia. Neither sev nor glass gene has so far been reported to be expressed in these neuronal cells. Expression pattern of sev-GAL4 driver parallels that of the endogenous Sevenless protein. In addition to cells in which sev-GAL4 is expressed, the GMR-GAL4 is expressed in several other larval cell types also. Further, two different GMR-GAL4 lines also show some specific differences in their expression domains outside the eye discs. These findings emphasize the need for a careful confirmation of the expression domains of a GAL4 driver being used in a given study, rather than relying only on the empirically claimed expression domains.

  6. Molecular characterization of pig alpha2,3-Gal-beta1,3-GalNAc-alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (pST6GalNAc IV) gene specific for Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAc trisaccharide structure.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun-Kwon; Song, Kwon-Ho; Jin, Un-Ho; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Dong-Soo; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2010-04-01

    Sialic acids of glycoconjugates play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as cell-cell communication and cell-substrate interaction. A sisalyltransferase, ST6GalNAc IV (Neu5Ac-alpha2,3-Gal-beta1,3-GalNAc-alpha2,6-sialyltransferase), catalyzes the formation of alpha2-6-linkages onto GalNAc residues of O-glycosidically linked Ser/Thr of proteins. In this study, we cloned the pig ST6GalNAc IV (pST6GalNAc IV) and investigated its functional characterization. pST6GalNAc IV cDNA has been isolated from pig liver tissues and it contains an entire open reading frame (ORF, 906 bp) coding for 302 amino acid residues. Entire ORF of pST6GalNAc IV containing sialylmotif 'L'-(Large), 'S'-(Small) and '-VS' (Very small) has a high degree of sequence similarity with Homo sapiens (90%), Pan troglodytes (91%) and Mus musculus (87%). Expression of pST6GalNAc IV mRNA in various pig tissues was identified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. pST6GalNAc IV mRNA was highly expressed in tongue, muscle and heart, whereas it was not expressed in pancreas. For functional characterization of pST6GalNAc IV gene in pig kidney PK15 cells, we have also established pST6GalNAc IV-transfected PK15 cells, which are stably expressing the pST6GalNAc IV gene. The glycosylation pattern of pST6GalNAc IV-transfected PK15 cells was detected by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis with Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA), Maackia amurensis hemagglutinin (MAL II), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectins. The specific carbohydrate structures of Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-3(Neu5Acalpha2-6)GalNAc tetrasaccharide or Neu5Acalpha2-6GalNAc disaccharide recognized by MAL-II and SNA were revealed to be newly synthesized by pST6GalNAc IV. From the results, it was suggested that the pig pST6GalNAc IV gene is capable of synthesizing Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-3(Neu5Acalpha2-6)GalNAc tetrasaccharide structures on O-glycoproteins.

  7. Galactose-inducible expression systems in Candida maltosa using promoters of newly-isolated GAL1 and GAL10 genes.

    PubMed

    Park, S M; Ohkuma, M; Masuda, Y; Ohta, A; Takagi, M

    1997-01-01

    The GAL1 and GAL10 gene cluster encoding the enzymes of galactose utilization was isolated from an asporogenic yeast, Candida maltosa. The structure of the gene cluster in which both genes were divergently transcribed from the central promoter region resembled those of some other yeasts. The expression of both genes was strongly induced by galactose and repressed by glucose in the medium. Galactose-inducible expression vectors in C. maltosa were constructed on low- and high-copy number plasmids using the promoter regions of both genes. With these vectors and the beta-galactosidase gene from Kluyveromyces lactis as a reporter, galactose-inducible expression was confirmed. Homologous overexpression of members of the cytochrome P-450 gene family in C. maltosa was also successful by using a high-copy-number vector under the control of these promoters.

  8. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c+ Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c+ cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL+ CD11c+ cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite. PMID:28360908

  9. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c(+) Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c(+) cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL(+) CD11c(+) cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite.

  10. Brucella melitensis 16M: characterisation of the galE gene and mouse immunisation studies with a galE deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Petrovska, L; Hewinson, R G; Dougan, G; Maskell, D J; Woodward, M J

    1999-02-23

    The galE gene of Streptomyces lividans was used to probe a cosmid library harbouring Brucella melitensis 16M DNA and the nucleotide sequence of a 2.5 kb ClaI fragment which hybridised was determined. An open reading frame encoding a predicted polypeptide with significant homology to UDP-galactose-4-epimerases of Brucella arbortus strain 2308 and other bacterial species was identified. DNA sequences flanking the B. melitensis galE gene shared no identity with other gal genes and, as for B. abortus, were located adjacent to a mazG homologue. A plasmid which encoded the B. melitensis galE open reading frame complemented a galE mutation in Salmonella typhimurium LB5010, as shown by the restoration of smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, sensitivity to phage P22 infection and restoration of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase activity. The galE gene on the B. melitensis 16M chromosome was disrupted by insertional inactivation and these mutants lacked UDP-galactose-4-epimerase activity but no discernible differences in LPS structure between parent and the mutants were observed. One B. melitensis 16M galE mutant, Bm92, was assessed for virulence in CD-1 and BALB/c mice and displayed similar kinetics of invasion and persistence in tissues compared with the parent bacterial strain. CD-1 mice immunised with B. melitensis 16M galE were protected against B. melitensis 16M challenge.

  11. Computational studies of H5N1 hemagglutinin binding with SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal

    SciTech Connect

    Li Minyong; Wang Binghe . E-mail: wang@gsu.edu

    2006-09-01

    For influenza H5N1 hemagglutinin, a switch from SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal to SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal receptor specificity is a critical step leading to the conversion from avian-to-human to human-to-human infection. Therefore, the understanding of the binding modes of SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal to H5N1 hemagglutinin will be very important for the examination of possible mutations needed for going from an avian to a human flu virus. Based on the available H5N1 hemagglutinin crystal structure, the binding profiles between H5N1 hemagglutinin and two saccharide ligands, SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal and SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal, were investigated by ab initio quantum mechanics, molecular docking, molecular mechanics, and molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that SA-{alpha}-2, 3-Gal has strong multiple hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions in its trans conformation with H5N1 hemagglutinin, whereas the SA-{alpha}-2, 6-Gal only shows weak interactions in a different conformation (cis type)

  12. ato-Gal4 fly lines for gene function analysis: Eya is required in late progenitors for eye morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linlin; Zhou, Qingxiang; Pignoni, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Gal4/UAS system is one of the most powerful tools for the study of cellular and developmental processes in Drosophila. Gal4 drivers can be used to induce targeted expression of dominant-negative and dominant-active proteins, histological markers, activity sensors, gene-specific dsRNAs, modulators of cell survival or proliferation, and other reagents. We describe here novel atonal-Gal4 lines that contain regions of the regulatory DNA of atonal, the proneural gene for photoreceptors, stretch receptors, auditory organ and some olfactory sensilla. During neurogenesis, the atonal gene is expressed at a critical juncture, a time of transition from progenitor cell to developing neuron. Thus, these lines are particularly well suited for the study of the transcription factors and signaling molecules orchestrating this critical transition. To demonstrate their usefulness, we focus on two visual organs, the eye and the Bolwig. We demonstrate the induction of predicted eye phenotypes when expressing the dominant-negative EGF receptor, EGFRDN, or a dsRNA against Notch, NotchRNAi, in the developing eye disc. In another example, we show the deletion of the Bolwig’s organ using the proapoptotic factor Hid. Lastly, we investigate the function of the eye specification factor Eyes absent or Eya in late retinal progenitors, shortly before they begin morphogenesis. We show that Eya is still required in these late progenitors to promote eye formation, and show failure to induce the target gene atonal and consequent lack of neuron formation. PMID:25980363

  13. ato-Gal4 fly lines for gene function analysis: Eya is required in late progenitors for eye morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linlin; Zhou, Qingxiang; Pignoni, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    The Gal4/UAS system is one of the most powerful tools for the study of cellular and developmental processes in Drosophila. Gal4 drivers can be used to induce targeted expression of dominant-negative and dominant-active proteins, histological markers, activity sensors, gene-specific dsRNAs, modulators of cell survival or proliferation, and other reagents. Here, we describe novel atonal-Gal4 lines that contain regions of the regulatory DNA of atonal, the proneural gene for photoreceptors, stretch receptors, auditory organ, and some olfactory sensilla. During neurogenesis, the atonal gene is expressed at a critical juncture, a time of transition from progenitor cell to developing neuron. Thus, these lines are particularly well suited for the study of the transcription factors and signaling molecules orchestrating this critical transition. To demonstrate their usefulness, we focus on two visual organs, the eye and the Bolwig. We demonstrate the induction of predicted eye phenotypes when expressing the dominant-negative EGF receptor or a dsRNA against Notch in the developing eye disc. In another example, we show the deletion of the Bolwig's organ using the proapoptotic factor Hid. Finally, we investigate the function of the eye specification factor Eyes absent or Eya in late retinal progenitors, shortly before they begin morphogenesis. We show that Eya is still required in these late progenitors to promote eye formation, and show failure to induce the target gene atonal and consequent lack of neuron formation.

  14. Depleting gene activities in early Drosophila embryos with the "maternal-Gal4-shRNA" system.

    PubMed

    Staller, Max V; Yan, Dong; Randklev, Sakara; Bragdon, Meghan D; Wunderlich, Zeba B; Tao, Rong; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Depace, Angela H; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In a developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo, mRNAs have a maternal origin, a zygotic origin, or both. During the maternal-zygotic transition, maternal products are degraded and gene expression comes under the control of the zygotic genome. To interrogate the function of mRNAs that are both maternally and zygotically expressed, it is common to examine the embryonic phenotypes derived from female germline mosaics. Recently, the development of RNAi vectors based on short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) effective during oogenesis has provided an alternative to producing germline clones. Here, we evaluate the efficacies of: (1) maternally loaded shRNAs to knockdown zygotic transcripts and (2) maternally loaded Gal4 protein to drive zygotic shRNA expression. We show that, while Gal4-driven shRNAs in the female germline very effectively generate phenotypes for genes expressed maternally, maternally loaded shRNAs are not very effective at generating phenotypes for early zygotic genes. However, maternally loaded Gal4 protein is very efficient at generating phenotypes for zygotic genes expressed during mid-embryogenesis. We apply this powerful and simple method to unravel the embryonic functions of a number of pleiotropic genes.

  15. Depleting Gene Activities in Early Drosophila Embryos with the “Maternal-Gal4–shRNA” System

    PubMed Central

    Staller, Max V.; Yan, Dong; Randklev, Sakara; Bragdon, Meghan D.; Wunderlich, Zeba B.; Tao, Rong; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; DePace, Angela H.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In a developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo, mRNAs have a maternal origin, a zygotic origin, or both. During the maternal–zygotic transition, maternal products are degraded and gene expression comes under the control of the zygotic genome. To interrogate the function of mRNAs that are both maternally and zygotically expressed, it is common to examine the embryonic phenotypes derived from female germline mosaics. Recently, the development of RNAi vectors based on short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) effective during oogenesis has provided an alternative to producing germline clones. Here, we evaluate the efficacies of: (1) maternally loaded shRNAs to knockdown zygotic transcripts and (2) maternally loaded Gal4 protein to drive zygotic shRNA expression. We show that, while Gal4-driven shRNAs in the female germline very effectively generate phenotypes for genes expressed maternally, maternally loaded shRNAs are not very effective at generating phenotypes for early zygotic genes. However, maternally loaded Gal4 protein is very efficient at generating phenotypes for zygotic genes expressed during mid-embryogenesis. We apply this powerful and simple method to unravel the embryonic functions of a number of pleiotropic genes. PMID:23105012

  16. PREFACE: 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity and 9th International Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Grinberga, Liga; Sarakovskis, Anatolijs; Rutkis, Martins

    2015-03-01

    The joint International Symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT successfully has united two international events - 12th Russia/CIS/Baltic/Japan Symposium on Ferroelectricity (RCBJSF-12) and 9th International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2014). The RCBJSF symposium is a continuation of series of meetings on ferroelectricity, the first of which took place in Novosibirsk (USSR) in 1976. FM&NT conferences started in 2006 and have been organized by Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia in Riga. In 2012 the International program committee decided to transform this conference into a traveling Baltic State conference and the FM&NT-2013 was organized by the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia. In 2014 the joint international symposium RCBJSF-2014-FM&NT was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia and was part of Riga - 2014, the European Capital of Culture event. The purpose of the joint Symposium was to bring together scientists, students and high-level experts in solid state physics, materials science, engineering and related disciplines. The number of the registered participants from 26 countries was over 350. During the Symposium 128 high quality scientific talks (5 plenary, 42 invited, 81 oral) and over 215 posters were presented. All presentations were divided into 4 parallel sessions according to 4 main topics of the Symposium: Ferroelectricity, including ferroelectrics and multiferroics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics and actuators, integrated ferroelectrics, relaxors, phase transitions and critical phenomena. Multifunctional Materials, including theory, multiscale and multiphenomenal material modeling and simulation, advanced inorganic, organic and hybrid materials. Nanotechnologies, including progressive methods, technologies and design for production, investigation of nano- particles, composites, structures, thin films and coatings. Energy, including perspective materials and

  17. The 9aaTAD Is Exclusive Activation Domain in Gal4

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina

    2017-01-01

    The Gal4 protein is a well-known prototypic acidic activator that has multiple activation domains. We have previously identified a new activation domain called the nine amino acid transactivation domain (9aaTAD) in Gal4 protein. The family of the 9aaTAD activators currently comprises over 40 members including p53, MLL, E2A and other members of the Gal4 family; Oaf1, Pip2, Pdr1 and Pdr3. In this study, we revised function of all reported Gal4 activation domains. Surprisingly, we found that beside of the activation domain 9aaTAD none of the previously reported activation domains had considerable transactivation potential and were not involved in the activation of transcription. Our results demonstrated that the 9aaTAD domain is the only decisive activation domain in the Gal4 protein. We found that the artificial peptides included in the original Gal4 constructs were results of an unintended consequence of cloning that were responsible for the artificial transcriptional activity. Importantly, the activation domain 9aaTAD, which is the exclusive activation domain in Gal4, is also the central part of a conserved sequence recognized by the inhibitory protein Gal80. We propose a revision of the Gal4 regulation, in which the activation domain 9aaTAD is directly linked to both activation function and Gal80 mediated inhibition. PMID:28056036

  18. Arm-Gal4 inheritance influences development and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Slade, F A; Staveley, B E

    2015-10-19

    The UAS-Gal4 ectopic expression system is a widely used and highly valued tool that allows specific gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. Yeast transcription factor Gal4 can be directed using D. melanogaster transcriptional control elements, and is often assumed to have little effect on the organism. By evaluation of the consequences of maternal and paternal inheritance of a Gal4 transgene under the transcriptional regulation of armadillo control elements (arm-Gal4), we demonstrated that Gal4 expression could be detrimental to development and longevity. Male progeny expressing arm-Gal4 in the presence of UAS-lacZ transgene had reduced numbers and size of ommatidia, compared to flies expressing UAS-lacZ transgene under the control of other Gal4 transgenes. Aged at 25°C, the median life span of male flies with maternally inherited elav-Gal4 was 70 days, without a responding transgene or with UAS-lacZ. The median life span of maternally inherited arm-Gal4 male flies without a responding transgene was 48 days, and 40 days with the UAS-lacZ transgene. A partial rescue of this phenotype was observed with the expression of UAS-lacZ under paternal arm-Gal4 control, having an average median lifespan of 60 days. This data suggests that arm-Gal4 has detrimental effects on Drosophila development and lifespan that are directly dependent upon parental inheritance, and that the benign responder and reporter gene UAS-lacZ may influence D. melanogaster development. These findings should be taken into consideration during the design and execution of UAS-Gal4 expression experiments.

  19. In vivo "photofootprint" changes at sequences between the yeast GAL1 upstream activating sequence and "TATA" element require activated GAL4 protein but not a functional TATA element.

    PubMed Central

    Selleck, S B; Majors, J

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the yeast GAL1 and GAL10 genes is induced by growth on galactose. Using the technique of photofootprinting in vivo, we previously documented equivalent transcription-dependent footprints within the putative "TATA" elements of both genes. To explore the functional significance of these observations, we created a 3-base-pair substitution mutation within the GAL1 promoter TATA element, which disrupted the ATATAA consensus sequence but left intact the photomodification targets. The mutation reduced galactose-induced RNA levels by a factor of 100. The mutant promoter no longer displayed the characteristic TATA sequence footprint, supporting the hypothesis that transcription activation involves the binding of a TATA box factor. We also observed a collection of transcription-correlated alterations in the modification pattern at sites between the UASG and the GAL1 TATA element, within sequences that are not required for inducible transcription. These patterns, characteristic of the induced wild-type GAL1 gene, were still galactose inducible with the TATA mutant GAl1 promoter, despite the low level of transcription from this promoter. We conclude that the GAL4-dependent protein/DNA structure responsible for the altered pattern within nonessential sequences is therefore not strictly coupled to an active TATA element or to high levels of expression. Nonetheless, the patterns probably reflect a stable protein-dependent structure that accompanies assembly of the transcription initiation complex. Images PMID:3041409

  20. Cloning, expression and gene organization of a human Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha 2,6-sialyltransferase: hST6GalNAcIV.

    PubMed Central

    Harduin-Lepers, A; Stokes, D C; Steelant, W F; Samyn-Petit, B; Krzewinski-Recchi, M A; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Zanetta, J P; Augé, C; Delannoy, P

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the detection of expressed sequence tag ('EST') similar to the rat N-acetylgalactosamine alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6GalNAc) III cDNA, we have identified a novel member of the human ST6GalNAc family. We have isolated a cDNA clone containing an open reading frame that codes for a type II membrane protein of 302 amino acids with a seven-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain, an 18-amino-acid transmembrane domain and the smallest described catalytic domain of 277 amino acids. This predicted sialyltransferase sequence is similar to the rat ST6GalNAc III (46.6%), but was found to be even more similar to the recently reported mouse ST6GalNAc IV (88.1%) on the basis of amino acid sequence identity. Northern-blot analysis showed that the newly identified gene is expressed constitutively in various adult human tissues as a 2.2kb transcript, but was also found to be expressed at lower levels in brain, heart and skeletal muscle as a 2.5kb transcript. Expression of the hST6GalNAc IV gene was investigated by reverse transcription PCR in various human cancer cells, and was found to be present in the majority of cell types with the exception of the carcinoma cell line T47D and pro-monocyte THP cells. The transient expression in COS-7 cells of the full-length cDNA led to the production of an active enzyme sharing the acceptor specificity of the ST6GalNAc family towards Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha-O-R (where 'R' denotes H, benzyl, or a peptidic chain). Detailed analysis in vitro of substrate specificity revealed that the enzyme required the trisaccharide Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc found on O-glycans and arylglycosides. In addition, we have clarified the genomic organization of ST6GalNAc IV gene. PMID:11062056

  1. Generation of Driver and Reporter Constructs for the GAL4 Expression System in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Southall, Tony D; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe GAL4 system is a method for ectopic gene expression that allows the selective activation of any cloned gene in a wide variety of tissue- and cell-specific patterns. This protocol describes the generation of driver and reporter lines for use with the GAL4 system in Drosophila. A promoter-GAL4 fusion is constructed using a P-element transformable vector, and a GAL4-responsive target gene is created via generation of an upstream activation sequence (UAS)-reporter construct. An alternative strategy for integration using the phiC31 system is also provided. Transformant lines are generated using standard procedures for microinjection.

  2. Expression of Functional Human Sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Soto, Maria Elena; Seibel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Sialyltransferases (STs) are disulfide-containing, type II transmembrane glycoproteins that catalyze the transfer of sialic acid to proteins and lipids and participate in the synthesis of the core structure oligosaccharides of human milk. Sialic acids are found at the outermost position of glycostructures, playing a key role in health and disease. Sialylation is also essential for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins (RTPs). Despite their importance, availability of sialyltransferases is limited due to the low levels of stable, soluble and active protein produced in bacterial expression systems, which hampers biochemical and structural studies on these enzymes and restricts biotechnological applications. We report the successful expression of active human sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in commercial Escherichia coli strains designed for production of disulfide-containing proteins. Fusion of hST3Gal1 with different solubility enhancers and substitution of exposed hydrophobic amino acids by negatively charged residues (supercharging-like approach) were performed to promote solubility and folding. Co-expression of sialyltransferases with the chaperon/foldases sulfhydryl oxidase, protein disulfide isomerase and disulfide isomerase C was explored to improve the formation of native disulfide bonds. Active sialyltransferases fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) were obtained in sufficient amounts for biochemical and structural studies when expressed under oxidative conditions and co-expression of folding factors increased the yields of active and properly folded sialyltransferases by 20%. Mutation of exposed hydrophobic amino acids increased recovery of active enzyme by 2.5-fold, yielding about 7 mg of purified protein per liter culture. Functionality of recombinant enzymes was evaluated in the synthesis of sialosides from the β-d-galactoside substrates lactose, N-acetyllactosamine and benzyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O

  3. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  4. Pollination patterns and plant breeding systems in the Galápagos: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Susana; Heleno, Ruben; Olesen, Jens M.; McMullen, Conley K.; Traveset, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of the Galápagos Islands for the development of central concepts in ecology and evolution, the understanding of many ecological processes in this archipelago is still very basic. One such process is pollination, which provides an important service to both plants and their pollinators. The rather modest level of knowledge on this subject has so far limited our predictive power on the consequences of the increasing threat of introduced plants and pollinators to this unique archipelago. Scope As a first step toward building a unified view of the state of pollination in the Galápagos, a thorough literature search was conducted on the breeding systems of the archipelago's flora and compiled all documented flower–visitor interactions. Based on 38 studies from the last 100 years, we retrieved 329 unique interactions between 123 flowering plant species (50 endemics, 39 non-endemic natives, 26 introduced and eight of unknown origin) from 41 families and 120 animal species from 13 orders. We discuss the emergent patterns and identify promising research avenues in the field. Conclusions Although breeding systems are known for <20 % of the flora, most species in our database were self-compatible. Moreover, the incidence of autogamy among endemics, non-endemic natives and alien species did not differ significantly, being high in all groups, which suggests that a poor pollinator fauna does not represent a constraint to the integration of new plant species into the native communities. Most interactions detected (approx. 90 %) come from a single island (most of them from Santa Cruz). Hymenopterans (mainly the endemic carpenter bee Xylocopa darwinii and ants), followed by lepidopterans, were the most important flower visitors. Dipterans were much more important flower visitors in the humid zone than in the dry zone. Bird and lizard pollination has been occasionally reported in the dry zone. Strong biases were detected in the sampling effort

  5. Recombinant Mucin-Type Fusion Proteins with a Galα1,3Gal Substitution as Clostridium difficile Toxin A Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The capability of a recombinant mucin-like fusion protein, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse IgG2b (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), carrying Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc determinants to bind and inhibit Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) was investigated. The fusion protein, produced by a glyco-engineered stable CHO-K1 cell line and designated C-PGC2, was purified by affinity and gel filtration chromatography from large-scale cultures. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to characterize O-glycans released by reductive β-elimination, and new diagnostic ions to distinguish Galα1,3Gal- from Galα1,4Gal-terminated O-glycans were identified. The C-PGC2 cell line, which was 20-fold more sensitive to TcdA than the wild-type CHO-K1, is proposed as a novel cell-based model for TcdA cytotoxicity and neutralization assays. The C-PGC2-produced fusion protein could competitively inhibit TcdA binding to rabbit erythrocytes, making it a high-efficiency inhibitor of the hemagglutination property of TcdA. The fusion protein also exhibited a moderate capability for neutralization of TcdA cytotoxicity in both C-PGC2 and CHO-K1 cells, the former with and the latter without cell surface Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc sequences. Future studies in animal models of C. difficile infection will reveal its TcdA-inhibitory effect and therapeutic potential in C. difficile-associated diseases. PMID:27456831

  6. Supercoiling and denaturation in Gal repressor/heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU)-mediated DNA looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lia, Giuseppe; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Dunlap, David; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Adhya, Sankar; Finzi, Laura

    2003-09-01

    The overall topology of DNA profoundly influences the regulation of transcription and is determined by DNA flexibility as well as the binding of proteins that induce DNA torsion, distortion, and/or looping. Gal repressor (GalR) is thought to repress transcription from the two promoters of the gal operon of Escherichia coli by forming a DNA loop of 40 nm of DNA that encompasses the promoters. Associated evidence of a topological regulatory mechanism of the transcription repression is the requirement for a supercoiled DNA template and the histone-like heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU). By using single-molecule manipulations to generate and finely tune tension in DNA molecules, we directly detected GalR/HU-mediated DNA looping and characterized its kinetics, thermodynamics, and supercoiling dependence. The factors required for gal DNA looping in single-molecule experiments (HU, GalR and DNA supercoiling) correspond exactly to those necessary for gal repression observed both in vitro and in vivo. Our single-molecule experiments revealed that negatively supercoiled DNA, under slight tension, denatured to facilitate GalR/HU-mediated DNA loop formation. Such topological intermediates may operate similarly in other multiprotein complexes of transcription, replication, and recombination.

  7. Effect of blood type on anti-α-Gal immunity and the incidence of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Alberdi, Pilar; Villar, Margarita; Riveau, Gilles; Hermann, Emmanuel; Schacht, Anne-Marie; Khalife, Jamal; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2017-01-01

    The identification of factors affecting the susceptibility to infectious diseases is essential toward reducing their burden on the human population. The ABO blood type correlates with susceptibility to malaria and other infectious diseases. Due to the structural similarity between blood antigen B and Galα1-3Galβ1-(3)4GlcNAc-R (α-Gal), we hypothesized that self-tolerance to antigen B affects the immune response to α-Gal, which in turn affects the susceptibility to infectious diseases caused by pathogens carrying α-Gal on their surface. Here we found that the incidence of malaria and tuberculosis, caused by pathogens with α-Gal on their surface, positively correlates with the frequency of blood type B in endemic regions. However, the incidence of dengue fever, caused by a pathogen without α-Gal, was not related to the frequency of blood type B in these populations. Furthermore, the incidence of malaria and tuberculosis was negatively correlated with the anti-α-Gal antibody protective response. These results have implications for disease control and prevention. PMID:28280265

  8. Bimodal expression of yeast GAL genes is controlled by a long non-coding RNA and a bifunctional galactokinase.

    PubMed

    Zacharioudakis, Ioannis; Tzamarias, Dimitris

    2017-04-22

    Bimodality in gene expression can generate phenotypic heterogeneity facilitating fitness and growth of isogenic cell populations in suboptimal environments. We investigated the mechanism by which, in conditions of limiting galactose, yeast cell populations activate GAL genes in a bimodal fashion with a cell fraction expressing GAL genes (ON), while the rest subpopulation is kept at the non-expressing (OFF) state. We show that a long non-coding RNA (GAL10-ncRNA) crossing the bidirectional GAL1-10 promoter, decreases the rate by which single cells commit transition to the ON state without affecting the rate of GAL transcription per se in ON cells. This is accomplished by repressing stochastic expression of the bifunctional Gal1p galactokinase, which besides its enzymatic activity acts as an essential inducer of the system under those conditions. We show that once single cells switch to the ON state, the GAL10-ncRNA effect is overridden by accumulating Gal1p levels sufficient to feedback positively on Gal4p, and not by the active transcription of GAL10 that occurs in opposite direction relative to that of GAL10-ncRNA. Conversely, GAL10-ncRNA does not influence transition of ON cells, where Gal4p is active, back to the OFF state. Our model suggests that the functional interplay between GAL10-ncRNA transcription, stochastic Gal1p expression and Gal1p positive feedback on Gal4p constitutes a novel molecular switch mechanism dictating the commitment of individual cells for either metabolic state.

  9. Phylogeography and history of giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Caccone, Adalgisa; Gentile, Gabriele; Gibbs, James P; Frirts, Thomas H; Snell, Howard L; Betts, Jessica; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2002-10-01

    We examined the phylogeography and history of giant Galápagos tortoise populations based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data from 161 individuals from 21 sampling sites representing the 11 currently recognized extant taxa. Molecular clock and geological considerations indicate a founding of the monophyletic Galápagos lineage around 2-3 million years ago, which would allow for all the diversification to have occurred on extant islands. Founding events generally occurred from geologically older to younger islands with some islands colonized more than once. Six of the 11 named taxa can be associated with monophyletic maternal lineages. One, Geochelone porteri on Santa Cruz Island, consists of two distinct populations connected by the deepest node in the archipelago-wide phylogeny, whereas tortoises in northwest Santa Cruz are closely related to those on adjacent Pinzón Island. Volcan Wolf, the northernmost volcano of Isabela Island, consists of both a unique set of maternal lineages and recent migrants from other islands, indicating multiple colonizations possibly due to human transport or multiple colonization and partial elimination through competition. These genetic findings are consistent with the mixed morphology of tortoises on this volcano. No clear genetic differentiation between two taxa on the two southernmost volcanoes of Isabela was evident. Extinction of crucial populations by human activities confounds whether domed versus saddleback carapaces of different populations are mono- or polyphyletic. Our findings revealed a complex phylogeography and history for this tortoise radiation within an insular environment and have implications for efforts to conserve these endangered biological treasures.

  10. Characterization of canarypox-like viruses infecting endemic birds in the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Teresa; Whiteman, Noah K; Tirapé, Ana; Baquero, Maria Ines; Cedeño, Virna; Walsh, Tim; Uzcátegui, Gustavo Jiménez; Parker, Patricia G

    2005-04-01

    The presence of avian pox in endemic birds in the Galápagos Islands has led to concern that the health of these birds may be threatened by avipoxvirus introduction by domestic birds. We describe here a simple polymerase chain reaction-based method for identification and discrimination of avipoxvirus strains similar to the fowlpox or canarypox viruses. This method, in conjunction with DNA sequencing of two polymerase chain reaction-amplified loci totaling about 800 bp, was used to identify two avipoxvirus strains, Gal1 and Gal2, in pox lesions from yellow warblers (Dendroica petechia), finches (Geospiza spp.), and Galápagos mockingbirds (Nesomimus parvulus) from the inhabited islands of Santa Cruz and Isabela. Both strains were found in all three passerine taxa, and sequences from both strains were less than 5% different from each other and from canarypox virus. In contrast, chickens in Galápagos were infected with a virus that appears to be identical in sequence to the characterized fowlpox virus and about 30% different from the canarypox/Galápagos group viruses in the regions sequenced. These results indicate the presence of canarypox-like viruses in endemic passerine birds that are distinct from the fowlpox virus infecting chickens on Galápagos. Alignment of the sequence of a 5.9-kb region of the genome revealed that sequence identities among Gal1, Gal2, and canarypox viruses were clustered in discrete regions. This indicates that recombination between poxvirus strains in combination with mutation led to the canarypox-like viruses that are now prevalent in the Galápagos.

  11. Molecular cloning of pigeon UDP-galactose:beta-D-galactoside alpha1,4-galactosyltransferase and UDP-galactose:beta-D-galactoside beta1,4-galactosyltransferase, two novel enzymes catalyzing the formation of Gal alpha1-4Gal beta1-4Gal beta1-4GlcNAc sequence.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriko; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2010-02-19

    We previously found that pigeon IgG possesses unique N-glycan structures that contain the Gal alpha1-4Gal beta1-4Gal beta1-4GlcNAc sequence at their nonreducing termini. This sequence is most likely produced by putative alpha1,4- and beta1,4-galactosyltransferases (GalTs), which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the Gal alpha1-4Gal and Gal beta1-4Gal sequences on the N-glycans, respectively. Because no such glycan structures have been found in mammalian glycoproteins, the biosynthetic enzymes that produce these glycans are likely to have distinct substrate specificities from the known mammalian GalTs. To study these enzymes, we cloned the pigeon liver cDNAs encoding alpha4GalT and beta4GalT by expression cloning and characterized these enzymes using the recombinant proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence of pigeon alpha4GalT has 58.2% identity to human alpha4GalT and 68.0 and 66.6% identity to putative alpha4GalTs from chicken and zebra finch, respectively. Unlike human and putative chicken alpha4GalTs, which possess globotriosylceramide synthase activity, pigeon alpha4GalT preferred to catalyze formation of the Gal alpha1-4Gal sequence on glycoproteins. In contrast, the sequence of pigeon beta4GalT revealed a type II transmembrane protein consisting of 438 amino acid residues, with no significant homology to the glycosyltransferases so far identified from mammals and chicken. However, hypothetical proteins from zebra finch (78.8% identity), frogs (58.9-60.4%), zebrafish (37.1-43.0%), and spotted green pufferfish (43.3%) were similar to pigeon beta4GalT, suggesting that the pigeon beta4GalT gene was inherited from the common ancestors of these vertebrates. The sequence analysis revealed that pigeon beta4GalT and its homologs form a new family of glycosyltransferases.

  12. Characterizing the structure of diffuse emission in Hi-GAL maps

    SciTech Connect

    Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Liu, S. J.; Strafella, F.; Maruccia, Y.; Schneider, N.; Paladini, R.; Vavrek, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.; Traficante, A.; Calzoletti, L.; Natoli, P.; Martin, P.; Fukui, Y.; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) through the Δ-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/submillimeter maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters, which are useful for characterizing different morphological and physical conditions, and better constraining the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey, carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 μm, constitutes a unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2° × 2° Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217° ≲ ℓ ≲ 225°, –2° ≲ b ≲ 0°). The low level of confusion along the line of sight, testified by CO observations, makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values for the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 ≲ β ≲ 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to comparisons with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.

  13. Fotometria de grupos compactos de galáxias no infravermelho próximo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasileiro, F.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos medidas nas bandas J, H e K de cerca de 90 galáxias em 34 grupos compactos. Através da combinação dos novos dados, com dados obtidos na literatura para a banda B, investigamos como as luminosidades, cores, tamanhos e massas das galáxias em grupos compactos foram afetadas por processos dinâmicos, e como essas diferem de galáxias em ambientes menos densos. Uma comparação dos novos valores obtidos com aqueles listados no catálogo 2MASS, mostram que para 50 galáxias estudadas em comum, as diferenças nas magnitudes J, H e K estão dentro dos erros fotométricos. Através da construção dos diagramas de cor (J-H x H-K e B-H x J-K), percebemos que as galáxias em grupos compactos ocupam posições no diagrama diferentes das posições de galáxias em campo ou em aglomerados, sendo mais parecidas com as posições ocupadas por galáxias HII, ou com excesso de poeira, acreditamos que tal deslocamento é derivado do aumento da taxa de formação estelar.

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis galE is involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryoma; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Watanabe, Haruo

    2006-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a crucial component of complex plaque biofilms that form in the oral cavity, resulting in the progression of periodontal disease. To elucidate the mechanism of periodontal biofilm formation, we analyzed the involvement of several genes related to the synthesis of polysaccharides in P. gingivalis. Gene knockout P. gingivalis mutants were constructed by insertion of an ermF-ermAM cassette; among these mutants, the galE mutant showed some characteristic phenotypes involved in the loss of GalE activity. As expected, the galE mutant accumulated intracellular carbohydrates in the presence of 0.1% galactose and did not grow in the presence of galactose at a concentration greater than 1%, in contrast to the parental strain. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) analysis indicated that the length of the O-antigen chain of the galE mutant was shorter than that of the wild type. It was also demonstrated that biofilms generated by the galE mutant had an intensity 4.5-fold greater than those of the wild type. Further, the galE mutant was found to be significantly susceptible to some antibiotics in comparison with the wild type. In addition, complementation of the galE mutation led to a partial recovery of the parental phenotypes. We concluded that the galE gene plays a pivotal role in the modification of LPS O antigen and biofilm formation in P. gingivalis and considered that our findings of a relationship between the function of the P. gingivalis galE gene and virulence phenotypes such as biofilm formation may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of pathogenicity in periodontal disease.

  15. Luxuriant life on the Galápagos seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Marine life found unexpectedly in 1977 in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift has proven to be of considerable interest because of newly discovered growth mechanisms. Among the life forms observed were giant tube worms, clams, mussels, and plantlike animals. If the sizes alone were beyond belief, the hostility of the living environment—noxious, hydrogen sulfide-rich warm pockets—appeared bizarre. Even though life at depths of 2.5 km on the seafloor is known normally to be sparse in comparison with shallow-water biological systems, the heated water pockets seem to account for the localized contradictions. What was difficult to explain was the toxic environment and the apparent lack of nutrients. Furthermore, the tube worms had no mouths, not even digestive systems. Recent reports in Science (November 20, 1981), and by the Smithsonian Institution (Research Reports), describe findings on bivalves studied at the hydrothermal vents and tube worms returned to the laboratory by the U.S. Navy research submersible Alvin. The growth rates are among the highest known for deep-sea life. The way the deep seafloor marine life are understood to ‘eat’ (absorb nutrients would be a better description) involves mechanisms never observed before that breakdown hydrogen sulfide with bacteria.

  16. Amblyomma sculptum tick saliva: α-Gal identification, antibody response and possible association with red meat allergy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ricardo Nascimento; Franco, Paula Ferreira; Rodrigues, Henrique; Santos, Luiza C B; McKay, Craig S; Sanhueza, Carlos A; Brito, Carlos Ramon Nascimento; Azevedo, Maíra Araújo; Venuto, Ana Paula; Cowan, Peter J; Almeida, Igor C; Finn, M G; Marques, Alexandre F

    2016-03-01

    The anaphylaxis response is frequently associated with food allergies, representing a significant public health hazard. Recently, exposure to tick bites and production of specific IgE against α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing epitopes has been correlated to red meat allergy. However, this association and the source of terminal, non-reducing α-Gal-containing epitopes have not previously been established in Brazil. Here, we employed the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mouse (α1,3-GalT-KO) model and bacteriophage Qβ-virus like particles (Qβ-VLPs) displaying Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc (Galα3LN) epitopes to investigate the presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes in the saliva of Amblyomma sculptum, a species of the Amblyomma cajennense complex, which represents the main tick that infests humans in Brazil. We confirmed that the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout animals produce significant levels of anti-α-Gal antibodies against the Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc epitopes displayed on Qβ-virus like particles. The injection of A. sculptum saliva or exposure to feeding ticks was also found to induce both IgG and IgE anti-α-Gal antibodies in α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice, thus indicating the presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes in the tick saliva. The presence of α-Gal-containing epitopes was confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting following removal of terminal α-Gal epitopes by α-galactosidase treatment. These results suggest for the first known time that bites from the A. sculptum tick may be associated with the unknown etiology of allergic reactions to red meat in Brazil.

  17. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  18. Molecular basis of Escherichia coli colonization of the upper urinary tract in BALB/c mice. Gal-Gal pili immunization prevents Escherichia coli pyelonephritis in the BALB/c mouse model of human pyelonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanley, P; Lark, D; Falkow, S; Schoolnik, G

    1985-01-01

    Most human pyelonephritis Escherichia coli isolates express both mannose (MS)- and globoside (Gal-Gal)-binding pili. An ascending E. coli urinary tract infection model was established in the 16-wk-old female BALB/c mouse to compare the pathogenic significance of MS and Gal-Gal pili and their efficacy as vaccines for the prevention of pyelonephritis. The distribution and density of pilus receptor compounds in urogenital tissues and as soluble compounds in urine were determined with antibodies to the synthetic receptor analogues, alpha D-Gal(1----4) beta D-Gal and alpha D-Man(1----2) alpha D-Man. Both carbohydrates were detected in vagina, bladder, ureter, and renal pelvis epithelium and in collecting duct and tubular cells. A pilus receptor compound also was detected in urine. It competitively inhibited the binding capacity of MS pili and was found to be physically, chemically, and immunologically related to Tamm-Horsfall uromucoid. Infectivity and invasiveness were quantitatively and histologically characterized for four E. coli strains: J96, a human pyelonephritis strain that expresses both MS and Gal-Gal pili; two recombinant strains prepared from J96 chromosomal DNA encoding MS pili or Gal-Gal pili; and the nonpiliated K12 recipient. Intravesicular administration of J96 (10(6) colony-forming units [CFU]) resulted in renal colonization and invasion in each of nine mice. The Gal-Gal clone (10(6) CFU) colonized the kidneys in each of 10 mice but did not invade. In contrast, the MS clone (10(6) CFU) did not colonize renal epithelium or invade. This effect was superceded when larger doses (greater than or equal to 10(10) CFU) of the MS clone were administered in volumes that cause acute vesicoureteric reflux. The efficacy was determined of vaccines composed of pure MS or Gal-Gal pili or the lipopolysaccharide containing O somatic antigen of the challenge strain, J96. The Gal-Gal pilus vaccine blocked renal colonization in 19 of 22 mice and renal invasion in 10 of 11

  19. Drosophila enhancer-Gal4 lines show ectopic expression during development

    PubMed Central

    Arnés, Mercedes; Ferrús, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster the most widely used technique to drive gene expression is the binary UAS/Gal4 system. We show here that a set of nervous system specific enhancers (elav, D42/Toll-6, OK6/RapGAP1) display ectopic activity in epithelial tissues during development, which is seldom considered in experimental studies. This ectopic activity is variable, unstable and influenced by the primary sequence of the enhancer and the insertion site in the chromosome. In addition, the ectopic activity is independent of the protein expressed, Gal4, as it is reproduced also with the expression of Gal80. Another enhancer, LN2 from the sex lethal (Sxl) gene, shows sex-dependent features in its ectopic expression. Feminization of LN2 expressing males does not alter the male specific pattern indicating that the sexual dimorphism of LN2 expression is an intrinsic feature of this enhancer. Other X chromosome enhancers corresponding to genes not related to sex determination do not show sexual dimorphism in their ectopic expressions. Although variable and unstable, the ectopic activation of enhancer-Gal4 lines seems to be regulated in terms of tissue and intensity. To characterize the full domain of expression of enhancer-Gal4 constructs is relevant for the design of transgenic animal models and biotechnology tools, as well as for the correct interpretation of developmental and behavioural studies in which Gal4 lines are used.

  20. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  1. Interfering with Gal-1–mediated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Barrientos, Gabriela; Herse, Florian; Thijssen, Victor L. J. L.; Weedon-Fekjær, Susanne M.; Schulz, Herbert; Wallukat, Gerd; Klapp, Burghard F.; Nevers, Tania; Sharma, Surendra; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Dechend, Ralf; Blois, Sandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by sudden onset of hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy (>20 wk). PE is strongly associated with abnormal placentation and an excessive maternal inflammatory response. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a member of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins, has been shown to modulate several processes associated with placentation and to promote maternal tolerance toward fetal antigens. Here, we show that Gal-1 exhibits proangiogenic functions during early stages of pregnancy, promoting decidual vascular expansion through VEGF receptor 2 signaling. Blocking Gal-1–mediated angiogenesis or lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 1 deficiency results in a spontaneous PE-like syndrome in mice, mainly by deregulating processes associated with good placentation and maternal spiral artery remodeling. Consistent with these findings, we observed a down-regulation of Gal-1 in patients suffering from early onset PE. Collectively, these results strengthen the notion that Gal-1 is required for healthy gestation and highlight Gal-1 as a valuable biomarker for early PE diagnosis. PMID:23798433

  2. Populações estelares em galáxias HII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westera, P.; Cuisinier, F.; Telles, E.; Kehrig, C.

    2003-08-01

    Analisamos o conteúdo estelar de 74 galáxias HII a partir do contínuo observado nos espectros ópticos dessas galáxias, utilizando métodos de síntese de população estelar. Descobrimos que todas as galáxias para as quais encontramos soluções contêm uma população estelar velha que domina a massa estelar, e numa maioria dessas também encontramos evidência de uma população de idade intermediaria além da geração jovem que está se formando agora. Concluímos que a formação estelar dessas galáxias se realiza em surtos individuais, Esses surtos são interrompidos por longos períodos de inatividade, com os primeiros consumindo a maior parte do gás. Sugerimos, portanto, que as galáxias HII sejam galáxias anãs normais flagradas em um período de surto.

  3. Interfering with Gal-1-mediated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Barrientos, Gabriela; Herse, Florian; Thijssen, Victor L J L; Weedon-Fekjær, Susanne M; Schulz, Herbert; Wallukat, Gerd; Klapp, Burghard F; Nevers, Tania; Sharma, Surendra; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Dechend, Ralf; Blois, Sandra M

    2013-07-09

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by sudden onset of hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy (>20 wk). PE is strongly associated with abnormal placentation and an excessive maternal inflammatory response. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a member of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins, has been shown to modulate several processes associated with placentation and to promote maternal tolerance toward fetal antigens. Here, we show that Gal-1 exhibits proangiogenic functions during early stages of pregnancy, promoting decidual vascular expansion through VEGF receptor 2 signaling. Blocking Gal-1-mediated angiogenesis or lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 1 deficiency results in a spontaneous PE-like syndrome in mice, mainly by deregulating processes associated with good placentation and maternal spiral artery remodeling. Consistent with these findings, we observed a down-regulation of Gal-1 in patients suffering from early onset PE. Collectively, these results strengthen the notion that Gal-1 is required for healthy gestation and highlight Gal-1 as a valuable biomarker for early PE diagnosis.

  4. Recent colonization of the Galápagos by the tree Geoffroea spinosa Jacq. (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Caetano, S; Currat, M; Pennington, R T; Prado, D; Excoffier, L; Naciri, Y

    2012-06-01

    This study puts together genetic data and an approximate bayesian computation (ABC) approach to infer the time at which the tree Geoffroea spinosa colonized the Galápagos Islands. The genetic diversity and differentiation between Peru and Galápagos population samples, estimated using three chloroplast spacers and six microsatellite loci, reveal significant differences between two mainland regions separated by the Andes mountains (Inter Andean vs. Pacific Coast) as well as a significant genetic differentiation of island populations. Microsatellites identify two distinct geographical clusters, the Galápagos and the mainland, and chloroplast markers show a private haplotype in the Galápagos. The nuclear distinctiveness of the Inter Andean populations suggests current restricted pollen flow, but chloroplast points to cross-Andean dispersals via seeds, indicating that the Andes might not be an effective biogeographical barrier. The ABC analyses clearly point to the colonization of the Galápagos within the last 160,000 years and possibly as recently as 4750 years ago (475 generations). Founder events associated with colonization of the two islands where the species occurs are detected, with Española having been colonized after Floreana. We discuss two nonmutually exclusive possibilities for the colonization of the Galápagos, recent natural dispersal vs. human introduction.

  5. Polyvalent GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (T alpha) as the most potent recognition factors involved in Maclura pomifera agglutinin-glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M

    2005-01-01

    The agglutinin isolated from the seeds of Maclura pomifera (MPA) recognizes a mucin-type disaccharide sequence, Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) on a human erythrocyte membrane. We have utilized the enzyme-linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA) and inhibition assay to more systematically analyze the carbohydrate specificity of MPA with glyco-recognition factors and mammalian Gal/GalNAc structural units in lectin-glycoform interactions. From the results, it is concluded that the high densities of polyvalent GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (T(alpha)) glycotopes in macromolecules are the most critical factors for MPA binding, being on a nanogram basis 2.0 x 10(5), 4.6 x 10(4) and 3.9 x 10(4) more active than monovalent Gal, monomeric T and Tn glycotope, respectively. Other carbohydrate structural units in mammalian glycoconjugates, such as human blood group Sd (a+) related disaccharide (GalNAcbeta1-->4Gal) and Pk/P1 active disaccharide (Galalpha1-->4Gal) were inactive. These results demonstrate that the configurations of carbon-4 and carbon-2 are essential for MPA binding and establish the importance of affinity enhancement by high-density polyvalencies of Tn/T glycotopes in MPA-glycan interactions. The overall binding profile of MPA can be defined in decreasing order as high density of polyvalent Tn/T(alpha) (M.W. > 4.0 x 10(4)) > Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W. < 3.0 x 10(3)) > monomeric T/Tn and P (GalNAcbeta1-->3Gal) > GalNAc > Gal > Man, L: ARA: , D: Fuc and Glc (inactive). Our findings should aid in the selection of this lectin for elucidating functions of carbohydrate chains in life processes and for applications in the biomedical sciences.

  6. Using stylized agent-based models for population-environment research: A case study from the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Breckheimer, Ian; McCleary, Amy L; Guzmán-Ramirez, Liza; Caplow, Susan C; Jones-Smith, Jessica C; Walsh, Stephen J

    2010-05-01

    Agent Based Models (ABMs) are powerful tools for population-environment research but are subject to trade-offs between model complexity and abstraction. This study strikes a compromise between abstract and highly specified ABMs by designing a spatially explicit, stylized ABM and using it to explore policy scenarios in a setting that is facing substantial conservation and development challenges. Specifically, we present an ABM that reflects key Land Use / Land Cover (LULC) dynamics and livelihood decisions on Isabela Island in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. We implement the model using the NetLogo software platform, a free program that requires relatively little programming experience. The landscape is composed of a satellite-derived distribution of a problematic invasive species (common guava) and a stylized representation of the Galápagos National Park, the community of Puerto Villamil, the agricultural zone, and the marine area. The agent module is based on publicly available data and household interviews, and represents the primary livelihoods of the population in the Galápagos Islands - tourism, fisheries, and agriculture. We use the model to enact hypothetical agricultural subsidy scenarios aimed at controlling invasive guava and assess the resulting population and land cover dynamics. Findings suggest that spatially explicit, stylized ABMs have considerable utility, particularly during preliminary stages of research, as platforms for (1) sharpening conceptualizations of population-environment systems, (2) testing alternative scenarios, and (3) uncovering critical data gaps.

  7. ST3GAL1-Associated Transcriptomic Program in Glioblastoma Tumor Growth, Invasion, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yuk Kien; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Koh, Lynnette W. H.; Thangaveloo, Moogaambikai; Tan, Melanie S. Y.; Koh, Geraldene R. H.; Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Grace G. Y.; Holbrook, Joanna D.; Kon, Oi Lian; Nadarajah, Mahendran; Ng, Ivan; Ng, Wai Hoe; Tan, Nguan Soon; Lim, Kah Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cell surface sialylation is associated with tumor cell invasiveness in many cancers. Glioblastoma is the most malignant primary brain tumor and is highly infiltrative. ST3GAL1 sialyltransferase gene is amplified in a subclass of glioblastomas, and its role in tumor cell self-renewal remains unexplored. Methods: Self-renewal of patient glioma cells was evaluated using clonogenic, viability, and invasiveness assays. ST3GAL1 was identified from differentially expressed genes in Peanut Agglutinin–stained cells and validated in REMBRANDT (n = 390) and Gravendeel (n = 276) clinical databases. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upstream processes. TGFβ signaling on ST3GAL1 transcription was assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Transcriptome analysis of ST3GAL1 knockdown cells was done to identify downstream pathways. A constitutively active FoxM1 mutant lacking critical anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome ([APC/C]-Cdh1) binding sites was used to evaluate ST3Gal1-mediated regulation of FoxM1 protein. Finally, the prognostic role of ST3Gal1 was determined using an orthotopic xenograft model (3 mice groups comprising nontargeting and 2 clones of ST3GAL1 knockdown in NNI-11 [8 per group] and NNI-21 [6 per group]), and the correlation with patient clinical information. All statistical tests on patients’ data were two-sided; other P values below are one-sided. Results: High ST3GAL1 expression defines an invasive subfraction with self-renewal capacity; its loss of function prolongs survival in a mouse model established from mesenchymal NNI-11 (P < .001; groups of 8 in 3 arms: nontargeting, C1, and C2 clones of ST3GAL1 knockdown). ST3GAL1 transcriptomic program stratifies patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.72 to 3.55, REMBRANDT P = 1.92x10-8; HR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.94 to 4.30, Gravendeel P = 1.05x10-11), independent of age and histology, and associates with higher tumor grade and T2 volume (P = 1.46x10

  8. Entamoeba histolytica: expression and localization of Gal/GalNAc lectin in virulent and non-virulent variants from HM1:IMSS strain.

    PubMed

    López-Vancell, R; Arreguín Espinosa, R; González-Canto, A; Néquiz Avendaño, M; García de León, M C; Olivos-García, A; López-Vancell, D; Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2010-07-01

    We have purified Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica by electroelution. The purified protein was used to immunize rabbits and obtain polyclonal IgG's anti-lectin. These antibodies were used as tools to analyze the expression and localization of the amoebic lectin in both virulent (vEh) and non-virulent (nvEh) variants of axenically cultured HM1:IMSS strain. vEh is able to induce liver abscesses in hamsters, whereas nvEh has lost this ability. In vitro, amoebic trophozoites from both variants equally express this protein as shown by densitometric analysis of the corresponding band in Western blots from lysates. In both types of trophozoites, the pattern of distribution of the lectin was mainly on the surface. We have also compared by immunohistochemistry the presence and distribution of lectin in the in vivo liver lesions produced in hamsters. In order to prolong the survival of nvEh to analyze both variants in an in vivo model, hamsters inoculated with nvEh were treated with methyl prednisolone. Our results suggest that the Gal/GalNAc lectin is equally expressed in both nvEh and vEh.

  9. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  10. Galanin Protects from Caspase-8/12-initiated Neuronal Apoptosis in the Ischemic Mouse Brain via GalR1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Mei, Zhu; Liu, Shuiqiao; Wang, Tong; Li, Hui; Li, Xiao-Xiao; Han, Song; Yang, Yutao; Li, Junfa; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2017-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) plays key role in many pathophysiological processes, but its role in ischemic stroke remains unclear. Here, the models of 1 h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/1-7 d reperfusion (R)-induced ischemic stroke and in vitro cell ischemia of 1 h oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/24 h reoxygenation in primary cultured cortical neurons were used to explore GAL’s effects and its underlying mechanisms. The results showed significant increases of GAL protein levels in the peri-infarct region (P) and infarct core (I) within 48 h R of MCAO mice (p<0.001). The RT-qPCR results also demonstrated significant increases of GAL mRNA during 24-48 h R (p<0.001), and GAL receptors GalR1-2 (but not 3) mRNA levels in the P region at 24 h R of MCAO mice (p<0.001). Furthermore, the significant decrease of infarct volume (p<0.05) and improved neurological outcome (p<0.001-0.05) were observed in MCAO mice following 1 h pre- or 6 h post-treatment of GAL during 1-7 d reperfusion. GalR1 was confirmed as the receptor responsible for GAL-induced neuroprotection by using GalR2/3 agonist AR-M1896 and Lentivirus-based RNAi knockdown of GalR1. GAL treatment inhibited Caspase-3 activation through the upstream initiators Capsases-8/-12 (not Caspase-9) in both P region and OGD-treated cortical neurons. Meanwhile, GAL’s neuroprotective effect was not observed in cortical neurons from conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) γ knockout mice. These results suggested that exogenous GAL protects the brain from ischemic injury by inhibiting Capsase-8/12-initiated apoptosis, possibly mediated by GalR1 via the cPKCγ signaling pathway. PMID:28203483

  11. Lewis type 1 antigen synthase (beta3Gal-T5) is transcriptionally regulated by homeoproteins.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Soichiro; Kudo, Takashi; Nishihara, Shoko; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Togayachi, Akira; Furuya, Akiko; Shitara, Kenya; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kitajima, Masaki; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2003-09-19

    The type 1 carbohydrate chain, Galbeta1-3GlcNAc, is synthesized by UDP-galactose:beta-N-acetylglucosamine beta1,3-galactosyltransferase (beta3Gal-T). Among six beta3Gal-Ts cloned to date, beta3Gal-T5 is an essential enzyme for the synthesis of type 1 chain in epithelium of digestive tracts or pancreatic tissue. It forms the type 1 structure on glycoproteins produced from such tissues. In the present study, we found that the transcriptional regulation of the beta3Gal-T5 gene is controlled by homeoproteins, i.e. members of caudal-related homeobox protein (Cdx) and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) families. We found an important region (-151 to -121 from the transcription initiation site), named the beta3Gal-T5 control element (GCE), for the promoter activity. GCE contained the consensus sequences for members of the Cdx and HNF families. Mutations introduced into this sequence abolished the transcriptional activity. Four factors, Cdx1, Cdx2, HNF1alpha, and HNF1beta, could bind to GCE and transcriptionally activate the beta3Gal-T5 gene. Transcriptional regulation of the beta3Gal-T5 gene was consistent with that of members of the Cdx and HNF1 families in two in vivo systems. 1) During in vitro differentiation of Caco-2 cells, transcriptional up-regulation of beta3Gal-T5 was observed in correlation with the increase in transcripts for Cdx2 and HNF1alpha. 2) Both transcript and protein levels of beta3Gal-T5 were determined to be significantly reduced in colon cancer. This down-regulation was correlated with the decrease of Cdx1 and HNF1beta expression in cancer tissue. This is the first finding that a glycosyltransferase gene is transcriptionally regulated under the control of homeoproteins in a tissue-specific manner. beta3Gal-T5, controlled by the intestinal homeoproteins, may play an important role in the specific function of intestinal cells by modifying the carbohydrate structure of glycoproteins.

  12. A computational and experimental study of O-glycosylation. Catalysis by human UDP-GalNAc polypeptide:GalNAc transferase-T2†

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Hansel; Rojas, Raúl; Patel, Divya; Lluch, José M.

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that >50% of proteins are glycosylated with sugar tags that can modulate protein activity through what has been called the sugar code. Here we present the first QM/MM calculations of human GalNAc-T2, a retaining glycosyltransferase, which initiates the biosynthesis of mucin-type O-glycans. Importantly, we have characterized a hydrogen bond between the β-phosphate of UDP and the backbone amide group from the Thr7 of the sugar acceptor (EA2 peptide) that promotes catalysis and that we propose could be a general catalytic strategy used in peptide O-glycosylation by retaining glycosyltransferases. Additional important substrate–substrate interactions have been identified, for example, between the β-phosphate of UDP with the attacking hydroxyl group from the acceptor substrate and with the substituent at the C2′ position of the transferred sugar. Our results support a front-side attack mechanism for this enzyme, with a barrier height of ~20 kcal mol−1 at the QM(M05-2X/TZVP//BP86/SVP)/CHARMM22 level, in reasonable agreement with the experimental kinetic data. Experimental and in silico mutations show that transferase activity is very sensitive to changes in residues Glu334, Asn335 and Arg362. Additionally, our calculations for different donor substrates suggest that human GalNAc-T2 would be inactive if 2′-deoxy-Gal or 2′-oxymethyl-Gal were used, while UDP-Gal is confirmed as a valid sugar donor. Finally, the analysis herein presented highlights that both the substrate–substrate and the enzyme–substrate interactions are mainly concentrated on stabilizing the negative charge developing at the UDP leaving group as the transition state is approached, identifying this as a key aspect of retaining glycosyltransferases catalysis. PMID:24643241

  13. A GAL4-HP1 fusion protein targeted near heterochromatin promotes gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Seum, C; Spierer, A; Delattre, M; Pauli, D; Spierer, P

    2000-11-01

    We have constructed a new reporter transgene, Winkelried, equipped with a synthetic binding site for the yeast GAL4 transcriptional activator. The binding site is inserted between the white and lacZ reporter genes, and is flanked by FRT sequences. These elements allow excision of the GAL4 binding site by crossing the transgenic line with an FLP recombinase producing strain. We have generated by X-ray irradiation two independent chromosomal rearrangements, Heidi and Tell, relocating Winkelried next to pericentromeric heterochromatin. These rearrangements induce variegation of both white and lacZ. Variegation of Winkelried in the rearranged transgenic lines responds to the loss and excess of doses of the dominant suppressors of position-effect variegation (PEV) Su(var)3-7 and Su(var)2-5. Winkelried therefore constitutes a unique tool to test the effect on variegation in cis of any factor fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. Indeed, a chimeric protein, made of the DNA binding site of GAL4 and of HP1, the modifier of PEV encoded by Su(var)2-5, is shown to enhance variegation of Heidi and Tell. Excision of the binding sites for GAL4 in the variegating rearrangements Heidi and Tell abolishes the modifier effect of the GAL4-HP1 chimera. Therefore, in the Heidi and Tell rearrangements, enhancement of position-effect variegation depends strictly both on the concentration of GAL4-HP1 and on the presence of its binding site in the vicinity of the reporter genes.

  14. Characterization of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum galE gene: its impact on lipopolysaccharide profile and nodulation of soybean.

    PubMed

    Chang, Woo-Suk; Park, Kyoung-Min; Koh, Sung-Cheol; So, Jae-Seong

    2008-03-01

    The galE gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61A101C, a soybean endosymbiont, was cloned and characterized. Its deduced amino-acid sequence showed a high similarity with that of other rhizobia. Functional identification of the galE gene was achieved by complementation of a galE mutant strain, PL2, with a series of pKM subclones. Disruption of the B. japonicum galE gene affects the lipopolysaccharide profile compared with that of the wild type, suggesting that galE is responsible for alteration of lipopolysaccharide structure. Examination of nodule formation by the wild-type and galE mutant revealed that the former displayed normal nodule development on soybean roots, whereas the latter showed no nodule formation at all time points examined except for 20 days after inoculation when <10% of soybean formed pseudo-nodules.

  15. ST6Gal-I expression in ovarian cancer cells promotes an invasive phenotype by altering integrin glycosylation and function

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Daniel R; Shaikh, Faheem M; Lucas, John A; Lucas, John A; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovarian adenocarcinoma is not generally discovered in patients until there has been widespread intraperitoneal dissemination, which is why ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. Though incompletely understood, the mechanism of peritoneal metastasis relies on primary tumor cells being able to detach themselves from the tumor, escape normal apoptotic pathways while free floating, and adhere to, and eventually invade through, the peritoneal surface. Our laboratory has previously shown that the Golgi glycosyltransferase, ST6Gal-I, mediates the hypersialylation of β1 integrins in colon adenocarcinoma, which leads to a more metastatic tumor cell phenotype. Interestingly, ST6Gal-I mRNA is known to be upregulated in metastatic ovarian cancer, therefore the goal of the present study was to determine whether ST6Gal-I confers a similarly aggressive phenotype to ovarian tumor cells. Methods Three ovarian carcinoma cell lines were screened for ST6Gal-I expression, and two of these, PA-1 and SKOV3, were found to produce ST6Gal-I protein. The third cell line, OV4, lacked endogenous ST6Gal-I. In order to understand the effects of ST6Gal-I on cell behavior, OV4 cells were stably-transduced with ST6Gal-I using a lentiviral vector, and integrin-mediated responses were compared in parental and ST6Gal-I-expressing cells. Results Forced expression of ST6Gal-I in OV4 cells, resulting in sialylation of β1 integrins, induced greater cell adhesion to, and migration toward, collagen I. Similarly, ST6Gal-I expressing cells were more invasive through Matrigel. Conclusion ST6Gal-I mediated sialylation of β1 integrins in ovarian cancer cells may contribute to peritoneal metastasis by altering tumor cell adhesion and migration through extracellular matrix. PMID:19014651

  16. Contrasting volcanism in Hawaiʻi and the Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P; Harpp, Karen S.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; d'Ozouville, Noémi; Graham, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The archipelagos of Hawai‘i and the Galápagos originated at mantle hotspots, yet the volcanoes that make up the island chains differ in most respects. Some of the most important differences include the dynamics of magma supply, characteristics of magma storage and transport, morphology, and compositional and structural evolution. Of particular significance in the Galápagos is the lack of well-developed rift zones, which may be related to higher rates of pre-eruptive inflation compared to Hawai‘i, and the absence of widespread flank instability—a common feature of Hawai‘i's volcanoes. The close proximity of the Galápagos to a mid-ocean-ridge system may account for many of the differences between Hawaiian and Galápagos volcanoes. The Galápagos archipelago is built on young, thin oceanic crust, which might allow for contemporaneous growth of numerous volcanoes, and its volcanoes are fed by a mix of plume and asthenospheric melt sources. Hawaiian volcanoes, in contrast, grew in the middle of the Pacific Plate on older, thicker crust, where localized changes in mantle and lithosphere structure and composition did not exert dominant control over volcano evolution.

  17. Islet Xenotransplantation Using Gal-deficient Neonatal Donors Improves Engraftment and Function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P; Badell, IR; Lowe, M; Cano, J; Song, M; Leopardi, F; Avila, J; Ruhil, R; Strobert, E; Korbutt, G; Rayat, G; Rajotte, R; Iwakoshi, N; Larsen, CP; Kirk, AD

    2011-01-01

    Significant deficiencies in understanding of xenospecific immunity have impeded the success of preclinical trials in xenoislet transplantation. While galactose-α1,3-galactose, the gal epitope, has emerged as the principal target of rejection in pig-to-primate models of solid organ transplant, the importance of gal-specific immunity in islet xenotransplant models has yet to be clearly demonstrated. Here we directly compare the immunogenicity, survival and function of neonatal porcine islets (NPIs) from gal-expressing wild-type (WT) or gal-deficient galactosyl transferase knock-out (GTKO) donors. Paired diabetic rhesus macaques were transplanted with either WT (n=5) or GTKO (n=5) NPIs. Recipient blood glucose, transaminase, and serum xenoantibody levels were used to monitor response to transplant. Four of 5 GTKO versus 1 of 5 WT recipients achieved insulin-independent normoglycemia; transplantation of WT islets resulted in significantly greater transaminitis. WT NPIs were more susceptible to antibody and complement binding and destruction in vitro. Our results confirm that gal is an important variable in xenoislet transplantation. GTKO NPI recipients have improved rates of normoglycemia, likely due to decreased susceptibility of xenografts to innate immunity mediated by complement and preformed xenoantibody. Therefore, the use of GTKO donors is an important step towards improved consistency and interpretability of results in future xenoislet studies. PMID:21883917

  18. Evidence for regular ongoing introductions of mosquito disease vectors into the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Cedeño, Virna; Cruz, Marilyn; Eastwood, Gillian; Fonseca, Dina M.; Causton, Charlotte E.; Azuero, Ronal; Loayza, Jose; Martinez, Jose D. Cruz; Goodman, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Wildlife on isolated oceanic islands is highly susceptible to the introduction of pathogens. The recent establishment in the Galápagos Islands of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, a vector for diseases such as avian malaria and West Nile fever, is considered a serious risk factor for the archipelago's endemic fauna. Here we present evidence from the monitoring of aeroplanes and genetic analysis that C. quinquefasciatus is regularly introduced via aircraft into the Galápagos Archipelago. Genetic population structure and admixture analysis demonstrates that these mosquitoes breed with, and integrate successfully into, already-established populations of C. quinquefasciatus in the Galápagos, and that there is ongoing movement of mosquitoes between islands. Tourist cruise boats and inter-island boat services are the most likely mechanism for transporting Culex mosquitoes between islands. Such anthropogenic mosquito movements increase the risk of the introduction of mosquito-borne diseases novel to Galápagos and their subsequent widespread dissemination across the archipelago. Failure to implement and maintain measures to prevent the human-assisted transport of mosquitoes to and among the islands could have catastrophic consequences for the endemic wildlife of Galápagos. PMID:19675009

  19. βIII-Gal is involved in galactan reduction during phloem element differentiation in chickpea stems.

    PubMed

    Martín, Ignacio; Hernández-Nistal, Josefina; Albornos, Lucía; Labrador, Emilia; Dopico, Berta

    2013-06-01

    βIII-Gal, a member of the chickpea β-galactosidase family, is the enzyme responsible for the cell wall autolytic process. This enzyme, whose activity increases during epicotyl growth, displays significant hydrolytic activity against cell wall pectins, and its natural substrate has been determined as an arabinogalactan from the pectic fraction of the cell wall. In the present work, the localization of βIII-Gal in different seedling and plant organs was analyzed by using specific anti-βIII-Gal antibodies. Our results revealed that besides its possible role in cell wall loosening and in early events during primary xylem and phloem fiber differentiation βIII-Gal acts on the development of sieve elements. Localization of the enzyme in this tissue, both in epicotyls and radicles from seedlings and in the different stem internodes, is consistent with the reduction in galactan during the maturation of phloem elements, as can be observed with LM5 antibodies. Thus, βIII-Gal could act on its natural substrate, the neutral side chains of rhamnogalacturonan I, contributing to cell wall reinforcement allowing phloem elements to differentiate, and conferring the necessary strengthening of the cell wall to fulfill its function. This work completes the immunolocation studies of all known chickpea β-galactosidases. Taken together, our results reflect the broad range of developmental processes covered by different members of this protein family, and confirm their crucial role in cell wall remodeling during tissue differentiation.

  20. Origin and evolutionary relationships of giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Caccone, A; Gibbs, J P; Ketmaier, V; Suatoni, E; Powell, J R

    1999-11-09

    Perhaps the most enduring debate in reptile systematics has involved the giant Galápagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra), whose origins and systematic relationships captivated Charles Darwin and remain unresolved to this day. Here we report a phylogenetic reconstruction based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from Galápagos tortoises and Geochelone from mainland South America and Africa. The closest living relative to the Galápagos tortoise is not among the larger-bodied tortoises of South America but is the relatively small-bodied Geochelone chilensis, or Chaco tortoise. The split between G. chilensis and the Galápagos lineage probably occurred 6 to 12 million years ago, before the origin of the oldest extant Galápagos island. Our data suggest that the four named southern subspecies on the largest island, Isabela, are not distinct genetic units, whereas a genetically distinct northernmost Isabela subspecies is probably the result of a separate colonization. Most unexpectedly, the lone survivor of the abingdoni subspecies from Pinta Island ("Lonesome George") is very closely related to tortoises from San Cristobal and Espanola, the islands farthest from the island of Pinta. To rule out a possible recent transplant of Lonesome George, we sequenced DNA from three tortoises collected on Pinta in 1906. They have sequences identical to Lonesome George, consistent with his being the last survivor of his subspecies. This finding may provide guidance in finding a mate for Lonesome George, who so far has failed to reproduce.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genomes of the Galápagos iguanas, Amblyrhynchus cristatus and Conolophus subcristatus.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Amy; Irisarri, Iker; Vences, Miguel; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    The Galápagos iguanas are among the oldest vertebrate lineages on the Galápagos archipelago, and the evolutionary history of this clade is of great interest to biologists. We describe here the complete mitochondrial genomes of the marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus (Genbank accession number: KT277937) and the land iguana Conolophus subcristatus (Genbank accession number: KT277936). The genomes contain 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs genes, as well as a control region (CR). Both species have an identical gene order, which matches that of Iguana iguana. The CR of both Galápagos iguanas features similar tandem repeats units, which are absent in I. iguana. We present a phylogeny of the Iguanidae based on complete mitochondrial genomes, which confirms the sister-group relationship of Galápagos iguanas. These new mitochondrial genomes constitute an important data source for future exploration of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the Galápagos iguanas.

  2. Nine Months to 9th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enter large comprehensive high schools without having the necessary social and academic skills or understanding of what will be expected of them as they move through the high school curriculum. To help a higher number of students experience success, schools must help them develop academic, social, and self-management skills.…

  3. Government Contract Law (9th Edition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    their continuarce in office with the evident pur- businr,’o. For this reason a knowledge of the pose of securing them and their ccurts In Indepen...an integral part of its unified and specified commands, and other orgaiization, the Defense Logistics Agency. This Department of Defense agencies. The...effective even though the offeree does riot have exceptions, such as where an option has been actual knowledge of it. paid for by the offeree. 4-12

  4. 9th Annual UC Systemwide Bioengineering Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Cylindrical Wells Facilitate Single-Molecule Enzymology of Bovine a-Chymotrypsin. Angela Y. Chen , A.S. Jani, L. Zheng, P.J. Burke and James P. Brody...1. Andrew McCammon, Lei Yu , Stephen B. Howell and David A. Gough, UCSDlNitto Denko Technology Corporation • Genentech 3rd Place Award ($250) o A...Shadi Mahjoob UC Riverside Zhenshan Chen UC Riverside Mariela Anguelov Winchester Associates Inc Entcho Anguelov Winchester Associates Inc

  5. The 9th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with performance and development of various spacecraft components, mechanical devices, and subsystems. Topics discussed include: manipulator arms, the Skylab Parasol, cooling system performance, extendable booms, magnetically suspended reaction wheels, the Skylab Trash Airlock, magnetometers, actuators, life support systems, and technology transfer.

  6. Novel UDP-GalNAc Derivative Structures Provide Insight into the Donor Specificity of Human Blood Group Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd K; Pesnot, Thomas; Palcic, Monica M; Jørgensen, Rene

    2015-12-25

    Two closely related glycosyltransferases are responsible for the final step of the biosynthesis of ABO(H) human blood group A and B antigens. The two enzymes differ by only four amino acid residues, which determine whether the enzymes transfer GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc or Gal from UDP-Gal to the H-antigen acceptor. The enzymes belong to the class of GT-A folded enzymes, grouped as GT6 in the CAZy database, and are characterized by a single domain with a metal dependent retaining reaction mechanism. However, the exact role of the four amino acid residues in the specificity of the enzymes is still unresolved. In this study, we report the first structural information of a dual specificity cis-AB blood group glycosyltransferase in complex with a synthetic UDP-GalNAc derivative. Interestingly, the GalNAc moiety adopts an unusual yet catalytically productive conformation in the binding pocket, which is different from the "tucked under" conformation previously observed for the UDP-Gal donor. In addition, we show that this UDP-GalNAc derivative in complex with the H-antigen acceptor provokes the same unusual binding pocket closure as seen for the corresponding UDP-Gal derivative. Despite this, the two derivatives show vastly different kinetic properties. Our results provide a important structural insight into the donor substrate specificity and utilization in blood group biosynthesis, which can very likely be exploited for the development of new glycosyltransferase inhibitors and probes.

  7. Initiation of protein O glycosylation by the polypeptide GalNAcT-1 in vascular biology and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Tenno, Mari; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Hagen, Fred K; Ditto, David; Zarbock, Alexander; Schaerli, Patrick; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Ley, Klaus; Le, Dzung; Tabak, Lawrence A; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-12-01

    Core-type protein O glycosylation is initiated by polypeptide N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) transferase (ppGalNAcT) activity and produces the covalent linkage of serine and threonine residues of proteins. More than a dozen ppGalNAcTs operate within multicellular organisms, and they differ with respect to expression patterns and substrate selectivity. These distinctive features imply that each ppGalNAcT may differentially modulate regulatory processes in animal development, physiology, and perhaps disease. We found that ppGalNAcT-1 plays key roles in cell and glycoprotein selective functions that modulate the hematopoietic system. Loss of ppGalNAcT-1 activity in the mouse results in a bleeding disorder which tracks with reduced plasma levels of blood coagulation factors V, VII, VIII, IX, X, and XII. ppGalNAcT-1 further supports leukocyte trafficking and residency in normal homeostatic physiology as well as during inflammatory responses, in part by providing a scaffold for the synthesis of selectin ligands expressed by neutrophils and endothelial cells of peripheral lymph nodes. Animals lacking ppGalNAcT-1 are also markedly impaired in immunoglobulin G production, coincident with increased germinal center B-cell apoptosis and reduced levels of plasma B cells. These findings reveal that the initiation of protein O glycosylation by ppGalNAcT-1 provides a distinctive repertoire of advantageous functions that support vascular responses and humoral immunity.

  8. Cell surface binding site for Clostridium difficile enterotoxin: evidence for a glycoconjugate containing the sequence Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc.

    PubMed Central

    Krivan, H C; Clark, G F; Smith, D F; Wilkins, T D

    1986-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether a binding site for Clostridium difficile enterotoxin (toxin A) exists in the brush border membranes (BBMs) of the hamster, an animal known to be extremely sensitive to the action of the toxin. Toxin A was the only antigen adsorbed by the BBMs from the culture filtrate of C. difficile. The finding that binding activity could not be destroyed by heat indicated that a carbohydrate moiety might be involved. We therefore examined erythrocytes from various animal species for binding activity since erythrocytes provide a variety of carbohydrate sequences on their cell surfaces. Only rabbit erythrocytes bound the toxin, and the cells agglutinated. A binding assay based on an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for quantifying C. difficile toxin A was used to compare binding of the toxin to hamster BBMs, rabbit erythrocytes, and BBMs from rats, which are less susceptible to the action of C. difficile toxin A than hamsters. Results of this comparison indicated the following order of toxin-binding frequency: rabbit erythrocytes greater than hamster BBMs greater than rat BBMs. Binding of toxin A to hamster BBMs at 37 degrees C was comparable to what has been observed with cholera toxin, but binding was enhanced at 4 degrees C. A similar binding phenomenon was observed with rabbit erythrocytes. Examination of the cell surfaces of hamster BBMs and rabbit erythrocytes with lectins and specific glycosidases revealed a high concentration of terminal alpha-linked galactose. Treatment of both membrane types with alpha-galactosidase destroyed the binding activity. The glycoprotein, calf thyroglobulin, also bound the toxin and inhibited toxin binding to cells. Toxin A did not bind to human erythrocytes from blood group A, B, or O donors. However, after fucosidase treatment of human erythrocytes, only blood group B erythrocytes, which possess the blood group B structure Gal alpha 1-3[Fuc alpha 1-2]Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc-R, bound the toxin

  9. Development of selective and differential medium for Shigella sonnei using three carbohydrates (lactose, sorbitol, and xylose) and X-Gal.

    PubMed

    Na, G N; Kim, S A; Kwon, O C; Rhee, M S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new selective and differential medium for isolating Shigella sonnei (designated 3SD medium). The new medium was based on three carbohydrates (lactose, sorbitol, and xylose) and a chromogenic substrate (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside, X-Gal). S. sonnei cannot ferment lactose, sorbitol, or xylose, but can ferment X-Gal, which generates turquoise-blue colonies with rough edges. Other bacteria (54 strains of foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria) produced visually distinct colonies on 3SD medium (colorless or pink-violet colonies), or their growth was inhibited on 3SD medium. The optimum concentration of 50 mg/L X-Gal was selected because it yielded the highest level of morphological discrimination between S. sonnei and other bacteria, and this concentration was cost-effective. Bile salt concentration optimization was performed using healthy, heat-injured, and acid-injured S. sonnei. The recovery rate differed significantly depending on the bile salt concentration; media containing >1.0 g/L bile salt showed significantly lower recovery of stress-injured cells than medium containing 0.5 g/L bile salt (P<0.05). Growth of all Gram-positive bacteria was inhibited on medium containing 0.5 g/L bile salt; therefore, this concentration was used as the optimal concentration. Previous media used to isolate Shigella spp. (MacConkey, xylose lysine desoxycholate, and Salmonella-Shigella agar) showed poor performance when used to support the growth of injured S. sonnei cells, whereas 3SD medium supported a high growth rate of injured and healthy cells (equivalent to that obtained with nutrient-rich tryptic soy agar). To validate the performance of 3SD medium with real specimens, S. sonnei and other bacteria were spiked into samples such as untreated water, carrot, salad, and oyster. 3SD medium showed superior specificity (100%) and sensitivity (100%) for S. sonnei, and yielded no false-positive or false-negative results

  10. Acquisition of the capsule locus by horizontal gene transfer in Neisseria meningitidis is often accompanied by the loss of UDP-GalNAc synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Stephanie N.; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Mullally, Christopher A.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Vrielink, Alice; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Harrison, Odile B.; Perkins, Timothy T.; Kahler, Charlene M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic meningococci have acquired a 24 kb capsule synthesis island (cps) by horizontal gene transfer which consists of a synthetic locus and associated capsule transport genes flanked by repetitive Regions D and D’. Regions D and D’ contain an intact gene encoding a UDP-galactose epimerase (galE1) and a truncated remnant (galE2), respectively. In this study, GalE protein alleles were shown to be either mono-functional, synthesising UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), or bi-functional, synthesising UDP-Gal and UDP-galactosamine (UDP-GalNAc). Meningococci possessing a capsule null locus (cnl) typically possessed a single bi-functional galE. Separation of functionality between galE1 and galE2 alleles in meningococcal isolates was retained for all serogroups except serogroup E which has a synthetic requirement for UDP-GalNAc. The truncated galE2 remnant in Region D’ was also phylogenetically related to the bi-functional galE of the cnl locus suggesting common ancestry. A model is proposed in which the illegitimate recombination of the cps island into the galE allele of the cnl locus results in the formation of Region D’ containing the truncated galE2 locus and the capture of the cps island en bloc. The retention of the duplicated Regions D and D’ enables inversion of the synthetic locus within the cps island during bacterial growth. PMID:28290510

  11. Direct confocal acquisition of fluorescence from X-gal staining on thick tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Konstantin L.; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; López-Barneo, José; Villadiego, Javier

    2013-01-01

    X-gal staining is a common procedure used in the histochemical monitoring of gene expression by light microscopy. However, this procedure does not permit the direct confocal acquisition of images, thus preventing the identification of labelled cells on the depth (Z) axis of tissue sections and leading sometimes to erroneous conclusions in co-localization and gene expression studies. Here we report a technique, based on X-gal fluorescence emission and mathematically-based optical correction, to obtain high quality fluorescence confocal images. This method, combined with immunofluorescence, makes it possible to unequivocally identify X-gal-labelled cells in tissue sections, emerging as a valuable tool in gene expression and cell tracing analysis. PMID:24121824

  12. Preclinical and Clinical Advances of GalNAc-Decorated Nucleic Acid Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyu

    2017-03-17

    A main challenge in realizing the full potential of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient delivery of them into targeted tissues and cells. N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) is a well-defined liver-targeted moiety benefiting from its high affinity with asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). By conjugating it directly to the oligonucleotides or decorating it to a certain delivery system as a targeting moiety, GalNAc has achieved compelling successes in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics in recent years. Several oligonucleotide modalities are undergoing pivotal clinical studies, followed by a blooming pipeline in the preclinical stage. This review covers the progress of GalNAc-decorated oligonucleotide drugs, including siRNAs, anti-miRs, and ASOs, which provides a panorama for this field.

  13. Structured inquiry-based learning: Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap characterization in an undergraduate laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Christopher R; Cillo, Anthony R; Glick, Danielle R; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W; Strauss, David; Talai, Rene; Tomtishen, John P; Vargas, Josephine; Veloz, Tony; Vogler, Thomas O; Clenshaw, Michael E; Gordon-Hamm, Devin T; Lee, Kathryn L; Marin, Elizabeth C

    2014-12-01

    We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross each GAL4 strain to a UAS-CD8-GFP reporter strain, and students perform whole mount CNS dissection, immunohistochemistry, confocal imaging, and analysis of developmental expression patterns. We have found these exercises to be very effective in teaching the uses and limitations of PCR and antibody-based techniques as well as critical reading of the primary literature and scientific writing. Students appreciate the opportunity to apply what they learn by generating novel data of use to the wider research community.

  14. A renal variant of Fabry disease: A case with a novel Gal A hemizygote mutation

    PubMed Central

    H. Mukdsi, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Barrón, Belén; Novoa, Pablo; Fernández, Segundo; de Diller, Ana B; I. Torres, Alicia; Formica Jr., Richard N; Orías, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is caused by an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism with deficient activity of a lysosomal enzyme, alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA). Case Presentation A 46 year-old man with progressive kidney disease showed on kidney biopsy electron microscopic evidence of Fabry disease. The patient had no systemic manifestations of Fabry disease, despite residual α-GalA activity, therefore genetic testing was done by direct DNA sequencing, demonstrating a new GAL A gene mutation (C174G-exon 3). After three years of enzyme replacement therapy (agalsidase beta) treatment, a second biopsy was done. Although there was demonstrable clearance of intracellular inclusions, remarkable podocyte activation was evident. Conclusions This report represents an unusual renal variant of Fabry disease and provides histologic data on long-term follow up after enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:24475416

  15. Galápagos land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) as a seed disperser.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Rumeu, Beatriz; Olesen, Jens M; Jaramillo, Patricia; Heleno, Ruben

    2016-05-01

    The role of the most common land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) in the Galápagos Islands as an effective seed disperser is explored in this study. A total of 5705 seeds of 32 plant species were identified from 160 scats, 4545 of which (80%) appeared visually undamaged. Germination trials of 849 seeds from 29 species revealed that at least 10 species remained viable after passing through the iguana's gut, although only a small proportion of those seeds (4%) germinated. In any case, we argue that C. subcristatus exerts an important role on the 7 Galapagos islands where it occurs because of its abundance and capacity to ingest and disperse seeds at long distances. Our results strongly suggest that the Galápagos C. subcristatus plays an important role as a seed disperser of not only of native species but also some introduced plants in the Galápagos Islands.

  16. Gal80 proteins of Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are highly conserved but contribute differently to glucose repression of the galactose regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Zenke, F T; Zachariae, W; Lunkes, A; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    We cloned the GAL80 gene encoding the negative regulator of the transcriptional activator Gal4 (Lac9) from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The deduced amino acid sequence of K. lactis GAL80 revealed a strong structural conservation between K. lactis Gal80 and the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, with an overall identity of 60% and two conserved blocks with over 80% identical residues. K. lactis gal80 disruption mutants show constitutive expression of the lactose/galactose metabolic genes, confirming that K. lactis Gal80 functions in essentially in the same way as does S. cerevisiae Gal80, blocking activation by the transcriptional activator Lac9 (K. lactis Gal4) in the absence of an inducing sugar. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, in which Gal4-dependent activation is strongly inhibited by glucose even in a gal80 mutant, glucose repressibility is almost completely lost in gal80 mutants of K. lactis. Indirect evidence suggests that this difference in phenotype is due to a higher activator concentration in K. lactis which is able to overcome glucose repression. Expression of the K. lactis GAL80 gene is controlled by Lac9. Two high-affinity binding sites in the GAL80 promoter mediate a 70-fold induction by galactose and hence negative autoregulation by Gal80. Gal80 in turn not only controls Lac9 activity but also has a moderate influence on its rate of synthesis. Thus, a feedback control mechanism exists between the positive and negative regulators. By mutating the Lac9 binding sites of the GAL80 promoter, we could show that induction of GAL80 is required to prevent activation of the lactose/galactose regulon in glycerol or glucose plus galactose, whereas the noninduced level of Gal80 is sufficient to completely block Lac9 function in glucose. Images PMID:8246973

  17. A 3D Searchable Database of Transgenic Zebrafish Gal4 and Cre Lines for Functional Neuroanatomy Studies.

    PubMed

    Marquart, Gregory D; Tabor, Kathryn M; Brown, Mary; Strykowski, Jennifer L; Varshney, Gaurav K; LaFave, Matthew C; Mueller, Thomas; Burgess, Shawn M; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic methods enable the selective manipulation of neurons for functional mapping of neuronal circuits. Using confocal microscopy, we have imaged the cellular-level expression of 109 transgenic lines in live 6 day post fertilization larvae, including 80 Gal4 enhancer trap lines, 9 Cre enhancer trap lines and 20 transgenic lines that express fluorescent proteins in defined gene-specific patterns. Image stacks were acquired at single micron resolution, together with a broadly expressed neural marker, which we used to align enhancer trap reporter patterns into a common 3-dimensional reference space. To facilitate use of this resource, we have written software that enables searching for transgenic lines that label cells within a selectable 3-dimensional region of interest (ROI) or neuroanatomical area. This software also enables the intersectional expression of transgenes to be predicted, a feature which we validated by detecting cells with co-expression of Cre and Gal4. Many of the imaged enhancer trap lines show intrinsic brain-specific expression. However, to increase the utility of lines that also drive expression in non-neuronal tissue we have designed a novel UAS reporter, that suppresses expression in heart, muscle, and skin through the incorporation of microRNA binding sites in a synthetic 3' untranslated region. Finally, we mapped the site of transgene integration, thus providing molecular identification of the expression pattern for most lines. Cumulatively, this library of enhancer trap lines provides genetic access to 70% of the larval brain and is therefore a powerful and broadly accessible tool for the dissection of neural circuits in larval zebrafish.

  18. GAL4-NF-kappaB fusion protein augments transgene expression from neuronal promoters in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, B H; Yang, Y; Paton, J F R; Li, F; Boulaire, J; Kasparov, S; Wang, S

    2006-12-01

    Targeted gene expression mediated by a mammalian cellular promoter is desirable for gene therapy in the brain, where there are a variety of different neuronal phenotypes, several types of supportive cells, and blood vessels. However, this approach can be hampered by weak activity of some cellular promoters. In view of the potency of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in regulating neuronal gene expression, we have assessed whether it can be used to enhance the strength of neuron-specific promoters. Our approach was to use a neuronal promoter to drive expression of a chimeric transactivator, which consisted of a part of the transcriptional activation domain of the NF-kappaB p65 protein fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 protein from yeast. The second copy of the neuronal promoter was modified by introducing the unique GAL4 binding sequences at its 5' end and used to drive the expression of a transgene. Binding of the chimeric transcriptional activator upstream of the second promoter was expected to potentiate its transcriptional activity. In this study, the approach was applied to the platelet-derived growth factor beta chain and synapsin-1 neuron-specific promoters and tested in vitro and in vivo using plasmid, lentiviral, and baculoviral vectors. We observed up to a 100-fold improvement in reporter gene expression in cultured neurons and 20-fold improvement in the rat brain in vivo. Moreover, the cell-type specificity of the two tested promoters was well preserved and restricted to neurons. Finally, the expression driven by the new lentiviral vectors with the p65-potentiated synapsin-1 promoter showed no signs of decline or cell damage 4 weeks after injection. This approach should be suitable for constructing powerful and stable gene expression systems based on weak cell-specific promoters in neuronal phenotypes.

  19. A 3D Searchable Database of Transgenic Zebrafish Gal4 and Cre Lines for Functional Neuroanatomy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Gregory D.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Brown, Mary; Strykowski, Jennifer L.; Varshney, Gaurav K.; LaFave, Matthew C.; Mueller, Thomas; Burgess, Shawn M.; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic methods enable the selective manipulation of neurons for functional mapping of neuronal circuits. Using confocal microscopy, we have imaged the cellular-level expression of 109 transgenic lines in live 6 day post fertilization larvae, including 80 Gal4 enhancer trap lines, 9 Cre enhancer trap lines and 20 transgenic lines that express fluorescent proteins in defined gene-specific patterns. Image stacks were acquired at single micron resolution, together with a broadly expressed neural marker, which we used to align enhancer trap reporter patterns into a common 3-dimensional reference space. To facilitate use of this resource, we have written software that enables searching for transgenic lines that label cells within a selectable 3-dimensional region of interest (ROI) or neuroanatomical area. This software also enables the intersectional expression of transgenes to be predicted, a feature which we validated by detecting cells with co-expression of Cre and Gal4. Many of the imaged enhancer trap lines show intrinsic brain-specific expression. However, to increase the utility of lines that also drive expression in non-neuronal tissue we have designed a novel UAS reporter, that suppresses expression in heart, muscle, and skin through the incorporation of microRNA binding sites in a synthetic 3′ untranslated region. Finally, we mapped the site of transgene integration, thus providing molecular identification of the expression pattern for most lines. Cumulatively, this library of enhancer trap lines provides genetic access to 70% of the larval brain and is therefore a powerful and broadly accessible tool for the dissection of neural circuits in larval zebrafish. PMID:26635538

  20. Absence of intraepidermal glycosyltransferase ppGalNac-T3 expression in familial tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Orit; Bergman, Reuven; Mandel, Ulla; Maor, Gila; Goldberg, Ruth; Richard, Gabriele; Sprecher, Eli

    2005-06-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive, tumor-like calcifications in the dermis and subcutaneous tissues. The disease is associated with primary hyperphosphatemia due to increased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate. We recently identified mutations in GALNT3 as the proximal cause of this metabolic disorder. GALNT3 encodes the glycosyltransferase UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase 3 (ppGalNAc-T3), which initiates mucin-type O-glycosylation and thus takes part in posttranslational modification and formation of mucin-type glycoproteins. A number of studies have previously described the histopathological and ultrastructural features of lesional skin in HFTC, but little is currently known about the morphology of the normal-appearing non-lesional skin. We obtained biopsies of uninvolved skin from two HFTC patients carrying a known splice site mutation in GALNT3. Light and electron microscopic examination of a biopsy of one of the two patients did not reveal abnormal findings in the epidermis or dermis. However, immunohistochemical studies of frozen skin sections of biopsies of the two patients using monoclonal antibodies directed against three ppGalNac isoforms revealed the complete absence of immunostaining for ppGalNAc-T3 while the staining pattern for ppGalNAc-T2 and -T6 was identical in skin biopsies obtained from HFTC patients and healthy control individuals. Our data provide for the first time evidence for ppGalNAc-T3 deficiency in the skin of HFTC patients and suggest that immunostaining of skin biopsy samples for ppGal-Nac-T3 might be a useful tool for the diagnosis of HFTC.

  1. Proceedings of the Air Power Symposium on the Role of Airpower in Low Intensity Conflict (9th) Held at Maxwell AFB, Alabama on 11-13 March 1985. Appendix 2. Symposium Papers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Ardrey, however, ascribes some uniquely hominid characteristics to the list including a predatory nature and dependence on weapons. It is interesting...to note, however, that he describes the use of weapons in defense of territory by hominids which preceded homo sapiens, or modern man. 10 Similar

  2. Proceedings of the Air Power Symposium on the Role of Airpower in Low Intensity Conflict (9th) Held at Maxwell AFB, Alabama on 11-13 March 1985. Appendix 1. Symposium Papers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    SESSION I EDITED BY: Lt Col Allen Dodson, USAF (Faculty Advisor) Col Donald Johnson, USAF Lt Col Ronald Merriott . USAF Lt Col David Schiachier, USAF...and IWhA or, as he describes the distinction, freedom fi(nters and terrorists. His act of bombina the Vinq Tlavid Hotel was an act of a freedom fiahter...he claims. The sianificant difference was "warninq": We issued a warninq, we qave enouqh time to evacuate the hotel so that no one would have been

  3. WebWise 2.0: The Power of Community. WebWise Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World Proceedings (9th, Miami Beach, Florida, March 5-7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2009-01-01

    Since it was coined by Tim O'Reilly in formulating the first Web 2.0 Conference in 2004, the term "Web 2.0" has definitely caught on as a designation of a second generation of Web design and experience that emphasizes a high degree of interaction with, and among, users. Rather than simply consulting and reading Web pages, the Web 2.0 generation is…

  4. Proceedings of the Air Power Symposium on the Role of Airpower in Low Intensity Conflict (9th) Held at Maxwell AFB, Alabama on 11-13 March 1985. Appendix 3. Symposium Papers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    THE NEXT DECADE August Gregory Jannarone Lieutenant Colonel (P), USAF Senior Air Force Research Fellow, The Rand Corporation 1700 Main Street, Santa...United States Air Force, or The Rand Corporation . 29 Nint Al Uniersty lrpoer ympoium,.- C 7.7". .7r BIOGRAPHY OF AUTHOR Lieutenant Colonel (P) August G...Jannarone is the HQ USAF/XO-sponsored Rand Research Fellow and Senior Officer of the Air Force Element at The Rand Corporation , in Santa Monica

  5. Steroid levels and reproductive cycle of the Galápagos tortoise, Geochelone nigra, living under seminatural conditions on Santa Cruz Island (Galápagos).

    PubMed

    Schramm, B G; Casares, M; Lance, V A

    1999-04-01

    The Galápagos Islands are home to 11 subspecies of large terrestrial tortoises (Geochelone nigra). All Galápagos tortoises are considered endangered and approximately 12,000 animals still exist. Until now, the reproductive cycle of the Galápagos tortoise has been studied only in captive animals, and no data from free-ranging tortoises have been available. During a one-year period, blood samples were collected from male and female G. nigra living under seminatural conditions on Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos. Plasma steroid hormones were measured by radioimmunoassays (RIAs). In males, plasma testosterone and corticosterone increased a few months before the onset of the mating season. Peak levels were observed while most copulations occurred and environmental temperatures were highest. Both testosterone and corticosterone showed low levels during the cold and dry nesting season and high levels during the hot and rainy mating season. In females, testosterone and corticosterone also rose during the hot and rainy mating season. Both hormones peaked during the second half of the mating season and decreased during the cooler dry season. Female estradiol levels increased at the onset of the mating season, reaching the highest level at the peak of the mating season, which coincided with the highest annual temperatures measured. Estradiol slowly decreased within the next months and rapidly dropped at the onset of the nesting season when temperatures decreased. Progesterone levels were high close to the time of ovulation and showed clearly elevated levels at the beginning of the nesting season after some females had laid their first clutch. Progesterone decreased during the nesting season, when ambient temperatures began to decrease, and reached minimal levels in the postbreeding period shortly before the onset of the next mating season. There were significant annual variations in plasma testosterone in both males and females. Plasma corticosterone was generally higher in

  6. Protective Effects of Fucoidan on Aβ25–35 and d-Gal-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells and d-Gal-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hengyun; Gao, Zixiang; Zheng, Luping; Zhang, Cuili; Liu, Zundong; Yang, Yazong; Teng, Hongming; Hou, Lin; Yin, Yuling; Zou, Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which contributes to memory loss and cognitive decline in the elderly. Fucoidan, extracted from brown algae, is a complex sulfated polysaccharide and potential bioactive compound. In this study, we investigated whether fucoidan protects PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by a combination of beta-amyloid 25–35 (Aβ25–35) and d-galactose (d-Gal), and improves learning and memory impairment in AD model mice. The results indicated that fucoidan could inhibit the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to cytosol and activation of caspases, and increase the expression of apoptosis inhibitor proteins (IAPs), including livin and X-linked IAP (XIAP) in PC12 cells damaged by Aβ25–35 and d-Gal-induction. Fucoidan reversed the decreased activity of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), as well as the increased activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), in AD model mice induced by infusion of d-Gal. Furthermore, fucoidan improved antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo by activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH). These results suggested that fucoidan could protect PC12 cells from apoptosis and ameliorate the learning and memory impairment in AD model mice, which appeared to be due to regulating the cholinergic system, reducing oxidative stress, and inhibiting the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:28300775

  7. Protective Effects of Fucoidan on Aβ25-35 and d-Gal-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells and d-Gal-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hengyun; Gao, Zixiang; Zheng, Luping; Zhang, Cuili; Liu, Zundong; Yang, Yazong; Teng, Hongming; Hou, Lin; Yin, Yuling; Zou, Xiangyang

    2017-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which contributes to memory loss and cognitive decline in the elderly. Fucoidan, extracted from brown algae, is a complex sulfated polysaccharide and potential bioactive compound. In this study, we investigated whether fucoidan protects PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by a combination of beta-amyloid 25-35 (Aβ25-35) and d-galactose (d-Gal), and improves learning and memory impairment in AD model mice. The results indicated that fucoidan could inhibit the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to cytosol and activation of caspases, and increase the expression of apoptosis inhibitor proteins (IAPs), including livin and X-linked IAP (XIAP) in PC12 cells damaged by Aβ25-35 and d-Gal-induction. Fucoidan reversed the decreased activity of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), as well as the increased activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), in AD model mice induced by infusion of d-Gal. Furthermore, fucoidan improved antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo by activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH). These results suggested that fucoidan could protect PC12 cells from apoptosis and ameliorate the learning and memory impairment in AD model mice, which appeared to be due to regulating the cholinergic system, reducing oxidative stress, and inhibiting the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  8. Hematology, serum chemistry, and serology of Galápagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Vargas, F Hernan; Merkel, Jane; Gottdenker, Nicole; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-07-01

    The Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) is an endangered species endemic to the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. In 2003 and 2004, 195 penguins from 13 colonies on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina in the Galápagos archipelago were examined. Genetic sexing of 157 penguins revealed 62 females and 95 males. Hematology consisted of packed cell volume (n = 134), white blood cell differentials (n = 83), and hemoparasite blood smear evaluation (n = 114). Microfilariae were detected in 22% (25/114) of the blood smears. Female penguins had significantly higher eosinophil counts than males. Serum chemistry on 83 penguins revealed no significant differences between males and females. Birds were seronegative to avian paramyxovirus type 1-3, avian influenza virus, infectious bursal disease virus, Marek's disease virus (herpes), reovirus, avian encephalomyelitis virus, and avian adenovirus type 1 and 2 (n = 75), as well as to West Nile virus (n = 87), and Venezuelan, western and eastern equine encephalitis viruses (n = 26). Seventy-five of 84 (89%) penguins had antibodies to Chlamydophila psittaci but chlamydial DNA was not detected via polymerase chain reaction in samples from 30 birds.

  9. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  10. Approach to outcome measurement in the prevention of thrombosis in surgical and medical patients: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Eikelboom, John W; Gould, Michael K; Garcia, David A; Crowther, Mark; Murad, M Hassan; Kahn, Susan R; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Francis, Charles W; Lansberg, Maarten G; Akl, Elie A; Hirsh, Jack

    2012-02-01

    This article provides the rationale for the approach to making recommendations primarily used in four articles of the Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines: orthopedic surgery, nonorthopedic surgery, nonsurgical patients, and stroke. Some of the early clinical trials of antithrombotic prophylaxis with a placebo or no treatment group used symptomatic VTE and fatal PE to measure efficacy of the treatment. These trials suggest a benefit of thromboprophylaxis in reducing fatal PE. In contrast, most of the recent clinical trials comparing the efficacy of alternative anticoagulants used a surrogate outcome, asymptomatic DVT detected at mandatory venography. This outcome is fundamentally unsatisfactory because it does not allow a trade-off with serious bleeding; that trade-off requires knowledge of the number of symptomatic events that thromboprophylaxis prevents. In this article, we review the merits and limitations of four approaches to estimating reduction in symptomatic thrombosis: (1) direct measurement of symptomatic thrombosis, (2) use of asymptomatic events for relative risks and symptomatic events from randomized controlled trials for baseline risk, (3) use of baseline risk estimates from studies that did not perform surveillance and relative effect from asymptomatic events in randomized controlled trials, and (4) use of available data to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic events that will become symptomatic. All approaches have their limitations. The optimal choice of approach depends on the nature of the evidence available.

  11. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5-8, 2011, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ~800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics session comprised five sessions: (1)Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies.

  12. Efficient and Regioselective Synthesis of β-GalNAc/GlcNAc-Lactose by a Bifunctional Transglycosylating β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodi; Xu, Li; Jin, Lan; Sun, Bin; Gu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    donor and their broader acceptor specificity, glycosidases are more advantageous than glycosyltransferases for large-scale synthesis. β-N-Acetylhexosaminidases have attracted interest particularly for β-N-acetylhexosaminyl oligosaccharide synthesis, but their application is affected by having few enzyme sources, low efficiency, and relaxed regioselectivity of transglycosylation. In this work, we describe a microbial β-N-acetylhexosaminidase that exhibited strong transglycosylation activity and strict regioselectivity for β-N-acetylhexosaminyl lactose synthesis and thus provides a powerful synthetic tool to obtain biologically important GalNAcβ1-3Lac and GlcNAcβ1-3Lac. PMID:27422836

  13. Autoregulation of GAL4 transcription is essential for rapid growth of Kluyveromyces lactis on lactose and galactose.

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, M; Nagiec, M M; Dickson, R C

    1993-01-01

    Transcriptional induction of genes in the lactose-galactose regulon of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis requires the GAL4 transcription activator protein. Previous data indicated that the concentration of GAL4 was tightly regulated under basal, inducing, and glucose repressing conditions but the mechanisms were unknown. In this paper we demonstrate that transcription of the GAL4 gene (KI-GAL4) increases 3- to 4-fold during induction of the regulon. This increase requires a KI-GAL4 binding site, UASG, in front of the KI-GAL4 gene, indicating that the KI-GAL4 protein autoregulates transcription of its own gene. Our data demonstrate that the autoregulatory circuit is essential for full induction of the lactose-galactose regulon and, hence, for rapid growth on lactose or galactose. Other data indicate that basal transcription of the KI-GAL4 gene is governed by unidentified promoter elements. The existence of the autoregulatory circuit reveals an important difference between the lactose-galactose regulon and its homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the melibiose-galactose regulon. This difference may have evolved in response to different selective pressures encountered by the two organisms. PMID:8414996

  14. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Galápagos Endemic Land Snail Naesiotus nux

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Samuel S.; Settles, Matthew L.; New, Daniel D.; Parent, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft mitochondrial genome sequence of Naesiotus nux, a Galápagos endemic land snail species of the genus Naesiotus. The circular genome is 15 kb and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes. PMID:26798085

  15. ERK8 is a negative regulator of O-GalNAc glycosylation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Joanne; Tham, Keit Min; Gill, David James; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie Anne; Bard, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    ER O-glycosylation can be induced through relocalisation GalNAc-Transferases from the Golgi. This process markedly stimulates cell migration and is constitutively activated in more than 60% of breast carcinomas. How this activation is achieved remains unclear. Here, we screened 948 signalling genes using RNAi and imaging. We identified 12 negative regulators of O-glycosylation that all control GalNAc-T sub-cellular localisation. ERK8, an atypical MAPK with high basal kinase activity, is a strong hit and is partially localised at the Golgi. Its inhibition induces the relocation of GalNAc-Ts, but not of KDEL receptors, revealing the existence of two separate COPI-dependent pathways. ERK8 down-regulation, in turn, activates cell motility. In human breast and lung carcinomas, ERK8 expression is reduced while ER O-glycosylation initiation is hyperactivated. In sum, ERK8 appears as a constitutive brake on GalNAc-T relocalisation, and the loss of its expression could drive cancer aggressivity through increased cell motility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01828.001 PMID:24618899

  16. The alpha-gal story: lessons learned from connecting the dots.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E; Commins, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be rapidly progressing and fatal, and therefore establishing its cause is pivotal to long-term risk management. Our recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal). IgE to alpha-gal has been associated with 2 distinct forms of anaphylaxis: (1) immediate-onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab and (2) delayed-onset anaphylaxis 3 to 6 hours after ingestion of mammalian food products (eg, beef and pork). Results of our studies and those of others strongly suggest that tick bites are a cause, if not the only significant cause, of IgE antibody responses to alpha-gal in the southern, eastern, and central United States; Europe; Australia; and parts of Asia. Typical immune responses to carbohydrates are considered to be T-cell independent, whereas IgE antibody production is thought to involve sequential class-switching that requires input from T cells. Therefore, establishing the mechanism of the specific IgE antibody response to alpha-gal will be an important aspect to address as this area of research continues.

  17. Gastrointestinal Parasites in the Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) of Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo; Sarzosa, María Soledad; Encalada, Edison; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Huyvaert, Kathryn P

    2015-07-01

    Using a fecal flotation technique, we detected three genera of endoparasites in the critically endangered Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) of Galápagos. These genera were Contracaecum, Tetrabothrius, and Cardiocephaloides. Juvenile albatrosses were more likely to be infected than adults, but we found no effect of sex or mass on infection probability.

  18. Tropical Instability Wave Interactions within the Galápagos Archipelago.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the boreal fall of 2005, the effects of tropical instability waves (TIW) appear as oscillations within the sea surface temperature (SST), meridional current (Vy), and thermocline (20°C) in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Within the Galápagos Archipelago, a strong 3-wave succes...

  19. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Galápagos Endemic Land Snail Naesiotus nux.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Samuel S; Settles, Matthew L; New, Daniel D; Parent, Christine E; Gerritsen, Alida T

    2016-01-21

    We report herein the draft mitochondrial genome sequence of Naesiotus nux, a Galápagos endemic land snail species of the genus Naesiotus. The circular genome is 15 kb and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes.

  20. An annotated checklist of parasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) from the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Palma, Ricardo L; Peck, Stewart B

    2013-01-01

    We list all described species and subspecies of parasitic lice from the Galápagos Islands, based on literature and specimen records. A total of eight families, 47 genera, and 104 species and subspecies of parasitic lice are listed, of which 26 are new species records and eight are new genus records. Also, we report 17 new host-louse associations. The checklist includes 17 endemic species (16 from birds, one from a mammal), 79 native species and subspecies (78 from birds, one from a mammal), and eight species and subspecies (five from birds, three from mammals) introduced by human agency. Nine species assigned in error to the Galápagos Islands in the literature are discussed and deleted from the fauna. For each valid species and subspecies we give information on its taxonomic history, type material, host associations, geographic distribution, biogeographical status, systematic relationships, and relevant literature references. We also give a brief summary of louse biology, and an account of the history of louse collecting, expeditions, collections, and research relating to Galápagos Islands lice. We include a host-parasite list, and a list of hosts which breed in the Galápagos Islands but without lice recorded from them. Also, we formally designate four lectotypes from the Kellogg Collection.

  1. Understanding the colonization history of the Galápagos flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris).

    PubMed

    Sari, Eloisa H R; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-05-01

    The Galápagos archipelago has never been connected to any continental land masses, so it is of interest to know the colonization and diversification history of its endemic species. We analyzed the phylogenetic placement of the endemic Galápagos flycatcher, M. magnirostris, within Myiarchus by using the genes ND2 and cytb (1970 bp) to compare 16 of the 22 species that comprise this genus. We also analyzed variability in cytb sequences from 154 M. magnirostris individuals captured on seven Galápagos islands. Our phylogenetic analyses recovered the two main Myiarchus clades that had been described by previous genetic, morphological, and vocal analyses. M. magnirostris is monophyletic and its closest living relative is M. tyrannulus from Mexico and Central America. The average age for the split node between these two groups was approximately 850,000 years (95% C.I. 630,735-1,087,557). M. tyrannulus, M. nugator, M. nuttingi, M. sagrae, and M. stolidus are not monophyletic species. Within M. magnirostris itself, we found low nucleotide and haplotype diversities (π=0.0009 and h=0.4913, respectively) and a high genetic structure among populations. We also detected a star-shaped haplotype network and significantly negative values for Tajima's D and Fu's Fs for this species. Our results suggest that M. magnirostris originated from a single colonization event and had a recent population expansion in the Galápagos archipelago.

  2. Origin and evolution of endemic Galápagos Varronia species (Cordiaceae).

    PubMed

    Weeks, Andrea; Baird, Kristen E; McMullen, Conley K

    2010-11-01

    Four endemic Varronia species (Cordiaceae) occupy the Galápagos archipelago. Three comprise the V. leucophlyctis complex (V. anderssonii, V. leucophlyctis, V. scouleri), whose species' limits are not well defined but that is morphologically distinct from the fourth endemic species, V. revoluta. Sequence data from the nuclear rDNA ITS region and the cpDNA ndhF gene were gathered from 49 accessions of Varronia from five Galápagos islands in order to test the evolutionary relationships of endemic Varronia species, determine the number of immigration events to the islands and estimate their age of origin. All endemic species nest within the clade of species belonging to Varronia, which is an entirely American genus. We find little evidence of phylogenetic structuring of the V. leucophlyctis complex but divergent phylogenetic signals from nuclear and chloroplast genomes regarding its relationship to V. revoluta. Results are consistent with a hybridization event involving ancestral Galapagean lineages, with chloroplast and nuclear data suggesting one or two dispersal events from the Americas to the Galápagos, respectively. Fossil-based divergence time estimates indicate endemic species diverged from American continental species as early as 4.5 Myr ago and radiated 1.12 Myr, which coincides with ages of exposed and subsided Galápagos islands.

  3. Applications of β-gal-III isozyme from Bacillus coagulans RCS3, in lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Navneet; Singh, Jagtar; Joshi, Amit; Bhatia, Sonu

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans RCS3 isolated from hot water springs secreted five isozymes i.e. β-gal I-V of β-galactosidase. β-gal III isozyme was purified using DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G 100 column chromatography. Its molecular weight characterization showed a single band at 315kD in Native PAGE, while two subunits of 50.1 and 53.7 kD in SDS PAGE. β-Gal III had pH optima in the range of 6-7 and temperature optima at 65°C. It preferred nitro-aryl-β-d-galactoside as substrate having K(m) of 4.16 mM with ONPG. More than 85% and 80% hydrolysis of lactose (1-5%, w/v) was recorded within 48 h of incubation at 55°C and 50°C respectively and pH range of 6-7. About 78-86% hydrolysis of lactose in various brands of standardized milk was recorded at incubation temperature of 50°C. These results marked the applications of β-gal III in processing of milk/whey industry.

  4. Development Of A Consensus Protocol To Quantify Primate Anti-Non-Gal Xenoreactive Antibodies Using Pig Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Byrne, Guerard W.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Welty, Emily; Braileanu, Gheorghe; Cheng, Xiangfei; Robson, Simon C.; McGregor, Christopher G.A.; Cooper, David K.C.; Pierson, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of xenotransplantation do not employ a uniform method to measure and report natural and induced antibody responses to non-Galα(1,3)Gal (non-Gal) epitopes. Such humoral responses are thought to be particularly pathogenic after transplantation of vascularized GalTKO pig organs and having a more uniform assay and reporting format would greatly facilitate comparisons between laboratories. Flow cytometry allows examination of antibody reactivity to intact antigens in their natural location and conformation on cell membranes. We have established a simple and reproducible flow cytometric assay to detect antibodies specific for non-Gal pig antigens by using primary porcine aortic endothelial cells (pAECs) and cell culture adapted pAEC cell lines generated from wild type and α1,3galactosyl transferase knockout (GalTKO) swine. The consensus protocol we propose here is based on procedures routinely used in four xenotransplantation centers, and was independently evaluated at three sites using shared cells and serum samples. Our observation support use of the cell culture adapted GalTKO pAEC KO:15502 cells as a routine method to determine the reactivity of anti-non-Gal antibodies in human and baboon serum. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that allows the detection of natural and induced non-Gal xenoreactive antibodies present in human or baboon serum in a reliable and consistent manner. This consensus assay and format for reporting the data should be accessible to most laboratories and will be useful for assessing experimental results between multiple research centers. Adopting this assay and format for reporting the data should facilitate the detection, monitoring, and detailed characterization of non-Gal antibody responses. PMID:25176173

  5. Preparation of low galactose yogurt using cultures of Gal(+) Streptococcus thermophilus in combination with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Anbukkarasi, Kaliyaperumal; UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Nanda, Dhiraj Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important lactic starter used in the production of yogurt. Most strains of S. thermophilus are galactose negative (Gal(-)) and are able to metabolize only glucose portion of lactose and expel galactose into the medium. This metabolic defect leads to the accumulation of free galactose in yogurt, resulting in galactosemia among consumers. Hence there is an absolute need to develop low galactose yogurt. Therefore, in this study, three galactose positive (Gal(+)) S. thermophilus strains from National Collection of Dairy Cultures (NCDC) viz. NCDC 659 (AJM), NCDC 660 (JM1), NCDC 661 (KM3) and a reference galactose negative (Gal(-)) S. thermophilus NCDC 218 were used for preparation of low galactose yogurt. In milk fermented using S. thermophilus isolates alone, NCDC 659 released less galactose (0.27 %) followed by NCDC 661 (0.3 %) and NCDC 660 (0.45 %) after 10 h at 42 °C. Milk was fermented in combination with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04, in which NCDC 659 released least galactose upto 0.49 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %) and NCDC 660 (0.60 %) than reference Gal(-) NCDC 218(0.79 %). Low galactose yogurt was prepared following standard procedure using Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates and Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC 04 in 1:1 ratio. Among which low galactose yogurt by NCDC 659 combination contained less galactose 0.37 % followed by NCDC 661 (0.51 %), NCDC 660 (0.65 %) and reference Gal(-) NCDC 218 (0.98 %) after 4 h of fermentation. This study clearly reveals that Gal(+) S. thermophilus isolates can be paired with Gal(-) L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus for developing low galactose yogurt.

  6. Cloning and expression of cDNA for a human Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferase from the CEM T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Laffont, C; Van Miegem, V; Harduin-Lepers, A; Delannoy, P; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-07-15

    Complementary DNA encoding a human Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferase type II (hST3Gal II) was cloned from a CEM T-cell cDNA library using a 23-base oligonucleotide probe. The sequence of this probe was established on the basis of a slightly divergent sialylmotif L that was obtained by polymerase chain reaction with degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the conserved sialylmotif L of mammalian Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferases. It was thus confirmed that a short oligonucleotide probe may be sensitive and highly specific. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of hST3Gal II show, respectively, 56.3% and 49.3% similarity to hST3Gal I [Kitagawa, H. & Paulson, J. C. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17872-17878] and 88.1% and 93.7% similarity to murine ST3Gal II [Lee, Y. C., Kojima, N., Wada, E., Kurosawa, N., Nakaoka, T., Hamamoto, T. & Tsuji, S. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 10028-10033]. hST3Gal II mRNA was highly expressed in heart, liver, skeletal muscle and various lymphoid tissues but not in brain and kidney. A soluble form of hST3Gal II expressed in COS-7 cells was tested in vitro for substrate specificity and kinetic properties. Asialofetuin and asialo-bovine submaxillary mucin appeared better substrates for hST3Gal II than for its murine counterpart as previously reported [Kojima, N., Lee, Y.-C., Hamamoto, T., Kurosawa, N. & Tsuji, S. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 5772-5776]. In previous studies, we have shown hyposialylation of O-glycans attached to two major lymphocyte CD43 and CD45 cell surface molecules in human-immunodeficiency-virus-1(HIV-1)-infected T-cell lines. Since comparable levels of hST3Gal I and hST3Gal II mRNA and enzymatic activity were observed in parental and HIV-1-infected CEM T-cell lysates, the sialylation defect associated with HIV infection of this cell line is probably due to a mechanism different from a simple altered catalytic activity of these sialyltransferases.

  7. Origin and evolutionary relationships of giant Galápagos tortoises

    PubMed Central

    Caccone, Adalgisa; Gibbs, James P.; Ketmaier, Valerio; Suatoni, Elizabeth; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Perhaps the most enduring debate in reptile systematics has involved the giant Galápagos tortoises (Geochelone nigra), whose origins and systematic relationships captivated Charles Darwin and remain unresolved to this day. Here we report a phylogenetic reconstruction based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from Galápagos tortoises and Geochelone from mainland South America and Africa. The closest living relative to the Galápagos tortoise is not among the larger-bodied tortoises of South America but is the relatively small-bodied Geochelone chilensis, or Chaco tortoise. The split between G. chilensis and the Galápagos lineage probably occurred 6 to 12 million years ago, before the origin of the oldest extant Galápagos island. Our data suggest that the four named southern subspecies on the largest island, Isabela, are not distinct genetic units, whereas a genetically distinct northernmost Isabela subspecies is probably the result of a separate colonization. Most unexpectedly, the lone survivor of the abingdoni subspecies from Pinta Island (“Lonesome George”) is very closely related to tortoises from San Cristóbal and Española, the islands farthest from the island of Pinta. To rule out a possible recent transplant of Lonesome George, we sequenced DNA from three tortoises collected on Pinta in 1906. They have sequences identical to Lonesome George, consistent with his being the last survivor of his subspecies. This finding may provide guidance in finding a mate for Lonesome George, who so far has failed to reproduce. PMID:10557302

  8. Low MHC variation in the endangered Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus).

    PubMed

    Bollmer, Jennifer L; Vargas, F Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2007-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most polymorphic regions of the genome, likely due to balancing selection acting to maintain alleles over time. Lack of MHC variability has been attributed to factors such as genetic drift in small populations and relaxed selection pressure. The Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus), endemic to the Galápagos Islands, is the only penguin that occurs on the equator. It relies upon cold, nutrient-rich upwellings and experiences severe population declines when ocean temperatures rise during El Niño events. These bottlenecks, occurring in an already small population, have likely resulted in reduced genetic diversity in this species. In this study, we used MHC class II exon 2 sequence data from a DRB1-like gene to characterize the amount of genetic variation at the MHC in 30 Galápagos penguins, as well as one Magellanic penguin (S. magellanicus) and two king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), and compared it to that in five other penguin species for which published data exist. We found that the Galápagos penguin had the lowest MHC diversity (as measured by number of polymorphic sites and average divergence among alleles) of the eight penguin species studied. A phylogenetic analysis showed that Galápagos penguin MHC sequences are most closely related to Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) sequences, its putative sister species based on other loci. An excess of non-synonymous mutations and a pattern of trans-specific evolution in the neighbor-joining tree suggest that selection is acting on the penguin MHC.

  9. Over-expression of ST3Gal-I promotes mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Picco, Gianfranco; Julien, Sylvain; Brockhausen, Inka; Beatson, Richard; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Haslam, Stuart; Mandel, Ulla; Dell, Anne; Pinder, Sarah; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy

    2010-10-01

    Changes in glycosylation are common in malignancy, and as almost all surface proteins are glycosylated, this can dramatically affect the behavior of tumor cells. In breast carcinomas, the O-linked glycans are frequently truncated, often as a result of premature sialylation. The sialyltransferase ST3Gal-I adds sialic acid to the galactose residue of core 1 (Galbeta1,3GalNAc) O-glycans and this enzyme is over-expressed in breast cancer resulting in the expression of sialylated core 1 glycans. In order to study the role of ST3Gal-I in mammary tumor development, we developed transgenic mice that over-express the sialyltransferase under the control of the human membrane-bound mucin 1 promoter. These mice were then crossed with PyMT mice that spontaneously develop mammary tumors. As expected, ST3Gal-I transgenic mice showed increased activity and expression of the enzyme in the pregnant and lactating mammary glands, the stomach, lungs and intestine. Although no obvious defects were observed in the fully developed mammary gland, when these mice were crossed with PyMT mice, a highly significant decrease in tumor latency was observed compared to the PyMT mice on an identical background. These results indicate that ST3Gal-I is acting as a tumor promoter in this model of breast cancer. This, we believe, is the first demonstration that over-expression of a glycosyltransferase involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation can promote tumorigenesis.

  10. Method for predicting water demand for crop uses in New Jersey in 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020, and for estimating water use for livestock and selected sectors of the food-processing industry in New Jersey in 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawges, R.M.; Titus, E.O.

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to predict water demand for crop uses in New Jersey. A separate method was developed to estimate water use for livestock and selected sectors of the food-processing industry in 1987. Predictions of water demand for field- grown crops in New Jersey were made for 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020 under three climatological scenarios: (1) wet year, (2) average year, and (3) drought year. These estimates ranged from 4.10 times 10 to the 9th power to 16.82 times 10 to the 9th power gal (gallons). Irrigation amounts calculated for the three climatological scenarios by using a daily water-balance model were multiplied by predicted numbers of irrigated acreage. Irrigated acreage was predicted from historical crop-irrigation data and from predictions of harvested acreage produced by using a statistical model relating population to harvested acreage. Predictions of water demand for cranberries and container-grown nursery crops also were made for 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. Predictions of water demand under the three climatological scenarios were made for container- grown nursery crops, but not for cranberries, because water demand for cranberries varies little in response to climatological factors. Water demand for cranberries was predicted to remain constant at 4.43 times 10 to the 9th power gal through the year 2020. Predictions of water demand for container-grown nursery crops ranged from 1.89 times 10 to the 9th power to 3.63 times 10 to the 9th power gal. Water-use for livestock in 1987 was estimated to be 0.78 times 10 to the 9th power gal, and water use for selected sectors of the food-processing industry was estimated to be 3.75 times 10 to the 9th power gal.

  11. Integrative View of α2,3-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal) Molecular and Functional Evolution in Deuterostomes: Significance of Lineage-Specific Losses

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Daniel; Teppa, Elin; Mir, Anne-Marie; Vicogne, Dorothée; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Filloux, Cyril; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Sialyltransferases are responsible for the synthesis of a diverse range of sialoglycoconjugates predicted to be pivotal to deuterostomes’ evolution. In this work, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the metazoan α2,3-sialyltransferases family (ST3Gal), a subset of sialyltransferases encompassing six subfamilies (ST3Gal I–ST3Gal VI) functionally characterized in mammals. Exploration of genomic and expressed sequence tag databases and search of conserved sialylmotifs led to the identification of a large data set of st3gal-related gene sequences. Molecular phylogeny and large scale sequence similarity network analysis identified four new vertebrate subfamilies called ST3Gal III-r, ST3Gal VII, ST3Gal VIII, and ST3Gal IX. To address the issue of the origin and evolutionary relationships of the st3gal-related genes, we performed comparative syntenic mapping of st3gal gene loci combined to ancestral genome reconstruction. The ten vertebrate ST3Gal subfamilies originated from genome duplication events at the base of vertebrates and are organized in three distinct and ancient groups of genes predating the early deuterostomes. Inferring st3gal gene family history identified also several lineage-specific gene losses, the significance of which was explored in a functional context. Toward this aim, spatiotemporal distribution of st3gal genes was analyzed in zebrafish and bovine tissues. In addition, molecular evolutionary analyses using specificity determining position and coevolved amino acid predictions led to the identification of amino acid residues with potential implication in functional divergence of vertebrate ST3Gal. We propose a detailed scenario of the evolutionary relationships of st3gal genes coupled to a conceptual framework of the evolution of ST3Gal functions. PMID:25534026

  12. A hitchhikers guide to the Galápagos: co-phylogeography of Galápagos mockingbirds and their parasites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parasites are evolutionary hitchhikers whose phylogenies often track the evolutionary history of their hosts. Incongruence in the evolutionary history of closely associated lineages can be explained through a variety of possible events including host switching and host independent speciation. However, in recently diverged lineages stochastic population processes, such as retention of ancestral polymorphism or secondary contact, can also explain discordant genealogies, even in fully co-speciating taxa. The relatively simple biogeographic arrangement of the Galápagos archipelago, compared with mainland biomes, provides a framework to identify stochastic and evolutionary informative components of genealogic data in these recently diverged organisms. Results Mitochondrial DNA sequences were obtained for four species of Galápagos mockingbirds and three sympatric species of ectoparasites - two louse and one mite species. These data were complemented with nuclear EF1α sequences in selected samples of parasites and with information from microsatellite loci in the mockingbirds. Mitochondrial sequence data revealed differences in population genetic diversity between all taxa and varying degrees of topological congruence between host and parasite lineages. A very low level of genetic variability and lack of congruence was found in one of the louse parasites, which was excluded from subsequent joint analysis of mitochondrial data. The reconciled multi-species tree obtained from the analysis is congruent with both the nuclear data and the geological history of the islands. Conclusions The gene genealogies of Galápagos mockingbirds and two of their ectoparasites show strong phylogeographic correlations, with instances of incongruence mostly explained by ancestral genetic polymorphism. A third parasite genealogy shows low levels of genetic diversity and little evidence of co-phylogeny with their hosts. These differences can mostly be explained by variation in life

  13. Lectinochemical studies on the glyco-recognition factors of a Tn (GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr) specific lectin isolated from the seeds of Salvia sclarea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M

    2005-01-01

    The lectin extracted from the seeds of Salvia sclarea (SSL) recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr) expressed in certain human carcinomas. In previous studies, knowledge of the binding properties of SSL was restricted to GalNAcalpha1--> related oligosaccharides and glycopeptides. Thus, the requirements of functional groups in monosaccharide and high-density polyvalent carbohydrate structural units for SSL binding and an updated affinity profile were further evaluated by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent (ELLSA) and inhibition assays. Among the glycoproteins (gps) tested for interaction, a high density of exposed Tn-containing glycoproteins such as in the armadillo salivary Tn glycoprotein and asialo ovine salivary glycoprotein reacted best with SSL. When the gps were tested for inhibition of SSL binding, which was expressed as 50% nanogram inhibition, the high density polyvalent Tn present in macromolecules was the most potent inhibitor. Among the monosaccharide and carbohydrate structural units studied, which were expressed as nanomole inhibition, GalNAc alpha1-->3GalNAc beta1-->3Gal alpha1-->4Gal beta1-->4Glc (Fp), GalNAc alpha1-->3Gal beta1-->4Glc (A(L)), GalNAc alpha1-->3GalNAc beta1-->Me (F beta), GalNAc alpha1-->3GalNAc alpha1-->Me (F alpha) and GalNAc alpha1--> Ser/Thr (Tn) were the most active ligands, being 2.5-5.0 x 10(3) and 1.25-2.5 times more active than Gal and GalNAc, respectively. From the results, it is suggested that the combining site of SSL is a shallow groove type, recognizing the monosaccharide of GalNAc as the major binding site or Tn up to the Forssman pentasaccharide (Fp). It can be concluded that the three critical factors for SSL binding are the -NH CH(3)CO at carbon-2 in Gal, the configuration of carbon-3 in GalNAc, and the polyvalent Tn (GalNAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr) present in macromolecules. These results should assist in understanding the glyco-recognition factors involved in carbohydrate-lectin interactions in biological processes

  14. Histone H3 N-terminal mutations allow hyperactivation of the yeast GAL1 gene in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, R K; Grunstein, M

    1992-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the yeast histone H4 N-terminus, while not essential for viability, is required for repression of the silent mating loci and activation of GAL1 and PHO5 promoters. Because histone H3 shares many structural features with histone H4 and is intimately associated with H4 in the assembled nucleosome, we asked whether H3 has similar functions. While the basic N-terminal domain of H3 is found to be non-essential (deletion of residues 4-40 of this 135 amino acid protein allows viability), its removal has only a minor effect on mating. Surprisingly, both deletions (of residues 4-15) and acetylation site substitutions (at residues 9, 14 and 18) within the N-terminus of H3 allow hyperactivation of the GAL1 promoter as well as a number of other GAL4-regulated genes including GAL2, GAL7 and GAL10. To a limited extent glucose repression is also alleviated by H3 N-terminal deletions. Expression of another inducible promoter, PHO5, is shown to be relatively unaffected. We conclude that the H3 and H4 N-termini have different functions in both the repression of the silent mating loci and in the regulation of GAL1. Images PMID:1505519

  15. GalNAc moieties in O-linked oligosaccharides of the primordial germ cells of Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Edurne; Sáez, Francisco José; Madrid, Juan Francisco; Hernández, Francisco

    2002-04-01

    Glycoconjugates could play a role in cell adhesion and migration mechanisms, including the locomotive movements of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) during the development of the embryo. In the present work, we have studied by lectin histochemistry the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in the glycans of the Xenopus PGCs, as a first approach to identifying their glycoconjugates which could be involved in the migration mechanism. The PGCs were negative for three of the GalNAc-binding lectins employed (from soybean, SBA; from lima bean, LBA; and from snail, HPA). However, when sialic acid (NeuAc) was previously removed by acid hydrolysis, SBA and HPA, but not LBA, labeled the PGCs, except if the staining was combined with the beta-elimination procedure. This suggests the presence of GalNAc alpha(1,3)-linked to galactose (Gal) in O-linked oligosaccharides, in a subterminal position to NeuAc. As the PGCs were always negative for LBA, the absence of fucose alpha(1,2)-linked to subterminal Gal is suggested. With the lectin from horse gram (DBA), the PGCs were stained, although beta-elimination turned the cells negative and acid hydrolysis increased the labeling, suggesting that GalNAc(alpha)(1,3)GalNAc was in O-linked glycans in terminal and subterminal to NeuAc position.

  16. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  17. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans. PMID:25939779

  18. Efficient disruption of Zebrafish genes using a Gal4-containing gene trap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background External development and optical transparency of embryos make zebrafish exceptionally suitable for in vivo insertional mutagenesis using fluorescent proteins to visualize expression patterns of mutated genes. Recently developed Gene Breaking Transposon (GBT) vectors greatly improve the fidelity and mutagenicity of transposon-based gene trap vectors. Results We constructed and tested a bipartite GBT vector with Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter. Our vector also contains a UAS:eGFP cassette for direct detection of gene trap events by fluorescence. To confirm gene trap events, we generated a UAS:mRFP tester line. We screened 270 potential founders and established 41 gene trap lines. Three of our gene trap alleles display homozygous lethal phenotypes ranging from embryonic to late larval: nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19. Our gene trap cassette is flanked by direct loxP sites, which enabled us to successfully revert nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19 gene trap alleles by injection of Cre mRNA. The UAS:eGFP cassette is flanked by direct FRT sites. It can be readily removed by injection of Flp mRNA for use of our gene trap alleles with other tissue-specific GFP-marked lines. The Gal4-VP16 component of our vector provides two important advantages over other GBT vectors. The first is increased sensitivity, which enabled us to detect previously unnoticed expression of nsf in the pancreas. The second advantage is that all our gene trap lines, including integrations into non-essential genes, can be used as highly specific Gal4 drivers for expression of other transgenes under the control of Gal4 UAS. Conclusions The Gal4-containing bipartite Gene Breaking Transposon vector presented here retains high specificity for integrations into genes, high mutagenicity and revertibility by Cre. These features, together with utility as highly specific Gal4 drivers, make gene trap mutants presented here especially useful to the research community. PMID:24034702

  19. P1 Trisaccharide (Galα1,4Galβ1,4GlcNAc) Synthesis by Enzyme Glycosylation Reactions Using Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziye; Lu, Yuquan; Zhang, Jianbo; Pardee, Keith; Wang, Peng George

    2003-01-01

    The frequency of Escherichia coli infection has lead to concerns over pathogenic bacteria in our food supply and a demand for therapeutics. Glycolipids on gut cells serve as receptors for the Shiga-like toxin produced by E. coli. Oligosaccharide moiety analogues of these glycolipids can compete with receptors for the toxin, thus acting as antibacterials. An enzymatic synthesis of the P1 trisaccharide (Galα1,4Galβ1,4GlcNAc), one of the oligosaccharide analogues, was assessed in this study. In the proposed synthetic pathway, UDP-glucose was generated from sucrose with an Anabaena sp. sucrose synthase and then converted with an E. coli UDP-glucose 4-epimerase to UDP-galactose. Two molecules of galactose were linked to N-acetylglucosamine subsequently with a Helicobacter pylori β-l,4-galactosyltransferase and a Neisseria meningitidis α-1,4-galactosyltransferase to produce one molecule of P1 trisaccharide. The four enzymes were coexpressed in a single genetically engineered E. coli strain that was then permeabilized and used to catalyze the enzymatic reaction. P1 trisaccharide was accumulated up to 50 mM (5.4 g in a 200-ml reaction volume), with a 67% yield based on the consumption of N-acetylglucosamine. This study provides an efficient approach for the preparative-scale synthesis of P1 trisaccharide with recombinant bacteria. PMID:12676690

  20. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 4: The global-database manager GAL-DBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Mary A.; Regelbrugge, Marc E.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fourth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language CLAMP, the command language interpreter CLIP, and the data manager GAL. Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 4 describes the nominal-record data management component of the NICE software. It is intended for all users.

  1. A cryptic taxon of Galápagos tortoise in conservation peril.

    PubMed

    Russello, Michael A; Glaberman, Scott; Gibbs, James P; Marquez, Cruz; Powell, Jeffrey R; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2005-09-22

    As once boldly stated, 'bad taxonomy can kill', highlighting the critical importance of accurate taxonomy for the conservation of endangered taxa. The concept continues to evolve almost 15 years later largely because most legal protections aimed at preserving biological diversity are based on formal taxonomic designations. In this paper we report unrecognized genetic divisions within the giant tortoises of the Galápagos. We found three distinct lineages among populations formerly considered a single taxon on the most populous and accessible island of Santa Cruz; their diagnosability, degree of genetic divergence and phylogenetic placement merit the recognition of at least one new taxon. These results demonstrate the fundamental importance of continuing taxonomic investigations to recognize biological diversity and designate units of conservation, even within long-studied organisms such as Galápagos tortoises, whose evolutionary heritage and contribution to human intellectual history warrant them special attention.

  2. Geochemical and Geophysical Estimates of Lithospheric Thickness Variation Beneath Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanism in Galápagos is far more widespread (>40,000 km2) than in other hotspot-related archipelagos, such as Hawaii (~20,000 km2). We have employed geochemical and geophysical data to constrain the causes of this widespread volcanism. Basaltic magmas recently erupted across the Galápagos Archipelago are linked to the variable distribution of ‘enriched’, depleted MORB (DMM) and FOZO-like plume (PLUME) components in anomalously-hot upwelling mantle. We have used rare-earth-element inversion modelling for basalts dominated by PLUME and DMM components to constrain the depth to the top of the melt column beneath different Galápagos volcanoes. Basalts erupted on islands in the southwest of the Galápagos Archipelago (e.g. Fernandina and Isabela) -- and closest to the postulated axis of the present-day plume -- have the highest [Sm/Yb]n (typically 2.3 to 3). REE inversion models suggest that adiabatic decompression melting of anhydrous peridotite occurs beneath these islands between ~ 85 and 58 km. In the northeast of the archipelago (e.g. Genovesa, Marchena, eastern Santiago and northern Santa Cruz) [Sm/Yb]n ratios are lower (1.0 to 2.3) and inversion models predict that melting of anhydrous peridotite occurs between 85 and 48 km depth. Models run with different PLUME and DMM source compositions give almost identical depth estimates for the base and top of the anhydrous melt column, because primitive mantle, MORB and recycled oceanic crust all have [Sm/Yb]n close to unity. Incipient melting (of volatile-rich peridotite and or pyroxenite) at depths between ~85 and 150 km is required to explain elevated concentrations of strongly-incompatible trace elements. The length of this small-fraction melt ‘tail’ is greatest for basalts erupted closest to the plume axis, which have super-chondritic Nb/La ratios but variable 3He/4He. By converting surface wave data from a recently published tomographic experiment [1] to temperature we have been able to map the

  3. A cryptic taxon of Galápagos tortoise in conservation peril

    PubMed Central

    Russello, Michael A; Glaberman, Scott; Gibbs, James P; Marquez, Cruz; Powell, Jeffrey R; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2005-01-01

    As once boldly stated, ‘bad taxonomy can kill’, highlighting the critical importance of accurate taxonomy for the conservation of endangered taxa. The concept continues to evolve almost 15 years later largely because most legal protections aimed at preserving biological diversity are based on formal taxonomic designations. In this paper we report unrecognized genetic divisions within the giant tortoises of the Galápagos. We found three distinct lineages among populations formerly considered a single taxon on the most populous and accessible island of Santa Cruz; their diagnosability, degree of genetic divergence and phylogenetic placement merit the recognition of at least one new taxon. These results demonstrate the fundamental importance of continuing taxonomic investigations to recognize biological diversity and designate units of conservation, even within long-studied organisms such as Galápagos tortoises, whose evolutionary heritage and contribution to human intellectual history warrant them special attention. PMID:17148189

  4. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of T helper subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Tfh, Tr1 and Tregs) markers expression in periapical lesions reveals multiple cytokine clusters accountable for lesions activity and inactivity status

    PubMed Central

    ARAUJO-PIRES, Ana Claudia; FRANCISCONI, Carolina Favaro; BIGUETTI, Claudia Cristina; CAVALLA, Franco; ARANHA, Andreza Maria Fabio; LETRA, Ariadne; TROMBONE, Ana Paula Favaro; FAVERI, Marcelo; SILVA, Renato Menezes; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators determines the stable or progressive nature of periapical granulomas by modulating the balance of the osteoclastogenic factor RANKL and its antagonist OPG. However, the cytokine networks operating in the development of periapical lesions are quite more complex than what the simple pro- versus anti-inflammatory mediators' paradigm suggests. Here we simultaneously investigated the patterns of Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Thf, Tr1 and Tregs cytokines/markers expression in human periapical granulomas. Methods The expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL23, IL21, IL-33, IL-10, IL-4, IL-9, IL-22, FOXp3 markers (via RealTimePCR array) was accessed in active/progressive (N=40) versus inactive/stable (N=70) periapical granulomas (as determined by RANKL/OPG expression ratio), and also to compare these samples with a panel of control specimens (N=26). A cluster analysis of 13 cytokine levels was performed to examine possible clustering between the cytokines in a total of 110 granulomas. Results The expression of all target cytokines was higher in the granulomas than in control samples. TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21 mRNA levels were significantly higher in active granulomas, while in inactive lesions the expression levels of IL-4, IL-9, IL-10, IL-22 and FOXp3 were higher than in active granulomas. Five clusters were identified in inactive lesion groups, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-17, IL-10, FOXp3, IFN-γ, IL-9, IL-33 and IL-4 statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Three clusters were identified in active lesions, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-22, IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-33, FOXp3, IL-21 and RANKL statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Conclusion There is a clear dichotomy in the profile of cytokine expression in inactive and active periapical lesions. While the widespread cytokine expression seems to be a feature of chronic lesions

  6. Novel O-linked glycans containing 6'-sulfo-Gal/GalNAc of MUC1 secreted from human breast cancer YMB-S cells: possible carbohydrate epitopes of KL-6(MUC1) monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Seko, Akira; Ohkura, Takashi; Ideo, Hiroko; Yamashita, Katsuko

    2012-02-01

    Human serum Krebs von den Lugen-6 (KL-6) antigen is a MUC1 glycoprotein (KL-6/MUC1) recognized by anti-KL-6 monoclonal antibody (KL-6/mAb) and has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for interstitial pneumonia. KL-6/mAb is thought to recognize the specific glycopeptides sequence of MUC1, but the precise glycan structure of the epitope is unclear. In this study, we determined the carbohydrate structures of KL-6/MUC1 to search the carbohydrate epitopes for KL-6/mAb. KL-6/MUC1 was purified from the culture medium of human breast cancer YMB-S cells by KL-6/mAb-affinity chromatography; the O-linked glycan structures were determined in combination with paper electrophoresis, several lectin column chromatographies, sialidase digestion and methanolysis. KL-6/MUC1 contained core 1 and extended core 1 glycans modified with one or two sialic acid/sulfate residues. Based on these structures, several synthetic glycans binding to anti-KL-6/mAb were compared with one another by surface plasmon resonance. Sequentially, related radiolabeled oligosaccharides were enzymatically synthesized and analyzed for binding to a KL-6/mAb-conjugated affinity column. 3'-sialylated, 6'-sulfated LNnT [Neu5Acα2-3(SO(3)(-)-6)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4Glc], 3'-sialylated, 6-sulfated core 1 [Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3(SO(3)(-)-6)GalNAc] and disulfated core 1 SO(3)(-)-3Galβ1-3(SO(3)(-)-6)GalNAc exhibited substantial affinity for KL-6/mAb, and 3'-sulfated core 1 derivatives [SO(3)(-)-3Galβ1-3(±Neu5Acα2-6)GalNAc] and 3'-sialylated core 1 weakly interacted with KL-6/mAb. These results indicated that the possible carbohydrate epitopes of KL-6/mAb involve not only 3'-sialylated core 1 but also novel core 1 and extended core 1 with sulfate and sialic acid residues. Epitope expressing changes with suppression or over-expression of the Gal6ST (Gal 6-O-sulfotransferase) gene, suggesting that Gal6ST is involved in the biosynthesis of the unique epitopes of KL-6/mAb.

  7. Disulphide linkage in mouse ST6Gal-I: determination of linkage positions and mutant analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuichi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Takumi; Ishihara, Yoshimi; Takaki, Yoshie; Kono, Mari; Dohmae, Naoshi; Tsuji, Shuichi

    2012-02-01

    All cloned sialyltransferases from vertebrates are classified into four subfamilies and are characterized as having type II transmembrane topology. The catalytic domain has highly conserved motifs known as sialylmotifs. Besides sialylmotifs, each family has several unique conserved cysteine (Cys) residues mainly in the catalytic domain. The number and loci of conserved amino acids, however, differ with each subfamily, suggesting that the conserved Cys-residues and/or disulphide linkages they make may contribute to linkage specificity. Using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry, the present study performed disulphide linkage analysis on soluble mouse ST6Gal-I, which has six Cys-residues. Results confirmed that there were no free Cys-residues, and all six residues contributed to disulphide linkage formation, C(139)-C(403), C(181)-C(332) and C(350)-C(361). Study of single amino acid-substituted mutants revealed that the disulphide linkage C(181)-C(332) was necessary for molecular expression of the enzyme, and that the disulphide linkage C(350)-C(361) was necessary for enzyme activity. The remaining disulphide linkage C(139)-C(403) was not necessary for enzyme expression or for activity, including substrate specificity. Crystallographic study of pig ST3Gal I has recently been reported. Interestingly, the loci of disulphide linkages in ST6Gal-I differ from those in ST3Gal I, suggesting that the linkage specificity of sialyltransferase may results from significant structural differences, including the loci of disulphide linkages.

  8. Wolf-Darwin lineament and plume-ridge interaction in northern Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, Karen; Geist, Dennis

    2002-11-01

    The Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL), located in the northwestern sector of the Galápagos Archipelago, lies between the focus of the Galápagos hot spot and the Galápagos Spreading Center. Consequently, most researchers have attributed its origin to the interaction between the plume and the adjacent ridge. We propose that the WDL is caused only partially by the plume-ridge interaction, and instead that it is primarily the result of tensional stresses emanating from the inside corner of the transform fault at 91°W. An additional factor that amplifies the tension in this region is the oblique orientation of the major transform fault with respect to the Nazca plate's spreading direction. This setting creates a transtensional zone whereby strain is partitioned into strike-slip motion along the transform and extension throughout the inside corner of the ridge-transform system. The area under tension is magmatic owing to the overlapping effects of the ridge and the Galápagos plume. The extensional model predicts no age-progressive volcanism, which is supported by observed age relationships. The WDL volcanoes define two distinct chemical groups: lavas erupted south of Wolf Island have compositions similar to those produced along the GSC west of 93°W, while those from the northern WDL resemble GSC lavas from the segment directly north of the lineament. This geographic distribution implies that the WDL is supplied by the same type of plume-affected mantle as the segment of the GSC that produced the lithosphere underlying the volcanoes. The observed WDL geochemical gradients are consistent with the extension model; the region under tension simply taps hybrid products of mixing at the margins of the subridge convection system and the periphery of the plume. Essentially, the stress field around the transform fault, normally not observable in a typical midocean ridge setting, is illuminated by the presence of melt from the adjacent hot spot.

  9. Recombinant Production of an Inulinase in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gal80 Strain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Hongweon; Sok, Dai-Eun; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2010-11-01

    The inulinase gene (INU1) from Kluyveromyces marxianus NCYC2887 strain was overexpressed by using GAL10 promotor in a △gal80 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The inulinase gene lacking the original signal sequence was fused in-frame to mating factor alpha signal sequence for secretory expression. Use of the △gal80 strain allowed the galactose-free induction of inulinase expression using a glucose-only medium. Shake flask cultivation in YPD medium produced 34.6 U/ml of the recombinant inulinase, which was approximately 13-fold higher than that produced by K. marxianus NCYC2887. It was found that the use of the △gal80 strain improved the expression of inulinase in the recombinant S. cerevisiae in both the aerobic and the anaerobic condition by about 2.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively. 5 L fed-batch fermentation using YPD medium was performed under aerobic condition with glucose feeding, which resulted in the inulinase production of 31.7 U/ml at OD600 of 67. Ethanol fermentation of dried powder of Jerusalem artichoke, an inulin-rich biomass, was also performed using the recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing INU1 and K. marxianus NCYC2887. Fermentation in a 5L scale fermentor was carried out at an aeration rate of 0.2 vvm, an agitation rate of 300 rpm, and the pH was controlled at 5.0. The temperature was maintained at 30degrees C and 37degrees C, respectively, for the recombinant S. cerevisiae and K. marxianus. The maximum productivities of ethanol were 59.0 and 53.5 g/L, respectively.

  10. Coral reef recovery in the Galápagos Islands: the northernmost islands (Darwin and Wenman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Peter W.; Riegl, Bernhard; Purkis, Samuel; Kerr, Jeremy M.; Smith, Tyler B.

    2015-06-01

    The remote northernmost Galápagos Islands, Darwin and Wenman, exhibited well-developed coral communities in 1975, which were severely degraded during the 1982-1983 El Niño warming event. Mapping of the coral reef at Darwin, herein Wellington Reef, shows it presently to be the largest known structural reef in the Galápagos. It consists of numerous 1- to 3-m-high Porites framework towers or stacks and overlies a carbonate (coral/calcareous sediments) basement. Pre-disturbance Wellington Reef was constructed chiefly by Porites lobata and Pocillopora elegans, and Wenman coral cover was dominated by Pavona clavus and Porites lobata. Subsequent surveys in 2012 have demonstrated robust recovery in spite of ENSO thermal shock events, involving both high and low stressful temperatures that have caused tissue bleaching and mortality. No losses of coral species have been observed. Radiocarbon dating of 1- to 3-m-high poritid framework stacks, from their peaks to bases, revealed modern ages of up to 690 yr. Incremental stack growth rates ranged from 0.15-0.39 to 1.04-2.40 cm yr-1. The former are equivalent to framework accretion rates of 1.5-3.9 m Kyr-1, the latter to coral skeletal growth rates of 1.0-2.4 cm yr-1. Coral recovery in the central and southern Galápagos has been nonexistent to low compared with the northern islands, due chiefly to much higher population densities and destructive grazing pressure of the echinoid Eucidaris galapagensis. Thus, coral reef resistance to ENSO perturbations and recovery potential in the Galápagos are influenced by echinoid bioerosion that varies significantly among islands.

  11. Identification of Genes Mediating Drosophila Follicle Cell Progenitor Differentiation by Screening for Modifiers of GAL4::UAS Variegation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Chia; Skora, Andrew D.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster ovarian follicle cell lineage provides a powerful system for investigating how epigenetic changes contribute to differentiation. Downstream from an epithelial stem cell, follicle progenitors undergo nine mitotic cell cycles before transitioning to the endocycle and initiating differentiation. During their proliferative phase, follicle progenitors experience Lsd1-dependent changes in epigenetic stability that can be monitored using GAL4::UAS variegation. Eventually, follicle progenitors acquire competence to respond to Delta, a Notch ligand present in the environment, which signals them to cease division and initiate differentiation. The time required to acquire competence determines the duration of mitotic cycling and hence the final number of follicle cells. We carried out a screen for dominant modifiers of variegation spanning nearly 70% of Drosophila euchromatin to identify new genes influencing follicle progenitor epigenetic maturation. The eight genes found include chromatin modifiers, but also cell cycle regulators and transcription factors. Five of the modifier genes accelerate the acquisition of progenitor competence and reduce follicle cell number, however, the other three genes affect follicle cell number in an unexpected manner. PMID:27866148

  12. Identification of Genes Mediating Drosophila Follicle Cell Progenitor Differentiation by Screening for Modifiers of GAL4::UAS Variegation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Chia; Skora, Andrew D; Spradling, Allan C

    2017-01-05

    The Drosophila melanogaster ovarian follicle cell lineage provides a powerful system for investigating how epigenetic changes contribute to differentiation. Downstream from an epithelial stem cell, follicle progenitors undergo nine mitotic cell cycles before transitioning to the endocycle and initiating differentiation. During their proliferative phase, follicle progenitors experience Lsd1-dependent changes in epigenetic stability that can be monitored using GAL4::UAS variegation. Eventually, follicle progenitors acquire competence to respond to Delta, a Notch ligand present in the environment, which signals them to cease division and initiate differentiation. The time required to acquire competence determines the duration of mitotic cycling and hence the final number of follicle cells. We carried out a screen for dominant modifiers of variegation spanning nearly 70% of Drosophila euchromatin to identify new genes influencing follicle progenitor epigenetic maturation. The eight genes found include chromatin modifiers, but also cell cycle regulators and transcription factors. Five of the modifier genes accelerate the acquisition of progenitor competence and reduce follicle cell number, however, the other three genes affect follicle cell number in an unexpected manner.

  13. Purification and characterization of D-Gal-6-sulfurylase from Eucheuma striatum.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojuan; Ma, Chaoyang; Lou, Zaixiang; Wang, Aimei; Wang, Hongxin

    2013-07-01

    D-Gal-6-sulfurylase catalyzing the conversion of μ-carrageenan into κ-carrageenan was extracted from Eucheuma striatum and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of about 65 kDa as shown in SDS-PAGE. The maximum activity of the enzyme was observed at pH 7.0 and temperature 40°C. Km value for μ-carrageenan was 4.31 mM, and the corresponding Vmax was 0.17 mM min(-1). The carrageenan treated with 10 U of the purified enzyme exhibited 7.1-fold increase in gel strength with a removal of 30% sulfate groups. (1)H NMR spectral analysis of the control and enzyme treated carrageenan confirmed the conversion of μ- into κ-carrageenan and highlighted the specificity of Gal-6-sulfurylase for μ-carrageenan. This Gal-6-sulfurylase provides an eco-friendly and alternative for alkali treatment method to produce high gel strength κ-carrageenan.

  14. Digesta retention time in the Galápagos tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra).

    PubMed

    Sadeghayobi, Elham; Blake, Stephen; Wikelski, Martin; Gibbs, James; Mackie, Roderick; Cabrera, Fredy

    2011-12-01

    The retention time of food in the digestive tract of animals has important implications for digestive physiology. Retention time impacts digestive efficiency and among herbivores affects plant-animal interactions including herbivory and seed dispersal. Poorly studied yet iconic Galápagos tortoises are large-bodied generalist herbivores and ecosystem engineers which migrate seasonally. Potentially variable digesta retention times due to strong seasonal and altitudinal temperature gradients may influence tortoise seed dispersal abilities and rates of herbivory. We fed captive adult tortoises living in semi-natural conditions on Galápagos with inert particles and seeds from locally available fruits to determine whether seed size and ambient temperature influenced retention time. Median retention time varied from 6 to 28days, with a mode of 12days. Seed size had no effect on any of our measures of retention time, but ambient temperature was inversely correlated with retention times. Long retention time facilitates long distance seed dispersal by Galápagos tortoises, which may improve effectiveness. The effect of temperature, which may double from hot lowlands to cold highlands through the seasonal cycle, on tortoise digesta retention time will strongly influence seed dispersal efficiency and may influence patterns of food selection and migration in this species.

  15. External control of the GAL network in S. cerevisiae: a view from control theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruoting; Lenaghan, Scott C; Wikswo, John P; Zhang, Mingjun

    2011-04-29

    While there is a vast literature on the control systems that cells utilize to regulate their own state, there is little published work on the formal application of control theory to the external regulation of cellular functions. This paper chooses the GAL network in S. cerevisiae as a well understood benchmark example to demonstrate how control theory can be employed to regulate intracellular mRNA levels via extracellular galactose. Based on a mathematical model reduced from the GAL network, we have demonstrated that a galactose dose necessary to drive and maintain the desired GAL genes' mRNA levels can be calculated in an analytic form. And thus, a proportional feedback control can be designed to precisely regulate the level of mRNA. The benefits of the proposed feedback control are extensively investigated in terms of stability and parameter sensitivity. This paper demonstrates that feedback control can both significantly accelerate the process to precisely regulate mRNA levels and enhance the robustness of the overall cellular control system.

  16. West Nile Virus Vector Competency of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes in the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Gillian; Kramer, Laura D.; Goodman, Simon J.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The mosquito-transmitted pathogen West Nile virus (WNV) is not yet present in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. However, concern exists for fragile endemic island fauna after population decreases in several North American bird species and pathology in certain reptiles. We examined WNV vector competency of a Galápagos strain of mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus Say). Field specimens were tested for their capacity to transmit the WN02-1956 strain of WNV after incubation at 27°C or 30°C. Rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission all increased with days post-exposure to WNV, and the highest rates were observed at 28 days. Infection rates peaked at 59% and transmission rates peaked at 44% (of mosquitoes tested). Vector efficiency increased after day 14. Rates of infection but not of transmission were significantly influence by temperature. No vertical transmission was detectable. We demonstrate that Galápagos Cx. quinquefasciatus are competent WNV vectors, and therefore should be considered an animal and public health risk for the islands and controlled wherever possible. PMID:21896799

  17. Cryptic differentiation in the endemic micromoth Galagete darwini (Lepidoptera, Autostichidae) on Galápagos volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Patrick; Cibois, Alice; Landry, Bernard

    2008-10-27

    To gain insight into the early stages of speciation, we reconstructed a DNA-based phylogeny, using combined mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II: 1008 bp) and nuclear (elongation factor 1-alpha and wingless: 1062 bp) markers of populations of the moth Galagete darwini endemic to the Galápagos, which belongs to an insular radiation similar in size to that of Darwin's finches. Adults of G. darwini were collected in the arid lowlands of 11 of the Galápagos Islands (Baltra, Española, Fernandina, Floreana, Isabela, Pinta, Pinzón, San Cristobal, Santa Cruz, Santiago and Seymour) and the humid highlands of a subset of 5 of them (Fernandina, Floreana, Isabela, Santa Cruz and Santiago). The combined phylogeographic analysis surprisingly revealed that G. darwini populations at higher elevation on the western islands (Fernandina, Isabela and Santiago) represent a distinct lineage from the one in the low arid zones of these same islands. This is the first reported case in the archipelago of genetic cryptic differentiation correlated with elevation on the western Galápagos volcanoes.

  18. Colonization and diversification of Galápagos terrestrial fauna: a phylogenetic and biogeographical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Parent, Christine E; Caccone, Adalgisa; Petren, Kenneth

    2008-10-27

    Remote oceanic islands have long been recognized as natural models for the study of evolutionary processes involved in diversification. Their remoteness provides opportunities for isolation and divergence of populations, which make islands remarkable settings for the study of diversification. Groups of islands may share a relatively similar geological history and comparable climate, but their inhabitants experience subtly different environments and have distinct evolutionary histories, offering the potential for comparative studies. A range of organisms have colonized the Galápagos Islands, and various lineages have radiated throughout the archipelago to form unique assemblages. This review pays particular attention to molecular phylogenetic studies of Galápagos terrestrial fauna. We find that most of the Galápagos terrestrial fauna have diversified in parallel to the geological formation of the islands. Lineages have occasionally diversified within islands, and the clearest cases occur in taxa with very low vagility and on large islands with diverse habitats. Ecology and habitat specialization appear to be critical in speciation both within and between islands. Although the number of phylogenetic studies is continuously increasing, studies of natural history, ecology, evolution and behaviour are essential to completely reveal how diversification proceeded on these islands.

  19. Cryptic diversity in Black rats Rattus rattus of the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Willows-Munro, Sandi; Dowler, Robert C; Jarcho, Michael R; Phillips, Reese B; Snell, Howard L; Wilbert, Tammy R; Edwards, Cody W

    2016-05-05

    Human activity has facilitated the introduction of a number of alien mammal species to the Galápagos Archipelago. Understanding the phylogeographic history and population genetics of invasive species on the Archipelago is an important step in predicting future spread and designing effective management strategies. In this study, we describe the invasion pathway of Rattus rattus across the Galápagos using microsatellite data, coupled with historical knowledge. Microsatellite genotypes were generated for 581 R. rattus sampled from 15 islands in the archipelago. The genetic data suggest that there are at least three genetic lineages of R. rattus present on the Galápagos Islands. The spatial distributions of these lineages correspond to the main centers of human settlement in the archipelago. There was limited admixture among these three lineages, and these finding coupled with low rates of gene flow among island populations suggests that interisland movement of R. rattus is rare. The low migration among islands recorded for the species will have a positive impact on future eradication efforts.

  20. Site specific N-glycan profiling of NeuAc(α2-6)-Gal/GalNAc-binding bark Sambucus nigra agglutinin using LC-MS(n) revealed differential glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Gnanesh Kumar, B S; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2016-12-01

    The bark of Sambucus nigra contains a complex mixture of glycoproteins that are characterized as chimeric lectins known as type II ribosome inactivating proteins and holo lectins. These type II ribosome inactivating proteins possess RNA N-glycosidase activity in subunit A and lectin activity associated with subunit B exhibiting distinct sugar specificities to NeuAc(α2-6)-Gal/GalNAc and Gal/GalNAc. In the present study we have determined the N-glycosylation pattern of type II ribosome inactivating protein specific to NeuAc(α2-6)-Gal/GalNAc (Sambucus nigra agglutinin I) by subjecting it to digestion with multiple proteases. The resulting mixture of peptides and N-glycopeptides were analyzed on liquid chromatography coupled to electro spray ionization-iontrap mass spectrometry in MS(n) mode. MS(2) of precursor ions was carried out using CID which provided information on glycan sequence. In subsequent MS(3) of Y1/Y1α ions (peptide + HexNAc)(+n) of corresponding N-glycopeptides, resulted in the fragmentation of peptide backbone confirming the site of attachment. We observed microheterogeneity in each glycan occupied site with subunit A possessing four N-glycans out of six sites with complex and paucimannose types while subunit B comprises occupancy of two sites with a paucimannose and a high mannose type. The differential N-glycosylation of subunits in SNA is discussed in the context of other type II RIPs glycans.

  1. NeuAc alpha 2,3gal-glycoconjugate expression determines cell susceptibility to the porcine rubulavirus LPMV.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Leyva, J; Espinosa, B; Hernandez, J; Zenteno, R; Vallejo, V; Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Zenteno, E

    1997-10-01

    Relevance of membrane sialoglycoconjugates as receptors for infection by the porcine rubulavirus has been determined in vitro by sugar and lectin competition assays and by inhibition of glycosylation. Our results show that NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal but not NeuAc alpha 2,6Gal inhibits the virus infectivity of Vero cells, and the virus was effectively blocked with the lectin Maackia amurensis, specific for NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal. Inhibition of the cellular glycosylation with tunicamycin, deoxinojirimycin as well as neuraminidase treatment diminishes the viral capacity to bind and infect this cell line. Dexamethasone, which promotes the activity of sialyl alpha 2,6 glycosyltransferase, also diminishes the cell susceptibility for infection. This is the first report confirming that NeuAc alpha-2,3Gal recognition is determinant in the pathogenesis of the porcine rubulavirus.

  2. Gradiente radial de [Mg/Fe] em duas galáxias elípticas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A.; Capelato, H.

    2003-08-01

    Basicamente, são propostos dois cenários de evolução quí mio-dinâmico para os sistemas esferoidais: (i) o hierárquico através da fusão e/ou acresção de sub-sistemas com ou sem surtos de formação estelar, e (ii) o colapso monolí tico dissipativo com formação estelar interrompida por um vento galáctico. Ambos, dentro de certos limites, conseguem explicar os gradientes internos de metalicidade estelar presentes nas galáxias elí pticas bem como a relação observada entre a metalicidade central e a massa (Mg20 vs. log sv0). No entanto, nenhum prevê uma variação interna para a razão de abundâncias Mg/Fe que indiretamente define a escala temporal da formação estelar. Empregamos a espectroscopia óptica de fenda longa com a finalidade de recuperar as histórias de formação estelar, de enriquecimento quí mico e da dinâmica dentro de determinadas regiões das galáxias. Os espectros de média resolução (FWHM = 7,1 Å) e escala angular de 1,092 arcsec/pixel foram coletados com o telescópio 1,60m do OPD/LNA. Comparamos nossas medidas de linhas de absorção com resultados espectrofotométricos de modelos de populações estelares simples - mais especificamente os í ndices do Sistema Lick como Mg2, Mg b, < Fe > e Hb - a fim de se investigar as variações internas de [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe] e idade. Para duas galáxias elí pticas, NGC 1052 e NGC 7796, pertencentes a ambientes de baixa densidade, encontramos uma variação radial da razão Mg/Fe decrescente do centro para fora em regiões de 0,6 e 1 raio efetivo respectivamente. Discutimos alguns cenários de enriquecimento quí mico para estas duas galáxias.

  3. The Temporal Evolution of the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province (NGVP), located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered near the 90°50'W Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF) of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC), hosts a complex set of islands, seamount chains, and ridges. Magmatism in this region is thought to represent the interaction between the Galápagos hotspot, the overlying lithosphere, and the GSC. To better understand the evolution of the ridge-hotspot interaction, we present an integration of new with existing 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating age data from submarine lavas. The section of the NGVP on the Nazca Plate south and west of the GTF is dominated by three volcanic lineaments (the largest of which is the Wolf-Darwin Lineament or WDL), two east-west trending pseudofaults, and the islands of Pinta and Marchena. Eruption ages of lavas along the WDL range from recent (e.g., 0.1 Ma) to 2.3 × 0.4 (2 sigma) Ma with no discernible spatial pattern. Lavas recovered from the flanks of Pinta and Marchena vary from recent to 1.4 × 0.4 Ma. The more northern pseudofault is younger (3.4 × 0.3 Ma) than the ridge to the south (4.7 × 0.1 Ma); these observations are generally consistent with model ages for the crust near the volcanic lineaments. East of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, the dominant features are several linear ridges with up to 1km of relief and a few scattered seamounts. The age of recovered lavas range from 0.4 × 0.7 Ma to 3.4 × 0.5 Ma with no real spatial pattern, with the exception that the oldest seamount is located in the northeastern corner of the sampling area. These relatively young ages of compositionally enriched lavas indicate intraplate magmatism on the Cocos Plate provide insight into the distribution of plume material beneath the NGVP.

  4. Use of sialylated or sulfated derivatives and acrylamide copolymers of Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- and GalNAc alpha- to determine the specificities of blood group T- and Tn-specific lectins and the copolymers to measure anti-T and anti-Tn antibody levels in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Jain, R K; Chandrasekaran, E V; Matta, K L

    1995-02-01

    Sialylated or sulfated derivatives and acrylamide copolymers of blood group T-(Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-) and Tn-(GalNAc alpha) haptens were studied for their interaction with the lectins of peanut (PNA), Agaricus bisporus-(ABA), Helix pomatia-(HPA) and Vicia villosa B4-(VVA), using asialo Cowper's gland mucin (ACGM), which contains both T and Tn epitopes, as the coating substrate in enzyme linked lectin assay. Both T and Tn copolymers (-40 haptens) showed high affinity and strict specificity; although the T-copolymer at 0.05-0.07 microM concentration caused 50% inhibition of interaction of either PNA or ABA with ACGM, there was little inhibition of the HPA and VVA interactions even at over 100 times that concentration. The Tn-copolymer at 0.02-0.05 microM inhibited HPA or VVA interaction with ACGM by 50% but gave virtually no inhibition of PNA and ABA binding. Sialyl, sulfate or methyl group substitution on C-6 of GalNAc of the T-haptene did not prevent interaction with PNA but almost abolished interaction with ABA. In contrast, sialyl or sulfate group on C-6 and sulfate on C-3 of Gal in Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- inhibited almost completely the interaction of PNA with ACGM but had only a slight effect on the interaction of ABA; C-6 substitution with either sialic acid or sulfate on GalNAc alpha- almost abolished the interaction of both HPA and VVA with ACGM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Structural and functional characterization of the GalNAc/Gal-specific lectin from the phytopathogenic ascomycete Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary.

    PubMed

    Candy, Laure; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Erard, Monique; Rougé, Pierre

    2003-08-22

    The lectin found in mycelium and sclerotes of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a homodimer consisting of two identical non-covalently bound subunits of 16,000 Da. CD spectra analysis revealed that the S. sclerotiorum agglutinin (SSA) contains predominantly beta-sheet structures. SSA exhibits specificity towards GalNAc whereby the hydroxyls at positions 4 and 6 of the pyranose ring play a key role in the interaction with simple sugars. The carbohydrate-binding site of SSA can also accommodate disaccharides. The N-terminal sequence of SSA shares no significant similarity with any other protein except a lectin from the Sclerotiniaceae species Ciborinia camelliae. A comparison of SSA and the lectins from C. camelliae and some previously characterized lectins indicates that the Sclerotiniaceae lectins form a homogeneous family of fungal lectins. This newly identified lectin family, which is structurally unrelated to any other family of fungal lectins, is most probably confined to the Ascomycota.

  6. Entamoeba histolytica: Overexpression of the gal/galnac lectin, ehcp2 and ehcp5 genes in an in vivo model of amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Virginia; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2016-12-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal amebiasis and amebic liver abscess as its main extraintestinal manifestation. To study the in vivo events related to inflammation and the interactions between hosts and parasites during amebiasis, we designed a novel model of host-parasite interactions using cellulose membrane dialysis bags containing E. histolytica trophozoites. A bag is placed into the hamster peritoneal cavity, as has been reported in previous studies of programmed cell death (PCD) in E. histolytica trophozoites. To determine if virulence factors such as cysteine proteinases (EhCP2 and EhCP5) and Gal/GalNAc lectin could be involved in the host-parasite interaction using this model, we examined the relative expression of the ehcp2 and ehcp5 genes and the carbohydrate recognition domain (crd) of Gal/GalNAc lectin using real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). All analyzed genes were over-expressed 0.5h after the initiation of the host-parasite interaction and were then progressively down-regulated. However, Gal/GalNAc lectin had the greatest increase in gene expression 1.5h after host-parasite interaction; Gal/GalNAc lectin had a 250-fold increase with respect to the axenically grown trophozoites, which over-express Gal/GalNAc lectin in in vivo models. These results support the important role of these molecules in the initiation of cell damage by E. histolytica.

  7. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong-Xia; Wang, Honglan; Wang, Yuchun; Song, Juan; Tian, Hua; Xia, Chunhui; Shen, Yetong

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the carbohydrate structure on the surface of tumor cells is an important feature of cancer metastasis. The specific role of sialic acids in the glycoconjugate terminal has not yet been clearly elucidated in these processes. Previously, we reported that α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer are associated with metastatic potential. The α2,3-sialyltransferase ST3Gal III, which adds α2,3-sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in various tumors, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor metastasis, yet its mechanistic role has not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of ST3Gal III on key steps in the process of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III-overexpressing and ST3Gal III-silenced breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell lines were generated. They showed an increase or decrease in the tumor-associated antigen sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX). The E-selectin binding capacity of the transfectants was proportional to cell surface SLeX levels. Cell migration and invasion were positively correlated with ST3Gal III levels. Moreover, ST3Gal III expression modulated the protein expression of invasion-related molecules, including β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and cyclooxygenase-2, which may account for the mechanism involved in the effects of ST3Gal III on breast cancer invasiveness. In conclusion, our findings in these novel models of ST3Gal III expression revealed a critical requirement for ST3Gal III in several steps of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying metastasis and suggests a new target for the effective drug treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  8. Supercritical biodiesel production and power cogeneration: technical and economic feasibilities.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Anitescu, G; Rice, P A; Tavlarides, L L

    2010-03-01

    An integrated supercritical fluid technology with power cogeneration to produce biodiesel fuels, with no need for the costly separations involved with the conventional technology, is proposed, documented for technical and economic feasibility, and preliminarily designed. The core of the integrated system consists of the transesterification of various triglyceride sources (e.g., vegetable oils and animal fats) with supercritical methanol/ethanol. Part of the reaction products can be combusted by a diesel power generator integrated in the system which, in turn, provides the power needed to pressurize the system and the heat of the exhaust gases necessary in the transesterification step. The latter energy demand can also be satisfied by a fired heater, especially for higher plant capacities. Different versions of this system can be implemented based on the main target of the technology: biodiesel production or diesel engine applications, including power generation. The process options considered for biodiesel fuel production estimate break-even processing costs of biodiesel as low as $0.26/gal ($0.07/L) with a diesel power generator and $0.35/gal ($0.09/L) with a fired heater for a plant capacity of 15,000 gal/day (56,775 L/day). Both are significantly lower than the current processing costs of approximately $0.51/gal ($0.13/L) of biodiesel produced by conventional catalytic methods. A retail cost of biodiesel produced by the proposed method is likely to be competitive with the prices of diesel fuels.

  9. Populações estelares do bojo galáctico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, A. V.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.

    2003-08-01

    Os estudos mais recentes do bojo galáctico têm enfocado essencialmente as abundâncias químicas de elementos pesados, como o ferro, obtidos a partir das estrelas nas regiões centrais da galáxia. Elementos leves, como hélio, nitrogênio, oxigênio e argônio ainda são pouco estudados nestas regiões, devido à difícil determinação de suas abundâncias a partir de estrelas. Nestas condições as nebulosas planetárias desempenham um importante papel, pois permitem a determinação de abundâncias destes elementos usando técnicas de espectroscopia nebular. Neste trabalho, reportamos a análise das abundâncias químicas de uma nova amostra de nebulosas planetárias do bojo, bem como os resultados preliminares de um código numérico destinado a modelar a evolução química desta região. Usamos como vínculos observacionais os resultados obtidos das nebulosas planetárias, bem como de abundâncias estelares da região do bojo, obtidas da literatura. A partir deste modelo da evolução química e dos vínculos observacionais foi possível fazer um diagnóstico mais preciso das populações que constituem o bojo galáctico. O estudo destas populações que compõem a região central de nossa galáxia é de extrema importância para o maior entendimento da evolução química e dinâmica da galáxia como um todo. Por isto, verificamos a importância dos modelos de formação simples e mista utilizados para explicar características da população da região central da galáxia. Algumas destas características são: uma grande dispersão nos valores das abundâncias químicas e um grande espalhamento nas correlações entre as abundâcias de nitrogênio e oxigênio. Estas peculiaridades são dificilmente reproduzidas por modelos de formação simples, e portanto são importantes indícios da validade dos modelos de formação mista, tais como um rápido colapso do bojo seguido de uma evolução secular. (FAPESP, CNPq)

  10. Gradientes de abundâncias em galáxias espirais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, O. L.., Jr.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2003-08-01

    Gradientes de abundâncias obtidos através de observações de regiões H II têm um papel importante no estudo de formação e evolução de galáxias espirais. Determinações diretas de abundâncias somente são obtidas quando linhas de emissão sensíveis à temperatura eletrônica (e.g., [O III]l4363) são detectadas. Infelizmente estas linhas são fracas ou não observadas em regiões H II de baixa excitação. Nestes casos métodos empíricos são utilizados para estimar as abundâncias químicas. Entretanto, diferentes métodos têm produzido diferentes estimativas de gradientes de abundâncias. Neste trabalho, nós construímos modelos de fotoionização com o objetivo de descrever diagramas de diagnósticos construídos com dados publicados de algumas galáxias espirais normais e barradas. Comparações entre nossas estimativas de abundâncias e de outros métodos mostram que quando não há acordo entre eles, nossos modelos superestimam as abundâncias de O/H e N/H por um fator de 0.3 dex em relação a estimativas diretas de abundâncias, e por fator de 0.2 dex em relação a outros métodos empíricos. A origem da produção de nitrogênio nas galáxias estudadas é discutida.

  11. Mantle plume capture, anchoring, and outflow during Galápagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. J.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Compositions of basalts erupted between the main zone of Galápagos plume upwelling and adjacent Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) provide important constraints on dynamic processes involved in transfer of deep-mantle-sourced material to mid-ocean ridges. We examine recent basalts from central and northeast Galápagos including some that have less radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions than plume-influenced basalts (E-MORB) from the nearby ridge. We show that the location of E-MORB, greatest crustal thickness, and elevated topography on the GSC correlates with a confined zone of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle connecting the plume stem and ridge at depths of ˜100 km. At this site on the ridge, plume-driven upwelling involving deep melting of partially dehydrated, recycled ancient oceanic crust, plus plate-limited shallow melting of anhydrous peridotite, generate E-MORB and larger amounts of melt than elsewhere on the GSC. The first-order control on plume stem to ridge flow is rheological rather than gravitational, and strongly influenced by flow regimes initiated when the plume was on axis (>5 Ma). During subsequent northeast ridge migration material upwelling in the plume stem appears to have remained "anchored" to a contact point on the GSC. This deep, confined NE plume stem-to-ridge flow occurs via a network of melt channels, embedded within the normal spreading and advection of plume material beneath the Nazca plate, and coincides with locations of historic volcanism. Our observations require a more dynamically complex model than proposed by most studies, which rely on radial solid-state outflow of heterogeneous plume material to the ridge.

  12. Galápagos mockingbirds tolerate introduced parasites that affect Darwin's finches.

    PubMed

    Knutie, Sarah A; Owen, Jeb P; McNew, Sabrina M; Bartlow, Andrew W; Arriero, Elena; Herman, Jordan M; DiBlasi, Emily; Thompson, Michael; Koop, Jennifer A H; Clayton, Dale H

    2016-04-01

    Introduced parasites threaten native host species that lack effective defenses. Such parasites increase the risk of extinction, particularly in small host populations like those on islands. If some host species are tolerant to introduced parasites, this could amplify the risk of the parasite to vulnerable host species. Recently, the introduced parasitic nest fly Philornis downsi has been implicated in the decline of Darwin's finch populations in the Galápagos Islands. In some years, 100% of finch nests fail due to P. downsi; however, other common host species nesting near Darwin's finches, such as the endemic Galápagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus), appear to be less affected by P. downsi. We compared effects of P. downsi on mockingbirds and medium ground finches (Geospiza fortis) on Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos. We experimentally manipulated the abundance of P. downsi in nests of mockingbirds and finches to measure the direct effect of the parasite on the reproductive success of each species of host. We also compared immunological and behavioral responses by each species of host to the fly. Although nests of the two host species had similar parasite densities, flies decreased the fitness of finches but not mockingbirds. Neither host species had a significant antibody-mediated immune response to P. downsi. Moreover, finches showed no significant increase in begging, parental provisioning, or plasma glucose levels in response to the flies. In contrast, parasitized mockingbird nestlings begged more than nonparasitized mockingbird nestlings. Greater begging was correlated with increased parental provisioning behavior, which appeared to compensate for parasite damage. The results of our study suggest that finches are negatively affected by P. downsi because they do not have such behavioral mechanisms for energy compensation. In contrast, mockingbirds are capable of compensation, making them tolerant hosts, and a possible indirect threat to Darwin's finches.

  13. Parallel habitat specialization within the wolf spider genus Hogna from the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    De Busschere, C; Hendrickx, F; Van Belleghem, S M; Backeljau, T; Lens, L; Baert, L

    2010-09-01

    Within most island archipelagos, such as the Galápagos, similar ecological gradients are found on geographically isolated islands. Species radiations in response to these ecological gradients may follow different scenarios being (i) a single habitat specialization event followed by secondary colonization of each ecotype on the different islands or (ii) repeated and parallel habitat specialization on each island separately. This latter scenario has been considered less likely as gene flow might hamper such ecotypic differentiation. At least for the Galápagos, the extent to which this process is involved in species radiations remains yet poorly understood. Within the wolf spider genus Hogna, seven species are described that can be divided into three different ecotypes based on general morphology and habitat preference i.e. species that inhabit the pampa vegetation in the highlands, species that occur in coastal dry habitats and one generalist species. Comparison of the species phylogeny based on one mitochondrial (COI) and one nuclear (28S) gene fragment convincingly demonstrates that 'pampa' and 'coastal dry' species evolved in parallel on the islands Santa Cruz and San Cristóbal. Despite the observation that allozymes analysis indicated that each species forms a distinct genetic cluster, phylogenetic divergence within these species complexes was very low and paraphyletic and most likely due to hybridization rather than incomplete lineage sorting, as demonstrated for the Santa Cruz species complex. This suggests that within-island speciation occurred under low levels of gene flow. Species phylogeny in general did not follow the progression of island emergence as a molecular clock analysis suggested that island endemic species may have diverged after as well as before the emergence of the islands. This represents the first clear example of parallel and within-island speciation because of habitat specialization on the Galápagos and that such divergence most likely

  14. Expression of sialyl-Tn antigen in breast cancer cells transfected with the human CMP-Neu5Ac: GalNAc alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6GalNac I) cDNA.

    PubMed

    Julien, S; Krzewinski-Recchi, M A; Harduin-Lepers, A; Gouyer, V; Huet, G; Le Bourhis, X; Delannoy, P

    2001-01-01

    Sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) is a cancer associated carbohydrate antigen over-expressed in several cancers including breast cancer, and currently associated with more aggressive diseases and poor prognosis. However, the commonly used breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, T47-D and MCF7) do not express STn antigen. The key step in the biosynthesis of STn is the transfer of a sialic acid residue in alpha2,6-linkage to GalNAc alpha-O-Ser/Thr. This reaction is mainly catalyzed by a CMP-Neu5Ac GalNAc alpha2,6-sialyltransferase: ST6GalNAc I. In order to generate STn-positive breast cancer cells, we have cloned a cDNA encoding the full-length human ST6GalNAc I from HT-29-MTX cells. The stable transfection of MDA-MB-231 with an expression vector encoding ST6GalNAc I induces the expression of STn antigen at the cell surface. The expression of STn short cuts the initial O-glycosylation pattern of these cell lines, by competing with the Core-1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase, the first enzyme involved in the elongation of O-glycan chains. Moreover, we show that STn expression is associated with morphological changes, decreased growth and increased migration of MDA-MB-231 cells.

  15. Molecular Phylogeny and Functional Genomics of β-Galactoside α2,6-Sialyltransferases That Explain Ubiquitous Expression of st6gal1 Gene in Amniotes*

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Daniel; Mir, Anne-Marie; Petit, Jean-Michel; Thisse, Christine; Delannoy, Philippe; Oriol, Rafael; Thisse, Bernard; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Sialyltransferases are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of sialoglycoconjugates that catalyze the transfer of sialic residue from its activated form to an oligosaccharidic acceptor. β-Galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferases ST6Gal I and ST6Gal II are the two unique members of the ST6Gal family described in higher vertebrates. The availability of genome sequences enabled the identification of more distantly related invertebrates' st6gal gene sequences and allowed us to propose a scenario of their evolution. Using a phylogenomic approach, we present further evidence of an accelerated evolution of the st6gal1 genes both in their genomic regulatory sequences and in their coding sequence in reptiles, birds, and mammals known as amniotes, whereas st6gal2 genes conserve an ancestral profile of expression throughout vertebrate evolution. PMID:20855889

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hi-Gal sources distance determination (Russeil+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russeil, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Mottram, J. C.; Bontemps, S.; Anderson, L. D.; Zavagno, A.; Beltran, M. T.; Bally, J.; Brand, J.; Brunt, C.; Cesaroni, R.; Joncas, G.; Marshall, D.; Martin, P.; Massi, F.; Molinari, S.; Moore, T.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Olmi, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Wienen, M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2011-05-01

    We obtain velocities along the line of sight to Hi-GAL sources, where possible, using CO data observed with the SEQUOIA receiver on the FCRAO 14m telescope. In the l=30 ° region we use the 13CO J=1-0 data from the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey (GRS, Jackson et al., 2006ApJS..163..145J) while in the l=59° region we use 13CO and C18O J=1-0 observations obtained as part of the Exeter-FCRAO CO Galactic Plane Survey (Brunt et al., in prep.). (2 data files).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOs in Herschel-Hi-GAL survey (Veneziani+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, M.; Elia, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Carey, S.; Faimali, A.; Molinari, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Piacentini, F.; Schisano, E.

    2012-09-01

    File yso.dat contains the photometry and distances of the identified Young Stellar Objects (YSO) in two 2x2 tiles of the Herschel-Hi-GAL survey. The fields are centered in (l,b)=(30,0) and (l,b)=(59,0). The detection and photometry from 24 micron to 500 micron have been extracted with the CuTEX algorithm (Molinari et al., 2011A&A...530A.133M) while the kinematic distances have been estimated by Russeil et al. (2011, Cat. J/A+A/526/A151). (1 data file).

  18. Nebulosas planetárias galácticas: idades e cinemática

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, L. G.; Maciel, W. J.

    2003-08-01

    As nebulosas planetárias são formadas a partir de estrelas com massas entre 0.8 e 8 massas solares na sequência principal, formando um conjunto de objetos com idades e populações diferentes. Esse fato torna as nebulosas interessantes ao estudo da rotação galáctica, uma vez que as populações mais jovens devem estar claramente associadas ao disco fino da Galáxia, enquanto que as populações mais velhas estariam associadas ao disco espesso ou mesmo ao halo galáctico. Neste trabalho, utilizamos uma grande amostra de nebulosas com velocidades radiais conhecidas para determinar a curva de rotação da Galáxia. Para minimizar os erros decorrentes das incertezas nas distâncias, usamos quatro diferentes escalas estatísticas. Para a atribuição da idade dos objetos, utilizamos o método proposto recentemente por Maciel et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 397, 667, 2003), em um estudo da variação temporal dos gradientes de abundâncias. Com esse método, é possível obter uma classificação das nebulosas por grupos de idade, totalmente independente de outros sistemas de classificação, uma vez que as idades são estimadas individualmente, a partir das metalicidades das nebulosas. Nossos resultados são comparados com as previsões dos tipos de Peimbert, e mostram que os desvios médios das curvas obtidas são sensivelmente menores nos casos dos objetos mais jovens, associados ao disco fino, com relação aos objetos mais velhos do disco espesso, levando à determinação de uma curva de rotação semelhante à dos objetos de população I jovem. (CNPq)

  19. The segregation of starless and protostellar clumps in the Hi-GAL ℓ = 224° region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.; Cunningham, M.; Elia, D.; Jones, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (≳1 pc). The origin (e.g., turbulence or gravitational instabilities) and evolution of these filaments, as well as their relation to clump and core formation, are not yet fully understood. A large sample of both starless and protostellar clumps can now be found in the Herschel Infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) key project, which also provides striking images of the filamentary structure of the parent molecular clouds. Recent results indicate that populations of clumps on and off filaments may differ. Aims: One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the ℓ = 224° field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. We want to investigate this segregation effect and how it may affect the clumps properties. Methods: We mapped the 12CO (1-0) line and its main three isotopologues toward the two most prominent filaments observed toward the ℓ = 224° field using the Mopra radio telescope, in order to set observational constraints on the dynamics of these structures and the associated starless and protostellar clumps. Results: Compared to the starless clumps, the protostellar clumps are more luminous, more turbulent and lie in regions where the filamentary ambient gas shows larger linewidths. We see evidence of gas flowing along the main filament, but we do not find any signs of accretion flow from the filament onto the Hi-GAL clumps. We analyze the radial column density profile of the filaments and their gravitational stability. Conclusions: The more massive and highly fragmented main filament appears to be thermally supercritical and gravitationally bound

  20. A critical role for chromatin in mounting a synergistic transcriptional response to GAL4-VP16.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Gralla, J D

    1994-01-01

    The role of chromatin in mounting a synergistic transcriptional response to GAL4-VP16 was investigated. Strong synergy was observed when chromatin templates were used in vitro. The synergy was severely reduced when naked DNA templates were transcribed. In vivo synergy was strong when nonreplicating templates were used. However, the use of replicating templates, which involved transient disruptions of chromatin, led to strong reductions in synergy. In both of these low-synergy responses, transcription levels were high. We infer that strong synergy has a requirement for chromatin that may be understood in terms of the competition between multiple activator molecules and histone cores for promoter DNA. Images PMID:8035798

  1. Requirement of the galU Gene for Polysaccharide Production by and Pathogenicity and Growth In Planta of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri▿

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yinping; Sagaram, Uma Shankar; Kim, Jeong-soon; Wang, Nian

    2010-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of citrus canker, which has a significant impact on citrus production. In this study, we characterized the galU gene of X. citri subsp. citri. Two galU mutants (F6 and D12) were identified in an X. citri subsp. citri EZ-Tn5 Tnp transposon library. Rescue cloning, sequence analysis, and Southern blot analysis indicated that both of these mutants had a single copy of the EZ-Tn5 transposon inserted in galU in the chromosome. Further study showed that galU was required for biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS; xanthan gum) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and biofilm formation. Mutation of galU resulted in a loss of pathogenicity for grapefruit. The loss of pathogenicity of a galU mutant resulted from its inability to grow in planta rather than from the effect on virulence genes. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that mutation of galU did not impair the expression of key virulence genes, such as pthA of X. citri subsp. citri. Although D12 had a growth rate similar to that of the wild-type strain in nutrient broth, no D12 population became established in the intercellular spaces of citrus leaves. Coinoculation of a galU mutant with the wild-type strain did not promote growth of the galU mutant in planta. Defects in EPS and CPS production, pathogenicity, and growth in planta of the galU mutant were complemented to the wild-type level using plasmid pCGU2.1 containing an intact galU gene. These data indicate that the galU gene contributes to X. citri subsp. citri growth in intercellular spaces and is involved in EPS and CPS synthesis and biofilm formation. PMID:20118360

  2. Characterization of a double-CRD-mutated Gal-8 recombinant protein that retains co-stimulatory activity on antigen-specific T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matías Nicolás; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Carabelli, Julieta; André-Leroux, Gwenaëlle; Caramelo, Julio Javier; Cattaneo, Valentina; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Galectins (Gals) constitute a family of mammalian lectins with affinity for β-galactosides, characterized by the presence of conserved CRDs (carbohydrate-recognition domains). We have found previously that Gal-8, from the tandem-repeat group with two linked CRDs, exerts two separate actions on CD4(+)T-cells: antigen-independent proliferation and, at lower concentration, antigen-specific co-stimulation. Whereas proliferation can be ascribed to the pro-inflammatory role of Gal-8, the co-stimulatory activity of borderline T-cell-specific responses allows the proposal of Gal-8 as an adjuvant in vaccination. To study the relevance of glycan-lectin interaction to these T-cell activities, we generated a double-mutated protein (Gal-8mut) by replacing canonical arginine residues on each CRD, so as to abolish sugar-binding capacity. As expected, Gal-8mut was unable to bind to lactosyl-Sepharose, confirming that lactose recognition was precluded; however, preservation of lectin activity was still evident since Gal-8mut displayed haemoagglutinatory effects and binding capacity to the T-cell surface. To search for glycan affinity, a glycan microarray analysis was conducted which revealed that Gal-8mut lost most low- and intermediate-, but retained high-, affinity interactions, mainly to polylactosamines and blood group antigens. These findings were supported further by molecular modelling. Regarding biological activity, Gal-8mut was unable to induce T-cell proliferation, but efficiently co-stimulated antigen-specific responses, bothin vitroandin vivo.Therefore Gal-8mut represents a useful tool to dissect the specificities of lectin-glycan interactions underlying distinctive Gal-8 activities on T-cell biology. Moreover, given its distinguishing properties, Gal-8mut could be used to enhance borderline immune responses without the non-specific pro-inflammatory activity or other potential adverse effects.

  3. Subnuclear positioning and interchromosomal clustering of the GAL1-10 locus are controlled by separable, interdependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brickner, Donna Garvey; Sood, Varun; Tutucci, Evelina; Coukos, Robert; Viets, Kayla; Singer, Robert H.; Brickner, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    On activation, the GAL genes in yeast are targeted to the nuclear periphery through interaction with the nuclear pore complex. Here we identify two cis-acting “DNA zip codes” from the GAL1-10 promoter that are necessary and sufficient to induce repositioning to the nuclear periphery. One of these zip codes, GRS4, is also necessary and sufficient to promote clustering of GAL1-10 alleles. GRS4, and to a lesser extent GRS5, contribute to stronger expression of GAL1 and GAL10 by increasing the fraction of cells that respond to the inducer. The molecular mechanism controlling targeting to the NPC is distinct from the molecular mechanism controlling interchromosomal clustering. Targeting to the nuclear periphery and interaction with the nuclear pore complex are prerequisites for gene clustering. However, once formed, clustering can be maintained in the nucleoplasm, requires distinct nuclear pore proteins, and is regulated differently through the cell cycle. In addition, whereas targeting of genes to the NPC is independent of transcription, interchromosomal clustering requires transcription. These results argue that zip code–dependent gene positioning at the nuclear periphery and interchromosomal clustering represent interdependent phenomena with distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:27489341

  4. Expression of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (KlGAL4) in Kluyveromyces lactis is controlled by autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, W; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (KlGAL4) of Kluyveromyces lactis is moderately regulated by the carbon source as is the case for GAL4, its homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of the LAC9 gene is induced about twofold in galactose. This induction is due to autoregulation. The LAC9 gene product binds to a low-affinity binding site in the LAC9 promoter and moderately activates transcription in response to galactose above a basal level. As for the LAC9-controlled metabolic genes, induction of LAC9 is inhibited in the presence of glucose. This inhibition of induction is a prerequisite for glucose repression of the lactose-galactose metabolic pathway. On the other hand, induced LAC9 levels are required for optimal growth on galactose, since mutating the LAC9 binding site in the LAC9 promoter resulted in poor growth and reduced expression of LAC9-controlled genes. Thus, in addition to the GAL80-dependent regulation by protein-protein interaction, the regulation of LAC9 gene expression is an important parameter in determining carbon source control of the LAC-GAL regulon. Although the mode of control is different, the pattern of LAC9 gene regulation resembles that of the S. cerevisiae GAL4 gene, being lower in glucose and glucose-galactose than in galactose. Images PMID:8474461

  5. Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Tran, T A T; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Starkhammar, M; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2015-11-01

    Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against α-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3-6 h after consumption of red meat. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognizes other mammalian glycans than α-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that none of the 24 red meat allergic patients investigated had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid or against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1, and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an α-Gal-containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion, we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan found in red meat. Other common glycans reactive in allergic disease are not targets of red meat allergic patients' IgE.

  6. The galU gene of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is involved in bacterial attachment, cell motility, polysaccharide synthesis, virulence, and tolerance to various stresses.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chao-Tsai; Du, Shin-Chiao; Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2014-10-01

    Uridine triphosphate (UTP)-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GalU; EC 2.7.7.9) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose from UTP and glucose-1-phosphate. GalU is involved in virulence in a number of animal-pathogenic bacteria since its product, UDP-glucose, is indispensable for the biosynthesis of virulence factors such as lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide. However, its function in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the phytopathogen that causes black rot in cruciferous plants, is unclear. Here, we characterized a galU mutant of X. campestris pv. campestris and showed that the X. campestris pv. campestris galU mutant resulted in a reduction in virulence on the host cabbage. We also demonstrated that galU is involved in bacterial attachment, cell motility, and polysaccharide synthesis. Furthermore, the galU mutant showed increased sensitivity to various stress conditions including copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. In addition, mutation of galU impairs the expression of the flagellin gene fliC as well as the attachment-related genes xadA, fhaC, and yapH. In conclusion, our results indicate involvement of galU in the virulence factor production and pathogenicity in X. campestris pv. campestris, and a role for galU in stress tolerance of this crucifer pathogen.

  7. Exploring the GalMer database: bar properties and non-circular motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamampandry, T. H.; Deg, N.; Carignan, C.; Combes, F.; Spekkens, K.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We use Tree-SPH simulations from the GalMer database to characterize and quantify the non-circular motions induced by the presence of bar-like structures on the observed rotation curve of barred galaxies derived from empirical models of their line-of-sight velocity maps. The GalMer database consists of SPH simulations of galaxies spanning a wide range of morphological types and sizes. Aims: The aim is to compare the intrinsic velocities and bar properties from the simulations with those derived from pseudo-observations. This allows us to estimate the amount of non-circularity and to test the various methods used to derive the bar properties and rotation curves. Methods: The intrinsic velocities in the simulations are calculated from the gravitational forces whereas the observed rotation velocities are derived by applying the ROTCUR and DiskFit algorithms to well-resolved observations of intermediate-inclination, strongly barred galaxies. Results: Our results confirm that the tilted ring method implemented in ROTCUR systematically underestimates or overestimates the rotational velocities by up to 40 percent in the inner part of the galaxy when the bar is aligned with one of the symmetry axes for all the models. For the DiskFit analysis, we find that it produces unrealistic values for all the models used in this work when the bar is within approximately ten degrees of the major or minor axis.

  8. El nuevo panorama de la Dinámica Galáctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovaroff, Michael James

    En general, la tendencia imperante en Dinámica Galáctica ha sido considerar que los movimientos estelares son básicamente regulares y que el caos no tiene mayor relevancia en los sistemas estelares. Sin embargo, en el último lustro se vienen acumulando pruebas de la importancia del movimiento caótico en ciertos sistemas estelares que existen en la naturaleza. Por una parte, sobre todo el grupo de David Merritt, lo ha mostrado en los casos de galaxias elípticas con concentraciones centrales de materia; por otra parte, en nuestro propio grupo, lo hemos mostrado para el caso de los satélites galácticos. Las consecuencias de estos hallazgos son tanto de tipo técnico, por la necesidad de construir modelos que contengan órbitas caóticas, como astrofísico, por los efectos del caos sobre la estacionariedad y evolución de los sistemas estelares en los que se presenta.

  9. Island tameness: an altered cardiovascular stress response in Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Maren N; Romero, L Michael; Tarlow, Elisa; Cyr, Nicole E; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-03-30

    Island tameness is a widely documented phenomenon in which island species, particularly those that have evolved with no or few natural predators, show a greatly reduced behavioral response when faced with unfamiliar predators. This insufficient anti-predator response has led to widespread population declines among many island species exposed to novel predators, and has become a serious conservation problem. Despite its prevalence, the underlying physiology of island tameness is not known. Here we report that although Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) initiated flight from an evolutionarily recent and unfamiliar potential predator (humans), they failed to show the cardiovascular stress response that facilitates successful escape, even after a prior capture experience. In contrast, when approached by a native predator (the Galápagos hawk; Buteo galapagoensis), marine iguanas show markedly increased heart rate independent of initiating escape movement. The secretion of catecholamines appears to be central to the initiation of escape behavior: naïve animals remotely injected with epinephrine immediately increased flight initiation distance, whereas those injected with corticosterone did not. Our results provide the first evidence that muted escape behavior in predator-naïve species is indicative of both a cognitive deficit in recognizing potential predators and a catecholamine deficit in response. Understanding how the response to predators differs in predator-naïve species could enable the design of maximally effective techniques for inducing an anti-predator response in these vulnerable species.

  10. Genetic modification of alphaGal expression in xenogeneic endothelial cells yields a complex immunological response.

    PubMed

    Fischbeck, J A; Baier, J M; Akella, R; Hern-Anderson, D; Schmidt, C E

    2001-12-01

    The source of cells for tissue engineering applications remains a hurdle, predominantly for procedures in which there is insufficient time to harvest a patient's own cells. Animal cells are readily available, but undergo immune rejection. Rejection of animal (i.e., xenogeneic) tissue involves practically every component of the immune system. The initial phase, hyperacute rejection (HAR), involves natural xenoreactive antibodies and the complement system, and leads to endothelial cell lysis and rapid tissue destruction. The cell-surface epitope, galactose-alpha(1,3)-galactose (alphaGal), is presumed to play a key role in HAR. The later stage of immune response (delayed xenograft rejection or DXR), is mediated by immune cells such as monocytes. Carbohydrates are likely also involved in DXR, but their role in this phase of the immune response is less clear. A better understanding of all stages of xenogeneic immune rejection may make it feasible to create cell lines that are immune tolerant. In these studies, we have genetically modified bovine endothelial cells to study the roles of carbohydrates in immune rejection. Our studies suggest that one or more epitopes other than alphaGal may influence complement-mediated lysis. Furthermore, antibodies, as instigators in the complement response, and monocytes appear to recognize different cell surface epitopes.

  11. Hybridization masks speciation in the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amy; Rodríguez, Ariel; Vences, Miguel; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; García, Carolina; Trillmich, Fritz; Gentile, Gabriele; Caccone, Adalgisa; Quezada, Galo; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the direct interaction between hybridization and speciation—two major contrasting evolutionary processes—are poorly understood. We present here the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and reveal a case of incipient within-island speciation, which is paralleled by between-island hybridization. In-depth genome-wide analyses suggest that Amblyrhynchus diverged from its sister group, the Galápagos land iguanas, around 4.5 million years ago (Ma), but divergence among extant populations is exceedingly young (less than 50 000 years). Despite Amblyrhynchus appearing as a single long-branch species phylogenetically, we find strong population structure between islands, and one case of incipient speciation of sister lineages within the same island—ostensibly initiated by volcanic events. Hybridization between both lineages is exceedingly rare, yet frequent hybridization with migrants from nearby islands is evident. The contemporary snapshot provided by highly variable markers indicates that speciation events may have occurred throughout the evolutionary history of marine iguanas, though these events are not visible in the deeper phylogenetic trees. We hypothesize that the observed interplay of speciation and hybridization might be a mechanism by which local adaptations, generated by incipient speciation, can be absorbed into a common gene pool, thereby enhancing the evolutionary potential of the species as a whole. PMID:26041359

  12. Órbitas caóticas en satelites galácticos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, D. D.; Muzzio, J. C.; Vergne, M. M.; Wachlin, F. C.

    En trabajos anteriores investigamos las órbitas de estrellas que forman los satelites galácticos utilizando análisis de frecuencias. Su uso estaba plenamente justificado por su velocidad y la gran información que brinda, amén de haber dado resultados muy concordantes con los exponentes de Liapunov. Sin embargo, más recientemente, encontramos algunos problemas en la utilización del análisis de frecuencias en sistemas de referencia rotantes (como se utilizan para los satélites), por lo que en este trabajo rehicimos nuestras investigaciones previas utilizando exclusivamente exponentes de Liapunov. Algunas conclusiones anteriores se han confirmado, en tanto que otras deben modificarse. Además, los nuevos resultados muestran que las escalas de tiempo de los procesos caóticos en los satélites galácticos son comparables a, o más cortas que, las escalas de tiempo de otros procesos dinámicos característicos de estos objetos.

  13. Morphometrics parallel genetics in a newly discovered and endangered taxon of Galápagos tortoise.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Ylenia; Hyseni, Chaz; Fritts, Tom H; Glaberman, Scott; Marquez, Cruz; Gibbs, James P; Claude, Julien; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2009-07-17

    Galápagos tortoises represent the only surviving lineage of giant tortoises that exhibit two different types of shell morphology. The taxonomy of Galápagos tortoises was initially based mainly on diagnostic morphological characters of the shell, but has been clarified by molecular studies indicating that most islands harbor monophyletic lineages, with the exception of Isabela and Santa Cruz. On Santa Cruz there is strong genetic differentiation between the two tortoise populations (Cerro Fatal and La Reserva) exhibiting domed shell morphology. Here we integrate nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial data with statistical analyses of shell shape morphology to evaluate whether the genetic distinction and variability of the two domed tortoise populations is paralleled by differences in shell shape. Based on our results, morphometric analyses support the genetic distinction of the two populations and also reveal that the level of genetic variation is associated with morphological shell shape variation in both populations. The Cerro Fatal population possesses lower levels of morphological and genetic variation compared to the La Reserva population. Because the turtle shell is a complex heritable trait, our results suggest that, for the Cerro Fatal population, non-neutral loci have probably experienced a parallel decrease in variability as that observed for the genetic data.

  14. Phylogeographic history and gene flow among giant Galápagos tortoises on southern Isabela Island.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Wilson, Gregory A; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Marquez, Cruz; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Snell, Howard L; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2006-03-01

    Volcanic islands represent excellent models with which to study the effect of vicariance on colonization and dispersal, particularly when the evolution of genetic diversity mirrors the sequence of geological events that led to island formation. Phylogeographic inference, however, can be particularly challenging for recent dispersal events within islands, where the antagonistic effects of land bridge formation and vicariance can affect movements of organisms with limited dispersal ability. We investigated levels of genetic divergence and recovered signatures of dispersal events for 631 Galápagos giant tortoises across the volcanoes of Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul on the island of Isabela. These volcanoes are among the most recent formations in the Galápagos (<0.7 million years), and previous studies based on genetic and morphological data could not recover a consistent pattern of lineage sorting. We integrated nested clade analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences, to infer historical patterns of colonization, and a novel Bayesian multilocus genotyping method for recovering evidence of recent migration across volcanoes using eleven microsatellite loci. These genetic studies illuminate taxonomic distinctions as well as provide guidance to possible repatriation programs aimed at countering the rapid population declines of these spectacular animals.

  15. The Xbp1s/GalE axis links ER stress to postprandial hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yingfeng; Wang, Zhao V; Tao, Caroline; Gao, Ningguo; Holland, William L; Ferdous, Anwarul; Repa, Joyce J; Liang, Guosheng; Ye, Jin; Lehrman, Mark A; Hill, Joseph A; Horton, Jay D; Scherer, Philipp E

    2013-01-01

    Postprandially, the liver experiences an extensive metabolic reprogramming that is required for the switch from glucose production to glucose assimilation. Upon refeeding, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is rapidly, though only transiently, activated. Activation of the UPR results in a cessation of protein translation, increased chaperone expression, and increased ER-mediated protein degradation, but it is not clear how the UPR is involved in the postprandial switch to alternate fuel sources. Activation of the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) branch of the UPR signaling pathway triggers expression of the transcription factor Xbp1s. Using a mouse model with liver-specific inducible Xbp1s expression, we demonstrate that Xbp1s is sufficient to provoke a metabolic switch characteristic of the postprandial state, even in the absence of caloric influx. Mechanistically, we identified UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GalE) as a direct transcriptional target of Xbp1s and as the key mediator of this effect. Our results provide evidence that the Xbp1s/GalE pathway functions as a novel regulatory nexus connecting the UPR to the characteristic postprandial metabolic changes in hepatocytes.

  16. Hybridization masks speciation in the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Amy; Rodríguez, Ariel; Vences, Miguel; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; García, Carolina; Trillmich, Fritz; Gentile, Gabriele; Caccone, Adalgisa; Quezada, Galo; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2015-06-22

    The effects of the direct interaction between hybridization and speciation-two major contrasting evolutionary processes--are poorly understood. We present here the evolutionary history of the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and reveal a case of incipient within--island speciation, which is paralleled by between-island hybridization. In-depth genome-wide analyses suggest that Amblyrhynchus diverged from its sister group, the Galápagos land iguanas, around 4.5 million years ago (Ma), but divergence among extant populations is exceedingly young (less than 50,000 years). Despite Amblyrhynchus appearing as a single long-branch species phylogenetically, we find strong population structure between islands, and one case of incipient speciation of sister lineages within the same island--ostensibly initiated by volcanic events. Hybridization between both lineages is exceedingly rare, yet frequent hybridization with migrants from nearby islands is evident. The contemporary snapshot provided by highly variable markers indicates that speciation events may have occurred throughout the evolutionary history of marine iguanas, though these events are not visible in the deeper phylogenetic trees. We hypothesize that the observed interplay of speciation and hybridization might be a mechanism by which local adaptations, generated by incipient speciation, can be absorbed into a common gene pool, thereby enhancing the evolutionary potential of the species as a whole.

  17. Imaging rapidly deforming ocean island volcanoes in the western Galápagos archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Ruiz, Mario; Belachew, Manahloh

    2014-01-01

    Using local body wave arrival-time tomography methods to determine 3-D seismic velocity structure, we imaged the plumbing system of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galápagos. This hot spot volcanic chain includes some of the fastest deforming volcanoes in the world, making this an ideal location to study shield volcano plumbing systems. We inverted P and S wave arrivals recorded on a 15-station temporary array between July 2009 and June 2011 using an a priori 1-D velocity model constrained by offshore refraction studies. With local seismicity from nearby volcanoes as well as the ring fault system, the model resolution is good between depths of 3 and 15.5 km. The propagation of S waves throughout this volume argues against any large high-melt accumulations, although a shallow melt sill may exist above 5 km. We image a broad low-velocity region (>25 km laterally) below Sierra Negra at depths ~8-15 km. No large, regional velocity increase is found within the limits of good resolution, suggesting that crust is thicker than 15 km beneath the western Galápagos archipelago. Our results are consistent with crustal accretion of mafic cumulates from a large-volume magma chamber that may span the boundary between preplume and accreted crust. The similarity between our results and those of Hawaii leave open the possibility that the crust has also been thickened by under-plating.

  18. Study of the carapace shape and growth in two Galápagos tortoise lineages.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Ylenia; Claude, Julien

    2011-03-01

    Galápagos tortoises possess two main shell forms, domed and saddleback, that correlate with the biogeographic history of this species group. However, the lack of description of morphological shell variation within and among populations has prevented the understanding of the contribution of evolutionary forces and the potential role of ontogeny in shaping morphological shell differences. Here, we analyze two lineages of Galápagos tortoises inhabiting Santa Cruz Island by applying geometric morphometrics in combination with a photogrammetry 3D reconstruction method on a set of tortoises of different ages (from juvenile to adult). The aim of this study is to describe morphological features on the carapace that could be used for taxonomic recognition by taking into account confounding factors, such as the morphological changes occurring during growth. Our results indicate that despite the shared similarities of growth patterns and of morphological changes observed during growth, the two lineages and the different sexes can be distinguished on the basis of distinct carapace features. Lineages differ by the shape of the vertebral (especially concerning their width) and pleural scutes, with one lineage having a more compressed carapace shape, whereas the other possesses a carapace that is more elongated and expanded toward the sides as well as an higher positioning of the first vertebral scute. Furthermore, females have a more elongated and wider carapace shape than males. Finally, carapace shape changes with growth, with vertebral scutes becoming narrower and pleural scutes becoming larger during late ontogeny.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hi-GAL. inner Milky Way: +68>=l>=70 (Molinari+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Swinyard, B. M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bally, J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Zavagno, A.; di Giorgio A. M.; Liu, S. J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Russeil, D.; Piazzo, L.; Veneziani, M.; Benedettini, M.; Calzoletti, L.; Faustini, F.; Natoli, P.; Piacentini, F.; Merello, M.; Palmese, A.; Del Grande, R.; Polychroni, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Polenta, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Martin, P. G.; Testi, L.; Ali, B.; Andre, P.; Beltran, M. T.; Billot, N.; Carey, S.; Cesaroni, R.; Compiegne, M.; Eden, D.; Fukui, Y.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Hoare, M. G.; Huang, M.; Joncas, G.; Lim, T. L.; Lord, S. D.; Martinavarro-Armengol, S.; Motte, F.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Peretto, N.; Robitaille, T.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, N.; Schulz, B.; Sibthorpe, B.; Strafella, F.; Thompson, M. A.; Umana, G.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-08-01

    This is the first public data release of high-quality products from the Herschel Hi-GAL survey. The release comes two years after the end of the Herschel observing campaign and is the result of extensive testing of the data reduction and extraction procedures created by members of the Hi-GAL consortium. The complexity and the large variation of the background conditions in all Herschel wavelength bands makes source extraction on the Galactic plane a challenging task. With Hi-GAL DR1, we provide access (http://vialactea.iaps.inaf.it) through a cutout service to high-quality images and compact source catalogues for the Galactic plane at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500um in the region 68°>=l>=-70° and |b|<= 1°. (6 data files).

  20. Archipelago-wide island restoration in the Galápagos Islands: reducing costs of invasive mammal eradication programs and reinvasion risk.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Victor; Donlan, C Josh; Campbell, Karl J; Lavoie, Christian; Cruz, Felipe

    2011-05-11

    Invasive alien mammals are the major driver of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation on islands. Over the past three decades, invasive mammal eradication from islands has become one of society's most powerful tools for preventing extinction of insular endemics and restoring insular ecosystems. As practitioners tackle larger islands for restoration, three factors will heavily influence success and outcomes: the degree of local support, the ability to mitigate for non-target impacts, and the ability to eradicate non-native species more cost-effectively. Investments in removing invasive species, however, must be weighed against the risk of reintroduction. One way to reduce reintroduction risks is to eradicate the target invasive species from an entire archipelago, and thus eliminate readily available sources. We illustrate the costs and benefits of this approach with the efforts to remove invasive goats from the Galápagos Islands. Project Isabela, the world's largest island restoration effort to date, removed >140,000 goats from >500,000 ha for a cost of US$10.5 million. Leveraging the capacity built during Project Isabela, and given that goat reintroductions have been common over the past decade, we implemented an archipelago-wide goat eradication strategy. Feral goats remain on three islands in the archipelago, and removal efforts are underway. Efforts on the Galápagos Islands demonstrate that for some species, island size is no longer the limiting factor with respect to eradication. Rather, bureaucratic processes, financing, political will, and stakeholder approval appear to be the new challenges. Eradication efforts have delivered a suite of biodiversity benefits that are in the process of revealing themselves. The costs of rectifying intentional reintroductions are high in terms of financial and human resources. Reducing the archipelago-wide goat density to low levels is a technical approach to reducing reintroduction risk in the short-term, and is being

  1. A Galactic Molecular Cloud Clump Catalog from Hi-GAL Data: Method and Initial Results Comparison with BGPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2017-02-01

    As the precursors to stellar clusters, it is imperative that we understand the distribution and physical properties of dense molecular gas clouds and clumps. Such a study has been done with the ground-based Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Now the Herschel infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) allows us to do the same with higher-quality data and complete coverage of the Galactic plane. We have made a pilot study comparing dense molecular gas clumps identified in Hi-GAL and BGPS, using six 2° × 2° regions centered at Galactic longitudes of {\\ell }=11^\\circ , 30°, 41°, 50°, 202°, and 217°. We adopted the BGPS methodology for identifying clumps and estimating distances, leading to 6198 clumps being identified in our substudy, with 995 of those having well-constrained distances. These objects were evenly distributed with Galactic longitude, a consequence of Hi-GAL being source confusion limited. These clumps range in mass from 10‑2 to 105 M⊙ and have heliocentric distances of up to 16 kpc. When clumps found in both surveys are compared, we see that distances agree within 1 kpc and ratios of masses are of the order of unity. This serves as an external validation for BGPS and instills confidence as we move forward to cataloging the clumps from the entirety of Hi-GAL. In addition to the sources that were in common with BGPS, Hi-GAL found many additional sources, primarily due to the lack of atmospheric noise. We expect Hi-GAL to yield 2 × 105 clumps, with 20% having well-constrained distances, an order of magnitude above what was found in BGPS.

  2. Biogeography of Parasitic Nematode Communities in the Galápagos Giant Tortoise: Implications for Conservation Management

    PubMed Central

    Fournié, Guillaume; Goodman, Simon J.; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Vélez, Alberto; Patiño, Leandro; Millins, Caroline; Gibbons, Lynda M.; Fox, Mark T.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    The Galápagos giant tortoise is an icon of the unique, endemic biodiversity of Galápagos, but little is known of its parasitic fauna. We assessed the diversity of parasitic nematode communities and their spatial distributions within four wild tortoise populations comprising three species across three Galápagos islands, and consider their implication for Galápagos tortoise conservation programmes. Coprological examinations revealed nematode eggs to be common, with more than 80% of tortoises infected within each wild population. Faecal samples from tortoises within captive breeding centres on Santa Cruz, Isabela and San Cristobal islands also were examined. Five different nematode egg types were identified: oxyuroid, ascarid, trichurid and two types of strongyle. Sequencing of the 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene from adult nematodes passed with faeces identified novel sequences indicative of rhabditid and ascaridid species. In the wild, the composition of nematode communities varied according to tortoise species, which co-varied with island, but nematode diversity and abundance were reduced or altered in captive-reared animals. Evolutionary and ecological factors are likely responsible for the variation in nematode distributions in the wild. This possible species/island-parasite co-evolution has not been considered previously for Galápagos tortoises. We recommend that conservation efforts, such as the current Galápagos tortoise captive breeding/rearing and release programme, be managed with respect to parasite biogeography and host-parasite co-evolutionary processes in addition to the biogeography of the host. PMID:26332126

  3. Biogeography of Parasitic Nematode Communities in the Galápagos Giant Tortoise: Implications for Conservation Management.

    PubMed

    Fournié, Guillaume; Goodman, Simon J; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Vélez, Alberto; Patiño, Leandro; Millins, Caroline; Gibbons, Lynda M; Fox, Mark T; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The Galápagos giant tortoise is an icon of the unique, endemic biodiversity of Galápagos, but little is known of its parasitic fauna. We assessed the diversity of parasitic nematode communities and their spatial distributions within four wild tortoise populations comprising three species across three Galápagos islands, and consider their implication for Galápagos tortoise conservation programmes. Coprological examinations revealed nematode eggs to be common, with more than 80% of tortoises infected within each wild population. Faecal samples from tortoises within captive breeding centres on Santa Cruz, Isabela and San Cristobal islands also were examined. Five different nematode egg types were identified: oxyuroid, ascarid, trichurid and two types of strongyle. Sequencing of the 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene from adult nematodes passed with faeces identified novel sequences indicative of rhabditid and ascaridid species. In the wild, the composition of nematode communities varied according to tortoise species, which co-varied with island, but nematode diversity and abundance were reduced or altered in captive-reared animals. Evolutionary and ecological factors are likely responsible for the variation in nematode distributions in the wild. This possible species/island-parasite co-evolution has not been considered previously for Galápagos tortoises. We recommend that conservation efforts, such as the current Galápagos tortoise captive breeding/rearing and release programme, be managed with respect to parasite biogeography and host-parasite co-evolutionary processes in addition to the biogeography of the host.

  4. Using avian surveillance in Ecuador to assess the imminence of West Nile virus incursion to Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J; Hilgert, Nancy; Cruz, Marilyn; Kramer, Laura D; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Infectious disease emergence represents a global threat to human, agricultural animal and wildlife health. West Nile virus (WNV) first emerged in the Americas in 1999 following its introduction to New York from the Old World. This flavivirus rapidly spread across much of North America, causing human, equine and avian mortalities and population declines of multiple wild bird species. It has now spread to Central and South America, and there is concern that the virus will reach the Galápagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage Site famous for its unique biodiversity, with potentially catastrophic results. Here, we use wild bird surveillance to examine the current WNV status in the Galapagos Islands and around the Ecuadorian city of Guayaquil (the main air and sea port serving Galápagos). We conducted serosurveys of wild birds on three Galápagos Islands (Baltra, San Cristobal and Santa Cruz) with direct transport links to the South American continent. In addition, dead birds killed by car collisions on Santa Cruz were tested for WNV infection. On mainland Ecuador, serosurveys of wild birds were conducted at three sites around Guayaquil. No evidence of WNV seropositivity or infection was detected. Although wider testing is recommended on the mainland, the study highlights a limit of WNV spread within South America. Our results indicate the continued absence of WNV on Galápagos and suggest the current likelihood of human-mediated transport of WNV to Galápagos to be low. The risk of emergence will almost certainly increase over time, however, and stringent biosecurity and surveillance measures should be put in place to minimise the risk of the introduction of WNV (and other alien pathogens) to Galápagos.

  5. ST6Gal-I Regulates Macrophage Apoptosis via α2-6 Sialylation of the TNFR1 Death Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyu; Swindall, Amanda F.; Kesterson, Robert A.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages play a central role in innate immunity, however mechanisms regulating macrophage survival are not fully understood. Herein we describe a novel apoptotic pathway involving α2-6 sialylation of the TNFR1 death receptor by the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase. Variant glycosylation of TNFR1 has not previously been implicated in TNFR1 function, and little is known regarding the TNFR1 glycan composition. To study sialylation in macrophages, we treated U937 monocytic cells with PMA, which stimulates both macrophage differentiation and apoptosis. Interestingly, macrophage differentiation induces ST6Gal-I down-regulation, leading to reduced α2-6 sialylation of selected receptors. To prevent loss of α2-6 sialylation, we forced constitutive expression of ST6Gal-I, and found that this strongly inhibited PMA-induced apoptosis. Given that PMA-mediated apoptosis is thought to result from up-regulation of TNFα, which then activates TNFR1, we next evaluated the α2-6 sialylation of TNFR1. U937 cells with forced ST6Gal-I displayed TNFR1 with elevated α2-6 sialylation, and this was associated with diminished TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. Correspondingly, removal of α2-6 sialylation from TNFR1 through either neuraminidase treatment or expression of ST6Gal-I shRNA markedly enhanced TNFα-mediated apoptosis. To confirm the physiologic importance of TNFR1 sialylation, we generated overexpressing ST6Gal-I transgenic mice. Peritoneal macrophages from transgenic lines displayed TNFR1 with elevated α2-6 sialylation, and these cells were significantly protected against TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. Moreover, greater numbers of thioglycollate-induced peritoneal cells were observed in transgenic mice. These collective results highlight a new mechanism of TNFR1 regulation, and further intimate that loss of α2-6 sialylation during macrophage differentiation may limit macrophage lifespan by sensitizing cells to TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. PMID:21930713

  6. Expression of each cistron in the gal operon can be regulated by transcription termination and generation of a galk-specific mRNA, mK2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Ji, Sang Chun; Yun, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Heung Jin; Kim, Si Wouk; Lim, Heon M

    2014-07-01

    The gal operon of Escherichia coli has 4 cistrons, galE, galT, galK, and galM. In our previous report (H. J. Lee, H. J. Jeon, S. C. Ji, S. H. Yun, H. M. Lim, J. Mol. Biol. 378: 318-327, 2008), we identified 6 different mRNA species, mE1, mE2, mT1, mK1, mK2, and mM1, in the gal operon and mapped these mRNAs. The mRNA map suggests a gradient of gene expression known as natural polarity. In this study, we investigated how the mRNAs are generated to understand the cause of natural polarity. Results indicated that mE1, mT1, mK1, and mM1, whose 3' ends are located at the end of each cistron, are generated by transcription termination. Since each transcription termination is operating with a certain frequency and those 4 mRNAs have 5' ends at the transcription initiation site(s), these transcription terminations are the basic cause of natural polarity. Transcription terminations at galE-galT and galT-galK junctions, making mE1 and mT1, are Rho dependent. However, the terminations to make mK1 and mM1 are partially Rho dependent. The 5' ends of mK2 are generated by an endonucleolytic cleavage of a pre-mK2 by RNase P, and the 3' ends are generated by Rho termination 260 nucleotides before the end of the operon. The 5' portion of pre-mK2 is likely to become mE2. These results also suggested that galK expression could be regulated through mK2 production independent from natural polarity.

  7. ST6Gal-I protein expression is upregulated in human epithelial tumors and correlates with stem cell markers in normal tissues and colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Swindall, Amanda F; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I; Schultz, Matthew J; Fineberg, Naomi; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Bellis, Susan L

    2013-04-01

    The ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase adds an α2-6-linked sialic acid to the N-glycans of certain receptors. ST6Gal-I mRNA has been reported to be upregulated in human cancer, but a prior lack of antibodies has limited immunochemical analysis of the ST6Gal-I protein. Here, we show upregulated ST6Gal-I protein in several epithelial cancers, including many colon carcinomas. In normal colon, ST6Gal-I localized selectively to the base of crypts, where stem/progenitor cells are found, and the tissue staining patterns were similar to the established stem cell marker ALDH1. Similarly, ST6Gal-I expression was restricted to basal epidermal layers in skin, another stem/progenitor cell compartment. ST6Gal-I was highly expressed in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, with no detectable expression in the fibroblasts from which iPS cells were derived. On the basis of these observations, we investigated further an association of ST6Gal-I with cancer stem cells (CSC). Selection of irinotecan resistance in colon carcinoma cells led to a greater proportion of CSCs compared with parental cells, as measured by the CSC markers CD133 and ALDH1 activity (Aldefluor). These chemoresistant cells exhibited a corresponding upregulation of ST6Gal-I expression. Conversely, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated attenuation of ST6Gal-I in colon carcinoma cells with elevated endogenous expression decreased the number of CD133/ALDH1-positive cells present in the cell population. Collectively, our results suggest that ST6Gal-I promotes tumorigenesis and may serve as a regulator of the stem cell phenotype in both normal and cancer cell populations.

  8. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  9. Notes on Galápagos grenadiers (Pisces, Gadiformes, Macrouridae), with the description of a new species of Coryphaenoides.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, T; McCosker, J E

    2001-07-01

    Two unusual specimens of the grenadier genus Coryphaenoides were collected by the deep-submersible vehicle Johnson Sea-Link off the Galápagos. Unlike any other member of the genus, the snout in these specimens was rounded, non-protruding, naked anteriorly and ventrally, with no tubercular scales marking the terminal and lateral angles. They are herein described as Coryphaenoides gypsochilus. Additional specimens of grenadiers were procured by the Johnson Sea-Link, including the second and third specimens of Nezumia ventralis and the first record of Caelorinchus canus from these waters. Three species and one subspecies of Galápagos grenadiers are endemic.

  10. Do Periodic Plate Reorganisations Control Late-stage Volcanism across a Broad Galápagos Hotspot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Hoernle, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Werner, R.; Hauff, S. F.; Stoffers, P.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the Galápagos Volcanic Province (GVP), consisting of the Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and related seamount provinces, remains poorly understood due to a lack of direct age and geochemical data. In recent years reconnaissance dredge/grab sampling of these submerged regions of the GVP provides some new insights that can be re-evaluated in the context of the three new cruises to the region in 2010. The distribution of 40Ar/39Ar basement ages [1-3] suggest that volcanism migrated time-progressively across GVP in broad regions of long-lived, possible concurrent, hotspot volcanism. Development of the GVP via such broad zones of overlapping volcanism leads to multiple phases of volcanism post-dating the onset of hotspot volcanism, similar to rejuvenescent volcanism that occurs million years after the main shield-building phase of mid-plate oceanic volcano, most notably along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain. Evidence for rejuvenescent volcanism across the GVP provides an opportunity to evaluate this poorly understood process in a very different physical setting compared to the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain (mid-plate versus on/near spreading axis). Widespread episodes of coeval GVP volcanism show that the Galápagos hotspot influences broad regions of the lithosphere implying relative motion between the Cocos and Nazca plates and a broad Galápagos hotspot. The complex spreading history of the Cocos-Nazca spreading centre likely controlled the relative distribution of GVP volcanism between the Cocos and Nazca plates while creating lithosphere of variable age/thickness across the region [3]. But recent age and geochemical studies of other hotspot systems show that lithosphere influenced in the past by hotspot activity is more likely to generate late-stage volcanism in response to changing patterns of stress in the lithosphere. Late stage volcanism across a broad Galápagos hotspot might therefore reflect periodic reorganisations of the Gal

  11. Development of 10 highly-polymorphic microsatellite markers in the vulnerable Galápagos land iguanas (genus Conolophus).

    PubMed

    Rosa, Sabrina F P; Monteyne, Daniel; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2009-01-01

    The two species of Galápagos land iguanas (Conolophus subcristatus and C. pallidus) are listed as 'vulnerable' species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN Red List; http://www.iucnredlist.org). Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of 10 microsatellite markers using 562 individuals sampled on all Galápagos islands where Conolophus species occur today. We show that these 10 loci are highly polymorphic and display diagnostic alleles for five out of the six island populations. These markers will be useful for Conolophus population genetic analyses as well as for guiding ongoing captive breeding programmes.

  12. Structural analysis of oligosaccharide-alditols released by reductive beta-elimination from oviducal mucins of Bufo bufo: characterization of the carbohydrate sequence Gal(alpha1-3)GalNAc(alpha1-3)[Fuc(alpha1-2)]Gal.

    PubMed

    Morelle, W; Strecker, G

    1997-09-01

    Several tri- to hexasaccharide-alditols of the jelly coat surrounding the eggs of Bufo bufo were studied by methylation analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. As observed for six other amphibian species, these carbohydrate chains are highly species-specific. The main characteristics of the species Bufo bufo consists in the presence of the new carbohydrate sequence Gal(alpha1-3)GalNAc(alpha1-3)[Fuc(alpha1-2)]Gal, in which a blood group A determinant is substituted with an external alpha1-3 linked galactose unit. Since the role of carbohydrates appears more and more apparent during the fertilization processes, the species-specificity of these carbohydrate moieties should be relevant to the species-specific gamete recognition which characterizes most amphibians.

  13. New Age Constraints on the Eruptive History of the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province, located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered west of the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF), and the region east of the GTF are represented by a complex set of islands, seamount chains and ridges. To improve our understanding of the dynamics of ridge-hotspot interaction in this unique region, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the lavas collected during the 2010 FLAMINGO (MV1007) cruise of the R/V Melville. Lava samples were recovered by dredge on both the Nazca Plate and Cocos Plate. The bathymetry shows that the region on the Nazca Plate west of the GTF is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in three volcanic lineaments. A previously uncharted seamount southeast of Isla Marchena, with a strikingly flat, shallow surface and terraced flanks, shows eruption ages ranging from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 1.1 ± 0.5 Ma. Using standard subsidence rates, such ages place the seamount above sea level at 2 Ma, which is supported by apparent erosional features on some of the dredged lavas. The best age for a rhyolite and associated basalt from an east-west trending ridge on the Nazca plate is 4.71 ± 0.06 Ma. This age agrees well with a recent magnetic reconstruction that suggests that this ridge is a pseudofault, marking the propagation of a new ridge segment subsequent to a southward ridge jump. East of the GTF, on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism; instead, there are several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features with up to 1km of relief. Ages along a transect striking approximately perpendicular to the ridge axis are older than expected near the current axis (3.4 ± 0.6 Ma) and younger than expected further to the north (1.4 ± 0.3 Ma). These anomalous ages closely match those predicted by both sediment thicknesses and a magnetic reconstruction, which predicts a fossil ridge axis in this area. To the northeast of the GTF, the age of lavas dredged from ridges and a small

  14. População estelar jovem em galáxias irregulares próximas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, T. A.; Telles, E.

    2003-08-01

    A análise do conteúdo estelar de galáxias próximas através da fotometria das suas estrelas resolvidas nos fornece informações importantes sobre a história de formação estelar e os processos de formação estelar em galáxias, que estão diretamente ligados ao estudo de evolução de galáxias. Quando nenhuma estrela puder ser resolvida o método mais poderoso consiste na análise do conteúdo estelar integrado das galáxias através das suas cores integradas em conjunto com informação espectroscópica que combinados com modelos de síntese evolutiva podem restringir simultaneamente a função de massa inicial (IMF) e a taxa de formação estelar (SFR). Nesse contexto, galáxias do tipo tardio, em particular, irregulares, são relevantes por várias razões: elas são objetos relativamente simples, com alta atividade de formação estelar e são objetos relativamente jovens (geralmente apresentam baixas abundâncias de elementos pesados e grande quantidade de gás). Apresentamos uma análise fotométrica de uma amostra de 7 galáxias do tipo tardio do universo local (NGC 2366, NGC 4395, NGC 4656, NGC 4214, NGC 4236, HOII, IC2574) que foram observadas com uma boa resolução espacial nas bandas B, V e R no telescópio Isaac Newton de 2.5m de Roque de los Muchachos nas Ilhas Canárias, Espanha. A distribuição espacial da população estelar jovem dessas galáxias é discutida sobre os pontos de vista dos íindices de cor integrados e dos seus diagramas cor magnitude, que comparados com isócronas teóricas, nos fornecem informações sobre os eventos de formação estelar, como por exemplo, indicações sobre a idade dos mesmos. As principais conclusões do trabalho podem ser resumidas em: (i) As galáxias irregulares possuem formação estelar recente (FE) espalhada ocorrendo nos últimos 50 Manos; (ii) A formação estelar em galáxias irregulares não é auto-propagante em escalas globais ( > 100 pc) ; (iii) A FE pode ser auto-regulável em escalas

  15. Proteomic Identification of S-Nitrosylated Proteins in the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica by Resin-Assisted Capture: Insights into the Regulation of the Gal/GalNAc Lectin by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Rivka; Ben Lulu, Shani; Shahi, Preeti; Trebicz-Geffen, Meirav; Benhar, Moran; Ankri, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a gastrointestinal protozoan parasite that causes amebiasis, a disease which has a worldwide distribution with substantial morbidity and mortality. Nitrosative stress, which is generated by innate immune cells, is one of the various environmental challenges that E. histolytica encounters during its life cycle. Although the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the regulation of gene expression in this parasite have been previously investigated, our knowledge on S-nitrosylated proteins in E.histolytica is lacking. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we performed a large-scale detection of S-nitrosylated (SNO) proteins in E.histolytica trophozoites that were treated with the NO donor, S-nitrosocysteine by resin-assisted capture (RAC). We found that proteins involved in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, translation, protein transport, and adherence to target cells such as the heavy subunit of Gal/GalNac lectin are among the S-nitrosylated proteins that were enriched by SNO-RAC. We also found that the S-nitrosylated cysteine residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of Gal/GalNAc lectin impairs its function and contributes to the inhibition of E.histolytica adherence to host cells. Collectively, these results advance our understanding of the mechanism of reduced E.histolytica adherence to mammalian cells by NO and emphasize the importance of NO as a regulator of key physiological functions in E.histolytica. PMID:24626316

  16. Infrared emission of young HII regions: a Herschel/Hi-GAL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Pestalozzi, M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Hoare, M. G.; Molinari, S.; Olmi, L.; Smith, M. D.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Testi, L.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Investigating the relationship between radio and infrared emission of Hii regions may help shed light on the nature of the ionizing stars and the formation mechanism of early-type stars in general. Aims: We have taken advantage of recent unbiased surveys of the Galactic plane such as Herschel/Hi-GAL and VLA/CORNISH to study a bona fide sample of young Hii regions located in the Galactic longitude range 10°-65° by comparing the mid- and far-IR continuum emission to the radio free-free emission at 5 GHz. Methods: We have identified the Hi-GAL counterparts of 230 CORNISH Hii regions and reconstructed the spectral energy distributions of 204 of these by complementing the Hi-GAL fluxes with ancillary data at longer and shorter wavelengths. Using literature data, we obtained a kinematical distance estimate for 200 Hii regions with Hi-GAL counterparts and determined their luminosities by integrating the emission of the corresponding spectral energy distributions. We have also estimated the mass of the associated molecular clumps from the (sub)millimeter flux densities. Results: Our main finding is that for ~1/3 of the Hii regions the Lyman continuum luminosity appears to be greater than the value expected for a zero-age main-sequence star with the same bolometric luminosity. This result indicates that a considerable fraction of young, embedded early-type stars presents a "Lyman excess" possibly due to UV photons emitted from shocked material infalling onto the star itself and/or a circumstellar disk. Finally, by comparing the bolometric and Lyman continuum luminosities with the mass of the associated clump, we derive a star formation efficiency of 5%. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that accretion may still be present during the early stages of the evolution of Hii regions, with important effects on the production of ionizing photons and thus on the circumstellar environment. More reliable numerical models describing the accretion process onto massive

  17. Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Galápagos Archipelago From Body Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft Toomey, E. E.; Hooft Toomey, E. E.; Solomon, S. C.; James, D. E.; Hall, M. L.

    2001-12-01

    We report on the initial results from an ongoing broadband seismic experiment conducted in the Galápagos Islands. The Galápagos offer an advantageous site for a reconnaissance seismic study of an oceanic hotspot, because the islands cover nearly the entire bathymetric swell or surface signature of the presumed underlying plume. In September 1999 we deployed 10 three-component broadband seismometers, which augment an existing GSN site and a telemetered array of high-frequency seismometers. The combined seismic networks record data suitable for imaging upper mantle structure, constraining crustal thickness variations, and characterizing local seismic activity associated with tectonic and volcanic processes. The resulting elliptically shaped array is 300 km by 200 km in aperture (east-west/north-south, respectively); stations are spaced 50-70 km apart. A primary goal of the experiment is to define the first-order characteristics of the upper mantle structure beneath the Galápagos hotspot in order to ascertain if the hotspot is associated with a plume-like feature in the upper mantle. To do so, we are inverting the delay times of teleseismic P and S body waves. The Galápagos hotspot is well situated with respect to regional and teleseismic earthquake sources, and the region displays remarkably low seismic noise, as it is located in the doldrums with calm winds (<5 m/s) over 60% of the time (90% of the time from February through April). Examination of our data and plots of magnitude versus epicentral distance indicates that teleseismic earthquakes with mb>5.5 and regional earthquakes with mb>4.2 provide useful data. P waves often show excellent signal-to-noise ratios in the frequency band 0.3 to 2 Hz. These phases can be picked, using waveform alignment, to an accuracy of 20 ms. The spectral content of the larger events is broad, with teleseismic earthquakes generating signals at frequencies up to 5 Hz, as well as at lower frequencies (< 0.1 Hz). The S wave data are

  18. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  19. Bartonella quintana in head lice from Sénégal.

    PubMed

    Boutellis, Amina; Veracx, Aurélie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Diatta, Georges; Mediannikov, Oleg; Trape, Jean-François; Raoult, Didier

    2012-07-01

    Head and body lice are strict, obligate human ectoparasites with three mitochondrial clades (A, B, and C). Body lice have been implicated as vectors of human diseases, and as the principal vectors of epidemic typhus, relapsing fever, and Bartonella quintata-associated diseases (trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, chronic bacteremia, and chronic lymphadenopathy). Using molecular methods (real-time and traditional PCR), we assessed the presence of Bartonella quintana DNA in black head lice collected from three locations in Sénégal. DNA from B. quintana was identified in 19 lice (6.93%) collected from 7 patients (7%) in Dakar. B. quintana-positive lice collected from three subjects were identified as clades C and A.

  20. Ecological correlates of microfilariae prevalence in endangered Galápagos birds.

    PubMed

    Siers, Shane; Merkel, Jane; Bataille, Arnaud; Vargas, F H; Parker, P G

    2010-04-01

    This study assesses the ecological factors associated with microfilariae prevalence in wild populations of endangered flightless cormorants (Phalacrocorax harrisi) and Galápagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus). Prevalence values were tested for correlation with a large number of environmental variables, as modeled from weather station data and measured by satellite-borne sensors. Predictions were made based on the expected effects of climatic and landscape variables on sustained populations of arthropod vectors required for transmission of microfilariae. In general, findings were consistent with predictions in both cormorants and penguins; prevalence correlated positively with temperature, precipitation, and vegetation density, and negatively with measures of environmental variability. Resulting correlates were used to derive predictive distributions of prevalence values in cormorants throughout the archipelago. Evidence is presented implicating the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus as a likely vector. Knowledge of environmental variables that predict risk of disease transmission by arthropod vectors may be useful in control measures should novel pathogens be introduced to the ecosystem.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hi-GAL cluster candidates physical properties (Beuret+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambresy, L.; Eden, D. J.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.

    2016-11-01

    Physical properties for 1633 Hi-GAL cluster candidates in the inner part of the Galactic Plane are presented. The 1633 cluster candidates are splitted into two tables : 496 reliable cluster candidates and 1137 potential cluster candidates. For each of the 1633 cluster candidates central positions, angular minor and major axis, position angles of the ellipses, the total number of clumps and the ratio of number of pre-stellar clumps over proto-stellar clumps are given. Besides these properties, for each reliable cluster candidates heliocentric distances, galactocentric distances, scale heights, linear minor and major axis, surface densities and closest HII regions are given. For each potential cluster candidates angular surface density and a flag that determines their classifications as potential cluster candidates are given. (2 data files).

  2. Bird-flower visitation networks in the Galápagos unveil a widespread interaction release.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Jaramillo, Patricia; Antolín, Elena; Trigo, María Mar; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-03-10

    Owing to food scarcity and to the high densities that vertebrates often reach on islands, typical insect- and seed-eaters widen their feeding niche and interact with a greater fraction of species than their mainland counterparts. This phenomenon, coined here 'interaction release', has been previously reported for single species but never for an entire community. During 4 years, we gathered data on bird-flower visitation on 12 Galápagos islands. We show that all sampled land birds exploit floral resources and act as potential pollinators across the entire archipelago, in all major habitats and all year round. Although species and link composition varies among islands, strong interaction release takes place on all islands, making their bird-flower network highly generalized. Interaction release is crucial to the survival of native birds but simultaneously threatens the unique biodiversity of this archipelago, as the birds also visit invading plants, likely facilitating their integration into pristine native communities.

  3. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Method Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. Results We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Conclusion Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  4. Source clustering in the Hi-GAL survey determined using a minimum spanning tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Eden, D. J.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aims are to investigate the clustering of the far-infrared sources from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) in the Galactic longitude range of -71 to 67 deg. These clumps, and their spatial distribution, are an imprint of the original conditions within a molecular cloud. This will produce a catalogue of over-densities. Methods: The minimum spanning tree (MST) method was used to identify the over-densities in two dimensions. The catalogue was further refined by folding in heliocentric distances, resulting in more reliable over-densities, which are cluster candidates. Results: We found 1633 over-densities with more than ten members. Of these, 496 are defined as cluster candidates because of the reliability of the distances, with a further 1137 potential cluster candidates. The spatial distributions of the cluster candidates are different in the first and fourth quadrants, with all clusters following the spiral structure of the Milky Way. The cluster candidates are fractal. The clump mass functions of the clustered and isolated are statistically indistinguishable from each other and are consistent with Kroupa's initial mass function. Hi-GAL is a key-project of the Herschel Space Observatory survey (Pilbratt et al. 2010) and uses the PACS (Poglitsch et al. 2010) and SPIRE (Griffin et al. 2010) cameras in parallel mode.The catalogues of cluster candidates and potential clusters are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A114

  5. Lineage identification and genealogical relationships among captive Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael; Boyer, Donal; Wiese, Robert J; Kajdacsi, Brittney; Marquez, Lady; Garrick, Ryan; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2012-01-01

    Genetic tools have become a critical complement to traditional approaches for meeting short- and long-term goals of ex situ conservation programs. The San Diego Zoo (SDZ) harbors a collection of wild-born and captive-born Galápagos giant tortoises (n = 22) of uncertain species designation and unknown genealogical relationships. Here, we used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic data and nuclear microsatellite genotypic data to identify the evolutionary lineage of wild-born and captive-born tortoises of unknown ancestry, to infer levels of relatedness among founders and captive-born tortoises, and assess putative pedigree relationships assigned by the SDZ studbook. Assignment tests revealed that 12 wild-born and five captive-born tortoises represent five different species from Isabela Island and one species from Santa Cruz Island, only five of which were consistent with current studbook designations. Three wild-born and one captive-born tortoise were of mixed ancestry. In addition, kinship analyses revealed two significant first-order relationship pairs between wild-born and captive-born tortoises, four second-order relationships (half-sibling) between wild-born and captive tortoises (full-sibs or parent-offspring), and one second-order relationship between two captive-born tortoises. Of particular note, we also reconstructed a first-order relationship between two wild-born individuals, violating the founder assumption. Overall, our results contribute to a worldwide effort in identifying genetically important Galápagos tortoises currently in captivity while revealing closely related founders, reconstructing genealogical relationships, and providing detailed management recommendations for the SDZ tortoises.

  6. Evidence and models for lower crustal flow beneath the Galápagos platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana-Rovirosa, Felipe; Richards, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The volcanic Galápagos Islands are constructed upon a broad platform, with their active westernmost islands marking the current position of the hotspot. Built upon young oceanic lithosphere (<15 Ma), this platform exhibits unique morphologic features including a system of stepped terraces on the southwestern escarpment with 3 km relief, contrasting with gentle slopes off the eastern platform toward the Carnegie Ridge. Considering horizontal lithostatic pressure differences associated with this relief, along with high temperatures within the young, hotspot-affected lithosphere, it is likely that lower crustal flow contributes significantly to crustal deformation within the Galápagos platform. Using a 2-D, isostatic, thin-sheet approximation for the Stokes flow equation with (Newtonian) space-time-dependent viscosity, we suggest that the bathymetric rim along the eastern platform region (where gravimetry indicates Airy isostasy) near Española Island may be the expression of a mature lower crustal flow front developed over the last ˜3 Myr; horizontal mass displacements (˜50 km) associated with this crustal flow episode may have advected mantle plume geochemical signatures toward the southeast, and in directions not necessarily parallel to the hotspot track. Also, the stepped terraces along the southwestern platform may be explained by lower crustal flow-associated backward tilting of the bathymetric surface that, although resulting in small angular changes (˜0.1°), effectively hinders the horizontal flow of lava sheets. This backward-tilting process was likely restricted to the last ˜1 Ma or less, and may be a unique event involving extrusion of lavas from within the southwestward-marching lower-crustal flow front.

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Immunological Evaluation of Benzyloxyalkyl-Substituted 1,2,3-Triazolyl α-GalCer Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of the amide moiety in the structure of α-GalCer with a 1,2,3-triazole linker is known to elicit a response skewed toward Th2 immunity, and glycolipids containing an aromatic ring in the terminus of their acyl or phytosphingosine structural component exhibit an enhanced Th1 immune response. In the current study, synthesis and immunological screening of a focused library of benzyloxyalkyl-substituted 1,2,3-triazolyl α-GalCer analogues are reported. The novel α-GalCer analogues activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells via CD1d mediated presentation, which was confirmed by in vitro tests performed on iNKT hybridomas incubated with CD1d proteins. When tested on isolated murine splenocytes, the T1204B and T1206B compounds stimulated higher levels of both IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine expression in vitro compared to that of α-GalCer. PMID:26985293

  8. Strong sea surface cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and implications for Galápagos Penguin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, K. B.; Jenouvrier, S.; Brown, C. W.; Murtugudde, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Galápagos is a flourishing yet fragile ecosystem whose health is particularly sensitive to regional and global climate variations. The distribution of several species, including the Galápagos Penguin, is intimately tied to upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water along the western shores of the archipelago. Here we show, using reliable, high-resolution sea surface temperature observations, that the Galápagos cold pool has been intensifying and expanding northward since 1982. The linear cooling trend of 0.8°C/33 yr is likely the result of long-term changes in equatorial ocean circulation previously identified. Moreover, the northward expansion of the cold pool is dynamically consistent with a slackening of the cross-equatorial component of the regional trade winds—leading to an equatorward shift of the mean position of the Equatorial Undercurrent. The implied change in strength and distribution of upwelling has important implications for ongoing and future conservation measures in the Galápagos.

  9. Skills Needed by Secondary School Graduates for Breeding and Rearing of Giant African Land Snail (GALS) in Ebonyi State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogba, Ernest Ituma; Ndem, Joseph Uka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the skills required by secondary school Graduates for breeding and rearing Giant African Land Snail (GALS) in Ebonyi State. Three research questions guided the study. The design was descriptive survey. The total population was 254 agricultural science Teachers in junior and senior secondary schools in Ebonyi…

  10. Historical Isolation of the Galápagos Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa darwini) despite Strong Flight Capability and Ecological Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Colonization across the Galápagos Islands by the carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) was reconstructed based on distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes (cytochrome oxidase II (COII) sequences) and haplotype lineages. A total of 12 haplotypes were found in 118 individuals of X. darwini. Distributional, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses suggest early colonization of most islands followed by historical isolation in two main groups: eastern and central-western islands. Evidence of recurrent inter-island colonization of haplotypes is largely lacking, despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude of the species. Recent palaeogeographic data suggest that several of the current islands were connected in the past and thus the isolation pattern may have been even more pronounced. A contrast analysis was also carried out on 10 animal groups of the Galápagos Islands, and on haplotype colonization of seven animal and plant species from several oceanic archipelagos (the Galápagos, Azores, Canary Islands). New colonization metrics on the number of potential vs. inferred colonization events revealed that the Galápagos carpenter bee shows one of the most significant examples of geographic isolation. PMID:25807496

  11. Historical isolation of the Galápagos carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Rumeu, Beatriz; Heleno, Ruben H; Traveset, Anna; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Colonization across the Galápagos Islands by the carpenter bee (Xylocopa darwini) was reconstructed based on distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes (cytochrome oxidase II (COII) sequences) and haplotype lineages. A total of 12 haplotypes were found in 118 individuals of X. darwini. Distributional, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses suggest early colonization of most islands followed by historical isolation in two main groups: eastern and central-western islands. Evidence of recurrent inter-island colonization of haplotypes is largely lacking, despite strong flight capability and ecological amplitude of the species. Recent palaeogeographic data suggest that several of the current islands were connected in the past and thus the isolation pattern may have been even more pronounced. A contrast analysis was also carried out on 10 animal groups of the Galápagos Islands, and on haplotype colonization of seven animal and plant species from several oceanic archipelagos (the Galápagos, Azores, Canary Islands). New colonization metrics on the number of potential vs. inferred colonization events revealed that the Galápagos carpenter bee shows one of the most significant examples of geographic isolation.

  12. Origin and population history of a recent colonizer, the yellow warbler in Galápagos and Cocos Islands.

    PubMed

    Chaves, J A; Parker, P G; Smith, T B

    2012-03-01

    The faunas associated with oceanic islands provide exceptional examples with which to examine the dispersal abilities of different taxa and test the relative contribution of selective and neutral processes in evolution. We examine the patterns of recent differentiation and the relative roles of gene flow and selection in genetic and morphological variation in the yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia aureola) from the Galápagos and Cocos Islands. Our analyses suggest aureola diverged from Central American lineages colonizing the Galápagos and Cocos Islands recently, likely less than 300 000 years ago. Within the Galápagos, patterns of genetic variation in microsatellite and mitochondrial markers suggest early stages of diversification. No intra-island patterns of morphological variation were found, even across steep ecological gradients, suggesting that either (i) high levels of gene flow may be homogenizing the effects of selection, (ii) populations may not have had enough time to accumulate the differences in morphological traits, or (iii) yellow warblers show lower levels of 'evolvability' than some other Galápagos species. By examining genetic data and morphological variation, our results provide new insight into the microevolutionary processes driving the patterns of variation.

  13. The Galectin CvGal1 from the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Binds to Blood Group A Oligosaccharides on the Hemocyte Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chiguang; Ghosh, Anita; Amin, Mohammed N.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Shridhar, Surekha; Banerjee, Aditi; Fernández-Robledo, José A.; Bianchet, Mario A.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2013-01-01

    The galectin CvGal1 from the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), which possesses four tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains, was previously shown to display stronger binding to galactosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine relative to d-galactose. CvGal1 expressed by phagocytic cells is “hijacked” by the parasite Perkinsus marinus to enter the host, where it proliferates and causes systemic infection and death. In this study, a detailed glycan array analysis revealed that CvGal1 preferentially recognizes type 2 blood group A oligosaccharides. Homology modeling of the protein and its oligosaccharide ligands supported this preference over type 1 blood group A and B oligosaccharides. The CvGal ligand models were further validated by binding, inhibition, and competitive binding studies of CvGal1 and ABH-specific monoclonal antibodies with intact and deglycosylated glycoproteins, hemocyte extracts, and intact hemocytes and by surface plasmon resonance analysis. A parallel glycomic study carried out on oyster hemocytes (Kurz, S., Jin, C., Hykollari, A., Gregorich, D., Giomarelli, B., Vasta, G. R., Wilson, I. B. H., and Paschinger, K. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288,) determined the structures of oligosaccharides recognized by CvGal1. Proteomic analysis of the hemocyte glycoproteins identified β-integrin and dominin as CvGal1 “self”-ligands. Despite strong CvGal1 binding to P. marinus trophozoites, no binding of ABH blood group antibodies was observed. Thus, parasite glycans structurally distinct from the blood group A oligosaccharides on the hemocyte surface may function as potentially effective ligands for CvGal1. We hypothesize that carbohydrate-based mimicry resulting from the host/parasite co-evolution facilitates CvGal1-mediated cross-linking to β-integrin, located on the hemocyte surface, leading to cell activation, phagocytosis, and host infection. PMID:23824193

  14. Glycosyltransferase ST6Gal-I protects tumor cells against serum growth factor withdrawal by enhancing survival signaling and proliferative potential.

    PubMed

    Britain, Colleen M; Dorsett, Kaitlyn A; Bellis, Susan L

    2017-01-30

    A hallmark of cancer cells is the ability to survive and proliferate when challenged with stressors such as growth factor insufficiency. In the current study we report a novel glycosylation-dependent mechanism that protects tumor cells from serum growth factor withdrawal. Results herein suggest that the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase, which is upregulated in numerous cancers, promotes the survival of serum-starved cells. Using ovarian and pancreatic cancer cell models with ST6Gal-I overexpression or knockdown, we find that serum-starved cells with high ST6Gal-I levels exhibit increased activation of pro-survival signaling molecules including pAkt, p-p70S6K and pNFkB. Correspondingly, ST6Gal-I activity augments expression of tumor-promoting NFkB transcriptional targets such as IL-6, IL-8, and the apoptosis inhibitor cIAP2. ST6Gal-I also potentiates expression of the cell cycle regulator, cyclin D2, leading to increased phosphorylation and inactivation of the cell cycle inhibitor, pRb. Consistent with these results, serum-starved cells with high ST6Gal-I expression maintain a greater number of S-phase cells compared with low ST6Gal-I expressors, reflecting enhanced proliferation. Finally, selective enrichment in clonal variants with high ST6Gal-I expression is observed upon prolonged serum deprivation, supporting the concept that ST6Gal-I confers a survival advantage. Collectively these results implicate a functional role for ST6Gal-I in fostering tumor cell survival within the serum-depleted tumor microenvironment.

  15. Sex-biased transcription enhancement by a 5' tethered Gal4-MOF histone acetyltransferase fusion protein in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In male Drosophila melanogaster, the male specific lethal (MSL) complex is somehow responsible for a two-fold increase in transcription of most X-linked genes, which are enriched for histone H4 acetylated at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). This acetylation requires MOF, a histone acetyltransferase that is a component of the MSL complex. MOF also associates with the non-specific lethal or NSL complex. The MSL complex is bound within active genes on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias. In contrast, the NSL complex is enriched at promoter regions of many autosomal and X-linked genes in both sexes. In this study we have investigated the role of MOF as a transcriptional activator. Results MOF was fused to the DNA binding domain of Gal4 and targeted to the promoter region of UAS-reporter genes in Drosophila. We found that expression of a UAS-red fluorescent protein (DsRed) reporter gene was strongly induced by Gal4-MOF. However, DsRed RNA levels were about seven times higher in female than male larvae. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes showed that Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on the X chromosome in male but not female nuclei. However, in female nuclei that express MSL2, Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on polytene chromosomes but DsRed expression was reduced. Mutation of conserved active site residues in MOF (Glu714 and Cys680) reduced HAT activity in vitro and UAS-DsRed activation in Drosophila. In the presence of Gal4-MOF, H4K16ac levels were enriched over UAS-lacZ and UAS-arm-lacZ reporter genes. The latter utilizes the constitutive promoter from the arm gene to drive lacZ expression. In contrast to the strong induction of UAS-DsRed expression, UAS-arm-lacZ expression increased by about 2-fold in both sexes. Conclusions Targeting MOF to reporter genes led to transcription enhancement and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16. Histone acetyltransferase activity was required for the full transcriptional response. Incorporation of Gal

  16. Molecular and immunological analysis of hen's egg yolk allergens with a focus on YGP42 (Gal d 6).

    PubMed

    De Silva, Chamika; Dhanapala, Pathum; Doran, Tim; Tang, Mimi L K; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2016-03-01

    Allergy to hen's (Gallus domesticus) egg white is one of the most common forms of food allergy. Allergy to hen's yolk also exists however, to a lesser extent when compared to egg white allergy. Two minor allergens from the hen's egg yolk known as α-livetin (Gal d 5) and YGP42 (Gal d 6) were discovered recently. In this study, we investigated whether sensitization to egg white is associated with reactivity to egg yolk as well. Sera obtained from 25 patients with allergy to egg white were tested for specific IgE binding for egg yolk proteins through western immunoblotting. 36% of patients were found with true IgE-sensitization against egg yolk proteins. It was found that most of the IgE reactive yolk proteins were fragments of major precursor proteins of hen; vitellogenin-1 (VTG-1), vitellogenin-2 (VTG-2) and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). The egg yolk allergen Gal d 6 is the C-terminal part of VTG-1 and was found to be allergenic in significant percentage of egg white allergy patients. These results highlight the significance of Gal d 6 as an important allergen of egg yolk. Therefore, the secondary aim of this study involved developing a recombinant version of YGP42 in an Escherichia coli expression system. Recombinant Gal d 6 (rGal d6) was expressed as a fusion peptide with a 6 × His tag and purified using metal chelating resin. The inhibition ELISA results showed that rYGP42 was IgE reactive and was able to inhibit IgE binding to crude egg yolk (CEY) by up to 30%. Traditionally, it was thought that allergy to egg yolk occurred independently from sensitization to egg white. This study underlies the importance of concomitant sensitization to egg yolk proteins in patients allergic to egg white. Evidence reported in this study strongly suggests that egg yolk has potentially undiscovered allergens and therefore warrants further investigation. Furthermore, IgE reactive Gal d 6 presented in this study has the potential to be used in diagnosis and immunotherapy to treat egg

  17. INDUCED REMODELING OF PORCINE TENDONS TO HUMAN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENTS BY α-GAL EPITOPE REMOVAL AND PARTIAL CROSSLINKING.

    PubMed

    Stone, Kevin Robert; Walgenbach, Ann; Galili, Uri

    2017-01-09

    This review describes a novel method developed for processing porcine tendon and other ligament implants which enables in situ remodeling into autologous ligaments in humans. The method differs from methods using extracellular matrices (ECM) which provide post-operative ortho-biologic support (i.e. augmentation grafts) for healing of injured ligaments, in that the porcine bone-patellar-tendon-bone itself serves as the graft replacing ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The method allows for gradual remodeling of porcine tendon into autologous human ACL while maintaining the biomechanical integrity. The method was first evaluated in a pre-clinical model of monkeys and subsequently in patients. The method overcomes detrimental effects of the natural anti-Gal antibody and harnesses anti-non gal antibodies for the remodeling process in two steps: Step 1. Elimination of α-gal epitopes- This epitope which is abundant in pigs (as in other non-primate mammals) binds the natural anti-Gal antibody which is the most abundant natural antibody in humans. This interaction, which can induce fast resorption of the porcine implant, is avoided by enzymatic elimination of α-gal epitopes from the implant with recombinant α-galactosidase. Step 2. Partial crosslinking of porcine tendon with glutaraldehyde- This crosslinking generates covalent bonds in the ECM which slow infiltration of macrophages into the implant. Anti-non gal antibodies are produced in recipients against the multiple porcine antigenic proteins and proteoglycans because of sequence differences between human and porcine homologous proteins. Anti-non gal antibodies bind to the implant ECM, recruit macrophages and induce the implant destruction by directing proteolytic activity of macrophages. Partial crosslinking of the tendon ECM decreases the extent of macrophage infiltration and degradation of the implant and enables concomitant infiltration of fibroblasts which follow the infiltrating macrophages. These

  18. Multiple expressions of plume-ridge interaction in the Galápagos: Volcanic lineaments and ridge jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, E.; Soule, S.; Harpp, K.; Fornari, D.; McKee, C.; Tivey, M.; Geist, D.; Kurz, M. D.; Sinton, C.; Mello, C.

    2012-05-01

    Anomalous volcanism and tectonics between near-ridge mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges provide important insights into the mechanics of plume-lithosphere interaction. We present new observations and analysis of multibeam, side scan sonar, sub-bottom chirp, and total magnetic field data collected during the R/V Melville FLAMINGO cruise (MV1007; May-June, 2010) to the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province (NGVP), the region between the Galápagos Archipelago and the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) on the Nazca Plate, and to the region east of the Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF) on the Cocos Plate. The NGVP exhibits pervasive off-axis volcanism related to the nearby Galápagos hot spot, which has dominated the tectonic evolution of the region. Observations indicate that ˜94% of the excess volcanism in our survey area occurs on the Nazca Plate in three volcanic lineaments. Identified faults in the NGVP are consistent with normal ridge spreading except for those within a ˜60 km wide swath of transform-oblique faults centered on the GTF. These transform-oblique faults are sub-parallel to the elongation direction of larger lineament volcanoes, suggesting that lineament formation is influenced by the lithospheric stress field. We evaluate current models for lineament formation using existing and new observations as well as numerical models of mantle upwelling and melting. The data support a model where the lithospheric stress field controls the location of volcanism along the lineaments while several processes likely supply melt to these eruptions. Synthetic magnetic models and an inversion for crustal magnetization are used to determine the tectonic history of the study area. Results are consistent with creation of the GTF by two southward ridge jumps, part of a series of jumps that have maintained a plume-ridge separation distance of 145 km to 215 km since ˜5 Ma.

  19. Short wavelength heterogeneity in the Galápagos plume: Evidence from compositionally diverse basalts on Isla Santiago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. G.; Day, J. A.; Dale, C. W.

    2012-09-01

    Analyses of basalts from the Galápagos archipelago and adjacent spreading center have shown that the underlying mantle plume is isotopically heterogeneous over length scales of 10s to 100s of km. We show that the convecting mantle is also compositionally heterogeneous on smaller length scales (kms). Our evidence comes from recent small-volume mildly alkaline and tholeiitic basalts on Isla Santiago, central Galápagos. Flows from volcanic vents <5 km apart are homogeneous in terms of incompatible-trace element and isotopic ratios but inter-vent variations in these ratios are large, such that Santiago basalts display some of the most extensive ranges known for any Galápagos island. Geochemical indexes of depth of melting correlate with an eastward decrease in geophysical estimates of lithospheric thickness-from 55 to 43 km over a ˜10 km horizontal distance beneath Isla Santiago-suggesting that melts have not undergone significant lateral transport in the underlying crust. This lithospheric `step' below the center of the island generally results in a greater proportion of enriched mantle melts contributing to basalts from west Santiago, than to those in the east, due to less melting of more depleted mantle as the plume upwells beneath thicker lithosphere. Nevertheless, the sporadic occurrence of isotopically enriched flows with low [Sm/Yb]n, and more isotopically depleted compositions with elevated [Sm/Yb]n, across Santiago suggests that portions of the underlying Galápagos plume are compositionally heterogeneous in terms of enriched and depleted reservoirs over short length scales (kilometers). In this respect the Galápagos mantle plume is similar to plumes beneath Hawaii and Canary Islands.

  20. La formación de la Nube de Oort y el entorno galáctico primitivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J. A.

    Se analizan las condiciones de formación de la nube de Oort en el medio galáctico primitivo, bajo la suposición de que los objetos que alcanzaron la nube fueron planetesimales residuales eyectados por los planetas gigantes durante las etapas finales de su acreción. Los objetos que adquieren órbitas cuasiparabólicas están sujetos a las perturbaciones de estrellas vecinas y al potencial del disco galáctico, las que desacoplan sus perihelios de la región planetaria, dando a los objetos una larga estabilidad dinámica. Se demuestra que un entorno galáctico como el presente pudo, sin embargo, no ser suficiente para formar un reservorio cometario con una vida dinámica comparable a la vida del sistema solar. La existencia de la nube de Oort después de 4600 millones de años es, pues, una fuerte indicación de que el sistema solar se formó en un entorno galáctico mucho mas denso que el presente, tal vez en una nube molecular y/o un cúmulo abierto, que es el modo de producción de la mayoría de las estrellas. Se encuentra que un campo perturbador externo mas intenso, producto de un entorno galáctico mas denso, sería capaz de formar una nube de Oort mas compacta, con un radio del orden de 103- 104 UA. El campo externo mas intenso cesó de actuar una vez que la nube molecular y/o el cúmulo abierto se disiparon, previniendo entonces que ese mismo campo externo disolviera el reservorio cometario.

  1. Frugivory and seed dispersal in the Galápagos: what is the state of the art?

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben; Blake, Stephen; Jaramillo, Patricia; Traveset, Anna; Vargas, Pablo; Nogales, Manuel

    2011-06-01

    The Galápagos are considered a model oceanic archipelago, with unique flora and fauna currently threatened by alien invasive species. Seed dispersal is an important ecosystem function with consequences for plant population dynamics and vegetation structure. Hence, understanding the seed dispersal abilities of the assemblages of frugivores will inform scientists and managers of the dynamics of plant invasions and improve management planning. Here we provide the first comprehensive review of published information on frugivory and animal seed dispersal in the Galápagos. We collected data from a variety of sources, including notes of the first naturalist expeditions, gray literature available only in Galápagos collections, and peer-reviewed journal articles. Plant-animal frugivorous interactions were retrieved from 43 studies and compiled into an interaction matrix describing 366 unique interactions. Most studies focused on fruit consumption as a driving force for natural selection, but seed fate was seldom considered. Although most (71%) of the interactions involved native plants, more than one-quarter (28%) involved introduced species. Interactions involving birds are considerably more common than those of reptiles and mammals, probably reflecting a research bias towards birds. Despite the historical importance of the archipelago as the laboratory for evolutionary and ecological research, understanding of its seed dispersal systems is limited. We end the review by suggesting 3 priority areas of research on frugivory and seed dispersal in the Galápagos: (i) target research to close knowledge gaps; (ii) the use of a network approach to frame seed dispersal at the community level; and (iii) evaluation of the effect of seed dispersal as a selective pressure acting upon plants and frugivores. Finally, the output of this research has to be properly delivered to the Galápagos National Park Services to help increase management effectiveness.

  2. Host selection and parasite infection in Aedes taeniorhynchus, endemic disease vector in the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fournié, Guillaume; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Parker, Patricia G; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2012-12-01

    Host selection in blood-sucking arthropods has important evolutionary and ecological implications for the transmission dynamics, distribution and host-specificity of the parasites they transmit. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedemann) is distributed throughout tropical to temperate coastal zones in the Americas, and continental populations are primarily mammalphilic. It is the only indigenous mosquito in the Galápagos Islands, having colonised the archipelago around 200,000 years ago, potentially adapting its host selection, and in the process, altering the dynamics of vector mediated pathogen interactions in the archipelago. Here, we use blood-meal analysis and PCR-based parasite screening approach to determine the blood-feeding patterns of A. taeniorhynchus in the Galápagos Islands and identify potential parasite transmission with which this mosquito could be involved. Our results show that A. taeniorhynchus feeds equally on mammals and reptiles, and only one avian sample was observed in 190 successful PCR amplifications from blood meals. However, we detected endemic filarial worms and Haemoproteus parasites known to infect various Galápagos bird species in mosquito thoraces, suggesting that feeding on birds must occur at low frequency, and that A. taeniorhynchus may play a role in maintaining some avian vector-borne pathogens, although more work is needed to explore this possibility. We also isolated three different DNA sequences corresponding to hemogregarine parasites of the genus Hepatozoon from mosquito and iguana blood samples, suggesting that more than one species of Hepatozoon parasites are present in Galápagos. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatozoon 18sRNA sequences indicates that A. taeniorhynchus may have facilitated a recent breakdown in host-species association of formerly isolated Hepatozoon spp. infecting the reptile populations in the Galápagos Islands.

  3. Comparative rates of transfer of N-acetylneuraminic acid to acceptors bearing one or more Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc terminus by the Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc(NeuAc-Gal) (alpha 2-6)-sialyltransferase from embryonic chicken liver. Utilization of oligosaccharides as acceptors in sialyltransferase assays.

    PubMed Central

    Bendiak, B; Cook, G M

    1983-01-01

    Using a number of branched and unbranched oligosaccharides, glycoproteins and artificial glycoproteins bearing Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc-R termini as acceptors (where R represents H, oligosaccharide, oligosaccharide-protein or fatty acid-protein), the comparative rates of transfer of NeuAc by the Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc(NeuAc-Gal) (alpha 2-6)-sialyltransferase of embryonic chicken liver were determined. Acceptor substrates were utilized at levels approximating physiological, near the Km value of the best acceptor, desialylated alpha 1 acid glycoprotein. The sialyltransferase has a marked preference for multi-branched acceptors. From the specificity data, it is concluded that the enzyme binds at least two Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc termini of an acceptor molecule, and that the relative orientation of the branches is an important factor determining the rate of catalysis by the enzyme. The use of oligosaccharides as acceptors to study sialyltransferase catalyses is emphasized. Results are discussed in the context of the mode of assembly of sialoside termini of known glycoprotein structures in vivo. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6615429

  4. The geology and geochemistry of Isla Floreana, Galápagos: A different type of late-stage ocean island volcanism: Chapter 6 in The Galápagos: A natural laboratory for the earth sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harpp, Karen S.; Geist, Dennis J.; Koleszar, Alison M.; Christensen, Branden; Lyons, John; Sabga, Melissa; Rollins, Nathan; Harpp, Karen S.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; d'Ozouville, Noémi; Graham, David W

    2014-01-01

    Isla Floreana, the southernmost volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago, has erupted a diverse suite of alkaline basalts continually since 1.5 Ma. Because these basalts have different compositions than xenoliths and older lavas from the deep submarine sector of the volcano, Floreana is interpreted as being in a rejuvenescent or late-stage phase of volcanism. Most lavas contain xenoliths, or their disaggregated remains. The xenolithic debris and large ranges in composition, including during single eruptions, indicate that the magmas do not reside in crustal magma chambers, unlike magmas in the western Galápagos. Floreana lavas have distinctive trace element compositions that are rich in fluid-immobile elements (e.g., Ta, Nb, Th, Zr) and even richer in fluid-mobile elements (e.g., Ba, Sr, Pb). Rare earth element (REE) patterns are light REE-enriched and distinctively concave-up. Neodymium isotopic ratios are comparable to those from Fernandina, at the core of the Galápagos plume, but Floreana has the most radiogenic Sr and Pb isotopic ratios in the archipelago. These trace element patterns and isotopic ratios are attributed to a mixed source originating within the Galápagos plume, which includes depleted upper mantle, plume material rich in TITAN elements (Ti, Ta, Nb), and recycled oceanic crust that has undergone partial dehydration in an ancient subduction zone. Because Floreana lies at the periphery of the Galápagos plume, melting occurs mostly in the spinel zone, and enriched components dominate; the Floreana recycled mantle component influence is detectable in volcanoes along the entire southern periphery of the archipelago as well. Floreana is the only Galápagos volcano known to have undergone late-stage volcanism. Here, however, the secondary stage activity is more compositionally enriched than the shield-building phase, in contrast to what is observed in Hawai‘i, suggesting that the mechanism driving late-stage volcanism may vary among ocean island

  5. Cotton GalT1 Encoding a Putative Glycosyltransferase Is Involved in Regulation of Cell Wall Pectin Biosynthesis during Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development. PMID:23527103

  6. Cotton GalT1 encoding a putative glycosyltransferase is involved in regulation of cell wall pectin biosynthesis during plant development.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development.

  7. First comprehensive in silico analysis of the functional and structural consequences of SNPs in human GalNAc-T1 gene.

    PubMed

    Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Hussain, Muhammad Ramzan Manwar; El-Harouni, Ashraf A; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Qasmi, Zaheer Ulhaq; Merican, Amir Feisal; Baig, Mukhtiar; Anwar, Yasir; Asfour, Hani; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf

    2014-01-01

    GalNAc-T1, a key candidate of GalNac-transferases genes family that is involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation pathway, is expressed in most biological tissues and cell types. Despite the reported association of GalNAc-T1 gene mutations with human disease susceptibility, the comprehensive computational analysis of coding, noncoding and regulatory SNPs, and their functional impacts on protein level, still remains unknown. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed to screen the entire listed coding SNPs of GalNAc-T1 gene in order to identify and characterize them. Our concordant in silico analysis by SIFT, PolyPhen-2, PANTHER-cSNP, and SNPeffect tools, identified the potential nsSNPs (S143P, G258V, and Y414D variants) from 18 nsSNPs of GalNAc-T1. Additionally, 2 regulatory SNPs (rs72964406 and #x26; rs34304568) were also identified in GalNAc-T1 by using FastSNP tool. Using multiple computational approaches, we have systematically classified the functional mutations in regulatory and coding regions that can modify expression and function of GalNAc-T1 enzyme. These genetic variants can further assist in better understanding the wide range of disease susceptibility associated with the mucin-based cell signalling and pathogenic binding, and may help to develop novel therapeutic elements for associated diseases.

  8. Development of a high-throughput β-Gal-based neutralization assay for quantitation of herpes simplex virus-neutralizing antibodies in human samples.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Amy; Cooney, Michael; Blevins, Tamara P; Morrison, Lynda A; Larson, Shane; Skoberne, Mojca; Belshe, Robert B; Flechtner, Jessica B; Long, Deborah

    2016-07-19

    Measurement of neutralizing antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is important for evaluation of candidate vaccines. The established plaque-reduction neutralization assay is time consuming, labor intensive, and difficult to validate and transfer. Here, we describe the characterization of a HSV-neutralization assay based on the expression of a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (β-Gal). Using previously constructed HSV-β-Gal recombinant viruses, HSV-2/Gal and HSV-1/tk12, we developed a colorimetric β-Gal-based neutralization assay that is sensitive and highly reproducible, and performed in less than 48h. HSV-1 and HSV-2 neutralizing titers measured by the β-Gal-based neutralization assay were equivalent to those obtained by a plaque reduction neutralization assay. Intra- and inter-assay precision studies demonstrated that the β-Gal-based assay was repeatable and yielded low and acceptable variation. In addition, comparison of HSV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers measured in two independent laboratories by two unique β-Gal-based assays showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.9499, p<0.0001) between the two assays. The new assay will serve as an important tool both for preclinical and clinical trials of new HSV vaccines.

  9. In vitro and in vivo study of Gal-OS self-assembled nanoparticles for liver-targeting delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hejian; Zhang, Dianrui; Li, Tingting; Li, Caiyun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Liu, Guangpu; Hao, Leilei; Shen, Jingyi; Qi, Lisi; Liu, Xinquan; Luan, Jingjing; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    A liver-targeting drug delivery system for doxorubicin (DOX), that is, DOX-loaded self-assembled nanoparticles based on galactosylated O-carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-stearic acid conjugates (Gal-OS/DOX), has been prepared. The objective of the present study was to investigate the preparation, in vitro release, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and tissue distribution of Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles. The drug-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape with mean size of 181.9 nm. In vitro release profiles indicated that the release of DOX from Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles behaved with a sustained and pH-dependent drug release. Pharmacokinetics study revealed Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles exhibited a higher AUC value and a prolonged residence time of drug in the blood circulation than those of DOX solution. Furthermore, Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles increased the uptake of DOX in liver and spleen, but decreased uptake in heart, lung, and kidney in the tissue distribution study. These results suggested that the Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles could prolong blood circulation time, enhance the liver accumulation, and reduce the side effect especially the cardiotoxicity of DOX. In conclusion, Gal-OS/DOX nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system for liver cancer therapy.

  10. Serum Deprivation-Induced Human GM3 Synthase (hST3Gal V) Gene Expression Is Mediated by Runx2 in Human Osteoblastic MG-63 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun-Kyoung; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Mun, Seo-Won; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2015-12-29

    Serum deprivation (SD) is well known to induce G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various cells. In the present study, we firstly found that SD could induce G1 arrest and the differentiation of human osteoblastic MG-63 cells, as evidenced by the increase of osteoblastic differentiation markers, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteocalcin and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In parallel, gene expression of human GM3 synthase (hST3Gal V) catalyzing ganglioside GM3 biosynthesis was upregulated by SD in MG-63 cells. The 5'-flanking region of the hST3Gal V gene was functionally characterized to elucidate transcriptional regulation of hST3Gal V in SD-induced MG-63 cells. Promoter analysis using 5'-deletion constructs of the hST3Gal V gene demonstrated that the -432 to -177 region functions as the SD-inducible promoter. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the Runx2 binding sites located side-by-side at positions -232 and -222 are essential for the SD-induced expression of hST3Gal V in MG-63 cells. In addition, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also showed that Runx2 specifically binds to the hST3Gal V promoter region containing Runx2 binding sites. These results suggest that SD triggers upregulation of hST3Gal V gene expression through Runx2 activation by BMP signaling in MG-63 cells.

  11. First Comprehensive In Silico Analysis of the Functional and Structural Consequences of SNPs in Human GalNAc-T1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ali Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh; Manwar Hussain, Muhammad Ramzan; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Qasmi, Zaheer Ulhaq; Merican, Amir Feisal; Baig, Mukhtiar; Anwar, Yasir; Asfour, Hani; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf

    2014-01-01

    GalNAc-T1, a key candidate of GalNac-transferases genes family that is involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation pathway, is expressed in most biological tissues and cell types. Despite the reported association of GalNAc-T1 gene mutations with human disease susceptibility, the comprehensive computational analysis of coding, noncoding and regulatory SNPs, and their functional impacts on protein level, still remains unknown. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed to screen the entire listed coding SNPs of GalNAc-T1 gene in order to identify and characterize them. Our concordant in silico analysis by SIFT, PolyPhen-2, PANTHER-cSNP, and SNPeffect tools, identified the potential nsSNPs (S143P, G258V, and Y414D variants) from 18 nsSNPs of GalNAc-T1. Additionally, 2 regulatory SNPs (rs72964406 and #x26; rs34304568) were also identified in GalNAc-T1 by using FastSNP tool. Using multiple computational approaches, we have systematically classified the functional mutations in regulatory and coding regions that can modify expression and function of GalNAc-T1 enzyme. These genetic variants can further assist in better understanding the wide range of disease susceptibility associated with the mucin-based cell signalling and pathogenic binding, and may help to develop novel therapeutic elements for associated diseases. PMID:24723968

  12. Early graft failure of GalTKO pig organs in baboons is reduced by expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Kelishadi, Sean S; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Singh, Avneesh K; Stoddard, Tiffany; Iwase, Hayato; Zhang, Tianshu; Burdorf, Lars; Sievert, Evelyn; Avon, Chris; Cheng, Xiangfei; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A; Corcoran, Philip C; Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Barth, Rolf N; Cooper, David K C; Pierson, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    We describe the incidence of early graft failure (EGF, defined as loss of function from any cause within 3 days after transplant) in a large cohort of GalTKO pig organs transplanted into baboons in three centers, and the effect of additional expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein, CD46 or CD55 (GalTKO.hCPRP). Baboon recipients of life-supporting GalTKO kidney (n = 7) or heterotopic heart (n = 14) grafts received either no immunosuppression (n = 4), or one of several partial or full immunosuppressive regimens (n = 17). Fourteen additional baboons received a GalTKO.hCPRP kidney (n = 5) or heart (n = 9) and similar treatment regimens. Immunologic, pathologic, and coagulation parameters were measured at frequent intervals. EGF of GalTKO organs occurred in 9/21 baboons (43%). hCPRP expression reduced the GalTKO EGF incidence to 7% (1/14; P < 0.01 vs. GalTKO alone). At 30 mins, complement deposits were more intense in organs in which EGF developed (P < 0.005). The intensity of peri-transplant platelet activation (as β-thromboglobulin release) correlated with EGF, as did the cumulative coagulation score (P < 0.01). We conclude that (i) the transgenic expression of a hCPRP on the vascular endothelium of a GalTKO pig reduces the incidence of EGF and reduces complement deposition, (ii) complement deposition and platelet activation correlate with early GalTKO organ failure, and (iii) the expression of a hCPRP reduces EGF but does not prevent systemic coagulation activation. Additional strategies will be required to control coagulation activation.

  13. Phyllodes tumor of the breast: role of Axl and ST6GalNAcII in the development of mammary phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongliang; Li, Yanyan; Gong, Yanxin; Xu, Jingchao; Miao, Xiaolong; Li, Xiangnan; Liu, Chen; Jia, Li; Zhao, Yongfu

    2014-10-01

    Phyllodes tumor exhibits an aggressive growth. The expression of many biological markers has been explored to discriminate between different grades of phyllodes tumor and to predict their behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implications of Axl and ST6GalNAcII in phyllodes tumors. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical were used to analyze differential expression of ST6GalNAcII and Axl in phyllodes tumor (PT) cell lines and tissue specimens. RNAi assay, ECM invasion assay, and tumorigenicity assay were used to analyze the altered expression of ST6GalNAcII gene effects on the expression of Axl and invasive ability of phyllodes tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Compared to benign tumors, borderline and malignant ones showed a remarkable increase in mRNA levels of Axl and ST6GalNAcII gene, and it was higher in malignant tumor cells than in borderline tumor cells. When ST6GalNAcII was silenced, compared to the control, the expression level of Axl was significantly reduced in malignant tumor cell transfectants and knockdown of ST6GalNAcII gene significantly inhibited invasive activity in malignant tumor cells. The high expression of ST6GalNAcII and Axl was significantly correlated with tumor grade and distance metastasis by immunohistochemical analysis. Axl and ST6GalNAcII expression increases with increasing tumor grade in mammary phyllodes tumors. ST6GalNAc II might be participated in the glycosylation of Axl, and this Axl glycosylation may mediate the tumorigenicity, invasion, and distant metastasis of PT cells.

  14. Identification of gangliosides recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies in bovine spinal motor neurons and motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiide; Ariga, Toshio; Suzuki, Akemi; Yu, Robert K; Miyatake, Tadashi

    2008-08-28

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-type antibodies to the ganglioside, N-acetylgalactosaminyl GD1a (GalNAc-GD1a), is closely associated with the pure motor type of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). In the present study, we isolated disialogangliosides from the motor neurons and motor nerves of bovine spinal cords by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The disialoganglioside fraction contained GD1a, GD2, GD1b, and three gangliosides, designated X1, X2 and X3. Serum from a patient with axonal GBS with IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody yielded positive immunostaining with X1, X2, and X3. When isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography (TLC), X1 migrated at the same position as GalNAc-GD1a from Tay-Sachs brain, suggesting that X1 is GalNAc-GD1a containing N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc). TLC of isolated X2 revealed that it migrated between GD1a and GD2. On the other hand, X3 had a migratory rate on TLC between and GD1b and GT1b. Since both X2 and X3 were recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody, the results suggest that X2 is a GalNAc-GD1a species containing a mixture containing a NeuAc-and an N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) species, and X3 is a GalNAc-GD1a species with two NeuGc. This evidence indicating the specific localization of GalNAc-GD1a and its isomers in spinal motor neurons should be useful in elucidating the pathogenic role of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody in pure motor-type GBS.

  15. Ecosystem Resilience and Threshold Response in the Galápagos Coastal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Alistair W. R.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Milne, Glenn A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a conservative estimate on rates of sea-level rise of 3.8 mm yr−1 at the end of the 21st century, which may have a detrimental effect on ecologically important mangrove ecosystems. Understanding factors influencing the long-term resilience of these communities is critical but poorly understood. We investigate ecological resilience in a coastal mangrove community from the Galápagos Islands over the last 2700 years using three research questions: What are the ‘fast and slow’ processes operating in the coastal zone? Is there evidence for a threshold response? How can the past inform us about the resilience of the modern system? Methodology/Principal Findings Palaeoecological methods (AMS radiocarbon dating, stable carbon isotopes (δ13C)) were used to reconstruct sedimentation rates and ecological change over the past 2,700 years at Diablas lagoon, Isabela, Galápagos. Bulk geochemical analysis was also used to determine local environmental changes, and salinity was reconstructed using a diatom transfer function. Changes in relative sea level (RSL) were estimated using a glacio-isostatic adjustment model. Non-linear behaviour was observed in the Diablas mangrove ecosystem as it responded to increased salinities following exposure to tidal inundations. A negative feedback was observed which enabled the mangrove canopy to accrete vertically, but disturbances may have opened up the canopy and contributed to an erosion of resilience over time. A combination of drier climatic conditions and a slight fall in RSL then resulted in a threshold response, from a mangrove community to a microbial mat. Conclusions/Significance Palaeoecological records can provide important information on the nature of non-linear behaviour by identifying thresholds within ecological systems, and in outlining responses to ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ environmental change between alternative stable states. This study

  16. Evolução química de galáxias HII anãs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraresi, M., Jr.; Cuisinier, F.; Telles, E.

    2003-08-01

    Galáxias HII anãs são galáxias de baixa massa, com alto conteúdo de gás, e se encontram em uma fase intensa de formação estelar. A taxa de formação estelar está tão alta nestas galáxias que não pode ter se mantido durante sua vida inteira. O tempo máximo de duração do episódio atual de formação estelar deve ser no máximo de algumas dezenas de milhões de anos, bem inferior à idade destas galáxias. Isto leva naturalmente a idéia de que já aconteceram surtos anteriores. Abundâncias químicas oferecem uma ferramenta poderosa para investigar a história evolutiva destas galáxias, porque aumentam de geração em geração estelar. O hidrogênio, o oxigênio, o nitrogênio produzem algumas das linhas mais importantes em um gás foto-ionizado, permitindo a determinação das abundâncias destes elementos facilmente. A dispersão das abundâncias em oxigênio e nitrogênio é significativa, sendo maior que os erros observacionais. O oxigênio é produzido em estrelas massivas, que explodem quase instâneamente, enquanto o nitrogênio é produzido em estrelas de massa intermediária, que só o liberam depois de um atraso de @ 500 mihões de anos. Construímos um modelo de evolução química semi-analítico, utilizando rendimentos empíricos baseados nas abundâncias observadas destes dois elementos. Conseguimos através deste modelo rudimentar explicar nas galáxias de mais baixas metalicidades as abundâncias de oxigênio e de nitrogênio, assim como a dispersão dos dados observacionais devida a formação estelar descontínua, e isto com um número baixo de surtos (1 ou 2, no máximo 3).

  17. Phylogenetic-Derived Insights into the Evolution of Sialylation in Eukaryotes: Comprehensive Analysis of Vertebrate β-Galactoside α2,3/6-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal and ST6Gal)

    PubMed Central

    Teppa, Roxana E.; Petit, Daniel; Plechakova, Olga; Cogez, Virginie; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface of eukaryotic cells is covered with a wide variety of sialylated molecules involved in diverse biological processes and taking part in cell–cell interactions. Although the physiological relevance of these sialylated glycoconjugates in vertebrates begins to be deciphered, the origin and evolution of the genetic machinery implicated in their biosynthetic pathway are poorly understood. Among the variety of actors involved in the sialylation machinery, sialyltransferases are key enzymes for the biosynthesis of sialylated molecules. This review focus on β-galactoside α2,3/6-sialyltransferases belonging to the ST3Gal and ST6Gal families. We propose here an outline of the evolutionary history of these two major ST families. Comparative genomics, molecular phylogeny and structural bioinformatics provided insights into the functional innovations in sialic acid metabolism and enabled to explore how ST-gene function evolved in vertebrates. PMID:27517905

  18. Eight lipooligosaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis react with a monoclonal antibody which binds lacto-N-neotetraose (Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc).

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C M; Civin, C I

    1991-01-01

    Eight of 12 serologically different lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of Neisseria meningitidis bound a mouse monoclonal antibody (anti-My-28) that recognizes lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) (Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc). Among the 12 LOS immunotypes, types 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 exhibited strong binding; types 5 and 10 were moderate; and types 1, 6, 11, and 12 were negative as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunodot assays, and immunoblot assays. If an LOS showed multiple components by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, the antibody-reactive epitope was expressed on the larger major component, of which the molecular weight was estimated to be 4,000 for most types. The expression of the reactive epitope on the LOS was influenced by the growth medium, and the epitope could be masked by sialylation when N. meningitidis was grown in tryptic soy broth. N-Acetyllactosamine inhibited the binding of the antibody to all eight reactive LOS. The antibody binding to a representative LOS was best inhibited by LNnT and next by N-acetyllactosamine but was not inhibited by lacto-N-tetraose (Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc). These results suggest that the LNnT sequence is present in 8 of 12 immunotype LOS. The presence of the LNnT sequence, a structure expressed by a variety of human cells, in the LOS may play a role in the virulence of N. meningitidis by enabling the organism to evade host immune defenses. Images PMID:1910009

  19. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wild-type cells enriched for DNA-binding proteins by heparin affinity chromatography. These extracts could be used directly for DNase I and exonuclease III protection experiments. A lac9 deletion strain, which fails to induce the beta-galactosidase gene, did not contain the binding factor. The homology of LAC9 protein with GAL4 (J.M. Salmeron and S. A. Johnston, Nucleic Acids Res. 14:7767-7781, 1986) strongly suggests that LAC9 protein binds directly to UASL and plays a role similar to that of GAL4 in regulating transcription. Images PMID:2830492

  20. Invaders of pollination networks in the Galápagos Islands: emergence of novel communities

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Heleno, Ruben; Chamorro, Susana; Vargas, Pablo; McMullen, Conley K.; Castro-Urgal, Rocío; Nogales, Manuel; Herrera, Henri W.; Olesen, Jens M.

    2013-01-01

    The unique biodiversity of most oceanic archipelagos is currently threatened by the introduction of alien species that can displace native biota, disrupt native ecological interactions, and profoundly affect community structure and stability. We investigated the threat of aliens on pollination networks in the species-rich lowlands of five Galápagos Islands. Twenty per cent of all species (60 plants and 220 pollinators) in the pooled network were aliens, being involved in 38 per cent of the interactions. Most aliens were insects, especially dipterans (36%), hymenopterans (30%) and lepidopterans (14%). These alien insects had more links than either endemic pollinators or non-endemic natives, some even acting as island hubs. Aliens linked mostly to generalized species, increasing nestedness and thus network stability. Moreover, they infiltrated all seven connected modules (determined by geographical and phylogenetic constraints) of the overall network, representing around 30 per cent of species in two of them. An astonishingly high proportion (38%) of connectors, which enhance network cohesiveness, was also alien. Results indicate that the structure of these emergent novel communities might become more resistant to certain type of disturbances (e.g. species loss), while being more vulnerable to others (e.g. spread of a disease). Such notable changes in network structure as invasions progress are expected to have important consequences for native biodiversity maintenance. PMID:23486435

  1. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M.; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation. PMID:26104283

  2. Characterizing radio continuum sources in a sample of Hi-GAL massive cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jason

    In 2012 and 2013, Olmi and collaborators conducted a survey for 6.7GHz methanol masers with the Arecibo Telescope toward far infrared sources selected from the Hi-GAL catalog of massive cores. They reported a number of sources with weak 6.7GHz methanol masers, possibly indicating regions in early stages of star formation. Follow-up observations were conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico to characterize the sources. This thesis presents the results of radio continuum observations of nine of the Arecibo regions. A total of 33 radio continuum sources were detected. The nature of the radio continuum sources was analyzed based on their spectral indices. Most of the sources have negative spectral indices, which is indicative of synchrotron radiation. Many of the synchrotron sources are associated with a supernova remnant in our Galaxy, while the rest are likely background radio galaxies and quasars. Evidence for thermal bremsstrahlung radiation was found toward six sources associated with the Arecibo regions, which is consistent with the interpretation of gas ionized by young high-mass stellar objects.

  3. Automatic Segmentation of Drosophila Neural Compartments Using GAL4 Expression Data Reveals Novel Visual Pathways.

    PubMed

    Panser, Karin; Tirian, Laszlo; Schulze, Florian; Villalba, Santiago; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; Bühler, Katja; Straw, Andrew D

    2016-08-08

    Identifying distinct anatomical structures within the brain and developing genetic tools to target them are fundamental steps for understanding brain function. We hypothesize that enhancer expression patterns can be used to automatically identify functional units such as neuropils and fiber tracts. We used two recent, genome-scale Drosophila GAL4 libraries and associated confocal image datasets to segment large brain regions into smaller subvolumes. Our results (available at https://strawlab.org/braincode) support this hypothesis because regions with well-known anatomy, namely the antennal lobes and central complex, were automatically segmented into familiar compartments. The basis for the structural assignment is clustering of voxels based on patterns of enhancer expression. These initial clusters are agglomerated to make hierarchical predictions of structure. We applied the algorithm to central brain regions receiving input from the optic lobes. Based on the automated segmentation and manual validation, we can identify and provide promising driver lines for 11 previously identified and 14 novel types of visual projection neurons and their associated optic glomeruli. The same strategy can be used in other brain regions and likely other species, including vertebrates.

  4. Galápagos coral reef persistence after ENSO warming across an acidification gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, D.; Enochs, I.; Bruckner, A.; Renaud, P.; Kolodziej, G.; Budd, D. A.; Carlton, R.; Glynn, P.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is causing warming and ocean acidification. Coral reefs are being severelyimpacted, yet confusion lingers regarding how reefs will respond to these stressors over this century. Sincethe 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation warming event, the persistence of reefs around the GalápagosIslands has differed across an acidification gradient. Reefs disappeared where pH<8.0 and aragonitesaturation state (Ωarag) ≤ 3 and have not recovered, whereas one reef has persisted where pH>8.0 andΩarag>3. Where upwelling is greatest, calcification by massive Porites is higher than predicted by a publishedrelationship with temperature despite high CO2, possibly due to elevated nutrients. However, skeletal P/Ca, aproxy for phosphate exposure, negatively correlates with density (R = -0.822, p<0.0001). We propose thatelevated nutrients have the potential to exacerbate acidification by depressing coral skeletal densities andfurther increasing bioerosion already accelerated by low pH.

  5. Genetic analysis of a successful repatriation programme: giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Monteyne, Daniel; Gibbs, James P; Fritts, Thomas H; Tapia, Washington; Snell, Howard L; Tiedemann, Ralph; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2004-02-22

    As natural populations of endangered species dwindle to precarious levels, remaining members are sometimes brought into captivity, allowed to breed and their offspring returned to the natural habitat. One goal of such repatriation programmes is to retain as much of the genetic variation of the species as possible. A taxon of giant Galápagos tortoises on the island of Española has been the subject of a captive breeding-repatriation programme for 33 years. Core breeders, consisting of 12 females and three males, have produced more than 1200 offspring that have been released on Española where in situ reproduction has recently been observed. Using microsatellite DNA markers, we have determined the maternity and paternity of 132 repatriated offspring. Contributions of the breeders are highly skewed. This has led to a further loss of genetic variation that is detrimental to the long-term survival of the population. Modifications to the breeding programme could alleviate this problem.

  6. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Ruben H; Olesen, Jens M; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-07

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles.

  7. Recovery of a nearly extinct Galápagos tortoise despite minimal genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Kanitz, Ricardo; Tiedemann, Ralph; Tapia, Washington; Llerena, Fausto; Caccone, Adalgisa; Gibbs, James P; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2013-02-01

    A species of Galápagos tortoise endemic to Española Island was reduced to just 12 females and three males that have been bred in captivity since 1971 and have produced over 1700 offspring now repatriated to the island. Our molecular genetic analyses of juveniles repatriated to and surviving on the island indicate that none of the tortoises sampled in 1994 had hatched on the island versus 3% in 2004 and 24% in 2007, which demonstrates substantial and increasing reproduction in situ once again. This recovery occurred despite the parental population having an estimated effective population size <8 due to a combination of unequal reproductive success of the breeders and nonrandom mating in captivity. These results provide guidelines for adapting breeding regimes in the parental captive population and decreasing inbreeding in the repatriated population. Using simple morphological data scored on the sampled animals, we also show that a strongly heterogeneous distribution of tortoise sizes on Española Island observed today is due to a large variance in the number of animals included in yearly repatriation events performed in the last 40 years. Our study reveals that, at least in the short run, some endangered species can recover dramatically despite a lack of genetic variation and irregular repatriation efforts.

  8. Microsatellite analysis of genetic divergence among populations of giant Galápagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Gibbs, James P; Caccone, Adalgisa; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2002-11-01

    Giant Galápagos tortoises represent an interesting model for the study of patterns of genetic divergence and adaptive differentiation related to island colonization events. Recent mitochondrial DNA work elucidated the evolutionary history of the species and helped to clarify aspects of nomenclature. We used 10 microsatellite loci to assess levels of genetic divergence among and within island populations. In particular, we described the genetic structure of tortoises on the island of Isabela, where discrimination of different taxa is still subject of debate. Individual island populations were all genetically distinct. The island of Santa Cruz harboured two distinct populations. On Isabela, populations of Volcan Wolf, Darwin and Alcedo were significantly different from each other. On the other hand, Volcan Wolf showed allelic similarity with the island of Santiago. On Southern Isabela, lower genetic divergence was found between Northeast Sierra Negra and Volcan Alcedo, while patterns of gene flow were recorded among tortoises of Cerro Azul and Southeast Sierra Negra. These tortoises have endured heavy exploitation during the last three centuries and recently attracted much concern due to the current number of stochastic and deterministic threats to extant populations. Our study complements previous investigation based on mtDNA diversity and provides further information that may help devising tortoise management plans.

  9. Lake or bog? Reconstructing baseline ecological conditions for the protected Galápagos Sphagnum peatbogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Emily E. D.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper documents the first 10,000 year old plant macrofossil record of vegetation changes on the central island of Santa Cruz, providing information on Sphagnum bog vegetation patterns, local extinction of key taxa, and temporal successions in the Galápagos humid highlands. Vegetation change is reconstructed through examination of Holocene sedimentary sequences obtained from three Sphagnum bogs located within volcanic caldera forming the high elevation central ridge system of Santa Cruz Island. Results indicate that these specialized Sphagnum bog ecosystems are dynamic and have undergone considerable changes in vegetation composition, transitioning from diverse hygrophilous herbs and submerged aquatic ecosystems to drier Sphagnum/Pteridium bog systems, during the last 10,000 cal yr BP. Additionally a new aquatic genus previously undocumented on the islands, Elatine, was discovered at two of the study sites, but it is now extinct on the archipelago. Some of the observed vegetation successions may have been driven by climatic shifts occurring within the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP). Other drivers including anthropogenic change are also considered significant over the last hundred years, placing strain on this naturally dynamic system. This study helps reveal patterns of change in the humid highlands over the last 10,000 cal yr BP regarding vegetation variability, climatic shifts, the historical influence of fire, tortoise disturbance, and recent anthropogenic impacts on the island.

  10. Widespread uplift and 'trapdoor' faulting on Galápagos volcanoes observed with radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Amelung, F; Jónsson, S; Zebker, H; Segall, P

    2000-10-26

    Volcanic uplift, caused by the accumulation of magma in subsurface reservoirs, is a common precursor to eruptions. But, for some volcanoes, uplift of metres or more has not yet led to an eruption. Here we present displacement maps of volcanoes in the Galápagos Islands, constructed using satellite radar interferometry, that might help explain this dichotomy. We show that all but one of the seven volcanoes on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina deformed during 1992-99. Cerro Azul and Fernandina erupted during the observation period and show evidence of inflation, co-eruptive deflation and shallow dyke intrusion. In contrast, the largest volcano, Sierra Negra, has not erupted, yet exhibits spatially and temporally variable deformation, with a maximum uplift of 2.7 m between 1992 and 1999, which can be modelled by a shallow inflating sill. Inflation during 1997-98, however, was accompanied by 'trapdoor' faulting on a steeply dipping fracture system within the caldera. Repeated trapdoor faulting over geological time has formed an arcuate intra-caldera ridge within Sierra Negra and may have acted to relax stresses above the magma chamber, inhibiting summit eruptions. Similar processes may help explain large uplift unaccompanied by eruptive activity at other volcanoes.

  11. Seed dispersal networks in the Galápagos and the consequences of alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Heleno, Ruben H.; Olesen, Jens M.; Nogales, Manuel; Vargas, Pablo; Traveset, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Alien plants are a growing threat to the Galápagos unique biota. We evaluated the impact of alien plants on eight seed dispersal networks from two islands of the archipelago. Nearly 10 000 intact seeds from 58 species were recovered from the droppings of 18 bird and reptile dispersers. The most dispersed invaders were Lantana camara, Rubus niveus and Psidium guajava, the latter two likely benefiting from an asynchronous fruit production with most native plants, which facilitate their consumption and spread. Lava lizards dispersed the seeds of 27 species, being the most important dispersers, followed by small ground finch, two mockingbirds, the giant tortoise and two insectivorous birds. Most animals dispersed alien seeds, but these formed a relatively small proportion of the interactions. Nevertheless, the integration of aliens was higher in the island that has been invaded for longest, suggesting a time-lag between alien plant introductions and their impacts on seed dispersal networks. Alien plants become more specialized with advancing invasion, favouring more simplified plant and disperser communities. However, only habitat type significantly affected the overall network structure. Alien plants were dispersed via two pathways: dry-fruited plants were preferentially dispersed by finches, while fleshy fruited species were mostly dispersed by other birds and reptiles. PMID:23173203

  12. Population genetics of Galápagos land iguana (genus Conolophus) remnant populations.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Athanasia C; Rosa, Sabrina F P; Fabiani, Anna; Snell, Howard L; Snell, Heidi M; Marquez, Cruz; Tapia, Washington; Rassmann, Kornelia; Gentile, Gabriele; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2008-12-01

    The Galápagos land iguanas (genus Conolophus) have faced significant anthropogenic disturbances since the 17th century, leading to severe reduction of some populations and the extinction of others. Conservation activities, including the repatriation of captive-bred animals to depleted areas, have been ongoing since the late 1970s, but genetic information has not been extensively incorporated. Here we use nine species-specific microsatellite loci of 703 land iguanas from the six islands where the species occur today to characterize the genetic diversity within, and the levels of genetic differentiation among, current populations as well as test previous hypotheses about accidental translocations associated with early conservation efforts. Our analyses indicate that (i) five populations of iguanas represent distinct conservation units (one of them being the recently discovered rosada form) and could warrant species status, (ii) some individuals from North Seymour previously assumed to be from the natural Baltra population appear related to both Isabela and Santa Cruz populations, and (iii) the five different management units exhibit considerably different levels of intrapopulation genetic diversity, with the Plaza Sur and Santa Fe populations particularly low. Although the initial captive breeding programmes, coupled with intensive efforts to eradicate introduced species, saved several land iguana populations from extinction, our molecular results provide objective data for improving continuing in situ species survival plans and population management for this spectacular and emblematic reptile.

  13. Genetic Status and Timing of a Weevil Introduction to Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Successful invasive species can overcome or circumvent the potential genetic loss caused by an introduction bottleneck through a rapid population expansion and admixture from multiple introductions. We explore the genetic makeup and the timing of a species introduction to Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos archipelago. We investigate the presence of processes that can maintain genetic diversity in populations of the broad-nosed weevil Galapaganus howdenae howdenae. Analyses of combined genotypes for 8 microsatellite loci showed evidence of past population size reductions through moment and likelihood-based estimators. No evidence of admixture through multiple introductions was found, but substantial current population sizes (N0 298, 95% credible limits 50–2300), genetic diversity comparable with long-established endemics (Mean number of alleles = 3.875), and lack of genetic structure across the introduced range (F ST = 0.01359) could suggest that foundations are in place for populations to rapidly recover any loss of genetic variability. The time estimates for the introduction into Santa Cruz support an accidental transfer during the colonization period (1832–1959) predating the spurt in human population growth. Our evaluation of the genetic status of G. h. howdenae suggests potential for population growth in addition to our field observations of a concurrent expansion in range and feeding preferences towards protected areas and endemic host plants. PMID:24399746

  14. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-06-23

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation.

  15. Galápagos coral reef persistence after ENSO warming across an acidification gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, Derek P.; Enochs, Ian C.; Bruckner, Andrew; Renaud, Philip G.; Kolodziej, Graham; Budd, David A.; Carlton, Renée.; Glynn, Peter W.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is causing warming and ocean acidification. Coral reefs are being severely impacted, yet confusion lingers regarding how reefs will respond to these stressors over this century. Since the 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation warming event, the persistence of reefs around the Galápagos Islands has differed across an acidification gradient. Reefs disappeared where pH < 8.0 and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) ≤ 3 and have not recovered, whereas one reef has persisted where pH > 8.0 and Ωarag > 3. Where upwelling is greatest, calcification by massive Porites is higher than predicted by a published relationship with temperature despite high CO2, possibly due to elevated nutrients. However, skeletal P/Ca, a proxy for phosphate exposure, negatively correlates with density (R = -0.822, p < 0.0001). We propose that elevated nutrients have the potential to exacerbate acidification by depressing coral skeletal densities and further increasing bioerosion already accelerated by low pH.

  16. Recovery of a nearly extinct Galápagos tortoise despite minimal genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Kanitz, Ricardo; Tiedemann, Ralph; Tapia, Washington; Llerena, Fausto; Caccone, Adalgisa; Gibbs, James P; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    A species of Galápagos tortoise endemic to Española Island was reduced to just 12 females and three males that have been bred in captivity since 1971 and have produced over 1700 offspring now repatriated to the island. Our molecular genetic analyses of juveniles repatriated to and surviving on the island indicate that none of the tortoises sampled in 1994 had hatched on the island versus 3% in 2004 and 24% in 2007, which demonstrates substantial and increasing reproduction in situ once again. This recovery occurred despite the parental population having an estimated effective population size <8 due to a combination of unequal reproductive success of the breeders and nonrandom mating in captivity. These results provide guidelines for adapting breeding regimes in the parental captive population and decreasing inbreeding in the repatriated population. Using simple morphological data scored on the sampled animals, we also show that a strongly heterogeneous distribution of tortoise sizes on Española Island observed today is due to a large variance in the number of animals included in yearly repatriation events performed in the last 40 years. Our study reveals that, at least in the short run, some endangered species can recover dramatically despite a lack of genetic variation and irregular repatriation efforts. PMID:23467700

  17. Hypoallergenic Variant of the Major Egg White Allergen Gal d 1 Produced by Disruption of Cysteine Bridges

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapala, Pathum; Withanage-Dona, Dulashi; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Doran, Tim; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gal d 1 (ovomucoid) is the dominant allergen in the chicken egg white. Hypoallergenic variants of this allergen can be used in immunotherapy as an egg allergy treatment approach. We hypothesised that disruption of two of the nine cysteine-cysteine bridges by site-directed mutagenesis will allow the production of a hypoallergenic variant of the protein; Methods: Two cysteine residues at C192 and C210 in domain III of the protein were mutated to alanine using site-directed mutagenesis, to disrupt two separate cysteine-cysteine bridges. The mutated and non-mutated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) by induction with isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expressed proteins were analysed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting to confirm expression. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity of the two proteins was analysed, by immunoblotting, against a pool of egg-allergic patients’ sera. A pool of non-allergic patients’ sera was also used in a separate blot as a negative control; Results: Mutant Gal d 1 showed diminished IgE reactivity in the immunoblot by showing lighter bands when compared to the non-mutated version, although there was more of the mutant protein immobilised on the membrane when compared to the wild-type protein. The non-allergic negative control showed no bands, indicating an absence of non-specific binding of secondary antibody to the proteins; Conclusion: Disruption of two cysteine bridges in domain III of Gal d 1 reduces IgE reactivity. Following downstream laboratory and clinical testing, this mutant protein can be used in immunotherapy to induce tolerance to Gal d 1 and in egg allergy diagnosis. PMID:28230769

  18. Recycled crust in the Galápagos Plume source at 70 Ma: Implications for plume evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, Jarek; Vidito, Christopher; Gazel, Esteban; Herzberg, Claude; Class, Cornelia; Whalen, William; Jicha, Brian; Bizimis, Michael; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2015-09-01

    Galápagos plume-related lavas in the accreted terranes of the Caribbean and along the west coast of Costa Rica and Panama provide evidence on the evolution of the Galápagos mantle plume, specifically its mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and dynamics. Here we provide new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions, and high-precision olivine analyses for samples from the Quepos terrane (Costa Rica) to closely examine the transitional phase of the Galápagos Plume from Large Igneous Province (LIP) to ocean island basalt (OIB) forming stages. The new ages indicate that the record of Quepos volcanism began at 70 Ma and persisted for 10 Ma. Petrological evidence suggests that the maximum mantle potential temperature (Tp) of the plume changed from ∼1650° to ∼1550 °C between 90-70 Ma. This change correlates with a dominant pyroxenite component in the Galapagos source as indicated by high Ni and Fe/Mn and low Ca olivines relative to those that crystallized in normal peridotite derived melts. The decrease in Tp also correlates with an increase in high-field strength element enrichments, e.g., Nb/Nb*, of the erupted lavas. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Nd-Pb) suggest that the Quepos terrane samples have intermediate (Central Domain) radiogenic signatures. The Galápagos plume at 70 Ma represents elevated pyroxenite melt productivity relative to peridotite in a cooling lithologically heterogeneous mantle.

  19. A new model for the growth of basaltic shields based on deformation of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Amelung, Falk; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Space-geodetic measurements of surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina – the most frequently erupting volcano in the Galápagos Archipelago – reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from a shallow magma reservoir. This includes eruptions from fissures that are oriented both radially and circumferentially with respect to the summit caldera. A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image acquired 1–2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galápagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, and this assumption has guided models of the origin of the eruptive fissure geometry and overall development of the volcanoes. Our findings allow us to reinterpret the internal structure and evolution of Galápagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields. Furthermore, we note that stress changes generated by the emplacement of subhorizontal sills feeding one type of eruption may control the geometry of subsequent eruptive fissures. Specifically, circumferential fissures tend to open within areas uplifted by sill intrusions that initiated previous radial fissure eruptions. This mechanism provides a possible explanation for the pattern of eruptive fissures that characterizes all the western Galápagos volcanoes, as well as the alternation between radial and circumferential fissure eruptions at Fernandina. The same model suggests that the next eruption of Fernandina will be from a circumferential fissure in the area uplifted by the 2009 sill intrusion, just southwest of the caldera rim.

  20. Tracing early stages of species differentiation: Ecological, morphological and genetic divergence of Galápagos sea lion populations

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Oceans are high gene flow environments that are traditionally believed to hamper the build-up of genetic divergence. Despite this, divergence appears to occur occasionally at surprisingly small scales. The Galápagos archipelago provides an ideal opportunity to examine the evolutionary processes of local divergence in an isolated marine environment. Galápagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) are top predators in this unique setting and have an essentially unlimited dispersal capacity across the entire species range. In theory, this should oppose any genetic differentiation. Results We find significant ecological, morphological and genetic divergence between the western colonies and colonies from the central region of the archipelago that are exposed to different ecological conditions. Stable isotope analyses indicate that western animals use different food sources than those from the central area. This is likely due to niche partitioning with the second Galápagos eared seal species, the Galápagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) that exclusively dwells in the west. Stable isotope patterns correlate with significant differences in foraging-related skull morphology. Analyses of mitochondrial sequences as well as microsatellites reveal signs of initial genetic differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest a key role of intra- as well as inter-specific niche segregation in the evolution of genetic structure among populations of a highly mobile species under conditions of free movement. Given the monophyletic arrival of the sea lions on the archipelago, our study challenges the view that geographical barriers are strictly needed for the build-up of genetic divergence. The study further raises the interesting prospect that in social, colonially breeding mammals additional forces, such as social structure or feeding traditions, might bear on the genetic partitioning of populations. PMID:18485220

  1. Aedes Taeniorhynchus Vectorial Capacity Informs A Pre-Emptive Assessment Of West Nile Virus Establishment In Galápagos

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    Increased connectivity with the mainland has led to the arrival of many invasive species to the Galápagos Islands, including novel pathogens, threatening the archipelago's unique fauna. Here we consider the potential role of the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus in maintaining the flavivirus West Nile virus [WNV] should it reach the islands. We report on three components of vectorial capacity - vector competency, distributional abundance and host-feeding. In contrast to USA strains, Galápagos A. taeniorhynchus is a competent and efficient WNV vector, capable of transmission at 5 days post-exposure. Based on 25 blood-meals, mammalian feeding suggests a potential bridge vector role should contact with key amplification taxa occur. Vector population abundance is driven primarily by climatic factors, peaking between January and March. As a ubiquitous competent vector, A. taeniorhynchus may facilitate future WNV establishment, therefore it is vital to ensure the biosecurity of Galápagos to prevent introductions of pathogens such as WNV. PMID:23519190

  2. Structural basis for binding the TREX2 complex to nuclear pores, GAL1 localisation and mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Jani, Divyang; Valkov, Eugene; Stewart, Murray

    2014-06-01

    The conserved Sac3:Thp1:Sem1:Sus1:Cdc31 (TREX2) complex binds to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and, in addition to integrating mRNA nuclear export with preceding steps in the gene expression pathway, facilitates re-positioning of highly regulated actively transcribing genes (such as GAL1) to NPCs. Although TREX2 is thought to bind NPC protein Nup1, defining the precise role of this interaction has been frustrated by the complex pleiotropic phenotype exhibited by nup1Δ strains. To provide a structural framework for understanding the binding of TREX2 to NPCs and its function in the gene expression pathway, we have determined the structure of the Nup1:TREX2 interaction interface and used this information to engineer a Sac3 variant that impairs NPC binding while not compromising TREX2 assembly. This variant inhibited the NPC association of both de-repressed and activated GAL1 and also produced mRNA export and growth defects. These results indicate that the TREX2:Nup1 interaction facilitates the efficient nuclear export of bulk mRNA together with the re-positioning of GAL1 to NPCs that is required for transcriptional control that is mediated by removal of SUMO from repressors by NPC-bound Ulp1.

  3. Disposition and Pharmacology of a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO Targeting Human Lipoprotein (a) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Graham, Mark J; Post, Noah; Riney, Stan; Zanardi, Thomas; Hall, Shannon; Burkey, Jennifer; Shemesh, Colby S; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Geary, Richard S; Wang, Yanfeng; Henry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3)-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have greatly improved potency via receptor-mediated uptake. In the present study, the in vivo pharmacology of a 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified ASO conjugated with GalNAc3 (ISIS 681257) together with its unmodified congener (ISIS 494372) targeting human apolipoprotein (a) (apo(a)), were studied in human LPA transgenic mice. Further, the disposition kinetics of ISIS 681257 was studied in CD-1 mice. ISIS 681257 demonstrated over 20-fold improvement in potency over ISIS 494372 as measured by liver apo(a) mRNA and plasma apo(a) protein levels. Following subcutaneous (SC) dosing, ISIS 681257 cleared rapidly from plasma and distributed to tissues. Intact ISIS 681257 was the major full-length oligonucleotide species in plasma. In tissues, however, GalNAc sugar moiety was rapidly metabolized and unconjugated ISIS 681257 accounted > 97% of the total exposure, which was then cleared slowly from tissues with a half-life of 7–8 days, similar to the half-life in plasma. ISIS 681257 is highly bound to plasma proteins (> 94% bound), which limited its urinary excretion. This study confirmed dose-dependent exposure to the parent drug ISIS 681257 in plasma and rapid conversion to unconjugated ASO in tissues. Safety data and the extended half-life support its further development and weekly dosing in phase 1 clinical studies. PMID:27138177

  4. Differentiation with drift: a spatio-temporal genetic analysis of Galápagos mockingbird populations (Mimus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Hoeck, Paquita E. A.; Bollmer, Jennifer L.; Parker, Patricia G.; Keller, Lukas F.

    2010-01-01

    Small and isolated island populations provide ideal systems to study the effects of limited population size, genetic drift and gene flow on genetic diversity. We assessed genetic diversity within and differentiation among 19 mockingbird populations on 15 Galápagos islands, covering all four endemic species, using 16 microsatellite loci. We tested for signs of drift and gene flow, and used historic specimens to assess genetic change over the last century and to estimate effective population sizes. Within-population genetic diversity and effective population sizes varied substantially among island populations and correlated strongly with island size, suggesting that island size serves as a good predictor for effective population size. Genetic differentiation among populations was pronounced and increased with geographical distance. A century of genetic drift did not change genetic diversity on an archipelago-wide scale, but genetic drift led to loss of genetic diversity in small populations, especially in one of the two remaining populations of the endangered Floreana mockingbird. Unlike in other Galápagos bird species such as the Darwin's finches, gene flow among mockingbird populations was low. The clear pattern of genetically distinct populations reflects the effects of genetic drift and suggests that Galápagos mockingbirds are evolving in relative isolation. PMID:20194174

  5. Aedes taeniorhynchus vectorial capacity informs a pre-emptive assessment of West Nile virus establishment in Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J; Cunningham, Andrew A; Kramer, Laura D

    2013-01-01

    Increased connectivity with the mainland has led to the arrival of many invasive species to the Galápagos Islands, including novel pathogens, threatening the archipelago's unique fauna. Here we consider the potential role of the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus in maintaining the flavivirus West Nile virus [WNV] should it reach the islands. We report on three components of vectorial capacity - vector competency, distributional abundance and host-feeding. In contrast to USA strains, Galápagos A. taeniorhynchus is a competent and efficient WNV vector, capable of transmission at 5 days post-exposure. Based on 25 blood-meals, mammalian feeding suggests a potential bridge vector role should contact with key amplification taxa occur. Vector population abundance is driven primarily by climatic factors, peaking between January and March. As a ubiquitous competent vector, A. taeniorhynchus may facilitate future WNV establishment, therefore it is vital to ensure the biosecurity of Galápagos to prevent introductions of pathogens such as WNV.

  6. Distribution of acetylated histones resulting from Gal4-VP16 recruitment of SAGA and NuA4 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Marissa; Steger, David J.; Neely, Kristen E.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the targeting of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes by DNA-binding activators during transcriptional activation and the resulting distribution of acetylated histones. An in vitro competition assay was developed to acetylate and transcribe a nucleosomal array template in the presence of excess non-specific chromatin, which mimics in vivo conditions. Stimulation of transcription from the nucleosomal array template under competitive conditions by the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes depended on the presence of the Gal4-VP16 activator, which recognizes sites in the promoter and directly interacts with these HATs. Importantly, the stimulation of transcription by SAGA and NuA4 depended on the presence of Gal4-VP16 during histone acetylation, and Gal4-VP16-bound nucleosomal templates were acetylated preferentially by SAGA and NuA4 relative to the competitor chromatin. While targeting of the SAGA complex led to H3 acetylation of promoter-proximal nucleosomes, targeting of the NuA4 complex led to a broader domain of H4 acetylation of >3 kbp. Thus, either promoter-proximal H3 acetylation by SAGA or broadly distributed acetylation of H4 by NuA4 activated transcription from chromatin templates. PMID:10835360

  7. Ascorbic acid deficiency leads to increased grain chalkiness in transgenic rice for suppressed of L-GalLDH.

    PubMed

    Yu, Le; Liu, Yonghai; Lu, Lina; Zhang, Qilei; Chen, Yezheng; Zhou, Liping; Chen, Hua; Peng, Changlian

    2017-04-01

    The grain chalkiness of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which determines the rice quality and price, is a major concern in rice breeding. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in regulating rice endosperm chalkiness. Ascorbic acid (Asc) is a major plant antioxidant, which strictly regulates the levels of ROS. l-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (L-GalLDH, EC 1.3.2.3) is an enzyme that catalyzes the last step of Asc biosynthesis in higher plants. Here we show that the L-GalLDH-suppressed transgenic rice, GI-1 and GI-2, which have constitutively low (between 30% and 50%) leaf and grain Asc content compared with the wild-type (WT), exhibit significantly increased grain chalkiness. Further examination showed that the deficiency of Asc resulted in a higher lipid peroxidation and H2O2 content, accompanied by a lower hydroxyl radical scavenging rate, total antioxidant capacity and photosynthetic ability. In addition, changes of the enzyme activities and gene transcript abundances related to starch synthesis were also observed in GI-1 and GI-2 grains. The results we presented here suggest a close correlation between Asc deficiency and grain chalkiness in the L-GalLDH-suppressed transgenics. Asc deficiency leads to the accumulation of H2O2, affecting antioxidant capacity and photosynthetic function, changing enzyme activities and gene transcript abundances related to starch synthesis, finally leading to the increased grain chalkiness.

  8. Microrefugia and species persistence in the Galápagos highlands: a 26,000-year paleoecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aaron F; Bush, Mark B; Sachs, Julian P

    2013-01-01

    The Galápagos Islands are known to have experienced significant drought during the Quaternary. The loss of mesophytic upland habitats has been suggested to underlie the relatively lower endemism of upland compared with lowland plant assemblages. A fossil pollen record spanning the last 26,000 years from an upland bog on Santa Cruz Island, revealed the persistent presence of highland pollen and spore types during the last glacial maximum and a millennial-scale series of droughts in the mid Holocene. The absence of lowland taxa and presence of mesic taxa led to the conclusion that the highland flora of the Galápagos persisted during both these periods. The resiliency of the highland flora of the Galápagos to long-term drought contradicts an earlier hypothesis that an extinction of highland taxa occurred during the last glacial maximum and that rapid Holocene speciation created the modern plant assemblage within the last 10,000 years. Based on the palynological data, we suggest that, even during the height of glacial and Holocene droughts, cool sea-surface temperatures and strong trade-wind activity would have promoted persistent ground level cloudiness that provided the necessary moisture inputs to maintain microrefugia for mesophytic plants. Although moist conditions were maintained, the lack of precipitation caused the loss of open water habitat during such events, and accounts for the known extinctions of species such as Azolla sp., and Elatine sp., while other moisture dependent taxa, i.e., Cyathea weatherbyana, persisted.

  9. Present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylidae: Phyllodactylus) stems from three independent colonization events.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Rodríguez-Guerra, Andrea; Chaves, Jaime A

    2016-10-01

    We re-examined the biogeography of the leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus) endemic to the Galápagos Islands by analyzing for the first time samples of P. gilberti, a species endemic to Wolf island, in a phylogenetic framework. Our aim was to test the three-colonizations scenario previously proposed for these lizards and estimate the age of each colonization event. To achieve this we estimated simultaneously a species tree and divergence times with Bayesian methods. Our results supported the three-colonizations scenario. Similar to a previous hypothesis, the species tree obtained here showed that most species of Phyllodactylus are nested in a single clade with an age between 5.49 and 13.8Ma, whereas a second independent colonization corresponding to P. darwini from San Cristóbal island occurred 3.03Ma ago. The species from Wolf island, P. gilberti, stems from a more recent colonization event (0.69Ma). Thus, present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos stems from three independent, asynchronous colonization events. As with other Galápagos organisms, the Pacific coast of South America seems to be the source for the founders of P. gilberti.

  10. ST6Gal-I overexpression facilitates prostate cancer progression via the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujie; Zhang, Han; Wang, Liping; Yu, Xiao; Yuan, Qingmin; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Shujing

    2016-01-01

    ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase adds α2,6-linked sialic acids to the terminal ends of glycan chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids. ST6Gal-I is reportedly upregulated in many cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, ovarian cancer and breast cancer. However, the expression and function of ST6Gal-I in prostate cancer (PCa) and the mechanism underlying this function remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed that ST6Gal-I expression was upregulated in human PCa tissues compared to non-malignant prostate tissues. High ST6Gal-I expression was positively correlated with Gleason scores, seminal vesicle involvement and poor survival in patients with PCa. ST6Gal-I knockdown in aggressive prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells significantly inhibited the proliferation, growth, migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. ST6Gal-I knockdown decreased the levels of several PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/ β-catenin pathway components, such as p-PI3K, (Ser473)p-Akt, (Ser9)p-GSK-3β and β-catenin. Furthermore, targeting this pathway with a PI3K inhibitor or Akt RNA interference decreased p-Akt, p-GSK-3β and β-catenin expression, resulting in decreased PC-3 and DU145 proliferation, migration and invasion. Taken together, these results indicate that ST6Gal-I plays a critical role in cell proliferation and invasion via the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway during PCa progression and that it might be a promising target for PCa prognosis determination and therapy. PMID:27588482

  11. Making Home Sweet and Sturdy: Toxoplasma gondii ppGalNAc-Ts Glycosylate in Hierarchical Order and Confer Cyst Wall Rigidity

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Tadakimi; Sugi, Tatsuki; Yakubu, Rama; Tu, Vincent; Ma, Yanfen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protozoan intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii forms latent cysts in the central nervous system (CNS) and persists for the lifetime of the host. This cyst is cloaked with a glycosylated structure called the cyst wall. Previously, we demonstrated that a mucin-like glycoprotein, CST1, localizes to the cyst wall and confers structural rigidity on brain cysts in a mucin-like domain-dependent manner. The mucin-like domain of CST1 is composed of 20 units of threonine-rich tandem repeats that are O-GalNAc glycosylated. A family of enzymes termed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) initiates O-GalNAc glycosylation. To identify which isoforms of ppGalNAc-Ts are responsible for the glycosylation of the CST1 mucin-like domain and to evaluate the function of each ppGalNAc-T in the overall glycosylation of the cyst wall, all five ppGalNAc-T isoforms were deleted individually from the T. gondii genome. The ppGalNAc-T2 and -T3 deletion mutants produced various glycosylation defects on the cyst wall, implying that many cyst wall glycoproteins are glycosylated by T2 and T3. Both T2 and T3 glycosylate the CST1 mucin-like domain, and this glycosylation is necessary for CST1 to confer structural rigidity on the cyst wall. We established that T2 is required for the initial glycosylation of the mucin-like domain and that T3 is responsible for the sequential glycosylation on neighboring acceptor sites, demonstrating hierarchical glycosylation by two distinct initiating and filling-in ppGalNAc-Ts in an intact organism. PMID:28074022

  12. The Diagnostic Utility of Determining Anti-GM1: GalC Complex Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Galban-Horcajo, Francesc; Vlam, Lotte; Delmont, Emilien; Halstead, Susan K.; van den Berg, Leonard; van der Pol, W-Ludo; Willison, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is associated with IgM antibodies to GM1 ganglioside. The importance of the lipid milieu that might facilitate or inhibit antibody binding to GM1 in immunoassays is well recognised. Existing studies, using a range of different approaches, generally concur that anti-GM1 IgM antibody detection rates are improved by the addition of galactocerebroside (GalC) to the GM1 assay. Objective: The current study sought to formally evaluate the clinical utility of the GM1:GalC complex assay in the diagnosis of MMN. Methods: Anti-GM1 and -GM1:GalC antibodies were examined using ELISA and glycoarray (dot blot) in a fully blinded study design, consisting of 100 MMN patients, 100 ALS cases and 100 healthy controls. Results: The detection of anti-GM1 Abs using glycoarray was 67% sensitive and 85% specific. The addition of GalC to GM1, (1:1 weight to weight ratio), increased the sensitivity to 81% , whilst dropping specificity to 80% . Increasing the GalC content to a 1:5 ratio (or higher) further decreased specificity, and in doing so limited the usefulness of the GM1:GalC assay to the level of GM1 alone. The addition of GalC to the ELISA method also significantly increased sensitivity compared with GM1 alone, albeit with a significant decrease in specificity. Conclusions: This study indicates that the GM1:GalC assay is an advantageous assay adaptation for detecting anti-GM1 antibodies in MMN, using either glycoarray or ELISA, and warrants introduction into clinical diagnostic practice. PMID:27858734

  13. IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody inhibits the voltage-dependent calcium channel currents in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Nagaoka, Takumi; Hotta, Sayako; Utsunomiya, Iku; Yoshino, Hiide; Miyatake, Tadashi; Hoshi, Keiko; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies, produced by immunizing rabbits with GalNAc-GD1a, on the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCCs) currents in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Immunized rabbit serum that had a high titer of anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibited the VDCCs currents in the NGF-differentiated PC12 cells (36.0+/-9.6% reduction). The inhibitory effect of this serum was reversed to some degree within 3-4 min by washing with bath solution. Similarly, application of purified IgG from rabbit serum immunized with GalNAc-GD1a significantly inhibited the VDCCs currents in PC12 cells (30.6+/-2.5% reduction), and this inhibition was recovered by washing with bath solution. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect was also observed in the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column binding fraction (reduction of 31.1+/-9.85%), while the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column pass-through fraction attenuated the inhibitory effect on VDCCs currents. Normal rabbit serum and normal rabbit IgG did not affect the VDCCs currents in the PC12 cells. In an immunocytochemical study using fluorescence staining, the PC12 cells were stained using GalNAc-GD1a binding fraction. These results indicate that anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibit the VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  14. ST6Gal-I overexpression facilitates prostate cancer progression via the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wei, Anwen; Fan, Bo; Zhao, Yujie; Zhang, Han; Wang, Liping; Yu, Xiao; Yuan, Qingmin; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Shujing

    2016-10-04

    ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase adds α2,6-linked sialic acids to the terminal ends of glycan chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids. ST6Gal-I is reportedly upregulated in many cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, ovarian cancer and breast cancer. However, the expression and function of ST6Gal-I in prostate cancer (PCa) and the mechanism underlying this function remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed that ST6Gal-I expression was upregulated in human PCa tissues compared to non-malignant prostate tissues. High ST6Gal-I expression was positively correlated with Gleason scores, seminal vesicle involvement and poor survival in patients with PCa. ST6Gal-I knockdown in aggressive prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells significantly inhibited the proliferation, growth, migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. ST6Gal-I knockdown decreased the levels of several PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/ β-catenin pathway components, such as p-PI3K, (Ser473)p-Akt, (Ser9)p-GSK-3β and β-catenin. Furthermore, targeting this pathway with a PI3K inhibitor or Akt RNA interference decreased p-Akt, p-GSK-3β and β-catenin expression, resulting in decreased PC-3 and DU145 proliferation, migration and invasion. Taken together, these results indicate that ST6Gal-I plays a critical role in cell proliferation and invasion via the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway during PCa progression and that it might be a promising target for PCa prognosis determination and therapy.

  15. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  16. The Streptomyces galP1 promoter has a novel RNA polymerase recognition sequence and is transcribed by a new form of RNA polymerase in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, M E; Mattern, S G; Babcock, M J; Westpheling, J

    1997-01-01

    We report the identification of DNA sequences that determine the activity of the Streptomyces galP1 promoter and a new form of RNA polymerase holoenzyme that recognizes these sequences in vitro. Base substitutions were introduced throughout the galP1 promoter region, and bases at positions -34, -36, and -11 with respect to the transcription start site were shown to be required for promoter function. These bases correspond in their positions to regions known to be important for RNA polymerase binding in several classes of eubacterial promoters, but the sequences themselves are not similar to those previously described. The -35 region of the galP1 promoter consists of six G residues, and base changes in this G hexamer had a dramatic effect on promoter activity. By using galP1-containing DNA template, a new RNA polymerase activity was purified from Streptomyces. Holoenzyme reconstitution experiments identified a new sigma factor that directs galP1 transcription in vitro. DNase I protection experiments identified a binding site for this new holoenzyme immediately upstream of the galP1 transcription start site. PMID:9150217

  17. Proteolytic Shedding of ST6Gal-I by BACE1 Regulates the Glycosylation and Function of α4β1 Integrins*

    PubMed Central

    Woodard-Grice, Alencia V.; McBrayer, Alexis C.; Wakefield, John K.; Zhuo, Ya; Bellis, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Differentiation of monocytes into macrophages is accompanied by increased cell adhesiveness, due in part to the activation of α4β1 integrins. Here we report that the sustained α4β1 activation associated with macrophage differentiation results from expression of β1 integrin subunits that lack α2–6-linked sialic acids, a carbohydrate modification added by the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase. During differentiation of U937 monocytic cells and primary human CD14+ monocytes, ST6Gal-I is down-regulated, leading to β1 hyposialylation and enhanced α4β1-dependent VCAM-1 binding. Importantly, ST6Gal-I down-regulation results from cleavage by the BACE1 secretase, which we show is dramatically up-regulated during macrophage differentiation. BACE1 up-regulation, ST6Gal-I shedding, β1 hyposialylation, and α4β1-dependent VCAM-1 binding are all temporally correlated and share the same signaling mechanism (protein kinase C/Ras/ERK). Preventing ST6Gal-I down-regulation (and therefore integrin hyposialylation), through BACE1 inhibition or ST6Gal-I constitutive overexpression, eliminates VCAM-1 binding. Similarly, preventing integrin hyposialylation inhibits a differentiation-induced increase in the expression of an activation-dependent conformational epitope on the β1 subunit. Collectively, these results describe a novel mechanism for α4β1 regulation and further suggest an unanticipated role for BACE1 in macrophage function. PMID:18650447

  18. Functional characterization and transcriptional analysis of galE gene encoding a UDP-galactose 4-epimerase in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Te; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Du, Shin-Chiao; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causative agent of black rot in crucifers, a disease that causes tremendous agricultural loss. In this study, the Xcc galE gene was characterized. Sequence and mutational analysis demonstrated that the Xcc galE encodes a UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (EC 5.1.3.2), which catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose. Alanine substitution of the putative catalytic residues (Ser124, Tyr147, and Lys151) of GalE caused loss of epimerase activity. Further study showed that the Xcc galE mutant had reduced biofilm formation ability. Furthermore, reporter assays revealed that galE transcription exhibits a distinct expression profile under different culture conditions, is subject to catabolite repression, and is positively regulated by Clp and RpfF. In addition, the galE transcription initiation site was mapped. This is the first time that UDP-galactose 4-epimerase has been characterized in the crucifer pathogen Xcc.

  19. Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Galápagos Hotspot from Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, D. R.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    To understand plume-lithosphere interaction in a near-ridge setting, we present a surface wave tomographic study of the upper mantle beneath the Galápagos Archipelago. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by a network of 10 broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA experiment and the GSN station PAYG. We analyze waves in 12 separate frequency bands (8-50 mHz), which are sensitive to shear wave velocity (Vs) structure in the upper 150 km. To account for non-great-circle propagation caused by multipathing we use the two-plane-wave approximation of Forsyth and others. Two-dimensional models of phase velocity obtained at each frequency are inverted for three-dimensional variations in Vs. Average one-dimensional phase velocities are 1-2% slower than for 0-4 My-old Pacific mantle, and phase velocities vary laterally by ±3%. Inversions of phase velocities reveal that Vs varies regionally from 3.7 to 4.1 km/s, 3-15% slower than predicted along a 1300° C adiabat, and that there are two volumes of pronounced low velocity (>10% Vs reduction). Neither anomaly can be attributed to temperature alone; instead they require increased amounts of partial melt. The first anomaly, located beneath the volcanoes of the southwestern archipelago that erupt large volumes of enriched magmas, is most pronounced above 40 km depth and its magnitude increases toward the surface. This anomaly lies above an area of thinner-than-normal mantle transition zone and a cylindrical low-velocity body imaged by P and S wave tomography at depths of 100 to 250 km. This first anomaly may be the result of melt accumulation above a region of decompression melting driven by plume upwelling. The second low-velocity volume underlies the central archipelago, including the islands of Santiago and Marchena, and appears to be concentrated between 50 and 80 km depth. This anomaly is less pronounced near the surface, underlies a region that produces MORB, and coincides with a region of apparent

  20. Comparative Genetic Structure and Demographic History in Endemic Galápagos Weevils

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Courtney C.; Sijapati, Manisha; Roque Albelo, Lázaro

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of maintaining genetic diversity within populations can be exacerbated for island endemics if they display population dynamics and behavioral attributes that expose them to genetic drift without the benefits of gene flow. We assess patterns of the genetic structure and demographic history in 27 populations of 9 species of flightless endemic Galápagos weevils from 9 of the islands and 1 winged introduced close relative. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA reveals a significant population structure and moderately variable, though demographically stable, populations for lowland endemics (FST = 0.094–0.541; π: 0.014–0.042; Mismatch P = 0.003–0.026; and D(Tajima) = −0.601 to 1.203), in contrast to signals of past contractions and expansions in highland specialists on 2 islands (Mismatch P = 0.003–0.026 and D(Tajima) = −0.601 to 1.203). We interpret this series of variable and highly structured population groups as a system of long-established, independently founded island units, where structuring could be a signal of microallopatric differentiation due to patchy host plant distribution and poor dispersal abilities. We suggest that the severe reduction and subsequent increase of a suitably moist habitat that accompanied past climatic variation could have contributed to the observed population fluctuations in highland specialists. We propose the future exploration of hybridization between the introduced and highland endemic species on Santa Cruz, especially given the expansion of the introduced species into the highlands, the sensitivity to past climatic variation detected in highland populations, and the potentially threatened state of single-island endemics. PMID:22174444

  1. Road effects on abundance and fitness of Galápagos lava lizards (Microlophus albemarlensis).

    PubMed

    Tanner, Dawn; Perry, Jim

    2007-10-01

    Vehicle collisions with wildlife have the potential to negatively impact species everywhere roads divide natural habitats; this is especially true in areas where roads are a recent addition to the landscape (e.g., in the last decade) and/or where expansion of a road network is underway. This study addresses the impact of traffic fatalities on lava lizards, Microlophus albemarlensis, on the island of Santa Cruz, Galápagos. The main road bisecting the island north to south was added to the island beginning in 1974 but not fully paved until 2000. We assessed impacts occurring due to traffic and vehicle speeds on the island. This study adds impacts to lizard populations to those conducted on birds on Santa Cruz, providing a means to create multi-species recommendations. To quantify impacts to lizard populations, we assessed lizards on randomly chosen transects perpendicular to the road. We used Poisson regression to analyze those data and found a 30% increase in lizard abundance per 100 m distance from the road across vegetation zones. We compared incidence of prior tail loss of road-killed lizards and live animals to comment on additional energetic costs of occupying near-road territories. Tail condition could not be assessed in some road-killed lizards; among those that we could assess, 29% showed evidence of prior tail loss. That rate declined to apparent baseline conditions of only 1% beyond 200 m from the road. By traveling the length of the 40-km road, we identified hot spots for fatalities of both lizards and birds to provide necessary information for developing management and remediation strategies. We offer guidance on Best Management Practices, such as testing overpasses, fencing and underpasses, which might reduce vehicle impacts to lizards from drivers on the current road. This information is essential because of a planned increase in the Santa Cruz road network in areas where lava lizards are most abundant.

  2. Metamorphosed oceanic lithosphere from the Chunky Gal Mountain complex, Blue Ridge province, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ranson, W.A.; Garihan, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Closely associated dunite and layered troctolite, gabbro, and anorthosite from the Chunky Gal Mountain mafic-ultramafic complex suggest a related ocean floor origin for these lithologies, with regional emplacement by the pre-metamorphic Hayesville-Fries thrust of Taconic age. Anhydrous mineral assemblages of dunitic and troctolitic rocks were more resistant to granulite and upper amphibolite metamorphic episodes, retaining much of their original mineralogy. Dunite consists of fresh polycrystalline olivine with local development of anthophyllite, serpentine, and talc along fractures. Dunite adjacent to mafic amphibolites of the complex contains distinctive cm-scale bands or layers of recrystallized plagioclase( ) of uncertain affinity, possibly veins or rhythmic layers. Troctolitic rocks display reaction textures around fresh olivine and plagioclase. Orthopyroxene growing normal to olivine grain boundaries forms an inner corona, in turn surrounded by a complex symplectite of Cpx + Plag [+-] Grt [+-] Spl. Gabbroic rocks show nearly complete replacement of original mafic minerals. Orthopyroxene survives in a few gabbros but mostly has been replaced by emerald green alumino-magnesio-hornblende. Calcic plagioclase is abundant as subhedral crystals or as oval, polycrystalline clots and pink corundum constitutes an accessory phase. A possible reaction resulting in the observed aluminous assemblage is: Na-Plag + Opx + Di + Spl + fluid = Mg-Hbl + Crn + Ca-Plag. Anorthosites occur as layers 10--50 cm in width within layered troctolites and consist of beautifully recrystallized plagioclase with seriate texture and minor amounts of alumino-magnesio hornblende occurring as fine-grained clots. Contacts between anorthosite and troctolite display the same sort of symplectite formed as an outer corona around olivine in the troctolite.

  3. Steroid hormones and aggression in female Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Dustin R; Wikelski, Martin

    2005-09-01

    We studied steroid hormone patterns and aggression during breeding in female Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Females display vigorously towards courting males after copulating (female-male aggression), as well as fight for and defend nest sites against other females (female-female aggression). To understand the neuroendocrine basis of this aggressive behavior, we examined changes in testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), corticosterone (CORT), and progesterone (P4) during the mating and nesting periods, and then measured levels in nesting females captured during aggressive interactions. Testosterone reached maximal levels during the mating stage when female-male aggression was most common, and increased slightly, but significantly, during the nesting stage when female-female aggression was most common. However, fighting females had significantly lower T, but higher E2 and P4, than non-fighting females. It remains unclear whether these changes in hormone levels during aggressive interactions are a cause or a consequence of a change in behavior. Our results support the "challenge hypothesis", but suggest that E2 and/or P4 may increase in response to aggressive challenges in females just as T does in males. Females may be rapidly aromatizing T to elevate circulating levels of E2 during aggressive interactions. This hypothesis could explain why non-fighting females had slightly elevated baseline T, but extremely low E2, during stages when aggressive interactions were most common. Although P4 increased rapidly during aggressive encounters, it is unclear whether it acts directly to affect behavior, or indirectly via conversion to E2. The rapid production and conversion of E2 and P4 may be an important mechanism underlying female aggression in vertebrates.

  4. Blood gases, biochemistry and haematology of Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    Lewbart, Gregory A; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Brothers, J Roger; Muñoz-Pérez, Juan Pablo; Denkinger, Judith; Vinueza, Luis; García, Juan; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    The marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus, is an iconic lizard endemic to the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador, but surprisingly little information exists on baseline health parameters for this species. We analysed blood samples drawn from 35 marine iguanas captured at three locations on San Cristóbal Island. A portable blood analyser (iSTAT) was used to obtain near-immediate field results for pH, lactate, partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), percentage O2 saturation, haematocrit, haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium and glucose. Parameter values affected by temperature were auto-corrected by the iSTAT. Standard laboratory haematology techniques were employed for differential white blood cell counts and haematocrit determination; resulting values were also compared with the haematocrit values generated by the iSTAT. Body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and body measurements were also recorded. Body length was positively correlated with several blood chemistry values (HCO3 (-) and glucose) and two haematology parameters (haemoglobin and manually determined haematocrit). A notable finding was the unusually high blood sodium level; the mean value of 178 mg/dl is among the highest known for any reptile. This value is likely to be a conservative estimate because some samples exceeded the maximal value the iSTAT can detect. For haematocrit determination, the iSTAT blood analyser yielded results significantly lower than those obtained with high-speed centrifugation. The values reported in this study provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among marine iguanas affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic threats. The findings might also be helpful in future efforts to demonstrate associations between specific biochemical parameters and disease.

  5. Endocrine-reproductive-immune interactions in female and male Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; French, Susannah S

    2017-02-01

    Endocrine-immune interactions are variable across species and contexts making it difficult to discern consistent patterns. There is a paucity of data in non-model systems making these relationships even more nebulous, particularly in reptiles. In the present study, we have completed a more comprehensive test of the relationship among steroid hormones and ecologically relevant immune measures. We tested the relationship between baseline and stress-induced levels of sex and adrenal steroid hormones and standard ecoimmunological metrics in both female and male Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). We found significant associations between adrenal activity and immunity, whereby females that mounted greater corticosterone responses to stress had lower basal and stress-induced immunity (i.e., bactericidal ability). Males showed the opposite relationship, suggesting sex-specific immunomodulatory actions of corticosterone. In both sexes, we observed a stress-induced increase in corticosterone, and in females a stress-induced increase in bactericidal ability. Consistent with other taxa, we also found that baseline corticosterone and testosterone in males was inversely related to baseline bactericidal ability. However, in females, we found a positive relationship between both testosterone and progesterone and bactericidal ability. Multivariate analysis did not discern any further endocrine-immune relationships, suggesting that interactions between adrenal, sex steroid hormones, and the immune system may not be direct and instead may be responding to other common stimuli, (i.e., reproductive status, energy). Taken together, these data illustrate significant endocrine-immune interactions that are highly dependent on sex and the stress state of the animal.

  6. Blood gases, biochemistry and haematology of Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

    PubMed Central

    Lewbart, Gregory A.; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Brothers, J. Roger; Muñoz-Pérez, Juan Pablo; Denkinger, Judith; Vinueza, Luis; García, Juan; Lohmann, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus, is an iconic lizard endemic to the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador, but surprisingly little information exists on baseline health parameters for this species. We analysed blood samples drawn from 35 marine iguanas captured at three locations on San Cristóbal Island. A portable blood analyser (iSTAT) was used to obtain near-immediate field results for pH, lactate, partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−), percentage O2 saturation, haematocrit, haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium and glucose. Parameter values affected by temperature were auto-corrected by the iSTAT. Standard laboratory haematology techniques were employed for differential white blood cell counts and haematocrit determination; resulting values were also compared with the haematocrit values generated by the iSTAT. Body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and body measurements were also recorded. Body length was positively correlated with several blood chemistry values (HCO3− and glucose) and two haematology parameters (haemoglobin and manually determined haematocrit). A notable finding was the unusually high blood sodium level; the mean value of 178 mg/dl is among the highest known for any reptile. This value is likely to be a conservative estimate because some samples exceeded the maximal value the iSTAT can detect. For haematocrit determination, the iSTAT blood analyser yielded results significantly lower than those obtained with high-speed centrifugation. The values reported in this study provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among marine iguanas affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic threats. The findings might also be helpful in future efforts to demonstrate associations between specific biochemical parameters and disease. PMID:27293719

  7. Niche expansion, body size, and survival in Galápagos marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, M; Wrege, Peter H

    2000-07-01

    Foraging theory predicts that dietary niche breadth should expand as resource availability decreases. However, Galápagos marine iguanas often die during algae shortages (El Niños) although land plants abound where they rest and reproduce. On Seymour Norte island, a subpopulation of iguanas exhibited unique foraging behavior: they consistently included the succulent beach plant B. maritima in their diet. We investigated the consequences of land-plant feeding for body size and survival. Batis-eaters supplemented their algae diet both before and after intertidal zone foraging, and more Batis was eaten during tides unfavorable for intertidal zone foraging (dawn and dusk). Larger, energy-constrained iguanas fed more on land than did smaller animals. Compared to intertidal zone algae, Batis was 39% lower in caloric content (1.6 vs. 2.6 kcal g(-1) dry mass), 56% lower in protein (8.3 vs. 18.9% dry mass) and 57% lower in nitrogen (1.3 vs. 3.0% dry mass). In spite of its lower nutrient value, iguanas that supplemented their diet with this plant were able to attain nearly twice the body size of other iguanas on the island. Age estimates indicate that many Batis-eaters survived repeated El Niño episodes during which animals of their relative size-class experienced high mortality on other islands. The larger animals were, however, completely dependent upon this supplementary source of food to maintain condition, and all perished in the 1997-1998 El Niño when high tides inundated and killed Batis on Seymour Norte Island. We hypothesize that Batis feeding developed as a local foraging tradition, and that dietary conservatism and strong foraging site fidelity explain why the inclusion of land plants in the diet has been observed in only a single population. Ultimately, a unique algae-adapted hindgut morphology and physiology may limit a switch from marine to terrestrial diet.

  8. Evidence for a Dying Magma Chamber at Rábida Island, Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, H.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.; Almeida, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rábida Island in the Galapagos has experienced both explosive and effusive volcanism. It is located to the east of the most active volcanoes of the Galapagos, and previously determined ages range from 0.9 to 1.1 Ma. An unusually curved escarpment cuts the western sector of the island, which might be part of a caldera wall, although its radius of curvature is much greater than that of the island. Lavas range from basalt to rhyolite, and there are also several intermediate compositions, which are unique in the archipelago. A welded ignimbrite crops out in northeast sector, the only such deposit known in the entire region. The volumetric proportion of evolved rocks is unusually high; 25% of the rocks in our comprehensive sample set are intermediate to felsic. The siliceous rocks occur in two clusters in the southern and southwestern sections of the island, suggesting two separate sources. The intermediate rocks are concentrated in the center and northwestern parts of the island. Despite these foci of more siliceous lavas, basalt is the most widespread rock type across the island. It is notable that Rabida is immediately east of Volcan Alcedo, which is the only active Galápagos volcano that has also erupted rhyolite, and south of Santiago Island, which erupted the trachyte dome observed by Charles Darwin in 1835. These observations, in conjunction with the cumulate xenoliths observed in Rábida explosive deposits, are consistent with the evolved rocks resulting from fractional crystallization of a dying magma chamber, as the volcano is carried away from the hotspot.

  9. Large-scale latitude distortions of the inner Milky Way disk from the Herschel/Hi-GAL Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bally, J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Elia, D.; Schisano, E.; Plume, R.; Swinyard, B.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pezzuto, S.; Benedettini, M.; Testi, L.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We use the Herschel Hi-GAL survey data to study the spatial distribution in Galactic longitude and latitude of the interstellar medium (ISM) and of dense, star-forming clumps in the inner Galaxy. Methods: We assemble a complete mosaic of the inner Galaxy between l = -70° and +68° in the far-infrared continuum from Hi-GAL. The peak position and width of the latitude distribution of the dust column density is analysed by fitting a polynomial function to the diffuse IR surface brightness in 1° longitude bins, and the result is compared to MIPSGAL 24-μm data. The latitude distribution of the number density of compact sources from the band-merged Hi-GAL photometric catalogues is also analysed as a function of longitude. Results: The width of the diffuse dust column density traced by the Hi-GAL 500-μm emission varies across the inner Galaxy with a mean value of 1.̊2-1.̊3, similar to the distribution of MIPSGAL 24-μm sources and of Hi-GAL sources with a 250-μm counterpart. Hi-GAL sources with a 70-μm counterpart define a much thinner disk with a mean FWHM ~ 0.̊75, which is in excess of the result obtained by the ATLASGAL submillimetre survey. The discrepancy with the 250-μm source distribution can be explained by relatively higher confusion in the Herschel data in the midplane region. The peak of the average latitude distribution of Hi-GAL sources is at b ~ -0.̊06, coincident with the results from ATLASGAL. The detailed latitude distribution as a function of longitude shows clear modulations both for the diffuse emission and for the compact sources. The displacements are mostly towards negative latitudes with excursions of ~0.̊2 below the midplane at l ~ + 40°, +12°, -25°, and -40°. The only positive bend peaks at l ~ -5°. No such modulations can be found in the MIPSGAL 24 μm or WISE 22 μm data when the entire source samples are considered. Modulations that are in part similar to the ones exhibited by the Herschel sources appear when the mid

  10. The peak electromagnetic power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Guo, C.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the peak electromagnetic (EM) power radiated by return strokes have been made by integrating the Poynting vector of measured fields over an imaginary hemispherical surface that is centered on the lightning source, assuming that ground losses are negligible. Values of the peak EM power from first and subsequent strokes have means and standard deviations of 2 + or - 2 x 10 to the 10th and 3 + or - 4 x 10 to the 9th W, respectively. The average EM power that is radiated by subsequent strokes, at the time of the field peak, is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical power that is radiated by these strokes in the wavelength interval from 0.4 to 1.1 micron; hence an upper limit to the radiative efficiency of a subsequent stroke is of the order of 1 percent or less at this time.

  11. Is There 9th Planet in Our Solar System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Brown and Batygin informed on indirect evidence of existence of the ninth planet in Solar System (SS). Some evidence pointing on its possible mass in 10 Earth's mass; its distance from Sun at perihelion can be ˜200AU, at aphelion 600-1200AU, and orbital period about 15000 years. Authors suggest that in early SS about 4.5 billion years ago, planet has been pushed out of the field of planets formation near the Sun. But all these conclusions are based on computer calculations of orbits of several known trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), including Sedna, 2004VN112, 2012VP113, 2010GB174, 2007TG422, 2013RF98. We draw attention to the fact that these 6 TNOs found at perihelion, when their brilliance for terrestrial observers be maximal, and orbital speed was greatest. But just only after 50-100 years, they depart from this convenient location in space to open them. And then for thousands years, these objects will move in remote parts of their orbits. Our estimates show that the actual number of TNO with the same orbits as 6 taken into account in calculations objects should be several orders of magnitude greater. But for the moment they are invisible for terrestrial observer, because they are very far from perihelion point. Therefore, on the basis of purely probabilistic assumptions, it should be very large number of TNOs with very eccentric orbits. Then real results of calculation for the entire ensemble of existing remote objects is strikingly different from the primary. And therefore problem of ninth planet is still on the agenda. Most likely, it is necessary to raise the question of finding the many thousands of TNOs on highly elongated orbits, and very far from terrestrial observer.

  12. Occupational Exploration at Ontario Junior High School: 9th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gene; And Others

    The document contains 56 activities for Grade 9. The contents include the following areas: questions about the future; job seeking activities and guidelines; career games; a personal interest check list; unit guides for courses in World of Work (55 pages), and Career Educational Planning (40 pages) which include objectives, activities, evaluation,…

  13. NASA Space Biology Program: 9th Annual Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered include plant and animal gravity receptors and transduction; the role of gravity in growth and development of plants and animals; biological support structures and the role of calcium; mechanisms and responses of gravity sensitive systems; and mechanisms of plant responses to gravity.

  14. Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery Davis

    2011-09-09

    The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

  15. Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Papers are reported which were presented at the conference in the areas of displays, ride qualities and handling, driving and psychomotor skills, control, system identification and signal detection, electrophysiological and systems analysis, and modelling.

  16. Minimum Competency Testing Clarification Hearing (July 9th, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Barbara Jordan served as the hearing officer for three-day adversary evaluation hearings about the pros and cons of minimum competency testing (MCT). This report is the complete transcript of the second day of proceedings. The pro team, lead by James Popham, began by presenting representatives of four states (Florida, California, Texas, and…

  17. PREFACE: 9th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitmann, Christoph; David, Christian; Nolting, Frithjof; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Conference logo This volume compiles the contributions to the International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM2008) held on 20-25 July 2008 in Zurich, Switzerland. The conference was the ninth in a series which started in Göttingen in 1984. Over the years the XRM conference series has served as a forum bringing together all relevant players working on the development of methods, building instrumentation, and applying x-ray microscopy to challenging issues in materials science, condensed matter research, environmental science and biology. XRM2008 was attended by about 300 participants who followed 44 oral presentations and presented 220 posters. Conference photograph Figure 1: Participants of the XRM2008 conference gathered in front of the main building of the ETH-Zurich. The conference showed that x-ray microscopy has become a mature field resting on three pillars. The first are workhorse instruments available even to non-specialist users. These exist at synchrotron sources world-wide as well as in laboratories. They allow the application of established microscopy methods to solve scientific projects in areas as diverse as soil science, the investigation of cometary dust particles, magnetic materials, and the analysis of ancient parchments. Examples of all of these projects can be found in this volume. These instruments have become so well understood that now they are also commercially available. The second pillar is the continued development of methods. Methods like stroboscopic imaging, wet cells or high and low temperature environments add versatility to the experiments. Methods like phase retrieval and ptychographic imaging allow the retrieval of information which hitero was thought to be inaccessible. The third pillar is the extension of such instruments and methods to new photon sources. With x-ray free electron lasers on the horizon the XRM community is working to transfer their know-how to these novel sources which will offer unprecedented brightness and time structure, but which at the same time require unprecedented effort to perform the experiment and to extract meaningful information from the data. Resting on these three pillars, the XRM community seems well prepared to solve the scientific questions of today and to help solve even more challenging scientific questions in the future. Many people contributed to the success of XRM2008, first and foremost were the participants with their excellent contributions and through their lively discussions. Organizing the event was made possible due to many helping hands and brains at the organizing institution, the Paul Scherrer Institut. It is our pleasure to thank all of these people. Financial support was given by the Gold Sponsor, XRADIA, by the European Round Table for Synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers, the Center for Imaging Science and Technology at Zurich, and by the Swiss National Science Foundation. The conference was kindly hosted by ETH Zurich which provided a perfect setting for this venue. We thank all the participants of XRM2008, everybody who helped in the organization and all financial supporters and are looking forward to hearing about further progress during XRM2010 which will be organized by Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. C Quitmann, C David, F Nolting, F Pfeiffer and M Stampanoni Proceedings Editors Conference photograph Figure 2 View over Zurich and into the alps from the terrace of the ETHZ main building during the XRM2008 reception. Conference photograph Figure 3 Flag tosser and Alphorn blowers in front of the ETH Zurich main building during the XRM2008 opening reception. Conference photograph Figure 4 Industry exhibition in the entrance hall of the ETHZ main building. Conference photograph Figure 5 Lively discussions amongst the conference participants took place during the two poster sessions. Conference photograph Figure 6 Lecture hall with the participants busily discussing between talks. Conference photograph Figure 7 Past and present winners of the Werner Meyer-Ilse Award are joined by Andrea Meyer-Ilse, the wife of the deceased x-ray microscopy pioneer Werner Meyer-Ilse. From left to right: Weilun Chao (winner 2005), Ann Sakdinawat (winner 2008), Piere Thibault (winner 2008), Andrea Meyer-Ilse and M Feser (winner 2002). Conference photograph Figure 8 Reception in the court of Schloss Rapperswil during the XRM2008 conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 9 Conference participants walking towards the castle of Rapperswil during the conference excursion. Conference photograph Figure 10 Accompanying persons group gathered in the port of Lucerne.

  18. Natick Soldier Systems Center Science and Technology Board (9th)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-29

    Education Program. Peter L. Antoinette President & Chief Executive Officer Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. Peter co-founded Nanocomp Technologies...Inc. in 2004 and serves as its President and Chief Executive Officer. Prior to founding Nanocomp Technologies, he was the President and CEO of

  19. 9th International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2016)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-12

    International Conference on Multiphase Flows Event Dates: May 22-27, 2016 Event City and Country: Florence, Italy Grantee (Name and Contact ...and Contact Information): Alfredo Soldati (Tel +39 0432 558020, Fax +39 0432 558027, E-mail: soldati@uniud.it) ONRG CSP Grant Number: N62909-16-1

  20. 2005 9th Annual Army Small Business Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-03

    WOSB/P – 3D Research Corporation; D/VOSB – All Points Logistics; WOSB – Byte Size Incorporated; S – Dynetics ; S – Dynetics Inc.; S – Applied Data...Incorporated; S – Dynetics ; S – Dynetics Inc.; S – Applied Data Trends; S – Sparta, Inc.; L – Teledyne Brown Engineering; L – The Aegis Technologies Group

  1. Introduction to Marketing for 9th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotosky, Paul; Johnson, Jeannie G.

    Designed to enable students to develop knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses and to be able to understand the relationship of these characteristics to educational and vocational choices, this guide presents an introductory program on vocations using a thematic interdisciplinary approach to career awareness. It is suggested that the…

  2. 9TH Scientific Meeting of the International Epidemiological Association.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-09

    seen with malaria and S. mrnsoni infections but not with malaria and S. haematobium. Further, patients with onchocerciasis appear to have a greater...approach the needs outlined by Lucas in his opening address. The onchocerciasis control program in the Volta Basin was repre- sented by 2 papers. Dr...WHO Project, Ouagadougou, Upper Volta) supported the decreasing prevalence of onchocerciasis in the region with their data but noted that blindness was

  3. The 9th Asian-Pacific Regional IAU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutantyo, W.; Premadi, P. W.; Mahasena, P.; Hidayat, T.; Mineshige, S.

    2006-01-01

    This proceedings covered topics presented in APRIM 2005, i.e. Sun-Earth Interactions, Solar Physics, Planetary Systems, Compact Objects, Stellar Evolution, The Milky Way, up to the Large Scale Structure of the Universe and Cosmology. Also recorded in this proceedings are experiences in managing astronomy shared by countries where the advancement of astronomy is firmly established and less advanced countries. We even noted the situation of astronomy in Iraq which is still in turbulent situation. We also report the discussion and activities in the field of education and popularization of astronomy held in a special session, attended not only by the registered astronomers but also by teachers, students, and amateurs.

  4. 9th International Symposium on Materials in a Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Karen

    2003-09-01

    Contents: Introduction. Opening. New materials. Atomic oxygen. Materials for inner planetary environments. Contamination. Synergistics effects. Ground testing. Modelling. Radiation/flight. Posters. Additional papers.

  5. The International Conference on Amorphous and Liquid Semiconductors (9th).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-11

    loop effective action of a constant gluon field can be expressed in terms of the experimentally determinable A,.,• In the following chapter, the...regularization and Schwinger’s proper time method. The renormalization mass parameters appearing in the two treatments can then be related and the exact one

  6. A systematic analysis of acceptor specificity and reaction kinetics of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases: Product inhibition studies illustrates reaction mechanism for ST3Gal-I

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rohitesh; Matta, Khushi L.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Sialyltransferases (STs) catalyze the addition of sialic acids to the non-reducing ends of glycoproteins and glycolipids. In this work, we examined the acceptor specificity of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases, namely ST3Gal-I, -II, -III, -IV and -VI. KM values for each of these enzymes is presented using radioactivity for acceptors containing Type-I (Galβ1,3GlcNAc), Type-II (Galβ1,4GlcNAc), Type-III (Galβ1,3GalNAc) and Core-2 (Galβ1,3(GlcNAcβ1,6)GalNAc) reactive groups. Several variants of acceptors inhibited ST3Gal activity emphasizing structural role of acceptor in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In some cases, mass spectrometry was performed for structural verification. The results demonstrate human ST3Gal-I catalysis towards Type-III and Core-2 acceptors with KM = 5–50μM and high VMax values. The KM for ST3Gal-I and ST3Gal-II was 100 and 30-fold lower, respectively, for Type-III compared to Type-I acceptors. Variants of Type-I and Type-II structures characterized ST3Gal-III, -IV and -VI for their catalytic specificity. This manuscript also estimates KM for human ST3Gal-VI using Type-I and Type-II substrates. Together, these findings built a platform for designing inhibitors of STs having therapeutic potential. PMID:26692484

  7. A systematic analysis of acceptor specificity and reaction kinetics of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases: Product inhibition studies illustrate reaction mechanism for ST3Gal-I.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rohitesh; Matta, Khushi L; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-15

    Sialyltransferases (STs) catalyze the addition of sialic acids to the non-reducing ends of glycoproteins and glycolipids. In this work, we examined the acceptor specificity of five human α(2,3)sialyltransferases, namely ST3Gal -I, -II, -III, -IV and -VI. KM values for each of these enzymes is presented using radioactivity for acceptors containing Type-I (Galβ1,3GlcNAc), Type-II (Galβ1,4GlcNAc), Type-III (Galβ1,3GalNAc) and Core-2 (Galβ1,3(GlcNAcβ1,6)GalNAc) reactive groups. Several variants of acceptors inhibited ST3Gal activity emphasizing structural role of acceptor in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In some cases, mass spectrometry was performed for structural verification. The results demonstrate human ST3Gal-I catalysis towards Type-III and Core-2 acceptors with KM = 5-50 μM and high VMax values. The KM for ST3Gal-I and ST3Gal-II was 100 and 30-fold lower, respectively, for Type-III compared to Type-I acceptors. Variants of Type-I and Type-II structures characterized ST3Gal-III, -IV and -VI for their catalytic specificity. This manuscript also estimates KM for human ST3Gal-VI using Type-I and Type-II substrates. Together, these findings built a platform for designing inhibitors of STs having therapeutic potential.

  8. A Transposon Site Hybridization Screen Identifies galU and wecBC as Important for Survival of Yersinia pestis in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kathryn A.; Fukuto, Hana S.; Pelletier, Mark; Romanov, Galina; Grabenstein, Jens P.; Palmer, Lance E.; Ernst, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is able to survive and replicate within murine macrophages. However, the mechanism by which Y. pestis promotes its intracellular survival is not well understood. To identify genes that are important for Y. pestis survival in macrophages, a library comprised of ∼31,500 Y. pestis KIM6+ transposon insertion mutants (input pool) was subjected to negative selection in primary murine macrophages. Genes underrepresented in the output pool of surviving bacteria were identified by transposon site hybridization to DNA oligonucleotide microarrays. The screen identified several genes known to be important for survival of Y. pestis in macrophages, including phoPQ and members of the PhoPQ regulon (e.g., pmrF). In addition, genes predicated to encode a glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase (wecB) and a UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase (wecC) were identified in the screen. Viable-count assays demonstrated that a KIM6+ galU mutant and a KIM6+ wecBC mutant were defective for survival in murine macrophages. The galU mutant was studied further because of its strong phenotype. The KIM6+ galU mutant exhibited increased susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of the galU mutant migrated faster than the LOS of the parent KIM6+, suggesting the core was truncated. In addition, the analysis of LOS isolated from the galU mutant by mass spectrometry showed that aminoarabinose modification of lipid A is absent. Therefore, addition of aminoarabinose to lipid A and complete LOS core (galU), as well as enterobacterial common antigen (wecB and wecC), is important for survival of Y. pestis in macrophages. PMID:22139502

  9. ST6GalNAc I expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells greatly modifies their O-glycosylation pattern and enhances their tumourigenicity.

    PubMed

    Julien, S; Adriaenssens, E; Ottenberg, K; Furlan, A; Courtand, G; Vercoutter-Edouart, A-S; Hanisch, F-G; Delannoy, P; Le Bourhis, X

    2006-01-01

    Sialyl-Tn is a carbohydrate antigen overexpressed in several epithelial cancers, including breast cancer, and usually associated with poor prognosis. Sialyl-Tn is synthesized by a CMP-Neu5Ac:GalNAcalpha2,6-sialyltransferase: CMP-Neu5Ac: R-GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (EC 2.4.99.3) (ST6GalNAc I), which transfers a sialic acid residue in alpha2,6-linkage to the GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr structure. However, established breast cancer cell lines express neither ST6GalNAc I nor sialyl-Tn. We have previously shown that stable transfection of MDA-MB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, with ST6GalNAc I cDNA induces sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) expression. We report here the modifications of the O-glycosylation pattern of a MUC1-related recombinant protein secreted by MDA-MB-231 sialyl-Tn positive cells. We also show that sialyl-Tn expression and concomitant changes in the overall O-glycan profiles induce a decrease of adhesion and an increase of migration of MDA-MB-231. Moreover, STn positive clones exhibit an increased tumour growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. These observations suggest that modification of the O-glycosylation pattern induced by ST6GalNAc I expression are sufficient to enhance the tumourigenicity of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

  10. Evaluation of Human and Nonhuman Primate Antibody Binding to Pig Cells Lacking GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, J; Martens, G; Li, P; Adams, AB; Newell, KA; Ford, ML; Butler, JR; Sidner, RA; Tector, M; Tector, AJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Simultaneous inactivation of pig GGTA1 and CMAH genes eliminates carbohydrate xenoantigens recognized by human antibodies. The β4GalNT2 glycosyltransferase may also synthesize xenoantigens. To further characterize glycan-based species incompatibilities, we examined human and non-human primate antibody binding to cells derived from genetically modified pigs lacking these carbohydrate-modifying genes. Methods The Cas9 endonuclease and gRNA were used to create pigs lacking GGTA1, GGTA1/CMAH, or GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2 genes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from these animals and examined for binding to IgM and IgG from humans, rhesus macaques, and baboons. Results Cells from GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2 deficient pigs exhibited reduced human IgM and IgG binding compared to cells lacking both GGTA1 and CMAH. Nonhuman primate antibody reactivity with cells from the various pigs exhibited a slightly different pattern of reactivity than that seen in humans. Simultaneous inactivation of the GGTA1 and CMAH genes increased nonhuman primate antibody binding compared to cells lacking either GGTA1 only or to those deficient in GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2. Conclusions Inactivation of the β4GalNT2 gene reduces human and nonhuman primate antibody binding resulting in diminished porcine xenoantigenicity. The increased humoral immunity of nonhuman primates towards GGTA1/CMAH-deficient cells compared to pigs lacking either GGTA1 or GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2 highlights the complexities of carbohydrate xenoantigens and suggests potential limitations of the nonhuman primate model for examining some genetic modifications. The progressive reduction of swine xenoantigens recognized by human immunoglobulin through inactivation of pig GGTA1/CMAH/β4GalNT2 genes demonstrates that the antibody barrier to xenotransplantation can be minimized by genetic engineering. PMID:25728481

  11. Sialylation of the Fas Death Receptor by ST6Gal-I Provides Protection against Fas-mediated Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase, ST6Gal-I, adds sialic acid in an α2–6 linkage to the N-glycans of membrane and secreted glycoproteins. Up-regulation of ST6Gal-I occurs in many cancers, including colon carcinoma, and correlates with metastasis and poor prognosis. However, mechanisms by which ST6Gal-I facilitates tumor progression remain poorly understood due to limited knowledge of enzyme substrates. Herein we identify the death receptor, Fas (CD95), as an ST6Gal-I substrate, and show that α2–6 sialylation of Fas confers protection against Fas-mediated apoptosis. Intriguingly, differences in ST6Gal-I activity do not affect the function of DR4 or DR5 death receptors upon treatment with TRAIL, implicating a selective effect of ST6Gal-I on the Fas receptor. Using ST6Gal-I knockdown and forced overexpression colon carcinoma cell models, we find that α2–6 sialylation of Fas prevents apoptosis stimulated by FasL as well as the Fas-activating antibody, CH11, as evidenced by decreased activation of caspases 8 and 3. We also show that α2–6 sialylation of Fas does not alter the binding of CH11, but rather inhibits the capacity of Fas to induce apoptosis by blocking the association of FADD with Fas cytoplasmic tails, an event that initiates death-inducing signaling complex formation. Furthermore, α2–6 sialylation of Fas inhibits Fas internalization, which is required for apoptotic signaling. Although dysregulated Fas activity is a well kno