Science.gov

Sample records for a centers

  1. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  2. PLANNING A NATURE CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASHBAUGH, BYRON L.

    THIS BULLETIN IS PRODUCED BY THE NATURE CENTERS DIVISION, NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY TO PROVIDE PROFESSIONAL GUIDANCE AND TECHNICAL KNOW-HOW IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY NATURE AND CONSERVATION CENTERS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE--(1) PURPOSE AND VALUE OF A NATURE AND CONSERVATION CENTER, (2) INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS SUCH AS COMMUNITY READINESS, LAND…

  3. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  4. Starting a sleep center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  5. Organizing a Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.

    The organization and development of instructional materials centers (IMC's) as a part of a program of educational improvement is discussed. Analysis is made of the advantages, disadvantages, and organization of centralized IMC's, decentralized IMC's, and coordinated IMC's, with recommendations being made for their development. The operation of…

  6. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  7. Find a Brain Tumor Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to Give Charitable Shopping Close Find a Brain Tumor Center Below is a listing of brain ... center is in your insurance plan’s covered network Brain Tumor Treatment Centers: Filter: Mayo Clinic Arizona Mayo ...

  8. Choosing a Transplant Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient and her daughter Every patient — from ... your doctor Clinical Trials Read results of recent studies Find a clinical trial Before Transplant Things to ...

  9. A College Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Bernard

    This report considers problems and solutions related to the design and establishment of college health facilities. This includes the results of a study involving Colorado, Knox, and Wittenberg Colleges in which personal visits and expert testimony concluded that the health services of small colleges in the central and western states were seriously…

  10. A COLLEGE HEALTH CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRAD, BERNARD

    THIS REPORT CONSIDERS PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS RELATED TO THE DESIGN AND ESTABLISHMENT OF COLLEGE HEALTH FACILITIES. THIS INCLUDES THE RESULTS OF A STUDY INVOLVING COLORADO, KNOX, AND WITTENBERG COLLEGES IN WHICH PERSONAL VISITS AND EXPERT TESTIMONY CONCLUDED THAT THE HEALTH SERVICES OF SMALL COLLEGES IN THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN STATES WERE SERIOUSLY…

  11. Environmental Learning Centers: A Template.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vozick, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Provides a working model, or template, for community-based environmental learning centers (ELCs). The template presents a philosophy as well as a plan for staff and administration operations, educational programming, and financial support. The template also addresses "green" construction and maintenance of buildings and grounds and…

  12. Designing a Computerized Presentation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Doris A.

    1995-01-01

    The Office Systems and Business Education Department at California State University (Los Angeles) developed a computerized presentation center, with multimedia classrooms and a multipurpose room, where students learn computerized presentation design skills, faculty can develop materials for class, and local business can do videoconferencing and…

  13. A Tale of Three Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubey, Lynn; Huffman, Dennis; Grinberg, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Prince George's Community College has developed three distinct models for off-campus centers. Examination of each model reveals the impact of variables such as location, ownership, design, target audience for a particular site (student demographics, community needs, and access issues), the role of partnerships with other institutions, and…

  14. Computer Center: Setting Up a Microcomputer Center--1 Person's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Collins, Michael, A. J., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Considers eight components to be considered in setting up a microcomputer center for use with college classes. Discussions include hardware, software, physical facility, furniture, technical support, personnel, continuing financial expenditures, and security. (CW)

  15. HRSA: Find a Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 8 p.m. ET, weekdays (except federal holidays). Additional Links: organdonor.gov Organ Procurement and Transplantation ... to 8 p.m. ET, weekdays (except federal holidays) HRSA Contact Center Close × Center Name Close Close ...

  16. Starting a Day Care Center: The Day Care Center Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checkett, Donald

    Designed to be of help to individuals and groups seeking to establish a day care center in the metropolitan St. Louis area, this manual calls attention to important and basic information which must be taken into account if planning is to produce tangible results. Following a brief section defining commonly used terms referring to organized…

  17. A Learning Center Can Happen to You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currey, Mary Nell; Hancock, Vickie

    This booklet describes the development and activities of the Clinton Park Elementary School Media Center, a first and second grade learning center located in Clinton, Mississippi. Following introductory materials on the establishment of the media center in September 1975 and federal funding of media center projects from 1975 to 1978, information…

  18. Centers of Excellence: A Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Paul B. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes information on State-sponsored 'Centers of Excellence' gathered during a survey of State programs in the Fall of 1987. For the purposes of this catalog, 'Centers of Excellence' refers to organizations or activities with the following characteristics: institutionalized, focused, cooperative Research and Development (R&D) programs; supported in part by State governments, in addition to universities, industry and (in some cases) Federal agencies; performed by teams that may include both industry and university employees; and concentrated on relatively specific R&D agendas, usually with near term commercial or governmental applicability. Most of these activities involve state-of-the-art advancement of new technologies under conditions leading to early practical applications. Not included in this catalog are project-level matching grant programs. The principal purpose of this catalog is to help NASA program management, at all levels. to identify and where appropriate, to initiate relationships with other technology-developing organizations. These State-sponsored programs should be of particular interest, because: they present an opportunity to leverage NASA's R&D investments; they are concentrated at the frontier, yet have a concern for practical applications; and they involve industrial participation under conditions that increase the probability of prompt, widespread dissemination in the form of new or enhanced commercial products, processes, or services.

  19. A specialized information center. The clinical neurology information center.

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, W J

    1978-01-01

    The history, philosophy, and methodology of a unique specialized medical information center are reported. The Clinical Neurology Information Center is an educational information service (giving its audience information which can be the basis for formulating their own questions) rather than an instructional information service (giving information in reply to questions). Clinical, as well as basic neuroscience, information is culled by professional neurologists from 855 medical periodicals. The essence of each article is summarized in a single sentence ("terse conclusions") or a bibliographic reference only is given; this material is published every two weeks in the Concise Clinical Neurology Review (CCNR). The format of the CCNR is such that the reader should be able to scan a very large amount of current literature by investing only twenty to thirty minutes every two weeks. The values of this system as well as some of its problems are discussed. PMID:354706

  20. The Beginnings of a Nature Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherem, Gabriel J.; And Others

    This guide is a comprehensive interpretive plan for the development of a nature center. Although the plan centers on a proposed nature center, the ideas included in the guide can be applied to other situations. The guide deals with all aspects of planning and is divided into seven chapters. Chapter 1, Visitorship, looks at the people who attend…

  1. Development and Demise of a Women's Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Lora

    The formation, development, and demise of a women's center in suburban New York are described. The women's center resulted from a conference designed to assess problems confronting women and to mobilize resources to meet those problems. However, after the formation of the center, a struggle for leadership and conflicts over the values and beliefs…

  2. Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography contains the research output of the Center indexed during 1981 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (LSTAR), International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA), and Computer Program Abstracts (CPA). This bibliography is published annually in an attempt to effect greater awareness and distribution of the Center's research output.

  3. Une maison de culture (A Culture Center).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourlevat, Alain

    1980-01-01

    Describes the "Culture Center" designed by Le Corbusier and located in Firminy, France. The role of the center in arousing intellectual curiosity in people living in a technological age is discussed. The audience of this culture center, young people, and the types of activities directed toward them are described. (AMH)

  4. A Learning Center Approach to Infant Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Following a prefatory description of infant development and high-quality infant day care centers, this paper focuses on the construction of learning centers for infants and toddlers in day care. Issues for consideration are specified, and 18 different care/learning centers and 6 work sstations for parents/staff are briefly described. In addition…

  5. Model for a patient-centered comparative effectiveness research center.

    PubMed

    Costlow, Monica R; Landsittel, Douglas P; James, A Everette; Kahn, Jeremy M; Morton, Sally C

    2015-04-01

    This special report describes the systematic approach the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) undertook in creating an infrastructure for comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research resources. We specifically highlight the administrative structure, communication and training opportunities, stakeholder engagement resources, and support services offered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Maximizing the value of a breast center.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Mickey; Chang, Dan

    2010-08-01

    This article focuses on the value and benefit of a Breast Center to an organization by identifying the best ways to maximize their contribution in order to create and sustain a financially viable, clinically respected and community-oriented Breast Center. The goal of the Breast Center is to ultimately benefit the community and the hospital's Comprehensive Cancer Program as a whole. The value propositions are divided into three areas that have positive impacts to the program and hospital, collectively. These value propositions are: 1. Financial Value e identified values of the Breast Center that contribute to the bottom line - or Return on Investment (ROI) - of the Cancer Program. 2. Clinical Quality Values - identified values of the Breast Center that improve the quality of care and outcomes of the patients. 3. Intangibles Values - identified values of the Breast Center that connect to the community and women that is invaluable to the Cancer Program. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Patterns for Designing Children's Centers. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmon, Fred Linn

    This book summarizes the issues involved in the design of a children's center. A children's center is defined as an away from home, group child care program for 2-4 year olds. The material is organized into 35 chapters or "patterns." A pattern is a package of design requirements whose solution is focused on a distinct part of the physical…

  8. Gateway's Horizon: A Center of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Jayne; Colony, Lee

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Gateway Technical College's Horizon Center for Transportation Technology, located in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which was the product of collaboration with business and industry, community support and a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) grant. The center, which opened this fall, is a prime example of a sustainable community…

  9. A Nature Center for Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shomon, Joseph J.

    A nature center is an outdoor education area; a parcel of natural land where people, particularly the young, and nature can meet. It can be an educational section of a state or national forest or park set aside specifically to serve the people of one or several nearby communities. These centers usually include an educational or interpretive…

  10. College Psychotherapy at a Taiwanese Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yii-nii

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces Yii-nii Lin, Professor in the Center for Teacher Education at the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan, and prior director of the university's counseling center for a 3 year term. She has worked as a university counselling psychologist for more than 15 years when she participated in an online interview that questioned…

  11. How To Start a Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Phylis M., Comp.; Hollestelle, Kay, Comp.

    This paper is addressed to those who want to start their own child care center, and provides guidelines for doing so. It identifies the first things to be considered--planning and conducting a community needs assessment to analyze the competition in the area and make the decision of opening a day care center, and gathering information from a…

  12. Providing a Learning-Centered Instructional Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ruby

    This paper describes efforts made by the faculty at Santa Fe Community College (Florida) to provide a learning-centered instructional environment for students in an introductory statistics class. Innovation in instruction has been stressed as institutions switch from "teacher-centered classrooms" to "student-centered…

  13. Person-Centered Gestalt Therapy: A Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Barbara

    1985-01-01

    Highlights the similarities between the person-centered approach to counseling of Carl Rogers and the Gestalt therapy of Fritz Perls. Discusses implementation of the two approaches and suggests they may be synthesized into a person-centered Gestalt therapy. (MCF)

  14. Establishing a Center to Support Faculty Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Laura; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Muth, Rodney; Rhodes, Lynn K.; White, Kim Kennedy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the establishment in fall 2002 of a School of Education Research Center designed to support faculty in increasing productivity and quality in research. Details are provided about center goals, services, staffing, space, resources, and logistics during the first year of operation. In addition, data are shared about faculty…

  15. Establishing a multidisciplinary academic cosmetic center.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venkat K; Schmid, Daniel B; Hanson, Summer E; Bentz, Michael L

    2011-12-01

    The demand for cosmetic services has risen rapidly in recent years, but has slowed down with the current economic downturn. Managed care organizations and Medicare have been steadily reducing their reimbursements for physician services. The payment for reconstructive surgical procedures has been decreasing and is likely to worsen with healthcare reform, and many plastic surgery residency programs are facing fiscal challenges. An adequate volume of patients needing cosmetic services is necessary to recruit and train the best candidates to the residency programs. Self-pay patients will help ensure the fiscal viability of plastic surgery residency programs. Attracting patients to an academic healthcare center will become more difficult in a recession without the appropriate facilities, programs, and pricing strategies. Setting up a modern cosmetic services program at an academic center has some unique challenges, including funding, academic politics, and turf. The authors opened a free-standing academic multidisciplinary center at their medical school 3 years ago. The center is an off-site, 13,000-sq ft facility that includes faculty from plastic surgery, ear, nose, and throat, dermatology, and vascular surgery. In this article, the authors discuss the process of developing and executing a plan for starting an aesthetic services center in an academic setting. The financing of the center and factors in pricing services are discussed. The authors show the impact of the center on their cosmetic surgery patient volumes, resident education, and finances. They expect that their experience will be helpful to other plastic surgery programs at academic medical centers.

  16. Conference Center Serves as a Solar Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Alumni House Conference Center is a working example of how to use and conserve energy. The solar system is expected to provide at least a third of the building's heat in the coldest months. (Author/MLF)

  17. [Health behaviors between a health promotion demonstration health center and a general health center].

    PubMed

    Lee, Taewha; Lee, Chung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Soon; Ham, Ok-Kyung

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare community residents' perceptions, participation, satisfaction, and behavioral changes between a health promotion demonstration health center and general health center. The design of the study was ex-post facto that compared community residents in demonstration health centers and general health centers. The sample included 2,261 community residents who were conveniently selected from demonstration (792 participants) and general health centers (1,496 participants). The results of the study were as follows: 1) Perception and participation rates of exercise, nutrition, and hypertension management programs were significantly higher in the participants of demonstration health centers than those of general health centers.; 2) Satisfaction rates of all programs except the smoking cessation program were significantly higher in the participants of demonstration health centers than those of general health centers. However, only the exercise rate among risk behaviors of participants was significantly higher in demonstration health centers than general health centers. Systematic efforts for health promotion were effective not only in improving the community's awareness, participation, and satisfaction of the program, but also in changing health behaviors. This evidence should be used to foster and disseminate health promotion programs to other health centers to improve community residents' health status and quality of life.

  18. Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC

  19. A caveat concerning center of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nägerl, Hans; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The center of resistance is a concept in theoretical orthodontics used to describe tooth movement under loads. It is commonly used to qualitatively predict tooth movement without recourse to complex equations or simulations. We start with a survey of the historical origin of the technical term. After this, the periodontal ligament is idealized as a linear elastic suspension. The mathematical formalism of vector and tensor calculus will clarify our reasoning. We show that a point such as the center of resistance basically only exists in two dimensions or in very special symmetric spatial configurations. In three dimensions, a simple counterexample of a suspension without a center of resistance is given. A second more tooth-like example illustrates the magnitude of the effects in question in dentistry. In conclusion, the center of resistance should be replaced by a newer and wider mathematical concept, the “center of elasticity,” together with a limiting parameter, the “radius of resistance.” PMID:24019849

  20. Aphasia centers in North America: a survey.

    PubMed

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Holland, Audrey L

    2011-08-01

    There is a growing trend toward dedicated programs designed to improve the lives of people with aphasia and their families. We are referring to these programs collectively as "aphasia centers." These programs purportedly differ from more traditional medically based aphasia rehabilitation. However, there is no directory of aphasia centers and no definition of what constitutes such a program. Therefore, an online survey was designed to identify and describe aphasia centers in the United States and Canada. A 37-question survey was posted online via SurveyMonkey. An introductory letter was distributed by electronic mail to a listserv and mailing lists of programs associated with aphasia. Potential respondents who considered themselves an aphasia center were asked to complete the survey. A total of 33 survey responses were analyzed, and descriptive data were compiled resulting in a description of the following aspects of aphasia centers: demographic information, mission, admission and discharge policies, assessment practices, program logistics, staffing patterns, marketing, funding, and services offered. In addition, a qualitative analysis of written text responses revealed the following key themes that appear to characterize the responding programs: services that differ from traditional aphasia rehabilitation; a sense of community; a holistic focus on quality of life, psychosocial well-being, participation, and social support; the centrality of group interaction; and variety/intensity of services. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  1. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    PubMed

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  2. A Computer Learning Center for Environmental Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1998, MacMillan Hall opened at Brown University to students. In MacMillan Hall was the new Computer Learning Center, since named the EarthLab which was outfitted with high-end workstations and peripherals primarily focused on the use of remotely sensed and other spatial data in the environmental sciences. The NASA grant we received as part of the "Centers of Excellence in Applications of Remote Sensing to Regional and Global Integrated Environmental Assessments" was the primary source of funds to outfit this learning and research center. Since opening, we have expanded the range of learning and research opportunities and integrated a cross-campus network of disciplines who have come together to learn and use spatial data of all kinds. The EarthLab also forms a core of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research on environmental problems that draw upon the unique perspective of remotely sensed data. Over the last two years, the Earthlab has been a center for research on the environmental impact of water resource use in and regions, impact of the green revolution on forest cover in India, the design of forest preserves in Vietnam, and detailed assessments of the utility of thermal and hyperspectral data for water quality analysis. It has also been used extensively for local environmental activities, in particular studies on the impact of lead on the health of urban children in Rhode Island. Finally, the EarthLab has also served as a key educational and analysis center for activities related to the Brown University Affiliated Research Center that is devoted to transferring university research to the private sector.

  3. Space Operations Center: A concept analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The Space Operations Center is a concept for a shuttle-service, permanent, manned facility in low Earth orbit. An analysis of this concept was conducted and the results are reported. It is noted that there are no NASA plans at present to implement such a concept. The results are intended for consideration in future planning.

  4. A Meaning-Centered Therapy for Addictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a treatment for addictions, based on the idea that addiction is a response to living a life that has little personal meaning. First, it presents the theory of Meaning-Centered Therapy (MCT) as developed by Paul Wong, particularly the need to understand intoxication from the addict's perspective. Next, it presents the…

  5. Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,…

  6. Rethinking exploitation: a process-centered account.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A; Wall, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Exploitation has become an important topic in recent discussions of biomedical and research ethics. This is due in no small measure to the influence of Alan Wertheimer's path-breaking work on the subject. This paper presents some objections to Wertheimer's account of the concept. The objections attempt to show that his account places too much emphasis on outcome-based considerations and too little on process-based considerations. Building on these objections, the paper develops an alternative process-centered account of the concept. This alternative account of exploitation takes as its point of departure the broadly Kantian notion that it is wrong to use another as an instrument for the advancement of one's own ends. It sharpens this slippery notion and adds a number of refinements to it. The paper concludes by arguing that process-centered accounts of exploitation better illuminate the ethical challenges posed by research on human subjects than outcome-centered accounts.

  7. THE TRAINING CENTER, DIFFERENT PURPOSES, DIFFERENT DESIGNS, A LOOK AT SELECTED CORPORATE TRAINING CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAHLER, HARRY B.

    UNIQUE FEATURES AND FLOOR PLANS OF FUNCTIONALLY DESIGNED CORPORATE TRAINING CENTERS ARE DESICRIBED. THE TRAVELERS EDUCATION CENTER HAS SIMPLY DESIGNED ROOMS AND FEW AUDIOVISUAL AIDS (AV). BUTLER MANUFACTURING HAS ITS STUDY CENTER IN A WING OF A MOTEL WHICH IS CONVENIENT TO THE GENERAL OFFICES AND DOWNTOWN AREA. SINCE COMPANY PERSONNEL USE THE…

  8. Teaching Reading in a Learning Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caverly, David

    This paper reviews nine principles regarding the reading process, and six scaffolds for teaching students to read, and then suggests a specific developmental reading program for a learning center built upon this knowledge. It is generally accepted that four factors interact to form the reading/learning process: (1) Material; (2) Self; (3)…

  9. Managing Returns in a Catalog Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joyce; Stuart, Julie Ann; Bonawi-tan, Winston; Loehr, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    The research team of the Purdue University in the United States developed an algorithm that considers several different factors, in addition to cost, to help catalog distribution centers process their returns more efficiently. A case study to teach the students important concepts involved in developing a solution to the returns disposition problem…

  10. Project THEMIS: A Center for Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report summarizes the technical work accomplished under Project THEMIS, A Center for Remote Sensing at the University of Kansas during the...period 16 September 1967 through 15 September 1973. The highlights of the four major areas forming the remote sensing system are presented. A detailed description of the latest radar spectrometer results is presented.

  11. A National Periodicals Center Technical Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library Resources, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This technical plan for developing, managing, and operating a national periodicals center (NPC), which was prepared at the request of the Library of Congress, is designed so that it could be used by the Library or any other agency prepared to assume responsibility for the creation of a major periodicals facility. The overall goal of the NPC is to…

  12. A Design for the Teacher Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrory, David L., Ed.

    The Middle School in Beachwood is a unique site for a teaching center due to its open-space architecture, its team teaching organization, and its flexible curriculum. The faculty of the Middle School are utilized as supervisors of teacher education students with the belief that such work is of tangible benefit for the children in the Middle…

  13. Managing a Modern University Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veres, John G., III

    1988-01-01

    The university research center of the future will function best to serve the rapidly changing public and private demand for services with a highly trained core staff, adequately funded and equipped, whose morale and quality of work performance is a prime consideration. (MSE)

  14. Use of a "Freak Out" Control Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casse, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    A student staffed center, established to help those on bad trips", utilizes services of volunteer personnel for therapeutic support. A physician is on call to administer chemotherapy when needed. During the first year of operation, no cases of hepatitis or freak outs have been reported. (CJ)

  15. Center for Instructional Technology: A Strategic Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volzer, Debra; Weaver, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Ohio Dominican University, a small traditional Catholic Liberal Arts University steeped in the Dominican tradition, is in the midst of a technological metamorphosis. At the forefront of the change is the Center for Instructional Technology. Charged with supporting the development of technology enhanced, hybrid, and totally online curriculum, the…

  16. A Player-Centered Approach to Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Souza, Adriano; Oslin, Judy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a player-centered approach (PCA), highlighting its qualities, and then to provide examples of its application in coaching and teaching sport. Most of the examples relate to the game of volleyball, but many of the recommendations and examples can be applied to most team sports. The article will conclude…

  17. A Black Hole in Our Galactic Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    An introductory approach to black holes is presented along with astronomical observational data pertaining to the presence of a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Concepts of conservation of energy and Kepler's third law are employed so students can apply formulas from their physics class to determine the mass of the black hole…

  18. A Reading Resource Center: Why and How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkoff, Henry

    1974-01-01

    Hunter College has set up a Reading Resource Center where students receive individualized help in specific problem areas not covered in their reading classes and where teachers can find materials either for their own edification or for use in the classroom. (Author)

  19. Engineering Research Centers: A Partnership for Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This publication consists of colorful data sheets on the National Science Foundation's Engineering Research Centers (ERC) Program, a program designed to strengthen the competitiveness of U.S. industries by bringing new approaches and goals to academic engineering research and education. The main elements of the ERC mission are cross-disciplinary…

  20. Library Services in a Supercomputer Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layman, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Describes library services that are offered at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), which is located at the University of California at San Diego. Topics discussed include the user population; online searching; microcomputer use; electronic networks; current awareness programs; library catalogs; and the slide collection. A sidebar outlines…

  1. Learning-Centered Leadership: A Conceptual Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph; Elliott, Stephen N.; Goldring, Ellen; Porter, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the research base that undergirds the emerging concept of learning-centered leadership. We begin with our definition of leadership. Leadership is "the process of influencing others to achieve mutually agreed upon purposes for the organization" (Patterson, 1993, p. 3). Next, we make a number of…

  2. [Challenges in building a surgical obesity center].

    PubMed

    Fischer, L; El Zein, Z; Bruckner, T; Hünnemeyer, K; Rudofsky, G; Reichenberger, M; Schommer, K; Gutt, C N; Büchler, M W; Müller-Stich, B P

    2014-04-01

    It is estimated that approximately 1 million adults in Germany suffer from grade III obesity. The aim of this article is to describe the challenges faced when constructing an operative obesity center. The inflow of patients as well as personnel and infrastructure of the interdisciplinary Diabetes and Obesity Center in Heidelberg were analyzed. The distribution of continuous data was described by mean values and standard deviation and analyzed using variance analysis. The interdisciplinary Diabetes and Obesity Center in Heidelberg was founded in 2006 and offers conservative therapeutic treatment and all currently available operative procedures. For every operative intervention carried out an average of 1.7 expert reports and 0.3 counter expertises were necessary. The time period from the initial presentation of patients in the department of surgery to an operation was on average 12.8 months (standard deviation SD ± 4.5 months). The 47 patients for whom remuneration for treatment was initially refused had an average body mass index (BMI) of 49.2 kg/m(2) and of these 39 had at least the necessity for treatment of a comorbidity. Of the 45 patients for whom the reason for the refusal of treatment costs was given as a lack of conservative treatment, 30 had undertaken a medically supervised attempt at losing weight over at least 6 months. Additionally, 19 of these patients could document participation in a course at a rehabilitation center, a Xenical® or Reduktil® therapy or had undertaken the Optifast® program. For the 20 patients who supposedly lacked a psychosomatic evaluation, an adequate psychosomatic evaluation was carried out in all cases. The establishment of an operative obesity center can last for several years. A essential prerequisite for success seems to be the constructive and targeted cooperation with the health insurance companies.

  3. Anatomy of a Security Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John

    2010-01-01

    Many agencies and corporations are either contemplating or in the process of building a cyber Security Operations Center (SOC). Those Agencies that have established SOCs are most likely working on major revisions or enhancements to existing capabilities. As principle developers of the NASA SOC; this Presenters' goals are to provide the GFIRST community with examples of some of the key building blocks of an Agency scale cyber Security Operations Center. This presentation viII include the inputs and outputs, the facilities or shell, as well as the internal components and the processes necessary to maintain the SOC's subsistence - in other words, the anatomy of a SOC. Details to be presented include the SOC architecture and its key components: Tier 1 Call Center, data entry, and incident triage; Tier 2 monitoring, incident handling and tracking; Tier 3 computer forensics, malware analysis, and reverse engineering; Incident Management System; Threat Management System; SOC Portal; Log Aggregation and Security Incident Management (SIM) systems; flow monitoring; IDS; etc. Specific processes and methodologies discussed include Incident States and associated Work Elements; the Incident Management Workflow Process; Cyber Threat Risk Assessment methodology; and Incident Taxonomy. The Evolution of the Cyber Security Operations Center viII be discussed; starting from reactive, to proactive, and finally to proactive. Finally, the resources necessary to establish an Agency scale SOC as well as the lessons learned in the process of standing up a SOC viII be presented.

  4. Traveling salesman problem with a center.

    PubMed

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota

    2005-06-01

    We study a traveling salesman problem where the path is optimized with a cost function that includes its length L as well as a certain measure C of its distance from the geometrical center of the graph. Using simulated annealing (SA) we show that such a problem has a transition point that separates two phases differing in the scaling behavior of L and C, in efficiency of SA, and in the shape of minimal paths.

  5. Solar energy for a community recreation center

    SciTech Connect

    Libman, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 58,000 ft/sup 2/ recreation center in Shenandoah, Georgia is described. Rooftop solar collectors and reflectors serve as a basis for the active solar heating and cooling systems. The recreation center clearly demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar application in a recreation setting; economically, however, results are shown to be mixed. Although effective in the heating mode, solar cooling is considered as questionable in terms of a reasonable payoff period. A computer model predicts a payoff period of 11 years based on 1977 energy prices. The design and construction costs of the solar heating and cooling system ($726,000) was 90%more » financed by ERDA. A hockey-size ice rink and a gymnasium plus locker rooms and meeting rooms comprised the major part of the floor space. Problems encountered and operation of the facility are described. (MJJ)« less

  6. A new barrier-free burn center.

    PubMed

    Edlich, R F; Neal, J G; Suber, F; Kirby, D; Woods, J A; Bentram, D; McGawen, J

    1998-01-01

    This article describes a barrier-free burn center that is accessible to persons with disabilities and that complies with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The burn center has 3 separate components: patient rooms, patient support facilities, and staff support facilities. Thirteen rooms are used to care for 16 patients. Two of the 13 rooms are accessible to people with disabilities. These 2 rooms have wide doors that permit a wheelchair to pass through, and they have enough clear floor space for a wheelchair to make a 180 degrees turn. The rooms have a sink that is accessible from a wheelchair. The bathrooms have large, clear floor spaces that allow for the turning of a wheelchair, elevated toilets, grab bars, and showers that permit wheelchair access. Special wheelchairs that provide easier shower and commode access are available. The patient support services feature a large hydrotherapy room that contains a table-shower system that allows a person in a wheelchair to gain access to both sides of the shower table. A tub room has been constructed to provide compact patient bathing and hydromassage, and it is also accessible to people in wheelchairs. The staff support services include a locker room that has a shower accessible to people with disabilities so that staff members with mobility disorders can work in the burn center. Grade II braille writing marks all of the signs that designate the permanent rooms and spacing in the burn center and in the contiguous common use areas. The common use area has a restroom accessible to people with disabilities and a waiting room with a telephone communications system for people with mobility disorders or mobility impairment.

  7. Implementing Personalized Medicine in a Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Fenstermacher, David A.; Wenham, Robert M.; Rollison, Dana E.; Dalton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with patients, community clinicians, industry, academia, and seventeen hospitals in the United States to begin a personalized cancer care initiative called Total Cancer Care™ . Total Cancer Care was designed to collect tumor specimens and clinical data throughout a patient’s lifetime with the goal of finding “the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time.” Because Total Cancer Care is a partnership with the patient and involves collection of clinical data and tumor specimens for research purposes, a formal protocol and patient consent process was developed and an information technology platform was constructed to provide a robust “warehouse” for clinical and molecular profiling data. To date, over 76,000 cancer patients from Moffitt and consortium medical centers have been enrolled in the protocol. The TCC initiative has developed many of the capabilities and resources that are building the foundation of personalized medicine. PMID:22157297

  8. The development of a community breast center.

    PubMed

    Edge, R M; Peterson, C; James Ward, S

    1999-01-01

    Maximum capacity for mammography services had been reached at the Kaweah Delta Health Care District, a 504-bed, multicampus hospital district in Visalia, Calif., so the community supported the idea of better and easier access to cancer care. Kaweah Delta Foundation, the hospital's development arm, helped raise funds for a new community breast center after hearing from local women that they disliked traveling to Los Angeles or San Francisco for state-of-the-art technology in diagnosis. They also requested better education and quicker exam results. The new Center was the result of a collaborative effort between imaging services and the cancer care program at Kaweah Delta. A nearby hospital, with more space for parking and room to offer an education program, became the site of the new Center. New equipment that met MQSA guidelines was purchased. An architectural firm designed a layout for patient comfort and privacy and efficient throughput for high volume work. The purchase of a second mammography unit allowed the Center to offer same-day and next-day appointments, which increased both physician and patient satisfaction. Consultation services with a radiologist are now offered. An education program that includes group support meetings and referrals to an oncology clinical nurse specialist are also offered. A new mobile mammography unit, housed at a newly acquired hospital 13 miles away, serves the needs of women in the two-county rural area who have no transportation. With careful planning and collaboration, the volume of mammography services has doubled in a year. Customer service ratings have soared.

  9. Validation: A Family-Centered Communication Skill.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pat; Ahmann, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care can seem challenging when family member behavior, choices, attitudes, or emotions are "difficult" or "challenging" to deal with. Yet nurses can develop skills to effectively interact with families in a wide variety of circumstances and then become able to practice family-centered care in any situation that might arise. One particularly useful skill is "validation," which means accepting what the family member says or does as a valid expression of thoughts and feelings in that particular circumstance at that particular time. Validation does not mean there is agreement or acceptance of unsafe behaviors, only that the nurse acknowledges that the family member's concerns and feelings are important and should be listened to and taken seriously, even in the presence of disagreement. Validation, which should be individualized, can take many forms, ranging from providing complete attention to reflection of statements, identification of possible unexpressed emotions, normalization, and finally, a full and genuine sense of connection. Understanding and practicing validation can empower nurses and family members, as well as support effectivefamily-centered communication and problem solving even in challenging circumstances.

  10. Validation: a family-centered communication skill.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pat; Ahmann, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Family-centered care can seem challenging when family member behavior, choices, attitudes, or emotions are "difficult" or "challenging" to deal with. Yet nurses can develop skills to effectively interact with families in a wide variety of circumstances and then become able to practice family-centered care in any situation that might arise. One particularly useful skill is "validation," which means accepting what the family member says or does as a valid expression of thoughts and feelings in that particular circumstance at that particular time. Validation does not mean there is agreement or acceptance of unsafe behaviors, only that the nurse acknowledges that the family member's concerns and feelings are important and should be listened to and taken seriously, even in the presence of disagreement. Validation, which should be individualized, can take many forms, ranging from providing complete attention to reflection of statements, identification of possible unexpressed emotions, normalization, and finally, a full and genuine sense of connection. Understanding and practicing validation can empower nurses and family members, as well as support effective family-centered communication and problem solving, even in challenging circumstances.

  11. Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

    2013-05-01

    The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages.

  12. School Centered Management: A Matter of Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    School Centered Management (SCM) focuses on the school as the center of all management endeavors. Systematic delegation, support, and accountability are parts of SCM's situational approach to management. (MLF)

  13. Making Child Care Centers SAFER: A Non-Regulatory Approach to Improving Child Care Center Siting

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Tarah S; Harvey, Margaret L.; Rusnak, Sharee Major

    2011-01-01

    Licensed child care centers are generally considered to be safe because they are required to meet state licensing regulations. As part of their licensing requirements, many states inspect child care centers and include an assessment of the health and safety of the facility to look for hazardous conditions or practices that may harm children. However, most states do not require an environmental assessment of the child care center building or land to prevent a center from being placed on, next to, or inside contaminated buildings. Having worked on several sites where child care centers were affected by environmental contaminants, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) endeavor to raise awareness of this issue. One of ATSDR's partner states, Connecticut, took a proactive, non-regulatory approach to the issue with the development its Child Day Care Screening Assessment for Environmental Risk Program. PMID:21563710

  14. Genesis of a flexible turning center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanclemente, Paul; French, Robert D.

    GE - Aircraft Engines has designed, built, and is operating a flexible turning center for jet engine hardware. Although the plant is in the forefront of manufacturing technology development, it was intended from the start to be a production facility. So while there was much to learn from being involved in all phases of the project, meeting production schedules was, and is, key to its success. This paper reviews the early history of the project and ends with a view of its recent production status.

  15. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  16. Should you consider a women's center?

    PubMed

    Keele, R L; Delany, P E

    1986-05-01

    Comprehensive women's services programs should not be attempted by hospitals that have not made a strategic analysis to determine its consistency with hospital mission, contribution to survival, consumer need, and willingness of staff to make the necessary changes. Successful women's centers meet minimum criteria of philosophy/product, people (staff), place, and process. Unless the hospital commits the resources essential to meeting those criteria, it risks the perception of marketing to women rather than serving women. This has a potential for negative backlash that could affect hospital success as well as the success of women's services.

  17. Outreach facilities within a research center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, V.; Thériault, G.; Poulin-Girard, A.-S.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide, volunteers from student associations and non-profit organizations carry out outreach activities with high school students in their classrooms. Most of the time, these activities highlight optical phenomena but do not provide information about the reality of researchers in companies and universities. To address this issue, Université Laval's OSA and SPIE student chapters set up a demonstration laboratory dedicated to outreach, located in a research center. In this paper, we list the advantages of this type of facility as well as the steps leading to the creation of the laboratory, and we give an overview of the demonstration laboratory.

  18. Retrofit energy studies of a recreation center

    SciTech Connect

    Haberl, J.S.; Claridge, D.

    1985-01-01

    Retrofit energy options for the Student Recreation Center at the University of Colorado have been evaluated using the DOE-2.1b simulation program. This building has two major systems that are not included in the program - an ice rink and a swimming pool. The approach used to model these systems and the use of the program for other applications not included in the program, such as duty cycling and night cycling of fans for freeze protection, are emphasized. Measures that help streamline the usage of the program on a minicomputer are also discussed.

  19. A Virtual Mission Operations Center: Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Barbara; Bussman, Marie; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual Mission Operations Center - Collaborative Environment (VMOC-CE) intent is to have a central access point for all the resources used in a collaborative mission operations environment to assist mission operators in communicating on-site and off-site in the investigation and resolution of anomalies. It is a framework that as a minimum incorporates online chat, realtime file sharing and remote application sharing components in one central location. The use of a collaborative environment in mission operations opens up the possibilities for a central framework for other project members to access and interact with mission operations staff remotely. The goal of the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) Project is to identify, develop, and infuse technology to enable mission control by on-call personnel in geographically dispersed locations. In order to achieve this goal, the following capabilities are needed: Autonomous mission control systems Automated systems to contact on-call personnel Synthesis and presentation of mission control status and history information Desktop tools for data and situation analysis Secure mechanism for remote collaboration commanding Collaborative environment for remote cooperative work The VMOC-CE is a collaborative environment that facilitates remote cooperative work. It is an application instance of the Virtual System Design Environment (VSDE), developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Systems Engineering Services & Advanced Concepts (SESAC) Branch. The VSDE is a web-based portal that includes a knowledge repository and collaborative environment to serve science and engineering teams in product development. It is a "one stop shop" for product design, providing users real-time access to product development data, engineering and management tools, and relevant design specifications and resources through the Internet. The initial focus of the VSDE has been to serve teams working in the early portion of the system

  20. Space Operations Center - A concept analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Space Operations Center (SOC) which is a concept for a Shuttle serviced, permanent, manned facility in low earth orbit is viewed as a major candidate for the manned space flight following the completion of an operational Shuttle. The primary objectives of SOC are: (1) the construction, checkout, and transfer to operational orbit of large, complex space systems, (2) on-orbit assembly, launch, recovery, and servicing of manned and unmanned spacecraft, (3) managing operations of co-orbiting free-flying satellites, and (4) the development of reduced dependence on earth for control and resupply. The structure of SOC, a self-contained orbital facility containing several Shuttle launched modules, includes the service, habitation, and logistics modules as well as construction, and flight support facilities. A schedule is proposed for the development of SOC over ten years and costs for the yearly programs are estimated.

  1. A Resource Center for Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickow, B.

    2011-12-01

    Informal science education (ISE) is playing an increasingly important role in how and where the public engages with science. A growing body of research is showing that people learn the majority of their science knowledge outside of school (Falk & Dierking, 2010). The ISE field includes a wide variety of sources, including the internet, TV programs, magazines, hobby clubs and museums, all sectors of the informal science education field. These experiences touch large numbers of people throughout their lifetimes. If you would like to share your research with the public, ISE can be an effective conduit for meaningful science communication. However, because the ISE field is so diverse, it can be overwhelming with its multiple entry points. If you already are part of an ISE initiative, knowing how to access the most useful resources easily can also be daunting. CAISE, the Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education, is a resource center for the ISE field funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). CAISE can help connect you to the knowledge and people of ISE, through its website, products and in-person convenings. The proposed CAISE presentation will outline the diversity of the field and concisely present data that will make the case for the impact of ISE. We will focus on examples of successful programs that connect science with the public and that bring together AGU's science research community with practitioners and researchers within ISE. Pathways to various ISE resources in the form of current CAISE initiatives will be described as well. The presentation will include an interview section in which a CAISE staff member will ask questions of a scientist involved in an ISE initiative in order to detail one example of how ISE can be a valuable tool for engaging the public in science. Time for audience Q&A also will be included in the session.

  2. A Culture of Learning: Inside a Living-Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranzow, Jeannine; Hinkle, Sara E.; Muthiah, Richard; Davis, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the culture of a living-learning center, this study examines the educational practices that aim to link in- and out-of-class experiences. Through a cultural lens, the authors offer a glimpse into a living-learning center located within a state institution in the Midwest that models a way of effectively connecting the curricular and…

  3. A Visit to the Lederman Science Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Lederman Science Center. With the hands-on exhibits, you can discover the tools and methods scientists use Lederman Science Center Roll over the rooms in the floor plan to see the pictures of rooms in the

  4. Teacher Centering: A National Institute. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Linda Clark, Ed.; And Others

    This report is organized around six chapters: (1) "How This Institute Came About"; (2) "Agenda"; (3) "Teacher Centering in 1976: The Real Experience"; (4) "Description of Teacher Centers"; (5) "Conference Reactions"; and (6) "Conference Directory of Participants." The first chapter discusses the sponsors, and organizers of the conference. Chapter…

  5. Implementing the Data Center Energy Productivity Metric in a High Performance Computing Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Marquez, Andres; Rawson, Andrew

    2013-06-30

    As data centers proliferate in size and number, the improvement of their energy efficiency and productivity has become an economic and environmental imperative. Making these improvements requires metrics that are robust, interpretable, and practical. We discuss the properties of a number of the proposed metrics of energy efficiency and productivity. In particular, we focus on the Data Center Energy Productivity (DCeP) metric, which is the ratio of useful work produced by the data center to the energy consumed performing that work. We describe our approach for using DCeP as the principal outcome of a designed experiment using a highly instrumented,more » high-performance computing data center. We found that DCeP was successful in clearly distinguishing different operational states in the data center, thereby validating its utility as a metric for identifying configurations of hardware and software that would improve energy productivity. We also discuss some of the challenges and benefits associated with implementing the DCeP metric, and we examine the efficacy of the metric in making comparisons within a data center and between data centers.« less

  6. Center-Specific Factors Associated with Peritonitis Risk-A Multi-Center Registry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nadeau-Fredette, Annie-Claire; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Pascoe, Elaine M; Cho, Yeoungjee; Clayton, Philip A; Borlace, Monique; Badve, Sunil V; Sud, Kamal; Boudville, Neil; McDonald, Stephen P

    ♦ Previous studies have reported significant variation in peritonitis rates across dialysis centers. Limited evidence is available to explain this variability. The aim of this study was to assess center-level predictors of peritonitis and their relationship with peritonitis rate variations. ♦ All incident peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients treated in Australia between October 2003 and December 2013 were included. Data were accessed through the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. The primary outcome was peritonitis rate, evaluated in a mixed effects negative binomial regression model. Peritonitis-free survival was assessed as a secondary outcome in a Cox proportional hazards model. ♦ Overall, 8,711 incident PD patients from 51 dialysis centers were included in the study. Center-level predictors of lower peritonitis rates included smaller center size, high proportion of PD, low peritoneal equilibration test use at PD start, and low proportion of hospitalization for peritonitis. In contrast, a low proportion of automated PD exposure, high icodextrin exposure and low or high use of antifungal prophylaxis at the time of peritonitis were associated with a higher peritonitis rate. Similar results were obtained for peritonitis-free survival. Overall, accounting for center-level characteristics appreciably decreased peritonitis variability among dialysis centers (p = 0.02). ♦ This study identified specific center-level characteristics associated with the variation in peritonitis risk. Whether these factors are directly related to peritonitis risk or surrogate markers for other center characteristics is uncertain and should be validated in further studies. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  7. Medical center farmers markets: a strategic partner in the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Morrison, Kathy J; Dillon, Judith F; Bates, Beth Y

    2013-08-01

    The number of medical center-based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution's commitment to the medical home. We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market's Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance's report on the medical home. During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care.

  8. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  9. A Healthy Approach to Fitness Center Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Examines techniques for keeping college fitness centers secure while maintaining an inviting atmosphere. Building access control, preventing locker room theft, and suppressing causes for physical violence are discussed. (GR)

  10. Neuropsychology Within a Tertiary Care Epilepsy Center.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chris E; MacAllister, William S; Barr, William B

    2018-05-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent condition characterized by variations in its clinical presentation, etiology, and amenability to treatment. Through history, neuropsychologists have played a significant role in performing research studies on changes in language, memory, and executive functioning in patients with epilepsy, including those undergoing surgical treatment for medically refractory seizures. These studies provided a foundation for establishing neuropsychologists as critical members of interdisciplinary clinical teams specializing in evaluation and treatment of epilepsy. This article describes a number of elements of specialized neuropsychological practice that have evolved over the years within a tertiary care epilepsy center. Through diagnostic interview and objective testing, the neuropsychologist is able to provide a more complete and objective understanding of a patient's cognitive and behavioral functioning than what is obtained by other clinicians through brief office visits. While assessment of cognition, mood, and behavior is the most commonly provided service to patients with epilepsy from all age groups, there are many instances when neuropsychologists in surgical settings are called to perform more specialized procedures, including the intracarotid amytal (Wada) procedure, electrocortical stimulation mapping of language eloquent brain regions, and functional brain imaging procedures. While working as a neuropsychologist on an interdisciplinary epilepsy care team requires specialized knowledge and clinical training, it is extremely satisfying due to the diversity of the patient population and the particular challenges resulting from the often unique manner that cognition and behavior can be affected in patients with epilepsy across the lifespan.

  11. A multipurpose computing center with distributed resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudoba, J.; Adam, M.; Adamová, D.; Kouba, T.; Mikula, A.; Říkal, V.; Švec, J.; Uhlířová, J.; Vokáč, P.; Svatoš, M.

    2017-10-01

    The Computing Center of the Institute of Physics (CC IoP) of the Czech Academy of Sciences serves a broad spectrum of users with various computing needs. It runs WLCG Tier-2 center for the ALICE and the ATLAS experiments; the same group of services is used by astroparticle physics projects the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). OSG stack is installed for the NOvA experiment. Other groups of users use directly local batch system. Storage capacity is distributed to several locations. DPM servers used by the ATLAS and the PAO are all in the same server room, but several xrootd servers for the ALICE experiment are operated in the Nuclear Physics Institute in Řež, about 10 km away. The storage capacity for the ATLAS and the PAO is extended by resources of the CESNET - the Czech National Grid Initiative representative. Those resources are in Plzen and Jihlava, more than 100 km away from the CC IoP. Both distant sites use a hierarchical storage solution based on disks and tapes. They installed one common dCache instance, which is published in the CC IoP BDII. ATLAS users can use these resources using the standard ATLAS tools in the same way as the local storage without noticing this geographical distribution. Computing clusters LUNA and EXMAG dedicated to users mostly from the Solid State Physics departments offer resources for parallel computing. They are part of the Czech NGI infrastructure MetaCentrum with distributed batch system based on torque with a custom scheduler. Clusters are installed remotely by the MetaCentrum team and a local contact helps only when needed. Users from IoP have exclusive access only to a part of these two clusters and take advantage of higher priorities on the rest (1500 cores in total), which can also be used by any user of the MetaCentrum. IoP researchers can also use distant resources located in several towns of the Czech Republic with a capacity of more than 12000 cores in total.

  12. A Report on New Haven's Library Neighborhood Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloss, Meredith

    A library neighborhood center is a community built around a branch library, providing the usual branch library functions of self-education and improvement. Four of New Haven's eight branch libraries are designed as library neighborhood centers. The centers are supported by the Ford Foundation, the City of New Haven, the Office of Economic…

  13. Esrange Space Center, a Gate to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widell, Ola

    Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) is operating the Esrange Space Center in northern Sweden. Space operations have been performed for more than 40 years. We have a unique combination of maintaining balloon and rocket launch operations, and building payloads, providing space vehicles and service systems. Sub-orbital rocket flights with land recovery and short to long duration balloon flights up to weeks are offered. The geographical location, land recovery area and the long term experience makes Swedish Space Corporation and Esrange to an ideal gate for space activities. Stratospheric balloons are primarily used in supporting atmospheric research, validation of satellites and testing of space systems. Balloon operations have been carried out at Esrange since 1974. A large number of balloon flights are yearly launched in cooperation with CNES, France. Since 2005 NASA/CSBF and Esrange provide long duration balloon flights to North America. Flight durations up to 5 days with giant balloons (1.2 Million cubic metres) carrying heavy payload (up to 2500kg) with astronomical instruments has been performed. Balloons are also used as a crane for lifting space vehicles or parachute systems to be dropped and tested from high altitude. Many scientific groups both in US, Europe and Japan have indicated a great need of long duration balloon flights. Esrange will perform a technical polar circum balloon flight during the summer 2008 testing balloon systems and flight technique. We are also working on a permission giving us the opportunity on a circular stratospheric balloon flight around the North Pole.

  14. To center or not to center? Investigating inertia with a multilevel autoregressive model.

    PubMed

    Hamaker, Ellen L; Grasman, Raoul P P P

    2014-01-01

    Whether level 1 predictors should be centered per cluster has received considerable attention in the multilevel literature. While most agree that there is no one preferred approach, it has also been argued that cluster mean centering is desirable when the within-cluster slope and the between-cluster slope are expected to deviate, and the main interest is in the within-cluster slope. However, we show in a series of simulations that if one has a multilevel autoregressive model in which the level 1 predictor is the lagged outcome variable (i.e., the outcome variable at the previous occasion), cluster mean centering will in general lead to a downward bias in the parameter estimate of the within-cluster slope (i.e., the autoregressive relationship). This is particularly relevant if the main question is whether there is on average an autoregressive effect. Nonetheless, we show that if the main interest is in estimating the effect of a level 2 predictor on the autoregressive parameter (i.e., a cross-level interaction), cluster mean centering should be preferred over other forms of centering. Hence, researchers should be clear on what is considered the main goal of their study, and base their choice of centering method on this when using a multilevel autoregressive model.

  15. To center or not to center? Investigating inertia with a multilevel autoregressive model

    PubMed Central

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Whether level 1 predictors should be centered per cluster has received considerable attention in the multilevel literature. While most agree that there is no one preferred approach, it has also been argued that cluster mean centering is desirable when the within-cluster slope and the between-cluster slope are expected to deviate, and the main interest is in the within-cluster slope. However, we show in a series of simulations that if one has a multilevel autoregressive model in which the level 1 predictor is the lagged outcome variable (i.e., the outcome variable at the previous occasion), cluster mean centering will in general lead to a downward bias in the parameter estimate of the within-cluster slope (i.e., the autoregressive relationship). This is particularly relevant if the main question is whether there is on average an autoregressive effect. Nonetheless, we show that if the main interest is in estimating the effect of a level 2 predictor on the autoregressive parameter (i.e., a cross-level interaction), cluster mean centering should be preferred over other forms of centering. Hence, researchers should be clear on what is considered the main goal of their study, and base their choice of centering method on this when using a multilevel autoregressive model. PMID:25688215

  16. [Pancreatoduodenectomy: results in a large volume center].

    PubMed

    Chan, Carlos; Franssen, Bernardo; Uscanga, Luis; Robles, Guillermo; Campuzano, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Analyze the experience with pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) at the INCMNSZ. PD has become a popular procedure in hospitals throughout the USA and Europe in the last 25 years, where mortality is < 5% y morbidity remains around 40%. Nonetheless there are very few reports on PD in Latin America. The data of all PD's performed at the INCMNSZ between 1999 and 2005 was gathered prospectively and analyzed retrospectively. 133 PDs where performed; 47.5% where men and 52.5% where women. Median of age was 57.7 years. 81.5% underwent classical resection and 18.5% a pylorus preserving procedure. Intraoperative variables include: blood loss: 940 mL. (1,000). transfusion requirements: 1.9 U, median operative time: 5:49 (+/- 1:02) and median hospital stay: 14 days. Most frequent diagnosis include ampulary adenocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer Mortality in the entire series was 9.2%, decreased to 2.7% in the 2002-2005 period and from April 2003 has remained in 0. A total of 14 portal-superior mesenteric vein resections where performed. To our knowledge this is the largest series of PD in Latin America. Popularity and indications for PD are expanding. Mortality is acceptable and morbidity remains high despite much effort. This procedure is performed with a satisfactory outcome in high volume centers. Involvement of the portal-superior mesenteric vein is not a contraindication of PD.

  17. Student-Centered Instruction in a Theoretical Statistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates Prins, Samantha C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an example of how student-centered instruction can be used in a theoretical statistics class. The author taught a two-semester undergraduate probability and mathematical statistics sequence using primarily teacher-centered instruction in the first semester and primarily student-centered instruction in the second semester. A…

  18. Mass sociogenic illness in a youth center.

    PubMed

    Desenclos, J C; Gardner, H; Horan, M

    1992-01-01

    In July, 1989, 63 (42%) of 150 children ages 4-14 years attending an outreach program at a youth center in Florida, but no employees, developed acute and rapidly resolving upper gastrointestinal symptoms 2 to 40 minutes after a prepackaged lunch. All ill children were sent to 3 local hospital emergency departments for evaluation. However, clinical evaluation was normal for all. Of 102 children who ate any prepackaged foods, 48 (47%) became ill compared to 1/19 (5%) for children who did not eat (rate ratio [RR] = 8.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-60.9). No employees ate any of the food items served. Consumption of sandwiches was associated with a moderate increased risk of illness (RR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0-2.9). The attack rate did not differ by age, but was greater for girls (39/56, 70%) than for boys (9/46, 20%; [RR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.9-6.6]). Over 3,000 similar prepackaged meals from the same caterer were served in the same area of Florida that day. An inquiry in the area documented absence of similar symptoms elsewhere. Unopened meal samples tested negative for pesticide residues, heavy metals, staphylococcal toxin, or Bacillus cereus. We diagnosed the outbreak as mass sociogenic illness. Complaints of a bad tasting sandwich by the index case and possible staff anxiety about food poisoning may have contributed to the development of the outbreak.

  19. Marginal ulcer perforation: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, S K; Chua, D; Anbalakan, K; Shelat, V G

    2017-10-01

    Marginal ulcer (MU) is defined as ulcer on the jejunal side of the gastrojejunostomy (GJ) anastomosis. Most MUs are managed medically but those with complications like bleeding or perforation require intervention. It is recommended that GJ anastomosis be revised in patients with MU perforation (MUP). The aim of this case series is to study the clinical presentation and management of MUP. Three hundred and thirty-two patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer at a single center were studied over a period of 5 years. Nine patients (2.7 %) presented with MUP. GJ was previously done for either complicated peptic ulcer (n = 4) or for suspected gastric malignancy (n = 5). Two patients had previously completed H. pylori therapy. None of the patients presented with septic shock. MU was on the jejunal side of GJ in all patients. The median MUP size was 10 mm. Four patients (44.4 %) had omental patch repair, three (33.3 %) had primary closure, and one each had revision of GJ and jejunal serosal patch repair. There were no leaks, intra-abdominal abscess or reoperation and no malignancies. MUP patients do not present with septic shock. Omental patch repair or primary closure is sufficient enough. Revision of Billroth-II-GJ into Roux-en-Y-GJ is not mandatory.

  20. Verified Centers, Nonverified Centers or Other Facilities: A National Analysis of Burn Patient Treatment Location

    PubMed Central

    Zonies, David; Mack, Christopher; Kramer, Bradley; Rivara, Frederick; Klein, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Background Although comprehensive burn care requires significant resources, patients may be treated at verified burn centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities due to a variety of factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between patient and injury characteristics and treatment location using a national database. Study Design We performed an analysis of all burn patients admitted to United States hospitals participating in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project over 2 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient and injury factors associated with the likelihood of treatment at designated burn care facilities. Definitve care facilities were categorized as American Burn Association verified centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities. Results Over the two years, 29,971 burn patients were treated in 1,376 hospitals located in 19 participating states. A total of 6,712 (22%) patients were treated at verified centers, with 26% and 52% treated at non-verified or other facilities, respectively. Patients treated at verified centers were younger than those at non-verified or other facilities (33.1 years vs. 33.7 years vs. 41.9 years, p<0.001) and had a higher rate of inhalation injury (3.4% vs. 3.2% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001). Independent factors associated with treatment at verified centers include burns to the head/neck (RR 2.4, CI 2.1-2.7), hand (RR 1.8, CI 1.6-1.9), electrical injury (RR 1.4, CI 1.4, CI 1.2-1.7), and fewer co-morbidities (RR 0.55, CI 0.5-0.6). Conclusions More than two-thirds of significantly burned patients are treated at non-verified burn centers in the U.S. Many patients meeting ABA criteria for transfer to a burn center are being treated at non-burn center facilities. PMID:20193892

  1. [Sickle cell anemia: experience in a center].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chiari, M; Tusell Puigbert, J; Ortega Aramburu, J

    2003-02-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a structural hemoglobinopathy in which morphological and physical changes in erythrocytes cause vaso-occlusive episodes in various organs and tissues. The disease is common among blacks and the African population. As a result of the growing migratory flow, this is an emerging disease in Spain. To present the casuistics of a pediatric hospital: clinical onset, the most frequent features and complications, and treatment. We performed a retrospective study of 22 patients aged less than 18 years old diagnosed with sickle cell anemia between January 1985 and December 2001. Epidemiologic data, symptoms, complications, blood test results, treatment, and response were recorded. The mean age of the patients was 39 months. In 54 %, diagnosis was established before the age of 2 years. No differences were found in sex. The countries of origin were Gambia in 32 %, Morocco in 23 %, and Senegal in 18 % as well as other African and Central America countries; 53 % of the children were born in Spain. The most common complaint was vaso-occlusive pain localized in the abdomen (45 %). The most frequent complications were infections and 13.7 % suffered stroke. Twenty-eight percent of the patients diagnosed before the age of 2 years presented complications. Eleven patients received hydroxyurea for recurrent vaso-occlusive crises with favorable results; one patient underwent splenectomy and another received an allogenic bone marrow transplant from an HLA-identical brother with excellent results. This study reproduces the data described in the literature from countries with a high prevalence of the disease. Morbidity could be minimized by early diagnosis and preventive treatment and good healthcare. Given the increasing incidence of the disease, screening of black and African neonates and genetic counseling are recommended together with guidelines for prompt and appropriate treatment in primary health centers and emergency departments.

  2. Suggestions for Implementing a Content Mastery Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Amelia

    2010-01-01

    The content mastery center (CMC) model is responsive to the federal requirements of providing access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities and allowing special education teachers to meet the highly qualified requirement by providing consultation and support services in the content areas. The CMC model has been…

  3. Natural Gas Market Centers: A 2008 Update

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    This special report looks at the current status of market centers in today's natural gas marketplace, examining their role and their importance to natural gas shippers, pipelines, and others involved in the transportation of natural gas over the North American pipeline network.

  4. 100 Multivisceral Transplants at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Kato, Tomoaki; Levi, David M.; DeFaria, Werviston; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Weppler, Debbie; Nishida, Seigo; Moon, Jang; Madariaga, Juan R.; David, Andre I.; Gaynor, Jeffrey J.; Thompson, John; Hernandez, Erick; Martinez, Enrique; Cantwell, G Patricia; Augenstein, Jeffrey S.; Gyamfi, Anthony; Pretto, Ernesto A.; Dowdy, Lorraine; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Ruiz, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to summarize the evolution of multivisceral transplantation over a decade of experience and evaluate its current status. Summary Background Data: Multivisceral transplantation can be valuable for the treatment of patients with massive abdominal catastrophes. Its major limitations have been technical and rejection of the intestinal graft. Methods: This study consisted of an outcome analysis of 98 consecutive patients who received multivisceral transplantation at our institution. This represents the largest single center experience to date. Results: The most common diseases in our population before transplant were intestinal gastroschisis and intestinal dysmotility syndromes in children, and mesenteric thrombosis and trauma in adults. Kaplan Meier estimated patient and graft survivals for all cases were 65% and 63% at 1 year, 49% and 47% at 3 years, and 49% and 47% at 5 years. Factors that adversely influenced patient survival included transplant before 1998 (P = 0.01), being hospitalized at the time of transplant (P = 0.05), and being a child who received Campath-1H induction (P = 0.03). Among 37 patients who had none of these 3 factors (15 adults and 22 children), estimated 1- and 3-year survivals were 89% and 71%, respectively. Patients transplanted since 2001 had significantly less moderate and severe rejections (31.6% vs 67.6%, P = 0.0005) with almost half of these patients never developing rejection. Conclusions: Multivisceral transplantation is now an effective treatment of patients with complex abdominal pathology. The incidences of serious acute rejection and patient survival have improved in the most recent experience. Our results show that the multivisceral graft seems to facilitate engraftment of transplanted organs and raises the possibility that there is a degree of immunologic protection afforded by this procedure. PMID:16192808

  5. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    PubMed

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  6. Toward a statewide health information technology center (abbreviated version).

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Joe, John C

    2010-11-01

    With the passage of The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 that includes the Health Care Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health Act, the opportunity for states to develop a Health Information Technology Center (THITC) has emerged. The Center provides the intellectual, financial, and technical leadership along with the governance and oversight for all health information technology-related activities in the state. This Center would be a free-standing, not-for-profit, public-private partnership that would be responsible for operating one or more (in large states) Regional Health Information Technology Extension Centers (Extension Centers) along with several Regional Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) and one or more Regional Health Information Data Centers (Data Centers). We believe that if these features and functions could be developed, deployed, and integrated statewide, the health and welfare of the citizens of the state could be improved while simultaneously reducing the costs associated with the provision of care.

  7. Building a balanced scorecard for a burn center.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, T L; Hartford, C E; Hughes, J A

    1999-08-01

    The Balanced Scorecard provides a model that can be adapted to the management of any burn center, burn service or burn program. This model enables an organization to translate its mission and vision into specific strategic objectives across the four perspective: (1) the financial perspective; (2) the customer service perspective; (3) the internal business perspective; and (4) the growth and learning perspective. Once the appropriate objectives are identified, the Balanced Scorecard guides the organization to develop reasonable performance measures and establishes targets, initiatives and alternatives to meet programmatic goals and pursue longer-term visionary improvements. We used the burn center at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center to test whether the Balanced Scorecard methodology was appropriate for the core business plan of a healthcare strategic business unit (i.e. a burn center).

  8. Transition Components of the Frost Center, a Model Program Background: The Frost Center and Its Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosso, Janet L.

    The Frost Center (Rockville, Maryland) is a private, nonprofit school and therapeutic day program that serves adolescents with emotional, learning, and behavioral disabilities and their families. Approximately two-thirds of each student's day is spent in academic classes, acquiring the skills and behavior necessary for a return to a less…

  9. Space Operations Center System Analysis: Requirements for a Space Operations Center, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    The system and program requirements for a space operations center as defined by systems analysis studies are presented as a guide for future study and systems definition. Topics covered include general requirements for safety, maintainability, and reliability, service and habitat modules, the health maintenance facility; logistics modules; the docking tunnel; and subsystem requirements (structures, electrical power, environmental control/life support; extravehicular activity; data management; communications and tracking; docking/berthing; flight control/propulsion; and crew support). Facilities for flight support, construction, satellite and mission servicing, and fluid storage are included as well as general purpose support equipment.

  10. Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

  11. Patterns in hospitals' use of a regional poison information center.

    PubMed Central

    Chafee-Bahamon, C; Caplan, D L; Lovejoy, F H

    1983-01-01

    A statewide poison center undertook a study to identify types of hospitals which used its information services. Initial trends in calls from hospitals to the center over the center's first two years and percentages of hospitals' patient caseloads for which the center consulted were analyzed for 104 acute care hospitals by hospitals' location, size, and emergency room staffing. After the center's establishment as a regional resource, emergency room staff in urban teaching hospitals showed the greatest increase in calls within a year (88 per cent) and the highest consultation rates for poison patients seen (57 per cent). Private physician emergency room staff, and staff in distant and rural hospitals, showed lower or no increases in calls and lower consultation rates. Findings suggest that private physician emergency room staff and staff in distant and rural hospitals be considered for poison center outreach. Marketing of consultation services for non-pediatric overdoses is also indicated. PMID:6829822

  12. Profile Of A Rural Teachers' Center. Teachers' Center Exchange. Occasional Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter H.

    Project RISE (Regional In-Service Education) is an inservice center serving teachers, administrators, support staff and parents in central Connecticut. It began in 1976 with state funding, and serves 500 teachers in nine rural and small town districts. An initial needs assessment provided a basis for planning and responding to individual teachers'…

  13. A Multimedia Publishing Center from Scratch (and Scavenge).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ignazio, Fred

    1995-01-01

    Provides guidance for turning the library media center into a place where students can use multimedia tools for research, authoring, and publishing. Sidebars include: a multimedia club sample student contract, a component list for a multimedia workstation starter kit, a checklist for planning and assembling mini-centers, and a sample multimedia…

  14. Treatment in a center for geriatric traumatology.

    PubMed

    Grund, Stefan; Roos, Marco; Duchene, Werner; Schuler, Matthias

    2015-02-13

    Although the number of elderly patients with fractures is increasing, there have been only a few studies to date of the efficacy of collaborative treatment by trauma surgeons and geriatricians. Data on patients over age 75 with femoral neck, trochanteric, proximal humeral, and pelvic ring fractures were evaluated from the eras before and after the establishment of a certified center for geriatric traumatology (CGT) (retrospective analysis, n = 169; prospective analysis, n = 216). Moreover, data were also analyzed from younger patients (aged 65-74) with the same types of fracture who were not treated in the CGT. The main outcome parameter was in-hospital mortality. Other ones were the frequency and length of stays in the intensive care unit, the overall length of hospital stay, and the use of inpatient rehabilitation after acute hospitalization. Before the CGT was established, 20.7% of all patients over age 75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.8-27%) were treated in an intensive care unit; the corresponding figure after the establishment of the CGT was 13.4% (95% CI, 9.3-18.5%, p = 0.057). The mean length of stay in the intensive care unit before and after establishment of the CGT was 48 hours (95% CI, 32-64 hours) and 53 hours (95% CI, 29-77 hours), respectively (p = 0.973). The in-hospital mortality declined from 9.5% (95% CI, 5.3-13.8%) to 6.5% (95% CI, 3.7-9.5%, p = 0.278), while the overall length of hospital stay increased from 13.7 days (95% CI, 12.6-14.8 days) to 16.9 days (95% CI, 16.1-17.7 days, p<0.001). The percentage of patients transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility upon discharge decreased slightly, from 53.8% to 49.1%. Among the younger patients who were not treated in the CGT, no comparable trends were seen toward lower in-hospital mortality or toward less treatment in an intensive care unit. In fact, the developments over time in the younger age group tended to be in the opposite direction.0.001). The percentage of patients transferred

  15. [RABIN MEDICAL CENTER - A TERTIARY CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE, TEACHING AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron; Halpern, Eyran

    2017-04-01

    Rabin Medical Center (RMC) belongs to Clalit Health Services and is a tertiary, academic medical center with all the facilities of modern and advanced medicine. Annually in the RMC, 650,000 patients are treated in the outpatient clinics, and 100,000 patients are hospitalized in the hospital departments. All these patients are treated by 4500 devoted staff members, including 1000 physicians and 2000 nurses. RMC is one of the largest, centrally located medical centers for medical and nursing students' education in Israel, taking place in clinical departments, as well as in basic sciences courses. We also have a nursing school attached to the hospital. Our vision supports excellence in research. We have a special Research Department that supports RMC researchers, with research coordinators, and all the relevant facilities to assist in clinical and basic science studies. We also promote collaboration efforts with many academic centers in Israel and abroad. The scope of RMC research is broad, including 700 new studies every year and 1500 active studies currently. This issue of Harefuah is dedicated to the clinical and basic science research conducted at RMC with original papers presenting research performed by our departments and laboratories.

  16. What Currently Defines a Breast Center? Initial Data From the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Meena S.; Kaufman, Cary; Burgin, Cindy; Swain, Sandra; Granville, Tenisha; Winchester, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The definition of a “breast center” varies significantly, ranging from hospital-based or free-standing comprehensive programs to private subspecialty practices with patient resources in close proximity. This study analyzes the 2-year data of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) to assess the demographics of the types of programs seeking breast center (BC) accreditation. The results of a postaccreditation survey are also analyzed. Materials and Methods: All data (ie, Survey Application Record, on-site surveyors' reports, postaccreditation survey) for programs applying for accreditation between October 31, 2008, and October 31, 2010, were entered into a database at the American College of Surgeons headquarters. Analysis was conducted with SPSS v.19 and Microsoft Excel 2007. Results: During the initial 2-year period, 238 centers were surveyed across 41 states. With regard to the 27 standards and 17 BC components, 68% of centers had no deficiencies, 28% had ≤ 10% deficiencies, 3% had deficiencies in 11% to 29% of standards, and 2% had ≥ 30% deficiencies. The most common standards with noncompliance were accreditation for ultrasound-guided biopsy (standard 11), stereotactic biopsy (standard 10), and accrual onto clinical trials (standard 3.2). The only BC component found to be absent was survivorship program (1%). Desciptive categories were as follows: 81.5% were hospital-based centers, 13.5% were free-standing facilities, 2.5% were group practices, and 3% were “other.” There were no significant associations between descriptive category and full accreditation versus contingency or failure, or deficiencies in any one standard (all Ps > .05). On the basis of responses to the postaccreditation survey, 76% admitted making significant changes before the survey process. Conclusion: This initial analysis of the NAPBC 2-year data suggests that a wide variety of BC models adequately provide a high level of care and services for

  17. Suggestions for Successfully Establishing a University Selling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, C. David; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the multiple benefits a university selling center offers to students, faculty members, administrators, and the general business community. The seven essential steps in first establishing a university selling center are addressed: find a champion, obtain the support of administration, find a white knight, establish a board of…

  18. A Child Abuse Assessment Center: Alternative Investigative Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiester, Douglas S.

    A child abuse assessment center was created in Dade County, Florida, and was funded by state and local government sources. Staff includes a project director, two clinical social workers, a follow-up case monitor, clerical support, and a psychologist. The center attempts to minimize trauma to the child victim of sexual and physical abuse by a…

  19. Adult Resource Center--A Community/University Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegso, Kathryn A.

    Cooperative planning, based upon a decade of reentry programs for adults, culminated in the establishment of a public service known as the Adult Resource Center at the University of Akron (Ohio). Located in a renovated building between the campus and the downtown community, the Adult Resource Center serves as a liaison with social service…

  20. A Treasure Chest of Primary Learning Center Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Margaret; Kessler, John

    Defining a learning center as a classroom area containing several learning stations where students may work independently with materials which teach, reinforce, or enrich their skills, this guide presents a number of ideas for use in the visual motivation display area of such a center. Suggestions for displays for the various teaching stations are…

  1. A Holistic Emphasis: The UCLA American Indian Studies Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2001-01-01

    At UCLA, the American Indian Studies Center's structure as an organized research unit allows a platform for many activities not normally within the purview of departments. The Center implements a holistic, Native view of research, policy, community engagement, and education; has a library and publications; and is a gathering place for American…

  2. Data Collection: A Cybernetic Aspect of a Learning Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devirian, Margaret Coda

    Data collection and analysis as a cybernetic aspect of a Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is discussed. Using the LAC at California State University Long Beach (CSULB) as a model, the LAC is defined as a support, delivery, and referral service for the entire campus community. A LAC is held accountable to itself and its users through a cybernetics…

  3. Exploring Nonoffending Caregiver Satisfaction with a Children's Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonach, Kathryn; Mabry, J. Beth; Potts-Henry, Candice

    2010-01-01

    This study is a case evaluation research report on one Children's Advocacy Center that provides a coordinated response to allegations of child maltreatment, particularly sexual abuse. The data come from a mailed survey of nonoffending caregivers measuring their satisfaction with services provided through the Children's Advocacy Center. The results…

  4. Reconsiderations: After "The Idea of a Writing Center"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boquet, Elizabeth H.; Lerner, Neal

    2008-01-01

    Originally published in a 1984 issue of "College English," Stephen North's article "The Idea of a Writing Center" has over the years been much cited in writing center scholarship. Even so, this scholarship as a whole did not proceed to gain much presence in "CE" and other broadly-oriented composition journals. Reconsidering North's piece, the…

  5. 2. GRADIENT INTO A STREET IN SUPPLY CENTER, FROM SIDEWALK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GRADIENT INTO A STREET IN SUPPLY CENTER, FROM SIDEWALK ON SOUTHERN SIDE OF BRIDGE AT A POINT EAST OF 4TH STREET, LOOKING WEST, WITH MONUMENT AT END OF A STREET. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Maritime Street Overpass, Connecting Seventh Street & Third Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. Teacher Centers as a Social Phenomenon: An Anthropological Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet, Alanson

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the social and educational conditions that have supported the development of teacher centers, using a perspective from social anthropology, Malinowski's "functional" theory of institutions. Teacher centers are seen as a reflection of growing teacher power in a climate of shifting authority structures. (SJL)

  7. [Certified medical centers--A measurable benefit to patients?!].

    PubMed

    Eberlein-Gonska, Maria; Schellong, Sebastian; Baumann, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of medical centers should meet the high requirements of the healthcare system. They should provide innovative solutions for a number of problems, e.g. the interdisciplinary collaboration of various health departments with due regard to their autonomy. This is reminiscent of the implementation and advancement of a quality management system required by law where a clear idea of how to manage the organizational and procedural structures as an integral part of the management concept implemented is missing. The genuine efforts to implement and advance interdisciplinary medical centers are up against "bogus models" created out of sheer marketing interests. The term "medical center" has so far not been protected under trademark law, leaving patients, relatives or even the referring physicians unsure about how to judge a medical center's actual performance. The same is true of certified centers. Their numbers are growing, but not so the transparency about the amount of measurable, traceable and understandable benefits that a certified center provides to the patient. Therefore clear demands need to be placed on certified centers, especially with regard to the implementation of a concept that provides interdisciplinarity and process-oriented transparent structures and defines quality ratios and quality objectives. This includes providing resources for the continuous collection and evaluation of hard and soft data as well as deriving improvement measures. The three centers of the University Hospital Dresden--the University Cancer Center, the University Vascular Center and the University Pain Center--fulfil this high demand. They have created fundamentals for measurable improvement of patient care and are able to present first results.

  8. Student Teaching Centers: A Pilot Project. Report Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Stephen J.; Goddu, Roland J. B.

    Student Teaching Centers (STC) were established as a pilot project by Harvard University in cooperation with several public schools. The centers are directed by resident supervisors who are responsible for the supervision of student teachers, demonstration teaching of a limited number of classes in their respective fields, and, in some cases, the…

  9. Validating a Technology Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Myunghee; Hahn, Jungsun; Chung, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Enhanced Student Centered Learning (TESCL) Model in this study presents the core factors that ensure the quality of learning in a technology-supported environment. Although the model was conceptually constructed using a student-centered learning framework and drawing upon previous studies, it should be validated through real-world…

  10. Sports Center Is a Lab for Learning about Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Dickinson College (Pennsylvania) has a new sports center featuring a clear span roof system and an "earth sink" that stores excess heat for later use. The relationship between sports and the liberal arts is the basis for courses taught in the center. (Author/MLF)

  11. A Client-Centered Review of Rogers with Gloria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    Carl Rogers's nondirective theory and his response style with Gloria (E. L. Shostrom, 1965) are discussed in reply to S. A. Wickman and C. Campbell's (2003) "An Analysis of How Carl Rogers Enacted Client-Centered Conversation With Gloria." Client-centered studies of C. Rogers's transcripts give context for reformulating S. A. Wickman and C.…

  12. A Strategic Planning Model for Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Pizzo, Les; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a strategic plan developed at a community mental health center, the Summit Center for Human Development, to deal with its own survival while public demand increases, and federal and state programs are cut back. Examines current and prospective services and outlines directions for enhancing the mandated and optional services provided…

  13. The Center of Mass of a Soft Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    This article uses calculus to find the center of mass of a soft, vertically suspended, cylindrical helical spring, which necessarily is stretched non-uniformly by the action of gravity. A general expression for the vertical position of the center of mass is obtained and compared with other results in the literature.

  14. Steering the Ark: A Cultural Center for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on his experience developing and running The Ark, a Cultural Center for Children in Dublin, Ireland. The author describes the practice and ten guiding principles behind the center. While acknowledging that arts education and arts practice for and with young people is a rich and varied landscape, within which a…

  15. The Community Mental Health Center as a Matrix Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen L.

    1978-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the literature on matrix organizational designs and discusses the ways in which the matrix design might be applied to the special features of a community mental health center. The phases of one community mental health center's experience in adopting a matrix organizational structure are described. (Author)

  16. A User's Evaluation of a NASA Regional Dissemination Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovel, M. Terry; Coddington, Dean C.

    Retrospective searches provided by a NASA Regional Dissemination Center (RDC) were found to be of substantial value to researchers during a six-month experimental period at the University of Denver's Research Institute (DRI). The purpose of the experiment was to gain a better understanding of the usefulness of an RDC to a user organization. DRI…

  17. Financing of certified centers: a willingness-to-pay analysis.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Falk C; Scharl, Anton; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Kotziabassis, Efstratios; Schrauder, Michael G; Bani, Mayada R; Müller, Andreas; Hauzenberger, Tanja; Loehberg, Christian R; Jud, Sebastian M; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Strnad, Vratislav; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lux, Michael Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Although care in certified breast centers is now established throughout Germany, numerous services are still not being reimbursed. This also affects other centers involved in the specialty of gynecology such as gynecological cancer centers, perinatal centers, and endometriosis centers. Although a certified center is entitled to charge additional fees, these are in most cases not reimbursed. Calculation of additional costs is limited by the fact that data from the Institute for the Hospital Reimbursement System (Institut für das Entgeltsystem im Krankenhaus, InEK) do not reflect interdisciplinary services and procedures. For decision-makers, society's willingness to pay is an important factor in guiding decisions on the basis of social priorities. A hypothetical maximum willingness to pay can be calculated using a willingness-to-pay analysis, making it possible to identify deficiencies in the arbitrary setting of health budgets at the macro-level. In a multicenter study conducted between November 2009 and December 2010, 2,469 patients at a university hospital and at a non-university hospital were asked about the extent of their awareness of certified centers, the influence of centers on hospital presentation, and about personal attitudes toward quality-oriented reimbursement. A subjective assessment of possible additional charges was calculated using a willingness-to-pay analysis. In the overall group, 53.4 % of the patients were aware of what a certified center is and 27.4 % had specific information (obstetrics 40.0/32.3 %; mastology 66.8/23.2 %; gynecological oncology 54.7/27.3 %; P < 0.001). For 43.8 %, a certified center was one reason or the major reason for presentation (obstetrics 26.2 %; mastology 66.8 %; gynecological oncology 46.6 %; P < 0.001). A total of 72.6 % were in favor of quality-oriented reimbursement and 69.7 % were in favor of an additional charge for a certified center amounting to €538.56 (mastology €643.65, obstetrics €474

  18. A Model for a Health Career Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, John G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    One part of a model health career information center was a toll-free health careers hotline which provided information to high school and college students, parents, counselors, and teachers. Evaluation of the hotline indicates that it fills a need, is considered useful by callers, and is of relatively small cost. (Author/CT)

  19. Robust pupil center detection using a curvature algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, D.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Determining the pupil center is fundamental for calculating eye orientation in video-based systems. Existing techniques are error prone and not robust because eyelids, eyelashes, corneal reflections or shadows in many instances occlude the pupil. We have developed a new algorithm which utilizes curvature characteristics of the pupil boundary to eliminate these artifacts. Pupil center is computed based solely on points related to the pupil boundary. For each boundary point, a curvature value is computed. Occlusion of the boundary induces characteristic peaks in the curvature function. Curvature values for normal pupil sizes were determined and a threshold was found which together with heuristics discriminated normal from abnormal curvature. Remaining boundary points were fit with an ellipse using a least squares error criterion. The center of the ellipse is an estimate of the pupil center. This technique is robust and accurately estimates pupil center with less than 40% of the pupil boundary points visible.

  20. Impact of a transfer center on interhospital referrals and transfers to a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Southard, Patricia A; Hedges, Jerris R; Hunter, John G; Ungerleider, Ross M

    2005-07-01

    The partnership of faculty physicians and senior clinical hospital administrators in the decision to accept interhospital transfers has not been fully studied. Transfers to academic medical centers on the basis of economics have been of particular concern. To evaluate the impact of joint decision making on transfer acceptance, and to evaluate the basis for decisions to transfer patients to an academic medical center. This was a database study of requested adult interhospital transfers, excluding psychiatric transfers, occurring between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2003, by using data from a computerized patient-tracking system. Where possible, comparisons with the prior calendar year (i.e., prior to implementation of the administrative review process) were made. Incidence of refusal to accept requested transfers and payer mix of transfer patients were the main outcomes of interest. More than 90% of the adult patients were transferred for conditions that required tertiary care or met Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) requirements. The patient conditions that did not meet tertiary care needs included obstetric patients who did not have prenatal care, patients who had hand and facial trauma, and patients who weighed more than 300 pounds. The payer mix of transfer patients remained stable when using the administrator and physician team to determine acceptance of transfers. During the evaluation period, approximately 91,500 patients statewide lost some level of Medicaid coverage. The value of an administrator and physician team as partners in the interhospital transfer process was demonstrated. Active management of interhospital transfers supports transfer of patients who require tertiary care or who meet EMTALA criteria, thus conserving limited bed capacity and ensuring financial equity, while caring for the uninsured and underinsured patients throughout the state.

  1. A Chance for Independence. Weslaco Training and Development Center Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The booklet describes the origins and operations of the Weslaco (Texas) Training and Development Center, a center for severely retarded and handicapped students (ages 10-22). The facility simulates normal living and working conditions and focuses on household management skills (grocery list and meal preparation, clothing care, household repairs),…

  2. Academic health centers: their future in a changing economic environment.

    PubMed

    Nash, D B

    1985-10-01

    In order to survive, academic health centers will have to learn new ways of coping with the changing health environment. Explored here are the trends affecting academic health centers and speculation on how to meet the challenges presented. The author outlines a new dimension to the classical tripod of teaching, research, and patient care.

  3. Vocabulary and Experiences to Develop a Center of Mass Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaar, Taylor; Pollack, Linda B.; Lerner, Michael E.; Engels, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of systems in many introductory courses is limited and often implicit. Modeling two or more objects as a system and tracking the center of mass of that system is usually not included. Thinking in terms of the center of mass facilitates problem solving while exposing the importance of using conservation laws. We present below three…

  4. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  5. Making Feminism Matter: The Revitalization of a Campus Women's Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alice

    1988-01-01

    Describes the revitalization of the Brooklyn College Women's Center, a 10-year-old women's center experiencing the effects of the conservative 1980s. Discusses the challenge of making feminism matter to young women who may be suspicious or indifferent, or who may not have identified their needs as "women's issues." (NB)

  6. A National Network of Neurotechnology Centers for the BRAIN Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M.; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Roukes, Michael L.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    We propose the creation of a national network of neurotechnology centers to enhance and accelerate the BRAIN Initiative and optimally leverage the effort and creativity of individual laboratories involved in it. As “brain observatories,” these centers could provide the critical interdisciplinary environment both for realizing ambitious and complex technologies and for providing individual investigators with access to them. PMID:26481036

  7. Experiential Learning: A Review of College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaney, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study was conducted using a descriptive design and examined the use of college health centers for academic internships and clinical rotations. In addition, the study examined the relationship among health center director and school characteristics and the presence of academic internships or clinical rotations and the directors'…

  8. A Market Study for the Center for the Performing Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, John; And Others

    In fall 1983, a telephone survey was conducted by Macomb Community College (MCC) to assess community perceptions of the college's Center for the Performing Arts (CPA) and to aid in developing marketing strategies for the Center. Interviews were conducted with 500 randomly selected Macomb County (Michigan) residents to determine if they had…

  9. Serving the Community: A Small, Liberal Arts College Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossini, Carol

    The word "service" certainly conjures some undesirable connotations, and theorists such as Nancy Grimm propose that writing centers need to shed their service labels to attain respectability. In this paper, the writing center director of a small liberal arts college shares her perspective and juxtaposes that with Grimm's position that…

  10. Child center closures: Does nonprofit status provide a comparative advantage?

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Marcus; Klein, Sacha; Freisthler, Bridget; Weiss, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable access to dependable, high quality childcare services is a vital concern for large numbers of American families. The childcare industry consists of private nonprofit, private for-profit, and governmental providers that differ along many dimensions, including quality, clientele served, and organizational stability. Nonprofit providers are theorized to provide higher quality services given comparative tax advantages, higher levels of consumer trust, and management by mission driven entrepreneurs. This study examines the influence of ownership structure, defined as nonprofit, for-profit sole proprietors, for-profit companies, and governmental centers, on organizational instability, defined as childcare center closures. Using a cross sectional data set of 15724 childcare licenses in California for 2007, we model the predicted closures of childcare centers as a function of ownership structure as well as center age and capacity. Findings indicate that for small centers (capacity of 30 or less) nonprofits are more likely to close, but for larger centers (capacity 30+) nonprofits are less likely to close. This suggests that the comparative advantages available for nonprofit organizations may be better utilized by larger centers than by small centers. We consider the implications of our findings for parents, practitioners, and social policy. PMID:23543882

  11. Child center closures: Does nonprofit status provide a comparative advantage?

    PubMed

    Lam, Marcus; Klein, Sacha; Freisthler, Bridget; Weiss, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Reliable access to dependable, high quality childcare services is a vital concern for large numbers of American families. The childcare industry consists of private nonprofit, private for-profit, and governmental providers that differ along many dimensions, including quality, clientele served, and organizational stability. Nonprofit providers are theorized to provide higher quality services given comparative tax advantages, higher levels of consumer trust, and management by mission driven entrepreneurs. This study examines the influence of ownership structure, defined as nonprofit, for-profit sole proprietors, for-profit companies, and governmental centers, on organizational instability, defined as childcare center closures. Using a cross sectional data set of 15724 childcare licenses in California for 2007, we model the predicted closures of childcare centers as a function of ownership structure as well as center age and capacity. Findings indicate that for small centers (capacity of 30 or less) nonprofits are more likely to close, but for larger centers (capacity 30+) nonprofits are less likely to close. This suggests that the comparative advantages available for nonprofit organizations may be better utilized by larger centers than by small centers. We consider the implications of our findings for parents, practitioners, and social policy.

  12. Development of a Writing Center: A Bright Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeague, Patricia M.; Reis, Elizabeth

    Recognizing that good writing skills are critical to achieving college and career success, the Communications Department at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) initiated a 10-month research and planning process which culminated in the establishment of a Writing Center (WC) in the fall of 1990. The objectives of the WC are to: (1) offer all…

  13. Establishing a Drug Rehabilitation Center in a Prison Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.

    The implementation of a drug treatment center in a prison environment is described. Such topics as the program initiation, selection of residents, early program operation are discussed. Program activities such as regular group counseling and rational therapy were developed to assist residents in the resolution of personal problems and interactions…

  14. Neonatal Outcomes in the Birth Center Setting: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Danhausen, Kathleen; Alliman, Jill; Phillippi, R David

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review investigates the effect of the birth center setting on neonatal mortality in economically developed countries to aid women and clinicians in decision making. We searched the Google Scholar, CINAHL, and PubMed databases using key terms birth/birthing center or out of hospital with perinatal/neonatal outcomes. Ancestry searches identified additional studies, and an alert was set for new publications. We included primary source studies in English, published after 1980, conducted in a developed country, and researching planned birth in centers with guidelines similar to American Association of Birth Centers standards. After initial review, we conducted a preliminary analysis, assessing which measures of neonatal health, morbidity, and mortality were included across studies. Neonatal mortality was selected as the sole summary measure as other measures were sporadically reported or inconsistently defined. Seventeen studies were included, representing at least 84,500 women admitted to a birth center in labor. There were substantial differences of study design, sampling techniques, and definitions of neonatal outcomes across studies, limiting conclusive statements of the effect of intrapartum care in a birth center. No reviewed study found a statistically increased rate of neonatal mortality in birth centers compared to low-risk women giving birth in hospitals, nor did data suggest a trend toward higher neonatal mortality in birth centers. As in all birth settings, nulliparous women, women aged greater than 35 years, and women with pregnancies of more than 42 weeks' gestation may have an increased risk of neonatal mortality. There are substantial flaws in the literature concerning the effect of birth center care on neonatal outcomes. More research is needed on subgroups at risk of poor outcomes in the birth center environment. To expedite research, consistent use of national and international definitions of perinatal and neonatal mortality within

  15. A method which can enhance the optical-centering accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-min; Zhang, Xue-jun; Dai, Yi-dan; Yu, Tao; Duan, Jia-you; Li, Hua

    2014-09-01

    Optical alignment machining is an effective method to ensure the co-axiality of optical system. The co-axiality accuracy is determined by optical-centering accuracy of single optical unit, which is determined by the rotating accuracy of lathe and the optical-centering judgment accuracy. When the rotating accuracy of 0.2um can be achieved, the leading error can be ignored. An axis-determination tool which is based on the principle of auto-collimation can be used to determine the only position of centerscope is designed. The only position is the position where the optical axis of centerscope is coincided with the rotating axis of the lathe. Also a new optical-centering judgment method is presented. A system which includes the axis-determination tool and the new optical-centering judgment method can enhance the optical-centering accuracy to 0.003mm.

  16. Why Would a Community College Want a Women's Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Larry; And Others

    Outlines of presentations from a forum on community services and women's centers at Florida postsecondary institutions are provided. Larry Tyree's presentation covered various aspects of community services including administrative commitment, program benefits from an administrative viewpoint, characteristics of continuing education, and components…

  17. Feasibility of implementing a recovery education center in a Veterans Affairs medical center.

    PubMed

    Peer, Jason E; Gardner, Mary; Autrey, Sophia; Calmes, Christine; Goldberg, Richard W

    2018-04-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a recovery education program in a Veterans Affairs medical center. This case study describes development and implementation of a mental health and wellness curriculum offered through a centralized location. Referral and utilization data (n = 781) from the first 18 months of implementation were used to evaluate feasibility. Access to programming with zero exclusion was prioritized and average time from referral to enrollment was 9.6 days. Fifty-six percent of veterans admitted to mental health services during the 18-month evaluation period were referred to the program, and this level of utilization continued to be sustained. A broad range of classes was available. Opportunities to change classes as recovery goals evolved was encouraged and data indicate veterans actively tailored their individual recovery curriculum. Educational recovery programming was easily incorporated into a large integrated health facility, was well received, and offered greater opportunity for choice and individualization of recovery curriculum. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Data Center Consolidation: A Step towards Infrastructure Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Markus

    Application service providers face enormous challenges and rising costs in managing and operating a growing number of heterogeneous system and computing landscapes. Limitations of traditional computing environments force IT decision-makers to reorganize computing resources within the data center, as continuous growth leads to an inefficient utilization of the underlying hardware infrastructure. This paper discusses a way for infrastructure providers to improve data center operations based on the findings of a case study on resource utilization of very large business applications and presents an outlook beyond server consolidation endeavors, transforming corporate data centers into compute clouds.

  19. Transfer Wisdom Workshops: Coming to a NASA Center Near You

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Denise

    2003-01-01

    In november 2001, the APPL Knowledge Sharing Initiative introduced a new product, the transfer wisdom workshop. The idea was to give practitioners at each of the NASA centers the opportunity to engage in a knowledge sharing activity.

  20. Break-even analysis in a nurse-managed center.

    PubMed

    McBryde-Foster, Merry J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of break-even analysis as a financial assessment tool is defined and demonstrated in evaluation of a proposed nurse-managed center. The advantages of using break-even analysis during proposal development are explored.

  1. An annotated outline for a traffic management center operations manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-10-01

    This draft Traffic Management Center (TMC) and Operations manual outline is meant to serve as a model "checklist" for the development of similar manuals used in deployed environments. The purpose of this outline is to provide a reference for agencies...

  2. The Universe Observing Center a modern center to teach and communicate astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Salvador J.

    2011-06-01

    The Universe Observing Center is one of the parts of the Parc Astronòmic Montsec (PAM). PAM is an initiative of the Catalan government, through the Consorci del Montsec (Montsec Consortium), to take advantage of the capabilities and potential of the Montsec region to develop scientific research, training and outreach activities, particularly in the field of Astronomy. The choice of the Montsec mountains to install the PAM was motivated by the magnificent conditions for observing the sky at night; the sky above Montsec is the best (natural sky free of light pollution) in Catalonia for astronomical observations. The PAM has two main parts: the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM) and the Universe Observing Center (COU). The OAdM is a professional observatory with an 80-cm catadioptric telescope (Joan Oró Telescope). This telescope is a robotic telescope that can be controlled from anywhere in the world via the Internet. The COU is a large multipurpose center which is intended to become an educational benchmark for teaching and communicate astronomy and other sciences in Catalonia. The management of the COU has three main goals: 1) Teach primary and secondary school students in our Educational Training Camp. 2) Teach university students housing the practical astronomy lectures of the universities. 3) Communicate astronomy to the general public. The COU comprises special areas for these purposes: the Telescopes Park with more than 20 telescopes, a coelostat for solar observations and two dome containing full-automated telescopes. The most special equipment is ``The Eye of Montsec'', with its 12m dome containing a multimedia digital planetarium and a platform for direct observation of the sky and the environment. During 2009 we expect around 10000 visitors in Montsec area to enjoy science with Montsec dark skies and an special natural environment.

  3. Implementing a Reliability Centered Maintenance Program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Raymond E.; Pete, Robert R.

    1998-01-01

    Maintenance practices have long focused on time based "preventive maintenance" techniques. Components were changed out and parts replaced based on how long they had been in place instead of what condition they were in. A reliability centered maintenance (RCM) program seeks to offer equal or greater reliability at decreased cost by insuring only applicable, effective maintenance is performed and by in large part replacing time based maintenance with condition based maintenance. A significant portion of this program involved introducing non-intrusive technologies, such as vibration analysis, oil analysis and I/R cameras, to an existing labor force and management team.

  4. Veterinary Science Students, Center Changing a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwater, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Kayenta is a rural community located in northeastern Arizona on a Navajo reservation. On the reservation, many families rely on their livestock for income, and as a result, many reservation high school students show a great interest in agricultural education. Having livestock on the reservation is not just a source of income, but also part of a…

  5. College Psychotherapy at a Hong Kong Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Eugenie Y.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an online interview about college psychotherapy at a Hong Kong counseling center. The interview discusses how students generally feel about going for counseling or therapy and how common it is in Hong Kong.

  6. Suddenly, tomorrow came... A history of the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dethloff, Henry C.

    1993-01-01

    This book chronicles the history of the Johnson Space Center into 17 chapters with a forward written by Donald K. Slayton. Photographs and illustrations are provided. This book becomes part of the NASA history series.

  7. Research Needed for a Public Library's Community Information Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slanker, Barbara O.

    1975-01-01

    Libraries must do some research before trying to establish a community information center. Librarians should consider feasibility, identify the target population, inventory community resources, define information needs, and provide for continuing study while the service is in operation. (LS)

  8. The Residential Conference Center as a Learning Sanctuary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Edward G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Adult learning in residential conference centers is enhanced when a philosophical basis underlies their design. Six integrated elements for the development of learning sanctuaries are historical context, educational program, physical environment, support services, technology, and human resources. (SK)

  9. A Human-Centered Approach to Sense and Respond Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-10

    United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), a human-centered research initiative consisting of eight distinct research efforts designed to...27  2.5  Experimental Design ...120  6.3.6  Auction design parameters

  10. 18. Photocopy of a photographca. 1921 CENTER SECTION OF HORSESHOE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1921 CENTER SECTION OF HORSESHOE DAM PRIOR TO COMPLETION - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  11. Oklahoma: A View of the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruthe Blalock; Depriest, Maria; Fowler, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a dialogue on twentieth-century Oklahoma artists and writers given at a conference titled "Working from Community: American Indian Art and Literature in a Historical and Cultural Context" and held in the summer of 2003 at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Twenty-five educators converged for six weeks…

  12. [A relational database to store Poison Centers calls].

    PubMed

    Barelli, Alessandro; Biondi, Immacolata; Tafani, Chiara; Pellegrini, Aristide; Soave, Maurizio; Gaspari, Rita; Annetta, Maria Giuseppina

    2006-01-01

    Italian Poison Centers answer to approximately 100,000 calls per year. Potentially, this activity is a huge source of data for toxicovigilance and for syndromic surveillance. During the last decade, surveillance systems for early detection of outbreaks have drawn the attention of public health institutions due to the threat of terrorism and high-profile disease outbreaks. Poisoning surveillance needs the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of harmonised data about poisonings from all Poison Centers for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health. The entity-relationship model for a Poison Center relational database is extremely complex and not studied in detail. For this reason, not harmonised data collection happens among Italian Poison Centers. Entities are recognizable concepts, either concrete or abstract, such as patients and poisons, or events which have relevance to the database, such as calls. Connectivity and cardinality of relationships are complex as well. A one-to-many relationship exist between calls and patients: for one instance of entity calls, there are zero, one, or many instances of entity patients. At the same time, a one-to-many relationship exist between patients and poisons: for one instance of entity patients, there are zero, one, or many instances of entity poisons. This paper shows a relational model for a poison center database which allows the harmonised data collection of poison centers calls.

  13. GSDC: A Unique Data Center in Korea for HEP research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sang-Un

    2017-04-01

    Global Science experimental Data hub Center (GSDC) at Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI) is a unique data center in South Korea established for promoting the fundamental research fields by supporting them with the expertise on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and the infrastructure for High Performance Computing (HPC), High Throughput Computing (HTC) and Networking. GSDC has supported various research fields in South Korea dealing with the large scale of data, e.g. RENO experiment for neutrino research, LIGO experiment for gravitational wave detection, Genome sequencing project for bio-medical, and HEP experiments such as CDF at FNAL, Belle at KEK, and STAR at BNL. In particular, GSDC has run a Tier-1 center for ALICE experiment using the LHC at CERN since 2013. In this talk, we present the overview on computing infrastructure that GSDC runs for the research fields and we discuss on the data center infrastructure management system deployed at GSDC.

  14. A novel patient-centered "intention-to-treat" metric of U.S. lung transplant center performance.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Dawn A; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Lederer, David J

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of pretransplantation outcomes, 1-year posttransplantation survival is typically considered the primary metric of lung transplant center performance in the United States. We designed a novel lung transplant center performance metric that incorporates both pre- and posttransplantation survival time. We performed an ecologic study of 12 187 lung transplant candidates listed at 56 U.S. lung transplant centers between 2006 and 2012. We calculated an "intention-to-treat" survival (ITTS) metric as the percentage of waiting list candidates surviving at least 1 year after transplantation. The median center-level 1-year posttransplantation survival rate was 84.1%, and the median center-level ITTS was 66.9% (mean absolute difference 19.6%, 95% limits of agreement 4.3 to 35.1%). All but 10 centers had ITTS values that were significantly lower than 1-year posttransplantation survival rates. Observed ITTS was significantly lower than expected ITTS for 7 centers. These data show that one third of lung transplant candidates do not survive 1 year after transplantation, and that 12% of centers have lower than expected ITTS. An "intention-to-treat" survival metric may provide a more realistic expectation of patient outcomes at transplant centers and may be of value to transplant centers and policymakers. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. A Task-Centered Approach to Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendenhall, Anne; Buhanan, Caixia Wu; Suhaka, Michael; Mills, Gordon; Gibson, Gregory V.; Merrill, M. David

    2006-01-01

    Brigham Young University (BYU)-Hawaii has a student body of approximately 2,400 students representing 70 different countries. Almost half of this student body is international, representing many different cultures and languages. One of the biggest challenges for BYU-Hawaii is return-ability; that is, the university does not want to be a stepping…

  16. Waldorf Schools: A Child-Centered System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper presents an overview of the philosophy, psychology of learning, teaching methods, and curriculum of the Waldorf Schools. Most Waldorf teachers are influenced by the esoteric form of critical idealism propounded by Rudolf Steiner. The child is considered by Steiner to be a spiritual being who has reincarnated on to earth in a physical…

  17. Violence Prevention. A Center Quick Training Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    Safe schools, violence prevention, and conflict resolution are all major concerns in addressing barriers to learning. This quick training aid presents a brief set of resources to guide those providing an in-service training session on violence prevention in schools. The packet contains a brief introduction to the topic with key talking points,…

  18. A Caltech MURI Center for Quantum Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    the code. Thus the dimension of the code space is n5uPfAu5detD , ~64! where PfA denotes the Pfaffian, the square root of the deter- minant of the...material properties, such as bulk ab- sorption and surface scattering. However, as one moves to very small spheres with radius a&10 mm, the intrinsic...1550 nm, which yields a quality factor of Qbulk;3.8310 11. The quality factor due to surface scattering Qs.s. and ab- sorption by adsorbed water Qw has

  19. Find a Sleep Center Near You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Self-Tests Diagnosis ... for a Sleep Study Testing Process & Results Home Sleep Apnea Testing Overview Testing Process & Results CPAP Overview Benefits ...

  20. A Child Centered Approach to Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strader, William H.; Rinker, Catherine A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a curriculum for teaching young children about dinosaurs. Activity topics included Diplodocus eggs, sorting dinosaurs, creating terrariums, and extinction. Describes the incorporation of dinosaur activities into other subject areas and resource materials. (RJC)

  1. A National Coordinating Center for Trauma Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    symptoms of acute stress disorder and depression to prevent syndromal PTSD and depression Related Research Presentations/Publications Posters Annual JHU...Site: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine HRPO Assigned A-number: A-19299.2 Abstract: Background: Early, effective pain control for acute ...sparing drug for the treatment of acute post-traumatic pain • The side effect profile of ketamine when administered in sub-anesthetic doses • Whether

  2. A National Network of Neurotechnology Centers for the BRAIN Initiative.

    PubMed

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M; Greenspan, Ralph J; Roukes, Michael L; Yuste, Rafael

    2015-11-04

    We propose the creation of a national network of neurotechnology centers to enhance and accelerate the BRAIN Initiative and optimally leverage the effort and creativity of individual laboratories involved in it. As "brain observatories," these centers could provide the critical interdisciplinary environment both for realizing ambitious and complex technologies and for providing individual investigators with access to them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enrollment Management: A Market-Centered Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Hossler, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Enrollment management, the authors suggested in earlier essays, is a deliberate process of achieving an institution's preferred enrollment profile, starting by identifying the strategic purposes and mission of the institution, and then orchestrating the marketing, recruitment, admissions, pricing and aid, retention programs, academic support…

  4. A National Coordinating Center for Trauma Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    of ketamine during the first three days following injury has a sustained effect on reducing the incidence or severity of Post -Traumatic Stress... design , medical modeling, physical modeling, engineering and system integration. Progress Reported: The subcontract was fully executed on 05...were posted on the NTI website (www.nationaltraumainstitute.org). The goal is to comprehensively disseminate published works to the wider trauma

  5. A School at the Center: Study II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Continent Regional Educational Lab., Aurora, CO.

    This report, which focuses on improving education in rural Nebraska, grew out of a 2-week teachers' institute held in Walthill, Nebraska, in June 1993. "Introduction: The Vision of Community-Based Schools and the Future of Rural Places" (Toni Haas, Paul Nachtigal) examines current civic and social trends in rural communities and the role…

  6. A User Centered Faculty Scheduled Development Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadian, Shohreh; Sly, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Colleges provide professional development opportunities to faculty to promote knowledge growth and improvement of skills. At the college, Scheduled Development (SD) time for faculty is based on the educational practice and recognition of the need for continuous professional development of faculty members. The paper presents a user-centered…

  7. Instructional Leadership: A Learning-Centered Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Anita Woolfolk; Hoy, Wayne Kolter

    This book was written with the assumption that teachers and administrators must work as colleagues to improve instruction and learning in schools. It was written to be consistent with the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards for school administrators, especially Standards 1 and 2, which emphasize a learning-centered…

  8. A midwifery-led in-hospital birth center within an academic medical center: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Perdion, Karen; Lesser, Rebecca; Hirsch, Jennifer; Barger, Mary; Kelly, Thomas F; Moore, Thomas R; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The University of California San Diego Community Women's Health Program (CWHP) has emerged as a successful and sustainable coexistence model of women's healthcare. The cornerstone of this midwifery practice is California's only in-hospital birth center. Located within the medical center, this unique and physically separate birth center has been the site for more than 4000 births. With 10% cesarean delivery and 98% breast-feeding rates, it is an exceptional example of low-intervention care. Integrating this previously freestanding birth center into an academic center has brought trials of mistrust and ineffectual communication. Education, consistent leadership, and development of multidisciplinary guidelines aided in overcoming these challenges. This collaborative model provides a structure in which residents learn to be respectful consultants and appreciate differences in medical practice. The CWHP and its Birth Center illustrates that through persistence and flexibility a collaborative model of maternity services can flourish and not only positively influence new families but also future generations of providers.

  9. A Study of Computer Center Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    the United States and the rest of the western world and do not take into consideration the various economic and culture factors in developing countries...Mortagy, Thesis Advisor John B Isett, Second Reader David R. Whipple -airman Department of . .&;-sation Science mes M.mgen, Act ng Dean of nm_ Jon and oli...take into consideration the various economic and culture factors in developing countries. This thesis seeks to present a number of new techniques in

  10. Transplant tourism outcome: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Saad A; Nabi, Zahid G; Alkhafaji, Dania M; Askandrani, Sumaya A; Abdelsalam, Mohamed S; Shukri, Mohamed M; Eldali, Abdelmoneim M; Adra, Chaker N; Alkurbi, Lutfi A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh N

    2010-07-27

    Transplant tourism is the term used for patients who travel abroad for transplantation. Transplant tourism has always been surrounded with controversy regarding how these organs were obtained, the donor's care after transplantation, and the recipient outcome. Many authors have found that the outcome of the recipients in transplant tourism is inferior to those transplanted in their own countries. However, most these studies were small, with the latest one including only 33 patients. Here, we describe the outcome of 93 patients who were transplanted abroad compared with local transplantation. All transplant patients who were followed up at our Nephrology Clinic from 1998 until 2008 were identified using our data base system. We selected patients transplanted from 2003 and forward because the computerized system for laboratory and electronic records began operation that year. A total of 165 patients were identified (93 in the tourist group and 72 in the local one). Transplant tourists had a higher rate of acute rejection in the first year compared with local transplantation (27.9% vs. 9.9, P=0.005), higher mean creatinine at 6 months and 1 year (120 vs. 101 micromol/L, P=0.0007, 113 vs. 98 micromol/L, P=0.008). There was no statistical difference in graft or patient survival in 1 or 2 years after transplantation. However, transplant tourist had a higher rate of cytomegalovirus infection (15.1% vs. 5.6%, P=0.05) and hepatitis C seroconversion (7.5% vs. 0%, P=0.02). Transplant tourists had a more complex posttransplantation course with higher incidence of acute rejection and infectious complications.

  11. Method for maintaining a cutting blade centered in a kerf

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Davis, Pete J.; Landram, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  12. Inside a Postpartum Nursing Center: Tradition and Change.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yueh-Chen; St John, Winsome; Venturato, Lorraine

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how traditional ritual practices are incorporated into the context of contemporary healthcare. An ethnographic study was conducted, using observations and interviews with 27 first-time mothers and 3 nurses at a postpartum nursing center in Taipei, Taiwan. Nursing routines, policies and care provision at the center affected the way traditional ritual practices were conducted. New mothers in this study constructed their everyday activities at the center by incorporating and modifying the ritual practices inside and outside the postpartum nursing center setting. Social changes have an influence on traditional postpartum ritual practices so a postpartum nursing center becomes a choice for postpartum women. Thus, health care professionals should value their own functions and roles at the postpartum nursing center since the new mothers regard them as the primary support resource to help them recover from giving birth. Therefore, they need to re-examine their practices from the postpartum women's perspective to provide better support and sensitive care to postpartum women and their families. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Finding topological center of a geographic space via road network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Miao, Yanan; Qin, Yuhao; Zhao, Xiaomei; Gao, Zi-You

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies show that the center of a geographic space is of great importance in urban and regional studies, including study of population distribution, urban growth modeling, and scaling properties of urban systems, etc. But how to well define and how to efficiently extract the center of a geographic space are still largely unknown. Recently, Jiang et al. have presented a definition of topological center by their block detection (BD) algorithm. Despite the fact that they first introduced the definition and discovered the 'true center', in human minds, their algorithm left several redundancies in its traversal process. Here, we propose an alternative road-cycle detection (RCD) algorithm to find the topological center, which extracts the outmost road-cycle recursively. To foster the application of the topological center in related research fields, we first reproduce the BD algorithm in Python (pyBD), then implement the RCD algorithm in two ways: the ArcPy implementation (arcRCD) and the Python implementation (pyRCD). After the experiments on twenty-four typical road networks, we find that the results of our RCD algorithm are consistent with those of Jiang's BD algorithm. We also find that the RCD algorithm is at least seven times more efficient than the BD algorithm on all the ten typical road networks.

  14. A Community - Centered Astronomy Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2017-06-01

    The Boyce Research Initiatives and Education Foundation (BRIEF) is providing semester-long, hands-on, astronomy research experiences for students of all ages that results in their publishing peer-reviewed papers. The course in astronomy and double star research has evolved from a face-to-face learning experience with two instructors to an online - hybrid course that simultaneously supports classroom instruction at a variety of schools in the San Diego area. Currently, there are over 65 students enrolled in three community colleges, seven high schools, and one university as well as individual adult learners. Instructional experience, courseware, and supporting systems were developed and refined through experience gained in classroom settings from 2014 through 2016. Topics of instruction include Kepler's Laws, basic astrometry, properties of light, CCD imaging, use of filters for varying stellar spectral types, and how to perform research, scientific writing, and proposal preparation. Volunteer instructors were trained by taking the course and producing their own research papers. An expanded program was launched in the fall semester of 2016. Twelve papers from seven schools were produced; eight have been accepted for publication by the Journal of Double Observations (JDSO) and the remainder are in peer review. Three additional papers have been accepted by the JDSO and two more are in process papers. Three college professors and five advanced amateur astronomers are now qualified volunteer instructors. Supporting tools are provided by a BRIEF server and other online services. The server-based tools range from Microsoft Office and planetarium software to top-notch imaging programs and computational software for data reduction for each student team. Observations are performed by robotic telescopes worldwide supported by BRIEF. With this success, student demand has increased significantly. Many of the graduates of the first semester course wanted to expand their

  15. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive: a Data Education Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Schuster, D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive (RDA), rda.ucar.edu, is not just another data center or data archive. It is a data education center. We not only serve data, we TEACH data. Weather and climate data is the original "Big Data" dataset and lessons learned while playing with weather data are applicable to a wide range of data investigations. Erroneous data assumptions are the Achilles heel of Big Data. It doesn't matter how much data you crunch if the data is not what you think it is. Each dataset archived at the RDA is assigned to a data specialist (DS) who curates the data. If a user has a question not answered in the dataset information web pages, they can call or email a skilled DS for further clarification. The RDA's diverse staff—with academic training in meteorology, oceanography, engineering (electrical, civil, ocean and database), mathematics, physics, chemistry and information science—means we likely have someone who "speaks your language." Data discovery is another difficult Big Data problem; one can only solve problems with data if one can find the right data. Metadata, both machine and human-generated, underpin the RDA data search tools. Users can quickly find datasets by name or dataset ID number. They can also perform a faceted search that successively narrows the options by user requirements or simply kick off an indexed search with a few words. Weather data formats can be difficult to read for non-expert users; it's usually packed in binary formats requiring specialized software and parameter names use specialized vocabularies. DSs create detailed information pages for each dataset and maintain lists of helpful software, documentation and links of information around the web. We further grow the level of sophistication of the users with tips, tutorials and data stories on the RDA Blog, http://ncarrda.blogspot.com/. How-to video tutorials are also posted on the NCAR Computational and Information Systems

  16. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  17. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  18. Student-Centered and Teacher-Centered Classroom Management: A Case Study of Three Elementary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    The major purpose of this case study was to document the classroom management beliefs and practices of three teachers reputed to implement student-centered instruction and to examine the relationship between their instructional and managerial approaches. More specifically, do teachers who use student-centered instruction also implement…

  19. Problem of gas accretion on a gravitational center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladygin, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of the approximated solution of the problem of accretion on a rapidly moving gravitational center is developed. This solution is obtained in the vicinity of the axis of symmetry in the region of the potential flow. The solution of the problem of stationary gas accretion on a moving gravitational center simulates the movement of a substance in interstellar space in the vicinity of a black hole. A detailed picture of gas accretion on a black hole is of interest in connection with the problem of observation of black holes.

  20. A Medical Television Center; a Guide to Organizing a Large Television Center in Health Science Educational Institutions. Monograph 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Robert E.

    Guidelines are presented for establishing large television centers in health science education institutions. Television distribution systems are described, and staff, equipment, space and budgetary requirements are discussed. Included are: (1) a proposed chart of organizational development and job descriptions; (2) suggested equipment purchases;…

  1. Making the Change: From a Teacher-Centered to a Learner-Centered Environment--A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roof, Patty L.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education is calling for transformation in teaching practices which includes learner-centered environments. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore 15 nursing faculty life experiences as they relate to the choice of a learning environment. Participants expressed their life experiences through interview…

  2. Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

  3. 34 CFR 464.22 - May a State participating in a regional center use part of its allotment for a State center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant to a State? § 464.22... part of a regional center to reserve a portion of those funds for a State adult literacy resource...

  4. Camp health center usage at a Scout jamboree.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    To describe the incidence, reasons for, and characteristics of health center visits by campers at a Canadian provincial Scout jamboree. A retrospective observational design utilized a medical record review process. The study sample was 804 campers present for 4,816 camper days (CDs). There were 172 visits to the camp health center for an incidence rate of 36 per 1,000 CDs. The median length of stay was 30 minutes. Patients with illnesses were seen 1.7 times more frequently than those with injuries. One in five visits was for follow-up. More than 97% of visits occurred during the scheduled health center hours of operation. The rate of adverse events (AEs) was 3.32 per 1,000 CDs, accounting for 9.3% of all visits. The incidence of health center visits and AEs are consistent with studies conducted with other resident camps. Camp administrators, organizers, and healthcare personnel must be prepared to provide care for a wide range of illnesses and injuries at camp. Understanding the trends associated with camp health center usage allows adequate personnel and physical resources to be prepared and identifies increased usage levels. Nurses can use this information to advocate for nurses to be employed at camps to aid in health prevention services as well as to manage illnesses and injuries.

  5. A Survey of Invasive Catheter Practices in US Burn Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    exist. The purpose of this study was to define the breadth of current practices and identify areas of practice variation that may be targets for...Centers Robert L . Sheridan, MD,*|| Alice N. Neely, PhD,† Mayra A. Castillo, RN, BS,‡ Heather A. Shankowsky, RN,§ Shawn P. Fagan, MD,*|| Kevin K. Chung, MD...Practices in US Burn Centers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sheridan R. L ., Neely A. N., Castillo M. A

  6. A model for evaluating academic research centers: Case study of the Asian/Pacific Islander Youth Violence Prevention Center.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Stephanie T; Hishinuma, Earl S; Goebert, Deborah A; Onoye, Jane M M; Sugimoto-Matsuda, Jeanelle J

    2018-02-01

    To provide one model for evaluating academic research centers, given their vital role in addressing public health issues. A theoretical framework is described for a comprehensive evaluation plan for research centers. This framework is applied to one specific center by describing the center's Logic Model and Evaluation Plan, including a sample of the center's activities. Formative and summative evaluation information is summarized. In addition, a summary of outcomes is provided: improved practice and policy; reduction of risk factors and increase in protective factors; reduction of interpersonal youth violence in the community; and national prototype for prevention of interpersonal youth violence. Research centers are important mechanisms to advance science and improve people's quality of life. Because of their more infrastructure-intensive and comprehensive approach, they also require substantial resources for success, and thus, also require careful accountability. It is therefore important to comprehensively evaluate these centers. As provided herein, a more systematic and structured approach utilizing logic models, an evaluation plan, and successful processes can provide research centers with a functionally useful method in their evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrating Automation into a Multi-Mission Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surka, Derek M.; Jones, Lori; Crouse, Patrick; Cary, Everett A, Jr.; Esposito, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Science Mission Operations (SSMO) Project is currently tackling the challenge of minimizing ground operations costs for multiple satellites that have surpassed their prime mission phase and are well into extended mission. These missions are being reengineered into a multi-mission operations center built around modern information technologies and a common ground system infrastructure. The effort began with the integration of four SMEX missions into a similar architecture that provides command and control capabilities and demonstrates fleet automation and control concepts as a pathfinder for additional mission integrations. The reengineered ground system, called the Multi-Mission Operations Center (MMOC), is now undergoing a transformation to support other SSMO missions, which include SOHO, Wind, and ACE. This paper presents the automation principles and lessons learned to date for integrating automation into an existing operations environment for multiple satellites.

  8. Specifications of a Mechanized Center for Information Services for a Public Library Reference Center. Final Report. Part 1, Preliminary Specification: Mechanized Information Services in Public Library Reference Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Inst. of Library Research.

    This document presents preliminary specifications for a library-based Center for Information Services (CIS). Four sets of issues are covered: (1) data base inventory, providing a listing of magnetic tape data bases now available from national sources or soon to be so; (2) administrative issues, including the organization of the CIS within the…

  9. Implementation of a pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation program at an urban teaching medical center.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanchita; Siemianowski, Laura; Murphy, Michelle; McAllister, Susan Coutinho

    2014-01-01

    An inpatient medication reconciliation (MR) program emphasizing pharmacy technicians' role in the MR process is described. As part of quality-improvement (QI) efforts focused on MR-related adverse drug events, an urban academic medical center in New Jersey implemented a pharmacy technician-centered MR (PTMR) program targeting patients on its internal medicine, oncology, and clinical decision units. The program is staffed by five full- or part-time technicians who are trained in MR methods and work under direct pharmacist supervision, interviewing newly admitted patients and using other information sources (e.g., community pharmacies, physician offices, nursing facilities) to compile an accurate and complete medication list. About 30% of all patients admitted to the hospital are served by the PTMR program, which averages more than 500 cases each month. During one three-month period, 1748 discrepancies on preadmission medication lists were identified, most of which involved the omission of drugs (65.7% of cases) and incorrect information on dose and frequency of use (14.4%). Efforts to overcome resource constraints and other program challenges (e.g., privacy concerns, delays in community pharmacy transmittal of prescription refill lists) are ongoing. To date, most research on PTMR has been conducted in emergency departments or perioperative settings; experience with the PTMR program suggests that this approach can be applied in other hospital areas to improve MR processes and, ultimately, enhance pharmacotherapy safety and effectiveness across transitions of care. Based on experience, providers' perspectives, and QI data, the PTMR program is an effective method to obtain, document, and communicate accurate MR data for patients at this institution.

  10. A Learning Center on the Lever for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keislar, Evan R.; Luckenbill, Maryann

    This document describes a project designed to explore the possibilities of children's learning in mechanics. The principle of the lever, one example of a simple machine, was used in the form of a balance toy. The apparatus was set up as a game in a specially devised learning center. The children made non-verbal predictions as to which way the bar…

  11. Person-Centered Care: A Definition and Essential Elements.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Improving healthcare safety, quality, and coordination, as well as quality of life, are important aims of caring for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and/or functional limitations. Person-centered care is an approach to meeting these aims, but there are no standardized, agreed-upon parameters for delivering such care. The SCAN Foundation charged a team from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) in collaboration with a research and clinical team from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California to provide the evidence base to support a definition of person-centered care and its essential elements. An interprofessional panel of experts in person-centered care principles and practices that the AGS convened developed this statement. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Land Application Training Center - A Field Based Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Jonathan; Lindbo, David L.; McLaughlin, Rich

    2015-04-01

    More and more professionals have to be licensed or certified to perform activities related to soil and the environment. Many certification programs have been solely based on classroom instruction with no field experience. We saw this as a gap in training that could lead to problems with implementation and job performance. As a result we developed a field based training center to assist with both certification training and continuing education of environmental professionals. The center broke ground in 1997 and has expanded over the years to include soils and waste application, wetland restoration, and sediment and erosion control demonstrations. This presentation describes the individual components and outlines the courses offered at the training center.

  13. The Good-Bye Window: A Year in the Life of a Day-Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Harriet N.

    Started 25 years ago by a group of parents in Madison, Wisconsin, the Red Caboose is one of the oldest independent day-care centers in the United States. This book recounts observations of the activities at the center for 1 year, exploring what makes a good day care center successful and what obstacles a center is up against. Interspersed among…

  14. Designing and implementing a parenting resource center for pregnant teens.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Anne B; Broussard, Brenda S

    2009-01-01

    The Resource Center for Young Parents-To-Be is a longstanding and successful grant-funded project that was initiated as a response to an identified community need. Senior-level baccalaureate nursing students and their maternity-nursing instructors are responsible for staffing the resource center's weekly sessions, which take place at a public school site for pregnant adolescents. Childbirth educators interested in working with this population could assist in replicating this exemplary clinical project in order to provide prenatal education to this vulnerable and hard-to-reach group.

  15. Field Responsive, Center Specific: A Model for Collaborative Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Richard R.; Stahlhut, Richard G.

    A description is given of the Regional Partnership Program, a field-responsive, center-specific model established at the University of Northern Iowa (UNI) designed to oversee clinical field experiences for student teachers. This cooperative partnership calls for a resident tenure track professor to be placed in a geographic area away from the main…

  16. Managerial Cost Accounting for a Technical Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmkamp, John G.

    A two-fold solution to the cost information deficiency problem is proposed. A formal managerial cost accounting system is designed expressly for the two information services of retrospective search and selective dissemination. The system was employed during a trial period to test its effectiveness in a technical information center. Once…

  17. Collecting a whitebark snag for visitor center display

    Treesearch

    Jane Kapler Smith

    2006-01-01

    An educational display entitled "Whitebark pine forests-High country tapestry of life" is being assembled at the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) in Missoula. It will include a whitebark pine snag and several animal specimens (two grizzly bears, a Clark's nutcracker, and a red squirrel), arrayed in front of a large photo of whitebark pine habitat....

  18. Integrating Mindfulness Meditation within a University Counseling Center Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurash, Cheryl; Schaul, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    This paper documents the development of a mindfulness meditation component within a University Counseling Center setting. The specific focus is upon the inclusion of meditation as it pertains to both organizational structure and psychotherapy training. The integration of a meditation practice into any organization is a slow process that poses…

  19. Medicine As a Corporate Enterprise, Patient Welfare Centered Profession, or Patient Welfare Centered Professional Enterprise?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Singh, Shakuntala

    2005-01-01

    corporate enterprise or remain a patient welfare centered profession. A third approach involves an eclectic resolution of the two. Such amount of patient welfare as also ensures profit, and such amount of profit as also ensures patient welfare is to be forwarded. For, profit, without patient welfare, is blind. And patient welfare, without profit, is lame. According to this approach, medicine becomes a patient welfare centered professional enterprise. The various ramifications of each of these approaches are discussed in this monograph. PMID:22679354

  20. Medicine as a corporate enterprise, patient welfare centered profession, or patient welfare centered professional enterprise?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai; Singh, Shakuntala

    2005-11-01

    enterprise or remain a patient welfare centered profession. A third approach involves an eclectic resolution of the two. Such amount of patient welfare as also ensures profit, and such amount of profit as also ensures patient welfare is to be forwarded. For, profit, without patient welfare, is blind. And patient welfare, without profit, is lame. According to this approach, medicine becomes a patient welfare centered professional enterprise.The various ramifications of each of these approaches are discussed in this monograph.

  1. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Contact Us Director: Claire Max Office: Room 205, Center for Adaptive Optics Phone: (831) 459-2049 Fax: (831 ) 459-5717 Email: max@ucolick.org Associate Director: Donald Gavel Office: Room 209, Center for Adaptive

  2. Group Treatment of Eating Disorders in a University Counseling Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Gregory; And Others

    Sociocultural pressures to pursue an unrealistic ideal of thinness have contributed to an increasing number of students seeking help at a university counseling center for the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. To help these students, a group treatment technique was developed using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Treatment…

  3. A Planning Guide for Food Service in Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This publication is designed to help child care center directors and other personnel in programs receiving funding through the Child Care Food Program plan their food service. Included are sections on: (1) planning food for a day; (2) meal patterns (information on the necessary food groups, a chart of vegetables and fruits containing vitamin A, C…

  4. Is a Materials Resource Center Right for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When a commercial pilot steps into the cockpit of an airplane, it has been serviced by a host of personnel and will be supported by many more from takeoff to landing. In more and more places, when an elementary school teacher steps into inquiry-centered science instruction, his or her materials have been carefully prepared by a team of experts,…

  5. Team Approach to Staffing the Reference Center: A Speculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Mollie D.; And Others

    This document applies theories of participatory management to a proposal for a model that uses a team approach to staffing university library reference centers. In particular, the Ward Edwards Library at Central Missouri State University is examined in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of its current approach. Special attention is given to…

  6. Visiting Patterns and Effects of Density at a Visitors' Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrus-Bammel, Lei Lane; Bammel, Gene

    1986-01-01

    Reports on a study designed to investigate the relationship between the length of stay at a national forest visitor center and the density of the visitor population. Results indicate a significant negative correlation exists between the daily number of users and the average duration of their visits. (TW)

  7. Management System Design for a Learner Centered School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Examines how a learner-centered Montessori school in Toronto, Ontario, defines, specifies, and implements its management decision-support system. Findings indicate a tightly integrated management system comprised of a few student-focused decision-support elements. Identifies relationships, resources, and particular organizational arrangements as…

  8. Progress to a Gallium-Arsenide Deep-Center Laser

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    Although photoluminescence from gallium-arsenide (GaAs) deep-centers was first observed in the 1960s, semiconductor lasers have always utilized conduction-to-valence-band transitions. Here we review recent materials studies leading to the first GaAs deep-center laser. First, we summarize well-known properties: nature of deep-center complexes, Franck-Condon effect, photoluminescence. Second, we describe our recent work: insensitivity of photoluminescence with heating, striking differences between electroluminescence and photoluminescence, correlation between transitions to deep-states and absence of bandgap-emission. Room-temperature stimulated-emission from GaAs deep-centers was observed at low electrical injection, and could be tuned from the bandgap to half-the-bandgap (900–1,600 nm) by changing the electrical injection. The first GaAs deep-center laser was demonstrated with electrical injection, and exhibited a threshold of less than 27 mA/cm2 in continuous-wave mode at room temperature at the important 1.54 μm fiber-optic wavelength. This small injection for laser action was explained by fast depopulation of the lower state of the optical transition (fast capture of free holes onto deep-centers), which maintains the population inversion. The evidence for laser action included: superlinear L-I curve, quasi-Fermi level separations satisfying Bernard-Duraffourg’s criterion, optical gains larger than known significant losses, clamping of the optical-emission from lossy modes unable to reach laser action, pinning of the population distribution during laser action.

  9. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O.

    2008-01-15

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obviousmore » improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See

  10. Establishing a Writing Center in the Junior or Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the following interrelated areas pertinent to establishing a community college writing center: selling the idea to the department and administration; internal and external funding possibilities; locating a facility; staffing needs and difficulties; tutor training; referral and walk-in operational systems; forms; data collection;…

  11. Charlottesville-Albemarle Media Center: A Proposal for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. Gordon, Jr.

    Initiated as a graduate school project in educational media administration and later distributed to administrative personnel in the Charlottesville and Albemarle County public school districts, this document presents a 5-year plan for merging the district-level library media centers and related services of these two neighboring Virginia school…

  12. Evaluation of Teacher Training in a Title III Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ethna R.

    This study is a report on a series of exemplary and instructional reading programs conducted by the Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction and designed to improve reading instruction in kindergarten through grade 12. The following topics are included: (1) evaluation of beginning reading programs, including materials selection, materials…

  13. "Hospes": The Wabash Center as a Site of Transformative Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Carolyn M.

    2007-01-01

    The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion is a place of hospitality and its staff the epitome of the "good host." This essay explores the meaning of hospitality, including its problematic dimensions, drawing on a number of voices and texts: Jacques Derrida's "Of Hospitality"; Henri M. Nouwen's "Reaching Out: The Three…

  14. Worker-Centered Learning: A Union Guide to Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarmiento, Anthony R.; Kay, Ann

    This guide examines organized labor's views on adult literacy. It also describes several union-sponsored workplace education programs and suggests how a union can plan and operate a worker-centered literacy program. The book is organized in three parts. The first part examines workplace literacy in four chapters that cover the following: the…

  15. A College Financial Management Center: What Do Students Think?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vienne, Kristy; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing cost of a college education on the rise, college administrators need to address the long term financial, psychological, and academic risks associated with the increased responsibility of personal debt. In this qualitative study, college students' perspectives regarding the need for a personal financial management center at a…

  16. Creating a Resource Center for Homeschoolers: The Impact of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javid, Mahnaz A.

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of a two-month case study of Edmonds Cyberschool (Washington), a resource center for homeschoolers. The study focused on the impact of technology on students' learning as indicated in three areas: attitude toward technology, the use of technology, and value of technology versus other available resources. (Author/LRW)

  17. Bugs, Planes, and Ferris Wheels: A Problem-Centered Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, William E.; Kemp, Joyce C.; Zia, Joan H.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a problem-centered curriculum for grades 9-12, using problem sets developed by a mathematics department and designed to take the place of textbooks. The students discover mathematical concepts in the context of the problems and activities in the materials.

  18. Language-Centered Social Studies: A Natural Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rosalinda B.; Aleman, Magdalena

    1983-01-01

    Described is a newspaper project in which elementary students report life as it was in the Middle Ages. Students are involved in a variety of language-centered activities. For example, they gather and evaluate information about medieval times and write, edit, and proofread articles for the newspaper. (RM)

  19. A Problem-Centered Approach to Canonical Matrix Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a problem-centered approach to the topic of canonical matrix forms in a second linear algebra course. In this approach, abstract theory, including such topics as eigenvalues, generalized eigenspaces, invariant subspaces, independent subspaces, nilpotency, and cyclic spaces, is developed in response to the patterns discovered…

  20. Responsibility-Centered Management: A 10-Year Nursing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Angela Barron; Neiman, Sandra; Johnson, James

    2000-01-01

    Describes the implementation of responsibility-centered management, a decentralized model giving deans responsibility for expanding and using resources, at Indiana University's nursing school. Discusses how it led to creation of an information-rich environment, strategic decision making, and a performance-based reward structure. (SK)

  1. Toward a User-Centered Academic Library Home Page

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Nina

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, academic libraries have struggled with the design of an effective library home page. Since librarians' mental models of information architecture differ from those of their patrons, usability assessments are necessary in designing a user-centered home page. This study details a usability sequence of card sort and paper and…

  2. Exporting a Student-Centered Curriculum: A Home Institution's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Waterval, Dominique; Tinnemans-Adriaanse, Marjolijn; Meziani, Mohammed; Driessen, Erik; Scherpbier, Albert; Mazrou, Abdulrahman; Frambach, Janneke

    2017-07-01

    Numerous, mainly Anglo-Saxon, higher education institutions have agreements with foreign providers to deliver their curricula abroad. This trend is gradually making inroads into the medical domain, where foreign institutions undertake to offer their students learning experiences similar to those of the home institution. Not an easy feat, as the national health care contexts differ greatly between institutions. In a bid to export the curriculum, institutions risk compromising their financial resilience and reputation. This article presents an instrumental case study of a home institution's perspective on the establishment of a cross-border student-centered curriculum partnership. It provides the reader with a practical discourse on dimensions that need to be bridged between home and host contexts, and on new working processes that need to be integrated within the home institution's existing organizational structure. We describe the advantages and disadvantages based on our experiences with a centralized organizational approach, and advocate for a gradual move toward decentral interfaculty communities of practice.

  3. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes Stafford Technical Center's Engineering Technology Academy (ETA), in which students pursue a variety of educational and career options for anything connected to construction technologies--including drafting and design, architecture, and even work in historic preservation. In addition to technical skills,…

  4. Physical Interactions Involving Preschoolers and Kindergartners in a Childcare Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Bethany; Chavajay, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    This naturalistic observational study described the similarities and differences in physical interactions involving preschoolers and kindergartners within the context of a US childcare facility. It examined patterns of touch involving the children across center and circle activities within the course of their day. Results indicated that…

  5. The Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS): A video presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Freeman, Jeannine

    1992-01-01

    NASA Ames, working with the FAA, has developed a highly effective set of automation tools for aiding the air traffic controller in traffic management within the terminal area. To effectively demonstrate these tools, the video AAV-1372, entitled 'Center/TRACON Automation System,' was produced. The script to the video is provided along with instructions for its acquisition.

  6. Situated Practice: A Reflection on Person-Centered Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a situated perspective on the person-centered classroom management practices described in this issue, in order to highlight the special contribution these practices make to sustaining meaningful student engagement in classroom activity. Building on Paul Gump's efforts to conceptualize the classroom environment, the discussion…

  7. Evaluation of a day reporting center for repeat DWI offenders

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-08-01

    Describes and evaluates the effectiveness of a Day Reporting Center (DRC) in reducing the driving while intoxicated (DWI) recidivism of repeat DWI offenders. It also examines the effect of the DRC program in reducing the cost of post-conviction sanct...

  8. Measuring the Impact of a Science Center on Its Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.; Needham, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    A range of sources support science learning, including the formal education system, libraries, museums, nature and Science Centers, aquariums and zoos, botanical gardens and arboretums, television programs, film and video, newspapers, radio, books and magazines, the Internet, community and health organizations, environmental organizations, and…

  9. Support Group for International Students: A Counseling Center's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipeolu, Abiola; Kang, Jinhee; Cooper, Caren

    2007-01-01

    Statistics suggest a steady increase in the number of international students attending universities in the U.S. However, limited information is available to guide professionals in the delivery of effective mental health services to this diverse group. University counseling centers have repeatedly reported little to no success with international…

  10. Recycling: Establishing a Citizen-Sponsored Reclamation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keep America Beautiful, Inc., New York, NY.

    This booklet applies the Clean Community System (CCS) of Keep America Beautiful, Inc. to the development of citizen-sponsored recycling projects. Six initial steps in establishing a reclamation center are given and include information gathering, market analysis, legal requirements, and site location. Suggestions are included for recruiting staff…

  11. Bulimia: Issues a University Counseling Center Needs To Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitner, Phillip A.; Shetterly, Arminta

    The eating disorder known as bulimia is a relatively new and baffling phenomenon. This paper raises questions that college and university counseling center professionals need to address regarding this phenomenon. The first section focuses on defining the term "bulimia" and its evolution. The second section identifies numerous symptoms that need to…

  12. The Career Education Center: A Program with Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilivicky, Martin

    1976-01-01

    The Project Redesign grant proposal, developed by the faculty of William Cullen Bryant High School, was responsible for the initiation of a comprehensive career education program. That program and the Careers Center and Career Guidance Service were the focus of this article. (Author/RK)

  13. Student Technology Use in a Self-Access Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Joachim; Mynard, Jo; Rubesch, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Technology has played an increasingly vital role in self-access learning over the past twenty years or so, yet little research has been conducted into learners' actual use of the technology both for self-directed learning and as part of everyday life. This paper describes an ongoing action research project at a self-access learning center (SALC)…

  14. Evidence-Centered Design as a Foundation for ALD Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Barbara S.; Huff, Kristen; Reshetar, Rosemary

    2009-01-01

    [Slides] presented at the Annual Meeting of National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in San Diego, CA in April 2009. This presentation discusses a methodology for directly connecting evidence-centered assessment design (ECD) to score interpretation and use through the development of Achievement level descriptors.

  15. The 1994 Ames Research Center publications: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarich, Shelley J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that Ames Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for formal reports, high-number conference publications, high-number technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting presentation, tech briefs, patents, and translations.

  16. The Use of Clinical Hypnosis in a College Counseling Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Herbert A.

    This report describes the use of hypnosis at the Hiram College Counseling Center, a counseling technique that has been especially helpful in academic, athletic, and personal improvement areas. The induction techniques of hypnosis are described as well as the use of hyperempiria. The use of hypnosis in improving study habits and alleviating test…

  17. 14. VARIOUS OUTBUILDINGS: a) OCTAGONAL STRUCTURE (center): WASH HOUSE b) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VARIOUS OUTBUILDINGS: a) OCTAGONAL STRUCTURE (center): WASH HOUSE b) SQUARE BUILDING WITH HIPPED ROOF (right front): SMOKEHOUSE c) BRICK BUILDING WITH END CHIMNEYS (left front): KITCHEN AND COOK'S BUILDING d) LONG BRICK BUILDING (in background): SERVANTS' QUARTERS (?) - Colonel McNeal House, Union & Bills Streets, Bolivar, Hardeman County, TN

  18. The Door: A Model Youth Center. Treatment Program Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report provides basic facts about The Door, a multifaceted youth center in New York City, which serves 300-400 young people each day. The origins, early stages, guiding philosophy, activities, and organizational structure are described. Recommendations for initiating and operating multiservice youth projects based on the experience of The…

  19. Planning and Marketing: Two Keys to a Recreation Center's Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Joseph P.

    1983-01-01

    Indoor recreational facilities in Fairfax County, Virginia, owe their success to (1) development of comprehensive plans, which take into account site location, community needs, area trends, and financing possibilities, and (2) use of continuous marketing strategies. The centers are self-supporting. Each offers a variety of recreation/sports…

  20. Personality and Development in Childhood: A Person-Centered Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Daniel; Atkins, Robert; Fegley, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Applied a person-centered approach to childhood personality development in 28 diverse samples of 3- to 6-year-olds studied over 6 years. Identified resilient, overcontrolled, and undercontrolled personality types. Found that the undercontrolled personality type related to intellectual decline over 6 years. The number of family risks predicted…

  1. A northwest view from the campus center building toward the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A northwest view from the campus center building toward the south side and east rear of the administration building. The former front entrance of the life sciences building is visible in the distance to the right. - San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. Evidence for a Student-Centered Course Evaluation Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Dennis R.; And Others

    The purpose of the study was to develop a course-evaluation form for the assessment of student-centered courses. The development of the instrument was derived from theoretical views of student-courses which suggested five dimensions. The dimensions included bases of power, positive classroom environment, personal meaningfulness, student…

  3. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  4. Trade Centers: The Concept and a Rancherian Culture Area Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobyns, Henry F.

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates how the Northern Panya People were the key link in a Pacific Southwest trade route extending from the Pacific Ocean to the Colorado River, where it forked northeast--toward the Hopi Pueblos--and southeast--toward the Pima People. Conceptualizes an established network of pre-Contact trade centers in North America. (JHZ)

  5. Interpersonal Complexity: A Cognitive Component of Person-Centered Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medvene, Louis; Grosch, Kerry; Swink, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study concerns one component of the ability to provide person-centered care: the cognitive skill of perceiving others in relatively complex terms. This study tested the effectiveness of a social motivation for increasing the number of psychological constructs used to describe an unfamiliar senior citizen. Design and Methods:…

  6. Integration of pharmacists into a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Scott, Mollie Ashe; Hitch, Bill; Ray, Lisa; Colvin, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    To define the joint principles of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) and describe the integration of pharmacists into a PCMH. Family medicine residency training program in North Carolina from 2001 to 2011. Mountain Area Health Education Family Health Center is a family medicine residency training program that is part of the North Carolina Area Health Education Center system. The goal of the organization is to train and retain health care students and residents. The practice is recognized as a level III PCMH by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and seeks to provide quality, safe, patient-centered care according to the joint principles of PCMH. Pharmacists, nurses, nutritionists, care managers, Spanish translators, and behavioral medicine specialists work collaboratively with physicians to provide seamless, comprehensive care. The Department of Pharmacotherapy is embedded in the family medicine clinic. Three pharmacists and two pharmacy residents are involved in providing direct patient care services, ensuring access to community resources, assisting patients with transitions of care, providing interprofessional education, and participating in continuous quality improvement initiatives. The pharmacists serve as clinical pharmacist practitioners and provide medication therapy management services in a pharmacotherapy clinic, anticoagulation clinics, and an osteoporosis clinic and via an inpatient family medicine service. Multiple learners such as student pharmacists, pharmacy residents, and family medicine residents rotate through the various pharmacy clinics to learn about pharmacotherapeutic principles and the role of the pharmacist in PCMH. PCMH is a comprehensive, patient-centered, team-based approach to population management in the primary care setting. Pharmacists play a vital role in PCMH and make fundamental contributions to patient care across health care settings. Such innovations in the ambulatory care setting create a unique niche

  7. A conceptual framework for patient-centered fertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Elizabeth A; Cooper, Alexandra; Davis, Joseph B; Schoyer, Katherine D; Sandlow, Jay; Strawn, Estil Y; Flynn, Kathryn E

    2017-09-07

    Patient-centered care is a pillar of quality health care and is important to patients experiencing infertility. In this study we used empirical, in-depth data on couples' experiences of infertility treatment decision making to inform and revise a conceptual framework for patient-centered fertility treatment that was developed based on health care professionals' conceptualizations of fertility treatment, covering effectiveness, burden, safety, and costs. In this prospective, longitudinal mixed methods study, we collected data from both members (separately) of 37 couples who scheduled an initial consult with a reproductive specialist. Data collection occurred 1 week before the initial consultation, 1 week after the initial consultation, and then roughly 2, 4, 8, and 12 months later. Data collection included semi-structured qualitative interviews, self-reported questionnaires, and medical record review. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed in NVivo. A single coder analyzed all transcripts, with > 25% of transcripts coded by a second coder to ensure quality control and consistency. Content analysis of the interview transcripts revealed 6 treatment dimensions: effectiveness, physical and emotional burden, time, cost, potential risks, and genetic parentage. Thus, the revised framework for patient-centered fertility treatment retains much from the original framework, with modification to one dimension (from safety to potential risks) and the addition of two dimensions (time and genetic parentage). For patients and their partners making fertility treatment decisions, tradeoffs are explicitly considered across dimensions as opposed to each dimension being considered on its own. Patient-centered fertility treatment should account for the dimensions of treatment that patients and their partners weigh when making decisions about how to add a child to their family. Based on the lived experiences of couples seeking specialist medical care for

  8. Reflections from a Year at the Center for Global Health

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) Fellowship is a one-year fellowship, where a laboratory, a Center or a Division within the National Cancer Institute takes in a post baccalaureate trainee for a year. This trainee is typically someone who has completed their Bachelor’s degree and is ready to put their knowledge into useful action as they chart out their career and future education. After a year, CRTA Fellow, Tulika Singh reflects on her year of service.

  9. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Power demand, load center assessment and transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Thaik, A.; Pingel, P.

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramification of constructing a nuclear energy center in an arid western region. In this phase of the study. The projected power demands and load center locations were reviewed and assessed. Alternative transmission systems were analysed and a conceptual transmission for bulk power transportation is proposed with potential line routes. Environmental impacts of the proposed transmission were also identified.

  10. Operationalizing a Nursing Innovation Center Within a Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    In nursing, the terms "innovation" and "innovative" are used freely, especially when individuals or groups either develop something new or improve upon current practice. Innovation is often considered adjunct work, not part of foundational work that aims to meet the vision, mission, and values of the organization. Nurse leaders must include innovation as an important theme of this foundational work. Innovation must become a core expectation of all nurses and nursing team members. Team members can provide ideas that lead to innovations. They can also carry out roles that enhance or cultivate ideas, promote prototyping, ensure innovative ideas are efficacious and effective, and facilitate dissemination and diffusion into practice. To ensure that innovation is incorporated as part of nursing practice and then sustained over time, horizontal (elemental) and vertical (global) infrastructure and processes are needed. In this article, operationalization of a Nursing Innovation Center is described and rationale for specific horizontal and vertical services and features is discussed.

  11. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy at a comprehensive cancer center.

    PubMed

    Connors, Shahnjayla K; Goodman, Melody S; Myckatyn, Terence; Margenthaler, Julie; Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is an integral part of breast cancer treatment that positively impacts quality of life in breast cancer survivors. Although breast reconstruction rates have increased over time, African American women remain less likely to receive breast reconstruction compared to Caucasian women. National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, specialized institutions with more standardized models of cancer treatment, report higher breast reconstruction rates than primary healthcare facilities. Whether breast reconstruction disparities are reduced for women treated at comprehensive cancer centers is unclear. The purpose of this study was to further investigate breast reconstruction rates and determinants at a comprehensive cancer center in St. Louis, Missouri. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained for women who received mastectomy for definitive surgical treatment for breast cancer between 2000 and 2012. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the receipt of breast reconstruction. We found a breast reconstruction rate of 54 % for the study sample. Women who were aged 55 and older, had public insurance, received unilateral mastectomy, and received adjuvant radiation therapy were significantly less likely to receive breast reconstruction. African American women were 30 % less likely to receive breast reconstruction than Caucasian women. These findings suggest that racial disparities in breast reconstruction persist in comprehensive cancer centers. Future research should further delineate the determinants of breast reconstruction disparities across various types of healthcare institutions. Only then can we develop interventions to ensure all eligible women have access to breast reconstruction and the improved quality of life it affords breast cancer survivors.

  12. Renovating a 65-year-old performing arts center

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, R.S.

    This article describes the HVAC, electrical and lighting systems that were upgraded in the renovations to the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The renovations and restorations involved a complete restoration to elaborate interior finishes and a comprehensive upgrade of antiquated core mechanical and electrical systems in a 65-year-old performing arts theater. A new thermal storage cooling system, a new electrical power distribution system, new lighting systems and a new fire protection system were accomplished simultaneously as the theater interior was completely refinished with meticulous detail. The project offered a rare opportunity to integrate current technology with what may atmore » first appear to be obsolete systems to enable the original architectural grandeur to be maintained, yet be fully functional to meet the demanding requirements of a modern performing arts center. It is an example of a successful project that was completed within a very aggressive construction schedule and within a controlled budget.« less

  13. A Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Gerald G.

    1992-01-01

    A group of knowledgeable scientists and engineers in New Mexico has recognized the need for such a testing capability and has proposed a project to evelop an extraterrestrial surface simulation facility. A group of universities, national laboratories, and private industrial firms is proposing to establish a Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC) and to develop large extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities in which this needed testing can be realistically performed. The CETEC is envisioned to be both a center of knowledge and data regarding engineering, construction, mining, and material process operations on extraterrestrial bodies and a set of extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities. The primary CETEC facility is proposed to be a large domed building made of steel reinforced concrete with more than one acre of test floor area covered with several feet of simulated lunar soil and dust. Various aspects of the project are presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Shopping Centers: Their Development and Impact on a Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berezowski, P. E.; And Others

    Presenting extensive background material on the development of shopping centers, this paper includes elementary and junior high school outdoor education activities centering upon shopping center studies. Background material includes analysis of the following: shopping center types (architecture, regional location, etc); land use (guidelines for…

  15. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  16. A study of the remote neighborhood office center concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The substitution of communications for commuting to work is examined from several aspects. Attention is focused on the possibility of certain groups of white collar workers conducting their business affairs through a network of Remote Neighborhood Office Centers (RNOC's) located near their homes. Typically, employees would communicate with their headquarters organizations by means of voice and digital circuits. Although current technology is readily able to support such an RNOC network, the main problems confronting would-be implementers center around the need for demonstrating that a sufficient number of business operations can be carried out in such a decentralized configuration as efficiently as they are under more conventional circumstances. The description of a pilot program is presented which is intended to identify pacing issues that must be settled before firm conclusions can be reached on whether the concept is operationally viable.

  17. Mass center estimation of a drag-free satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz Fernandez De Cordova, S.; Debra, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The mass center location of a spinning drag-free satellite can be estimated because there is control required to accelerate the mass center along the axis of spin as long as there is some nutation in the spinning motion. Linear and nonlinear models are compared and observability discussed. Online estimation fails when nutation is damped so an offline mechanization is proposed. A new sensor has been designed to permit greater relative motion than was possible on the drag-free satellite flown in 1972 (JH-1). Experimental laboratory results using a spinning vehicle with the new sensor mounted 30 cm from a spherical air bearing support are presented which confirm earlier simulation results.

  18. Lean business model and implementation of a geriatric fracture center.

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2014-05-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is a common event associated with high costs of care and often with suboptimal outcomes for the patients. Ideally, a new care model to manage geriatric hip fractures would address both quality and safety of patient care as well as the need for reduced costs of care. The geriatric fracture center model of care is one such model reported to improve both outcomes and quality of care. It is a lean business model applied to medicine. This article describes basic lean business concepts applied to geriatric fracture care and information needed to successfully implement a geriatric fracture center. It is written to assist physicians and surgeons in their efforts to implement an improved care model for their patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resonance fluorescence and quantum interference of a single NV center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Wu, E.

    2017-11-01

    The detection of a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond has attracted much interest, since it is expected to lead to innovative applications in various domains of quantum information, including quantum metrology, information processing and communications, as well as in various nanotechnologies, such as biological and subdiffraction limit imaging, and tests of entanglement in quantum mechanics. We propose a novel scheme of a single NV center coupled with a multi-mode superconducting microwave cavity driven by coherent fields in squeezed vacuum. We numerically investigate the spectra in-phase quadrature and out-of-phase quadrature for different driving regimes with or without detunings. It shows that the maximum squeezing can be obtained for optimal Rabi fields. Moreover, with the same parameters, the maximum squeezing is greatly increased when the detunings are nonzero compared to the resonance case.

  20. Interruptions in a level one trauma center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brixey, Juliana J; Tang, Zhihua; Robinson, David J; Johnson, Craig W; Johnson, Todd R; Turley, James P; Patel, Vimla L; Zhang, Jiajie

    2008-04-01

    The emergency department has been characterized as interrupt-driven. Government agencies and patient safety organizations recognize that interruptions contribute to medical errors. The purpose of this study was to observe, record, and contextualize activities and interruptions experienced by physicians and Registered Nurses (RNs) working in a Level One Trauma Center. A case study that relied on an ethnographic study design using the shadowing method. A convenience sample of physicians and RNs, each with at least 6 months of experience in the Emergency Department (ED), were asked to participate. In these kinds of detailed qualitative investigations, it is quite common to have a small sample size. Ethical approval: Approval was obtained from institutional ethic committees prior to initiating the study. Community consent was obtained from the ED staff through in-service education. All observations were made in the trauma section of the ED of a tertiary teaching hospital. The hospital is situated in a major medical center in the Gulf Coast region of the United States of America (USA). Five attending ED physicians were observed for a total of 29h, 31min. Eight RNs were shadowed for a total of 40 h, 9min. Interruptions and activities were categorized using the Hybrid Method to Categorize Interruptions and Activities (HyMCIA). Registered Nurses received slightly more interruptions per hour than physicians. People, pagers, and telephones were identified as mediums through which interruptions were delivered. The physical environment was found to contribute to interruptions in workflow because of physical design and when supplies were not available. Physicians and RNs usually returned to the original, interrupted activity more often than leaving the activity unfinished. This research provides an enhanced understanding of interruptions in workflow in the ED, the identification of work constraints, and the need to develop interventions to manage interruptions. It is crucial

  1. Impact of the establishment of a specialty hernia referral center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristopher B; Belyansky, Igor; Dacey, Kristian T; Yurko, Yuliya; Augenstein, Vedra A; Lincourt, Amy E; Horton, James; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2014-12-01

    Creating a surgical specialty referral center requires a strong interest, expertise, and a market demand in that particular field, as well as some form of promotion. In 2004, we established a tertiary hernia referral center. Our goal in this study was to examine its impact on institutional volume and economics. The database of all hernia repairs (2004-2011) was reviewed comparing hernia repair type and volume and center financial performance. The ventral hernia repair (VHR) patient subset was further analyzed with particular attention paid to previous repairs, comorbidities, referral patterns, and the concomitant involvement of plastic surgery. From 2004 to 2011, 4927 hernia repairs were performed: 39.3% inguinal, 35.5% ventral or incisional, 16.2% umbilical, 5.8% diaphragmatic, 1.6% femoral, and 1.5% other. Annual billing increased yearly from 7% to 85% and averaged 37% per year. Comparing 2004 with 2011, procedural volume increased 234%, and billing increased 713%. During that period, there was a 2.5-fold increase in open VHRs, and plastic surgeon involvement increased almost 8-fold, (P = .004). In 2005, 51 VHR patients had a previous repair, 27.0% with mesh, versus 114 previous VHR in 2011, 58.3% with mesh (P < .0001). For VHR, in-state referrals from 2004 to 2011 increased 340% while out-of-state referrals jumped 580%. In 2011, 21% of all patients had more than 4 comorbidities, significantly increased from 2004 (P = .02). The establishment of a tertiary, regional referral center for hernia repair has led to a substantial increase in surgical volume, complexity, referral geography, and financial benefit to the institution. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Cast Study: National Naval Medical Center, A Graduate Management Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    USNR 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. pPDV^-- -’" !nDf-AxTT7ATION NATIONAL NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER BETHESDA 8901 WISCONSIN AVE...reinvented itself on July 3, 2000 when it transformed from a traditional stovepipe organization into a service line health care delivery system. In less...many diverse projects throughout the organization . Commander Steve Griffitts, USN... for your continual cooperation and flexibility as I pursued my

  3. A Conversation with Kristy and Jane | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Jane has been coming to the NIH Clinical Center for treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) since she was three years old. She is currently enrolled in a trial that tests Selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, and her tumor is now 30.7 percent smaller than when she first started this trial three years ago. Her diagnosis has changed the lives of her family but has also given them

  4. A Conversation with Kristy and Jane | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Jane has been coming to the NIH Clinical Center for treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) since she was three years old. She is currently enrolled in a trial that tests Selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, and her tumor is now 30.7 percent smaller than when she first started this trial three years ago. Her diagnosis has changed the lives of her family but has also given them new passions and perseverance. Read more...

  5. A patient centered electronic health: eHealth system development.

    PubMed

    Schiza, Eirini C; Neokleous, Kleanthis C; Petkov, Nikolai; Schizas, Christos N

    2015-01-01

    Medical practice and patient-doctor relationship will continue improving while technology is integrated in our everyday life. In recent years the term eHealth landmarked a new era with improved health provider's skills and knowledge, and increased patient participation in medical care activities. To show why the design and implementation of a healthcare system needs to follow a specific philosophy dictated by the level of eHealth maturity of a country and its citizens. Based on the maturity level, an adaptable framework for implementing an Electronic Health System at national level is derived, guided by the Patient Centered Philosophy as defined and introduced by the EU directives. Implementation prerequisites are analyzed together with guiding principles for identifying the maturity level of an organization or country. Cyprus being a small EU country, it can be used as pilot site for the whole Europe, was chosen for this study and its maturity level analysis is presented. Recommendations that determine general steps needed to prepare the ground for an adequate patient-centered national healthcare system are accompanied. The implementation of an integrated Electronic Health Record at National level, as a prerequisite for a patient-centered eHealth environment is evidently demonstrated.

  6. Mining of Business-Oriented Conversations at a Call Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Hironori; Nasukawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideo

    Recently it has become feasible to transcribe textual records from telephone conversations at call centers by using automatic speech recognition. In this research, we extended a text mining system for call summary records and constructed a conversation mining system for the business-oriented conversations at the call center. To acquire useful business insights from the conversational data through the text mining system, it is critical to identify appropriate textual segments and expressions as the viewpoints to focus on. In the analysis of call summary data using a text mining system, some experts defined the viewpoints for the analysis by looking at some sample records and by preparing the dictionaries based on frequent keywords in the sample dataset. However with conversations it is difficult to identify such viewpoints manually and in advance because the target data consists of complete transcripts that are often lengthy and redundant. In this research, we defined a model of the business-oriented conversations and proposed a mining method to identify segments that have impacts on the outcomes of the conversations and can then extract useful expressions in each of these identified segments. In the experiment, we processed the real datasets from a car rental service center and constructed a mining system. With this system, we show the effectiveness of the method based on the defined conversation model.

  7. Dimensionality of organizational justice in a call center context.

    PubMed

    Flint, Douglas; Haley, Lynn M; McNally, Jeffrey J

    2012-04-01

    Summary.-Employees in three call centers were surveyed about their perceptions of organizational justice. Four factors were measured: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether a two-, three-, or four-factor model best fit the call center data. A three-factor model of distributive, procedural, and informational justice provided the best fit to these data. The three-factor model that showed the best fit does not conform to any of the more traditional models identified in the organizational justice literature. This implies that the context in which organizational justice is measured may play a role in identifying which justice factors are relevant to employees. Findings add to the empirical evidence on the dimensionality of organizational justice and imply that dimensionality of organizational justice is more context-dependent than previously thought.

  8. A model for combatting malnutrition in children: nutritional rehabilitation centers.

    PubMed

    De Lauture, H; Wone, I; Perier-scheer, M; Penot, C

    1982-01-01

    Few Senegalese mothers are skilled in handling the dietary transition from nursing to adult food for their children. At least 20% of the children aged 1 to 4 are affected by 2 broad types of protein-calorie malnutrition, marasmus and kwashiorkor. To correct these diets, nutritional rehabilitation centers (NRCs) have been established in 2 villages. Children and mothers come to these centers for periods of up to 3 weeks. Mothers learn to use locally available, inexpensive food products to prepare well-balanced meals high in calories and protein. Traditional cooking techniques of the typical rural home are used (examples of recipes used in NRCs are given), and mothers are also taught better methods of selecting, cultivating, and preserving foods. Because the NRC approach not only costs about 1/10th that of a hospital stay, but also seems more effective in preventing a recurrence of malnutrition, it may become a widespread alternative to traditional hospitalization.

  9. Declining trend of peritoneal dialysis: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Agraharkar, Mahendra; Henry, Sharon; Martinez, Dora; Bonds, Becky

    2002-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD), despite being advantageous to patient, physician, and society, has failed to show the growth it deserves. On the contrary, PD utilization has declined. Over the past several years, we have noticed a decline in the number of our home dialysis patients. When compared to the national trend, we find our trend to be not significantly different from other centers across the country. A similar trend has also been noticed in Canada. Although several reasons may exist for the decline, we intend to concentrate on local factors. In the first quarter of 1996, we had a total of 46 adult and pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on PD. That number decreased to 23 at the end of fourth quarter of the year 2001. The losses in our program far exceeded the gains. We lost our patients mainly to in-center hemodialysis (ICHD) and to transplantation. Peritonitis and membrane failure remained the major grounds for the loss to ICHD. In our center, geographic location and a lack of structured pre-ESRD education probably played a major role in the decline. Many of our patients are from distant counties that have a contract with University of Texas Medical Branch for providing health care to their indigent population. However, once those patients develop complications, the counties rely on the expertise of local physicians and nephrologists.

  10. Spine surgery cost reduction at a specialized treatment center

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Lenza, Mario; de Almeida, Suze Luize Ferraz; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz; Ferretti, Mario

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the estimated cost of treatment of spinal disorders to those of this treatment in a specialized center. Methods An evaluation of average treatment costs of 399 patients referred by a Health Insurance Company for evaluation and treatment at the Spine Treatment Reference Center of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. All patients presented with an indication for surgical treatment before being referred for assessment. Of the total number of patients referred, only 54 underwent surgical treatment and 112 received a conservative treatment with motor physical therapy and acupuncture. The costs of both treatments were calculated based on a previously agreed table of values for reimbursement for each phase of treatment. Results Patients treated non-surgically had an average treatment cost of US$ 1,650.00, while patients treated surgically had an average cost of US$ 18,520.00. The total estimated cost of the cohort of patients treated was US$ 1,184,810.00, which represents a 158.5% decrease relative to the total cost projected for these same patients if the initial type of treatment indicated were performed. Conclusion Treatment carried out within a center specialized in treating spine pathologies has global costs lower than those regularly observed. PMID:23579752

  11. Implementing the patient-centered medical home in complex adaptive systems: Becoming a relationship-centered patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Flieger, Signe Peterson

    This study explores the implementation experience of nine primary care practices becoming patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) as part of the New Hampshire Citizens Health Initiative Multi-Stakeholder Medical Home Pilot. The purpose of this study is to apply complex adaptive systems theory and relationship-centered organizations theory to explore how nine diverse primary care practices in New Hampshire implemented the PCMH model and to offer insights for how primary care practices can move from a structural PCMH to a relationship-centered PCMH. Eighty-three interviews were conducted with administrative and clinical staff at the nine pilot practices, payers, and conveners of the pilot between November and December 2011. The interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using both a priori and emergent themes. Although there is value in the structural components of the PCMH (e.g., disease registries), these structures are not enough. Becoming a relationship-centered PCMH requires attention to reflection, sensemaking, learning, and collaboration. This can be facilitated by settings aside time for communication and relationship building through structured meetings about PCMH components as well as the implementation process itself. Moreover, team-based care offers a robust opportunity to move beyond the structures to focus on relationships and collaboration. (a) Recognize that PCMH implementation is not a linear process. (b) Implementing the PCMH from a structural perspective is not enough. Although the National Committee for Quality Assurance or other guidelines can offer guidance on the structural components of PCMH implementation, this should serve only as a starting point. (c) During implementation, set aside structured time for reflection and sensemaking. (d) Use team-based care as a cornerstone of transformation. Reflect on team structures and also interactions of the team members. Taking the time to reflect will facilitate greater sensemaking and learning and

  12. Implementing the patient-centered medical home in complex adaptive systems: Becoming a relationship-centered patient-centered medical home

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Signe Peterson

    2017-01-01

    Background This study explores the implementation experience of nine primary care practices becoming patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) as part of the New Hampshire Citizens Health Initiative Multi-Stakeholder Medical Home Pilot. Purpose The purpose of this study is to apply complex adaptive systems theory and relationship-centered organizations theory to explore how nine diverse primary care practices in New Hampshire implemented the PCMH model and to offer insights for how primary care practices can move from a structural PCMH to a relationship-centered PCMH. Methodology/Approach Eighty-three interviews were conducted with administrative and clinical staff at the nine pilot practices, payers, and conveners of the pilot between November and December 2011. The interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using both a priori and emergent themes. Findings Although there is value in the structural components of the PCMH (e.g., disease registries), these structures are not enough. Becoming a relationship-centered PCMH requires attention to reflection, sensemaking, learning, and collaboration. This can be facilitated by settings aside time for communication and relationship building through structured meetings about PCMH components as well as the implementation process itself. Moreover, team-based care offers a robust opportunity to move beyond the structures to focus on relationships and collaboration. Practice Implications (a) Recognize that PCMH implementation is not a linear process. (b) Implementing the PCMH from a structural perspective is not enough. Although the National Committee for Quality Assurance or other guidelines can offer guidance on the structural components of PCMH implementation, this should serve only as a starting point. (c) During implementation, set aside structured time for reflection and sensemaking. (d) Use team-based care as a cornerstone of transformation. Reflect on team structures and also interactions of the team members. Taking

  13. Lessons Learned from an LGBTQ Senior Center: A Bronx Tale.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Justine; Brown, Dwayne; Gasparro, Vita

    This article describes an interdisciplinary pilot study exploring the impact of LGBTQ senior centers on the lives of center members. Many LGBTQ adults face the future having experienced stigma and bias, restricted rights, and rejection from family of origin, and are now growing older without the support of a partner and adult children. As a result, older LGBTQ adults experience higher rates of depression, loneliness and isolation, and shortened life expectancy as compared to non-LGBTQ peers. Findings from focus group and key informant interviews highlight features of LGBTQ senior center experiences that can significantly improve members' quality of life. These include providing family, acceptance and a home, which can have an impact on outlook and outcomes. Moreover, findings suggest the need for re-thinking hetero-normative definitions of "community" in the context of LGBTQ aging. Beyond sharing findings from the study, suggesting a conceptual framework for deepening understanding about LGBTQ aging, and identifying lines of future inquiry, the article articulates implications for social work research, practice and education. Ultimately, the article argues that social work is well positioned to improve quality of life for this under-served population when it adopts a cultural humility stance in research, practice and education.

  14. A bee in the corridor: centering and wall-following

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, Julien R.; Masson, Guillaume P.; Ruffier, Franck; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    In an attempt to better understand the mechanism underlying lateral collision avoidance in flying insects, we trained honeybees ( Apis mellifera) to fly through a large (95-cm wide) flight tunnel. We found that, depending on the entrance and feeder positions, honeybees would either center along the corridor midline or fly along one wall. Bees kept following one wall even when a major (150-cm long) part of the opposite wall was removed. These findings cannot be accounted for by the “optic flow balance” hypothesis that has been put forward to explain the typical bees’ “centering response” observed in narrower corridors. Both centering and wall-following behaviors are well accounted for, however, by a control scheme called the lateral optic flow regulator, i.e., a feedback system that strives to maintain the unilateral optic flow constant. The power of this control scheme is that it would allow the bee to guide itself visually in a corridor without having to measure its speed or distance from the walls.

  15. Breastfeeding trends at a Community Breastfeeding Center: an evaluative survey.

    PubMed

    Adams, C; Berger, R; Conning, P; Cruikshank, L; Doré, K

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the Community Breastfeeding Center's (CBC) impact on clients' breastfeeding experiences. Retrospective survey; participants were mailed a questionnaire. A hospital-based drop-in center operated jointly by the Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Health Unit and Headwaters Health Care Center and offering professional breastfeeding support and peer interaction. The 164 mothers of singleton births, both inpatients and community clients, who attended the CBC during a 10-month period in 1996-1997 and completed a survey. A mailed survey with forced-choice and open-ended questions. Of the respondents, 90.9% rated their overall CBC experience as excellent or good. Seventy-three percent of respondents breastfed for 4 months or longer. Primiparae and mothers of preterm infants tended to visit the CBC more frequently, while achieving duration rates similar to other subgroups. Returning to work was the reason most frequently cited for stopping breastfeeding (35%). The CBC is an effective community support strategy to lengthen breastfeeding duration and enhance clients' satisfaction with their breastfeeding experience.

  16. Mergers involving academic health centers: a formidable challenge.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, V D

    2001-10-01

    Escalating economic pressures on the clinical enterprise threaten the missions of education and research in many of the most prestigious academic health centers. Following the model of industry, mergers of the healthcare delivery systems of teaching hospitals and clinics held promise for economies of scale and an improved operating margin. Failure to follow business principles in constructing the merged entity, differences in organizational governance and culture, and inability of physician leadership to prioritize, downsize, and consolidate clinical programs to optimize operational efficiencies all compromise the success of such mergers in academic medicine. Academic institutions and their respective governing boards need to exercise greater discipline in financial analysis and a willingness to make difficult decisions that show favor to one parent institution over another if mergers are to be effective in this setting. To date, an example of a vibrant and successful merger of academic health centers remains to be found.

  17. Are drowned donors marginal donors? A single pediatric center experience.

    PubMed

    Kumm, Kayla R; Galván, N Thao N; Koohmaraie, Sarah; Rana, Abbas; Kueht, Michael; Baugh, Katherine; Hao, Liu; Yoeli, Dor; Cotton, Ronald; O'Mahony, Christine A; Goss, John A

    2017-09-01

    Drowning, a common cause of death in the pediatric population, is a potentially large donor pool for OLT. Anecdotally, transplant centers have deemed these organs high risk over concerns for infection and graft dysfunction. We theorized drowned donor liver allografts do not portend worse outcomes and therefore should not be excluded from the donation pool. We reviewed our single-center experience of pediatric OLTs between 1988 and 2015 and identified 33 drowned donor recipients. These OLTs were matched 1:2 to head trauma donor OLTs from our center. A chart review assessed postoperative peak AST and ALT, incidence of HAT, graft and recipient survival. Recipient survival at one year between patients with drowned donor vs head trauma donor allografts was not statistically significant (94% vs 97%, P=.63). HAT incidence was 6.1% in the drowned donor group vs 7.6% in the control group (P=.78). Mean postoperative peak AST and ALT was 683 U/L and 450 U/L for drowned donors vs 1119 U/L and 828 U/L in the matched cohort. These results suggest drowned donor liver allografts do not portend worse outcomes in comparison with those procured from head trauma donors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A source-controlled data center network model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Liang, Mangui; Wang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The construction of data center network by applying SDN technology has become a hot research topic. The SDN architecture has innovatively separated the control plane from the data plane which makes the network more software-oriented and agile. Moreover, it provides virtual multi-tenancy, effective scheduling resources and centralized control strategies to meet the demand for cloud computing data center. However, the explosion of network information is facing severe challenges for SDN controller. The flow storage and lookup mechanisms based on TCAM device have led to the restriction of scalability, high cost and energy consumption. In view of this, a source-controlled data center network (SCDCN) model is proposed herein. The SCDCN model applies a new type of source routing address named the vector address (VA) as the packet-switching label. The VA completely defines the communication path and the data forwarding process can be finished solely relying on VA. There are four advantages in the SCDCN architecture. 1) The model adopts hierarchical multi-controllers and abstracts large-scale data center network into some small network domains that has solved the restriction for the processing ability of single controller and reduced the computational complexity. 2) Vector switches (VS) developed in the core network no longer apply TCAM for table storage and lookup that has significantly cut down the cost and complexity for switches. Meanwhile, the problem of scalability can be solved effectively. 3) The SCDCN model simplifies the establishment process for new flows and there is no need to download flow tables to VS. The amount of control signaling consumed when establishing new flows can be significantly decreased. 4) We design the VS on the NetFPGA platform. The statistical results show that the hardware resource consumption in a VS is about 27% of that in an OFS. PMID:28328925

  19. Center Director Chris Scolese with Sobe Restaurant owners Tony a

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-26

    Center Director Chris Scolese with Sobe Restaurant owners Tony and Josette Simpson and Nichelle Schoultz. Explore@NASAGoddard celebrates the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. All areas of Goddard’s research – Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, and engineering and technology – will be presented, as each discipline plays a critical part in NASA's ongoing journey to reach new heights.

  20. Cultivating Data Expertise and Roles at a National Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    As research becomes more computation and data-intensive, it brings new demands for staff that can manage complex data, design user services, and facilitate open access. Responding to these new demands, universities and research institutions are developing data services to support their scientists and scholarly communities. As more organizations extend their operations to research data, a better understanding of the staff roles and expertise required to support data-intensive research services is needed. What is data expertise - knowledge, skills, and roles? This study addresses this question through a case study of an exemplar research center, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, CO. The NCAR case study results were supplemented and validated with a set of interviews of managers at additional geoscience data centers. To date, 11 interviews with NCAR staff and 19 interviews with managers at supplementary data centers have been completed. Selected preliminary results from the qualitative analysis will be reported in the poster: Data professionals have cultivated expertise in areas such as managing scientific data and products, understanding use and users, harnessing technology for data solutions, and standardizing metadata and data sets. Staff roles and responsibilities have evolved over the years to create new roles for data scientists, data managers/curators, data engineers, and senior managers of data teams, embedding data expertise into each NCAR lab. Explicit career paths and ladders for data professionals are limited but starting to emerge. NCAR has supported organization-wide efforts for data management, leveraging knowledge and best practices across all the labs and their staff. Based on preliminary results, NCAR provides a model for how organizations can build expertise and roles into their data service models. Data collection for this study is ongoing. The author anticipates that the results will help answer questions on what are

  1. Adaptive Role-Play Exercises for a Leader Development Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    OR GRANT NUMBER W91 FD3-06-P-0023 Adaptive Role-Play Exercises for a Leader Development Center 5b. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 665502 6. AUTHOR(S): 5c...PROJECT NUMBER M770 Michael Hertz (Progeny Systems Corporation) 5d. TASK NUMBER 103 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Progeny Systems Corporation 9500 Innovation Drive Manassas, VA 20110 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME

  2. A source-controlled data center network model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Liang, Mangui; Wang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The construction of data center network by applying SDN technology has become a hot research topic. The SDN architecture has innovatively separated the control plane from the data plane which makes the network more software-oriented and agile. Moreover, it provides virtual multi-tenancy, effective scheduling resources and centralized control strategies to meet the demand for cloud computing data center. However, the explosion of network information is facing severe challenges for SDN controller. The flow storage and lookup mechanisms based on TCAM device have led to the restriction of scalability, high cost and energy consumption. In view of this, a source-controlled data center network (SCDCN) model is proposed herein. The SCDCN model applies a new type of source routing address named the vector address (VA) as the packet-switching label. The VA completely defines the communication path and the data forwarding process can be finished solely relying on VA. There are four advantages in the SCDCN architecture. 1) The model adopts hierarchical multi-controllers and abstracts large-scale data center network into some small network domains that has solved the restriction for the processing ability of single controller and reduced the computational complexity. 2) Vector switches (VS) developed in the core network no longer apply TCAM for table storage and lookup that has significantly cut down the cost and complexity for switches. Meanwhile, the problem of scalability can be solved effectively. 3) The SCDCN model simplifies the establishment process for new flows and there is no need to download flow tables to VS. The amount of control signaling consumed when establishing new flows can be significantly decreased. 4) We design the VS on the NetFPGA platform. The statistical results show that the hardware resource consumption in a VS is about 27% of that in an OFS.

  3. Building a personalized medicine infrastructure at a major cancer center.

    PubMed

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Farhangfar, Carol; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B

    2013-05-20

    Our understanding of cancer biology is rapidly increasing, as is the availability and affordability of high throughput technologies for comprehensive molecular characterization of tumors and the individual's own genetic makeup. Thus, the time is right to implement personalized molecular medicine for all patients with cancer. Personalized approaches span the full cancer care spectrum from risk stratification to prevention, screening, therapy, and survivorship programs. Several molecular therapeutics have entered clinical trials creating a huge opportunity to couple genomic markers with this emerging drug tool kit. The number of patients managed in major cancer centers creates a challenge to the implementation of genomic technologies required to successfully deliver on the promise of personalized cancer care. This requires a major investment in infrastructure to facilitate rapid deployment of multiplex, cost-effective, and tissue-sparing assays relevant across multiple tumor lineages in the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) environment. Efforts must be made to ensure that assays are accessible to patients most likely to be enrolled onto molecular-marker-driven trials and that the tests are billable and payable, which will make them accessible to a wide range of patients. As the number of patients and aberrations increase, it will become critical to provide decision support for genomic medicine. Institutional commitment is needed to optimize accessibility and quality of research biopsies and to facilitate novel personalized cancer therapy trials. This article will focus on the challenges and opportunities that accompany the building of infrastructure for personalized cancer therapy.

  4. Building diversity in a complex academic health center.

    PubMed

    South-Paul, Jeannette E; Roth, Loren; Davis, Paula K; Chen, Terence; Roman, Anna; Murrell, Audrey; Pettigrew, Chenits; Castleberry-Singleton, Candi; Schuman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    For 30 years, the many diversity-related health sciences programs targeting the University of Pittsburgh undergraduate campus, school of medicine, schools of the health sciences, clinical practice plan, and medical center were run independently and remained separate within the academic health center (AHC). This lack of coordination hampered their overall effectiveness in promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2007, a group of faculty and administrators from the university and the medical center recognized the need to improve institutional diversity and to better address local health disparities. In this article, the authors describe the process of linking the efforts of these institutions in a way that would be successful locally and applicable to other academic environments. First, they engaged an independent consultant to conduct a study of the AHC's diversity climate, interviewing current and former faculty and trainees to define the problem and identify areas for improvement. Next, they created the Physician Inclusion Council to address the findings of this study and to coordinate future efforts with institutional leaders. Finally, they formed four working committees to address (1) communications and outreach, (2) cultural competency, (3) recruitment, and (4) mentoring and retention. These committees oversaw the strategic development and implementation of all diversity and inclusion efforts. Together these steps led to structural changes within the AHC and the improved allocation of resources that have positioned the University of Pittsburgh to achieve not only diversity but also inclusion and to continue to address the health disparities in the Pittsburgh community.

  5. [Pharmacovigilance center --internal medicine interactions: A useful diagnostic tool].

    PubMed

    Rochoy, M; Gautier, S; Bordet, R; Caron, J; Launay, D; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2015-08-01

    Patients hospitalized in internal medicine often have unexplained clinical symptoms for which a drug origin can be considered. The prevalence of patients hospitalized for iatrogenic is estimated between 4-22%. We wanted to evaluate the diagnostic value of the regional center of pharmacovigilance to identify or confirm an iatrogenic disease in the department of internal medicine of Lille and characterize factors associated with drug-related side effect. This is a single-center prospective diagnostic study. We included all subsequent requests from the department of internal medicine with the Nord-Pas-de-Calais regional pharmacovigilance center between 2010 and 2012. The opinion of the regional pharmacovigilance centre was held on the record of the adverse drug reaction in the national pharmacovigilance database and analyzed according to the conclusion of iatrogenic used by clinicians in internal medicine (reference diagnosis) with a follow-up to June 2013. The variables relating to the patient, medication and adverse events were analyzed by binary logistic regression. We analyzed 160 contacts: 118 concordant cases, 38 false-positives (drug-related side effect retained by the regional pharmacovigilance center only), 4 false negatives. Registration in the national pharmacovigilance database had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI [0.92 to 0.99]), a specificity of 46% (95% CI [0.38 to 0.53]), a value positive predictive of 69% (95% CI [0.62 to 0.76]), a negative predictive value of 89% (95% CI [0.84 to 0.94]) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.1. False-positive had chronological and semiological accountabilities questionable (adjusted RR=2.1, 95% CI [1.2 to 2.8]). In our study, the regional pharmacovigilance center confirms the clinician's suspicion of drug-related side effects and helps to exclude drug-induced with a high negative predictive value. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. A revisionist view of the integrated academic health center.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Judith

    2004-02-01

    Like many academic health centers that had expanded aggressively during the 1990s, the nation's first vertically integrated academic health center, the University of Pennsylvania Health System, was profoundly challenged by the dramatic and unanticipated financial impacts of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The author explains why-although Penn's Health System had lost $300 million over two years and its debts threatened to cause serious financial and educational damage to the rest of the University-Penn chose to manage its way out of the financial crisis (instead of selling or spinning off its four hospitals, clinical practices, and possibly even its medical school). A strategy of comprehensive integration has not only stabilized Penn's Health System financially, but strengthened its position of leadership in medical education, research, and health care delivery. The author argues that a strategy of greater horizontal integration offers important strategic advantages to academic health centers. In an era when major social and scientific problems demand broadly multidisciplinary and highly-integrated approaches, such horizontally integrated institutions will be better able to educate citizens and train physicians, develop new approaches to health care policy, and answer pressing biomedical research questions. Institutional cultural integration is also crucial to create new, innovative organizational structures that bridge traditional disciplinary, school, and clinical boundaries.

  7. Communication technology in trauma centers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Kim, Young-Ju; Gardner, Sharyn D; Faraj, Samer; MacKenzie, Colin F

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between information and communication technology (ICT) and trauma work coordination has long been recognized. The purpose of the study was to investigate the type and frequency of use of various ICTs to activate and organize trauma teams in level I/II trauma centers. In a cross-sectional survey, questionnaires were mailed to trauma directors and clinicians in 457 trauma centers in the United States. Responses were received from 254 directors and 767 clinicians. Communication with pre-hospital care providers was conducted predominantly via shortwave radio (67.3%). The primary communication methods used to reach trauma surgeons were manual (56.7%) and computerized group page (36.6%). Computerized group page (53.7%) and regular telephone (49.8%) were cited as the most advantageous devices; e-mail (52.3%) and dry erase whiteboard (52.1%) were selected as the least advantageous. Attending surgeons preferred less overhead paging and more cellular phone communication than did emergency medicine physicians and nurses. Cellular phones have become an important part of hospital-field communication. In high-volume trauma centers, there is a need for more accurate methods of communicating with field personnel and among hospital care providers.

  8. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  9. Six Sigma and Lean concepts, a case study: patient centered care model for a mammography center.

    PubMed

    Viau, Mark; Southern, Becky

    2007-01-01

    Boca Raton Community Hospital in South Florida decided to increase return while enhancing patient experience and increasing staff morale. They implemented a program to pursue "enterprise excellence" through Six Sigma methodologies. In order to ensure the root causes to delays and rework were addressed, a multigenerational project plan with 3 major components was developed. Step 1: Stabilize; Step 2: Optimize; Step 3: Innovate. By including staff and process owners in the process, they are empowered to think differently about what they do and how they do it. A team that works collaboratively to identify problems and develop solutions can only be a positive to any organization.

  10. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.; Wilson, W.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach. PMID:1336413

  11. A Peer-to-Peer Mentoring Program for In-Center Hemodialysis: A Patient-Centered Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    St Clair Russell, Jennifer; Southerland, Shiree; Huff, Edwin D; Thomson, Maria; Meyer, Klemens B; Lynch, Janet R

    2017-01-01

    A patient-centered quality improvement program implemented in one Virginia hemodialysis facility sought to determine if peer-to-peer (P2P) programs can assist patients on in-center hemodialysis with self-management and improve outcomes. Using a single-arm, repeatedmeasurement, quasi-experimental design, 46 patients participated in a four-month P2P intervention. Outcomes include knowledge, self-management behaviors, and psychosocial health indicators: self-efficacy, perceived social support, hemodialysis social support, and healthrelated quality of life (HRQoL). Physiological health indicators included missed and shortened treatments, arteriovenous fistula placement, interdialytic weight gain, serum phosphorus, and hospitalizations. Mentees demonstrated increased knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived social support, hemodialysis social support, and HRQoL. Missed treatments decreased. Mentors experienced increases in knowledge, self-management, and social support. A P2P mentoring program for in-center hemodialysis can benefit both mentees and mentors. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  12. Advancing the Culture of Teaching on Campus: How a Teaching Center Can Make a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Constance, Ed.; Kaplan, Matthew, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Written by the director and staff of the first, and one of the largest, teaching centers in American higher education--the University of Michigan's Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT)--this book offers a unique perspective on the strategies for making a teaching center integral to an institution's educational mission. It presents a…

  13. Electronic Chemotherapy Order Entry: A Major Cancer Center's Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Sklarin, Nancy T.; Granovsky, Svetlana; O'Reilly, Eileen M.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of a computerized provider order entry system for complex chemotherapy regimens at a large cancer center required intense effort from a multidisciplinary team of clinical and systems experts with experience in all facets of the chemotherapy process. The online tools had to resemble the paper forms used at the time and parallel the successful established process as well as add new functionality. Close collaboration between the institution and the vendor was necessary. This article summarizes the institutional efforts, challenges, and collaborative processes that facilitated universal chemotherapy computerized electronic order entry across multiple sites during a period of several years. PMID:22043182

  14. Electronic Chemotherapy Order Entry: A Major Cancer Center's Implementation.

    PubMed

    Sklarin, Nancy T; Granovsky, Svetlana; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    Implementation of a computerized provider order entry system for complex chemotherapy regimens at a large cancer center required intense effort from a multidisciplinary team of clinical and systems experts with experience in all facets of the chemotherapy process. The online tools had to resemble the paper forms used at the time and parallel the successful established process as well as add new functionality. Close collaboration between the institution and the vendor was necessary. This article summarizes the institutional efforts, challenges, and collaborative processes that facilitated universal chemotherapy computerized electronic order entry across multiple sites during a period of several years.

  15. Implementation of a virtual link between power system testbeds at Marshall Spaceflight Center and Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1990-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) owns and operates a space station module power management and distribution (SSM-PMAD) testbed. This system, managed by expert systems, is used to analyze and develop power system automation techniques for Space Station Freedom. The Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and implemented a space station electrical power system (EPS) testbed. This system and its power management controller are representative of the overall Space Station Freedom power system. A virtual link is being implemented between the testbeds at MSFC and LeRC. This link would enable configuration of SSM-PMAD as a load center for the EPS testbed at LeRC. This connection will add to the versatility of both systems, and provide an environment of enhanced realism for operation of both testbeds.

  16. Facilitating Parent Centers: A Sharing of Ideas and Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Terri; And Others

    This handbook describes the development and operation of family enhancement programs in Parent Centers in Wisconsin. Parent Centers, also called Family Centers, provide opportunities for parents to meet each other and to share concerns, ideas and fun. They can be "legitimate" places for parents to find friends for their children and…

  17. A cryptologic based trust center for medical images.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate practical solutions that can integrate cryptographic techniques and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to improve the security of medical images. DESIGN: The PACS at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center consolidate images and associated data from various scanners into a centralized data archive and transmit them to remote display stations for review and consultation purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model of a digital trust center that integrates cryptographic algorithms and protocols seamlessly into such a digital radiology environment to improve the security of medical images. MEASUREMENTS: The timing performance of encryption, decryption, and transmission of the cryptographic protocols over 81 volumetric PACS datasets has been measured. Lossless data compression is also applied before the encryption. The transmission performance is measured against three types of networks of different bandwidths: narrow-band Integrated Services Digital Network, Ethernet, and OC-3c Asynchronous Transfer Mode. RESULTS: The proposed digital trust center provides a cryptosystem solution to protect the confidentiality and to determine the authenticity of digital images in hospitals. The results of this study indicate that diagnostic images such as x-rays and magnetic resonance images could be routinely encrypted in PACS. However, applying encryption in teleradiology and PACS is a tradeoff between communications performance and security measures. CONCLUSION: Many people are uncertain about how to integrate cryptographic algorithms coherently into existing operations of the clinical enterprise. This paper describes a centralized cryptosystem architecture to ensure image data authenticity in a digital radiology department. The system performance has been evaluated in a hospital-integrated PACS environment. PMID:8930857

  18. A cryptologic based trust center for medical images.

    PubMed

    Wong, S T

    1996-01-01

    To investigate practical solutions that can integrate cryptographic techniques and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to improve the security of medical images. The PACS at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center consolidate images and associated data from various scanners into a centralized data archive and transmit them to remote display stations for review and consultation purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model of a digital trust center that integrates cryptographic algorithms and protocols seamlessly into such a digital radiology environment to improve the security of medical images. The timing performance of encryption, decryption, and transmission of the cryptographic protocols over 81 volumetric PACS datasets has been measured. Lossless data compression is also applied before the encryption. The transmission performance is measured against three types of networks of different bandwidths: narrow-band Integrated Services Digital Network, Ethernet, and OC-3c Asynchronous Transfer Mode. The proposed digital trust center provides a cryptosystem solution to protect the confidentiality and to determine the authenticity of digital images in hospitals. The results of this study indicate that diagnostic images such as x-rays and magnetic resonance images could be routinely encrypted in PACS. However, applying encryption in teleradiology and PACS is a tradeoff between communications performance and security measures. Many people are uncertain about how to integrate cryptographic algorithms coherently into existing operations of the clinical enterprise. This paper describes a centralized cryptosystem architecture to ensure image data authenticity in a digital radiology department. The system performance has been evaluated in a hospital-integrated PACS environment.

  19. Acid-Base Titration Curves of Soils from a Low-Centered Polygon, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jianqiu Zheng; David Graham

    2017-12-05

    This dataset provides pH titration data of soils from a low-centered polygon center. The soil core was collected in 2013 from a low-centered polygon center from the NGEE-Arctic Intensive Study Site 1, Barrow, Alaska.

  20. A Comparative Study of Leadership Characteristics of Virginia Regional Technical Center Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bernard Trey S., III

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify leadership characteristics of technical school principals as perceived by technical center school principals, the superintendents, and the center's Joint Control Board of the regional technical centers of the Commonwealth of Virginia. A regional technical center principal position deals with a different…

  1. System for Centering a Turbofan in a Nacelle During Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.; Thompson, William K.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Shook, Tony D.

    2003-01-01

    A feedback position-control system has been developed for maintaining the concentricity of a turbofan with respect to a nacelle during acoustic and flow tests in a wind tunnel. The system is needed for the following reasons: Thermal and thrust loads can displace the fan relative to the nacelle; In the particular test apparatus (see Figure 1), denoted as a rotor-only nacelle (RAN), the struts, vanes, and other stator components of a turbofan engine that ordinarily maintain the required concentricity in the face of thermal and thrust loads are not present; and The struts and stator components are not present because it is necessary to provide a flow path that is acoustically clean in the sense that the measured noise can be attributed to the fan alone. The system is depicted schematically in Figure 2. The nacelle is supported by two struts attached to a two-axis traverse table located outside the wind-tunnel wall. Two servomotors acting through 100:1 gearboxes drive the table along the Y and Z axes, which are perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The Y and Z components of the deviation from concentricity are measured by four laser displacement sensors mounted on the nacelle and aimed at reflective targets on the center body, which is part of the fan assembly. The outputs of the laser displacement sensors are digitized and processed through a personal computer programmed with control software. The control output of the computer commands the servomotors to move the table as needed to restore concentricity. Numerous software and hardware travel limits and alarms are provided to maximize safety. A highly ablative rub strip in the nacelle minimizes the probability of damage in the event that a deviation from concentricity exceeds the radial clearance [<0.004 in. (<0.1 mm)] between the inner surface of the nacelle and the tips of the fan blades. To be able to prevent an excursion in excess of the tip clearance, the system must be accurate enough to control X and Y

  2. Wings: A New Paradigm in Human-Centered Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.

    1997-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents/incidents investigations cite crew error as a causal factor (Boeing Commercial Airplane Group 1996). Human factors experts suggest that crew error has many underlying causes and should be the start of an accident investigation and not the end. One of those causes, the flight deck design, is correctable. If a flight deck design does not accommodate the human's unique abilities and deficits, crew error may simply be the manifestation of this mismatch. Pilots repeatedly report that they are "behind the aircraft" , i.e., they do not know what the automated aircraft is doing or how the aircraft is doing it until after the fact. Billings (1991) promotes the concept of "human-centered automation"; calling on designers to allocate appropriate control and information to the human. However, there is much ambiguity regarding what it mean's to be human-centered. What often are labeled as "human-centered designs" are actually designs where a human factors expert has been involved in the design process or designs where tests have shown that humans can operate them. While such designs may be excellent, they do not represent designs that are systematically produced according to some set of prescribed methods and procedures. This paper describes a design concept, called Wings, that offers a clearer definition for human-centered design. This new design concept is radically different from current design processes in that the design begins with the human and uses the human body as a metaphor for designing the aircraft. This is not because the human is the most important part of the aircraft (certainly the aircraft would be useless without lift and thrust), but because he is the least understood, the least programmable, and one of the more critical elements. The Wings design concept has three properties: a reversal in the design process, from aerodynamics-, structures-, and propulsion-centered to truly human-centered; a design metaphor that guides function

  3. NASA CORE - A Worldwide Distribution Center for Educational Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser-Holscott, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Lorain County Joint Vocational School District (JVS) administers NASA's Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE) for the purpose of: A. Operating a mail order service to supply educators around the world with NASA's educational materials; B. Servicing NASA Education Programs/Projects with NASA's educational materials; C. Supporting the NASA Educator Resource Center Network with technology resources for the next generation of ERC. D. Support NASA's mission to inspire the next generation of explorers...as only NASA can; E. Inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This is accomplished by the continued operation of a central site that educators can contact to obtain information about NASA educational programs and research; obtain NASA educational publications and media; and receive technical support for NASA multimedia materials. In addition CORE coordinates the efforts of the 67 NASA Educator Resource Centers to establish a more effective network to serve educators. CORE directly supports part of NASA's core mission, To Inspire the Next Generation of Explorers.as only NASA can. CORE inspires and motivates students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics by providing educators with exciting and NASA-unique educational material to enhance the students' learning experience. CORE is located at the Lorain County Joint Vocational School (JVS) in Oberlin, Ohio. Students at the JVS assist with the daily operations of CORE. This assistance provides the students with valuable vocational training opportunities and helps the JVS reduce the amount of funding needed to operate CORE. CORE has vast experience in the dissemination of NASA educational materials as well as a network of NASA Education Resource Centers who distribute NASA materials to secondary and post-secondary schools and universities, informal educators, and other interested individuals and

  4. A Proposed Approach for Prioritizing Maintenance at NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Sawyer, Melvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) manages a vast array of infrastructure assets across ten National Centers with a worth of at least 30 billion dollars. Eighty percent of this infrastructure is greater than 40 years old and is in degraded condition. Maintenance budgets are typically less than one percent of current replacement value (CRV), much less than the 2-4% recommended by the National Research Council. The maintenance backlog was 2.55 billion dollars in FY10 and growing. NASA s annual budgets have flattened and are at risk of being reduced, so the problem is becoming even more difficult. NASA Centers utilize various means to prioritize and accomplish maintenance within available budgets, though data is suspect and processes are variable. This paper offers a structured means to prioritize maintenance based on mission criticality and facility performance (ability of the facility to deliver on its purpose). Mission alignment is assessed using the current timeframe Mission Dependence Index and a measure of facility alignment with the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan for the long-term perspective. Facility performance is assessed by combining specific findings from a structured facility condition assessment and an assessment of actual functional output. These are then combined in a matrix to identify the facilities most critical to mission and able to deliver services. The purpose of this approach is to provide the best benefits for the available funding. Additionally, this rationale can also be applied to the prioritization of investment (recapitalization) projects so that the ultimate customers of this paper, the senior infrastructure managers at each NASA Center, are better able to strategically manage their capabilities.

  5. Vasopressor use following traumatic injury - A single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hylands, Mathieu; Godbout, Marie-Pier; Mayer, Sandeep K; Fraser, William D; Vanasse, Alain; Leclair, Marc-André; Turgeon, Alexis F; Lauzier, François; Charbonney, Emmanuel; Trottier, Vincent; Razek, Tarek S; Roy, André; D'Aragon, Frédérick; Belley-Côté, Emilie; Day, Andrew G; Le Guillan, Soazig; Sabbagh, Robert; Lamontagne, François

    2017-01-01

    Vasopressors are not recommended by current trauma guidelines, but recent reports indicate that they are commonly used. We aimed to describe the early hemodynamic management of trauma patients outside densely populated urban centers. We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study in a Canadian regional trauma center. All adult patients treated for traumatic injury in 2013 who died within 24 hours of admission or were transferred to the intensive care unit were included. A systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, a mean arterial pressure <60 mmHg, the use of vasopressors or ≥2 L of intravenous fluids defined hemodynamic instability. Main outcome measures were use of intravenous fluids and vasopressors prior to surgical or endovascular management. Of 111 eligible patients, 63 met our criteria for hemodynamic instability. Of these, 60 (95%) had sustained blunt injury and 22 (35%) had concomitant severe traumatic brain injury. The subgroup of patients referred from a primary or secondary hospital (20 of 63, 32%) had significantly longer transport times (243 vs. 61 min, p<0.01). Vasopressors, used in 26 patients (41%), were independently associated with severe traumatic brain injury (odds ratio 10.2, 95% CI 2.7-38.5). In this cohort, most trauma patients had suffered multiple blunt injuries. Patients were likely to receive vasopressors during the early phase of trauma care, particularly if they exhibited signs of neurologic injury. While these results may be context-specific, determining the risk-benefit trade-offs of fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and permissive hypotension in specific patients subgroups constitutes a priority for trauma research going forwards.

  6. Organizing a Successful Family Center in Your School. A Resource Guide. Revised 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This booklet was developed to help school staff members, parents, and community leaders understand how family centers can promote family participation and strengthen their schools. It also serves as a guide to establishing family centers. The term, family center, is used throughout this booklet, although many schools prefer to call their center…

  7. A Cauldron of Stars at the Galaxy's Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This dazzling infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows hundreds of thousands of stars crowded into the swirling core of our spiral Milky Way galaxy. In visible-light pictures, this region cannot be seen at all because dust lying between Earth and the galactic center blocks our view.

    In this false-color picture, old and cool stars are blue, while dust features lit up by blazing hot, massive stars are shown in a reddish hue. Both bright and dark filamentary clouds can be seen, many of which harbor stellar nurseries. The plane of the Milky Way's flat disk is apparent as the main, horizontal band of clouds. The brightest white spot in the middle is the very center of the galaxy, which also marks the site of a supermassive black hole.

    The region pictured here is immense, with a horizontal span of 890 light-years and a vertical span of 640 light-years. Earth is located 26,000 light-years away, out in one of the Milky Way's spiral arms. Though most of the objects seen in this image are located at the galactic center, the features above and below the galactic plane tend to lie closer to Earth.

    Scientists are intrigued by the giant lobes of dust extending away from the plane of the galaxy. They believe the lobes may have been formed by winds from massive stars.

    This image is a mosaic of thousands of short exposures taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). The entire region was imaged in less than 16 hours.

  8. Romanian Data Center: A modern way for seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagoe, Cristian; Marius Manea, Liviu; Ionescu, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    The main seismic survey of Romania is performed by the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) which operates a real-time digital seismic network. The NIEP real-time network currently consists of 102 stations and two seismic arrays equipped with different high quality digitizers (Kinemetrics K2, Quanterra Q330, Quanterra Q330HR, PS6-26, Basalt), broadband and short period seismometers (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T,STS2, SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, gs21, Mark l22) and acceleration sensors (Episensor Kinemetrics). The data are transmitted at the National Data Center (NDC) and Eforie Nord (EFOR) Seismic Observatory. EFOR is the back-up for the NDC and also a monitoring center for the Black Sea tsunami events. NIEP is a data acquisition node for the seismic network of Moldova (FDSN code MD) composed of five seismic stations. NIEP has installed in the northern part of Bulgaria eight seismic stations equipped with broadband sensors and Episensors and nine accelerometers (Episensors) installed in nine districts along the Danube River. All the data are acquired at NIEP for Early Warning System and for primary estimation of the earthquake parameters. The real-time acquisition (RT) and data exchange is done by Antelope software and Seedlink (from Seiscomp3). The real-time data communication is ensured by different types of transmission: GPRS, satellite, radio, Internet and a dedicated line provided by a governmental network. For data processing and analysis at the two data centers Antelope 5.2 TM is being used running on 3 workstations: one from a CentOS platform and two on MacOS. Also a Seiscomp3 server stands as back-up for Antelope 5.2 Both acquisition and analysis of seismic data systems produce information about local and global parameters of earthquakes. In addition, Antelope is used for manual processing (event association, calculation of magnitude, creating a database, sending seismic bulletins, calculation of PGA and PGV, etc.), generating

  9. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla

    2018-05-23

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  10. A future perspective on technological obsolescenceat NASA, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The present research effort was the first phase of a study to forecast whether technological obsolescence will be a problem for the engineers, scientists, and technicians at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). There were four goals of the research: to review the literature on technological obsolescence; to determine through interviews of division chiefs and branch heads Langley's perspective on future technological obsolescence; to begin making contacts with outside industries to find out how they view the possibility of technological obsolescence; and to make preliminary recommendations for dealing with the problem. A complete description of the findings of this research can be reviewed in a technical report in preparation. The following are a small subset of the key findings of the study: NASA's centers and divisions vary in their missions and because of this, in their capability to control obsolescence; research-oriented organizations within NASA are believed by respondents to keep up to date more than the project-oriented organizations; asked what are the signs of a professional's technological obsolescence, respondents had a variety of responses; top performing scientists were viewed as continuous learners, keeping up to date by a variety of means; when asked what incentives were available to aerospace technologists for keeping up to data, respondents specified a number of ideas; respondents identified many obstacles to professionals' keeping up to date in the future; and most respondents expressed some concern for the future of the professionals at NASA vis a vis the issue of professional obsolescence.

  11. A phenomenological investigation of science center exhibition developers' expertise development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Denise L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the exhibition developer role in the context of United States (U.S.) science centers, and more specifically, to investigate the way science center exhibition developers build their professional expertise. This research investigated how successfully practicing exhibition developers described their current practices, how they learned to be exhibition developers, and what factors were the most important to the developers in building their professional expertise. Qualitative data was gathered from 10 currently practicing exhibition developers from three science centers: the Exploratorium, San Francisco, California; the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois; and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. In-depth, semistructured interviews were used to collect the data. The study embraced aspects of the phenomenological tradition and sought to derive a holistic understanding of the position and how expertise was built for it. The data were methodically coded and organized into themes prior to analysis. The data analysis found that the position consisted of numerous and varied activities, but the developers' primary roles were advocating for the visitor, storytelling, and mediating information and ideas. They conducted these activities in the context of a team and relied on an established exhibition planning process to guide their work. Developers described a process of learning exhibition development that was experiential in nature. Learning through daily practice was key, though they also consulted with mentors and relied on visitor studies to gauge the effectiveness of their work. They were adept at integrating prior knowledge gained from many aspects of their lives into their practice. The developers described several internal factors that contributed to their expertise development including the desire to help others, a natural curiosity about the world, a commitment to learning, and the ability to accept critique. They

  12. National Space Science Data Center and World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites - Ionospheric data holdings and services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.; King, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The activities and services of the National Space Science data Center (NSSDC) and the World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites (WDC-A-R and S) are described with special emphasis on ionospheric physics. The present catalog/archive system is explained and future developments are indicated. In addition to the basic data acquisition, archiving, and dissemination functions, ongoing activities include the Central Online Data Directory (CODD), the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshopps (CDAW), the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN), advanced data management systems (CD/DIS, NCDS, PLDS), and publication of the NSSDC News, the SPACEWARN Bulletin, and several NSSD reports.

  13. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Rietschel, Carly Hunt

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology…

  15. [Attendance at a health center by clandestine prostitutes in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Philippon, M; Saada, M; Kamil, M A; Houmed, H M

    1997-01-01

    The extent of clandestine prostitution in Djibouti is difficult to evaluate. Due to the secrecy of the prostitutes and often their low level of education, the follow-up of these patients is also difficult. A sexually transmitted disease clinic specialized in the treatment of prostitutes and their customers has been established in Djibouti since 1963. We tried to evaluate the available data on the clandestine prostitutes attendance at the center. The population was young with a mean age of 23 years. Fifty percent had children and 60% were divorced or separated. Ninety-one percent were Ethiopian and 73% lived in the same district of the city of Djibouti. Almost half of them were HIV positive. The duration of residence in Djibouti before the first visit to the clinic varied widely with a median of 12 months. However, the total duration of prostitution before the first visit was shorter with a median of 3 months. The complaint at the first visit was most often minor. Among the prostitutes who first came to the center in 1993, half of them came only once. The overall duration of follow-up was 8 months, for an average of 3.7 visits per patient. Alternatively, 20 patients had more than 10 consultations and this represented one third of the consultations given to previous patients. This last group is the only one which tended to respect the monthly visits proposed to each patient at the first consultation. The other patients seemed to come only when they felt ill. The routine statistical activities which separately counted the new and previous patients gave an optimistic but faulty impression: these showed an increase in the total number of patients and also an increase in the percentage of previous patients visiting (from 42 to 69% between 1988 and 1994). It is difficult to evaluate the follow-up of such a mobile population. The few patients known for their fidelity contrasted with the fact that half of the patients had visited the center only once. This low frequency of

  16. Double Star Research: A Student-Centered Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jolyon

    2016-06-01

    Project and team-based pedagogies are increasingly augmenting lecture-style science classrooms. Occasionally, university professors will invite students to tangentially partcipate in their research. Since 2006, Dr. Russ Genet has led an astronomy research seminar for community college and high school students that allows participants to work closely with a melange of professional and advanced amatuer researchers. The vast majority of topics have centered on measuring the position angles and searations of double stars which can be readily published in the Journal of Double Star Observations. In the intervening years, a collaborative community of practice (Wenger, 1998) formed with the students as lead researchers on their projects with the guidance of experienced astronomers and educators. The students who join the research seminar are often well prepared for further STEM education in college and career. Today, the research seminar involves multile schools in multiple states with a volunteer educator acting as an assistant instructor at each location. These assistant instructors interface with remote observatories, ensure progress is made, and recruit students. The key deliverables from each student team include a published research paper and a public presentation online or in-person. Citing a published paper on scholarship and college applications gives students' educational carreers a boost. Recently the Journal of Double Star Observations published its first special issue of exlusively student-centered research.

  17. A nursing-centered treatment team in inpatient medical psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Jones, R; Quarles, E; Danielle, J

    1999-04-01

    1. Nurses have the most extensive direct contact with their patients, yet in the traditional physician-centered model, they are often excluded from decision making. We have developed a new model of patient care with the nurse as the primary therapist and contact person, as well as the individual who cares for each patient's physical needs. 2. Out team approach improves efficiency, integration of care, and staff unity, which can be especially helpful for patients with personality disorders. 3. Patients appreciate the approach and are better able to increase focus on treatment when the physicians are not present in the ward.

  18. Epidemiology and control of enterobiasis in a developmental center

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Crinella, Francis M; Lohiya, Sonia

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine if enterobiasis could be controlled in a developmental center. Design Population-based study. Annual screening of all residents by perianal swabs for enterobiasis and on admission or discharge. Treatment of infected residents and their contacts with mebendazole, 100 mg orally, with two doses given 14 days apart. Main outcome measures The number of residents with enterobiasis and the cost of the program. Results The prevalence of enterobiasis fell rapidly and progressively, from 21% before mass medication to 1% after 3 years. Conclusion Mass medication of residents with enterobiasis and their contacts was beneficial, harmless, and cost effective. PMID:10832422

  19. Are we living near the center of a local void?

    SciTech Connect

    Cusin, Giulia; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: giulia.cusin@unige.ch, E-mail: pitrou@iap.fr, E-mail: uzan@iap.fr

    The properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarisation anisotropies measured by a static, off-centered observer located in a local spherically symmetric void, are described. In particular in this paper we compute, together with the standard 2-point angular correlation functions, the off-diagonal correlators, which are no more vanishing by symmetry. While the energy shift induced by the off-centered position of the observer can be suppressed by a proper choice of the observer velocity, a lensing-like effect on the CMB emission point remains. This latter effect is genuinely geometrical (e.g. non-degenerate with a boost) and reflects in the structuremore » of the off-diagonal correlators. At lowest order in this effect, the temperature and polarisation correlation matrices have non-vanishing diagonal elements, as usual, and all the off-diagonal terms are excited. This particular signature of a local void model allows one, in principle, to disentangle geometrical effects from local kinematical ones in CMB observations.« less

  20. [Fetal bradycardia: a retrospective study in 9 Spanish centers].

    PubMed

    Perin, F; Rodríguez Vázquez del Rey, M M; Deiros Bronte, L; Ferrer Menduiña, Q; Rueda Nuñez, F; Zabala Arguelles, J I; García de la Calzada, D; Teodoro Marin, S; Centeno Malfaz, F; Galindo Izquierdo, A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current management and outcomes of fetal bradycardia in 9 Spanish centers. Retrospective multicenter study: analysis of all fetuses with bradycardia diagnosed between January 2008 and September 2010. Underlying mechanisms of fetal bradyarrhythmias were studied with echocardiography. A total of 37 cases were registered: 3 sinus bradycardia, 15 blocked atrial bigeminy, and 19 high grade atrioventricular blocks. Sinus bradycardia: 3 cases (100%) were associated with serious diseases. Blocked atrial bigeminy had an excellent outcome, except for one case with post-natal tachyarrhythmia. Of the atrioventricular blocks, 16% were related to congenital heart defects with isomerism, 63% related to the presence of maternal SSA/Ro antibodies, and 21% had unclear etiology. Overall mortality was 20% (37%, if terminations of pregnancy are taken into account). Risk factors for mortality were congenital heart disease, hydrops and/or ventricular dysfunction. Management strategies differed among centers. Steroids were administrated in 73% of immune-mediated atrioventricular blocks, including the only immune-mediated IInd grade block. More than half (58%) of atrioventricular blocks had a pacemaker implanted in a follow-up of 18 months. Sustained fetal bradycardia requires a comprehensive study in all cases, including those with sinus bradycardia. Blocked atrial bigeminy has a good prognosis, but tachyarrhythmias may develop. Heart block has significant mortality and morbidity rates, and its management is still highly controversial. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. [Drug information management through the intranet of a hospital center].

    PubMed

    Juárez Giménez, J C; Mendarte Barrenechea, L; Gil Luján, G; Sala Piñol, F; Lalueza Broto, P; Girona Brumós, L; Monterde Junyent, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used for the implementation and validation of a network resource incorporated to the intranet of the Hospital, in order to retain and disseminate information from the Drug Information Center (DIC) of a pharmacy service in a hospital center. A working group designed the structure, contents, memory needs, priority of access for users and a quality assessment questionnaire. The resource developed by the working group had a capacity of 70 Gb and its structure was based on HTML documents, including files with different format and 12 theme areas. Two levels of priority of access were established depending on the user and two persons were in charge of the resource. The questionnaire was delivered after three months of use. Sixty nine per cent of the users regarded the resource as very useful and 31%, as useful. The final structure, according to the results of the survey, had 11 theme areas. The use of the hospital Intranet in order to include and organize DIC information can be very simple and economic. Furthermore, the involvement of all the users in its design and structure can facilitate the practical use of this tool and improve its quality.

  2. The Center for Collegiate Mental Health: An Example of a Practice-Research Network in University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a model of a practice-research network that offers benefits for clinicians working at college and university counseling centers. We briefly describe the basic components of this practice-research network, challenges in developing it, and some of the empirical studies that have resulted from this initiative. We also describe…

  3. Rapid-Response Parenting Intervention in Diagnostic Centers as a Patient-Centered Innovation for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillin, Stephen Edward; Bultas, Margaret W.; Wilmott, Jennifer; Grafeman, Sarah; Zand, Debra H.

    2015-01-01

    Parents of children newly diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders are a high-need population for whom skills-based parenting interventions likely help. Diagnostic centers are compelling locations to deliver parenting interventions because families are served in an accessible location and at a time they receive overwhelming treatment…

  4. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship over time. METHODS Informed by complexity theory and relational theories of organizational learning, we built on discoveries from the American Academy of Family Physicians’ National Demonstration Project (NDP) and 15 years of research to understand and improve primary care practice. RESULTS Primary care practices can fruitfully be understood as complex adaptive systems consisting of a core (a practice’s key resources, organizational structure, and functional processes), adaptive reserve (practice features that enhance resilience, such as relationships), and attentiveness to the local environment. The effectiveness of these attributes represents the practice’s internal capability. With adequate motivation, healthy, thriving practices advance along a pathway of slow, continuous developmental change with occasional rapid periods of transformation as they evolve better fits with their environment. Practice development is enhanced through systematically using strategies that involve setting direction and boundaries, implementing sensing systems, focusing on creative tensions, and fostering learning conversations. CONCLUSIONS Successful practice development begins with changes that strengthen practices’ core, build adaptive reserve, and expand attentiveness to the local environment. Development progresses toward transformation through enhancing primary care attributes. PMID:20530396

  5. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  6. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  7. Clinical spectrum of hypopituitarism in India: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gundgurthi, Abhay; Garg, M. K.; Bhardwaj, Reena; Brar, Karninder S.; Kharb, Sandeep; Pandit, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: There is paucity of information regarding clinical profile of hypopituitarism from India. We report the clinical profile of hypopituitarism from a tertiary center in North India. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in patients attending our endocrine center between January 2010 and December 2011. All new patients were studied prospectively and those registered before January 2010 retrospectively. Relevant clinical, hormonal, and imaging data were collected. Dynamic testing for pituitary functions was carried out as necessary. Hormonal deficiencies were defined as per prevailing recommendations. Results: This study included 113 subjects. The mean age was 38.6 ± 17.8 years (range, 4 – 76 years). There were 78 (69%) males and 35 females (31%). There were 22 subjects aged ≤18 years (childhood and adolescence) and 91 adults (>18 years). Visual disturbances were the most common presenting complaint (33%), though headache was the most common symptom (81%). Fifteen percent presented with pituitary apoplexy. Tumors comprised of 84% of cases. Hypogonadism (97%) was the most common abnormality seen followed by hypothyroidism (83.2%), hypoadrenalism (79.6%), growth hormone deficiency (88.1% of the 42 patients tested), and diabetes insipidus (13.3%). Panhypopituitarism was seen in 104 (92%) patients. There were no cases of hypopituitarism secondary to traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, central nervous system infections, or cranial irradiation to extrasellar tumors. Conclusion: The most common cause of hypopituitarism at tertiary care center is pituitary tumors and the commonest presenting complaint is visual symptoms. Panhypopituitarism is present in 92% cases. PMID:23087868

  8. An Intercenter Comparison of Nasolabial Appearance Including a Center Using Nasoalveolar Molding.

    PubMed

    Peanchitlertkajorn, Supakit; Mercado, Ana; Daskalogiannakis, John; Hathaway, Ronald; Russell, Kathleen; Semb, Gunvor; Shaw, William; Lamichane, Manish; Cohen, Marilyn; Long, Ross E

    2018-05-01

    To compare nasolabial appearance outcomes of patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP) in preadolescence from 4 cleft centers including a center using nasoalveolar molding (NAM) and primary nasal reconstruction. Retrospective cohort study. Four cleft centers in North America. 135 subjects with repaired CUCLP. Frontal and profile facial pictures were assessed using the Asher-McDade rating scale. Intra- and interrater reliability were tested using weighted Kappa statistics. Median scores by center were compared with Kruskal-Wallis statistics. Intrarater reliability scores were moderate to good. Interrater reliability scores were moderate. Significant differences ( P < .05) among centers were found. For nasal form, center G (median = 2.83) had better scores than centers C and D (C median = 3.33, D median = 3.17). For nose symmetry, center G had better scores (median = 2.33) than all other centers (B median = 2.67, C median = 2.83, D median = 2.83). For vermillion border, center G had better scores (median = 2.58) than centers B and C (B median = 3.17, C median = 3.17). For nasolabial profile, center G (median score = 2.67) had better scores than center C (median = 3.00). For total nasolabial score, center G (median = 2.67) had better scores than all other centers (B median = 2.83, C median = 3, D median = 2.83). The protocol followed by center G, the only center that performed NAM and primary nasal reconstruction, produced better results in all categories when compared to center C, the only center that did not perform presurgical orthopedics or lip/nose revisions. When compared to centers that performed traditional presurgical orthopedics and surgical revisions (B and D), center G was not consistently better in all categories. As with other uncontrolled, retrospective intercenter studies, it is not possible to attribute the outcomes to a specific protocol component.

  9. MCPB.py: A Python Based Metal Center Parameter Builder.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2016-04-25

    MCPB.py, a python based metal center parameter builder, has been developed to build force fields for the simulation of metal complexes employing the bonded model approach. It has an optimized code structure, with far fewer required steps than the previous developed MCPB program. It supports various AMBER force fields and more than 80 metal ions. A series of parametrization schemes to derive force constants and charge parameters are available within the program. We give two examples (one metalloprotein example and one organometallic compound example), indicating the program's ability to build reliable force fields for different metal ion containing complexes. The original version was released with AmberTools15. It is provided via the GNU General Public License v3.0 (GNU_GPL_v3) agreement and is free to download and distribute. MCPB.py provides a bridge between quantum mechanical calculations and molecular dynamics simulation software packages thereby enabling the modeling of metal ion centers. It offers an entry into simulating metal ions in a number of situations by providing an efficient way for researchers to handle the vagaries and difficulties associated with metal ion modeling.

  10. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  11. Oxygen Activation at Mononuclear Nonheme Iron Centers: A Superoxo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Chakraborti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K.; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron-oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon dioxygen activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron-superoxo and iron-peroxo species. While iron(IV)-oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(TpiPr2)FeII(O2CC(O)CH3)], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV)-oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles the iron(III)-superoxo species can play in the course of dioxygen activation at a nonheme iron center. PMID:20380464

  12. Oxygen activation at mononuclear nonheme iron centers: a superoxo perspective.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-04-19

    Dioxygen (O(2)) activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon O(2) activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron superoxo and iron peroxo species. While iron(IV) oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III) superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(Tp(iPr2))Fe(II)(O(2)CC(O)CH(3))], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III) superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV) oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles that the iron(III) superoxo species can play in the course of O(2) activation at a nonheme iron center.

  13. Experiential Education at a University-based Wellness Center

    PubMed Central

    Berdine, Hildegarde

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To enhance students' learning and confidence in their abilities to provide wellness screenings and disease counseling. Design An experiential rotation was implemented in January 2004 within the Center for Pharmacy Care, a pharmacist-coordinated, University-based wellness center that offers preventive health screenings, risk assessments, patient education, medication and lifestyle counseling, educational seminars, and referral for common health conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes and osteoporosis. Assessment A brief survey instrument consisting of both open-ended questions and ratings of perceived abilities and confidence to provide screening and counseling was administered to students prior to and upon completion of the experience. Results of the survey indicate that the experience significantly enhanced students' preparedness and confidence to conduct community-based wellness screenings. Conclusion Students gained confidence in implementing and conducting wellness programs and became motivated to incorporate such programs into their future practice. This experience can serve as a teaching model for other programs to achieve student conpetencies in helath promotion and disease prevention. PMID:17619649

  14. A Guide to the Data Resources of the Henry A. Murray Research Center of Radcliffe College: A Center for the Study of Lives [and] Index to [the] Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe Coll., Cambridge, MA. Henry A. Murray Research Center.

    The first of two volumes provides information about data resources available at the Henry A. Murray Research Center of Radcliffe College, a multidisciplinary research center that is a national repository for social and behavioral science data on human development and social change; topics of special concern to women are collection priorities. The…

  15. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. Integrating Mental Health in Schools: Schools, School-Based Centers, and Community Programs Working Together. A Center Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This paper explores why integrated efforts to include mental health in schools are important and what is involved in such an effort. In order to deal with the full continuum of school mental health concerns, a comprehensive, integrated approach is required.. To be comprehensive, the mental health focus of school based centers must be multifaceted…

  17. Cognitive Task Analysis and Work-Centered Support System Recommendations for a Deployed Network Operations Support Center (NOSC-D)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) of the deployed Network Operations Support Center (NOSC-D), and the...conducted Cognitive Task Analysis interviews with four (4) NOSC-D personnel. Because of the preliminary nature of the finding, the analysis is

  18. Growth of a Science Center: The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CESAME) at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafney, Leo; Bynum, R. David; Sheppard, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the origin and development of CESAME (The Center for Science and Mathematics Education) at Stony Brook University. The analysis identifies key ingredients in areas of personnel, funding, organizational structures, educational priorities, collaboration, and institutionalization. After a discussion of relevant issues in…

  19. The surgical residency interview: a candidate-centered, working approach.

    PubMed

    Seabott, Heather; Smith, Ryan K; Alseidi, Adnan; Thirlby, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    The interview process is a pivotal, differentiating component of the residency match. Our bias is toward a working interview, producing better fulfillment of the needs of both parties, and a more informed match selection for the candidates and program. We describe a "candidate-centered" approach for integrating applicant interviews into our daily work schedule. Applicants are informed upon accepting the interview of the working interview model. Our program offers 33 interview days over a 12-week period. A maximum of 5 applicants are hosted per day. Applicants are assigned to 1 of our general, thoracic, vascular, or plastic surgery teams. The interview day begins with the applicant changing into scrubs, attending a morning conference, and taking part in a program overview by a Chief Resident. Applicants join their host team where 4-8 hours are spent observing the operative team, on rounds and sharing lunch. The faculty and senior residents are responsible for interviewing and evaluating applicants though the Electronic Residency Application Service. A total of 13 surgeons are involved in the interview process resulting in broad-based evaluations. Each surgeon interviewed between 3 and 12 applicants. Faculty rate this interview approach highly because it allows them to maintain a rigorous operative schedule while interacting with applicants. Current residents are engaged in welcoming applicants to view the program. Faculty and residents believe cooperating in a real world manner aids their assessment of the applicant. Applicants routinely provide positive feedback, relaying this approach is informative, transparent, and should be the "standard." Applicants believe they are presented a realistic view of the program. Ultimately, this candidate-centered process may be attributable to our resident cohort who exhibit high satisfaction, excellent resident morale, and very low dropout rate. We present a candidate-centered, working interview approach used in the selection of

  20. Campus Health Centers' Lack of Information Regarding Providers: A Content Analysis of Division-I Campus Health Centers' Provider Websites.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Evan K

    2018-07-01

    Campus health centers are a convenient, and usually affordable, location for college students to obtain health care. Staffed by licensed and trained professionals, these providers can generally offer similar levels of care that providers at off-campus clinics can deliver. Yet, previous research finds students may forgo this convenient, on-campus option partially because of a lack of knowledge regarding the quality of providers at these campus clinics. This study sought to examine where this information deficit may come from by analyzing campus health centers' online provider information. All Division-I colleges or universities with an on-campus health center, which had information on their websites about their providers (n = 294), had their providers' online information analyzed (n = 2,127 providers). Results revealed that schools commonly offer professional information (e.g., provider specialties, education), but very little about their providers outside of the medical context (e.g., hobbies) that would allow a prospective student patient to more easily relate. While 181 different kinds of credentials were provided next to providers' names (e.g., MD, PA-C, FNP-BC), only nine schools offered information to help students understand what these different credentials meant. Most schools had information about their providers within one-click of the homepage. Recommendations for improving online information about campus health center providers are offered.

  1. A static data flow simulation study at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Howard, Lauri S.

    1987-01-01

    Demands in computational power, particularly in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), led NASA Ames Research Center to study advanced computer architectures. One architecture being studied is the static data flow architecture based on research done by Jack B. Dennis at MIT. To improve understanding of this architecture, a static data flow simulator, written in Pascal, has been implemented for use on a Cray X-MP/48. A matrix multiply and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT), two algorithms used in CFD work at Ames, have been run on the simulator. Execution times can vary by a factor of more than 2 depending on the partitioning method used to assign instructions to processing elements. Service time for matching tokens has proved to be a major bottleneck. Loop control and array address calculation overhead can double the execution time. The best sustained MFLOPS rates were less than 50% of the maximum capability of the machine.

  2. Democracy Through Learner-Centered Education: a Turkish Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Kaya

    2009-01-01

    Aimed at documenting the problems and constraints confronting learner-centered instruction in Turkey, this article first explains the link between democracy and education and the role of learner-centered instruction in realizing democratic ends. By drawing on John Dewey's ideas and Turkish scholars' perspectives on Turkish education, the article then presents the problems and constraints that pose threats to the implementation of learner-centered instruction in Turkey. The author also explains the problems within the Turkish educational system and teacher education programmes, and the challenges that in-service teachers and students may experience with learner-centered instruction.

  3. Barriers and facilitators to implementing a patient-centered model of contraceptive provision in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Politi, Mary C; Estlund, Amy; Milne, Anne; Buckel, Christina M; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Madden, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    The Contraceptive CHOICE Project developed a patient-centered model for contraceptive provision including: (1) structured, evidence-based counseling; (2) staff and health care provider education; and (3) removal of barriers such as cost and multiple appointments to initiate contraception. In preparation for conducting a research study of the CHOICE model in three community health settings, we sought to identify potential barriers and facilitators to implementation. Using a semi-structured interview guide guided by a framework of implementation research, we conducted 31 qualitative interviews with female patients, staff, and health care providers assessing attitudes, beliefs, and barriers to receiving contraception. We also asked about current contraceptive provision and explored organizational practices relevant to implementing the CHOICE model. We used a grounded theory approach to identify major themes. Many participants felt that current contraceptive provision could be improved by the CHOICE model. Potential facilitators included agreement about the necessity for improved contraceptive knowledge among patients and staff; importance of patient-centered contraceptive counseling; and benefits to same-day insertion of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Potential barriers included misconceptions about contraception held by staff and providers; resistance to new practices; costs associated with LARC; and scheduling challenges required for same-day insertion of LARC. In addition to staff and provider training, implementing a patient-centered model of contraceptive provision needs to be supplemented by strategies to manage patient and system-level barriers. Community health center staff, providers, and patients support patient-centered contraceptive counseling to improve contraception provision if organizations can address these barriers.

  4. Chronic gastritis in China: a national multi-center survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic gastritis is one of the most common findings at upper endoscopy in the general population, and chronic atrophic gastritis is epidemiologically associated with the occurrence of gastric cancer. However, the current status of diagnosis and treatment of chronic gastritis in China is unclear. Methods A multi-center national study was performed; all patients who underwent diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms from 33 centers were enrolled. Data including sex, age, symptoms and endoscopic findings were prospectively recorded. Results Totally 8892 patients were included. At endoscopy, 4389, 3760 and 1573 patients were diagnosed to have superficial gastritis, erosive gastritis, and atrophic gastritis, respectively. After pathologic examination, it is found that atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia were prevalent, which accounted for 25.8%, 23.6% and 7.3% of this patient population. Endoscopic features were useful for predicting pathologic atrophy (PLR = 4.78), but it was not useful for predicting erosive gastritis. Mucosal-protective agents and PPI were most commonly used medications for chronic gastritis. Conclusions The present study suggests non-atrophic gastritis is the most common endoscopic finding in Chinese patients with upper GI symptoms. Precancerous lesions, including atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia are prevalent in Chinese patients with chronic gastritis, and endoscopic features are useful for predicting pathologic atrophy. PMID:24502423

  5. Chronic gastritis in China: a national multi-center survey.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiqi; Bai, Yu; Xie, Pei; Fang, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaozhong; Hou, Xiaohua; Tian, Dean; Wang, Chengdang; Liu, Yandi; Sha, Weihong; Wang, Bangmao; Li, Yanqing; Zhang, Guoliang; Li, Yan; Shi, Ruihua; Xu, Jianming; Li, Youming; Huang, Minghe; Han, Shengxi; Liu, Jie; Ren, Xu; Xie, Pengyan; Wang, Zhangliu; Cui, Lihong; Sheng, Jianqiu; Luo, Hesheng; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Dai, Ning; Nie, Yuqiang; Zou, Yiyou; Xia, Bing; Fan, Zhining; Chen, Zhitan; Lin, Sanren; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2014-02-07

    Chronic gastritis is one of the most common findings at upper endoscopy in the general population, and chronic atrophic gastritis is epidemiologically associated with the occurrence of gastric cancer. However, the current status of diagnosis and treatment of chronic gastritis in China is unclear. A multi-center national study was performed; all patients who underwent diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms from 33 centers were enrolled. Data including sex, age, symptoms and endoscopic findings were prospectively recorded. Totally 8892 patients were included. At endoscopy, 4389, 3760 and 1573 patients were diagnosed to have superficial gastritis, erosive gastritis, and atrophic gastritis, respectively. After pathologic examination, it is found that atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia were prevalent, which accounted for 25.8%, 23.6% and 7.3% of this patient population. Endoscopic features were useful for predicting pathologic atrophy (PLR = 4.78), but it was not useful for predicting erosive gastritis. Mucosal-protective agents and PPI were most commonly used medications for chronic gastritis. The present study suggests non-atrophic gastritis is the most common endoscopic finding in Chinese patients with upper GI symptoms. Precancerous lesions, including atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia are prevalent in Chinese patients with chronic gastritis, and endoscopic features are useful for predicting pathologic atrophy.

  6. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N.

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise. PMID:26958297

  7. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise.

  8. Hubble Sees a Young Star Take Center Stage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-06

    With its helical appearance resembling a snail’s shell, this reflection nebula seems to spiral out from a luminous central star in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The star in the center, known as V1331 Cyg and located in the dark cloud LDN 981 — or, more commonly, Lynds 981 — had previously been defined as a T Tauri star. A T Tauri is a young star — or Young Stellar Object — that is starting to contract to become a main sequence star similar to the sun. What makes V1331Cyg special is the fact that we look almost exactly at one of its poles. Usually, the view of a young star is obscured by the dust from the circumstellar disc and the envelope that surround it. However, with V1331Cyg we are actually looking in the exact direction of a jet driven by the star that is clearing the dust and giving us this magnificent view. This view provides an almost undisturbed view of the star and its immediate surroundings allowing astronomers to study it in greater detail and look for features that might suggest the formation of a very low-mass object in the outer circumstellar disk. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Multidisciplinary Approach to Esophageal Achalasia: A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Andolfi, Ciro; Kavitt, Robert T; Konda, Vani J A; Patti, Marco G

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of achalasia is palliative. Pneumatic dilatation (PD) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) just eliminates the outflow obstruction allowing easier emptying of the esophagus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of a multidisciplinary approach to esophageal achalasia. A consecutive series of patients with achalasia treated by a multidisciplinary esophageal team consisting of radiologists, gastroenterologists, and surgeons in a quaternary care center between May 2008 and April 2015 were analyzed. A total of 147 patients with achalasia underwent LHM and partial fundoplication. Sixty-two patients (42%) had been treated preoperatively with PD and/or botulinum toxin (BT). The preoperative Eckardt score (ES) was 6.4 ± 2. At a median follow-up of 22 months, 128 patients (87%) did well and required no further treatment (ES 0.1). The remaining 19 patients (13%) had recurrence of symptoms and required further treatment: 12 were treated with PD and improved (ES 0.7); 4 were treated with PD and BT and improved (ES 1.3); 3 failed PD. These 3 patients had been treated with multiple sessions of PD and BT before the myotomy. Overall, 144 patients (98%) did well with laparoscopic (87%) or laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment (11%). The results of this study show that (a) LHM is an effective treatment modality, (b) PD improved symptoms in the majority of patients with recurrent dysphagia after myotomy and (c) multiple preoperative endoscopic treatments seem to affect outcomes of LHM. Patients with achalasia should be treated in a quaternary care center by a multidisciplinary team.

  10. Human-centered aircraft automation: A concept and guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft automation is examined and its effects on flight crews. Generic guidelines are proposed for the design and use of automation in transport aircraft, in the hope of stimulating increased and more effective dialogue among designers of automated cockpits, purchasers of automated aircraft, and the pilots who must fly those aircraft in line operations. The goal is to explore the means whereby automation may be a maximally effective tool or resource for pilots without compromising human authority and with an increase in system safety. After definition of the domain of the aircraft pilot and brief discussion of the history of aircraft automation, a concept of human centered automation is presented and discussed. Automated devices are categorized as a control automation, information automation, and management automation. The environment and context of aircraft automation are then considered, followed by thoughts on the likely future of automation of that category.

  11. A proto-Data Processing Center for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavet, Cécile; Petiteau, Antoine; Le Jeune, Maude; Plagnol, Eric; Marin-Martholaz, Etienne; Bayle, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-05-01

    The LISA project preparation requires to study and define a new data analysis framework, capable of dealing with highly heterogeneous CPU needs and of exploiting the emergent information technologies. In this context, a prototype of the mission’s Data Processing Center (DPC) has been initiated. The DPC is designed to efficiently manage computing constraints and to offer a common infrastructure where the whole collaboration can contribute to development work. Several tools such as continuous integration (CI) have already been delivered to the collaboration and are presently used for simulations and performance studies. This article presents the progress made regarding this collaborative environment and discusses also the possible next steps towards an on-demand computing infrastructure. This activity is supported by CNES as part of the French contribution to LISA.

  12. A Novel Conceptual Architecture for Person-Centered Health Records.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Titus; King, Zachary; Miled, Zina Ben

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records available to patients today suffer from multiple limitations, such as information fragmentation, a one-size-fits-all approach and a focus on data gathered over time and by institution rather than health conditions. This makes it difficult for patients to effectively manage their health, for these data to be enriched with relevant information from external sources and for clinicians to support them in that endeavor. We propose a novel conceptual architecture for person-centered health record information systems that transcends many of these limitations and capitalizes on the emerging trend of socially-driven information systems. Our proposed personal health record system is personalized on demand to the conditions of each individual patient; organized to facilitate the tracking and review of the patient's conditions; and able to support patient-community interactions, thereby promoting community engagement in scientific studies, facilitating preventive medicine, and accelerating the translation of research findings.

  13. Responsibility-centered management: a 10-year nursing assessment.

    PubMed

    McBride, A B; Neiman, S; Johnson, J

    2000-01-01

    In 1988-89, Indiana University became the first public university to implement responsibility-centered management (RCM) comprehensively. This article describes and assesses the implementation of RCM on the core campus of Indiana University School of Nursing in Indianapolis. It describes how RCM encouraged an information-rich environment, particularly with the advent of economic modeling; decision making linked to strategic goals/objectives; and a performance-based reward structure (e.g., merit pay increases and incentive plans). It ends with a discussion about the worth of RCM and the changes that frame-work produced, particularly in reconceptualizing the roles of the business officer and dean. The most profound consequence of RCM may be the effect it has in encouraging rethinking of what it means to be a school of nursing at this point in time.

  14. Common injuries in athletes' knee: experience of a specialized center

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Alexandre Pedro; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Sayum, Jorge; Cohen, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present cross-sectional study aims to identify the most common knee injuries in athletes cared at a Specialized Outpatient Clinics. METHOD: Analysis of patients cared at the Knee Outpatient Clinics of a Sports Trauma Center, divided by gender, age and diagnosed injury. RESULTS: Initially 440 patients were divided into 33 types of sports; after excluding the less statistically significant practices, nine sports remained. The most frequently performed sports were football with almost 50% of total patients presenting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and road runs with great frequency of meniscal injury. There was no correlation of the disorder with the type of sports performed but a correlation was found with patient's age/gender. CONCLUSION: The complete ACL rupture was the most common injury found in football, basketball and volleyball players, followed by meniscal injury in street runners. Level of Evidence IV, Study Transversal. PMID:25061417

  15. CAISE: A NSF Resource Center for Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickow, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Informal science education (ISE) is playing an increasingly important role in how and where the public engages with science. A growing body of research is showing that people learn the majority of their science knowledge outside of school (Falk & Dierking, 2010). The ISE field includes a wide variety of sources, including the internet, TV programs, magazines, hobby clubs and museums. These experiences touch large numbers of people throughout their lifetimes. If you would like to share your research with the public, ISE can be an effective conduit for meaningful science communication. However, because the ISE field is so diverse, it can be overwhelming with its multiple entry points. If you already are part of an ISE initiative, knowing how to access the most useful resources easily can also be daunting. CAISE, the Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education, is a resource center for the ISE field funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). CAISE can help connect you to the knowledge and people of ISE, through its website, products and in-person convenings. The proposed CAISE presentation will outline the diversity of the field and concisely present data that will make the case for the impact of ISE. We will focus on examples of successful programs that connect science with the public and that bring together AAS's science research community with practitioners and researchers within ISE. Pathways to various ISE resources in the form of current CAISE initiatives will be described as well. The presentation will include an interview section in which a CAISE staff member will ask questions of a scientist involved in an ISE initiative in order to detail one example of how ISE can be a valuable tool for engaging the public in science. Time for audience Q&A also will be included in the session.

  16. A Review of the Chinese Higher Education Evaluation Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Laura Pan; Dehai, Wang

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the Higher Education Evaluation Center, the administrative body under the auspices of the Chinese Ministry of Education responsible for organizing and conducting evaluation of baccalaureate and associate degree programs offered at different universities and colleges in China. The Center also conducts research on regulations and…

  17. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  18. Lessons Learned in Starting and Running a Neighborhood Networks Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This guide shares information about setting up and operating Neighborhood Networks centers. (These centers operate in Department of Housing and Urban Development-assisted or -insured housing nationwide to help low-income people boost their basic skills and find good jobs, learn to use computers and the Internet, run businesses, improve their…

  19. Contemporary Parenteral Antiplatelet Bridging Strategies: A Single-Center Real-World Experience at a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Stern, Gretchen; Rimsans, Jessica; Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-03-13

    Oral antiplatelet therapy may require interruption soon after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or acute coronary syndrome. The optimal parenteral antiplatelet bridge strategy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors or cangrelor, a P2Y12 inhibitor, is unclear. We explore real-world use of cangrelor or eptifibatide for antiplatelet bridging at a large tertiary-care center. Thirty-one patients (9 eptifibatide, 20 cangrelor, and 2 both) received bridge therapy from October 2015 to June 2017. Primary bridge therapy indications included surgery (68%), limited enteral access/absorption (16%), and high-perceived bleed risk (16%). Median duration of bridge therapy was 61 (20-100) hours for cangrelor and 83 (19-98) hours for eptifibatide. Severe/life-threatening bleeding or stent thrombosis was not observed. GUSTO-defined bleeding occurred in 30% (cangrelor) and 27% (eptifibatide). Initial dosing errors occurred in 23% of patients. Death during hospitalization occurred in 16% of patients. Parenteral antiplatelet bridging was used for ~3 days in this single-center, tertiary care experience, commonly for unplanned surgery following PCI. Despite high-risk presentations with >15% in-hospital mortality, efficacy profiles were reassuring with no identified stent thrombosis, but bleeding and dosing errors were common. Antiplatelet bridging should only be used in well-selected patients at the appropriate dose for the minimal necessary duration.

  20. A New Theoretical Foundation for Relationship-centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Suchman, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Relationship-centered care (RCC) is a clinical philosophy that stresses partnership, careful attention to relational process, shared decision-making, and self-awareness. A new complexity-inspired theory of human interaction called complex responsive processes of relating (CRPR) offers strong theoretical confirmation for the principles and practices of RCC, and thus may be of interest to communications researchers and reflective practitioners. It points out the nonlinear nature of human interaction and accounts for the emergence of self-organizing patterns of meaning (e.g., themes or ideas) and patterns of relating (e.g., power relations). CRPR offers fresh new perspectives on the mind, self, communication, and organizations. For observers of interaction, it focuses attention on the nature of moment-to-moment relational process, the value of difference and diversity, and the importance of authentic and responsive participation, thus closely corresponding to and providing theoretical support for RCC. PMID:16405709

  1. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  2. Fracture epidemiology and control in a developmental center.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, G S; Crinella, F M; Tan-Figueroa, L; Caires, S; Lohiya, S

    1999-01-01

    During 3.5 years, 182 fractures occurred among 994 residents of a developmental center. The fracture rate was 5.2 per 100 person-years (1.7 times greater than the rate in the US population). Fracture rate was significantly greater in residents with: epilepsy, older age, male gender, white race, independent ambulation, osteoporosis, and residence in intermediate care (versus skilled nursing) units; it was not affected by severity of mental retardation. Hand and foot bones were fractured in 58% of cases. Femur fracture occurred in 13 cases (7%). Fracture was caused by a fall in 41 cases (23%); its cause was indeterminable in 105 cases (58%). Fractures, occurring without significant injury, may be an important cause of preventable disability in this population. Control measures are suggested. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10344173

  3. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  4. The Patient-Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A Critical Concept for a Redesigned Healthcare Delivery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Sharing Knowledge: Achieving Breakthrough Performance 2010 Military Health System Conference The Patient -Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A Critical...DATE 25 JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Patient -Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A...Conference What is the Patient -Centered Medical Home?  …a vision of health care as it should be  …a framework for organizing systems of care at both the

  5. Factor VII deficiency: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Salcioglu, Zafer; Akcay, Arzu; Sen, Hulya Sayilan; Aydogan, Gonul; Akici, Ferhan; Tugcu, Deniz; Ayaz, Nuray Aktay; Baslar, Zafer

    2012-11-01

    Congenital factor VII deficiency is the most common form of rare coagulation factor deficiencies. This article presents a retrospective evaluation of 73 factor VII deficiency cases that had been followed at our center. The study consisted of 48 males and 25 females (2 months-19 years). Thirty-one (42.5%) of them were asymptomatic. Out of symptomatic patients, 17 had severe clinical symptoms, whereas 8 presented with moderate and 17 with mild symptoms. The symptoms listed in order of frequency were as follows: epistaxis, petechia or ecchymose, easy bruising, and oral cavity bleeding. The genotype was determined in 8 patients. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) was used to treat 49 bleeding episodes in 8 patients after 2002. In 2 patients with repeated central nervous system bleeding prophylaxis with rFVIIa was administered. No allergic and thrombotic events were observed during both treatment and prophylaxis courses. Antibody occurrence was not detected in the patients during treatment.

  6. Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center - A brief history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.; Fisher, M. F.; Mccool, A. A.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The history of propulsion development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized, beginning with the development of the propulsion system for the Redstone missile. This course of propulsion development continues through the Jupiter IRBM, the Saturn family of launch vehicles and the engines that powered them, the Centaur upper stage and RL-10 engine, the Reactor In-Flight Test stage and the NERVA nuclear engine. The Space Shuttle Main Engine and Solid Rocket Boosters are covered, as are spacecraft propulsion systems, including the reaction control systems for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory and the Space Station. The paper includes a description of several technology efforts such as those in high pressure turbomachinery, aerospike engines, and the AS203 cyrogenic fluid management flight experiment. These and other propulsion projects are documented, and the scope of activities in support of these efforts at Marshall delineated.

  7. Development of Pulsar Detection Methods for a Galactic Center Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Stephen; Wharton, Robert; Cordes, James; Chatterjee, Shami

    2018-01-01

    Finding pulsars within the inner parsec of the galactic center would be incredibly beneficial: for pulsars sufficiently close to Sagittarius A*, extremely precise tests of general relativity in the strong field regime could be performed through measurement of post-Keplerian parameters. Binary pulsar systems with sufficiently short orbital periods could provide the same laboratories with which to test existing theories. Fast and efficient methods are needed to parse large sets of time-domain data from different telescopes to search for periodicity in signals and differentiate radio frequency interference (RFI) from pulsar signals. Here we demonstrate several techniques to reduce red noise (low-frequency interference), generate signals from pulsars in binary orbits, and create plots that allow for fast detection of both RFI and pulsars.

  8. Journey to the Center of a Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A neutron star is not a place most would want to visit. This dense remnant of a collapsed star has a magnetic field billions of times stronger than Earth's, enough to shuffle your body's molecules long before you even land. The featureless surface is no fun either. Crushing gravity ensures that the star is a near perfect sphere, compressing all matter so that a sand-grain-sized scoop of neutron star material would weigh as much as a battleship on Earth. At least black holes offer the promise of funky singularity, time warps, and the Odyssean temptation to venture beyond a point of no return. What s a journey to a neutron star good for, one might ask? Well, for starters, it offers the possibility of confirming a theorized state of matter called quark-gluon plasma, which likely existed for a moment after the Big Bang and now might only exist in the superdense interiors of neutron stars. Beneath the neutron star crust, a kilometer-thick plate of crystalline matter, lies the great unknown. The popular theory is that the neutron star interior is made up of a neutron superfluid - a fluid without friction. With the help of two NASA satellites - the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - scientists are journeying to the center of a neutron star. Matter might be so compressed there that it breaks down into quarks, the building blocks of protons and neutrons, and gluons, the carrier of the strong nuclear force. To dig inside a neutron star, no simple drill bit will do. Scientists gain insight into the interior through events called glitches, a sudden change in the neutron star s precise spin rate. 'Glitches are one of the few ways we have to study the neutron star interior,' says Frank Marshall of NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center, who has used the Rossi Explorer to follow the escapades of the glitchiest of all neutron stars, dubbed the Big Glitcher and known scientifically as PSR J0537-6910.

  9. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  10. Metropolitan transportation management center : a case study : Long Island INFORM : identifying incidents and informing travelers

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-10-01

    The following case study provides a snapshot of Long Island's INFORM transportation management center. It follows the outline provided in the companion document, Metropolitan Transportation Management Center Concepts of Operation - A Cross Cutting St...

  11. ErgoTMC, A New Tool For Human-Centered TMC Design

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-04-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has recently made available a new tool to assist Transportation Management Center (TMC) managers and designers in incorporating human-centered design principles into their TMCs. ErgoTMC, a web site tailored t...

  12. Metropolitan transportation management center : a case study : COMPASS : effectively managing traffic and incidents

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-10-01

    The following case study provides a snapshot of the Downsview, Ontario transportation management center. It follows the outline provided in the companion document, Metropolitan Transportation Management Center Concepts of Operation - A Cross Cutting ...

  13. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions. PMID:27856550

  14. Developing a Career Planning Center. Occupational Education Research Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Frank E.; Embry, Judy K.

    Designed as a guide for those community college institutions developing a career planning center, this handbook presents a model for planning and implementing such a center. Options for centers are suggested for three levels of development and staffing: self-directed, intermediate, and comprehensive. Chapter 1 outlines the rationale and possible…

  15. Transforming a Curriculum Center for the 21st Century at Eastern Washington University Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Julie; Meyer, Nadean

    2008-01-01

    Teacher education is a vital component of Eastern Washington University's (EWU) mission and history. In 2006, after several years of decline in collections and usage of its curriculum center, EWU Libraries made a commitment to transform it into a center for twenty-first century educators. The center has changed greatly in a short time with five…

  16. Splish-splash: Center of mass, stability, and a fun pool toy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashman, Seth

    2018-03-01

    Center of mass is a common topic in physics courses. It appears in relation to studies of stable and unstable equilibrium, momentum, and rotation. Science products suppliers frequently include gadgets that demonstrate the concepts of center of mass and stability, such as the classic balancing bird. Additionally, The Physics Teacher has featured articles studying the center of mass of a rotating baton, locating the center of mass of a hanging Slinky toy, and describing a wide range of interesting systems.

  17. Psychology in academic health centers: a true healthcare home.

    PubMed

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2012-12-01

    This article is based on the invited presentation by the author at the American Psychological Association's Annual Convention, August 4-7, 2011, upon his receipt of the Joseph D. Matarazzo Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in Academic Health Centers presented by the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers. This article relates the history, roles, and responsibilities of psychologists in academic health centers to the ultimate survival and success of professional psychology. It describes implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the institutional practice of psychology including how psychology's place in academic health centers positions the field well for the future of healthcare reform. The article provides several recommendations to help professional psychology prepare for that future of integrated, interprofessional healthcare.

  18. Restating a Client-Centered Approach to Career Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1988-01-01

    Asserts career counseling too often is associated with objective test scores and rational decision making. Reiterates the importance of considering the client's developing self-concept in career counseling. Provides sample client centered career counseling session. (Author/ABL)

  19. How to Develop a Marketing Strategy for Your Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, George F.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses basic principles of marketing (referred to as the six p's: product, pricing, point of sale, people, promotion, and positioning) and shows how they can be applied to the marketing of day care centers. (SKC)

  20. Developing a clinical hypermedia corpus: experiences from the use of a practice-centered method.

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, T.; Nyce, J. M.; Sjöberg, C.; Hedblom, P.; Lindblom, P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines a practice-centered method for creation of a hypermedia corpus. It also describes experiences with creating such a corpus of information to support interprofessional work at a Primary Healthcare Center. From these experiences, a number of basic issues regarding information systems development within medical informatics will be discussed. PMID:1482924

  1. Review of a Proposal for a New Community College Center in Vallejo. Report 10-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stacy; Fuller, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a staff review of a proposal by the Solano Community College District to convert its existing facility in Vallejo to a state-approved off-campus educational center of Solano Community College. Educational centers can be a cost-effective means for meeting educational needs of a region through agreements with local high schools,…

  2. Localization of a microtubule organizing center by kinesin motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Chikashi; Bosche, Jonas; Lück, Alexander; Santen, Ludger

    2017-12-01

    Molecular motors are proteins which bind to a polarized cytoskeletal filament and move steadily along it. Molecular motors of the kinesin family move along microtubules (MTs), which are a component of the cytoskeleton. A very processive kinesin motor Kip3p, is known to promote catastrophes and pausing of MT, in particular on cortical contact. These properties play an important role in positioning the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. We present a theoretical approach to positioning of MT networks under confinement. In order to explore a localization mechanism of a microtubule organizing center (MTOC), we introduce an idealized system of two MTs connected by a MTOC. The dynamics of Kip3p is modeled by interacting stochastic particles, which allows us to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization in a finite volume. We find that localization in the middle of the cavity is realized in a parameter regime where the motor densities on the MTs are increasing with the distance from the MTOC. Localization at an asymmetric position is also possible by tuning model parameters.

  3. A work-centered cognitively based architecture for decision support: the work-centered infomediary layer (WIL) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachary, Wayne; Eggleston, Robert; Donmoyer, Jason; Schremmer, Serge

    2003-09-01

    Decision-making is strongly shaped and influenced by the work context in which decisions are embedded. This suggests that decision support needs to be anchored by a model (implicit or explicit) of the work process, in contrast to traditional approaches that anchor decision support to either context free decision models (e.g., utility theory) or to detailed models of the external (e.g., battlespace) environment. An architecture for cognitively-based, work centered decision support called the Work-centered Informediary Layer (WIL) is presented. WIL separates decision support into three overall processes that build and dynamically maintain an explicit context model, use the context model to identify opportunities for decision support and tailor generic decision-support strategies to the current context and offer them to the system-user/decision-maker. The generic decision support strategies include such things as activity/attention aiding, decision process structuring, work performance support (selective, contextual automation), explanation/ elaboration, infosphere data retrieval, and what if/action-projection and visualization. A WIL-based application is a work-centered decision support layer that provides active support without intent inferencing, and that is cognitively based without requiring classical cognitive task analyses. Example WIL applications are detailed and discussed.

  4. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adult day care center provisions. 226.19a Section 226..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.19a Adult day care center provisions. (a) Adult day care centers may participate in the Program...

  5. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adult day care center provisions. 226.19a Section 226..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.19a Adult day care center provisions. (a) Adult day care centers may participate in the Program...

  6. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adult day care center provisions. 226.19a Section 226..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.19a Adult day care center provisions. (a) Adult day care centers may participate in the Program...

  7. Center Stage: A Platform for the Discussion of Teaching/Learning Ideas. 1991-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Heron, Paul, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    "Center Stage" is a monthly publication of Broome Community College (Binghamton, New York), sponsored by the Teaching Resources Center as a platform for the discussion of ideas about teaching and learning by Broome College faculty. The second volume (nine issues) of "Center Stage" includes the following articles: "Towards a Learning Community:…

  8. 34 CFR 366.50 - What assurances shall a center provide and comply with?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What assurances shall a center provide and comply with... LIVING Assurances for Centers § 366.50 What assurances shall a center provide and comply with? To be eligible for assistance under this part, an eligible agency shall provide satisfactory assurances that— (a...

  9. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall...

  10. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall...

  11. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall...

  12. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall...

  13. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall...

  14. Constructing a Learner-Centered Syllabus: One Professor's Journey. IDEA Paper #60

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Educators increasingly agree that a learner-centered syllabus is associated with better rapport between students and teachers and increased student motivation, achievement, and empowerment. Accordingly, in 2009 Cullen and Harris developed a rubric for assessing the degree to which a syllabus is learner-centered versus teacher-centered. To date,…

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident

    Science.gov Websites

    Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center : Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

  16. 34 CFR 350.21 - What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and... Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.21 What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in? A Rehabilitation Research and Training Center must be operated by or in collaboration...

  17. 34 CFR 350.21 - What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and... Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.21 What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in? A Rehabilitation Research and Training Center must be operated by or in collaboration...

  18. Center-defined unacceptable HLA antigens facilitate transplants for sensitized patients in a multi-center kidney exchange program.

    PubMed

    Baxter-Lowe, L A; Cecka, M; Kamoun, M; Sinacore, J; Melcher, M L

    2014-07-01

    Multi-center kidney paired donation (KPD) is an exciting new transplant option that has not yet approached its full potential. One barrier to progress is accurate virtual crossmatching for KPD waitlists with many highly sensitized patients. Virtual crossmatch results from a large multi-center consortium, the National Kidney Registry (NKR), were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of flexible center-specific criteria for virtual crossmatching. Approximately two-thirds of the patients on the NKR waitlist are highly sensitized (>80% CPRA). These patients have antibodies against HLA-A (63%), HLA-B (66%), HLA-C (41%), HLA-DRB1 (60%), HLA-DRB3/4/5 (18-22%), HLA-DQB1 (54%) and HLA-DPB1 (26%). With donors typed for these loci before activation, 91% of virtual crossmatches accurately predicted an acceptable cell-based donor crossmatch. Failed virtual crossmatches were attributed to equivocal virtual crossmatches (46%), changes in HLA antibodies (21%), antibodies against HLA-DQA (6%), transcription errors (6%), suspected non-HLA antibodies (5%), allele-specific antibodies (1%) and unknown causes (15%). Some failed crossmatches could be prevented by modifiable factors such as more frequent assessment of HLA antibodies, DQA1 typing of donors and auditing data entry. Importantly, when transplant centers have flexibility to define crossmatch criteria, it is currently feasible to use virtual crossmatching for highly sensitized patients to reliably predict acceptable cell-based crossmatches. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    DOE PAGES

    Duncan-Miller, Gabrielle Christiane; Stone, William D.

    2017-11-16

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky [1] on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and makingmore » use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. Specifically, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.« less

  20. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan-Miller, G. C.; Stone, W. D.

    2018-07-01

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in the shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky (Astrophys J 398:184-189. https://doi.org/10.1086/171847 , 1992) on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and making use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. In particular, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.

  1. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan-Miller, Gabrielle Christiane; Stone, William D.

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky [1] on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and makingmore » use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. Specifically, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.« less

  2. A nationwide survey of patient centered medical home demonstration projects.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina; Landon, Bruce E

    2010-06-01

    The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified--consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows.

  3. Meeting the Expectations of the Social Studies Teacher at a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schober, Helen

    1984-01-01

    Teacher centers respond to a teacher's own defined needs by offering assistance, instruction, and materials to help enrich classroom learning experiences. Services provided social studies educators by the Teacher Center in Humboldt County, California, are described. (RM)

  4. Starting and Operating a Child Care Center. ERIC/EECE Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesarone, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Reviews ERIC documents and journal articles that discuss various issues related to starting, operating, and marketing a child care center. Annotations include center and family care operations. (Author/DLH)

  5. ESTABLISHMENT OF A GROUNDWATER RESEARCH DATA CENTER FOR VALIDATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Ground Water Modeling Center has established a Groundwater Research Data Center that provides information on datasets resulting from publicly funded field experiments and related bench studies in soil and groundwater pollution and distributes datasets for tes...

  6. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A GROUNDWATER RESEARCH DATA CENTER FOR VALIDATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Ground Water Modeling Center has established a Groundwater Research Data Center which provides information on research datasets resulting from publicly funded field experiments regarding soil and groundwater pollution and related laboratory bench studies, and wh...

  7. Plugging Into GEOSS - A Data Center Takes the Leap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Weaver, R. L.; Duerr, R. E.; Shaw, A.

    2008-12-01

    The data sets managed and distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado are accessible through a variety of interfaces: custom web services, WIST, which is the NASA EOS Data System interface, and by simple FTP. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems, GEOSS, offers the potential to make our data visible and accessible in the context of a much larger and more widely available system. But what does a data center have to do to tie into this larger system? What are the optimal data formats and protocols that should be maintained? What metadata standards and services should we sustain in order to maximize the visibility of our data? How will our holdings in existing catalogs be harvested by GEOSS? We address these questions through a pilot study that we report on in this paper. On June 2, 2008 the Group on Earth Observation, GEO, announced that the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) was "open for business," and that this Initial Operating Capability (IOC) was beginning a 1-year testing and evaluation period. The purpose of the IOC is two-fold: first, to encourage Earth observation providers to populate GEOSS by registering their data sets, services, and other components; and 2) to allow the global community to use, evaluate and thereby improve the GCI. NSIDC is contributing to both objectives. The GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan specifies, at a very high level, recommended standards for connectivity for services, data and metadata. GEO has also published Tactical and Strategic Guidance Documents to help data providers like NSIDC decide how it should proceed to become an active participant in the GEOSS. GEOSS and NSIDC are both adopting many of the OGC standards as their respective systems evolve. But how well do the OGC implementations of each of these entities mesh? What are the gaps, what are the currently less well developed yet critical path standards that require work? We describe our experiences in registering several data sets

  8. Volvulus without malposition--a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Kargl, Simon; Wagner, Oliver; Pumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This is a single-center case series about the rare condition of volvulus without malposition and/or malrotation (VWM) in preterm babies. We focus on diagnostic difficulties, and our results should help to distinguish VWM as a distinct entity different from classical volvulus and segmental volvulus. Medical chart review of infants with VWM from 2003-2012 was used. A total of 15 patients were identified. All of them had volvulus in the absence of intestinal malposition or other associated intestinal pathologies. All patients were born prematurely. Emergency laparotomy was necessary in all 15 patients. Two groups were identified. Group 1 includes four patients with typical signs of meconium obstruction of prematurity (MOP). Small bowel resection was only necessary in one of these four patients, all survived without residual intestinal lesions. Group 2 consists of 11 patients without signs of MOP-small bowel resection and temporary enterostomy were necessary in all these children. Four patients presented with pneumatosis intestinalis on the abdominal plain film, suggesting necrotizing enterocolitis. Although two infants died, the survivors showed complete recovery. VWM is a distinct disease of prematurity. When associated with MOP, VWM has a favorable outcome of treatment. In contrast, VWM occurring in the absence of signs of meconium obstruction requires small bowel resection. VWM primarily affects the top of the midgut (ileum). Because of absent malposition, presentation of VWM may be uncharacteristic. Pneumatosis intestinalis in advanced VWM may lead to diagnostic difficulties and a delay in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Building a Prototype of LHC Analysis Oriented Computing Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Della Ricca, G.; Donvito, G.; Paganoni, M.

    2012-12-01

    A Consortium between four LHC Computing Centers (Bari, Milano, Pisa and Trieste) has been formed in 2010 to prototype Analysis-oriented facilities for CMS data analysis, profiting from a grant from the Italian Ministry of Research. The Consortium aims to realize an ad-hoc infrastructure to ease the analysis activities on the huge data set collected at the LHC Collider. While “Tier2” Computing Centres, specialized in organized processing tasks like Monte Carlo simulation, are nowadays a well established concept, with years of running experience, site specialized towards end user chaotic analysis activities do not yet have a defacto standard implementation. In our effort, we focus on all the aspects that can make the analysis tasks easier for a physics user not expert in computing. On the storage side, we are experimenting on storage techniques allowing for remote data access and on storage optimization on the typical analysis access patterns. On the networking side, we are studying the differences between flat and tiered LAN architecture, also using virtual partitioning of the same physical networking for the different use patterns. Finally, on the user side, we are developing tools and instruments to allow for an exhaustive monitoring of their processes at the site, and for an efficient support system in case of problems. We will report about the results of the test executed on different subsystem and give a description of the layout of the infrastructure in place at the site participating to the consortium.

  10. Measuring physicians' productivity in a Veterans' Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Coleman, David L; Moran, Eileen; Serfilippi, Delchi; Mulinski, Paul; Rosenthal, Ronnie; Gordon, Bruce; Mogielnicki, R Peter

    2003-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs includes patient care, education, research, and backup to the Department of Defense. Because the measurement of physicians' productivity must reflect both institutional goals and market forces, the authors designed a productivity model that uses measures of clinical workload and academic activities commensurate with the VA's investments in these activities. The productivity model evaluates four domains of physicians' activity: clinical work, education, research, and administration. Examples of the application of the productivity model in the evaluation of VA-paid physician-staff and in the composition of contracts for clinical services are provided. The proposed model is a relatively simple strategy for measuring a broad range of the work of academic physicians in VA medical centers. The model provides incentives for documentation of resident supervision and participation in administrative activities required for effective and efficient clinical care. In addition, the model can aid in determining resource distribution among clinical services and permits comparison with non-VA health care systems. A strategy for modifying the model to incorporate measures of quality of clinical care, research, education, and administration is proposed. The model has been a useful part of the process to ensure the optimum use of resources and to meet clinical and academic institutional goals. The activities and accomplishments used to define physician productivity will have a substantial influence on the character of the medical profession, the vitality of medical education and research, and the cost and quality of health care.

  11. Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Omid; Gozdyra, Peter; Misic, Bratislav; Moola, Faisal; Palmer, Lyle J.; Paus, Tomáš; Berman, Marc G.

    2015-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

  12. A Student-Centered Astronomical Research Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell; Johnson, Jolyon; Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady; Buchheim, obert; Harshaw, Richard; Kenney, John; Collins, Dwight; Rowe, David; Brewer, Mark; Estrada, Reed; Estrada, Chris; Gillette, Sean; Ridgely, John; McNab, Christine; Freed, Rachel; Wallen, Vera

    2016-05-01

    For over a decade, students from Cuesta College and number of high schools have engaged in astronomical research during one-term seminars. A community of practice - consisting of students, educators, and astronomers - has formed that is centered on supporting the students' astronomical research. The seminar has recently adopted distance education technology and automated telescopes in a hybrid form of on-line and inperson collaborations between students, educators, and astronomers. This hybridization is not only resulting in new areas of growth and opportunity, but has created a number of challenges. For example, as more schools joined this seminar, standardized teaching materials such as a textbook and self-paced, online learning units had to be developed. Automated telescopes devoted to expanding student research opportunities within this community of practice are being brought on line by Concordia University and the Boyce Research Initiatives and Educational Foundation. The Institute for Student Astronomical Research supports this growing community in many ways including maintaining a website and editing books of student papers published through the Collins Foundation Press.

  13. Establishing a Secure Data Center with Remote Access: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Burton, E.; Murakami, E.

    2012-04-01

    Access to existing travel data is critical for many analysis efforts that lack the time or resources to support detailed data collection. High-resolution data sets provide particular value, but also present a challenge for preserving the anonymity of the original survey participants. To address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Transportation have launched the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). TSDC data sets include those from regional travel surveys and studies that increasingly use global positioning system devices. Data provided by different collecting agencies varies with respect tomore » formatting, elements included and level of processing conducted in support of the original purpose. The TSDC relies on a number of geospatial and other analysis tools to ensure data quality and to generate useful information outputs. TSDC users can access the processed data in two different ways. The first is by downloading summary results and second-by-second vehicle speed profiles (with latitude/longitude information removed) from a publicly-accessible website. The second method involves applying for a remote connection account to a controlled-access environment where spatial analysis can be conducted, but raw data cannot be removed.« less

  14. A person-centered approach to moral judgment.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Eric Luis; Pizarro, David A; Diermeier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Both normative theories of ethics in philosophy and contemporary models of moral judgment in psychology have focused almost exclusively on the permissibility of acts, in particular whether acts should be judged on the basis of their material outcomes (consequentialist ethics) or on the basis of rules, duties, and obligations (deontological ethics). However, a longstanding third perspective on morality, virtue ethics, may offer a richer descriptive account of a wide range of lay moral judgments. Building on this ethical tradition, we offer a person-centered account of moral judgment, which focuses on individuals as the unit of analysis for moral evaluations rather than on acts. Because social perceivers are fundamentally motivated to acquire information about the moral character of others, features of an act that seem most informative of character often hold more weight than either the consequences of the act or whether a moral rule has been broken. This approach, we argue, can account for numerous empirical findings that are either not predicted by current theories of moral psychology or are simply categorized as biases or irrational quirks in the way individuals make moral judgments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Coupled Plasma Filtration and Adsorption (CPFA): A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Abdul Cader, Rizna; Abdul Gafor, Halim; Mohd, Rozita; Yen Kong, Wei; Arshad, Norazimah; Kong, Norella

    2013-09-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is a novel extracorporeal blood purification therapy for sepsis which adsorbs both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators from filtered plasma, thereby achieving early haemodynamic stability and a reduction in inotropic support requirement. The main objective was to review our centers' experience with CPFA in septic patients. A retrospective chart review of all septic patients who received CPFA was performed. All patients were initially treated according to the 'surviving sepsis care bundle' with fluid resuscitation, antibiotics, and inotropes as required. CPFA was started as soon as possible after a nephrologists' assessment. Twenty five patients with sepsis received CPFA (15 M, 10 F, mean age 49.60 ± 18.97 years). Comorbidities included hypertension (n = 10, 40%), diabetes mellitus (n = 6, 24%), ischemic heart disease (n = 6, 24%), and an immunosuppressed state (n = 10, 40%). All patients received one cycle of CPFA with median duration of 5 (1-10) hours. CPFA was well tolerated but we encountered technical problems, especially filter clotting as CPFA was performed heparin free. 14 (56%) patients died within 28 days of treatment. CRP correlated with PCT (P = 0.040) and had an inverse trend with albumin (P = 0.066). Serum albumin was a strong predictor of mortality. The high prevalence of fungaemia and mortality could be attributed to many patients on chronic immunosuppressive therapy. Nonetheless, CPFA albeit expensive, does add to our armamentarium of extracorporeal treatment for severe sepsis. Regional citrate anticoagulation with CPFA may overcome problems with filter clotting.

  16. The Galactic Center: A Petaelectronvolt Cosmic-ray Acceleration Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi-Qing; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Zhen

    2017-02-20

    The multiteraelectronvolt γ -rays from the galactic center (GC) have a cutoff at tens of teraelectronvolts, whereas the diffuse emission has no such cutoff, which is regarded as an indication of petaelectronvolt proton acceleration by the HESS experiment. It is important to understand the inconsistency and study the possibility that petaelectronvolt cosmic-ray acceleration could account for the apparently contradictory point and diffuse γ -ray spectra. In this work, we propose that the cosmic rays are accelerated up to greater than petaelectronvolts in the GC. The interaction between cosmic rays and molecular clouds is responsible for the multiteraelectronvolt γ -ray emissionsmore » from both the point and diffuse sources today. Enhanced by the small volume filling factor (VFF) of the clumpy structure, the absorption of the γ -rays leads to a sharp cutoff spectrum at tens of teraelectronvolts produced in the GC. Away from the GC, the VFF grows, and the absorption enhancement becomes negligible. As a result, the spectra of γ -ray emissions for both point and diffuse sources can be successfully reproduced under such a self-consistent picture. In addition, a “surviving tail” at ∼100 TeV is expected from the point source, which can be observed by future projects CTA and LHAASO. Neutrinos are simultaneously produced during proton-proton (PP) collision. With 5–10 years of observations, the KM3Net experiment will be able to detect the petaelectronvolt source according to our calculation.« less

  17. Dofetilide in Overdose: A Case Series from Poison Center Data.

    PubMed

    Hieger, M A; Maskell, K F; Moss, M J; Powell, S W; Cumpston, K L

    2017-07-01

    Dofetilide is a class III antiarrhythmic used for treating atrial dysrhythmias. Though its adverse effects are well described in routine use, very little is known about dofetilide toxicity in overdose. This is a retrospective case series of consecutive patients reported to our poison center after dofetilide overdose. Twenty-seven cases were included. Seventeen patients were treated at a healthcare facility, and of these, eight were admitted. Twenty-one patients took one extra capsule, four took someone else's medication, one took three extra capsules, and one had a large intentional overdose. Ten patients had co-ingestants reported, including three QT-prolonging agents. No one required cardioversion, defibrillation, CPR, or overdrive pacing. The patient who reported taking 90 times his usual dose in suicide attempt was the only patient to have significant clinical effects. He experienced an 8-beat run of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, frequent multifocal PVCs, and ventricular bigeminy. He received magnesium sulfate and potassium chloride supplementation. In this series, unintentional small overdoses did not result in significant clinical effects and were often managed successfully at home, despite the fact that information showing a single capsule can cause torsades. This study is limited by its small sample size, retrospective design, and reliance on incomplete information.

  18. Learner-Centered (LCI) vs. Teacher-Centered (TCI) Instruction: A Classroom Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Mary Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education should incorporate management and leadership training with an emphasis on student audience analysis. Macro perspectives of teaching are needed for a workable approach to the management of education.

  19. Nigeria’s Center(s) of Gravity: A Complex and Violent Operational Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-28

    this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a... paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S

  20. Core Operations of the Metals and Ceramics Information Center (A DoD information Analysis Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    1214 Hy-Tuf Steel 12 Sep 4208 Wassaloy? 36 Dec 1215 Nitralloy 135 Mod 8 Dec 4310 Haynes Alloy 188 40 1987 Mar 1203 4140 Sterl 34 Mar 1601 A-286 Steel 37...BE /Ej*Az5 pofj.’t FRACT UjPE CATA FOR AISI 521 ,O ALLCY STEEL r-L’I1 AFS. 6 L Pesconm C OPY OF SELECTED DATA FAxED ,-T LCCP"EED 1MILES A AE OPol.es

  1. Application of theory to family-centered care: a role for social workers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered care is an emerging trend in health care settings today. An explanation, principles, and a definition of family-centered care are offered and discussed. A theoretical framework, Balance Theory of Coordination, which can be utilized by social workers to develop and enhance family-centered care practices, is explained and discussed. Various family-centered care practices are examined within the context of Balance Theory of Coordination as examples.

  2. Accounting for center in the Early External Cephalic Version trials: an empirical comparison of statistical methods to adjust for center in a multicenter trial with binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Angela; Chu, Rong; Thorpe, Julia; McDonald, Sarah; Thabane, Lehana; Hutton, Eileen

    2014-09-26

    Clustering of outcomes at centers involved in multicenter trials is a type of center effect. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement recommends that multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should account for center effects in their analysis, however most do not. The Early External Cephalic Version (EECV) trials published in 2003 and 2011 stratified by center at randomization, but did not account for center in the analyses, and due to the nature of the intervention and number of centers, may have been prone to center effects. Using data from the EECV trials, we undertook an empirical study to compare various statistical approaches to account for center effect while estimating the impact of external cephalic version timing (early or delayed) on the outcomes of cesarean section, preterm birth, and non-cephalic presentation at the time of birth. The data from the EECV pilot trial and the EECV2 trial were merged into one dataset. Fisher's exact method was used to test the overall effect of external cephalic version timing unadjusted for center effects. Seven statistical models that accounted for center effects were applied to the data. The models included: i) the Mantel-Haenszel test, ii) logistic regression with fixed center effect and fixed treatment effect, iii) center-size weighted and iv) un-weighted logistic regression with fixed center effect and fixed treatment-by-center interaction, iv) logistic regression with random center effect and fixed treatment effect, v) logistic regression with random center effect and random treatment-by-center interaction, and vi) generalized estimating equations. For each of the three outcomes of interest approaches to account for center effect did not alter the overall findings of the trial. The results were similar for the majority of the methods used to adjust for center, illustrating the robustness of the findings. Despite literature that suggests center effect can change the estimate of effect in

  3. Way Station to Space: A History of the John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Mack R.

    1997-01-01

    A history of the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center is presented. A study of the Apollo era is provided. This new addition to the NASA history series is also an allegory of the Center's relationship to the local communities in Mississippi and Louisiana, its sister Centers, and to NASA Headquarters.

  4. Chaos in the Classroom: Center Learning in a 1st Grade Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanaux, Courtney F.; Vice, Kristen E.; Fashing-Varner, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    How can centers be utilized in a classroom so students have full control of what they are learning and when? Can centers be used effectively post-kindergarten? During student teaching in a first grade classroom in southeast Louisiana, two student teachers, their classroom mentor teacher, and the 1st grade students experienced center learning that…

  5. 75 FR 48365 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-NIC Cost Containment Online Resource Center Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ...--NIC Cost Containment Online Resource Center Project AGENCY: National Institute of Corrections, U.S... containment online resource center. The NIC Cost Containment Online Resource Center (CCORC) will be housed on... project's four tasks are to (1) compile a guide providing a detailed review of existing evidence-based...

  6. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  7. A Study Investigating the Perceived Service Quality Levels of Sport Center Members: A Kano Model Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Kadir; Polat, Ercan; Güzel, Pinar

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate sport center members' perceived service quality levels with a view to Kano customer expectations and requirements model. To that end, a descriptive approach and a correlational research design featuring survey method is adopted. Research group consists of 680 (300 women, 380 men) sport center members who…

  8. Transforming a High School Media Center into a Library Learning Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study outlines a planned action based research project focused on studying the transformation of an urban high school media center to a learning commons model. This study includes a descriptive account as well as the impact of steps taken to match the media center to the needs of the 21st century learner. The research focuses on shifting…

  9. A Study Identifying the Components of a Quality Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panetta, Sandra J.

    Specific characteristics of a quality day care center are identified through a survey of parents, teachers, and directors utilizing or working in day care centers. The introduction to this descriptive research study offers background information on the history of the child care movement in America and a review of related research projects. A…

  10. Laparoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia: experience at a single center

    PubMed Central

    AGRUSA, A.; ROMANO, G.; BONVENTRE, S.; SALAMONE, G.; COCORULLO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Achalasia is a not frequent esophageal disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Its cause is unknown. The aim of treatment is to improve the symptoms. We report the results of the treatment of this condition achieved in one center. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients with esophageal achalasia. In the period 2010–2012 we observed 64 patients, of whom 19 were referred for medical treatment. Three of the remaining patients underwent botulinum toxin injection, 17 underwent multiple endoscopic dilation procedures and 25 underwent laparoscopic surgery. Results There were no complications in the group undergoing endoscopic therapy, but symptom remission was only temporary. Patients undergoing surgery showed a significant improvement in symptoms and no recurrence throughout the follow-up period, that is still ongoing (3 years). There were no major complications in any case and no morbidity or mortality. Conclusions Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia with laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication gives the best and longest-lasting results in suitably selected patients. The extension of the myotomy and reduction in LES pressure are the most important parameters to achieve a good result. PMID:24091178

  11. A Cell-Centered Multigrid Algorithm for All Grid Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gjesdal, Thor

    1996-01-01

    Multigrid methods are optimal; that is, their rate of convergence is independent of the number of grid points, because they use a nested sequence of coarse grids to represent different scales of the solution. This nesting does, however, usually lead to certain restrictions of the permissible size of the discretised problem. In cases where the modeler is free to specify the whole problem, such constraints are of little importance because they can be taken into consideration from the outset. We consider the situation in which there are other competing constraints on the resolution. These restrictions may stem from the physical problem (e.g., if the discretised operator contains experimental data measured on a fixed grid) or from the need to avoid limitations set by the hardware. In this paper we discuss a modification to the cell-centered multigrid algorithm, so that it can be used br problems with any resolution. We discuss in particular a coarsening strategy and choice of intergrid transfer operators that can handle grids with both an even or odd number of cells. The method is described and applied to linear equations obtained by discretization of two- and three-dimensional second-order elliptic PDEs.

  12. A User-centered Model for Web Site Design

    PubMed Central

    Kinzie, Mable B.; Cohn, Wendy F.; Julian, Marti F.; Knaus, William A.

    2002-01-01

    As the Internet continues to grow as a delivery medium for health information, the design of effective Web sites becomes increasingly important. In this paper, the authors provide an overview of one effective model for Web site design, a user-centered process that includes techniques for needs assessment, goal/task analysis, user interface design, and rapid prototyping. They detail how this approach was employed to design a family health history Web site, Health Heritage . This Web site helps patients record and maintain their family health histories in a secure, confidential manner. It also supports primary care physicians through analysis of health histories, identification of potential risks, and provision of health care recommendations. Visual examples of the design process are provided to show how the use of this model resulted in an easy-to-use Web site that is likely to meet user needs. The model is effective across diverse content arenas and is appropriate for applications in varied media. PMID:12087113

  13. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    PubMed Central

    Anbar, Ran D

    2002-01-01

    Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice. PMID:12460456

  14. Laparoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia: experience at a single center.

    PubMed

    Agrusa, A; Romano, G; Bonventre, S; Salamone, G; Cocorullo, G; Gulotta, G

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a not frequent esophageal disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Its cause is unknown. The aim of treatment is to improve the symptoms. We report the results of the treatment of this condition achieved in one center. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with esophageal achalasia. In the period 2010-2012 we observed 64 patients, of whom 19 were referred for medical treatment. Three of the remaining patients underwent botulinum toxin injection, 17 underwent multiple endoscopic dilation procedures and 25 underwent laparoscopic surgery. There were no complications in the group undergoing endoscopic therapy, but symptom remission was only temporary. Patients undergoing surgery showed a significant improvement in symptoms and no recurrence throughout the follow-up period, that is still ongoing (3 years). There were no major complications in any case and no morbidity or mortality. Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia with laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication gives the best and longest-lasting results in suitably selected patients. The extension of the myotomy and reduction in LES pressure are the most important parameters to achieve a good result.

  15. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center.

    PubMed

    Anbar, Ran D

    2002-12-03

    This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 - October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice.

  16. Patient-Centered Goal Setting in a Hospital-Based Outpatient Stroke Rehabilitation Center.

    PubMed

    Rice, Danielle B; McIntyre, Amanda; Mirkowski, Magdalena; Janzen, Shannon; Viana, Ricardo; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Goal-setting can have a positive impact on stroke recovery during rehabilitation. Patient participation in goal formulation can ensure that personally relevant goals are set, and can result in greater satisfaction with the rehabilitation experience, along with improved recovery of stroke deficits. This, however, not yet been studied in a stroke outpatient rehabilitation setting. To assess patient satisfaction of meeting self-selected goals during outpatient rehabilitation following a stroke. Retrospective chart review. Stroke patients enrolled in a multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation program, who set at least 1 goal during rehabilitation. Patients recovering from a stroke received therapy through the outpatient rehabilitation program between January 2010 and December 2013. Upon admission and discharge from rehabilitation, patients rated their satisfaction with their ability to perform goals that they wanted to achieve. Researchers independently sorted and labeled recurrent themes of goals. Goals were further sorted into International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) categories. To compare the perception of patients' goal satisfaction, repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted across the 3 ICF goal categorizations. Goal satisfaction scores. A total of 286 patients were included in the analysis. Patient goals concentrated on themes of improving hand function, mobility, and cognition. Goals were also sorted into ICF categories in which impairment-based and activity limitation-based goals were predominant. Compared to activity-based and participation-based goals, patients with impairment-based goals perceived greater satisfaction with meeting their goals at admission and discharge (P < .001). Patient satisfaction in meeting their first-, second-, and third-listed goals each significantly improved by discharge from the rehabilitation program (P < .001). Within an outpatient stroke rehabilitation setting, patients set

  17. Iterative user centered design for development of a patient-centered fall prevention toolkit.

    PubMed

    Katsulis, Zachary; Ergai, Awatef; Leung, Wai Yin; Schenkel, Laura; Rai, Amisha; Adelman, Jason; Benneyan, James; Bates, David W; Dykes, Patricia C

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large number of falls that occur in hospital settings, inpatient fall prevention is a topic of great interest to patients and health care providers. The use of electronic decision support that tailors fall prevention strategy to patient-specific risk factors, known as Fall T.I.P.S (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety), has proven to be an effective approach for decreasing hospital falls. A paper version of the Fall T.I.P.S toolkit was developed primarily for hospitals that do not have the resources to implement the electronic solution; however, more work is needed to optimize the effectiveness of the paper version of this tool. We examined the use of human factors techniques in the redesign of the existing paper fall prevention tool with the goal of increasing ease of use and decreasing inpatient falls. The inclusion of patients and clinical staff in the redesign of the existing tool was done to increase adoption of the tool and fall prevention best practices. The redesigned paper Fall T.I.P.S toolkit showcased a built in clinical decision support system and increased ease of use over the existing version. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric Liver Transplant For Hepatoblastoma: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kirnap, Mahir; Ayvazoglu Soy, Ebru; Ozcay, Figen; Moray, Gokhan; Ozdemir, Binnaz Handan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to analyze our experience with orthotopic liver transplant for hepatoblastoma patients. We performed a single-center retrospective analysis of 6 orthotopic liver transplant cases in children with hepatoblastoma from 2001 to March 2015. We evaluated patient demographic features, pretreatment extent of disease stage, type of transplant, change in serum alpha-fetoprotein levels, complications, and follow-up results. Orthotopic liver transplant was performed for pretreatment extent of disease stage III with a central location (n = 3) and pretreatment extent of disease stage IV (n = 3). All children underwent living-donor orthotopic liver transplant. Postoperative serum alpha-fetoprotein levels remained below 10 ng/mL during the follow-up period in 3 patients who were free of recurrences or metastases. Five patients were free of tumor recurrences at a median follow-up of 29.9 months. The limited number of cases we present without long-term follow-up of orthotopic liver transplant for unresectable hepatoblastoma seemed to show good clinical results.

  19. Gene: a gene-centered information resource at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Garth R; Hem, Vichet; Katz, Kenneth S; Ovetsky, Michael; Wallin, Craig; Ermolaeva, Olga; Tolstoy, Igor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Pruitt, Kim D; Maglott, Donna R; Murphy, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Gene database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) integrates gene-specific information from multiple data sources. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) genomes for viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes are the primary foundation for Gene records in that they form the critical association between sequence and a tracked gene upon which additional functional and descriptive content is anchored. Additional content is integrated based on the genomic location and RefSeq transcript and protein sequence data. The content of a Gene record represents the integration of curation and automated processing from RefSeq, collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology, and other databases within NCBI. Records in Gene are assigned unique, tracked integers as identifiers. The content (citations, nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, phenotypes, sequences, interactions, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities and Entrez Direct) and for bulk transfer by FTP. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. [Merkel cell carcinoma experience in a reference medical center.

    PubMed

    Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Devezé-Bocardi, Raúl; Ruiz-Juárez, Isabel; Grube-Pagola, Peter; Romero-Sierra, Graciela; Remes-Troche, José María; Silva-Cañetas, Carmen Sofía; Lozoya-López Escalera, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that occurs on areas exposed to ultraviolet light. It is usually asymptomatic and it is diagnosed late often. The treatment is surgical, associated with adjuvant radiotherapy. The objective was to present the experience in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma in a reference medical center. Methods: all patients with Merkel cell carcinoma treated at the Instituto de Investigaciones Médico-Biológicas of the Universidad Veracruzana during the period 2008 to 2011 were studied. Sex, age, evolution time, tumor localization, size, metastases and treatment were analyzed. Results: of 3217 patients treated, three cases were Merkel cell carcinoma (0.09 %), their age was 52.1 ± 14.17, male predominance of 66.67 %; the evolution time was of 29.66 ± 35.36 months; the tumour localization was on inguinal region, anterior chest and left arm; the noodle size was of 6.0 ± 5.19 cm; two patients had lymph node metastases. In two cases, resection and lymphadenectomy were performed. They all received radiation therapy and chemotherapy in one case. Histologically the medium variant predominated; immunohistochemistry was positive in the three cases. One patient died ten months after the study was done. Conclusions: our experience is similar with others authors, Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor, usually diagnosed late, and it has poor survival.

  1. From STEM to STEAM: Toward a Human-Centered Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    The 20th century was based on local linear engineering of complicated systems. We made cars, airplanes and chemical plants for example. The 21st century has opened a new basis for holistic non-linear design of complex systems, such as the Internet, air traffic management and nanotechnologies. Complexity, interconnectivity, interaction and communication are major attributes of our evolving society. But, more interestingly, we have started to understand that chaos theories may be more important than reductionism, to better understand and thrive on our planet. Systems need to be investigated and tested as wholes, which requires a cross-disciplinary approach and new conceptual principles and tools. Consequently, schools cannot continue to teach isolated disciplines based on simple reductionism. Science; Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) should be integrated together with the Arts1 to promote creativity together with rationalization, and move to STEAM (with an "A" for Arts). This new concept emphasizes the possibility of longer-term socio-technical futures instead of short-term financial predictions that currently lead to uncontrolled economies. Human-centered design (HCD) can contribute to improving STEAM education technologies, systems and practices. HCD not only provides tools and techniques to build useful and usable things, but also an integrated approach to learning by doing, expressing and critiquing, exploring possible futures, and understanding complex systems.

  2. Creating a vision for your medical call center.

    PubMed

    Barr, J L; Laufenberg, S; Sieckman, B L

    1998-01-01

    MCC technologies and applications that can have a positive impact on managed care delivery are almost limitless. As you determine your vision, be sure to have in mind the following questions: (1) Do you simply want an efficient front end for receiving calls? (2) Do you want to offer triage services? (3) Is your organization ready for a fully functional "electronic physician's office?" Understand your organization's strategy. Where are you going, not only today but five years from now? That information is essential to determine your vision. Once established, your vision will help determine what you need and whether you should build or outsource. Vendors will assist in cost/benefit analysis of their equipment, but do not lose sight of internal factors such as "prior inclination" costs in the case of a nurse triage program. The technology is available to take your vision to its outer reaches. With the projected increase in utilization of call center services, don't let your organization be left behind!

  3. Nutritional assessment of patients in a large Saudi dialysis center.

    PubMed

    Al-Saran, Khalid A; Elsayed, Sameh A; Molhem, Azeb J; AlDrees, Areej S; AlZara, Huda M

    2009-08-01

    To examine interventions used to manage malnutrition, and obesity, and to share experiences, concerns, and solutions to these problems for management of nutritional disorders in Saudi patients on maintenance hemodialysis. The subjects included in this cross-sectional study were chronic hemodialysis patients in the Prince Salman Center for Kidney Diseases (PSCKD), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period from September 2007 to September 2008. Medical history, examination, baseline laboratory tests, and the nutritional status was assessed using the subjective global assessment score (SGA). Subjects in the study had a mean age of 50+/-16 years, 108 (54%) were males and 92 (46%) were females with a mean single pooled Kt/v of 1.4+/-0.15, and a mean normalized protein catabolic ratio of 1.130.2. Regarding body mass index, 4% of patients were underweight, 49% had average weight, 27.5% were overweight, 14% were obese, and 5.5% had morbid obesity. The SGA classified patients into 68% normal, 24% mild to moderately malnourished, and 8% with severe malnutrition. Using different parameters for individualization of metabolic needs to each patient's own metabolic status, and for detection of the coexisting nutritional conditions is essential for optimal care for hemodialysis patients.

  4. Current State of Agile User-Centered Design: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    Agile software development methods are quite popular nowadays and are being adopted at an increasing rate in the industry every year. However, these methods are still lacking usability awareness in their development lifecycle, and the integration of usability/User-Centered Design (UCD) into agile methods is not adequately addressed. This paper presents the preliminary results of a recently conducted online survey regarding the current state of the integration of agile methods and usability/UCD. A world wide response of 92 practitioners was received. The results show that the majority of practitioners perceive that the integration of agile methods with usability/UCD has added value to their adopted processes and to their teams; has resulted in the improvement of usability and quality of the product developed; and has increased the satisfaction of the end-users of the product developed. The top most used HCI techniques are low-fidelity prototyping, conceptual designs, observational studies of users, usability expert evaluations, field studies, personas, rapid iterative testing, and laboratory usability testing.

  5. Lung Allocation Score: A Single-Center Simulation.

    PubMed

    Rosso, L; Palleschi, A; Tosi, D; Mendogni, P; Righi, I; Carrinola, R; Montoli, M; Damarco, F; Rossetti, V; Morlacchi, L C; Nosotti, M

    2016-03-01

    The lung allocation score (LAS) was introduced in the United States in May 2005 with the main goal of reducing the waiting list mortality of patients with end-stage lung diseases, but also to enhance the lung transplant benefit and improve the management of urgent candidates. Several papers have reported that LAS resulted in a reduction of the waiting list mortality but no significant survival benefit was noted. We evaluate the usefulness of LAS as a predictor for lung transplantation outcome in 123 patients listed for lung transplantation in an Italian center. Primary endpoints were waiting list mortality and posttransplant mortality at 1 year; secondary endpoints included perioperative circulatory support, cardiopulmonary bypass, primary graft dysfunction, and long-term survival after transplantation. We observed the absence of correlation between LAS and waiting list mortality. The LAS did not affect the long-term survival in our population. High LAS was predictive of primary graft dysfunction of grade 3 in the first 72 hours after transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Xeroderma pigmentosum at a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alwatban, Lenah; Binamer, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective DNA repair that results in extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Depending on the type of XP, the disease may affect the skin, eyes and nervous system. Describe the dermatologic manifestations in patients suffering from XP. Retrospective, descriptive review of medical records. Dermatology clinic at tertiary care center in Riyadh. This study included Saudi patients with clinically confirmed XP. Demographic and clinical data including pathology and associated conditions and outcomes. Of 21 patients with XP, the most common manifestation was lentigines, affecting 18 patients (86%). The most common skin cancer was basal cell carcinoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) affecting 15 (71.4%) and 9 (42.8%), respectively. Other skin findings included neurofibroma, trichilemmoma and seborrheic keratosis. Ocular involvement included photophobia, which was the most common finding followed by dryness and ocular malignancies. Two patients showed neurological involvement, which correlated with the type of mutation. Considering that XP is a rare genetic disease, this description of our patient population will aid in early recognition and diagnosis. Retrospective and small number of patients. Genetic analyses were done for only 5 of the 21 patients.

  7. Adrenalectomy for metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma - a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Ciurea, Silviu; Brasoveanu, Vlad; Hrehoret, Doina; Gangone, Eliza; Boros, Mirela; Herlea, Vlad; Croitoru, Adina

    2007-05-01

    Adrenal metastases (AM) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are rarely seen in clinical practice. The treatment is not standardized, the indications and efficacy of different therapeutic approaches being still controversial. Between January 1995 and December 2005, 174 patients underwent liver resection for HCC in our center. AM were detected in four patients (2.3%): three of them had HCC and synchronous AM, and the remaining one developed AM 10 months after liver resection. All the patients with AM were treated by adrenalectomy (simultaneously with liver resection in synchronous metastases), followed by systemic chemotherapy. Non-resectable multifocal liver recurrences occurred in two patients, one of them having also a contralateral adrenal metastasis; these two patients are presently alive 26 and 43 months after adrenalectomy, respectively. Another patient died by liver recurrence 27 months postoperatively. The fourth patient is disease-free at 17 months after the initial operation. Adrenalectomy for AM from HCC should be performed whenever the primary tumor is well therapeutically controlled and the patient has a good performance status. Adrenalectomy offers the chance of more than 2 years survival in many patients. However, once AM are detected, the prognosis remains poor.

  8. Description, Evaluation, and Validation of a Pilot Developmental Assessment Center in a Military-Educational Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; And Others

    The purpose of this report is to describe, evaluate, and validate a pilot assessment center (AC) established in the Center for Leadership and Personal Development at the U.S. Military Academy to develop cadets on job skills needed by newly commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The AC programs employ a leadership evaluation development method…

  9. The Design of a Pre-School "Learning Laboratory" in a Rehabilitation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ronnie

    The educational philosophy and medical setting of a preschool program in a rehabilitation center for handicapped children are presented in this monograph. Children with diverse physical, mental, and behavioral problems are served by the Center, which emphasizes development of each child's potential within the limits of his disabilities. The basic…

  10. Comparison of CDE data in phacoemulsification between an open hospital-based ambulatory surgical center and a free-standing ambulatory surgical center

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Chen, Mindy

    2010-01-01

    Mean CDE (cumulative dissipated energy) values were compared for an open hospital- based surgical center and a free-standing surgical center. The same model of phacoemulsifier (Alcon Infiniti Ozil) was used. Mean CDE values showed that surgeons (individual private practice) at the free-standing surgical center were more efficient than surgeons (individual private practice) at the open hospital-based surgical center (mean CDE at the hospital-based surgical center 18.96 seconds [SD = 12.51]; mean CDE at the free-standing surgical center 13.2 seconds [SD = 9.5]). CDE can be used to monitor the efficiency of a cataract surgeon and surgical center in phacoemulsification. The CDE value may be used by institutions as one of the indicators for quality control and audit in phacoemulsification. PMID:21151334

  11. Comparison of CDE data in phacoemulsification between an open hospital-based ambulatory surgical center and a free-standing ambulatory surgical center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Chen, Mindy

    2010-11-12

    Mean CDE (cumulative dissipated energy) values were compared for an open hospital- based surgical center and a free-standing surgical center. The same model of phacoemulsifier (Alcon Infiniti Ozil) was used. Mean CDE values showed that surgeons (individual private practice) at the free-standing surgical center were more efficient than surgeons (individual private practice) at the open hospital-based surgical center (mean CDE at the hospital-based surgical center 18.96 seconds [SD = 12.51]; mean CDE at the free-standing surgical center 13.2 seconds [SD = 9.5]). CDE can be used to monitor the efficiency of a cataract surgeon and surgical center in phacoemulsification. The CDE value may be used by institutions as one of the indicators for quality control and audit in phacoemulsification.

  12. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, May G; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P

    2008-01-01

    Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted.

  13. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  14. Regional Information Centers: A Frontier in Small Library Automation. Dissemination Document No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.; Vinsonhaler, John F.

    The regional information center is examined as an instrument for innovation in small library automation and as a basis for the evolution of national information systems. Summarized is development of regional information centers in education, including centers specially for handicapped children, and indicated are trends toward national information…

  15. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training...

  16. A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States. CLIR Publication No. 143

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorich, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the 2008 Scholarly Communications Institute (SCI 6) focused on humanities research centers, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) commissioned a survey of digital humanities centers (DHCs). The immediate goals of the survey were to identify the extent of these centers and to explore their financing,…

  17. 41 CFR 102-192.135 - Must we have a mail center manager at our facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... center manager at our facility? 102-192.135 Section 102-192.135 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Mail Center Manager Requirements § 102-192.135 Must we have a mail center manager at our facility? Yes, every facility that has more than two full time people dedicated to...

  18. Offering Women Childbirth Choices: A Case for Nurse-Midwives and Free-Standing Birth Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffron, Marsha S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of Certified Nurse Midwives and birth centers, examining how they present a safe, alternative maternity care option for low-risk women and discussing safety issues to consider with alternative childbirth experiences, birth center licensure and accreditation, cost effectiveness of freestanding birth centers, and client…

  19. A Quantitative Literature Review of the Effectiveness of Suicide Prevention Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Mary Amanda; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Applied meta-analysis to several series of studies to evaluate the effectiveness of prevention centers. Results indicate that centers do attract a high-risk population; center clients were more likely to commit suicide than were members of the general population, and individuals who committed suicide were more likely to have been clients than were…

  20. Educational program for pharmacists at a multifacility academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Rafael; Skledar, Susan J; Yourich, Bryan; Mark, Scott M

    2010-08-15

    An educational program for pharmacists in a multifacility health care setting is described. The expansion of pharmacy services at a university medical center from a centralized to a decentralized, unit-based model created the need for enhanced education of staff pharmacists. A steering committee with pharmacy department and school of pharmacy representation surveyed educational and professional needs related to the expanded services. Pharmacists indicated that they needed an educational program that was comprehensive, interactive, and accessible to all shifts. Pharmacy school clinical faculty members provided most of the initial educational sessions, which combined didactic presentations and case-based discussion. The needs survey was used in selecting topics that were most relevant to the pharmacists' expanded practice. Each major topic was covered in a series of one-hour sessions held at two-week intervals and scheduled at a time convenient for afternoon-shift pharmacists. Incentives were offered to encourage participation. The live presentations were recorded with video-streaming technology and made available via the Internet to pharmacists on all shifts in all facilities of the health system as well as to faculty members. Since program implementation in 2005, attendance at the live sessions has averaged 25. In postimplementation surveys, pharmacists indicated that the program was meeting their needs and improving patient care. Since 2008, pharmacists have been able to earn continuing-education (CE) credit for the sessions. A collaborative educational series with online access, clinical content, and CE credit has been effective in meeting pharmacists' needs in a multifacility health care setting.

  1. Infective endocarditis and complications; a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Ozveren, Olcay; Oztürk, Mehmet Akif; Sengül, Cihan; Bakal, Ruken Bengi; Akgün, Taylan; Izgi, Cemil; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Eroğlu Büyüköner, Atiye Elif; Değertekin, Muzaffer

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the microbiological characteristics and complications of infective endocarditis (IE) in 119 patients treated in our center for IE, diagnosed by modified Duke criteria. The archive records of 119 patients (82 [69%] males; 37 [31%] females; mean age 39 ± 16 years) with a definite diagnosis of IE between January 1997 and November 2004 were systematically reviewed for clinical and microbiological properties and complications. The most common complaint of the patients was fever and malaise (102 patients, 85.7%, each). Culture was negative in 68 patients (57.1%), while Staphylococcus aureus was the most common etiological agent in culture positive cases. The aortic valve was the most common region of vegetation (43 patients, 36.1%). The frequency of surgical operation for valvular insufficiency due to IE was 75.6%, and the frequency of congestive heart failure was 53.8% (64 patients). IE is still an important disease considering its high morbidity and mortality rates, increased life expectancy of the patients, and increased number of valve replacement procedures.

  2. The transplant center and business unit as a model for specialized care delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaber, A Osama; Schwartz, Roberta L; Bernard, David P; Zylicz, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Transplant centers are valuable assets to a transplantation hospital and essential to organize the delivery of patient care. A transplant center defined around physicians and activities of caring for patients with organ failure creates a team better equipped to manage care across the continuum of the diseases treated by transplantation. Through monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes, the transplant center can better respond to the changing regulatory and financial landscape of health care. This article seeks to explain the major organizational challenges facing the transplant center and how a transplant center can best serve its patients and parent organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas TH; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. METHODS: A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton’s Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. RESULTS: Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R2 = 0.59) and in collaboration (R2 = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. CONCLUSION: Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are

  4. Psychosocial Vulnerability Among Patients Contacting a Norwegian Sexual Assault Center.

    PubMed

    Vik, Bjarte Frode; Nöttestad, Jim Aage; Schei, Berit; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Hagemann, Cecilie Therese

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the objective was to assess the occurrence of specific vulnerability factors among adult and adolescent females attending a Norwegian sexual assault center (SAC). We also explored assault characteristics and investigated whether these characteristics differed between the group of patients with vulnerability factors compared with the group without such factors. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of 573 women ≥ 12 years of age attending the SAC at St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010. A patient was considered vulnerable if at least one of the following features was present: intellectual or physical disability; history of present/former mental health problems; history of present/former alcohol/substance abuse; or former sexual assault. At least one vulnerability factor was present in 59% of the cases. More than one vulnerability factor was present in 29%. Reporting at least one vulnerability factor was associated with a higher patient age, unemployment, a higher frequency of reported light/moderate physical violence, and the documentation of minor body injury. In contrast, those without vulnerability more often were students assaulted during night time, by a casual or stranger assailant and reporting a higher intake of alcohol prior to the assault. There are obvious patterns of differences in the nature of sexual assaults reported among victims with specific vulnerability factors compared with victims without these factors. Future research should address these differences and possible solutions for better protection of especially vulnerable individuals against sexual offenses, such as those with mental health and substance abuse difficulties.

  5. A Nationwide Survey of Patient Centered Medical Home Demonstration Projects

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Background The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Design Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Participants Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. Measurements We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. Results A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified—consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Conclusion Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20467907

  6. Personality and gambling involvement: a person-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jeanne E; Slutske, Wendy S; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    Individual differences in personality are likely to play an important role in explaining the propensity to gamble. One of the potential roadblocks to elucidating the relation between personality and gambling may be inadequately accounting for the diversity of gambling activities. The goal of the present study was to provide a comprehensive and nuanced portrait of the relation between personality and gambling by taking a multivariate approach to the co-use of multiple gambling activities and employing a broad inventory of potentially relevant personality dimensions. Participants were 4,669 individuals from a national Australian twin registry. Structured interviews including an extensive assessment of gambling behaviors were conducted, and personality questionnaires that included the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Sensation Seeking Scale, and the Magical Ideation Scale were completed. A latent class analysis of past-year involvement in 10 different gambling activities was performed to classify the participants into 5 groups. Unique personality configurations characterized the 3 more gambling-involved latent classes: (a) low behavioral control in the context of high negative emotionality and magical thinking typified extensive, versatile gamblers at high risk of gambling problems; (b) average behavioral control in the context of high negative emotionality and magical thinking typified those who primarily gambled on non-strategic games of chance; (c) low behavioral control in the context of high positive emotionality and low magical ideation typified those who primarily gambled on strategic games of skill. This study illustrates the value of using a multivariate person-centered approach for characterizing the personality correlates of the multifaceted phenomenon that is gambling.

  7. A Galaxy at the Center of the Hubble Tuning Fork

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This galaxy is known as Mrk 820 and is classified as a lenticular galaxy — type S0 on the Hubble Tuning Fork. The Hubble Tuning Fork is used to classify galaxies according to their morphology. Elliptical galaxies look like smooth blobs in the sky and lie on the handle of the fork. They are arranged along the handle based on how elliptical they are, with the more spherical galaxies furthest from the tines of the fork, and the more egg-shaped ones closest to the end of the handle where it divides. The two prongs of the tuning fork represent types of unbarred and barred spiral galaxies. Lenticular galaxies like Mrk 820 are in the transition zone between ellipticals and spirals and lie right where the fork divides. A closer look at the appearance of Mrk 820 reveals hints of a spiral structure embedded in a circular halo of stars. Surrounding Mrk 820 in this image is a good sampling of other galaxy types, covering almost every type found on the Hubble Tuning Fork, both elliptical and spiral. Most of the smears and specks are distant galaxies, but the prominent bright object at the bottom is a foreground star called TYC 4386-787-1. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA and N. Gorin (STScI), Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Sports hernias: experience in a sports medicine center.

    PubMed

    Santilli, O L; Nardelli, N; Santilli, H A; Tripoloni, D E

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain of the inguino-crural region or "pubalgia" explains the 0.5-6.2% of the consultations by athletes. Recently, areas of weakness in the posterior wall called "sports hernias," have been identified in some of these patients, capable of producing long-standing pain. Several authors use different image methods (CT, MRI, ultrasound) to identify the lesion and various techniques of repair, by open or laparoscopic approaches, have been proposed but there is no evidence about the superiority of one over others due to the difficulty for randomizing these patients. In our experience, diagnosis was based on clinical and ultrasound findings followed by laparoscopic exploration to confirm and repair the injury. The present study aims to assess the performance of our diagnostic and therapeutic management in a series of athletes affected by "pubalgia". 1450 athletes coming from the orthopedic office of a sport medicine center were evaluated. In 590 of them (414 amateur and 176 professionals) sports hernias were diagnosed through physical examination and ultrasound. We performed laparoscopic "TAPP" repair and, thirty days after, an assessment was performed to determine the evolution of pain and the degree of physical activity as a sign of the functional outcome. We used the U Mann-Whitney test for continuous scale variables and the chi-square test for dichotomous variables with p < 0.05 as a level of significance. In 573 patients ultrasound examination detected some protrusion of the posterior wall with normal or minimally dilated inguinal rings, which in 498 of them coincided with areas affected by pain. These findings were confirmed by laparoscopic exploration that also diagnosed associated contralateral (30.1%) and ipsilateral defects, resulting in a total of 1006 hernias. We found 84 "sport hernias" in 769 patients with previous diagnosis of adductor muscle strain (10.92%); on the other hand, in 127 (21.52%) of our patients with "sport hernias" US detected

  9. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  10. Personality and Gambling Involvement: A Person-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Jeanne E.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in personality are likely to play an important role in explaining the propensity to gamble. One of the potential roadblocks to elucidating the relation between personality and gambling may be inadequately accounting for the diversity of gambling activities. The goal of the present study was to provide a comprehensive and nuanced portrait of the relation between personality and gambling by taking a multivariate approach to the co-use of multiple gambling activities and employing a broad inventory of potentially-relevant personality dimensions. Participants were 4,669 individuals from a national Australian twin registry. Structured interviews including an extensive assessment of gambling behaviors were conducted, and personality questionnaires that included the tidimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Sensation Seeking Scale, and the Magical Ideation Scale were completed. A latent class analysis of past-year involvement in 10 different gambling activities was performed to classify the participants into five groups. Unique personality configurations characterized the three more gambling-involved latent classes. Low behavioral control in the context of high negative emotionality and magical thinking typified extensive, versatile gamblers at high risk of gambling problems. Average behavioral control in the context of high negative emotionality and magical thinking typified those who primarily gambled on non-strategic games of chance. Low behavioral control in the context of high positive emotionality and low magical ideation typified those who primarily gambled on strategic games of skill. This study illustrates the value of using a multivariate person-centered approach for characterizing the personality correlates of the multi-faceted phenomenon that is gambling. PMID:25134059

  11. The ESRC: A Web-based Environmental Satellite Resource Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Guarente, B.; Dills, P. N.

    2009-12-01

    The COMET® Program has developed an Environmental Satellite Resource Center (known as the ESRC), a searchable, database-driven Website that provides easy access to a wide range of useful information training materials on polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites. Primarily sponsored by the NPOESS Program and NOAA, the ESRC is a tool for users seeking reliable sources of satellite information, training, and data. First published in September 2008, and upgraded in April 2009, the site is freely available at: http://www.meted.ucar.edu/esrc. Additional contributions to the ESRC are sought and made on an ongoing basis. The ESRC was created in response to a broad community request first made in May 2006. The COMET Program was asked to develop the site to consolidate and simplify access to reliable, current, and diverse information, training materials, and data associated with environmental satellites. The ESRC currently includes over 400 significant resources from NRL, CIMSS, CIRA, NASA, VISIT, NESDIS, and EUMETSAT, and improves access to the numerous satellite resources available from COMET’s MetEd Website. The ESRC is designed as a community site where organizations and individuals around the globe can easily submit their resources via online forms by providing a small set of metadata. The ESRC supports languages other than English and multi-lingual character sets have been tested. COMET’s role is threefold: 1) maintain the site, 2) populate it with our own materials, including smaller, focused learning objects derived from our larger training modules, and 3) provide the necessary quality assurance and monitoring to ensure that all resources are appropriate and well described before being made available. Our presentation will demonstrate many of the features and functionality of searching for resources using the ESRC, and will outline the steps for users to make their own submissions. For the site to reach its full potential, submissions representing diverse

  12. Running a Successful Center: A Giant Step Forward in the Professions's Maturation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Noel T., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Based on his successful experience with the NASSP assessment center process in personnel selection and career development, a Maryland curriculum superintendent suggests that assessment center process and results need to be integrated into schools' promotional policies, their training and appraisal procedures, their human resource planning, and…

  13. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching.

    PubMed

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions. © 2016 G. Marbach-Ad and C. H. Rietschel. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. A dimensional analysis of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jennifer Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care (PCC) is a poorly conceptualized phenomenon and can indicate anything from soothing room design, emotional support of patients, customization of meals, to support of patient decision making. This inconsistency across the clinical and research literature makes the application of PCC difficult. The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of PCC as found in the literature. A dimensional analysis of PCC was conducted from 69 clinical and research articles published from 2000 to 2006. Coding of the literature for the perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences of PCC was completed. These codes were used to determine literature selected for inclusion, organize article content, and frame the delineation of PCC. Alleviating vulnerabilities, consisting of both compromised physiological states and threats to individual identity, was constant throughout the literature. Therapeutic engagement was the process sustaining the patient during an illness episode that necessitated service use and involved allocating time, carrying out information practices, knowing the patient, and developing a relationship. This process occurs during nurse-patient interaction, sustained during successive interactions, and reinforced by the information practices of a particular setting. The interaction between nurse and patient is central to the effective study and application of PCC. Appropriate use of PCC can improve study outcomes and measurements by clarifying the variables involved, and PCC holds great promise to frame patient outcome and satisfaction research by analyzing how and with what effect nurses alleviate patient vulnerability. Moreover, consideration of information practices as a critical supporting structure of nurse-patient interaction can be explored.

  15. NASA Center for Astronomy Education: Building a Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.; Alvidrez, R.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) is devoted to the professional development of introductory college astronomy instructors teaching at community colleges. The primary goal is building a "community of practice." Evaluation results suggest this community of practice model is effective at improving instructional practices, particularly in settings where instructors feel isolated from their peers. For community college faculty this isolation can be quite real. Many are the only astronomer, if not the only scientist, at their institution. In addition, they may be adjunct instructors who have no office, no institutional email address, nor appear in the campus directory. CAE works to prevent this sense of isolation by building both actual and virtual communities for these instructors, as well as provide actual and virtual professional development opportunities. CAE's major effort is providing multi-tiered "Teaching Excellence Workshops" offered at national and regional venues. Recently added to our workshop offerings is a Tier II, or advanced, workshop for instructors who have attended a previous Teaching Excellence Workshop. The focus of the Tier II workshops is on implementation issues. In addition, we are now also offering a workshop exclusively for post-docs, graduates, and undergraduate students. Ongoing support is offered through the CAE website. Instructors can learn about, and register for, upcoming workshops. They can engage in discussions about educational issues and share best practices with peers using the moderated discussion group Astrolrner@CAE. CAE also provides an updated article "This Month's Teaching Strategy” which is a reflection on teaching strategies discussed in the workshops. Instructors can also find their peers through the online map of US community colleges offering introductory astronomy courses. Lastly, CAE Regional Teaching Exchanges facilitate local, and sustained, community building. CAE is supported by the NASA/JPL Navigator

  16. Acute Demyelinating Events Following Vaccines: A Case-Centered Analysis.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Roger; Lewis, Edwin; Goddard, Kristin; Fireman, Bruce; Bakshi, Nandini; DeStefano, Frank; Gee, Julianne; Tseng, Hung Fu; Naleway, Allison L; Klein, Nicola P

    2016-12-01

     Case reports have suggested that vaccines may trigger transverse myelitis (TM) or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), but the evidence for a causal association is inconclusive. We analyzed the association of immunization and subsequent development of TM or ADEM.  We identified all cases of TM and ADEM in the Vaccine Safety Datalink population. Using a case-centered method, we compared vaccination of each case to vaccination of all matched persons in the study population, who received the same type of vaccine, with respect to whether or not their vaccination occurred during a predetermined exposure interval. We calculated a risk difference (excess risk) of TM and ADEM for each vaccine.  Following nearly 64 million vaccine doses, only 7 cases of TM and 8 cases of ADEM were vaccinated during the primary exposure window 5-28 days prior to onset. For TM, there was no statistically significant increased risk of immunization. For ADEM, there was no statistically significant increased risk following any vaccine except for Tdap (adolescent and adult tetanus, reduced diphtheria, acellular pertussis) vaccine. Based on 2 exposed cases, the odds ratio for Tdap exposure 5-28 days prior to ADEM onset was 15.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-471.6; P = .04), and the estimated excess risk was 0.385 (95% CI, -.04 to 1.16) cases per million doses.  We found no association between TM and prior immunization. There was a possible association of ADEM with Tdap vaccine, but the excess risk is not likely to be more than 1.16 cases of ADEM per million vaccines administered. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The impact of a large-scale power outage on hemodialysis center operations.

    PubMed

    Abir, Mahshid; Jan, Sophia; Jubelt, Lindsay; Merchant, Raina M; Lurie, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    On June 29, 2012, mid-Atlantic storms resulted in a large-scale power outage affecting up to three million people across multiple (US) states. Hemodialysis centers are dependent on electricity to provide dialysis care to end-stage renal disease patients. The objective of this study was to determine how the power outage impacted operations in a sample of hemodialysis centers in the impacted regions. The sample consisted of all hemodialysis centers located in the District of Columbia and a total of five counties with the largest power losses in West Virginia, Virginia, and Maryland. A semi-structured interview guide was developed, and the charge nurse or supervisor in each facility was interviewed. The survey questions addressed whether their centers lost power, if so, for how long, where their patients received dialysis, whether their centers had backup generators, and if so, whether they had any problems operating them, and whether their center received patients from other centers if they had power. Calls were placed to 90 dialysis centers in the sampled areas and a 90% response rate was achieved. Overall, hemodialysis operations at approximately 30% (n = 24) of the centers queried were impacted by the power outage. Of the 36 centers that lost power, 31% (n = 11) referred their patients to other dialysis centers, 22% (n = 8) accommodated their patients during a later shift or on a different day; the rest of the centers either experienced brief power outages that did not affect operations or experienced a power outage on days that the center is usually closed. Some centers in the study cohort reported receiving patients from other centers for dialysis 33% (n = 27). Thirty-two percent (n = 26) of the centers queried had backup generators on site. Eleven percent (n = 4) of the centers experiencing power outages reported that backup generators were brought in by their parent companies. Comprehensive emergency planning for dialysis centers should include provisions for

  18. Venus' Chasmata and Earth's Spreading Centers: A Topographic Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, P. R.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Like the Earth, Venus has a global rift system, which has been cited as evidence of tectonic activity, despite the apparent lack of Earth-style plate tectonics. Both systems are marked by large ridges, usually with central grabens. On Earth, the topography of the rifts can be modeled well by a cooling half-space and the spreading of two divergent plates. The origin of the topographic signature on Venus, however, remains enigmatic. Venus' rift zones (termed "chasmata") can be fit by four great circle arcs extending 1000s of kilometers. The Venus chasmata system measures 54,464 km, which when corrected for the smaller size of the planet, nearly matches the 59,200-km total length of the spreading ridges determined for Earth. As on Earth, the chasmata with the greatest relief (7 km in just a 30-km run for Venus) represent the most recent tectonic activity. We use topographic profiles to look for well-understood terrestrial analogs to Venusian features. Focusing on mid-ocean ridge systems on Earth, we examine the variation along individual ridges, or rises, due to the gradual change in spreading rate (and thus cooling times). We then analyze the difference between fast and slow ridges, and propose that this technique may also be used to pick plate boundaries along spreading centers (SAM/AFR vs. NAM/AFR, e.g.). These profiles are then compared to those for Venus' rifts. Topographic profiles are based on the Magellan (Venus) and ETOPO5 (Earth) data sets. Long wavelength features appear similar to spreading systems on Earth, suggesting a deep, thermal cause. Short wavelength features, such as rift troughs and constructional edifices, are quite different, however, as expected from the vastly different surface conditions. Comparison of topographic profiles from Venus and Earth may lend insight into tectonic features and activity on our sister planet.

  19. User-Centered Innovation: A Model for "Early Usability Testing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William A.; Boling, Elizabeth

    The goal of this study is to show how some concepts and techniques from disciplines outside Instructional Systems Development (ISD) have the potential to extend and enhance the traditional view of ISD practice when they are employed very early in the ISD process. The concepts and techniques employed were user-centered in design and usability, and…

  20. Instructional Media Center. Educational Facility Series. A Guide to Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Nicholas A., Ed.

    General recommendations are set forth regarding aesthetics, acoustics, lighting, temperature control, location, and layout of the instructional media center. Consideration is given to spatial relationships, equipment and furnishings, and suggestions are included regarding basic and advance facilities for primary, middle and secondary schools. (FS)