Science.gov

Sample records for a-1 fuel production

  1. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air and its products of combustion with ASTMA-A-1 fuel and natural gas at 20, 30, and 40 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The isentropic exponent, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy were calculated for air, the combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air, and the combustion products of natural gas and air. The properties were calculated over a temperature range from 300 to 2800 K in 100 K increments and for pressures of 20, 30 and 40 atmospheres. The data for natural gas and ASTM-A-1 were calculated for fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric in 0.01 increments.

  2. Computer program for obtaining thermodynamic and transport properties of air and products of combustion of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Colladay, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for determining desired thermodynamic and transport property values by means of a three-dimensional (pressure, fuel-air ratio, and either enthalpy or temperature) interpolation routine was developed. The program calculates temperature (or enthalpy), molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, isentropic exponent (equal to the specific heat ratio at conditions where gases do not react), Prandtl number, and entropy for air and a combustion gas mixture of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air over fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric, pressures from 1 to 40 atm, and temperatures from 250 to 2800 K.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production

    Science.gov Websites

    Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

  4. Fuel Production from Seawater and Fuel Cells Using Seawater.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2017-11-23

    Seawater is the most abundant resource on our planet and fuel production from seawater has the notable advantage that it would not compete with growing demands for pure water. This Review focuses on the production of fuels from seawater and their direct use in fuel cells. Electrolysis of seawater under appropriate conditions affords hydrogen and dioxygen with 100 % faradaic efficiency without oxidation of chloride. Photoelectrocatalytic production of hydrogen from seawater provides a promising way to produce hydrogen with low cost and high efficiency. Microbial solar cells (MSCs) that use biofilms produced in seawater can generate electricity from sunlight without additional fuel because the products of photosynthesis can be utilized as electrode reactants, whereas the electrode products can be utilized as photosynthetic reactants. Another important source for hydrogen is hydrogen sulfide, which is abundantly found in Black Sea deep water. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of Black Sea deep water can also be used in hydrogen fuel cells. Production of a fuel and its direct use in a fuel cell has been made possible for the first time by a combination of photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from seawater and dioxygen in the air and its direct use in one-compartment hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to obtain electric power. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The Collection of Ice in Jet A-1 Fuel Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Thomas C.

    Ice collection and blockages in fuel systems have been of interest to the aerospace community since their discovery in the late 1950's when a B-52 crashed. A recent growth of interest was provoked by several incidents that occurred within the last few years. This study seeks to understand the underlying principles of ice growth in fuel flow systems. Tests were performed in a recirculated fuel system with a fuel tank that held approximately 115 gallons of Jet A-1 fuel and ice accumulation was observed in two removable test pipes. The setup was in an altitude chamber capable of -60 °F and the experiments involved full scale flow components. Initially, tests were done to better understand the system and variables that effected accumulation. First, initial conditions within the test pipes were varied. Next, pipe geometry, pipe surface properties, initial water content of the fuel and heat transfer from the fuel pipe were varied. As a result of the tests, observations were made about other effects involved in the study. The effects include: the result of sequentially run tests, the effect of the fuel on the freezing temperature of the entrained water, the effect of ice accumulation on pipe welds, and the effect of the test pipe entrance and exit flow conditions on ice accumulation. The results of initial tests were qualitative. Later quantitative tests were done to demonstrate the dependence of temperature, Reynolds number, and heat transfer on ice accumulation. Tests were quantified with a pressure increase across the pipe sections that was normalized by the expected theoretical initial pressure. As a result of these tests the effect of contamination in the fuel was revealed. For ease of reference, the initial tests were called "stage I" and the later tests were called "stage II". The results of stage I showed that accumulation of soft ice was greatest when a layer of hard ice had initially formed on the pipe surface. Stainless steel collected more ice than Teflon

  6. Fuel cell electric power production

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Herng-Shinn; Heck, Ronald M.; Yarrington, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

  7. [Fuel ethanol production from cassava feedstock].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ribo; Chen, Dong; Wang, Qingyan; Shen, Naikun; Wei, Yutuo; Du, Liqin

    2010-07-01

    The regions suitable for growing cassava include five provinces in Southern China, with Guangxi alone accounting for over 65% of the total cassava production in the country. In this article, the state-of-the-art development of fuel ethanol production from cassava in China is illustrated by the construction of the cassava fuel ethanol plant with its annual production capacity of 200 000 metric tons. And in the meantime, problems and challenges encountered in the development of China's cassava fuel ethanol are highlighted and the strategies to address them are proposed.

  8. Composition and methods for improved fuel production

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Philip H.; Tanneru, Sathishkumar; Gajjela, Sanjeev K.

    2015-12-29

    Certain embodiments of the present invention are configured to produce boiler and transportation fuels. A first phase of the method may include oxidation and/or hyper-acidification of bio-oil to produce an intermediate product. A second phase of the method may include catalytic deoxygenation, esterification, or olefination/esterification of the intermediate product under pressurized syngas. The composition of the resulting product--e.g., a boiler fuel--produced by these methods may be used directly or further upgraded to a transportation fuel. Certain embodiments of the present invention also include catalytic compositions configured for use in the method embodiments.

  9. Production of Renewable Diesel Fuel

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    Vegetable oils have been investigated as a way to provide a renewable source for diesel fuel. A successful approach to using : vegetable oils in diesel engines has been transesterification of the oils with simple alcohols to produce mono-alkyl esters...

  10. Engineering organisms for industrial fuel production.

    PubMed

    Berry, David A

    2010-01-01

    Volatile fuel costs, the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel security concerns are driving efforts to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. Petroleum comes from sunlight, CO(2) and water converted via a biological intermediate into fuel over a several million year timescale. It stands to reason that using biology to short-circuit this time cycle offers an attractive alternative--but only with relevant products at or below market prices. The state of the art of biological engineering over the past five years has progressed to allow for market needs to drive innovation rather than trying to adapt existing approaches to the market. This report describes two innovations using synthetic biology to dis-intermediate fuel production. LS9 is developing a means to convert biological intermediates such as cellulosic hydrolysates into drop-in hydrocarbon product replacements such as diesel. Joule Unlimited is pioneering approaches to eliminate feedstock dependency by efficiently capturing sunlight, CO(2) and water to produce fuels and chemicals. The innovations behind these companies are built with the market in mind, focused on low cost biosynthesis of existing products of the petroleum industry. Through successful deployment of technologies such as those behind LS9 and Joule Unlimited, alternative sources of petroleum products will mitigate many of the issues faced with our petroleum-based economy. © 2010 Landes Bioscience

  11. Engineering cyanobacteria for fuels and chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Yin

    2010-03-01

    The world's energy and global warming crises call for sustainable, renewable, carbon-neutral alternatives to replace fossil fuel resources. Currently, most biofuels are produced from agricultural crops and residues, which lead to concerns about food security and land shortage. Compared to the current biofuel production system, cyanobacteria, as autotrophic prokaryotes, do not require arable land and can grow to high densities by efficiently using solar energy, CO(2), water, and inorganic nutrients. Moreover, powerful genetic techniques of cyanobacteria have been developed. For these reasons, cyanobacteria, which carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, are attractive hosts for production of fuels and chemicals. Recently, several chemicals including ethanol, isobutanol and isoprene have been produced by engineered cyanobacteria directly using solar energy, CO(2), and water. Cyanobacterium is therefore a potential novel cell factory for fuels and chemicals production to address global energy security and climate change issues.

  12. Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Qiao, Ming; Woods, Elizabeth; Myren, Paul; Cortright, Randy; Kania, John

    2018-01-23

    Methods, reactor systems, and catalysts are provided for converting in a continuous process biomass to fuels and chemicals, including methods of converting the water insoluble components of biomass, such as hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, to volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates, such as alcohols, ketones, cyclic ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and mixtures thereof. In certain applications, the volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates can be collected and used as a final chemical product, or used in downstream processes to produce liquid fuels, chemicals and other products.

  13. Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Elizabeth; Qiao, Ming; Myren, Paul; Cortright, Randy D.; Kania, John

    2015-12-15

    Described are methods, reactor systems, and catalysts for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals in a batch and/or continuous process. The process generally involves the conversion of water insoluble components of biomass, such as hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, to volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates, such as alcohols, ketones, cyclic ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and mixtures thereof. In certain applications, the volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates can be collected and used as a final chemical product, or used in downstream processes to produce liquid fuels, chemicals and other products.

  14. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  15. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Performance Composite Data Products: Spring 2018

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Jennifer M; Sprik, Samuel; Ainscough, Christopher D

    This publication includes 22 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2018 for fuel cell electric vehicle performance in the categories of deployment, driving behavior, fuel economy, fueling behavior, and hydrogen performance.

  16. Reducing Actinide Production Using Inert Matrix Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Deinert, Mark

    2017-08-23

    The environmental and geopolitical problems that surround nuclear power stem largely from the longlived transuranic isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and Pu that are contained in spent nuclear fuel. New methods for transmuting these elements into more benign forms are needed. Current research efforts focus largely on the development of fast burner reactors, because it has been shown that they could dramatically reduce the accumulation of transuranics. However, despite five decades of effort, fast reactors have yet to achieve industrial viability. A critical limitation to this, and other such strategies, is that they require a type of spent fuel reprocessingmore » that can efficiently separate all of the transuranics from the fission products with which they are mixed. Unfortunately, the technology for doing this on an industrial scale is still in development. In this project, we explore a strategy for transmutation that can be deployed using existing, current generation reactors and reprocessing systems. We show that use of an inert matrix fuel to recycle transuranics in a conventional pressurized water reactor could reduce overall production of these materials by an amount that is similar to what is achievable using proposed fast reactor cycles. Furthermore, we show that these transuranic reductions can be achieved even if the fission products are carried into the inert matrix fuel along with the transuranics, bypassing the critical separations hurdle described above. The implications of these findings are significant, because they imply that inert matrix fuel could be made directly from the material streams produced by the commercially available PUREX process. Zirconium dioxide would be an ideal choice of inert matrix in this context because it is known to form a stable solid solution with both fission products and transuranics.« less

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conventional Natural Gas Production

    Science.gov Websites

    Conventional Natural Gas Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center : Conventional Natural Gas Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conventional Natural Gas Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conventional Natural Gas Production

  18. 48 CFR 908.7109 - Fuels and packaged petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuels and packaged petroleum products. 908.7109 Section 908.7109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY....7109 Fuels and packaged petroleum products. Acquisitions of fuel and packaged petroleum products by DOE...

  19. Traversing the mountaintop: world fossil fuel production to 2050.

    PubMed

    Nehring, Richard

    2009-10-27

    During the past century, fossil fuels--petroleum liquids, natural gas and coal--were the dominant source of world energy production. From 1950 to 2005, fossil fuels provided 85-93% of all energy production. All fossil fuels grew substantially during this period, their combined growth exceeding the increase in world population. This growth, however, was irregular, providing for rapidly growing per capita production from 1950 to 1980, stable per capita production from 1980 to 2000 and rising per capita production again after 2000. During the past half century, growth in fossil fuel production was essentially limited by energy demand. During the next half century, fossil fuel production will be limited primarily by the amount and characteristics of remaining fossil fuel resources. Three possible scenarios--low, medium and high--are developed for the production of each of the fossil fuels to 2050. These scenarios differ primarily by the amount of ultimate resources estimated for each fossil fuel. Total fossil fuel production will continue to grow, but only slowly for the next 15-30 years. The subsequent peak plateau will last for 10-15 years. These production peaks are robust; none of the fossil fuels, even with highly optimistic resource estimates, is projected to keep growing beyond 2050. World fossil fuel production per capita will thus begin an irreversible decline between 2020 and 2030.

  20. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... longer be propelled by a clean-burning fuel; (B) The vehicle is used by the taxpayer in a manner... vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. 1.179A-1 Section 1.179A-1 Internal... of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling...

  1. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-burning fuel; (B) The vehicle is used by the taxpayer in a manner described in section 50(b); (C) The... vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. 1.179A-1 Section 1.179A-1 Internal... for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. (a) In...

  2. Traversing the mountaintop: world fossil fuel production to 2050

    PubMed Central

    Nehring, Richard

    2009-01-01

    During the past century, fossil fuels—petroleum liquids, natural gas and coal—were the dominant source of world energy production. From 1950 to 2005, fossil fuels provided 85–93% of all energy production. All fossil fuels grew substantially during this period, their combined growth exceeding the increase in world population. This growth, however, was irregular, providing for rapidly growing per capita production from 1950 to 1980, stable per capita production from 1980 to 2000 and rising per capita production again after 2000. During the past half century, growth in fossil fuel production was essentially limited by energy demand. During the next half century, fossil fuel production will be limited primarily by the amount and characteristics of remaining fossil fuel resources. Three possible scenarios—low, medium and high—are developed for the production of each of the fossil fuels to 2050. These scenarios differ primarily by the amount of ultimate resources estimated for each fossil fuel. Total fossil fuel production will continue to grow, but only slowly for the next 15–30 years. The subsequent peak plateau will last for 10–15 years. These production peaks are robust; none of the fossil fuels, even with highly optimistic resource estimates, is projected to keep growing beyond 2050. World fossil fuel production per capita will thus begin an irreversible decline between 2020 and 2030. PMID:19770156

  3. Artificial leaf device for solar fuel production.

    PubMed

    Amao, Yutaka; Shuto, Naho; Furuno, Kana; Obata, Asami; Fuchino, Yoshiko; Uemura, Keiko; Kajino, Tsutomu; Sekito, Takeshi; Iwai, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yasushi; Matsuda, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Solar fuels, such as hydrogen gas produced from water and methanol produced from carbon dioxide reduction by artificial photosynthesis, have received considerable attention. In natural leaves the photosynthetic proteins are well-organized in the thylakoid membrane. To develop an artificial leaf device for solar low-carbon fuel production from CO2, a chlorophyll derivative chlorin-e6 (Chl-e6; photosensitizer), 1-carboxylundecanoyl-1'-methyl-4,4'-bipyrizinium bromide, iodide (CH3V(CH2)9COOH; the electron carrier) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) (the catalyst) immobilised onto a silica-gel-based thin layer chromatography plate (the Chl-V-FDH device) was investigated. From luminescence spectroscopy measurements, the photoexcited triplet state of Chl-e6 was quenched by the CH3V(CH2)9COOH moiety on the device, indicating the photoinduced electron transfer from the photoexcited triplet state of Chl-e6 to the CH3V(CH2)9COOH moiety. When the CO2-saturated sample solution containing NADPH (the electron donor) was flowed onto the Chl-V-FDH device under visible light irradiation, the formic acid concentration increased with increasing irradiation time.

  4. Biomass gasification for liquid fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Najser, Jan, E-mail: jan.najser@vsb.cz, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz; Peer, Václav, E-mail: jan.najser@vsb.cz, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-06

    In our old fix-bed autothermal gasifier we tested wood chips and wood pellets. We make experiments for Czech company producing agro pellets - pellets made from agricultural waste and fastrenewable natural resources. We tested pellets from wheat and rice straw and hay. These materials can be very perspective, because they dońt compete with food production, they were formed in sufficient quantity and in the place of their treatment. New installation is composed of allothermal biomass fixed bed gasifier with conditioning and using produced syngas for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis. As a gasifying agent will be used steam. Gas purification willmore » have two parts - separation of dust particles using a hot filter and dolomite reactor for decomposition of tars. In next steps, gas will be cooled, compressed and removed of sulphur and chlorine compounds and carbon dioxide. This syngas will be used for liquid fuel synthesis.« less

  5. Biomass gasification for liquid fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najser, Jan; Peer, Václav; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In our old fix-bed autothermal gasifier we tested wood chips and wood pellets. We make experiments for Czech company producing agro pellets - pellets made from agricultural waste and fastrenewable natural resources. We tested pellets from wheat and rice straw and hay. These materials can be very perspective, because they dońt compete with food production, they were formed in sufficient quantity and in the place of their treatment. New installation is composed of allothermal biomass fixed bed gasifier with conditioning and using produced syngas for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis. As a gasifying agent will be used steam. Gas purification will have two parts - separation of dust particles using a hot filter and dolomite reactor for decomposition of tars. In next steps, gas will be cooled, compressed and removed of sulphur and chlorine compounds and carbon dioxide. This syngas will be used for liquid fuel synthesis.

  6. 10 CFR 490.8 - Replacement fuel production goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Replacement fuel production goal. 490.8 Section 490.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General... sufficient to replace, on an energy equivalent basis, at least 30 percent of motor fuel consumption in the...

  7. 10 CFR 490.8 - Replacement fuel production goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Replacement fuel production goal. 490.8 Section 490.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General... sufficient to replace, on an energy equivalent basis, at least 30 percent of motor fuel consumption in the...

  8. 10 CFR 490.8 - Replacement fuel production goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Replacement fuel production goal. 490.8 Section 490.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General... sufficient to replace, on an energy equivalent basis, at least 30 percent of motor fuel consumption in the...

  9. 10 CFR 490.8 - Replacement fuel production goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Replacement fuel production goal. 490.8 Section 490.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General... sufficient to replace, on an energy equivalent basis, at least 30 percent of motor fuel consumption in the...

  10. 10 CFR 490.8 - Replacement fuel production goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Replacement fuel production goal. 490.8 Section 490.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General... sufficient to replace, on an energy equivalent basis, at least 30 percent of motor fuel consumption in the...

  11. Nanoplasmonic Catalysis for Synthetic Fuel Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-22

    understanding of the basic mechanism underlying this enhancement with the ultimate goal of producing synthetic fuels, such as hydrogen , methane and...of producing synthetic fuels, such as hydrogen , methane and methanol using visible illumination. Objectives: - Fabricate arrays of metal...in our energy infrastructure. For photocatalysis , this area is especially exciting because it presents a possible route to direct solar-to-fuel

  12. Production of distillate fuels from biomass-derived polyoxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Kania, John; Blommel, Paul; Woods, Elizabeth; Dally, Brice; Lyman, Warren; Cortright, Randy

    2017-03-14

    The present invention provides methods, reactor systems and catalysts for converting biomass and biomass-derived feedstocks to C.sub.8+ hydrocarbons using heterogenous catalysts. The product stream may be separated and further processed for use in chemical applications, or as a neat fuel or a blending component in jet fuel and diesel fuel, or as heavy oils for lubricant and/or fuel oil applications.

  13. Fuel preparation for use in the production of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Policke, Timothy A.; Aase, Scott B.; Stagg, William R.

    The present invention relates generally to the field of medical isotope production by fission of uranium-235 and the fuel utilized therein (e.g., the production of suitable Low Enriched Uranium (LEU is uranium having 20 weight percent or less uranium-235) fuel for medical isotope production) and, in particular to a method for producing LEU fuel and a LEU fuel product that is suitable for use in the production of medical isotopes. In one embodiment, the LEU fuel of the present invention is designed to be utilized in an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR) for the production of various medical isotopes including, butmore » not limited to, molybdenum-99, cesium-137, iodine-131, strontium-89, xenon-133 and yttrium-90.« less

  14. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  15. Production of jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids from engineered Escherichia coli: Production of Jet Fuel Precursor Monoterpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun

    Monoterpenes (C 10 isoprenoids) are the main components of essential oils and are possible precursors for many commodity chemicals and high energy density fuels. Monoterpenes are synthesized from geranyl diphosphate (GPP), which is also the precursor for the biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). FPP biosynthesis diverts the carbon flux from monoterpene production to C 15 products and quinone biosynthesis. In this study, we tested a chromosomal mutation of Escherichia coli's native FPP synthase (IspA) to improve GPP availability for the production of monoterpenes using a heterologous mevalonate pathway. Monoterpene production at high levels required not only optimization of GPP productionmore » but also a basal level of FPP to maintain growth. The optimized strains produced two jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids 1,8-cineole and linalool at the titer of 653 mg/L and 505 mg/L, respectively, in batch cultures with 1% glucose. The engineered strains developed in this work provide useful resources for the production of high-value monoterpenes.« less

  16. Production of jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids from engineered Escherichia coli: Production of Jet Fuel Precursor Monoterpenoids

    DOE PAGES

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; ...

    2017-05-18

    Monoterpenes (C 10 isoprenoids) are the main components of essential oils and are possible precursors for many commodity chemicals and high energy density fuels. Monoterpenes are synthesized from geranyl diphosphate (GPP), which is also the precursor for the biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). FPP biosynthesis diverts the carbon flux from monoterpene production to C 15 products and quinone biosynthesis. In this study, we tested a chromosomal mutation of Escherichia coli's native FPP synthase (IspA) to improve GPP availability for the production of monoterpenes using a heterologous mevalonate pathway. Monoterpene production at high levels required not only optimization of GPP productionmore » but also a basal level of FPP to maintain growth. The optimized strains produced two jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids 1,8-cineole and linalool at the titer of 653 mg/L and 505 mg/L, respectively, in batch cultures with 1% glucose. The engineered strains developed in this work provide useful resources for the production of high-value monoterpenes.« less

  17. Fuel ethanol production: process design trends and integration opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos A; Sánchez, Oscar J

    2007-09-01

    Current fuel ethanol research and development deals with process engineering trends for improving biotechnological production of ethanol. In this work, the key role that process design plays during the development of cost-effective technologies is recognized through the analysis of major trends in process synthesis, modeling, simulation and optimization related to ethanol production. Main directions in techno-economical evaluation of fuel ethanol processes are described as well as some prospecting configurations. The most promising alternatives for compensating ethanol production costs by the generation of valuable co-products are analyzed. Opportunities for integration of fuel ethanol production processes and their implications are underlined. Main ways of process intensification through reaction-reaction, reaction-separation and separation-separation processes are analyzed in the case of bioethanol production. Some examples of energy integration during ethanol production are also highlighted. Finally, some concluding considerations on current and future research tendencies in fuel ethanol production regarding process design and integration are presented.

  18. Alcohol Fuel Production for Vocational Students: Secondary, Postsecondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, C. Paul; Burkhalter, Wayne

    In order to help bring about the potential for alcohol production by the farming community, Navarro College (Texas) has developed this curriculum for secondary and postsecondary levels in alcohol fuel production. The alcohol fuel curriculum consists of five modules for use in practical hands-on vocational programs. The curriculum is designed to…

  19. Stationary Fuel Cell System Composite Data Products | Hydrogen and Fuel

    Science.gov Websites

    Capacity by Equipment Type CDP STAT 14, 10/21/15 Average Eligible Cost by Equipment Type, including Other Distributed Generation CDP STAT 15, 10/21/15 Average Eligible Cost for Biogas Sources CDP STAT 16, 10/21/15 Capacity and Eligible Cost (CHP Fuel Cells) CDP STAT 22, 10/21/15 Distribution of Eligible Cost with and

  20. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Composite Data Products | Hydrogen and Fuel

    Science.gov Websites

    Ambient Temperature CDP FCEV 35, 2/19/16 Time Between Trips CDP FCEV 36, 5/1/16 Time Between Trips and Trip Ambient Temperature CDP FCEV 37, 5/1/16 Trips per Hour CDP FCEV 38, 2/19/16 Trips per Hour by Fuel Vehicle Miles Between Fills by Month CDP FCEV 56, 3/1/16 Reliability Maintenance Causes and Effects-Stack

  1. Comparison of combustion characteristics of ASTM A-1, propane, and natural-gas fuels in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of an annular turbojet combustor using natural-gas fuel is compared with that obtained using ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Propane gas was used to simulate operation with vaporized kerosene fuels. The results obtained at severe operating conditions and altitude relight conditions show that natural gas is inferior to both ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Combustion efficiencies were significantly lower and combustor pressures for relight were higher with natural-gas fuel than with the other fuels. The inferior performance of natural gas is shown to be caused by the chemical stability of the methane molecule.

  2. Fuel ethanol production from agricultural residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. In 2012, about 13.3 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was produced from corn in the USA which makes up 10% of gasoline supply. Various agricultural residues such as corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw and barley straw can serve as low-cost lignocellulosic fee...

  3. Production of bio-jet fuel from microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmoraghy, Marian

    The increase in petroleum-based aviation fuel consumption, the decrease in petroleum resources, the fluctuation of the crude oil price, the increase in greenhouse gas emission and the need for energy security are motivating the development of an alternate jet fuel. Bio-jet fuel has to be a drop in fuel, technically and economically feasible, environmentally friendly, greener than jet fuel, produced locally and low gallon per Btu. Bic jet fuel has been produced by blending petro-based jet fuel with microalgae biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester, or simply FAME). Indoor microalgae growth, lipids extraction and transetrification to biodiesel are energy and fresh water intensive and time consuming. In addition, the quality of the biodiesel product and the physical properties of the bio-jet fuel blends are unknown. This work addressed these challenges. Minimizing the energy requirements and making microalgae growth process greener were accomplished by replacing fluorescent lights with light emitting diodes (LEDs). Reducing fresh water footprint in algae growth was accomplished by waste water use. Microalgae biodiesel production time was reduced using the one-step (in-situ transestrification) process. Yields up to 56.82 mg FAME/g dry algae were obtained. Predicted physical properties of in-situ FAME satisfied European and American standards confirming its quality. Lipid triggering by nitrogen deprivation was accomplished in order to increase the FAME production. Bio-jet fuel freezing points and heating values were measured for different jet fuel to biodiesel blend ratios.

  4. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  5. Alcohol Fuel By-Product Utilization and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerboom, Jim

    Ten lessons comprise this curriculum intended to assist vocational teachers in establishing and conducting an alcohol fuels workshop on engine modification and plant design. A glossary is provided first. The 10 lessons cover these topics: the alcohol fuel plant, feedstock preparation lab, distillation lab, fuel plant processes, plant design lab,…

  6. Solar hydrogen production: renewable hydrogen production by dry fuel reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Jamie; Miyamoto, Henry K.

    2006-09-01

    SHEC LABS - Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation constructed a pilot-plant to demonstrate a Dry Fuel Reforming (DFR) system that is heated primarily by sunlight focusing-mirrors. The pilot-plant consists of: 1) a solar mirror array and solar concentrator and shutter system; and 2) two thermo-catalytic reactors to convert Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Water into Hydrogen. Results from the pilot study show that solar Hydrogen generation is feasible and cost-competitive with traditional Hydrogen production. More than 95% of Hydrogen commercially produced today is by the Steam Methane Reformation (SMR) of natural gas, a process that liberates Carbon Dioxide to the atmosphere. The SMR process provides a net energy loss of 30 to 35% when converting from Methane to Hydrogen. Solar Hydrogen production provides a 14% net energy gain when converting Methane into Hydrogen since the energy used to drive the process is from the sun. The environmental benefits of generating Hydrogen using renewable energy include significant greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant reductions.

  7. Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982

    DOE Data Explorer

    Rotty, R.M. [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marland, G. [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Global carbon dioxide emissions for 1950 through 1982 were estimated by Marland and Rotty (1984) from fuel production data from the U.N. Energy Statistics Yearbook (1983, 1984). Data before 1950 came from Keeling (1973). Fuel-production data were used in these calculations because they appeared to be more reliable on a global basis than fuel-consumption data. The data given are the year and annual global CO2 emissions (annual global total; cumulative global total since 1860; and annual global emissions from solid fuels, liquid fuels, natural gas, gas flaring, and cement manufacturing). These data provide the only pre-1950 estimates of the amount of carbon emitted to the atmosphere from fossil-fuel burning. The CO2 emission record since 1950 has been updated and revised several times with the most recent estimates being published by Marland et al. (1989).

  8. METHANOL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS TRANSPORTATION FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (i) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the U.S., (ii) minimizes em...

  9. Large Scale PEM Electrolysis to Enable Renewable Hydrogen Fuel Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-10

    PEM Fuel Cell Anode + -Cathode e- e- e- e- Electric load...BOP system. • Enables new product launch (C- Series) Proton PEM cell stack for UK Vanguard subs 18UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release...UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release “Large Scale PEM Electrolysis to Enable Renewable Hydrogen Fuel Production” Alternative Energy

  10. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. 1.179A-1 Section 1.179A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for...

  11. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. 1.179A-1 Section 1.179A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for...

  12. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle refueling property. 1.179A-1 Section 1.179A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for...

  13. New co-products from grain-based fuel ethanol production and their drying performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fuel ethanol production in the U.S. and elsewhere is an important and growing industry. In the U.S, about 40% of annual corn production is now converted into fuel ethanol. During co-product recovery, condensed distillers solubles (CDS) has to be mixed with distillers wet grains before drying due to ...

  14. Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  15. Midwest vision for sustainable fuel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meeting the challenge of providing 30% of the transportation fuels used in the USA from those developed from biomass will require significant improvements in technology across the supply chain, significant commercial investment in infrastructure, and, because of the unique characteristics of biomass...

  16. Fuels Products of the LANDFIRE Project

    Treesearch

    Matthew C. Reeves; Jay R. Kost; Kevin C. Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The LANDFIRE project is a collaborative interagency effort designed to provide seamless, nationally consistent, locally relevant geographic information systems (GIS) data layers depicting wildland fuels, vegetation and fire regime characteristics. The LANDFIRE project is the first of its kind and offers new opportunity for fire management and research activities. Here...

  17. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A., E-mail: Azizov-EA@nrcki.ru

    2015-12-15

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel canmore » be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.« less

  18. Trends in biotechnological production of fuel ethanol from different feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Oscar J; Cardona, Carlos A

    2008-09-01

    Present work deals with the biotechnological production of fuel ethanol from different raw materials. The different technologies for producing fuel ethanol from sucrose-containing feedstocks (mainly sugar cane), starchy materials and lignocellulosic biomass are described along with the major research trends for improving them. The complexity of the biomass processing is recognized through the analysis of the different stages involved in the conversion of lignocellulosic complex into fermentable sugars. The features of fermentation processes for the three groups of studied feedstocks are discussed. Comparative indexes for the three major types of feedstocks for fuel ethanol production are presented. Finally, some concluding considerations on current research and future tendencies in the production of fuel ethanol regarding the pretreatment and biological conversion of the feedstocks are presented.

  19. Spatial fuel data products of the LANDFIRE Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, M.C.; Ryan, K.C.; Rollins, M.G.; Thompson, T.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) Project is mapping wildland fuels, vegetation, and fire regime characteristics across the United States. The LANDFIRE project is unique because of its national scope, creating an integrated product suite at 30-m spatial resolution and complete spatial coverage of all lands within the 50 states. Here we describe development of the LANDFIRE wildland fuels data layers for the conterminous 48 states: surface fire behavior fuel models, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, canopy cover, and canopy height. Surface fire behavior fuel models are mapped by developing crosswalks to vegetation structure and composition created by LANDFIRE. Canopy fuels are mapped using regression trees relating field-referenced estimates of canopy base height and canopy bulk density to satellite imagery, biophysical gradients and vegetation structure and composition data. Here we focus on the methods and data used to create the fuel data products, discuss problems encountered with the data, provide an accuracy assessment, demonstrate recent use of the data during the 2007 fire season, and discuss ideas for updating, maintaining and improving LANDFIRE fuel data products.

  20. Production of LEU Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans Jr, James O; McMurray, Jake W

    2016-01-01

    Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded inside a SiC matrix. This fuel inherently possesses multiple barriers to fission product release, namely the various coating layers in the TRISO fuel particle as well as the dense SiC matrix that hosts these particles. This coupled with the excellent oxidation resistance of the SiC matrix and the SiC coating layer in the TRISO particle designate this concept as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). The FCM fuel takes advantage of uranium nitride kernels instead of oxide or oxide-carbide kernels used in high temperature gas reactors to enhancemore » heavy metal loading in the highly moderated LWRs. Production of these kernels with appropriate density, coating layer development to produce UN TRISO particles, and consolidation of these particles inside a SiC matrix have been codified thanks to significant R&D supported by US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program. Also, surrogate FCM pellets (pellets with zirconia instead of uranium-bearing kernels) have been neutron irradiated and the stability of the matrix and coating layer under LWR irradiation conditions have been established. Currently the focus is on production of LEU (7.3% U-235 enrichment) FCM pellets to be utilized for irradiation testing. The irradiation is planned at INL s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is a critical step in development of this fuel concept to establish the ability of this fuel to retain fission products under prototypical irradiation conditions.« less

  1. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  2. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, Harold T.

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressedmore » by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a

  3. Atomic Processes Relevant to Antimatter Fuel Production and Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    TO ANTIMATTER FUEL ’ |PRODUCTION AND STORAGE DTIC S nELECTE JUL0 11994 D FINAL REPORT F * 31 MAY 1994 I * Prepared by: J.B.A. Mitchell Dept. of Physics...Atomic Processes Relevant to Antimatter Fuel Production and Storage 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J.B.A. Mitchell I 3a. TYPE JFRE qT 113b. TIME COVERED 114... antimatter production, this investigation did shed a great deal of light on the recombination process in general and so is worthy of inclusion in this report

  4. Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0054 Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production Mamoru Nango NAGOYA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...for Solar Fuel Production 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4015 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Mamoru Nango 5d...density immobilization of the photoreactants in the nanocavity inside PGP. The maximum production efficiency of formic acid inside the nanocavity was

  5. Target-fueled nuclear reactor for medical isotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, Richard L.; Parma, Edward J.

    A small, low-enriched, passively safe, low-power nuclear reactor comprises a core of target and fuel pins that can be processed to produce the medical isotope .sup.99Mo and other fission product isotopes. The fuel for the reactor and the targets for the .sup.99Mo production are the same. The fuel can be low enriched uranium oxide, enriched to less than 20% .sup.235U. The reactor power level can be 1 to 2 MW. The reactor is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7more » to 21 days.« less

  6. Hydrogen production econometric studies. [hydrogen and fossil fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. R.; Bannerot, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The current assessments of fossil fuel resources in the United States were examined, and predictions of the maximum and minimum lifetimes of recoverable resources according to these assessments are presented. In addition, current rates of production in quads/year for the fossil fuels were determined from the literature. Where possible, costs of energy, location of reserves, and remaining time before these reserves are exhausted are given. Limitations that appear to hinder complete development of each energy source are outlined.

  7. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  8. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  9. Fuel alcohol production from agricultural lignocellulosic feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, G.E.; Barrier, J.W.; Forsythe, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    A two-stage, low-temperature, ambient pressure, acid hydrolysis process that utilizes separate unit operations to convert hemicellulose and cellulose in agricultural residues and crops to fermentable sugars is being developed and tested. Based on the results of the bench-scale tests, an acid hydrolysis experimental plant to demonstrate the concepts of low-temperature acid hydrolysis on a much larger scale was built. Plant tests using corn stover have been conducted for more that a year and conversion efficiences have equaled those achieved in the laboratory. Laboratory tests to determine the potential for low-temperature acid hydrolysis of other feedstocks - including red clover, alfalfa,more » kobe lespedeza, winter rape, and rye grass - are being conducted. Where applicable, process modifications to include extraction before or after hydrolysis also are being studied. This paper describes the experimental plant and process, results obtained in the plant, results of alternative feedstocks testing in the laboratory, and a plan for an integrated system that will produce other fuels, feed, and food from crops grown on marginal land.« less

  10. Compact hydrogen production systems for solid polymer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K.; Formanski, V.; Kalk, Th.; Roes, J.

    Generally there are several ways to produce hydrogen gas from carbonaceous fuels like natural gas, oil or alcohols. Most of these processes are designed for large-scale industrial production and are not suitable for a compact hydrogen production system (CHYPS) in the power range of 1 kW. In order to supply solid polymer fuel cells (SPFC) with hydrogen, a compact fuel processor is required for mobile applications. The produced hydrogen-rich gas has to have a low level of harmful impurities; in particular the carbon monoxide content has to be lower than 20 ppmv. Integrating the reaction step, the gas purification and the heat supply leads to small-scale hydrogen production systems. The steam reforming of methanol is feasible at copper catalysts in a low temperature range of 200-350°C. The combination of a small-scale methanol reformer and a metal membrane as purification step forms a compact system producing high-purity hydrogen. The generation of a SPFC hydrogen fuel gas can also be performed by thermal or catalytic cracking of liquid hydrocarbons such as propane. At a temperature of 900°C the decomposition of propane into carbon and hydrogen takes place. A fuel processor based on this simple concept produces a gas stream with a hydrogen content of more than 90 vol.% and without CO and CO2.

  11. Regional analysis of renewable transportation fuels - production and consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoshuai

    The transportation sector contributes more than a quarter of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Replacing fossil fuels with renewable fuels can be a key solution to mitigate GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Particularly, we have focused on land-based production of renewable fuels from landfills and brownfield in the southeastern region of the United States. These so call marginal lands require no direct land-use change to avoid environmental impact and, furthermore, have rendered opportunities for carbon trading and low-carbon intensity business. The resources potential and production capacity were derived using federal and state energy databases with the aid of GIS techniques. To maximize fuels production and land-use efficiency, a scheme of co-location renewable transportation fuels for production on landfills was conducted as a case study. Results of economic modeling analysis indicate that solar panel installed on landfill sites could generate a positive return within the project duration, but the biofuel production within the landfill facility is relatively uncertain, requiring proper sizing of the onsite processing facility, economic scale of production and available tax credits. From the consumers' perspective, a life-cycle cost analysis has been conducted to determine the economic and environmental implications of different transportation choices by consumers. Without tax credits, only the hybrid electric vehicles have lifetime total costs equivalent to a conventional vehicles differing by about 1 to 7%. With tax credits, electric and hybrid electric vehicles could be affordable and attain similar lifetime total costs as compared to conventional vehicles. The dissertation research has provided policy-makers and consumers a pathway of prioritizing investment on sustainable transportation systems with a balance of environmental benefits and economic feasibility.

  12. Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis Map (Text Version) | Hyrdrogen and Fuel

    Science.gov Websites

    Cells | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL Analysis Map (Text Version) Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis Map (Text Version) Below is a text version of the U.S. map that provides the results of NREL's

  13. Fate of virginiamycin through the fuel ethanol production process

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics are frequently used to prevent and treat bacterial contamination of commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, but there is concern that antibiotic residues may persist in the distillers grains coproducts. A study to evaluate the fate of virginiamycin during the ethanol production process wa...

  14. Fuel ethanol production from alkaline peroxide pretreated corn stover

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn stover (CS) has the potential to serve as an abundant low-cost feedstock for production of fuel ethanol. Due to heterogeneous complexity and recalcitrance of lignocellulosic feedstocks, pretreatment is required to break the lignin seal and/or disrupt the structure of crystalline cellulose to in...

  15. Antimicrobial peptides against contaminating bacteria in fuel ethanol production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly found as contaminants of fuel ethanol production, resulting in reduced ethanol yields: (1). Recent reports suggest that LAB can develop resistance to antibiotics such as virginiamycin and penicillin that are commonly used to control bacterial contamination; (2...

  16. Antimicrobial peptides against contaminating bacteria in fuel ethanol production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly found as contaminants of fuel ethanol production, resulting in reduced ethanol yields (1). Recent reports suggest that LAB can develop resistance to antibiotics such as virginiamycin and penicillin that are commonly used to control bacterial contamination (2)...

  17. Process technologies for production of fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw, and switchgrass can serve as low-cost feedstock for production of fuel ethanol. These feedstocks contain complex carbohydrates (cellulose and hemicelluloses) which need to be converted to fermentable sugars and then these sugars b...

  18. Spatial fuel data products of the LANDFIRE Project

    Treesearch

    Matt Reeves; Kevin C. Ryan; Matthew G. Rollins; Thomas G. Thompson

    2009-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) Project is mapping wildland fuels, vegetation, and fire regime characteristics across the United States. The LANDFIRE project is unique because of its national scope, creating an integrated product suite at 30-m spatial resolution and complete spatial coverage of all lands within the 50...

  19. Hydrogen production from bio-fuels using precious metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasel, Joachim; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Rotov, Mikhail; Löhken, Katrin; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming unit require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. Thus, an experimental screening of catalysts for autothermal reforming of commercial biodiesel fuel was performed. Catalysts consisted of a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3) and Pt, Ru, Ni, PtRh and PtRu as active phase. Experiments were run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. Fresh and aged catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed methods and thermogravimetry to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability.

  20. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Lauren M.; De La Ree, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  1. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2011-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  2. Positron production using a 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara, K. F.; Crivelli, P.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2013-04-01

    We report the foremost phase of a fourth generation positron source, being constructed at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Positron yields are reported by making use of the 19F(p,αe+e-)16O reaction, where the fluorine target is in the form of a CaF2 pellet. Positron production has been observed by detecting 511 keV annihilation gamma rays emerging from the irradiated CaF2 target.

  3. Method of preparing a high heating value fuel product

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, R.; Fan, L.T.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes a method of preparing a high heating value fuel product. The method comprising the steps of: blending a high heating value waste material with a cellulosic material; mixing an organic reagent to the blended mixture of the waste material and the cellulosic material, the organic reagent being a mixture having a 4-15 weight percent of a chemical selected from the group consisting of: triethylene, glycol, diethylene glycol, and glycerin propylene glycol; introducing a pozzolanic agent to the blended mixture for controlling the rate of solidification; and forming the blended mixture into a form suitable for handling. Alsomore » described is the same method with the mixture of the organic reagent further comprising: a 20-32 weight percent calcium chloride solution. Another method of preparing a fuel product is also described.« less

  4. Biomass Processing using Ionic Liquids for Jet Fuel Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-09

    lignocellulosic biomass. Biomass consists predominantly of three biopolymers— lignin , hemicellulose and cellulose. For fuel production, it is necessary to...hydrocarbons. The lignin and cellulose, however, have very low solubility in conventional solvents making processing difficult. Typically a pretreatment step...is used to break up the lignin and make the cellulose accessible to further hydrolysis to glucose. Pretreatment, however, is one of the most

  5. Production of jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids from engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun; Molinas, Margaux; Baidoo, Edward E K; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne J G; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek S

    2017-08-01

    Monoterpenes (C 10 isoprenoids) are the main components of essential oils and are possible precursors for many commodity chemicals and high energy density fuels. Monoterpenes are synthesized from geranyl diphosphate (GPP), which is also the precursor for the biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). FPP biosynthesis diverts the carbon flux from monoterpene production to C 15 products and quinone biosynthesis. In this study, we tested a chromosomal mutation of Escherichia coli's native FPP synthase (IspA) to improve GPP availability for the production of monoterpenes using a heterologous mevalonate pathway. Monoterpene production at high levels required not only optimization of GPP production but also a basal level of FPP to maintain growth. The optimized strains produced two jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids 1,8-cineole and linalool at the titer of 653 mg/L and 505 mg/L, respectively, in batch cultures with 1% glucose. The engineered strains developed in this work provide useful resources for the production of high-value monoterpenes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1703-1712. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Positron production using a 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, K. F.; Santos, A. C. F.; Crivelli, P.

    2013-04-19

    We report the foremost phase of a fourth generation positron source, being constructed at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Positron yields are reported by making use of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}e{sup +}e{sup -}){sup 16}O reaction, where the fluorine target is in the form of a CaF{sub 2} pellet. Positron production has been observed by detecting 511 keV annihilation gamma rays emerging from the irradiated CaF{sub 2} target.

  7. Preliminary assessment of Malaysian micro-algae strains for the production of bio jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. T.; Mustafa, E. M.; Vello, V.; Lim, P.; Nik Sulaiman, N. M.; Majid, N. Abdul; Phang, S.; Tahir, P. Md.; Liew, K.

    2016-10-01

    Malaysia is the main hub in South-East Asia and has one of the highest air traffic movements in the region. Being rich in biodiversity, Malaysia has long been touted as country rich in biodiversity and therefore, attracts great interests as a place to setup bio-refineries and produce bio-fuels such as biodiesel, bio-petrol, green diesel, and bio-jet fuel Kerosene Jet A-1. Micro-algae is poised to alleviate certain disadvantages seen in first generation and second generation feedstock. In this study, the objective is to seek out potential micro-algae species in Malaysia to determine which are suitable to be used as the feedstock to enable bio-jet fuel production in Malaysia. From 79 samples collected over 30 sites throughout Malaysia, six species were isolated and compared for their biomass productivity and lipid content. Their lipid contents were then used to derived the require amount of micro-algae biomass to yield 1 kg of certifiable jet fuel via the HEFA process, and to meet a scenario where Malaysia implements a 2% alternative (bio-) jet fuel requirement.

  8. Noncovalent immobilization of electrocatalysts on carbon electrodes for fuel production.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, James D; Gupta, Ayush; Warren, Jeffrey J; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Gray, Harry B

    2013-12-11

    We show that molecular catalysts for fuel-forming reactions can be immobilized on graphitic carbon electrode surfaces via noncovalent interactions. A pyrene-appended bipyridine ligand (P) serves as the linker between each complex and the surface. Immobilization of a rhodium proton-reduction catalyst, [Cp*Rh(P)Cl]Cl (1), and a rhenium CO2-reduction catalyst, Re(P)(CO)3Cl (2), afford electrocatalytically active assemblies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemistry confirm catalyst immobilization. Reduction of 1 in the presence of p-toluenesulfonic acid results in catalytic H2 production, while reduction of 2 in the presence of CO2 results in catalytic CO production.

  9. Biomass Biorefinery for the production of Polymers and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Oliver P. Peoples

    The conversion of biomass crops to fuel is receiving considerable attention as a means to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and to meet future energy needs. Besides their use for fuel, biomass crops are an attractive vehicle for producing value added products such as biopolymers. Metabolix, Inc. of Cambridge proposes to develop methods for producing biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in green tissue plants as well as utilizating residual plant biomass after polymer extraction for fuel generation to offset the energy required for polymer extraction. The primary plant target is switchgrass, and backup targets are alfalfa and tobacco. Themore » combined polymer and fuel production from the transgenic biomass crops establishes a biorefinery that has the potential to reduce the nation’s dependence on foreign oil imports for both the feedstocks and energy needed for plastic production. Concerns about the widespread use of transgenic crops and the grower’s ability to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment with foreign genes will be addressed by incorporating and expanding on some of the latest plant biotechnology developed by the project partners of this proposal. This proposal also addresses extraction of PHAs from biomass, modification of PHAs so that they have suitable properties for large volume polymer applications, processing of the PHAs using conversion processes now practiced at large scale (e.g., to film, fiber, and molded parts), conversion of PHA polymers to chemical building blocks, and demonstration of the usefulness of PHAs in large volume applications. The biodegradability of PHAs can also help to reduce solid waste in our landfills. If successful, this program will reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, as well as contribute jobs and revenue to the agricultural economy and reduce the overall emissions of carbon to the atmosphere.« less

  10. Metabolic engineering of yeast for production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Larsson, Christer; van Maris, Antonius; Pronk, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Microbial production of fuels and chemicals from renewable carbohydrate feedstocks offers sustainable and economically attractive alternatives to their petroleum-based production. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers many advantages as a platform cell factory for such applications. Already applied on a huge scale for bioethanol production, this yeast is easy to genetically engineer, its physiology, metabolism and genetics have been intensively studied and its robustness enables it to handle harsh industrial conditions. Introduction of novel pathways and optimization of its native cellular processes by metabolic engineering are rapidly expanding its range of cell-factory applications. Here we review recent scientific progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for the production of bioethanol, advanced biofuels, and chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Production, quality and quality assurance of Refuse Derived Fuels (RDFs).

    PubMed

    Sarc, R; Lorber, K E

    2013-09-01

    This contribution describes characterization, classification, production, application and quality assurance of Refuse Derived Fuels (RDFs) that are increasingly used in a wide range of co-incineration plants. It is shown in this paper, that the fuel-parameter, i.e. net calorific value [MJ/kg(OS)], particle size d(90) or d(95) [mm], impurities [w%], chlorine content [w%], sulfur content [w%], fluorine content [w%], ash content [w%], moisture [w%] and heavy metals content [mg/kg(DM)], can be preferentially used for the classification of different types of RDF applied for co-incineration and substitution of fossil-fuel in different industial sectors. Describing the external production of RDF by processing and confectioning of wastes as well as internal processing of waste at the incineration plant, a case study is reported on the application of RDF made out of different household waste fractions in a 120,000t/yr Waste to Energy (WtE) circulating fluidized bed (CFB) incinerator. For that purpose, delivered wastes, as well as incinerator feedstock material (i.e. after internal waste processing) are extensively investigated. Starting with elaboration of sampling plan in accordance with the relevant guidelines and standards, waste from different suppliers was sampled. Moreover, manual sorting analyses and chemical analyses were carried out. Finally, results of investigations are presented and discussed in the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Symbiotic Nuclear—Coal Systems for Production of Liquid Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taczanowski, S.

    The notion of safety is not confined to the technological or non-proliferation aspects. It covers also the elements of energy policy: irrational reactions of societies, emotions, egoistic interests of more or less powerful pressure of economical and external political factors. One should be conscious that the country's privilege of being equipped by the Nature with rich resources of oil or gas is not solely economical, but even more a political one. Simultaneously, the gradual depletion of world hydrocarbons that draws behind irrevocable price increase has to be expected within the time scale of exploitation of power plants (now amounted to ~60 years). Therefore consequences of energy policy last much longer than the perspectives the political or economical decision makers are planning and acting within and the public is expecting successes and finally evaluating them. The world oil and gas resources are geopolitically very non-uniformly distributed, in contrast to coal and uranium. Since the level of energy self-sufficiency of the EU is highest for coal, the old idea of synfuels production from coal is recalled. Yet, in view of limits to the CO2 emissions in the EU another method has to be used here than the conventional coal liquefaction just applied in China. Simultaneously, an interesting evolution of energy prices was be observed, namely an increase in that of motor fuels in contrast to that of electricity remaining well stable. This fact suggests that the use of electricity (mainly the off-peak load), generated without emissions of CO2 for production of liquid fuels can prove reasonable. Thus, the essence of the presented idea of coal-nuclear symbiosis lies in the supply of energy in the form of H2, necessary for this process, from a nuclear reactor. Particularly, in the present option H2 is obtained by electrolytic water splitting supplying also O2 as a precious by-product in well mature and commercially available already since decades, Light Water Reactors

  13. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  14. Validation of a Waste Heat Recovery Model for a 1kW PEM Fuel Cell using Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saufi Sulaiman, M.; Mohamed, W. A. N. W.; Singh, B.; Fitrie Ghazali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cell is a device that generates electricity through electrochemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. A major by-product of the exothermic reaction is waste heat. The recovery of this waste heat has been subject to research on order to improve the overall energy utilization. However, nearly all of the studies concentrate on high temperature fuel cells using advanced thermodynamic cycles due to the high quality of waste heat. The method, characteristics and challenges in harvesting waste heat from a low temperature fuel cell using a direct energy conversion device is explored in this publication. A heat recovery system for an open cathode 1kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) was developed using a single unit of thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to a heat pipe. Power output of the fuel cell was varied to obtain the performance of TEG at different stack temperatures. Natural and forced convections modes of cooling were applied to the TEG cold side. This is to simulate the conditions of a mini fuel cell vehicle at rest and in motion. The experimental results were analysed and a mathematical model based on the thermal circuit analogy was developed and compared. Forced convection mode resulted in higher temperature difference, output voltage and maximum power which are 3.3°C, 33.5 mV, and 113.96mW respectively. The heat recovery system for 1 kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) using single TEG was successfully established and improved the electrical production of fuel cell. Moreover, the experimental results obtained was in a good agreement with theoretical results.

  15. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processingmore » plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the

  16. Risks to global biodiversity from fossil-fuel production exceed those from biofuel production

    DOE PAGES

    Dale, Virginia H.; Parish, Esther S.; Kline, Keith L.

    2014-12-02

    Potential global biodiversity impacts from near-term gasoline production are compared to biofuel, a renewable liquid transportation fuel expected to substitute for gasoline in the near term (i.e., from now until c. 2030). Petroleum exploration activities are projected to extend across more than 5.8 billion ha of land and ocean worldwide (of which 3.1 billion is on land), much of which is in remote, fragile terrestrial ecosystems or off-shore oil fields that would remain relatively undisturbed if not for interest in fossil fuel production. Future biomass production for biofuels is projected to fall within 2.0 billion ha of land, most ofmore » which is located in areas already impacted by human activities. A comparison of likely fuel-source areas to the geospatial distribution of species reveals that both energy sources overlap with areas with high species richness and large numbers of threatened species. At the global scale, future petroleum production areas intersect more than double the area and higher total number of threatened species than future biofuel production. Energy options should be developed to optimize provisioning of ecosystem services while minimizing negative effects, which requires information about potential impacts on critical resources. Furthermore, energy conservation and identifying and effectively protecting habitats with high-conservation value are critical first steps toward protecting biodiversity under any fuel production scenario.« less

  17. Risks to global biodiversity from fossil-fuel production exceed those from biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H.; Parish, Esther S.; Kline, Keith L.

    Potential global biodiversity impacts from near-term gasoline production are compared to biofuel, a renewable liquid transportation fuel expected to substitute for gasoline in the near term (i.e., from now until c. 2030). Petroleum exploration activities are projected to extend across more than 5.8 billion ha of land and ocean worldwide (of which 3.1 billion is on land), much of which is in remote, fragile terrestrial ecosystems or off-shore oil fields that would remain relatively undisturbed if not for interest in fossil fuel production. Future biomass production for biofuels is projected to fall within 2.0 billion ha of land, most ofmore » which is located in areas already impacted by human activities. A comparison of likely fuel-source areas to the geospatial distribution of species reveals that both energy sources overlap with areas with high species richness and large numbers of threatened species. At the global scale, future petroleum production areas intersect more than double the area and higher total number of threatened species than future biofuel production. Energy options should be developed to optimize provisioning of ecosystem services while minimizing negative effects, which requires information about potential impacts on critical resources. Furthermore, energy conservation and identifying and effectively protecting habitats with high-conservation value are critical first steps toward protecting biodiversity under any fuel production scenario.« less

  18. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oilmore » and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A

  19. Electricity production coupled to ammonium in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Kan, Jinjun; Wang, Yanbing; Huang, Yuelong; Mansfeld, Florian; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2009-05-01

    The production of electricity from ammonium was examined using a rotating-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC). The addition of ammonium chloride, ammonium sulfate, or ammonium phosphate (monobasic) resulted in electricity generation, while adding sodium chloride, nitrate, or nitrite did not cause any increase in current production. The peak current increased with increasing amount of ammonium addition up to 62.3 mM of ammonium chloride, suggesting that ammonium was involved in electricity generation either directly as the anodic fuel or indirectly as substrates for nitrifiers to produce organic compounds for heterotrophs. Adding nitrate or nitrite with ammonium increased current production compared to solely ammonium addition. Using 16S rRNA-linked molecular analyses, we found ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria on both the anode and cathode electrodes, whereas no anammox bacteria were detected. The dominant ammonium-oxidizing bacteria were closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea. The present MFC achieved an ammonium removal efficiency of 49.2 +/- 5.9 or 69.7 +/- 3.6%, depending on hydraulic retention time, but exhibited a very low Coulombic efficiency.

  20. Fixed bed gasification for production of industrial fuel gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1977-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of technical and economic evaluations of six commercially available, fixed-bed coal gasification processes for the production of industrial fuel gas. The study was performed for DOE and is intended to assist industrial companies in exploring the feasibility of producing gaseous fuels for both retrofit and new industrial plant situations. The report includes a technical analysis of the physical configuration, performance capabilities, and commercial experiments to-date for both air-blown and oxygen-blown fixed bed gasifiers. The product gas from these gasifiers is analyzed economically for three different degrees of cleanliness: (1) hot raw gas, (2) dust-, tar-,more » and oil-free gas, and (3) dust-, tar-, oil-free and desulfurized gas. The evaluations indicate that low-Btu gases produced from fixed bed gasifiers constitute one of the most logical short-term solutions for helping ease the shortage of natural gas for industrial fuel applications because the technology is well-proven and has been utilized on a commercial scale for several decades both in this country and overseas; time from initiation of design to commercial operation is about two years; the technology is not complicated to construct, operate, or maintain; and a reliable supply of product gas can be generated on-site. The advantages and disadvantages of fixed bed gasification technology are listed. The cost of the low Btu gas is estimated at $2 to $4 per MM Btu depending on gas purity, cost of coal ($20 to $50 per ton) and a number of specified assumptions with respect to financing, reliability, etc. (LTN)« less

  1. Investigating the potential for subsurface primary production fueled by serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Nelson, B. Y.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    Ultramafic rocks in the Earth's mantle represent a tremendous reservoir of carbon and reducing power. Tectonic uplift of these materials into the crust can result in serpentinization, a highly exothermic geochemical reaction that releases hydrogen gas (H2) and promotes the abiogenic synthesis of organic molecules. The extent and activity of microbial communities in serpentinite-hosted subsurface habitats is almost entirely unknown, but they clearly have great potential to host extensive sunlight-independent primary production fueled by H2 and abiotic carbon compounds. We have been testing this hypothesis at several sites of serpentinization around the globe utilizing a suite of techniques including metagenomics, 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing, and stable isotope tracing experiments. All four of our study sites, which include deep-sea hydrothermal vents, terrestrial alkaline springs, and continental drill holes, are characteristically low in archaeal and bacterial genetic diversity. In carbonate chimneys of the Lost City hydrothermal field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge), for example, a single archaeal phylotype dominates the biofilm community. Stable isotope tracing experiments indicated that these archaeal biofilms are capable of both production and anaerobic oxidation of methane at 80C and pH 10. Both production and oxidation were stimulated by H2, suggesting a possible syntrophic relationship among cells within the biofilm. Preliminary results from similar stable isotope tracing experiments at terrestrial alkaline seeps at the Tablelands Ophiolite (Newfoundland), Ligurian springs (Italy), and McLaughlin Reserve (California) have indicated the potential for microbial activity fueled by H2 and acetate. Furthermore, recent metagenomic sequencing of fluids from the Tablelands and Ligurian springs have revealed genomic potential for chemolithotrophy powered by iron reduction with H2. In summary, these data support the potential for extensive microbial activity fueled by

  2. Biodegradation of international jet A-1 aviation fuel by microorganisms isolated from aircraft tank and joint hydrant storage systems.

    PubMed

    Itah, A Y; Brooks, A A; Ogar, B O; Okure, A B

    2009-09-01

    Microorganisms contaminating international Jet A-1 aircraft fuel and fuel preserved in Joint Hydrant Storage Tank (JHST) were isolated, characterized and identified. The isolates were Bacillus subtillis, Bacillus megaterium, Flavobacterium oderatum, Sarcina flava, Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus brevis. Others included Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces estuari, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium resinae, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium frequentans. The viable plate count of microorganisms in the Aircraft Tank ranged from 1.3 (+/-0.01) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.2 (+/-1.6) x 104 cfu/mL for bacteria and 102 cfu/mL to 1.68 (+/-0.32) x 103 cfu/mL for fungi. Total bacterial counts of 1.79 (+/-0.2) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.58 (+/-0.04) x 104 cfu/mL and total fungal count of 2.1 (+/-0.1) x 103 cfu/mL to 2.28 (+/-0.5) x 103 cfu/mL were obtained for JHST. Selected isolates were re-inoculated into filter sterilized aircraft fuels and biodegradation studies carried out. After 14 days incubation, Cladosporium resinae exhibited the highest degradation rate with a percentage weight loss of 66 followed by Candida albicans (60.6) while Penicillium citrinum was the least degrader with a weight loss of 41.6%. The ability of the isolates to utilize the fuel as their sole source of carbon and energy was examined and found to vary in growth profile between the isolates. The results imply that aviation fuel could be biodegraded by hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms. To avert a possible deterioration of fuel quality during storage, fuel pipe clogging and failure, engine component damage, wing tank corrosion and aircraft disaster, efficient routine monitoring of aircraft fuel systems is advocated.

  3. State-of-the-Art Fuel Cell Voltage Durability and Cost Status: 2018 Composite Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, Genevieve; Kurtz, Jennifer M; Dinh, Huyen N

    This publication includes 18 composite data products (CDPs) for fuel cell technology status, focusing on state-of-the-art fuel cell voltage durability and cost with data through the fourth quarter of 2017.

  4. Sweet sorghum biorefinery for production of fuel ethanol and value-added co-products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An integrated process has been developed for a sweet-sorghum biorefinery in which all carbohydrate components of the feedstock were used for production of fuel ethanol and industrial chemicals. In the first step, the juice was extracted from the stalks. The resulted straw (bagasse) then was pretreat...

  5. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2011-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  7. Brachypodium distachyon genomics for sustainable food and fuel production.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Michael W; Garvin, David F; Vogel, John P

    2010-04-01

    Grass crops are the most important sources of human nutrition, and their improvement is centrally important for meeting the challenges of sustainable agriculture, for feeding the world's population and for developing renewable supplies of fuel and industrial products. We describe the complete sequence of the compact genome of Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) the first pooid grass to be sequenced. We demonstrate the many favorable characteristics of Brachypodium as an experimental system and show how it can be used to navigate the large and complex genomes of closely related grasses. The functional genomics and other experimental resources that are being developed will provide a key resource for improving food and forage crops, in particular wheat, barley and forage grasses, and for establishing new grass crops for sustainable energy production. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering microbial electrocatalysis for chemical and fuel production.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A; Henrich, Alexander W

    2014-10-01

    In many biotechnological areas, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology have become core technologies for biocatalyst development. Microbial electrocatalysis for biochemical and fuel production is still in its infancy and reactions rates and the product spectrum are currently very low. Therefore, molecular engineering strategies will be crucial for the advancement and realization of many new bioproduction routes using electroactive microorganisms. The complex and unresolved biochemistry and physiology of extracellular electron transfer and the lack of molecular tools for these new non-model hosts for genetic engineering constitute the major challenges for this effort. This review is providing an insight into the current status, challenges and promising approaches of pathway engineering for microbial electrocatalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Applications of systems biology towards microbial fuel production.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Christopher M; Fong, Stephen S

    2011-10-01

    Harnessing the immense natural diversity of biological functions for economical production of fuel has enormous potential benefits. Inevitably, however, the native capabilities for any given organism must be modified to increase the productivity or efficiency of a biofuel bioprocess. From a broad perspective, the challenge is to sufficiently understand the details of cellular functionality to be able to prospectively predict and modify the cellular function of a microorganism. Recent advances in experimental and computational systems biology approaches can be used to better understand cellular level function and guide future experiments. With pressure to quickly develop viable, renewable biofuel processes a balance must be maintained between obtaining depth of biological knowledge and applying that knowledge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Occupational health and safety assessment of exposure to jet fuel combustion products in air medical transport.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Russell D; Thomas, Laura; Rusk, Frederick C; Marques, Shauna D; McGuire, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Transport medicine personnel are potentially exposed to jet fuel combustion products. Setting-specific data are required to determine whether this poses a risk. This study assessed exposure to jet fuel combustion products, compared various engine ignition scenarios, and determined methods to minimize exposure. The Beechcraft King Air B200 turboprop aircraft equipped with twin turbine engines, using a kerosene-based jet fuel (Jet A-1), was used to measure products of combustion during boarding, engine startup, and flight in three separate engine start scenarios ("shielded": internal engine start, door closed; "exposed": ground power unit start, door open; and "minimized": ground power unit right engine start, door open). Real-time continuous monitoring equipment was used for oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter. Integrated methods were used for aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Samples were taken in the paramedic breathing zone for approximately 60 minutes, starting just before the paramedics boarded the aircraft. Data were compared against regulated time-weighted exposure thresholds to determine the presence of potentially harmful products of combustion. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, volatile organic compounds, and aliphatic hydrocarbons were found at very low concentrations or beneath the limits of detection. There were significant differences in exposures to particulates, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compound between the "exposed" and "minimized" scenarios. Elevated concentrations of carbon monoxide and total volatile organic compounds were present during the ground power unit-assisted dual-engine start. There were no appreciable exposures during the "minimized" or "shielded" scenarios. Air medical personnel exposures to jet fuel combustion products were

  11. Effects of Fuel Aromatic Content on Nonvolatile Particulate Emissions of an In-Production Aircraft Gas Turbine.

    PubMed

    Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Siegerist, Frithjof; Beyerle, Peter; Bruderer, Kevin; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Rocci-Denis, Sara; Andac, M Gurhan; Zelina, Joseph; Penanhoat, Olivier; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-17

    Aircraft engines emit particulate matter (PM) that affects the air quality in the vicinity of airports and contributes to climate change. Nonvolatile PM (nvPM) emissions from aircraft turbine engines depend on fuel aromatic content, which varies globally by several percent. It is uncertain how this variability will affect future nvPM emission regulations and emission inventories. Here, we present black carbon (BC) mass and nvPM number emission indices (EIs) as a function of fuel aromatic content and thrust for an in-production aircraft gas turbine engine. The aromatics content was varied from 17.8% (v/v) in the neat fuel (Jet A-1) to up to 23.6% (v/v) by injecting two aromatic solvents into the engine fuel supply line. Fuel normalized BC mass and nvPM number EIs increased by up to 60% with increasing fuel aromatics content and decreasing engine thrust. The EIs also increased when fuel naphthalenes were changed from 0.78% (v/v) to 1.18% (v/v) while keeping the total aromatics constant. The EIs correlated best with fuel hydrogen mass content, leading to a simple model that could be used for correcting fuel effects in emission inventories and in future aircraft engine nvPM emission standards.

  12. Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2014-05-27

    Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

  13. Reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoz, Atilla; Olgun, Hayati; Ozdogan, Sibel

    PEM fuel cell systems are considered as a sustainable option for the future transport sector in the future. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based transportation fuels into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells on-board of vehicles. In this paper, we compare the results of our simulation studies for 100 kW PEM fuel cell systems utilizing three different major reforming technologies, namely steam reforming (SREF), partial oxidation (POX) and autothermal reforming (ATR). Natural gas, gasoline and diesel are the selected hydrocarbon fuels. It is desired to investigate the effect of the selected fuel reforming options on the overall fuel cell system efficiency, which depends on the fuel processing, PEM fuel cell and auxiliary system efficiencies. The Aspen-HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Process parameters of fuel preparation steps have been determined considering the limitations set by the catalysts and hydrocarbons involved. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel processing system and its operation parameters, and PEM fuel cell characteristics all affect the overall system efficiencies. Steam reforming appears as the most efficient fuel preparation option for all investigated fuels. Natural gas with steam reforming shows the highest fuel cell system efficiency. Good heat integration within the fuel cell system is absolutely necessary to achieve acceptable overall system efficiencies.

  14. 18 CFR Appendix A 1 to Part 281 - Comparison of Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976-January 1980 A Appendix A 1 to... Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976—January 1980 Type of fuel FPC form No. 423 price data 1 1976 1977 1978 1979 January 1980 Monthly energy review price data 2 1976 1977...

  15. 18 CFR Appendix A 1 to Part 281 - Comparison of Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976-January 1980 A Appendix A 1 to... Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976—January 1980 Type of fuel FPC form No. 423 price data 1 1976 1977 1978 1979 January 1980 Monthly energy review price data 2 1976 1977...

  16. 18 CFR Appendix A 1 to Part 281 - Comparison of Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976-January 1980 A Appendix A 1 to... Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976—January 1980 Type of fuel FPC form No. 423 price data 1 1976 1977 1978 1979 January 1980 Monthly energy review price data 2 1976 1977...

  17. 18 CFR Appendix A 1 to Part 281 - Comparison of Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976-January 1980 A Appendix A 1 to... Selected Fuel Price Data, FPC Form No. 423 Versus Monthly Energy Review, 1976—January 1980 Type of fuel FPC form No. 423 price data 1 1976 1977 1978 1979 January 1980 Monthly energy review price data 2 1976 1977...

  18. A novel biochemical platform for fuels and chemicals production from cellulosic biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The conventional biochemical platform for biofuels production featuring enzymatic hydrolysis involves five key steps: pretreatment, cellulase production, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, and product recovery. Sugars are produced as reactive intermediates for subsequent fermentation to fuels and c...

  19. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    PubMed

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Single-stream recycling has helped divert millions of metric tons of waste from landfills in the U.S., where recycling rates for municipal solid waste are currently over 30%. However, material recovery facilities (MRFs) that sort the municipal recycled streams do not recover 100% of the incoming material. Consequently, they landfill between 5% and 15% of total processed material as residue. This residue is primarily composed of high-energy-content non-recycled plastics and fiber. One possible end-of-life solution for these energy-dense materials is to process the residue into Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) that can be used as an alternative energy resource capable of replacing or supplementing fuel resources such as coal, natural gas, petroleum coke, or biomass in many industrial and power production processes. This report addresses the energetic and environmental benefits and trade-offs of converting non-recycled post-consumer plastics and fiber derived from MRF residue streams into SRF for use in a cement kiln. An experimental test burn of 118 Mg of SRF in the precalciner portion of the cement kiln was conducted. The SRF was a blend of 60% MRF residue and 40% post-industrial waste products producing an estimated 60% plastic and 40% fibrous material mixture. The SRF was fed into the kiln at 0.9 Mg/h for 24h and then 1.8 Mg/h for the following 48 h. The emissions data recorded in the experimental test burn were used to perform the life-cycle analysis portion of this study. The analysis included the following steps: transportation, landfill, processing and fuel combustion at the cement kiln. The energy use and emissions at each step is tracked for the two cases: (1) The Reference Case, where MRF residue is disposed of in a landfill and the cement kiln uses coal as its fuel source, and (2) The SRF Case, in which MRF residue is processed into SRF and used to offset some portion of coal use at the cement kiln. The experimental test burn and accompanying analysis indicate

  20. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  1. Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    equipment when supplying jet fuel not practicable or cost effective Unclassified 5 erna ve ue s ocus Petroleum Crude Oil (declining discovery / production...on Jet A/A-1 Approved fuels, DXXXX Unclassified 6 JP-8/5 (Commercial Jet Fuel, ASTM Spec) DARPA Alternative Jet Fuels • Agricultural crop oils ...canola, jatropha, soy, palm , etc.) Alternative fuels – University of North Dakota EERC – UOP – General Electric (GE) t i o n C o s t t i o n C o s t

  2. Methods for conversion of lignocellulosic-derived products to transportation fuel precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, Michael A.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2017-10-03

    Methods are disclosed for converting a biomass-derived product containing levulinic acid and/or gamma-valerolactone to a transportation fuel precursor product containing diesel like hydrocarbons. These methods are expected to produce fuel products at a reduced cost relative to conventional approaches.

  3. Hydrogen production and purification for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Soo Yin

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. Currently, production of hydrogen for fuel cells is primarily achieved via steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas, or steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed due to its adverse effects on the Pt-based electrocatalysts of the PEM fuel cell. Our efforts have focused on production of CO-free hydrogen via catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons and purification of H2 via the preferential oxidation of CO. The catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons is an attractive alternative for the production of H2. Previous studies utilizing methane have shown that this approach can indeed produce CO-free hydrogen, with filamentous carbon formed as the by-product and deposited on the catalyst. We have further extended this approach to the decomposition of ethane. In addition to hydrogen and filamentous carbon however, methane is also formed in this case as a by-product. Studies conducted at different temperatures and space velocities suggest that hydrogen is the primary product while methane is formed in a secondary step. Ni/SiO2 catalysts are active for ethane decomposition at temperatures above 500°C. Although the yield of hydrogen increases with temperature, the catalyst deactivation rate also accelerates at higher temperatures. The preferential oxidation of CO is currently used for the purification of CO-contaminated hydrogen streams due to its efficiency and simplicity. Conventional Pt catalysts used for this reaction have been shown to effectively remove CO, but have limited selectivity (i.e., substantial amounts of H 2 also react with O2). Our work focused on alternative catalytic materials, such as Ru and bimetallic Ru-based catalysts (Pt-Ru, Ru

  4. Artificial photosynthesis for sustainable fuel and chemical production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyung; Sakimoto, Kelsey K; Hong, Dachao; Yang, Peidong

    2015-03-09

    The apparent incongruity between the increasing consumption of fuels and chemicals and the finite amount of resources has led us to seek means to maintain the sustainability of our society. Artificial photosynthesis, which utilizes sunlight to create high-value chemicals from abundant resources, is considered as the most promising and viable method. This Minireview describes the progress and challenges in the field of artificial photosynthesis in terms of its key components: developments in photoelectrochemical water splitting and recent progress in electrochemical CO2 reduction. Advances in catalysis, concerning the use of renewable hydrogen as a feedstock for major chemical production, are outlined to shed light on the ultimate role of artificial photosynthesis in achieving sustainable chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Moving bed reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production

    DOEpatents

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2013-04-16

    Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor chambers between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between chambers during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat. In embodiments, chambers of a reactor are coupled to a heat exchanger to pre-heat the reactive particles prior to direct exposure to thermal energy with heat transferred from reduced reactive particles as the particles are oppositely conveyed between the thermal reduction chamber and the fuel production chamber. In an embodiment, particle conveyance is in part provided by an elevator which may further function as a heat exchanger.

  6. Production of gaseous fuel by pyrolysis of municipal solid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, T. H.; Ringer, H. N.; Bridges, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Pilot plant tests were conducted on a simulated solid waste which was a mixture of shredded newspaper, wood waste, polyethylene plastics, crushed glass, steel turnings, and water. Tests were conducted at 1400 F in a lead-bath pyrolyser. Cold feed was deaerated by compression and was dropped onto a moving hearth of molten lead before being transported to a sealed storage container. About 80 percent of the feed's organic content was converted to gaseous products which contain over 90 percent of the potential waste energy; 12 percent was converted to water; and 8 percent remained as partially pyrolyzed char and tars. Nearly half of the carbon in the feed is converted to benzene, toluene and medium-quality fuel gas, a potential credit of over $25 per ton of solid waste. The system was shown to require minimal preprocessing and less sorting then other methods.

  7. Fission product release from fuel under LWR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.

    Three tests have provided additional data on fission product release under LWR accident conditions in a temperature range (1400 to 2000/sup 0/C). In the release rate data are compared with curves from a recent NRC-sponsored review of available fission product release data. Although the iodine release in test HI-3 was inexplicably low, the other data points for Kr, I, and Cs fall reasonably close to the corresponding curve, thereby tending to verify the NRC review. The limited data for antimony and silver release fall below the curves. Results of spark source mass spectrometric analyses were in agreement with the gammamore » spectrometric results. Nonradioactive fission products such as Rb and Br appeared to behave like their chemical analogs Cs and I. Results suggest that Te, Ag, Sn, and Sb are released from the fuel in elemental form. Analysis of the cesium and iodine profiles in the thermal gradient tube indicates that iodine was deposited as CsT along with some other less volatile cesium compound. The cesium profiles and chemical reactivity indicate the presence of more than one cesium species.« less

  8. Alcohol Fuels Production, Manpower, and Education: Where Do Two-Year Colleges Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, James R.

    The Energy Communications Center (ECC) has sponsored a number of alcohol fuels activities designed to share information about alcohol fuels with two-year college faculty and administrators and to clarify the manpower and curriculum issues related to fuel production. This paper is the result of the last of these activities, a one-day meeting of…

  9. Briquette fuel production from wastewater sludge of beer industry and biodiesel production wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusong, P.; Puajindanetr, S.

    2018-04-01

    The production of industrial wastes is increasing each year. Current methods of waste disposal are severely impacting the environment. Utilization of industrial wastes as an alternative material for fuel is gaining interest due to its environmental friendliness. Thus, the objective of this research was to study the optimum condition for fuel briquettes produced from wastewater sludge of the beer industry and biodiesel production wastes. This research is divided into two parts. Part I will study the effects of carbonization of brewery wastewater sludge for high fixed carbon. Part II will study the ratio between brewery wastewater sludge and bleaching earth for its high heating value. The results show that the maximum fixed carbon of 10.01% by weight was obtained at a temperature of 350 °C for 30 minutes. The appropriate ratio of brewery wastewater sludge and bleaching earth by weight was 95:5. This condition provided the highest heating value of approximately 3548.10 kcal/kg.

  10. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James

    2012-12-19

    The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmutemore » minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.« less

  11. Solar fuels production as a sustainable alternative for substituting fossil fuels: COSOLπ project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Romero-Paredes, R.; Alvarado-Gil, Juan José; Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo Alberto; Ramos-Sánchez, Víctor Hugo; Villafán-Vidales, Heidi Isabel; Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Abanades, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    This article presents, in summary form, the characteristics of COSOLπ development project and some of the results obtained to date. The benefits of the work of this project will include the generation of a not polluting transportable energy feedstock from a free, abundant and available primary energy source, in an efficient method with no greenhouse gas emission. This will help to ensure energy surety to a future transportation/energy infrastructure, without any fuel import. Further technological development of thermochemical production of clean fuels, together with solar reactors and also with the possibility of determining the optical and thermal properties of the materials involved a milestone in the search for new processes for industrialization. With the above in mind, important national academic institutions: UAM, UNAM, CINVESTAV, UACH, UNISON among others, have been promoting research in solar energy technologies. The Goals and objectives are to conduct research and technological development driving high-temperature thermochemical processes using concentrated solar radiation as thermal energy source for the future sustainable development of industrial processes. It focuses on the production of clean fuels such as H2, syngas, biofuels, without excluding the re-value of materials used in the industry. This project conducts theoretical and experimental studies for the identification, characterization, and optimization of the most promising thermochemical cycles, and for the thorough investigation of the reactive chemical systems. It applies material science and nano-engineering to improve chemicals properties and stability upon cycling. The characterization of materials will serve to measure the chemical composition and purity (MOX fraction-1) of each of the samples. The characterizations also focus on the solid particle morphology (shape, size, state of aggregation, homogeneity, specific surface) images obtained from SEM / TEM and BET measurements. Likewise

  12. Lignin depolymerization and upgrading via fast pyrolysis and electrocatalysis for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garedew, Mahlet

    The production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass is needed to replace fossil fuels, which are decreasing in supply at an unsustainable rate. Renewable fuels also address the rising levels of greenhouse gases, an issue for which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change implicated humanity in 2013. In response, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the production of 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels by 2022. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) uses heat (400-600 °C) without oxygen to convert biomass to liquids fuel precursors offering an alternative to fossil fuels and a means to meet the EISA mandate. The major product, bio-oil, can be further upgraded to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, while biochar can serve as a solid fuel or soil amendment. The combustible gas co-product is typically burned for process heat. Though the most valuable of the pyrolysis products, the liquid bio-oil is highly oxygenated, corrosive, low in energy content and unstable during storage. As a means of improving bio-oil properties, electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) is employed to reduce and deoxygenate reactive compounds. This work specifically focuses on lignin as a feed material for BFP. As lignin comprises up to 30% of the mass and 40% of the energy stored in biomass, it offers great potential for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products by utilizing fast pyrolysis as a conversion method coupled with electrocatalysis as an upgrading method.

  13. Pectin-rich biomass as feedstock for fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Meredith C; Doran-Peterson, Joy

    2012-08-01

    The USA has proposed that 30 % of liquid transportation fuel be produced from renewable resources by 2030 (Perlack and Stokes 2011). It will be impossible to reach this goal using corn kernel-based ethanol alone. Pectin-rich biomass, an under-utilized waste product of the sugar and juice industry, can augment US ethanol supplies by capitalizing on this already established feedstock. Currently, pectin-rich biomass is sold (at low value) as animal feed. This review focuses on the three most studied types of pectin-rich biomass: sugar beet pulp, citrus waste and apple pomace. Fermentations of these materials have been conducted with a variety of ethanologens, including yeasts and bacteria. Escherichia coli can ferment a wide range of sugars including galacturonic acid, the primary component of pectin. However, the mixed acid metabolism of E. coli can produce unwanted side products. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot naturally ferment galacturonic acid nor pentose sugars but has a homoethanol pathway. Erwinia chrysanthemi is capable of degrading many of the cell wall components of pectin-rich materials, including pectin. Klebsiella oxytoca can metabolize a diverse array of sugars including cellobiose, one degradation product of cellulose. However, both E. chrysanthemi and K. oxytoca produce side products during fermentation, similar to E. coli. Using pectin-rich residues from industrial processes is beneficial because the material is already collected and partially pretreated to facilitate enzymatic deconstruction of the plant cell walls. Using biomass already produced for other purposes is an attractive practice because fewer greenhouse gases (GHG) will be anticipated from land-use changes.

  14. Fuel Sustainability And Actinide Production Of Doping Minor Actinide In Water-Cooled Thorium Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    Fuel sustainability of nuclear energy is coming from an optimum fuel utilization of the reactor and fuel breeding program. Fuel cycle option becomes more important for fuel cycle utilization as well as fuel sustainability capability of the reactor. One of the important issues for recycle fuel option is nuclear proliferation resistance issue due to production plutonium. To reduce the proliferation resistance level, some barriers were used such as matrial barrier of nuclear fuel based on isotopic composition of even mass number of plutonium isotope. Analysis on nuclear fuel sustainability and actinide production composition based on water-cooled thorium reactor system has been done and all actinide composition are recycled into the reactor as a basic fuel cycle scheme. Some important parameters are evaluated such as doping composition of minor actinide (MA) and volume ratio of moderator to fuel (MFR). Some feasible parameters of breeding gains have been obtained by additional MA doping and some less moderation to fuel ratios (MFR). The system shows that plutonium and MA are obtained low compositions and it obtains some higher productions of even mass plutonium, which is mainly Pu-238 composition, as a control material to protect plutonium to be used as explosive devices.

  15. Methane production and isotopic fingerprinting in ethanol fuel contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Fletcher, Barbara; Aravena, Ramon; Barker, James F

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of organic compounds in groundwater can be a significant source of methane in contaminated sites. Methane might accumulate in indoor spaces posing a hazard. The increasing use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is a concern with respect to methane production since it is easily biodegraded and has a high oxygen demand, favoring the development of anaerobic conditions. This study evaluated the use of stable carbon isotopes to distinguish the methane origin between gasoline and ethanol biodegradation, and assessed the occurrence of methane in ethanol fuel contaminated sites. Two microcosm tests were performed under anaerobic conditions: one test using ethanol and the other using toluene as the sole carbon source. The isotopic tool was then applied to seven field sites known to be impacted by ethanol fuels. In the microcosm tests, it was verified that methane from ethanol (δ¹³C = -11.1‰) is more enriched in ¹³C, with δ¹³C values ranging from -20‰ to -30‰, while the methane from toluene (δ¹³C = -28.5‰) had a carbon isotopic signature of -55‰. The field samples had δ¹³C values varying over a wide range (-10‰ to -80‰), and the δ¹³C values allowed the methane source to be clearly identified in five of the seven ethanol/gasoline sites. In the other two sites, methane appears to have been produced from both sources. Both gasoline and ethanol were sources of methane in potentially hazardous concentrations and methane could be produced from organic acids originating from ethanol along the groundwater flow system even after all the ethanol has been completed biodegraded. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Fate of virginiamycin through the fuel ethanol production process.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Kenneth M; Zhang, Yanhong; Rich, Joseph O

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotics are frequently used to prevent and treat bacterial contamination of commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, but there is concern that antibiotic residues may persist in the distillers grains coproducts. A study to evaluate the fate of virginiamycin during the ethanol production process was conducted in the pilot plant facilities at the National Corn to Ethanol Research Center, Edwardsville, IL. Three 15,000-liter fermentor runs were performed: one with no antibiotic (F1), one dosed with 2 parts per million (ppm) of a commercial virginiamycin product (F2), and one dosed at 20 ppm of virginiamycin product (F3). Fermentor samples, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), and process intermediates (whole stillage, thin stillage, syrup, and wet cake) were collected from each run and analyzed for virginiamycin M and virginiamycin S using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Virginiamycin M was detected in all process intermediates of the F3 run. On a dry-weight basis, virginiamycin M concentrations decreased approximately 97 %, from 41 μg/g in the fermentor to 1.4 μg/g in the DDGS. Using a disc plate bioassay, antibiotic activity was detected in DDGS from both the F2 and F3 runs, with values of 0.69 μg virginiamycin equivalent/g sample and 8.9 μg/g, respectively. No antibiotic activity (<0.6 μg/g) was detected in any of the F1 samples or in the fermentor and process intermediate samples from the F2 run. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of biologically active antibiotic may persist in distillers grains coproducts produced from fermentations treated with virginiamycin.

  17. Fractal Model of Fission Product Release in Nuclear Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas

    2012-09-01

    A model of fission gas migration in nuclear fuel pellet is proposed. Diffusion process of fission gas in granular structure of nuclear fuel with presence of inter-granular bubbles in the fuel matrix is simulated by fractional diffusion model. The Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter characterizes the influence of porous fuel matrix on the diffusion process of fission gas. A finite-difference method for solving fractional diffusion equations is considered. Numerical solution of diffusion equation shows correlation of fission gas release and Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter. Calculated profile of fission gas concentration distribution is similar to that obtained in the experimental studies. Diffusion of fission gas is modeled for real RBMK-1500 fuel operation conditions. A functional dependence of Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter with fuel burn-up is established.

  18. Effect of Neutron Absorbers Mixed in or Coating the Fuel of a 1-MWt Lithium-Cooled Space Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of various neutron poisons (boron, dysprosium, erbium, and gadolinium) on a 1-MWt, lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor. The isotopes were considered to be in-fuel poisons, as well as poisons coating the fuel. One way to quantify the effectiveness of a poison in meeting accident-condition requirements is by defining the safety margin as the difference between keff at the beginning of life and keff during the accident scenarios. The isotope that showed the most potential in increasing the safety margin for the wet-sand/water case was 157Gd. The safety margin was 10%-20% greater usingmore » 157Gd as an in-fuel poison as opposed to a coating, depending on the poison quantity. However, the most limiting condition (i.e., the accident scenario with the highest keff, thus the lowest safety margin) is when the reactor is submerged in wet sand. None of the isotopes considered significantly affected the safety margin for the dry-sand case. However, the poison isotopes considered may have applicability for meeting the wet-sand/water keff requirements or as burnable poisons in a moderated system. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.« less

  19. Fuel ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke stalks using different yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.; Bajpai, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    The inulin-type sugars present in the stalks of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) were extracted with hot water and were used as a substrate to produce fuel EtOH. Seven different yeasts were used to obtain batch kinetic data. The medium consisted of stalk extract from Jerusalem artichoke containing 7.3% total sugars, supplemented with 0.01% oleic acid, 0.01% corn steep liquor, and 0.05% Tween 80. All batch fermentations were carried out in a 1-L bioreactor at 35 degrees and pH 4.6, and the following parameters were measured as a function of time: total sugars, EtOH and biomass concentration, maximum specific growth rate,more » and biomass and EtOH yields. The best EtOH producer was Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 which gave an EtOH-to-sugar yield 97% of the theoretical maximum value, with almost 100% sugar utilization.« less

  20. Electricity production and microbial characterization of thermophilic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kun; Wen, Jun-Li; Zhang, Fang; Ma, Xi-Wen; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Ting-Jia; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-11-01

    Thermophilic microbial fuel cell (TMFC) offers many benefits, but the investigations on the diversity of exoelectrogenic bacteria are scarce. In this study, a two-chamber TMFC was constructed using ethanol as an electron donor, and the microbial dynamics were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing and 16S rRNA clone-library sequencing. The open-circuit potential of TMFC was approximately 650mV, while the maximum voltage was around 550mV. The maximum power density was 437mW/m 2 , and the columbic efficiency in this work was 20.5±6.0%. The Firmicutes bacteria, related to the uncultured bacterium clone A55_D21_H_B_C01 with a similarity of 99%, accounted for 90.9% of all bacteria in the TMFC biofilm. This unknown bacterium has the potential to become a new thermophilic exoelectrogenic bacterium that is yet to be cultured. The development of TMFC-involved biotechnologies will be beneficial for the production of valuable chemicals and generation of energy in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Brachypodium distachyon genomics for sustainable food and fuel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grasses are a vital source of food for humanity and are projected to be become an important source of renewable fuel. To provide food, feed and fuel for an ever expanding human population it will be necessary to improve existing grass crops (e.g. wheat, maize, rice) and domesticate perennial grasses...

  2. Systems analysis of electricity production from coal using fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gasifiers, heat transfer, gas stability, quench, water-gas shift reaction, reforming-methanation, other catalytic reactions, compressors and expanders, acid-gas removal, the fuel cell, and catalytic combustors are described. System pressure drops, efficiency of rotating power equipment, heat exchangers, chemical reactions, steam systems, and the fuel cell subsystems are discussed.

  3. C1-carbon sources for chemical and fuel production by microbial gas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2015-12-01

    Fossil resources for production of fuels and chemicals are finite and fuel use contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Thus, sustainable fuel supply, security, and prices necessitate the implementation of alternative routes to the production of chemicals and fuels. Much attention has been focussed on use of cellulosic material, particularly through microbial-based processes. However, this is still costly and proving challenging, as are catalytic routes to biofuels from whole biomass. An alternative strategy is to directly capture carbon before incorporation into lignocellulosic biomass. Autotrophic acetogenic, carboxidotrophic, and methanotrophic bacteria are able to capture carbon as CO, CO2, or CH4, respectively, and reuse that carbon in products that displace their fossil-derived counterparts. Thus, gas fermentation represents a versatile industrial platform for the sustainable production of commodity chemicals and fuels from diverse gas resources derived from industrial processes, coal, biomass, municipal solid waste (MSW), and extracted natural gas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using knownmore » refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to

  5. Production of biosolid fuels from municipal sewage sludge: Technical and economic optimisation.

    PubMed

    Wzorek, Małgorzata; Tańczuk, Mariusz

    2015-08-01

    The article presents the technical and economic analysis of the production of fuels from municipal sewage sludge. The analysis involved the production of two types of fuel compositions: sewage sludge with sawdust (PBT fuel) and sewage sludge with meat and bone meal (PBM fuel). The technology of the production line of these sewage fuels was proposed and analysed. The main objective of the study is to find the optimal production capacity. The optimisation analysis was performed for the adopted technical and economic parameters under Polish conditions. The objective function was set as a maximum of the net present value index and the optimisation procedure was carried out for the fuel production line input capacity from 0.5 to 3 t h(-1), using the search step 0.5 t h(-1). On the basis of technical and economic assumptions, economic efficiency indexes of the investment were determined for the case of optimal line productivity. The results of the optimisation analysis show that under appropriate conditions, such as prices of components and prices of produced fuels, the production of fuels from sewage sludge can be profitable. In the case of PBT fuel, calculated economic indexes show the best profitability for the capacity of a plant over 1.5 t h(-1) output, while production of PBM fuel is beneficial for a plant with the maximum of searched capacities: 3.0 t h(-1). Sensitivity analyses carried out during the investigation show that influence of both technical and economic assessments on the location of maximum of objective function (net present value) is significant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. 9-cis Retinoic Acid is the ALDH1A1 Product that Stimulates Melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Elyse K.; Ho, Hsiang; Kapadia, Rubina; Ganesan, Anand K.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of lipid aldehydes to lipid carboxylic acids, plays pleiotropic roles in UV-radiation resistance, melanogenesis, and stem cell maintenance. In this study, a combination of RNAi and pharmacologic approaches were used to determine which ALDH1A1 substrates and products regulate melanogenesis. Initial studies revealed that neither the UV-induced lipid aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal nor the ALDH1A1 product all-trans retinoic acid appreciably induced melanogenesis. In contrast, both the ALDH1A1 substrate 9-cis retinal and its corresponding product 9-cis retinoic acid potently induced the accumulation of MITF mRNA, Tyrosinase mRNA, and melanin. ALDH1A1 depletion inhibited the ability of 9-cis retinal but not 9-cis retinoic acid to stimulate melanogenesis, indicating that ALDH1A1 regulates melanogenesis by catalyzing the conversion of 9-cis retinal to 9-cis retinoic acid. The addition of potent ALDH1A inhibitors (cyanamide or Angeli’s salt) suppressed Tyrosinase and MITF mRNA accumulation in vitro and also melanin accumulation in skin equivalents, suggesting that 9-cis retinoids regulate melanogenesis in the intact epidermis. Taken together, these studies not only identify cyanamide as a potential novel treatment for hyperpigmentary disorders, but also identify 9-cis retinoic acid as a pigment stimulatory agent that may have clinical utility in the treatment of hypopigmentary disorders, such as vitiligo. PMID:23489423

  7. Water Footprint and Land Requirement of Solar Thermochemical Jet-Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Falter, Christoph; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-11-07

    The production of alternative fuels via the solar thermochemical pathway has the potential to provide supply security and to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. H 2 O and CO 2 are converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy mediated by redox reactions of a metal oxide. Because attractive production locations are in arid regions, the water footprint and the land requirement of this fuel production pathway are analyzed. The water footprint consists of 7.4 liters per liter of jet fuel of direct demand on-site and 42.4 liters per liter of jet fuel of indirect demand, where the dominant contributions are the mining of the rare earth oxide ceria, the manufacturing of the solar concentration infrastructure, and the cleaning of the mirrors. The area-specific productivity is found to be 33 362 liters per hectare per year of jet fuel equivalents, where the land coverage is mainly due to the concentration of solar energy for heat and electricity. The water footprint and the land requirement of the solar thermochemical fuel pathway are larger than the best power-to-liquid pathways but an order of magnitude lower than the best biomass-to-liquid pathways. For the production of solar thermochemical fuels arid regions are best-suited, and for biofuels regions of a moderate and humid climate.

  8. High-Pressure Liquid Chromatograph with Mass Spectrometric Detection for Analysis of Supercritical Fuels Pyrolysis Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    conditions will necessarily be supercritical fluids . These temperatures and pressures will also cause the fuel to undergo pyrolytic reactions, which...Spectrometric Detection for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Analysis of Supercritical Fuels Pyrolysis Products 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-05-1-0253 5c... supercritical pyrolysis experiments with the model fuels 1-methylnaphthalene and toluene. The HPLC/UV/MS instrument facilitated the identification of fifteen 5

  9. Production of renewable diesel fuel from biologically based feedstocks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    Renewable diesel is an emerging option to achieve the goal set by the Federal Renewable Fuel Standard of displacing 20% of our nations petroleum consumption with : renewable alternatives by 2022. It involves converting readily available vegetable ...

  10. Electricity production from municipal solid waste using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, H Y; Pai, T Y; Liu, M H; Chang, C A; Lo, F C; Chang, T C; Lo, H M; Chiang, C F; Chao, K P; Lo, W Y; Lo, S W; Chu, Y L

    2016-07-01

    The organic content of municipal solid waste has long been an attractive source of renewable energy, mainly as a solid fuel in waste-to-energy plants. This study focuses on the potential to use microbial fuel cells to convert municipal solid waste organics into energy using various operational conditions. The results showed that two-chamber microbial fuel cells with carbon felt and carbon felt allocation had a higher maximal power density (20.12 and 30.47 mW m(-2) for 1.5 and 4 L, respectively) than those of other electrode plate allocations. Most two-chamber microbial fuel cells (1.5 and 4 L) had a higher maximal power density than single-chamber ones with corresponding electrode plate allocations. Municipal solid waste with alkali hydrolysis pre-treatment and K3Fe(CN)6 as an electron acceptor improved the maximal power density to 1817.88 mW m(-2) (~0.49% coulomb efficiency, from 0.05-0.49%). The maximal power density from experiments using individual 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, and serial and parallel connections of 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, was found to be in the order of individual 4 L (30.47 mW m(-2)) > serial connection of 1.5 and 4 L (27.75) > individual 1.5 L (20.12) > parallel connection of 1.5 and 4 L (17.04) two-chamber microbial fuel cells . The power density using municipal solid waste microbial fuel cells was compared with information in the literature and discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Electrochemical device for syngas and liquid fuels production

    DOEpatents

    Braun, Robert J.; Becker, William L.; Penev, Michael

    2017-04-25

    The invention relates to methods for creating high value liquid fuels such as gasoline, diesel, jet and alcohols using carbon dioxide and water as the starting raw materials and a system for using the same. These methods combine a novel solid oxide electrolytic cell (SOEC) for the efficient and clean conversion of carbon dioxide and water to hydrogen and carbon monoxide, uniquely integrated with a gas-to-liquid fuels producing method.

  12. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Fan, Liangliang; Cao, Leipeng; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Yunfeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a ZrO 2 -based polycrystalline ceramic foam catalyst was prepared and used in catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene (HDPE) for hydrocarbon fuel production. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, catalyst dosage, and HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio on the product distribution and hydrocarbon fuel composition were examined. Experimental results indicate that the maximum hydrocarbon fuel yield of 63.1wt. % was obtained at 430°C, and the oxygenates were rarely detected in the hydrocarbon fuel. The hydrocarbon fuel yield increased when the catalyst was used. At the catalyst dosage of 15wt.%, the proportion of alkanes in the hydrocarbon fuel reached 97.85wt.%, which greatly simplified the fuel composition and improved the fuel quality. With the augment of HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio, the hydrocarbon fuel yield monotonously increased. At the HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio of 1:1, the maximum proportion (97.85wt.%) of alkanes was obtained. Moreover, the properties of hydrocarbon fuel were superior to biodiesel and 0 # diesel due to higher calorific value, better low-temperature low fluidity, and lower density and viscosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lux, Kenneth; Imam, Tahmina; Chevanan, Nehru

    This Final Technical Report describes the work and accomplishments of the project entitled, “Laboratory Scale Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production and Assessment.” The main objective of the project was to fabricate and test a lab-scale liquid-fuel production system using coal containing different percentages of biomass such as corn stover and switchgrass at a rate of 2 liters per day. The system utilizes the patented Altex fuel-production technology, which incorporates advanced catalysts developed by Pennsylvania State University. The system was designed, fabricated, tested, and assessed for economic and environmental feasibility relative to competing technologies.

  14. SYSTEM AND PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF METHANOL FROM COMBINED WIND TURBINE AND FUEL CELL POWER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper examines an integrated use of ultra-clean wind turbines and high temperature fuel cells to produce methanol, especially for transportation purposes. The principal utility and application of the process is the production of transportation fuel from domestic resources to ...

  15. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2015

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-01-08

    This FY 2015 report updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  16. Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  17. Amorphization of the interaction products in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.

    2009-04-01

    The microstructures of the product resulting from interaction between U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel are discussed. We analyzed the available characterization results for the Al matrix dispersion fuels from both the out-of-pile and in-pile tests and examined the difference between these results. The morphology of pores that form in the interaction products during irradiation is similar to the porosity previously observed in irradiation-induced amorphized uranium compounds. The available diffraction studies for the interaction products formed in both the out-of-pile and in-pile tests are analyzed. We have concluded that the interaction products in the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel are formed as an amorphous state or become amorphous during irradiation, depending on the irradiation conditions.

  18. Use of refinery computer model to predict fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several factors (crudes, refinery operation and specifications) that affect yields and properties of broad specification jet fuel were parameterized using the refinery simulation model which can simulate different types of refineries were used to make the calculations. Results obtained from the program are used to correlate yield as a function of final boiling point, hydrogen content and freezing point for jet fuels produced in two refinery configurations, each one processing a different crude mix. Refinery performances are also compared in terms of energy consumption.

  19. Modularized Production of Value-Added Products and Fuels from Distributed Waste Carbon-Rich Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Robert S.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    Here, we have adapted and characterized electrolysis reactors to complement the conversion of regional- and community-scale quantities of waste into fuel or chemicals. The overall process must be able to contend with a wide range of feedstocks, must be inherently safe, and should not rely on external facilities for co-reactants or heat rejection and supply. Our current approach is based on the upgrading of bio-oil produced by the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of carbon-containing waste feedstocks. HTL can convert a variety of feedstocks into a bio-oil that requires much less upgrading than the products of other ways of deconstructing biomass. Wemore » are now investigating the use of electrochemical processes for the further conversions needed to transform the bio-oil from HTL into fuel or higher value chemicals. We, and others, have shown that electrochemical reduction can offer adequate reaction rates and at least some of the necessary generality. In addition, an electrochemical reactor necessarily both oxidizes (removes electrons) on one side of the reactor and reduces (adds electrons) on the other side. Therefore, the two types of reactions could, in principle, be coupled to upgrade the bio-oil and simultaneously polish the water that is employed as a reactant and a carrier in the upstream HTL. Here, we overview a notional process, the possible conversion chemistry, and the economics of an HTL-electrochemical process.« less

  20. Modularized Production of Value-Added Products and Fuels from Distributed Waste Carbon-Rich Feedstocks

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, Robert S.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2018-05-22

    Here, we have adapted and characterized electrolysis reactors to complement the conversion of regional- and community-scale quantities of waste into fuel or chemicals. The overall process must be able to contend with a wide range of feedstocks, must be inherently safe, and should not rely on external facilities for co-reactants or heat rejection and supply. Our current approach is based on the upgrading of bio-oil produced by the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of carbon-containing waste feedstocks. HTL can convert a variety of feedstocks into a bio-oil that requires much less upgrading than the products of other ways of deconstructing biomass. Wemore » are now investigating the use of electrochemical processes for the further conversions needed to transform the bio-oil from HTL into fuel or higher value chemicals. We, and others, have shown that electrochemical reduction can offer adequate reaction rates and at least some of the necessary generality. In addition, an electrochemical reactor necessarily both oxidizes (removes electrons) on one side of the reactor and reduces (adds electrons) on the other side. Therefore, the two types of reactions could, in principle, be coupled to upgrade the bio-oil and simultaneously polish the water that is employed as a reactant and a carrier in the upstream HTL. Here, we overview a notional process, the possible conversion chemistry, and the economics of an HTL-electrochemical process.« less

  1. Method for forming nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction and the product thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Bo-Ching; Rosenbaum, Herman S.; Armijo, Joseph S.

    1984-01-01

    An improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof.

  2. Novel catalysts and photoelectrochemical system for solar fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan

    Solar fuel production from abundant raw chemicals such as CO2 and water is highly desired as a clean renewable energy solution for the future. Developing photoelectrochemical cells is viewed as a promising approach to realize this energy conversion and storage process. Efficient and robust oxygen evolution catalyst made from non-precious materials remains a major challenge for such a system. This thesis basically consists of three parts of work, including studies on enhancing the photocatalytic oxygen evolution activity of cobalt-based spinel nanoparticles by manganese3+ substitution, in situ formation of cobalt oxide nanocubanes as highly active catalyst for photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, and development of a photoanode-driven photoelectrochemical cell for CO2 reduction with water. The first part of this thesis work devotes efforts in the development and study on cobalt and other transition metal oxide based oxygen evolution catalyst. Photocatalytic oxygen evolution is a critical step for solar fuel production from abundant sources. It poses a significant challenge because it requires an efficient catalyst to bridge the one-electron photon capture process with the four-electron oxygen reaction. Among all the metal oxides, Co3O4 spinel exhibits a high activity as an oxygen evolution catalyst. The results of this work demonstrate that the photocatalytic oxygen evolution activity of Co3O4 spinel can be further enhanced by substituting Co with Mn in the spinel structure. Using a facile hydrothermal approach, Co3O4 spinel nanoparticles as well as Mn-substituted and Ni-substituted Co3O4 spinel nanoparticles with a typical particle size of 5-7 nm were successfully synthesized. The morphology and crystal structures of the as-synthesized nanoparticle catalysts have been carefully examined using various structural characterization techniques, including powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), gas adsorption, and x-ray absorption

  3. Separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons from spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Jerry D.; Sterbentz, James W.

    A method for the separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons comprising providing a spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel comprises UO.sub.2 and rare-earth oxides, preferably Sm, Gd, Nd, Eu oxides, with other elements depending on the fuel composition. Preferably, the provided nuclear fuel is a powder, preferably formed by crushing the nuclear fuel or using one or more oxidation-reduction cycles. A compound comprising Th or Zr, preferably metal, is provided. The provided nuclear fuel is mixed with the Th or Zr, thereby creating a mixture. The mixture is then heated to a temperature sufficient to reduce the UO.sub.2more » in the nuclear fuel, preferably to at least to 850.degree. C. for Th and up to 600.degree. C. for Zr. Rare-earth metals are then extracted to form the heated mixture thereby producing a treated nuclear fuel. The treated nuclear fuel comprises the provided nuclear fuel having a significant reduction in rare-earths.« less

  4. Progress in understanding fission-product behaviour in coated uranium-dioxide fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; Kissane, M. P.; Ozrin, V.

    2009-03-01

    Supported by results of calculations performed with two analytical tools (MFPR, which takes account of physical and chemical mechanisms in calculating the chemical forms and physical locations of fission products in UO2, and MEPHISTA, a thermodynamic database), this paper presents an investigation of some important aspects of the fuel microstructure and chemical evolutions of irradiated TRISO particles. The following main conclusions can be identified with respect to irradiated TRISO fuel: first, the relatively low oxygen potential within the fuel particles with respect to PWR fuel leads to chemical speciation that is not typical of PWR fuels, e.g., the relatively volatile behaviour of barium; secondly, the safety-critical fission-product caesium is released from the urania kernel but the buffer and pyrolytic-carbon coatings could form an important chemical barrier to further migration (i.e., formation of carbides). Finally, significant releases of fission gases from the urania kernel are expected even in nominal conditions.

  5. Climate Impact and Economic Feasibility of Solar Thermochemical Jet Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Falter, Christoph; Batteiger, Valentin; Sizmann, Andreas

    2016-01-05

    Solar thermochemistry presents a promising option for the efficient conversion of H2O and CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy. To explore the potential of this fuel production pathway, the climate impact and economic performance are analyzed. Key drivers for the economic and ecological performance are thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, the level of solar irradiation, operation and maintenance, and the initial investment in the fuel production plant. For the baseline case of a solar tower concentrator with CO2 capture from air, jet fuel production costs of 2.23 €/L and life cycle greenhouse gas (LC GHG) emissions of 0.49 kgCO2-equiv/L are estimated. Capturing CO2 from a natural gas combined cycle power plant instead of the air reduces the production costs by 15% but leads to LC GHG emissions higher than that of conventional jet fuel. Favorable assumptions for all involved process steps (30% thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, 3000 kWh/(m(2) a) solar irradiation, low CO2 and heliostat costs) result in jet fuel production costs of 1.28 €/L at LC GHG emissions close to zero. Even lower production costs may be achieved if the commercial value of oxygen as a byproduct is considered.

  6. The challenges and opportunities for integration of solar syngas production with liquid fuel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkley, James T.; McNaughton, Robbie K.; Pye, John; Saw, Woei; Stechel, Ellen B.

    2016-05-01

    Reforming of methane is practiced on a vast scale globally for the production of syngas as a precursor for the production of many commodities, including hydrogen, ammonia and synthetic liquid fuels. Solar reforming can reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of syngas production by up to about 40% by using solar thermal energy to provide the endothermic heat of reaction, traditionally supplied by combustion of some of the feed. This has the potential to enable the production of solar derived synthetic fuels as drop in replacements for conventional fuels with significantly lower CO2 intensity than conventional gas to liquids (GTL) processes. However, the intermittent nature of the solar resource - both diurnal and seasonal - poses significant challenges for such a concept, which relies on synthesis processes that typically run continuously on very stable feed compositions. We find that the integration of solar syngas production to a GTL process is a non-trivial exercise, with the ability to turn down the capacity of the GTL synthesis section, and indeed to suspend operations for short periods without significant detriment to product quality or process operability, likely to be a key driver for the commercial implementation of solar liquid fuels. Projected costs for liquid fuel synthesis suggest that solar reforming and small scale gas to liquid synthesis can potentially compete with conventional oil derived transport fuels in the short to medium term.

  7. Production of High Energy Aviation Fuels from Advanced Coal Liquids. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    AD-A192 333 PRODUCTION OF HIGH ENERGY AVIATION FUELS FROM RDYANCED 1/1 COAL LIQUIDS PHASE 1(U) STRAT CO SALT LAKE CITY UT J DOWNEN APR 9? AFWRL-TR-87...OF HIGH ENERGY AVIATION FUELS FROM ADVANCED COAL LIQUIDS * JOHN DOWNEN STRAT CO. 4597 JUPITER DRIVE SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84124 APRIL 1987 FINAL REPORT...OAU TION NME or dokew AFo Prpulsin LCbrator NOA"TO INACCE1SPONONO II-TTEX Xuc*cait* 65502F 1 3005 I 20 r 63 Production of High Energy Aviation Fuels

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution

    Science.gov Websites

    created by reacting natural gas with high-temperature steam. The carbon monoxide is reacted with water to synthesis gas can also be created by reacting coal or biomass with high-temperature steam and oxygen in a : Renewable liquid fuels, such as ethanol, are reacted with high-temperature steam to produce hydrogen near

  9. Bacteria engineered for fuel ethanol production: current status

    Treesearch

    B.S. Dien; M.A. Cotta; T.W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    The lack of industrially suitable microorganisms for converting biomass into fuel ethanol has traditionally been cited as a major technical roadblock to developing a bioethanol industry. In the last two decades, numerous microorganisms have been engineered to selectively produce ethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass contains complex carbohydrates that necessitate utilizing...

  10. Production, characterization and fuel properties of alternative diesel fuel from pyrolysis of waste plastic grocery bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyrolysis of HDPE waste grocery bags followed by distillation resulted in a liquid hydrocarbon mixture that consisted of saturated aliphatic paraffins (96.8%), aliphatic olefins (2.6%), and aromatics (0.6%) that corresponded to the boiling range of conventional petroleum diesel fuel (#1 diesel 182–2...

  11. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.

    2009-12-02

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology willmore » provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.« less

  12. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kuk; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-12-01

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

  13. Linked strategy for the production of fuels via formose reaction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jin; Pan, Tao; Xu, Qing; Chen, Meng-Yuan; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-01-01

    Formose reaction converts formaldehyde to carbohydrates. We found that formose reaction can be used linking the biomass gasification with the aqueous-phase processing (APP) to produce liquid transportation fuel in three steps. First, formaldehyde from syn-gas was converted to triose. This was followed by aldol condensation and dehydration to 4-hydroxymethylfurfural (4-HMF). Finally, 4-HMF was hydrogenated to produce 2,4-dimethylfuran (2,4-DMF) or C9-C15 branched-chain alkanes as liquid transportation fuels. In the linked strategy, high energy-consuming pretreatment as well as expensive and polluting hydrolysis of biomass were omitted, but the high energy recovery of APP was inherited. In addition, the hexoketoses via formose reaction could be converted to HMFs directly without isomerization. A potential platform molecule 4-HMF was formed simultaneously in APP. PMID:23393625

  14. Constraints on JP-900 Jet Fuel Production Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    most of this research effort has focused on a coal-tar blending process. Penn State currently plans to build a one-barrel- per-day pilot plant and...which a mixture of solid coal and a refinery intermediate, decant oil, is used to pro- duce a combination of liquid fuels and coke. The findings and...petroleum refinery intermedi- ate (specifically, light cycle oil). More recently, attention has been directed toward a co-coking process, in which a

  15. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  16. [Assays of HbA1c and Amadori products in human biology].

    PubMed

    Gillery, P

    2014-09-01

    Different Amadori products, formed during the early steps of the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, may be assayed in current practice in human biology. The most important marker is HbA1c, resulting from the binding of glucose to the N-terminal extremity of HbA beta chains. HbA1c may be evaluated by various techniques (ion exchange or affinity high performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, immunoassay, enzymatic technique) and is considered the best marker of diabetic patient survey. Due to its irreversible and cumulative formation, it provides a retrospective information on the glycemic balance over the four to eight weeks preceding blood collection. It benefits from an international standardization, based on a reference method using liquid chromatography coupled to capillary electrophoresis or mass spectrometry, maintained by an international network of reference laboratories. When HbA1c assay cannot be used (anemia, hemolysis, hemoglobinopathy) or when a shorter period of glycemic equilibrium must be evaluated (child and adolescent, pregnancy, therapeutic changes), other Amadori products may be assayed, like plasma fructosamine (all plasma glycated proteins) or glycated albumin. Nevertheless, these assays are less used in practice, because their semiological value has been less evidenced. Besides, fructosamine assay lacks specificity, and glycated albumin assay has been described recently. An expanding use of HbA1c assay is expected, especially for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and the evaluation of other risks, especially cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Biodiesel-fuel: content, production, producers, contemporary biotechnology (review)].

    PubMed

    Feofilova, E P; Sergeeva, Ia E; Ivashechkin, A A

    2010-01-01

    The necessity of expanding studies on producing renewable biofuel is reviewed. Special attention is given to biodiesel, the history of its creation, and its advantages and disadvantages in comparison with diesel-fuel. The main part of the review is devoted to an analysis of diesel biofuel on the basis of bacterial lipids, filamentous fungi, yeasts, plants, photo- and heterotrophic algae. Biodiesel on the basis of filamentous fungi is studied in detail and the possibility of creation of the most perspective biotechnology using these producers is grounded. The contemporary state of biotechnology in Russia is discussed in connection with the development of energetics based on renewable biofuels.

  18. Fuel From Farms: A Guide to Small-Scale Ethanol Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO.

    Ethanol and blends of ethanol and gasoline (such as gasohol) offer a near-term fuel alternative to oil. The focus of this handbook is upon the small-scale production of ethanol using farm crops as the source of raw materials. Provided are chapters on ethanol production procedures, feedstocks, plant design, and financial planning. Also presented…

  19. Ceria-thoria pellet manufacturing in preparation for plutonia-thoria LWR fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drera, Saleem S.; Björk, Klara Insulander; Sobieska, Matylda

    2016-10-01

    Thorium dioxide (thoria) has potential to assist in niche roles as fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). One such application for thoria is its use as the fertile component to burn plutonium in a mixed oxide fuel (MOX). Thor Energy and an international consortium are currently irradiating plutonia-thoria (Th-MOX) fuel in an effort to produce data for its licensing basis. During fuel-manufacturing research and development (R&D), surrogate materials were utilized to highlight procedures and build experience. Cerium dioxide (ceria) provides a good surrogate platform to replicate the chemical nature of plutonium dioxide. The project's fuel manufacturing R&D focused on powder metallurgical techniques to ensure manufacturability with the current commercial MOX fuel production infrastructure. The following paper highlights basics of the ceria-thoria fuel production including powder milling, pellet pressing and pellet sintering. Green pellets and sintered pellets were manufactured with average densities of 67.0% and 95.5% that of theoretical density respectively.

  20. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasolinemore » fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible

  1. Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Analysis Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis This interactive map displays the results of a 2011 NREL analysis on the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis at potential sites across the United States. NREL analyzed the cost of hydrogen production via wind-based water electrolysis at 42 potential sites in 11

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution

    Science.gov Websites

    produced from liquid components recovered during natural gas processing. These components include ethane & Incentives Propane Production and Distribution Propane is a by-product of natural gas processing distribution showing propane originating from three sources: 1) gas well and gas plant, 2) oil well and

  3. 48 CFR 908.7109 - Fuels and packaged petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... petroleum products. 908.7109 Section 908.7109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908... with 951, to acquire such products from Defense sources, they shall do so in accordance with FPMR 41...

  4. Hydrogen Production and Delivery | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | Hydrogen and

    Science.gov Websites

    degrees Celsius. Ultra-high temperatures are required for thermochemical reaction cycles to produce for the environmentally benign production of hydrogen. Very high reaction rates at these elevated temperatures give rise to very fast reaction rates, which significantly enhance production rates and more than

  5. A physical description of fission product behavior fuels for advanced power reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganas, G.; Rest, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-18

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is considering a list of reactors and nuclear fuels as part of its chartered initiative. Because many of the candidate materials have not been explored experimentally under the conditions of interest, and in order to economize on program costs, analytical support in the form of combined first principle and mechanistic modeling is highly desirable. The present work is a compilation of mechanistic models developed in order to describe the fission product behavior of irradiated nuclear fuel. The mechanistic nature of the model development allows for the possibility of describing a range of nuclear fuelsmore » under varying operating conditions. Key sources include the FASTGRASS code with an application to UO{sub 2} power reactor fuel and the Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART ) with an application to uranium-silicide and uranium-molybdenum research reactor fuel. Described behavior mechanisms are divided into subdivisions treating fundamental materials processes under normal operation as well as the effect of transient heating conditions on these processes. Model topics discussed include intra- and intergranular gas-atom and bubble diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth, gas-atom re-solution, fuel swelling and ?scion gas release. In addition, the effect of an evolving microstructure on these processes (e.g., irradiation-induced recrystallization) is considered. The uranium-alloy fuel, U-xPu-Zr, is investigated and behavior mechanisms are proposed for swelling in the {alpha}-, intermediate- and {gamma}-uranium zones of this fuel. The work reviews the FASTGRASS kinetic/mechanistic description of volatile ?scion products and, separately, the basis for the DART calculation of bubble behavior in amorphous fuels. Development areas and applications for physical nuclear fuel models are identified.« less

  6. Effect of subsidies to fossil fuel companies on United States crude oil production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Peter; Down, Adrian; Lazarus, Michael; Koplow, Doug

    2017-11-01

    Countries in the G20 have committed to phase out `inefficient' fossil fuel subsidies. However, there remains a limited understanding of how subsidy removal would affect fossil fuel investment returns and production, particularly for subsidies to producers. Here, we assess the impact of major federal and state subsidies on US crude oil producers. We find that, at recent oil prices of US50 per barrel, tax preferences and other subsidies push nearly half of new, yet-to-be-developed oil investments into profitability, potentially increasing US oil production by 17 billion barrels over the next few decades. This oil, equivalent to 6 billion tonnes of CO2, could make up as much as 20% of US oil production through 2050 under a carbon budget aimed at limiting warming to 2 °C. Our findings show that removal of tax incentives and other fossil fuel support policies could both fulfil G20 commitments and yield climate benefits.

  7. Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

    2009-11-01

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the powermore » cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.« less

  8. Effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from a combustor burning liquid ASTM A-1 and vaporized propane fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A combustor segment 0.457 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was operated at inlet-air temperatures of 590 and 700 K, inlet-air pressures of 4 and 10 atmospheres, and fuel-air ratios of 0.014 and 0.018 to determine the effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from burning either propane or ASTM A-1 fuel. At a simulated takeoff condition of 10 atmospheres and 700 K, multiple-orifice nozzles used to inject water at 1 percent of the airflow rate reduced nitrogen oxides 75 percent with propane and 65 percent with ASTM A-1 fuel. Although carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons increased with water injection, they remained relatively low; and smoke numbers were well below the visibility limit.

  9. Fission products detection in irradiated TRIGA fuel by means of gamma spectroscopy and MCNP calculation.

    PubMed

    Cagnazzo, M; Borio di Tigliole, A; Böck, H; Villa, M

    2018-05-01

    Aim of this work was the detection of fission products activity distribution along the axial dimension of irradiated fuel elements (FEs) at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Technische Universität (TU) Wien. The activity distribution was measured by means of a customized fuel gamma scanning device, which includes a vertical lifting system to move the fuel rod along its vertical axis. For each investigated FE, a gamma spectrum measurement was performed along the vertical axis, with steps of 1 cm, in order to determine the axial distribution of the fission products. After the fuel elements underwent a relatively short cooling down period, different fission products were detected. The activity concentration was determined by calibrating the gamma detector with a standard calibration source of known activity and by MCNP6 simulations for the evaluation of self-absorption and geometric effects. Given the specific TRIGA fuel composition, a correction procedure is developed and used in this work for the measurement of the fission product Zr 95 . This measurement campaign is part of a more extended project aiming at the modelling of the TU Wien TRIGA reactor by means of different calculation codes (MCNP6, Serpent): the experimental results presented in this paper will be subsequently used for the benchmark of the models developed with the calculation codes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of alcohol fuel production on agricultural markets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Production of alcohol from biomass feedstocks, such as corn, was given Federal and State support which resulted in alcohol production rising from 20 million gallons in 1979 to 430 million gallons in 1984. This study estimates the impacts of alcohol production from corn on selected agricultural markets. The tool of analysis was a three region (United States, the European Community and the rest of the world) econometric model of the markets for corn, soybeans, soybean meal, soybean oil, wheat and corn byproduct feeds. Three alternative growth paths for alcohol production (totalling 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0 billion gallons) were analyzed withmore » the model in the context of three different trade environments. The results of this analysis indicate that alcohol production of 1.1 billion gallons by 1980 would have caused moderate adjustments to commodity markets while 3.0 billion gallons would have caused major adjustments. Corn prices rose sharply with increased alcohol production as did wheat prices but to a somewhat lesser extent. The substitution of corn for soybeans on the supply side was not sufficient to offset the demand depressing effects of corn byproduct feeds on soybean meal which translated into slightly lower soybean prices. A quota limiting imports of corn gluten feed into the EC to three million tons annually would cause reductions in export earnings for corn millers.« less

  11. Laboratory Measurements of Gas Phase Pyrolysis Products from Southern Wildland Fuels using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharko, N.; Safdari, S.; Danby, T. O.; Howarth, J.; Beiswenger, T. N.; Weise, D.; Myers, T. L.; Fletcher, T. H.; Johnson, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Combustion is an oxidation reaction that occurs when there is less fuel available than oxidizers, while pyrolysis is a thermal decomposition process that occurs under "fuel rich" conditions where all of the available oxidizers are consumed leaving some fuel(s) either unreacted or partially reacted. Gas-phase combustion products from biomass burning experiments have been studied extensively; less is known, however, about pyrolysis processes and products. Pyrolysis is the initial reaction occurring in the burning process and generates products that are subsequently oxidized during combustion, yielding highly-oxidized chemicals. This laboratory study investigates the pyrolysis processes by using an FTIR spectrometer to detect and quantify the gas-phase products from thermal decomposition of intact understory fuels from forests in the southeastern United States. In particular, a laboratory flat-flame burner operating under fuel rich conditions (no oxygen) was used to heat individual leaves to cause decomposition. The gas-phase products were introduced to an 8 meter gas cell coupled to an infrared spectrometer were used to monitor the products. Trace gas emissions along with emission ratios, which are calculated by dividing the change in the amount of the trace gas by the change in the amount of CO, for the plant species, gallberry (Ilex glabra) and swampbay (Persea palustris) were determined. Preliminary measurements observed species such as CO2, CO, C2H2, C2H4, HCHO, CH3OH, isoprene, 1,3-butadiene, phenol and NH3 being produced as part of the thermal decomposition process. It is important to note that FTIR will not detect H2.

  12. Microbial alkane production for jet fuel industry: motivation, state of the art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Caballero, Antonio; Pérez-Hernández, Natalia; Segura, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Bio-jet fuel has attracted a lot of interest in recent years and has become a focus for aircraft and engine manufacturers, oil companies, governments and researchers. Given the global concern about environmental issues and the instability of oil market, bio-jet fuel has been identified as a promising way to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation industry, while also promoting energy security. Although a number of bio-jet fuel sources have been approved for manufacture, their commercialization and entry into the market is still a far way away. In this review, we provide an overview of the drivers for intensified research into bio-jet fuel technologies, the type of chemical compounds found in bio-jet fuel preparations and the current state of related pre-commercial technologies. The biosynthesis of hydrocarbons is one of the most promising approaches for bio-jet fuel production, and thus we provide a detailed analysis of recent advances in the microbial biosynthesis of hydrocarbons (with a focus on alkanes). Finally, we explore the latest developments and their implications for the future of research into bio-jet fuel technologies. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, D.L.

    1977-07-19

    A process is described for making a fuel by combining turpentine, alcohol and blending agent and reducing the temperature of a batch to form two separate phases of differing densities, both of which are separately useable as fuels for internal combustion engines. The proportions of combustion favor the denser phase. However, under certain conditions, the less dense phase may be desired. Either phase may also be combined with gasoline to enhance the performance of the gasoline.

  14. Production of electricity from proteins using a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Jenna; Logan, Bruce E

    2006-05-01

    Electricity generation was examined from proteins and a protein-rich wastewater using a single chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). The maximum power densities achieved were 354 +/- 10 mW/m2 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 269 +/- 14 mW/m2 using peptone (1100 mg/L BSA and 300 mg/L peptone). The recovery of organic matter as electricity, defined as the Coulombic efficiency (CE), was comparable to that obtained with other substrates with CE = 20.6% for BSA and CE = 6.0% for peptone. A meat packing wastewater (MPW), diluted to 1420 mg/L chemical oxygen demand, produced 80 +/- 1 mW/m2, and power was increased by 33% by adding salt (300 mg/L sodium chloride) to increase solution conductivity. A wastewater inoculum generated 33% less power than the MPW inoculum. The MFC was an effective method of wastewater treatment, demonstrated by >86% of biochemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon removal from wastewater.

  15. Simultaneous electricity production and antibiotics removal by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Nengwu; Guo, Wenying; Wang, Yun; Huang, Xixian; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Xian, Jinchan

    2018-07-01

    The removal of antibiotics is crucial for improvement of water quality in animal wastewater treatment. In this paper, the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in terms of degradation of typical antibiotics was investigated. Electricity was successfully produced by using sludge supernatant mixtures and synthesized animal wastewater as inoculation in MFC. Results demonstrated that the stable voltage, the maximum power density and internal resistance of anaerobic self-electrolysis (ASE) -112 and ASE-116 without antibiotics addition were 0.574 V, 5.78 W m -3 and 28.06 Ω, and 0.565 V, 5.82 W m -3 and 29.38 Ω, respectively. Moreover, when adding aureomycin, sulfadimidine, roxithromycin and norfloxacin into the reactors, the performance of MFC was inhibited (0.51 V-0.41 V), while the output voltage was improved with the decreased concentration of antibiotics. However, the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total phosphorus (TP) were both obviously enhanced. Simultaneously, LC-MS analysis showed that the removal efficiency of aureomycin, roxithromycin and norfloxacin were all 100% and the removal efficiency of sulfadimidine also reached 99.9%. These results indicated that antibiotics displayed significantly inhibitions for electricity performance but improved the quality of water simultaneously. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  17. Solar photochemical process engineering for production of fuels and chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, J. R.; Peterson, D. B.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering costs and performance of a nominal 25,000 scmd (883,000 scfd) photochemical plant to produce dihydrogen from water were studied. Two systems were considered, one based on flat-plate collector/reactors and the other on linear parabolic troughs. Engineering subsystems were specified including the collector/reactor, support hardware, field transport piping, gas compression equipment, and balance-of-plant (BOP) items. Overall plant efficiencies of 10.3 and 11.6% are estimated for the flat-plate and trough systems, respectively, based on assumed solar photochemical efficiencies of 12.9 and 14.6%. Because of the opposing effects of concentration ratio and operating temperature on efficiency, it was concluded that reactor cooling would be necessary with the trough system. Both active and passive cooling methods were considered. Capital costs and energy costs, for both concentrating and non-concentrating systems, were determined and their sensitivity to efficiency and economic parameters were analyzed. The overall plant efficiency is the single most important factor in determining the cost of the fuel.

  18. Solar photochemical process engineering for production of fuels and chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, J. R.; Peterson, D. B.; Fujita, T.

    1985-01-01

    The engineering costs and performance of a nominal 25,000 scmd (883,000 scfd) photochemical plant to produce dihydrogen from water were studied. Two systems were considered, one based on flat-plate collector/reactors and the other on linear parabolic troughs. Engineering subsystems were specified including the collector/reactor, support hardware, field transport piping, gas compression equipment, and balance-of-plant (BOP) items. Overall plant efficiencies of 10.3 and 11.6 percent are estimated for the flat-plate and trough systems, respectively, based on assumed solar photochemical efficiencies of 12.9 and 14.6 percent. Because of the opposing effects of concentration ratio and operating temperature on efficiency, it was concluded that reactor cooling would be necessary with the trough system. Both active and passive cooling methods were considered. Capital costs and energy costs, for both concentrating and non-concentrating systems, were determined and their sensitivity to efficiency and economic parameters were analyzed. The overall plant efficiency is the single most important factor in determining the cost of the fuel.

  19. Review of palm oil fuel ash and ceramic waste in the production of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasya Mazenan, Puteri; Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Shahidan, Shahiron; Shamsuddin, Shamrul-mar

    2017-11-01

    High demand for cement in the concrete production has been increased which become the problems in the industry. Thus, this problem will increase the production cost of construction material and the demand for affordable houses. Moreover, the production of Portland cement leads to the release of a significant amount of CO2 and other gases leading to the effect on global warming. The need for a sustainable and green construction building material is required in the construction industry. Hence, this paper presents utilization of palm oil fuel ash and ceramic waste as partial cement replacement in the production of concrete. Using both of this waste in the concrete production would benefit in many ways. It is able to save cost and energy other than protecting the environment. In short, 20% usage of palm oil fuel ash and 30% replacement of ceramic waste as cement replacement show the acceptable and satisfactory strength of concrete.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution

    Science.gov Websites

    coproduct). Approximately 100 pounds of oil or fat are reacted with 10 pounds of a short-chain alcohol Biodiesel Production Path Enlarge illustration Raw or refined plant oil, or recycled greases that have not (triglycerides) are much more viscous than biodiesel, and low-level vegetable oil blends can cause long-term

  1. Process for the production of fuel gas from coal

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Jitendra G.; Sandstrom, William A.; Tarman, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

  2. Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

    2007-01-01

    The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more

  3. General circulation model response to production-limited fossil fuel emission estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Rutledge, D.; Miller, C.

    2008-12-01

    The differences in emissions scenarios used to drive IPCC climate projections are the largest sources of uncertainty in future temperature predictions. These estimates are critically dependent on oil, gas, and coal production where the extremal variations in fossil fuel production used in these scenarios is roughly 10:1 after 2100. The development of emission scenarios based on production-limited fossil fuel estimates, i.e., total fossil fuel reserves can be reliably predicted from cumulative production, offers the opportunity to significantly reduce this uncertainty. We present preliminary results of the response of the NASA GISS atmospheric general circulation model to input forcings constrained by production-limited cumulative future fossil-fuel CO2 emissions estimates that reach roughly 500 GtC by 2100, which is significantly lower than any of the IPCC emission scenarios. For climate projections performed from 1958 through 2400 and a climate sensitivity of 5C/2xCO2, the change in globally averaged annual mean temperature relative to fixed CO2 does not exceed 3C with most changes occurring at high latitudes. We find that from 2100-2400 other input forcings such as increased in N2O play an important role in maintaining increase surface temperatures.

  4. Molybdenum-99 production calculation analysis of SAMOP reactor based on thorium nitrate fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarip; Togatorop, E.; Yassar

    2018-03-01

    SAMOP (Subcritical Assembly for Molybdenum-99 Production) has the potential to use thorium as fuel to produce 99Mo after modifying the design, but the production performance has not been discovered yet. A study needs to be done to obtain the correlation between 99Mo production with the mixed fuel composition of uranium and with SAMOP power on the modified SAMOP design. The study aims to obtain the production of 99Mo based thorium nitrate fuel on SAMOP’s modified designs. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) is required to simulate the operation of the assembly by varying the composition of the uranium-thorium nitrate mixed fuel, geometry and power fraction on the SAMOP modified designs. The burnup command on the MCNPX is used to confirm the 99Mo production result. The assembly is simulated to operate for 6 days with subcritical neutron multiplication factor (keff = 0.97-0.99). The neutron multiplication factor of the modified design (keff) is 0.97, the activity obtained from 99Mo is 18.58 Ci at 1 kW power operation.

  5. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trial production of fuel pellet from Acacia mangium bark waste biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirta, R.; Anwar, T.; Sudrajat; Yuliansyah; Suwinarti, W.

    2018-04-01

    Fuel pellet is one of the innovation products that can be produced from various sources of biomass such as agricultural residues, forestry and also wood industries including wood bark. Herein this paper, the potential fuel pellet production using Acacia mangium bark that abundant wasted from chip mill industry was studied. Fuel pellet was produced using a modified animal feed pellet press machine equipped with rotating roller-cylinders. The international standards quality of fuel pellet such as ONORM (Austria), SS (Sweden), DIN (Germany), EN (European) and ITEBE (Italy) were used to evaluate the optimum composition of feedstock and additive used. Theresults showed the quality offuel pellet produced were good compared to commercial sawdust pellet. Mixed of Acacia bark (dust) with 10% of tapioca and 20% of glycerol (w/w) was increased the stable form of pellet and the highest heating value to reached 4,383 Kcal/kg (calorific value). Blending of Acacia bark with tapioca and glycerol was positively improved its physical, chemical and combustion properties to met the international standards requirement for export market. Based on this finding, production of fuel pellet from Acacia bark waste biomass was promising to be developed as an alternative substitution of fossil energy in the future.

  7. The economic production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, E.L.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Yang, R.Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to discover, (1) study and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. Specifically, alternative methods of preparing catalysts are to be investigated, and novel catalysts, including sulfur-tolerant ones, are to be pursued. (Task 1); (2) explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. (Task 1); (3) simulate by computer the most energy efficient and economically efficient process for converting coal to energy, with primary focus on converting syngas to fuel alcohols. (Task 2);more » (4) develop on the bench scale the best holistic combination of chemistry, catalyst, reactor and total process configuration integrated with the overall coal conversion process to achieve economic optimization for the conversion of syngas to liquid products within the framework of achieving the maximum cost effective transformation of coal to energy equivalents. (Tasks 1 and 2); and (5) evaluate the combustion, emission and performance characteristics of fuel alcohols and blends of alcohols with petroleum-based fuels. (Task 2)« less

  8. Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.

    2005-12-05

    significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dewatering costs. Interestingly, the maximum feed moisture was found to be dependent to some extent on the binder type with molasses-containing blends being difficult to feed when the moisture content approached 12% while guar gum blends flowed consistently at moisture levels as high as 15% by weight. Due to the low ash and moisture contents of the coal-sawdust briquettes, a production increase of about 50 tons/hr would potentially be realized at a 1,400 ton/hr preparation plant. The overall capital cost of a 50 ton/hr flotation and briquetting addition was estimated to be around $8 million. Based on a conservative briquetting operating cost of $12/ton, the annual profit before taxes was approximated to be $4 million thereby indicating a return on investment in about 2 years. The internal rate of return based on a 10 year life was an attractive 43%.« less

  9. Yeast flocculation: New story in fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X Q; Bai, F W

    2009-01-01

    Yeast flocculation has been used in the brewing industry to facilitate biomass recovery for a long time, and thus its mechanism of yeast flocculation has been intensively studied. However, the application of flocculating yeast in ethanol production garnered attention mainly in the 1980s and 1990s. In this article, updated research progress in the molecular mechanism of yeast flocculation and the impact of environmental conditions on yeast flocculation are reviewed. Construction of flocculating yeast strains by genetic approach and utilization of yeast flocculation for ethanol production from various feedstocks were presented. The concept of self-immobilized yeast cells through their flocculation is revisited through a case study of continuous ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast SPSC01, and their technical and economic advantages are highlighted by comparing with yeast cells immobilized with supporting materials and regular free yeast cells as well. Taking the flocculating yeast SPSC01 as an example, the ethanol tolerance of the flocculating yeast was also discussed.

  10. Chipping whole trees for fuel chips: a production study

    Treesearch

    Dana Mitchell; Tom Gallagher

    2007-01-01

    A time and motion study was conducted to determine the productivity and cost of an in-woods chipping operation when processing whole mall-diameter trees for biomass. The study removed biomass from two overstocked stands and compared the cost of this treatment to existing alternatives. The treatment stands consisted of a 30-year-old longleaf pine stand and a 37-year-old...

  11. Peak oil demand: the role of fuel efficiency and alternative fuels in a global oil production decline.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R; Millard-Ball, Adam; Ganser, Matthew; Gorelick, Steven M

    2013-07-16

    Some argue that peak conventional oil production is imminent due to physical resource scarcity. We examine the alternative possibility of reduced oil use due to improved efficiency and oil substitution. Our model uses historical relationships to project future demand for (a) transport services, (b) all liquid fuels, and (c) substitution with alternative energy carriers, including electricity. Results show great increases in passenger and freight transport activity, but less reliance on oil. Demand for liquids inputs to refineries declines significantly after 2070. By 2100 transport energy demand rises >1000% in Asia, while flattening in North America (+23%) and Europe (-20%). Conventional oil demand declines after 2035, and cumulative oil production is 1900 Gbbl from 2010 to 2100 (close to the U.S. Geological Survey median estimate of remaining oil, which only includes projected discoveries through 2025). These results suggest that effort is better spent to determine and influence the trajectory of oil substitution and efficiency improvement rather than to focus on oil resource scarcity. The results also imply that policy makers should not rely on liquid fossil fuel scarcity to constrain damage from climate change. However, there is an unpredictable range of emissions impacts depending on which mix of substitutes for conventional oil gains dominance-oil sands, electricity, coal-to-liquids, or others.

  12. Farm Deployable Microbial Bioreactor for Fuel Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    Okeke, Benedict

    Research was conducted to develop a farm and field deployable microbial bioreactor for bioethanol production from biomass. Experiments were conducted to select the most efficient microorganisms for conversion of plant fiber to sugars for fermentation to ethanol. Mixtures of biomass and surface soil samples were collected from selected sites in Alabama black belt counties (Macon, Sumter, Choctaw, Dallas, Montgomery, Lowndes) and other areas within the state of Alabama. Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of culture parameters on key biomass saccharifying enzymes (cellulase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase and beta-xylosidase). A wide-scale sampling of locally-grown fruits in Central Alabama was embarked tomore » isolate potential xylose fermenting microorganisms. Yeast isolates were evaluated for xylose fermentation. Selected microorganisms were characterized by DNA based methods. Factors affecting enzyme production and biomass saccharification were examined and optimized in the laboratory. Methods of biomass pretreatment were compared. Co-production of amylolytic enzymes with celluloytic-xylanolytic enzymes was evaluated; and co-saccharification of a combination of biomass, and starch-rich materials was examined. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with and without pre-saccharifcation was studied. Whole culture broth and filtered culture broth simultaneous saccahrifcation and fermentation were compared. A bioreactor system was designed and constructed to employ laboratory results for scale up of biomass saccharification.« less

  13. Novel Catalysts and Processing Technologies for Production of Aerospace Fuels from Non-Petroleum Raw Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; Psarras, Peter C.; Ball, David W.; Timko, Michael T.; Wong, Hsi-Wu; Peck, Jay; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation fuels production (including aerospace propellants) from non-traditional sources (gases, waste materials, and biomass) has been an active area of research and development for decades. Reducing terrestrial waste streams simultaneous with energy conversion, plentiful biomass, new low-cost methane sources, and/or extra-terrestrial resource harvesting and utilization present significant technological and business opportunities being realized by a new generation of visionary entrepreneurs. We examine several new approaches to catalyst fabrication and new processing technologies to enable utilization of these nontraditional raw materials. Two basic processing architectures are considered: a single-stage pyrolysis approach that seeks to basically re-cycle hydrocarbons with minimal net chemistry or a two-step paradigm that involves production of supply or synthesis gas (mainly carbon oxides and H2) followed by production of fuel(s) via Sabatier or methanation reactions and/or Fischer-Tröpsch synthesis. Optimizing the fraction of product stream relevant to targeted aerospace (and other transportation) fuels via modeling, catalyst fabrication and novel reactor design are described. Energy utilization is a concern for production of fuels for either terrestrial or space operations; renewable sources based on solar energy and/or energy efficient processes may be mission enabling. Another important issue is minimizing impurities in the product stream(s), especially those potentially posing risks to personnel or operations through (catalyst) poisoning or (equipment) damage. Technologies being developed to remove (and/or recycle) heteroatom impurities are briefly discussed as well as the development of chemically robust catalysts whose activities are not diminished during operation. The potential impacts on future missions by such new approaches as well as balance of system issues are addressed.

  14. Novel Catalysts and Processing Technologies for Production of Aerospace Fuels from Non-Petroleum Raw Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Kulis, M. J.; Psarras, P. C.; Ball, D. W.; Timko, M. T.; Wong, H.-W.; Peck, J.; Chianelli, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation fuels production (including aerospace propellants) from non-traditional sources (gases, waste materials, and biomass) has been an active area of research and development for decades. Reducing terrestrial waste streams simultaneous with energy conversion, plentiful biomass, new low-cost methane sources, and/or extra-terrestrial resource harvesting and utilization present significant technological and business opportunities being realized by a new generation of visionary entrepreneurs. We examine several new approaches to catalyst fabrication and new processing technologies to enable utilization of these non-traditional raw materials. Two basic processing architectures are considered: a single-stage pyrolysis approach that seeks to basically re-cycle hydrocarbons with minimal net chemistry or a two-step paradigm that involves production of supply or synthesis gas (mainly carbon oxides and hydrogen) followed by production of fuel(s) via Sabatier or methanation reactions and/or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Optimizing the fraction of product stream relevant to targeted aerospace (and other transportation) fuels via modeling, catalyst fabrication and novel reactor design are described. Energy utilization is a concern for production of fuels for either terrestrial or space operations; renewable sources based on solar energy and/or energy efficient processes may be mission enabling. Another important issue is minimizing impurities in the product stream(s), especially those potentially posing risks to personnel or operations through (catalyst) poisoning or (equipment) damage. Technologies being developed to remove (and/or recycle) heteroatom impurities are briefly discussed as well as the development of chemically robust catalysts whose activity are not diminished during operation. The potential impacts on future missions by such new approaches as well as balance of system issues are addressed.

  15. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  16. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert B.; Hegarty, William P.; Studer, David W.; Tirados, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  17. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2014

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    This FY 2014 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  18. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  19. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  20. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2013

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    This FY 2013 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  1. 30 CFR 250.1629 - Additional production and fuel gas system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (4) Fire- and gas-detection system. (i) Fire (flame, heat, or smoke) sensors shall be installed in all enclosed classified areas. Gas sensors shall be installed in all inadequately ventilated, enclosed... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional production and fuel gas system...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1629 - Additional production and fuel gas system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... structure. (4) Fire- and gas-detection system. (i) Fire (flame, heat, or smoke) sensors shall be installed in all enclosed classified areas. Gas sensors shall be installed in all inadequately ventilated... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional production and fuel gas system...

  3. Solid recovered fuel production from biodegradable waste in grain processing industry.

    PubMed

    Kliopova, Irina; Staniskis, Jurgis Kazimieras; Petraskiene, Violeta

    2013-04-01

    Management of biodegradable waste is one of the most important environmental problems in the grain-processing industry since this waste cannot be dumped anymore due to legal requirements. Biodegradable waste is generated in each stage of grain processing, including the waste-water and air emissions treatment processes. Their management causes some environmental and financial problems. The majority of Lithuanian grain-processing enterprises own and operate composting sites, but in Lithuania the demand for compost is not given. This study focused on the analysis of the possibility of using biodegradable waste for the production of solid recovered fuel, as a local renewable fuel with the purpose of increasing environmental performance and decreasing the direct costs of grain processing. Experimental research with regard to a pilot grain-processing plant has proven that alternative fuel production will lead to minimizing of the volume of biodegradable waste by 75% and the volume of natural gas for heat energy production by 62%. Environmental indicators of grain processing, laboratory analysis of the chemical and physical characteristics of biodegradable waste, mass and energy balances of the solid recovered fuel production, environmental and economical benefits of the project are presented and discussed herein.

  4. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  5. Yeast selection for fuel ethanol production in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz C; de Amorim, Henrique V; de Oliveira, Antonio J; Lopes, Mario L

    2008-11-01

    Brazil is one of the largest ethanol biofuel producers and exporters in the world and its production has increased steadily during the last three decades. The increasing efficiency of Brazilian ethanol plants has been evident due to the many technological contributions. As far as yeast is concerned, few publications are available regarding the industrial fermentation processes in Brazil. The present paper reports on a yeast selection program performed during the last 12 years aimed at selecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suitable for fermentation of sugar cane substrates (cane juice and molasses) with cell recycle, as it is conducted in Brazilian bioethanol plants. As a result, some evidence is presented showing the positive impact of selected yeast strains in increasing ethanol yield and reducing production costs, due to their higher fermentation performance (high ethanol yield, reduced glycerol and foam formation, maintenance of high viability during recycling and very high implantation capability into industrial fermenters). Results also suggest that the great yeast biodiversity found in distillery environments could be an important source of strains. This is because during yeast cell recycling, selective pressure (an adaptive evolution) is imposed on cells, leading to strains with higher tolerance to the stressful conditions of the industrial fermentation.

  6. Production of dimethylfuran for liquid fuels from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Barrett, Christopher J; Liu, Zhen Y; Dumesic, James A

    2007-06-21

    Diminishing fossil fuel reserves and growing concerns about global warming indicate that sustainable sources of energy are needed in the near future. For fuels to be useful in the transportation sector, they must have specific physical properties that allow for efficient distribution, storage and combustion; these properties are currently fulfilled by non-renewable petroleum-derived liquid fuels. Ethanol, the only renewable liquid fuel currently produced in large quantities, suffers from several limitations, including low energy density, high volatility, and contamination by the absorption of water from the atmosphere. Here we present a catalytic strategy for the production of 2,5-dimethylfuran from fructose (a carbohydrate obtained directly from biomass or by the isomerization of glucose) for use as a liquid transportation fuel. Compared to ethanol, 2,5-dimethylfuran has a higher energy density (by 40 per cent), a higher boiling point (by 20 K), and is not soluble in water. This catalytic strategy creates a route for transforming abundant renewable biomass resources into a liquid fuel suitable for the transportation sector, and may diminish our reliance on petroleum.

  7. Progress in the Production of JP-8 Based Hydrogen and Advanced Tactical Fuels for Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    of a multi- year program to develop, optimize, and demonstrate the military viability of a technology for on-demand production of high...continuous reactor system used for kinetic rate data experiment 86 52 Schematic of a differential reactor. The catalyst bed is kept small , and...program to develop, optimize, and demonstrate the military viability of a technology for on-demand production of high-pressure hydrogen for fuel

  8. Large-Scale Production of Fuel and Feed from Marine Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, Mark

    2015-09-30

    In summary, this Consortium has demonstrated a fully integrated process for the production of biofuels and high-value nutritional bioproducts at pre-commercial scale. We have achieved unprecedented yields of algal oil, and converted the oil to viable fuels. We have demonstrated the potential value of the residual product as a viable feed ingredient for many important animals in the global food supply.

  9. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. All feedstock are suited for gasification, which produces syngas that can be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol and diesel, or can undergo steam reformation to produce hydrogen. Implementing a network of mobile facilities reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use a fraction of the biomass energy content to meet thermal or electrical demands. The total energy delivered by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energy content, respectively. However, implementing mobile facilities is economically feasible when large transport distances are required. For an annual harvest of 1.717 million m3 (equivalent to 2000 ODTPD), transport costs are reduced to less than 40% of the total levelised delivered feedstock cost when mobile facilities are implemented; transport costs account for up to 80% of feedstock costs for conventional woodchip delivery. Torrefaction provides the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.25 million m3 or when transport distances greater than 250 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs of feedstock are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, thermal and electrical demands of mobile facilities, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost

  10. Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua

    2012-08-02

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize “food versus fuel” concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews themore » progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.« less

  11. Physiological tolerance and stoichiometric potential of cyanobacteria for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Jari; Knoop, Henning; Stanford, Natalie J; Guerrero, Fernando; Akhtar, M Kalim; Aro, Eva-Mari; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R

    2012-11-30

    Cyanobacteria are capable of directly converting sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into hydrocarbon fuel or precursors thereof. Many biological and non-biological factors will influence the ability of such a production system to become economically sustainable. We evaluated two factors in engineerable cyanobacteria which could potentially limit economic sustainability: (i) tolerance of the host to the intended end-product, and (ii) stoichiometric potential for production. Alcohols, when externally added, inhibited growth the most, followed by aldehydes and acids, whilst alkanes were the least inhibitory. The growth inhibition became progressively greater with increasing chain-length for alcohols, whilst the intermediate C6 alkane caused more inhibition than both C3 and C11 alkane. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was more tolerant to some of the tested chemicals than Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, particularly ethanol and undecane. Stoichiometric evaluation of the potential yields suggested that there is no difference in the potential productivity of harvestable energy between any of the studied fuels, with the exception of ethylene, for which maximal stoichiometric yield is considerably lower. In summary, it was concluded that alkanes would constitute the best choice metabolic end-product for fuel production using cyanobacteria if high-yielding strains can be developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-catalytic alcoholysis process for production of biodiesel fuel by using bubble column reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, S.; Nabetani, H.; Nakajima, M.

    2015-04-01

    Biodiesel fuel is a replacement for diesel as a fuel produced from biomass resources. It is usually defined as a fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) derived from vegetable oil or animal fat. In European countries, such as Germany and France, biodiesel fuel is commercially produced mainly from rapeseed oil, whereas in the United States and Argentina, soybean oil is more frequently used. In many other countries such as Japan and countries in Southeast Asia, lipids that cannot be used as a food source could be more suitable materials for the production of biodiesel fuel because its production from edible oils could result in an increase in the price of edible oils, thereby increasing the cost of some foodstuffs. Therefore, used edible oil, lipids contained in waste effluent from the oil milling process, byproducts from oil refining process and crude oils from industrial crops such as jatropha could be more promising materials in these countries. The materials available in Japan and Southeast Asia for the production of biodiesel fuel have common characteristics; they contain considerable amount of impurities and are high in free fatty acids (FFA). Superheated methanol vapor (SMV) reactor might be a promising method for biodiesel fuel production utilizing oil feedstock containing FFA such as waste vegetable oil and crude vegetable oil. In the conventional method using alkaline catalyst, FFA contained in waste vegetable oil is known to react with alkaline catalyst such as NaOH and KOH generating saponification products and to inactivate it. Therefore, the FFA needs to be removed from the feedstock prior to the reaction. Removal of the alkaline catalyst after the reaction is also required. In the case of the SMV reactor, the processes for removing FFA prior to the reaction and catalyst after the reaction can be omitted because it requires no catalyst. Nevertheless, detailed study on the productivity of biodiesel fuel produced from waste vegetable oils and other non

  13. Dual application of duckweed and azolla plants for wastewater treatment and renewable fuels and petrochemicals production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shortages in fresh water supplies today affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. Phytoremediation strategies, based on the abilities of aquatic plants to recycle nutrients offer an attractive solution for the bioremediation of water pollution and represents one of the most globally researched issues. The subsequent application of the biomass from the remediation for the production of fuels and petrochemicals offers an ecologically friendly and cost-effective solution for water pollution problems and production of value-added products. Results In this paper, the feasibility of the dual application of duckweed and azolla aquatic plants for wastewater treatment and production of renewable fuels and petrochemicals is explored. The differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by these aquatic macrophytes were used as the basis for optimization of the composition of wastewater effluents. Analysis of pyrolysis products showed that azolla and algae produce a similar range of bio-oils that contain a large spectrum of petrochemicals including straight-chain C10-C21 alkanes, which can be directly used as diesel fuel supplement, or a glycerin-free component of biodiesel. Pyrolysis of duckweed produces a different range of bio-oil components that can potentially be used for the production of “green” gasoline and diesel fuel using existing techniques, such as catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. Conclusions Differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by different aquatic macrophytes can be used for optimization of composition of wastewater effluents. The generated data suggest that the composition of the petrochemicals can be modified in a targeted fashion, not only by using different species, but also by changing the source plants’ metabolic profile, by exposing them to different abiotic or biotic stresses. This study presents an attractive, ecologically friendly and cost

  14. Dual application of duckweed and azolla plants for wastewater treatment and renewable fuels and petrochemicals production.

    PubMed

    Muradov, Nazim; Taha, Mohamed; Miranda, Ana F; Kadali, Krishna; Gujar, Amit; Rochfort, Simone; Stevenson, Trevor; Ball, Andrew S; Mouradov, Aidyn

    2014-02-28

    Shortages in fresh water supplies today affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. Phytoremediation strategies, based on the abilities of aquatic plants to recycle nutrients offer an attractive solution for the bioremediation of water pollution and represents one of the most globally researched issues. The subsequent application of the biomass from the remediation for the production of fuels and petrochemicals offers an ecologically friendly and cost-effective solution for water pollution problems and production of value-added products. In this paper, the feasibility of the dual application of duckweed and azolla aquatic plants for wastewater treatment and production of renewable fuels and petrochemicals is explored. The differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by these aquatic macrophytes were used as the basis for optimization of the composition of wastewater effluents. Analysis of pyrolysis products showed that azolla and algae produce a similar range of bio-oils that contain a large spectrum of petrochemicals including straight-chain C10-C21 alkanes, which can be directly used as diesel fuel supplement, or a glycerin-free component of biodiesel. Pyrolysis of duckweed produces a different range of bio-oil components that can potentially be used for the production of "green" gasoline and diesel fuel using existing techniques, such as catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. Differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by different aquatic macrophytes can be used for optimization of composition of wastewater effluents. The generated data suggest that the composition of the petrochemicals can be modified in a targeted fashion, not only by using different species, but also by changing the source plants' metabolic profile, by exposing them to different abiotic or biotic stresses. This study presents an attractive, ecologically friendly and cost-effective solution for efficient bio

  15. Microbial liquefaction of peat for the production of synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gunasekaran, M.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to evaluate the potential of using various microorganisms to hydrolyse and liquify peat; to determine the optimal conditions for peat hydrolysis and liquefaction; to study the co-metabolizable substances; to separate the compounds present in liquified peat by alumina and silica acid chromatography and capillary gas chromatography; and to identify the compounds in liquified peat by capillary GC-Mass spectrometry. Organisms used in the study include: Coprinus comatus, Coriolus hirsutus, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Lenzites trabea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sapidus, Polyporus adjustus, Neurospora sitophila, Rhizophus arrhizus, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. The fungimore » were maintained and cultivated in potato dextrose agar at 30 C. The bacteria were maintained in nutrient agar at 30 C. We have also initiated work on coal solubilization in addition to the studies on peat liquefaction. A relatively new substratum or semi-solid base for culture media called Pluronic F-127, or Polyol (BASF, New Jersey). Objectives of this study were: (1) to study the growth patterns of Candida ML 13 on pluronic as substratum; (2) to determine the rate of microbial coal solubilization on pluronic F-127 amended in different growth media; (3) to separate the mycelial mat of Candida ML 13 from unsolubilized coal particles and solubilized coal products from pluronic F-127; (4) to determine the effects of pH on microbial coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media; (5) the effect of concentration of pluronic F-127 in media on coal solubilization; and, (6) to study the role of extracellular factors secreted by Candida ML 13 on coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media. Results are discussed. 4 refs.« less

  16. Water consumption footprint and land requirements of large-scale alternative diesel and jet fuel production.

    PubMed

    Staples, Mark D; Olcay, Hakan; Malina, Robert; Trivedi, Parthsarathi; Pearlson, Matthew N; Strzepek, Kenneth; Paltsev, Sergey V; Wollersheim, Christoph; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-01-01

    Middle distillate (MD) transportation fuels, including diesel and jet fuel, make up almost 30% of liquid fuel consumption in the United States. Alternative drop-in MD and biodiesel could potentially reduce dependence on crude oil and the greenhouse gas intensity of transportation. However, the water and land resource requirements of these novel fuel production technologies must be better understood. This analysis quantifies the lifecycle green and blue water consumption footprints of producing: MD from conventional crude oil; Fischer-Tropsch MD from natural gas and coal; fermentation and advanced fermentation MD from biomass; and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids MD and biodiesel from oilseed crops, throughout the contiguous United States. We find that FT MD and alternative MD derived from rainfed biomass have lifecycle blue water consumption footprints of 1.6 to 20.1 Lwater/LMD, comparable to conventional MD, which ranges between 4.1 and 7.4 Lwater/LMD. Alternative MD derived from irrigated biomass has a lifecycle blue water consumption footprint potentially several orders of magnitude larger, between 2.7 and 22 600 Lwater/LMD. Alternative MD derived from biomass has a lifecycle green water consumption footprint between 1.1 and 19 200 Lwater/LMD. Results are disaggregated to characterize the relationship between geo-spatial location and lifecycle water consumption footprint. We also quantify the trade-offs between blue water consumption footprint and areal MD productivity, which ranges from 490 to 4200 LMD/ha, under assumptions of rainfed and irrigated biomass cultivation. Finally, we show that if biomass cultivation for alternative MD is irrigated, the ratio of the increase in areal MD productivity to the increase in blue water consumption footprint is a function of geo-spatial location and feedstock-to-fuel production pathway.

  17. Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L Kenney

    2011-09-01

    Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrelmore » of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).« less

  18. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    PubMed

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  19. IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Youinou; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-03-01

    This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies (UOX SNF) is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Only non-gaseous FP have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1). This mixture of Pu and FP is called PuFP. Note that, in this preliminary analysis,more » the FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.« less

  20. Method and device for fabricating dispersion fuel comprising fission product collection spaces

    DOEpatents

    Shaber, Eric L; Fielding, Randall S

    2015-05-05

    A method of fabricating a nuclear fuel comprising a fissile material, one or more hollow microballoons, a phenolic resin, and metal matrix. The fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined. The combined fissile material, phenolic resin and the hollow microballoons are heated sufficiently to form at least some fissile material carbides creating a nuclear fuel particle. The resulting nuclear fuel particle comprises one or more fission product collection spaces. In a preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by forming the fissile material into microspheres. The fissile material microspheres are then overcoated with the phenolic resin and microballoon. In another preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by overcoating the microballoon with the fissile material, and phenolic resin.

  1. Economics of liquefied natural gas production, transport and distribution for end use as a transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, R.E.; Sutton, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas vehicles have been operating in the United States for over 30 years. With few exceptions, these vehicles are owned and operated by local gas utilities that utilize the natural gas in the compressed form (CNG), at pressures of up to 3,600 psi. However, the limited range, system weight and the high cost of fueling facilities presents a serious handicap for these compressed fuel systems. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) automotive fuel systems, on the other hand, are a relatively new player in the emerging clean fuels market. While the technical feasibility, safety, and operational suitability of LNG fuel systemsmore » have been demonstrated during the past 20 years, in a variety of test projects including automotive, marine, aviation, and rail systems, little has been done to commercialize or promote this technology. Recent independent cost comparisons and technical evaluations have been conducted by several major transit organizations and national truck fleets with interesting results. They have concluded that LNG automotive fuel systems can meet the performance and operational criteria of their gasoline and diesel fuel systems without compromising vehicle range or imposing unacceptable weight and payload penalties on their vehicles. The purpose of this paper is to further define the economics of LNG production, transportation and distribution costs. The liquefaction of natural gas is a mature technology and was first accomplished by Faraday in 1855. The first large scale plants were installed in the United States in 1941 and this paper provides a summary of the issues and costs associated with the procurement, installation, and operation of modern day natural gas liquefaction systems. There are no technical barriers to building LNG plants where needed. In addition to these {open_quotes}peak shaving{close_quotes} liquefaction plants, operated by utilities, there are many liquefaction plants owned and operated by the industrial gas business sector.« less

  2. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the enhanced production of isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fuel mixture.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Joungmin; Im, Jung Ae; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Julia; Eom, Moon-Ho; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young

    2013-01-01

    Butanol is considered as a superior biofuel, which is conventionally produced by clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Among ABE, only butanol and ethanol can be used as fuel alternatives. Coproduction of acetone thus causes lower yield of fuel alcohols. Thus, this study aimed at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced fuel alcohol production capability. For this, we previously developed a hyper ABE producing BKM19 strain was further engineered to convert acetone into isopropanol. The BKM19 strain was transformed with the plasmid pIPA100 containing the sadh (primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase) and hydG (putative electron transfer protein) genes from the Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 cloned under the control of the thiolase promoter. The resulting BKM19 (pIPA100) strain produced 27.9 g/l isopropanol-butanol-ethanol (IBE) as a fuel alcohols with negligible amount of acetone (0.4 g/l) from 97.8 g/l glucose in lab-scale (2 l) batch fermentation. Thus, this metabolically engineered strain was able to produce 99% of total solvent produced as fuel alcohols. The scalability and stability of BKM19 (pIPA100) were evaluated at 200 l pilot-scale fermentation, which showed that the fuel alcohol yield could be improved to 0.37 g/g as compared to 0.29 g/g obtained at lab-scale fermentation, while attaining a similar titer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest titer of IBE achieved and the first report on the large scale fermentation of C. acetobutylicum for IBE production. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Efficient solar-to-fuels production from a hybrid microbial–water-splitting catalyst system

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Chen, Janice S.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Colón, Brendan; Way, Jeffery C.; Silver, Pamela A.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells have considerable potential to satisfy future renewable-energy needs, but efficient and scalable methods of storing the intermittent electricity they produce are required for the large-scale implementation of solar energy. Current solar-to-fuels storage cycles based on water splitting produce hydrogen and oxygen, which are attractive fuels in principle but confront practical limitations from the current energy infrastructure that is based on liquid fuels. In this work, we report the development of a scalable, integrated bioelectrochemical system in which the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is used to efficiently convert CO2, along with H2 and O2 produced from water splitting, into biomass and fusel alcohols. Water-splitting catalysis was performed using catalysts that are made of earth-abundant metals and enable low overpotential water splitting. In this integrated setup, equivalent solar-to-biomass yields of up to 3.2% of the thermodynamic maximum exceed that of most terrestrial plants. Moreover, engineering of R. eutropha enabled production of the fusel alcohol isopropanol at up to 216 mg/L, the highest bioelectrochemical fuel yield yet reported by >300%. This work demonstrates that catalysts of biotic and abiotic origin can be interfaced to achieve challenging chemical energy-to-fuels transformations. PMID:25675518

  4. Seawater usable for production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel

    PubMed Central

    Mase, Kentaro; Yoneda, Masaki; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water has been proposed as a promising solar fuel instead of gaseous hydrogen because of advantages on easy storage and high energy density, being used as a fuel of a one-compartment H2O2 fuel cell for producing electricity on demand with emitting only dioxygen (O2) and water. It is highly desired to utilize the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water for the practical use of H2O2 as a solar fuel. Here we have achieved efficient photocatalytic production of H2O2 from the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water and O2 in a two-compartment photoelectrochemical cell using WO3 as a photocatalyst for water oxidation and a cobalt complex supported on a glassy-carbon substrate for the selective two-electron reduction of O2. The concentration of H2O2 produced in seawater reached 48 mM, which was high enough to operate an H2O2 fuel cell. PMID:27142725

  5. Selection and properties of alternative forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M. P.; King, J. C.; Gorman, B. P.

    2013-01-01

    Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardousmore » alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ~10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1- bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 °C and 80 °C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.« less

  6. Efficient solar-to-fuels production from a hybrid microbial-water-splitting catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Torella, Joseph P; Gagliardi, Christopher J; Chen, Janice S; Bediako, D Kwabena; Colón, Brendan; Way, Jeffery C; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-02-24

    Photovoltaic cells have considerable potential to satisfy future renewable-energy needs, but efficient and scalable methods of storing the intermittent electricity they produce are required for the large-scale implementation of solar energy. Current solar-to-fuels storage cycles based on water splitting produce hydrogen and oxygen, which are attractive fuels in principle but confront practical limitations from the current energy infrastructure that is based on liquid fuels. In this work, we report the development of a scalable, integrated bioelectrochemical system in which the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is used to efficiently convert CO2, along with H2 and O2 produced from water splitting, into biomass and fusel alcohols. Water-splitting catalysis was performed using catalysts that are made of earth-abundant metals and enable low overpotential water splitting. In this integrated setup, equivalent solar-to-biomass yields of up to 3.2% of the thermodynamic maximum exceed that of most terrestrial plants. Moreover, engineering of R. eutropha enabled production of the fusel alcohol isopropanol at up to 216 mg/L, the highest bioelectrochemical fuel yield yet reported by >300%. This work demonstrates that catalysts of biotic and abiotic origin can be interfaced to achieve challenging chemical energy-to-fuels transformations.

  7. Selection and properties of alternative forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, M. P.; King, J. C.; Gorman, B. P.; Marshall, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ˜10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1-bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 °C and 80 °C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

  8. Seawater usable for production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel.

    PubMed

    Mase, Kentaro; Yoneda, Masaki; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-04

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water has been proposed as a promising solar fuel instead of gaseous hydrogen because of advantages on easy storage and high energy density, being used as a fuel of a one-compartment H2O2 fuel cell for producing electricity on demand with emitting only dioxygen (O2) and water. It is highly desired to utilize the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water for the practical use of H2O2 as a solar fuel. Here we have achieved efficient photocatalytic production of H2O2 from the most earth-abundant seawater instead of precious pure water and O2 in a two-compartment photoelectrochemical cell using WO3 as a photocatalyst for water oxidation and a cobalt complex supported on a glassy-carbon substrate for the selective two-electron reduction of O2. The concentration of H2O2 produced in seawater reached 48 mM, which was high enough to operate an H2O2 fuel cell.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of fungicidal and termiticidal activities of filtrates from biomass slurry fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kartal, S N; Imamura, Y; Tsuchiya, F; Ohsato, K

    2004-10-01

    Biomass slurry fuel (BSF) production has recently been developed as a natural energy for the conversion of solid biomass into fuel. In addition to using fuel, filtrates from BSF production may also serve a chemical source with several organic compounds. There is an increasing interest in the research and application of biomass-based filtrates. In this study, fungicidal and termiticidal properties of filtrates from BSF production using sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) and acacia (Acacia mangium) wood were evaluated in laboratory decay and termite resistance tests. Wood blocks treated with the filtrates showed increased resistance against brown-rot fungus, Fomitopsis palustris. However the filtrates from sugi wood processed at 270 degrees C which contained less phenolic compounds than the other filtrates were effective against white-rot fungus, Trametes versicolor. Phenolic compounds of filtrates seemed to play a role in the decay resistance tests however the filtrates did not increase the durability of the wood blocks against subterranean termites Coptotermes formosanus. Despite high acetic and lactic acid content of the filtrates, vanillin content of the filtrates may have served as an additional food source and promoted termite attack. It can be concluded that filtrates with phenolic compounds from lignin degradation during BSF production can be considered for targeted inhibition of brown-rot.

  10. Pyrolysis of forest residues: An approach to techno-economics for bio-fuel production

    DOE PAGES

    Carrasco, Jose L.; Gunukula, Sampath; Boateng, Akwasi A.; ...

    2017-04-01

    Here, the techno-economics for producing liquid fuels from Maine forest residues were determined from a combination of: (1) laboratory experiments at USDA-ARS’s Eastern Regional Research Center using hog fuel (a secondary woody residue produced from mill byproducts such as sawdust, bark and shavings) as a feedstock for pyrolysis to establish product yields and composition, and (2) Aspen Plus® process simulation for a feed rate of 2000 dry metric tons per day to estimate energy requirements and equipment sizes. The simulated plant includes feedstock sizing and drying, pyrolysis, hydrogen production and hydrotreatment of pyrolysis oils. The biomass is converted into bio-oilmore » (61% yield), char (24%) and gases (15%) in the pyrolysis reactor, with an energy demand of 17%. The bio-oil is then hydrotreated to remove oxygen, thereby producing hydrocarbon fuels. The final mass yield of gasoline/diesel hydrocarbons is 16% with a 40% energy yield based on the dry biomass fed, this yield represents a fuel production of 51.9 gallons per dry metric ton of feedstock. A unique aspect of the process simulated herein is that pyrolysis char and gases are used as sources for both thermal energy and hydrogen, greatly decreasing the need to input fossil energy. The total capital investment for a grass-roots plant was estimated to be US$427 million with an annual operational cost of US$154 million. With a 30 year project life, a minimum fuel selling price was determined to be US$6.25 per gallon. The economic concerns are related to high capital costs, high feedstock costs and short hydrotreating catalyst lifetimes.« less

  11. Pyrolysis of forest residues: An approach to techno-economics for bio-fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, Jose L.; Gunukula, Sampath; Boateng, Akwasi A.

    Here, the techno-economics for producing liquid fuels from Maine forest residues were determined from a combination of: (1) laboratory experiments at USDA-ARS’s Eastern Regional Research Center using hog fuel (a secondary woody residue produced from mill byproducts such as sawdust, bark and shavings) as a feedstock for pyrolysis to establish product yields and composition, and (2) Aspen Plus® process simulation for a feed rate of 2000 dry metric tons per day to estimate energy requirements and equipment sizes. The simulated plant includes feedstock sizing and drying, pyrolysis, hydrogen production and hydrotreatment of pyrolysis oils. The biomass is converted into bio-oilmore » (61% yield), char (24%) and gases (15%) in the pyrolysis reactor, with an energy demand of 17%. The bio-oil is then hydrotreated to remove oxygen, thereby producing hydrocarbon fuels. The final mass yield of gasoline/diesel hydrocarbons is 16% with a 40% energy yield based on the dry biomass fed, this yield represents a fuel production of 51.9 gallons per dry metric ton of feedstock. A unique aspect of the process simulated herein is that pyrolysis char and gases are used as sources for both thermal energy and hydrogen, greatly decreasing the need to input fossil energy. The total capital investment for a grass-roots plant was estimated to be US$427 million with an annual operational cost of US$154 million. With a 30 year project life, a minimum fuel selling price was determined to be US$6.25 per gallon. The economic concerns are related to high capital costs, high feedstock costs and short hydrotreating catalyst lifetimes.« less

  12. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weakley, Steven A.

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EEREmore » predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.« less

  13. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EEREmore » predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.« less

  14. Transportation fuel production by combination of LDPE thermal cracking and catalytic hydroreforming.

    PubMed

    Escola, J M; Aguado, J; Serrano, D P; Briones, L

    2014-11-01

    Fuel production from plastics is a promising way to reduce landfilling rates while obtaining valuable products. The usage of Ni-supported hierarchical Beta zeolite (h-Beta) for the hydroreforming of the oils coming from LDPE thermal cracking has proved to produce high selectivities to gasoline and diesel fuels (>80%). In the present work, the effect of the Ni loading on Ni/h-Beta is investigated in the hydroreforming of the oils form LDPE thermal cracking. h-Beta samples were impregnated with Ni nitrate, calcined and reduced in H2 up to 550°C to achieve different Ni contents: 1.5%, 4%, 7% and 10%. Larger and more easily reducible metal particles were obtained on Ni 7%/h-Beta and Ni 10%/h-Beta. Hydroreforming tests were carried out in autoclave reactor at 310°C, under 20 bar H2, for 45 min. Ni content progressively increased the amount of gases at the expenses of diesel fractions, while gasoline remained approximately constant about 52-54%. Maximum selectivity to automotive fuels (∼81%) was obtained with Ni 7%/h-Beta. Ni loading also enhanced olefins saturation up to Ni 7%/h-Beta. High cetane indices (71-86) and octane numbers (89-91) were obtained over all the catalysts. Regarding the different studied Ni contents, Ni 7%/h-Beta constitutes a rather promising catalyst for obtaining high quality fuels from LDPE thermal cracking oils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Design, engineering, and construction of photosynthetic microbial cell factories for renewable solar fuel production.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Peter; Lindberg, Pia; Oliveira, Paulo; Stensjö, Karin; Heidorn, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop sustainable solutions to convert solar energy into energy carriers used in the society. In addition to solar cells generating electricity, there are several options to generate solar fuels. This paper outlines and discusses the design and engineering of photosynthetic microbial systems for the generation of renewable solar fuels, with a focus on cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic microorganisms with the same type of photosynthesis as higher plants. Native and engineered cyanobacteria have been used by us and others as model systems to examine, demonstrate, and develop photobiological H(2) production. More recently, the production of carbon-containing solar fuels like ethanol, butanol, and isoprene have been demonstrated. We are using a synthetic biology approach to develop efficient photosynthetic microbial cell factories for direct generation of biofuels from solar energy. Present progress and advances in the design, engineering, and construction of such cyanobacterial cells for the generation of a portfolio of solar fuels, e.g., hydrogen, alcohols, and isoprene, are presented and discussed. Possibilities and challenges when introducing and using synthetic biology are highlighted.

  16. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 3: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2015-02-01

    This is the third and final part of the three-part article written to describe the mass, energy and material balances of the solid recovered fuel production process produced from various types of waste streams through mechanical treatment. This article focused the production of solid recovered fuel from municipal solid waste. The stream of municipal solid waste used here as an input waste material to produce solid recovered fuel is energy waste collected from households of municipality. This article presents the mass, energy and material balances of the solid recovered fuel production process. These balances are based on the proximate as well as the ultimate analysis and the composition determination of various streams of material produced in a solid recovered fuel production plant. All the process streams are sampled and treated according to CEN standard methods for solid recovered fuel. The results of the mass balance of the solid recovered fuel production process showed that 72% of the input waste material was recovered in the form of solid recovered fuel; 2.6% as ferrous metal, 0.4% as non-ferrous metal, 11% was sorted as rejects material, 12% as fine faction and 2% as heavy fraction. The energy balance of the solid recovered fuel production process showed that 86% of the total input energy content of input waste material was recovered in the form of solid recovered fuel. The remaining percentage (14%) of the input energy was split into the streams of reject material, fine fraction and heavy fraction. The material balances of this process showed that mass fraction of paper and cardboard, plastic (soft) and wood recovered in the solid recovered fuel stream was 88%, 85% and 90%, respectively, of their input mass. A high mass fraction of rubber material, plastic (PVC-plastic) and inert (stone/rock and glass particles) was found in the reject material stream. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Life-cycle analysis of greenhouse gas emissions from renewable jet fuel production.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Sierk; Antonissen, Kay; Hoefnagels, Ric; Lonza, Laura; Wang, Michael; Faaij, André; Junginger, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of renewable jet fuel (RJF) is considered an important emission mitigation measure for the aviation industry. This study compares the well-to-wake (WtWa) greenhouse gas (GHG) emission performance of multiple RJF conversion pathways and explores the impact of different co-product allocation methods. The insights obtained in this study are of particular importance if RJF is included as an emission mitigation instrument in the global Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA). Fischer-Tropsch pathways yield the highest GHG emission reduction compared to fossil jet fuel (86-104%) of the pathways in scope, followed by Hydrothermal Liquefaction (77-80%) and sugarcane- (71-75%) and corn stover-based Alcohol-to-Jet (60-75%). Feedstock cultivation, hydrogen and conversion inputs were shown to be major contributors to the overall WtWa GHG emission performance. The choice of allocation method mainly affects pathways yielding high shares of co-products or producing co-products which effectively displace carbon intensive products (e.g., electricity). Renewable jet fuel can contribute to significant reduction of aviation-related GHG emissions, provided the right feedstock and conversion technology are used. The GHG emission performance of RJF may be further improved by using sustainable hydrogen sources or applying carbon capture and storage. Based on the character and impact of different co-product allocation methods, we recommend using energy and economic allocation (for non-energy co-products) at a global level, as it leverages the universal character of energy allocation while adequately valuing non-energy co-products.

  18. Economics of on-farm production and use of vegetable oils for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, C.S.; Withers, R.V.; Smith, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The technology of oilseed processing, on a small scale, is much simpler than that for ethanol production. This, coupled with the fact that most energy intensive farm operations use diesel powered equipment, has created substantial interest in vegetable oils as an alternative source of liquid fuel for agriculture. The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact on gross margins resulting from vegetable oil production and utilization in two case study areas, Latah and Power Counties, in Iadho. The results indicate that winter rape oil became a feasible alternative to diesel when the price of diesel reached $0.84 permore » liter in the Latah County model. A diesel price of $0.85 per liter was required in the Power County model before it became feasible to produce sunflower oil for fuel. 5 tables.« less

  19. Carbonaceous material for production of hydrogen from low heating value fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Koutsoukos, Elias P.

    1989-01-01

    A process for the catalytic production of hydrogen, from a wide variety of low heating value fuel gases containing carbon monoxide, comprises circulating a carbonaceous material between two reactors--a carbon deposition reactor and a steaming reactor. In the carbon deposition reactor, carbon monoxide is removed from a fuel gas and is deposited on the carbonaceous material as an active carbon. In the steaming reactor, the reactive carbon reacts with steam to give hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The carbonaceous material contains a metal component comprising from about 75% to about 95% cobalt, from about 5% to about 15% iron, and up to about 10% chromium, and is effective in suppressing the production of methane in the steaming reactor.

  20. Interpretation and modelling of fission product Ba and Mo releases from fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillant, G.

    2010-02-01

    The release mechanisms of two fission products (namely barium and molybdenum) in severe accident conditions are studied using the VERCORS experimental observations. Barium is observed to be mostly released under reducing conditions while molybdenum release is most observed under oxidizing conditions. As well, the volatility of some precipitates in fuel is evaluated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The polymeric species (MoO 3) n are calculated to largely contribute to molybdenum partial pressure and barium volatility is greatly enhanced if the gas atmosphere is reducing. Analytical models of fission product release from fuel are proposed for barium and molybdenum. Finally, these models have been integrated in the ASTEC/ELSA code and validation calculations have been performed on several experimental tests.

  1. Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-10-24

    Nitrate persists in eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters because phytoplankton growth fueled by nitrate (new production) is limited by iron. Nitrate isotope measurements provide a new constraint on the controls of surface nitrate concentration in this region and allow us to quantify the degree and temporal variability of nitrate consumption. Here we show that nitrate consumption in these waters cannot be fueled solely by the external supply of iron to these waters, which occurs by upwelling and dust deposition. Rather, a substantial fraction of nitrate consumption must be supported by the recycling of iron within surface waters. Given plausible iron recycling rates, seasonal variability in nitrate concentration on and off the equator can be explained by upwelling rate, with slower upwelling allowing for more cycles of iron regeneration and uptake. The efficiency of iron recycling in the equatorial Pacific implies the evolution of ecosystem-level mechanisms for retaining iron in surface ocean settings where it limits productivity.

  2. 7 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... beverage purposes, is manufactured from biomass. (2) The alcohol production facility includes all... Production Facilities C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...—Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities (1) Alcohol production facility. An...

  3. 7 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... beverage purposes, is manufactured from biomass. (2) The alcohol production facility includes all... Production Facilities C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...—Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities (1) Alcohol production facility. An...

  4. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.; ...

    2015-08-19

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption andmore » clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).« less

  5. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is described for predicting the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  6. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption andmore » clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).« less

  7. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Guan, Dabo; Wei, Wei; Davis, Steven J; Ciais, Philippe; Bai, Jin; Peng, Shushi; Zhang, Qiang; Hubacek, Klaus; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert J; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Lin, Jintai; Zhao, Hongyan; Hong, Chaopeng; Boden, Thomas A; Feng, Kuishuang; Peters, Glen P; Xi, Fengming; Liu, Junguo; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Zeng, Ning; He, Kebin

    2015-08-20

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China's carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000-2012 than the value reported by China's national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China's cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China's CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China's cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000-2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990-2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China's land carbon sink in 2000-2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  8. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhu; Guan, Dabo; Wei, Wei; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Bai, Jin; Peng, Shushi; Zhang, Qiang; Hubacek, Klaus; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert J.; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Lin, Jintai; Zhao, Hongyan; Hong, Chaopeng; Boden, Thomas A.; Feng, Kuishuang; Peters, Glen P.; Xi, Fengming; Liu, Junguo; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Zeng, Ning; He, Kebin

    2015-08-01

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China's carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000-2012 than the value reported by China's national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China's cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China's CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = +/-7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China's cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000-2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990-2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China's land carbon sink in 2000-2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  9. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. Themore » high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.« less

  10. Production and fuel characteristics of vegetable oil from oilseed crops in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, D.L.; Bettis, B.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential yield and fuel quality of various oilseed crops adapted to the Pacific Northwest as a source of liquid fuel for diesel engines. The seed yield and oil production of three cultivars of winter rape (Brassica napus L.), two cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and two cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were evaluated in replicated plots at Moscow. Additional trials were conducted at several locations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sunflower, oleic and linoleic safflower, and low and high erucic acid rapeseed were evaluated for fatty acid composition, energymore » content, viscosity and engine performance in short term tests. During 20 minute engine tests power output, fuel economy and thermal efficiency were compared to diesel fuel. Winter rape produced over twice as much farm extractable oil as either safflower or sunflower. The winter rape cultivars, Norde and Jet Neuf had oil yields which averaged 1740 and 1540 L/ha, respectively. Vegetable oils contained 94 to 95% of the KJ/L of diesel fuel, but were 11.1 to 17.6 times more viscous. Viscosity of the vegetable oils was closely related to fatty acid chain length and number of unsaturated bonds (R/sup 2/=.99). During short term engine tests all vegetable oils produced power outputs equivalent to diesel, and had thermal efficiencies 1.8 to 2.8% higher than diesel. Based on these results it appears that species and cultivars of oilseed crops to be utilized as a source of fuel should be selected on the basis of oil yield. 1 figure, 5 tables.« less

  11. Mechanistic approach for nitride fuel evolution and fission product release under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgodvorov, A. P.; Ozrin, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A model for describing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel pellet burning was developed. Except fission products generating, the model includes impurities of oxygen and carbon. Nitrogen behaviour in nitride fuel was analysed and the nitrogen chemical potential in solid solution with uranium-plutonium nitride was constructed. The chemical program module was tested with the help of thermodynamic equilibrium phase distribution calculation. Results were compared with analogous data in literature, quite good agreement was achieved, especially for uranium sesquinitride, metallic species and some oxides. Calculation of a process of nitride fuel burning was also conducted. Used mechanistic approaches for fission product evolution give the opportunity to find fission gas release fractions and also volumes of intergranular secondary phases. Calculations present that the most massive secondary phases are the oxide and metallic phases. Oxide phase contain approximately 1 % wt of substance over all time of burning with slightly increasing of content. Metallic phase has considerable rising of mass and by the last stage of burning it contains about 0.6 % wt of substance. Intermetallic phase has less increasing rate than metallic phase and include from 0.1 to 0.2 % wt over all time of burning. The highest element fractions of released gaseous fission products correspond to caesium and iodide.

  12. Novel Strategies for the Production of Fuels, Lubricants, and Chemicals from Biomass.

    PubMed

    Shylesh, Sankaranarayanapillai; Gokhale, Amit A; Ho, Christopher R; Bell, Alexis T

    2017-10-17

    Growing concern with the environmental impact of CO 2 emissions produced by combustion of fuels derived from fossil-based carbon resources has stimulated the search for renewable sources of carbon. Much of this focus has been on the development of methods for producing transportation fuels, the major source of CO 2 emissions today, and to a lesser extent on the production of lubricants and chemicals. First-generation biofuels such as bioethanol, produced by the fermentation of sugar cane- or corn-based sugars, and biodiesel, produced by the transesterification reaction of triglycerides with alcohols to form a mixture of long-chain fatty esters, can be blended with traditional fuels in limited amounts and also arise in food versus fuel debates. Producing molecules that can be drop-in solutions for fossil-derived products used in the transportation sector allows for efficient use of the existing infrastructure and is therefore particularly interesting. In this context, the most viable source of renewable carbon is abundantly available lignocellulosic biomass, a complex mixture of lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. Conversion of the carbohydrate portion of biomass (hemicellulose and cellulose) to fuels requires considerable chemical restructuring of the component sugars in order to achieve the energy density and combustion properties required for transportation fuels-gasoline, diesel, and jet. A different set of constraints must be met for the conversion of biomass-sourced sugars to lubricants and chemicals. This Account describes strategies developed by us to utilize aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, furfurals, and carboxylic acids derived from C 5 and C 6 sugars, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation mixtures, and various biomass-derived carboxylic acids and fatty acids to produce fuels, lubricants, and chemicals. Oxygen removal from these synthons is achieved by dehydration, decarboxylation, hydrogenolysis, and hydrodeoxygenation, whereas reactions such as

  13. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehiclesmore » in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.« less

  14. Dual-fuel production from restaurant grease trap waste: bio-fuel oil extraction and anaerobic methane production from the post-extracted residue.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Kouji; Tsuji, Tomoya; Xu, Kaiqin

    2014-10-01

    An effective way for restaurant grease trap waste (GTW) treatment to generate fuel oil and methane by the combination of physiological and biological processes was investigated. The heat-driven extraction could provide a high purity oil equivalent to an A-grade fuel oil of Japanese industrial standard with 81-93 wt% of extraction efficiency. A post-extracted residue was treated as an anaerobic digestion feedstock, and however, an inhibitory effect of long chain fatty acid (LCFA) was still a barrier for high-rate digestion. From the semi-continuous experiment fed with the residual sludge as a single substrate, it can be concluded that the continuous addition of calcium into the reactor contributed to reducing LCFA inhibition, resulting in the long-term stable operation over one year. Furthermore, the anaerobic reactor performed well with 70-80% of COD reduction and methane productivity under an organic loading rate up to 5.3g-COD/L/d. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stochastic techno-economic analysis of alcohol-to-jet fuel production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guolin; Staples, Mark D; Malina, Robert; Tyner, Wallace E

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol-to-jet (ATJ) is one of the technical feasible biofuel technologies. It produces jet fuel from sugary, starchy, and lignocellulosic biomass, such as sugarcane, corn grain, and switchgrass, via fermentation of sugars to ethanol or other alcohols. This study assesses the ATJ biofuel production pathway for these three biomass feedstocks, and advances existing techno-economic analyses of biofuels in three ways. First, we incorporate technical uncertainty for all by-products and co-products though statistical linkages between conversion efficiencies and input and output levels. Second, future price uncertainty is based on case-by-case time-series estimation, and a local sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to each uncertain variable. Third, breakeven price distributions are developed to communicate the inherent uncertainty in breakeven price. This research also considers uncertainties in utility input requirements, fuel and by-product outputs, as well as price uncertainties for all major inputs, products, and co-products. All analyses are done from the perspective of a private firm. The stochastic dominance results of net present values (NPV) and breakeven price distributions show that sugarcane is the lowest cost feedstock over the entire range of uncertainty with the least risks, followed by corn grain and switchgrass, with the mean breakeven jet fuel prices being $0.96/L ($3.65/gal), $1.01/L ($3.84/gal), and $1.38/L ($5.21/gal), respectively. The variation of revenues from by-products in corn grain pathway can significantly impact its profitability. Sensitivity analyses show that technical uncertainty significantly impacts breakeven price and NPV distributions. Technical uncertainty is critical in determining the economic performance of the ATJ fuel pathway. Technical uncertainty needs to be considered in future economic analyses. The variation of revenues from by-products plays a significant role in profitability. With the distribution of breakeven

  16. Combined energy production and waste management in manned spacecraft utilizing on-demand hydrogen production and fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Shani; Rosenband, Valery; Gany, Alon

    2016-11-01

    Energy supply and waste management are among the most significant challenges in human spacecraft. Great efforts are invested in managing solid waste, recycling grey water and urine, cleaning the atmosphere, removing CO2, generating and saving energy, and making further use of components and products. This paper describes and investigates a concept for managing waste water and urine to simultaneously produce electric and heat energies as well as fresh water. It utilizes an original technique for aluminum activation to react spontaneously with water at room temperature to produce hydrogen on-site and on-demand. This reaction has further been proven to be effective also when using waste water and urine. Applying the hydrogen produced in a fuel cell, one obtains electric energy as well as fresh (drinking) water. The method was compared to the traditional energy production technology of the Space Shuttle, which is based on storing the fuel cell reactants, hydrogen and oxygen, in cryogenic tanks. It is shown that the alternative concept presented here may provide improved safety, compactness (reduction of more than one half of the volume of the hydrogen storage system), and management of waste liquids for energy generation and drinking water production. Nevertheless, it adds mass compared to the cryogenic hydrogen technology. It is concluded that the proposed method may be used as an emergency and backup power system as well as an additional hydrogen source for extended missions in human spacecraft.

  17. Accelerator-Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidet, Florent; Brown, Nicholas R.; Haj Tahar, Malek

    This article is a review of several accelerator-reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of accelerator-driven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focus on issues of interest, such as the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systems on the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also review the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity than a critical fast reactor with recycling of uranium and plutonium.

  18. Accelerator Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Heidet, Florent; Haj Tahar, Malek

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of several accelerator–reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of acceleratordriven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focus on issues of interest, such as the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systemsmore » on the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also review the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity than a critical fast reactor with recycling of uranium and plutonium.« less

  19. Life cycle analysis of fuel production from fast pyrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeongwoo; Elgowainy, Amgad; Dunn, Jennifer B; Wang, Michael Q

    2013-04-01

    A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of pyrolysis-based gasoline was conducted and compared with petroleum gasoline. To address the variation and uncertainty in the pyrolysis pathways, probability distributions for key parameters were developed with data from literature. The impacts of two different hydrogen sources for pyrolysis oil upgrading and of two bio-char co-product applications were investigated. Reforming fuel gas/natural gas for H2 reduces WTW GHG emissions by 60% (range of 55-64%) compared to the mean of petroleum fuels. Reforming pyrolysis oil for H2 increases the WTW GHG emissions reduction up to 112% (range of 97-126%), but reduces petroleum savings per unit of biomass used due to the dramatic decline in the liquid fuel yield. Thus, the hydrogen source causes a trade-off between GHG reduction per unit fuel output and petroleum displacement per unit biomass used. Soil application of biochar could provide significant carbon sequestration with large uncertainty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Accelerator–Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Heidet, Florent; Brown, Nicholas R.; Haj Tahar, Malek

    2015-01-01

    This article is a review of several accelerator-reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of accelerator-driven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focused on issues of interest, e.g. the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systems onmore » the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are a critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also reviewed the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity versus a critical fast reactor with recycle of uranium and plutonium.« less

  1. Techno-economic comparison of biojet fuel production from lignocellulose, vegetable oil and sugar cane juice.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Gabriel Wilhelm; Ali Mandegari, Mohsen; Farzad, Somayeh; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a techno-economic comparison was performed considering three processes (thermochemical, biochemical and hybrid) for production of jet fuel from lignocellulosic biomass (2G) versus two processes from first generation (1G) feedstocks, including vegetable oil and sugar cane juice. Mass and energy balances were constructed for energy self-sufficient versions of these processes, not utilising any fossil energy sources, using ASPEN Plus® simulations. All of the investigated processes obtained base minimum jet selling prices (MJSP) that is substantially higher than the market jet fuel price (2-4 fold). The 1G process which converts vegetable oil, obtained the lowest MJSPs of $2.22/kg jet fuel while the two most promising 2G processes- the thermochemical (gasification and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) and hybrid (gasification and biochemical upgrading) processes- reached MJSPs of $2.44/kg and $2.50/kg jet fuel, respectively. According to the economic sensitivity analysis, the feedstock cost and fixed capital investment have the most influence on the MJSP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expandsmore » the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of

  3. Short and long-term carbon balance of bioenergy electricity production fueled by forest treatments.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Katharine C; Barnes, Kallie L; Ryan, Michael G; Neff, Jason C

    2014-01-01

    Forests store large amounts of carbon in forest biomass, and this carbon can be released to the atmosphere following forest disturbance or management. In the western US, forest fuel reduction treatments designed to reduce the risk of high severity wildfire can change forest carbon balance by removing carbon in the form of biomass, and by altering future potential wildfire behavior in the treated stand. Forest treatment carbon balance is further affected by the fate of this biomass removed from the forest, and the occurrence and intensity of a future wildfire in this stand. In this study we investigate the carbon balance of a forest treatment with varying fates of harvested biomass, including use for bioenergy electricity production, and under varying scenarios of future disturbance and regeneration. Bioenergy is a carbon intensive energy source; in our study we find that carbon emissions from bioenergy electricity production are nearly twice that of coal for the same amount of electricity. However, some emissions from bioenergy electricity production are offset by avoided fossil fuel electricity emissions. The carbon benefit achieved by using harvested biomass for bioenergy electricity production may be increased through avoided pyrogenic emissions if the forest treatment can effectively reduce severity. Forest treatments with the use of harvested biomass for electricity generation can reduce carbon emissions to the atmosphere by offsetting fossil fuel electricity generation emissions, and potentially by avoided pyrogenic emissions due to reduced intensity and severity of a future wildfire in the treated stand. However, changes in future wildfire and regeneration regimes may affect forest carbon balance and these climate-induced changes may influence forest carbon balance as much, or more, than bioenergy production.

  4. Municipal solid waste processing and separation employing wet torrefaction for alternative fuel production and aluminum reclamation.

    PubMed

    Mu'min, Gea Fardias; Prawisudha, Pandji; Zaini, Ilman Nuran; Aziz, Muhammad; Pasek, Ari Darmawan

    2017-09-01

    This study employs wet torrefaction process (also known as hydrothermal) at low temperature. This process simultaneously acts as waste processing and separation of mixed waste, for subsequent utilization as an alternative fuel. The process is also applied for the delamination and separation of non-recyclable laminated aluminum waste into separable aluminum and plastic. A 2.5-L reactor was used to examine the wet torrefaction process at temperatures below 200°C. It was observed that the processed mixed waste was converted into two different products: a mushy organic part and a bulky plastic part. Using mechanical separation, the two products can be separated into a granular organic product and a plastic bulk for further treatment. TGA analysis showed that no changes in the plastic composition and no intrusion from plastic fraction to the organic fraction. It can be proclaimed that both fractions have been completely separated by wet torrefaction. The separated plastic fraction product obtained from the wet torrefaction treatment also contained relatively high calorific value (approximately 44MJ/kg), therefore, justifying its use as an alternative fuel. The non-recyclable plastic fraction of laminated aluminum was observed to be delaminated and separated from its aluminum counterpart at a temperature of 170°C using an additional acetic acid concentration of 3%, leaving less than 25% of the plastic content in the aluminum part. Plastic products from both samples had high calorific values of more than 30MJ/kg, which is sufficient to be converted and used as a fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of yeast stress tolerance and its manipulation for efficient fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X Q; Bai, F W

    2009-10-12

    Yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied in recent years for fuel ethanol production, in which yeast cells are exposed to various stresses such as high temperature, ethanol inhibition, and osmotic pressure from product and substrate sugars as well as the inhibitory substances released from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. An in-depth understanding of the mechanism of yeast stress tolerance contributes to breeding more robust strains for ethanol production, especially under very high gravity conditions. Taking advantage of the "omics" technology, the stress response and defense mechanism of yeast cells during ethanol fermentation were further explored, and the newly emerged tools such as genome shuffling and global transcription machinery engineering have been applied to breed stress resistant yeast strains for ethanol production. In this review, the latest development of stress tolerance mechanisms was focused, and improvement of yeast stress tolerance by both random and rational tools was presented.

  6. System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Kllingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Benefiel, Bradley C.

    2014-04-01

    The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

  7. System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Benefiel, Bradley C

    2015-04-21

    The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

  8. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Markovich

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part ofmore » the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.« less

  9. A critical review of noise production models for turbulent, gas-fueled burners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The combustion noise literature for the period between 1952 and early 1984 is critically reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed on past theoretical and semi-empirical attempts to predict or explain observed direct combustion noise characteristics of turbulent, gas-fueled burners; works involving liquid-fueled burners are reviewed only when ideas equally applicable to gas-fueled burners are pesented. The historical development of the most important contemporary direct combustion noise theories is traced, and the theories themselves are compared and criticized. While most theories explain combustion noise production by turbulent flames in terms of randomly distributed acoustic monopoles produced by turbulent mixing of products and reactants, none is able to predict the sound pressure in the acoustic farfield of a practical burner because of the lack of a proven model which relates the combustion noise source strenght at a given frequency to the design and operating parameters of the burner. Recommendations are given for establishing a benchmark-quality data base needed to support the development of such a model.

  10. Production of hydrocarbon fuels from pyrolysis of soybean oils using a basic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junming; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Yunjuan; Chen, Jie

    2010-12-01

    Triglycerides obtained from animals and plants have attracted great attention from researchers for developing an environmental friendly and high-quality fuel, free of nitrogen and sulfur. In the present work, the production of biofuel by catalytic cracking of soybean oil over a basic catalyst in a continuous pyrolysis reactor at atmospheric pressure has been studied. Experiments were designed to study the effect of different types of catalysts on the yield and acid value of the diesel and gasoline fractions from the pyrolytic oil. It was found that basic catalyst gave a product with relatively low acid number. These pyrolytic oils were also further reacted with alcohol in order to decrease their acid value. After esterification, the physico-chemical properties of these biofuels were characterized, and compared with Chinese specifications for conventional diesel fuels. The results showed that esterification of pyrolytic oil from triglycerides represents an alternative technique for producing biofuels from soybean oils with characteristics similar to those of petroleum fuels. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. MICRO/NANO-STRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND FISSION PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION IN NEUTRON IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, I. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wen, H. M.

    Advanced microscopic and microanalysis techniques were developed and applied to study irradiation effects and fission product behavior in selected low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particles from fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA. Although no TRISO coating failures were detected during the irradiation, the fraction of Ag-110m retained in individual particles often varied considerably within a single compact and at the capsule level. At the capsule level Ag-110m release fractions ranged from 1.2 to 38% and within a single compact, silver release from individual particles often spanned a range that extended from 100% retentionmore » to nearly 100% release. In this paper, selected irradiated particles from Baseline, Variant 1 and Variant 3 type fueled TRISO coated particles were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atom Probe Tomography; Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy; Precession Electron Diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) examinations and Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer. Particle selection in this study allowed for comparison of the fission product distribution with Ag retention, fuel type and irradiation level. Nano sized Ag-containing features were predominantly identified in SiC grain boundaries and/or triple points in contrast with only two sitings of Ag inside a SiC grain in two different compacts (Baseline and Variant 3 fueled compacts). STEM and HRTEM analysis showed evidence of Ag and Pd co-existence in some cases and it was found that fission product precipitates can consist of multiple or single phases. STEM analysis also showed differences in precipitate compositions between Baseline and Variant 3 fuels. A higher density of fission product precipitate clusters were identified in the SiC layer in particles from the Variant 3 compact compared with the Variant 1 compact. Trend

  12. Thermal Decomposition of Methyl Esters in Biodiesel Fuel: Kinetics, Mechanisms and Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ming

    Biodiesel continues to enjoy increasing popularity. However, recent studies on carbonyl compounds emissions from biodiesel fuel are inconclusive. Emissions of carbonyl compounds from petroleum diesel fuels were compared to emissions from pure biodiesel fuels and petroleum-biodiesel blends used in a non-road diesel generator. The concentration of total carbonyl compounds was the highest when the engine was idling. The carbonyl emissions, as well as ozone formation potential, from biodiesel fuel blends were higher than those emitted from petroleum diesel fuel. The sulfur content of diesel fuel and the source of biodiesel fuel were not found to have a significant impact on emissions of carbonyl compounds. Mechanism parameters of the thermal decomposition of biodiesel-range methyl esters were obtained from the results of thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The overall reaction orders are between 0.49 and 0.71 and the energies of activation are between 59.9 and 101.3 kJ/mole. Methyl esters in air have lower activation energies than those in nitrogen. Methyl linoleate has the lowest activation energy, followed by methyl oleate, and methyl stearate. The pyrolysis and oxidation of the three methyl esters were investigated using a semi-isothermal tubular flow reactor. The profiles of major products versus reaction temperature are presented. In the pyrolysis of methyl stearate, the primary reaction pathway is the decarboxylic reaction at the methyl ester functional group. Methyl oleate's products indicate more reactions on its carbon-carbon double bond. Methyl linoleate shows highest reactivity among the three methyl esters, and 87 products were detected. The oxidation of three methyl esters resulted in more products in all compound classes, and 55, 114, and 127 products were detected, respectively. The oxidation of methyl esters includes decarboxylation on ester group. The methyl ester's carbon chain could be oxidized as a hydrocarbon compound and form oxidized esters and

  13. A novel biochemical route for fuels and chemicals production from cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiliang; Wu, Weihua; Hildebrand, Amanda; Kasuga, Takao; Zhang, Ruifu; Xiong, Xiaochao

    2012-01-01

    The conventional biochemical platform featuring enzymatic hydrolysis involves five key steps: pretreatment, cellulase production, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, and product recovery. Sugars are produced as reactive intermediates for subsequent fermentation to fuels and chemicals. Herein, an alternative biochemical route is proposed. Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production is consolidated into one single step, referred to as consolidated aerobic processing, and sugar aldonates are produced as the reactive intermediates for biofuels production by fermentation. In this study, we demonstrate the viability of consolidation of the enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production steps in the new route using Neurospora crassa as the model microorganism and the conversion of cellulose to ethanol as the model system. We intended to prove the two hypotheses: 1) cellulose can be directed to produce cellobionate by reducing β-glucosidase production and by enhancing cellobiose dehydrogenase production; and 2) both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate--glucose and gluconate--can be used as carbon sources for ethanol and other chemical production. Our results showed that knocking out multiple copies of β-glucosidase genes led to cellobionate production from cellulose, without jeopardizing the cellulose hydrolysis rate. Simulating cellobiose dehydrogenase over-expression by addition of exogenous cellobiose dehydrogenase led to more cellobionate production. Both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate: glucose and gluconate can be used by Escherichia coli KO 11 for efficient ethanol production. They were utilized simultaneously in glucose and gluconate co-fermentation. Gluconate was used even faster than glucose. The results support the viability of the two hypotheses that lay the foundation for the proposed new route.

  14. A Novel Biochemical Route for Fuels and Chemicals Production from Cellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhiliang; Wu, Weihua; Hildebrand, Amanda; Kasuga, Takao; Zhang, Ruifu; Xiong, Xiaochao

    2012-01-01

    The conventional biochemical platform featuring enzymatic hydrolysis involves five key steps: pretreatment, cellulase production, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, and product recovery. Sugars are produced as reactive intermediates for subsequent fermentation to fuels and chemicals. Herein, an alternative biochemical route is proposed. Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production is consolidated into one single step, referred to as consolidated aerobic processing, and sugar aldonates are produced as the reactive intermediates for biofuels production by fermentation. In this study, we demonstrate the viability of consolidation of the enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production steps in the new route using Neurospora crassa as the model microorganism and the conversion of cellulose to ethanol as the model system. We intended to prove the two hypotheses: 1) cellulose can be directed to produce cellobionate by reducing β-glucosidase production and by enhancing cellobiose dehydrogenase production; and 2) both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate—glucose and gluconate—can be used as carbon sources for ethanol and other chemical production. Our results showed that knocking out multiple copies of β-glucosidase genes led to cellobionate production from cellulose, without jeopardizing the cellulose hydrolysis rate. Simulating cellobiose dehydrogenase over-expression by addition of exogenous cellobiose dehydrogenase led to more cellobionate production. Both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate: glucose and gluconate can be used by Escherichia coli KO 11 for efficient ethanol production. They were utilized simultaneously in glucose and gluconate co-fermentation. Gluconate was used even faster than glucose. The results support the viability of the two hypotheses that lay the foundation for the proposed new route. PMID:22384058

  15. Optimization of enzyme parameters for fermentative production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Liu, Ping; Kautharapu, Kumar Babu; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively subjected to Metabolic Engineering for the fermentative production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals. This often entails the introduction of new enzymes, deletion of unwanted enzymes and efforts to fine-tune enzyme abundance in order to attain the desired strain performance. Enzyme performance can be quantitatively described in terms of the Michaelis-Menten type parameters Km, turnover number kcat and Ki, which roughly describe the affinity of an enzyme for its substrate, the speed of a reaction and the enzyme sensitivity to inhibition by regulatory molecules. Here we describe examples of where knowledge of these parameters have been used to select, evolve or engineer enzymes for the desired performance and enabled increased production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals. Examples include production of ethanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol and tyrosine and furfural tolerance. The Michaelis-Menten parameters can also be used to judge the cofactor dependence of enzymes and quantify their preference for NADH or NADPH. Similarly, enzymes can be selected, evolved or engineered for the preferred cofactor preference. Examples of exporter engineering and selection are also discussed in the context of production of malate, valine and limonene. PMID:24688665

  16. Renewable sustainable biocatalyzed electricity production in a photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC).

    PubMed

    Strik, David P B T B; Terlouw, Hilde; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-12-01

    Electricity production via solar energy capturing by living higher plants and microalgae in combination with microbial fuel cells are attractive because these systems promise to generate useful energy in a renewable, sustainable, and efficient manner. This study describes the proof of principle of a photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) based on naturally selected algae and electrochemically active microorganisms in an open system and without addition of instable or toxic mediators. The developed solar-powered PAMFC produced continuously over 100 days renewable biocatalyzed electricity. The sustainable performance of the PAMFC resulted in a maximum current density of 539 mA/m2 projected anode surface area and a maximum power production of 110 mW/m2 surface area photobioreactor. The energy recovery of the PAMFC can be increased by optimization of the photobioreactor, by reducing the competition from non-electrochemically active microorganisms, by increasing the electrode surface and establishment of a further-enriched biofilm. Since the objective is to produce net renewable energy with algae, future research should also focus on the development of low energy input PAMFCs. This is because current algae production systems have energy inputs similar to the energy present in the outcoming valuable products.

  17. Development of a more efficient process for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Wang, Ting; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    A process for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo treated with concentrated sulfuric acid has been previously proposed. To improve efficiency of the process, we tested saccharification with 70 weight% (wt%) sulfuric acid, acid-sugar separation by ion exclusion, addition of nutrients to the ethanol fermentation, and bioconversion of xylose to xylitol. A high efficiency of both sugar recovery (82.5 %) and acid recovery (97.5 %) was achieved in the saccharification process and in the continuous acid-sugar separation using a modified anion exchange resin, respectively. Reduction of the amount of mineral salts added to the saccharified liquid after acid-sugar separation did not negatively affect performance of the continuous ethanol fermentation. The ethanol yield and productivity were 93.7 % and 6 g/l h, respectively, at 35 °C and pH 4.0. And the ethanol yield and productivity were almost the same even at pH 3.5. Moreover, the xylose remaining in the fermented mash was efficiently converted to xylitol in batch fermentation by Candida tropicalis strain 2.1776. These results demonstrate a more efficient process for the production of fuel ethanol from bamboo.

  18. Advances in metabolic engineering in the microbial production of fuels and chemicals from C1 gas.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Christopher M; Minton, Nigel P

    2018-04-01

    The future sustainable production of chemicals and fuels from non-petrochemical sources, while at the same time reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, represent two of society's greatest challenges. Microbial chassis able to grow on waste carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) can provide solutions to both. Ranging from the anaerobic acetogens, through the aerobic chemoautotrophs to the photoautotrophic cyanobacteria, they are able to convert C1 gases into a range of chemicals and fuels which may be enhanced and extended through appropriate metabolic engineering. The necessary improvements will be facilitated by the increasingly sophisticated gene tools that are beginning to emerge as part of the Synthetic Biology revolution. These tools, in combination with more accurate metabolic and genome scale models, will enable C1 chassis to deliver their full potential. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Methods and systems for fuel production in electrochemical cells and reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

    Methods and systems for fuel, chemical, and/or electricity production from electrochemical cells are disclosed. A voltage is applied between an anode and a cathode of an electrochemical cell. The anode includes a metal or metal oxide electrocatalyst. Oxygen is supplied to the cathode, producing oxygen ions. The anode electrocatalyst is at least partially oxidized by the oxygen ions transported through an electrolyte from the cathode to the anode. A feed gas stream is supplied to the anode electrocatalyst, which is converted to a liquid fuel. The anode electrocatalyst is re-oxidized to higher valency oxides, or a mixture of oxide phases,more » by supplying the oxygen ions to the anode. The re-oxidation by the ions is controlled or regulated by the amount of voltage applied.« less

  20. Change, exchange, and rearrange: protein engineering for the biotechnological production of fuels, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael A; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2013-12-01

    Enzymes are indispensable in the effort to produce chemicals from fuels to pharmaceuticals in an ecologically friendly manner. They have the potential to catalyze reactions with high specificity and efficiency without the use of hazardous chemicals. Nature provides an extensive collection of enzymes, but often these must be altered to perform desired functions under required conditions. Advances in protein engineering permit the design and/or directed evolution of enzymes specifically tailored for such industrial applications. Recent years have seen the development of improved enzymes to assist in both the conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals, and the creation of key intermediates in pharmaceutical production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, W.; Heath, Garvin; Sandor, Debra

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect tomore » four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.« less

  2. Low-Carbon Fuel and Chemical Production by Anaerobic Gas Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Daniell, James; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Burton, Freya; Köpke, Michael; Simpson, Séan Dennis

    World energy demand is expected to increase by up to 40% by 2035. Over this period, the global population is also expected to increase by a billion people. A challenge facing the global community is not only to increase the supply of fuel, but also to minimize fossil carbon emissions to safeguard the environment, at the same time as ensuring that food production and supply is not detrimentally impacted. Gas fermentation is a rapidly maturing technology which allows low carbon fuel and commodity chemical synthesis. Unlike traditional biofuel technologies, gas fermentation avoids the use of sugars, relying instead on gas streams rich in carbon monoxide and/or hydrogen and carbon dioxide as sources of carbon and energy for product synthesis by specialized bacteria collectively known as acetogens. Thus, gas fermentation enables access to a diverse array of novel, large volume, and globally available feedstocks including industrial waste gases and syngas produced, for example, via the gasification of municipal waste and biomass. Through the efforts of academic labs and early stage ventures, process scale-up challenges have been surmounted through the development of specialized bioreactors. Furthermore, tools for the genetic improvement of the acetogenic bacteria have been reported, paving the way for the production of a spectrum of ever-more valuable products via this process. As a result of these developments, interest in gas fermentation among both researchers and legislators has grown significantly in the past 5 years to the point that this approach is now considered amongst the mainstream of emerging technology solutions for near-term low-carbon fuel and chemical synthesis.

  3. BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS CO-FEEDSTOCKS FOR PRODUCTION OF FUEL FOR FUEL-CELL VEHICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an examination of prospects for utilizing renewable energy crops as a source of liquid fuel to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from mobile sources and reduce dependence on imported petroleum. Fuel cells would provide an optimum vehicle technology fo...

  4. Hydrogen peroxide as sustainable fuel: electrocatalysts for production with a solar cell and decomposition with a fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Yurie; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2010-10-21

    Hydrogen peroxide was electrochemically produced by reducing oxygen in an aqueous solution with [Co(TCPP)] as a catalyst and photovoltaic solar cell operating at 0.5 V. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced is utilized as a fuel for a one-compartment fuel cell with Ag-Pb alloy nanoparticles as the cathode.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid-and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.

    2014-09-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass production, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the conceptual production economics of these fuels. This includes fuel pathways from lignocellulosic (terrestrial) biomass, as well as from algal (aquatic) biomass systems.

  6. Life cycle assessment of residual lignocellulosic biomass-based jet fuel with activated carbon and lignosulfonate as co-products.

    PubMed

    Pierobon, Francesca; Eastin, Ivan L; Ganguly, Indroneil

    2018-01-01

    Bio-jet fuels are emerging as a valuable alternative to petroleum-based fuels for their potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel dependence. In this study, residual woody biomass from slash piles in the U.S. Pacific Northwest is used as a feedstock to produce iso-paraffinic kerosene, through the production of sugar and subsequent patented proprietary fermentation and upgrading. To enhance the economic viability and reduce the environmental impacts of iso-paraffinic kerosene, two co-products, activated carbon and lignosulfonate, are simultaneously produced within the same bio-refinery. A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) is performed for the residual woody biomass-based bio-jet fuel and compared against the cradle-to-grave LCA of petroleum-based jet fuel. This paper also discusses the differences in the environmental impacts of the residual biomass-based bio-jet fuel using two different approaches, mass allocation and system expansion, to partition the impacts between the bio-fuel and the co-products, which are produced in the bio-refinery. The environmental assessment of biomass-based bio-jet fuel reveals an improvement along most critical environmental criteria, as compared to its petroleum-based counterpart. However, the results present significant differences in the environmental impact of biomass-based bio-jet fuel, based on the partitioning method adopted. The mass allocation approach shows a greater improvement along most of the environmental criteria, as compared to the system expansion approach. However, independent of the partitioning approach, the results of this study reveal that more than the EISA mandated 60% reduction in the global warming potential could be achieved by substituting petroleum-based jet fuel with residual woody biomass-based jet fuel. Converting residual woody biomass from slash piles into bio-jet fuel presents the additional benefit of avoiding the impacts of slash pile burning in the forest, which

  7. Engineering xylose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a great deal of interest in fuel productions from lignocellulosic biomass to minimize the conflict between food and fuel use. The bioconversion of xylose, which is the second most abundant sugar present after glucose in lignocellulosic biomass, is important for the development of cost effective bioprocesses to fuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630, an oleaginous bacterium, accumulates large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs), which can be processed into advanced liquid fuels. However, R. opacus PD630 does not metabolize xylose. Results We generated DNA libraries from a Streptomyces bacterium capable of utilizing xylose and introduced them into R. opacus PD630. Xsp8, one of the engineered strains, was capable of growing on up to 180 g L-1 of xylose. Xsp8 grown in batch-cultures derived from unbleached kraft hardwood pulp hydrolysate containing 70 g L-1 total sugars was able to completely and simultaneously utilize xylose and glucose present in the lignocellulosic feedstock, and yielded 11.0 g L-1 of TAGs as fatty acids, corresponding to 45.8% of the cell dry weight. The yield of total fatty acids per gram of sugars consumed was 0.178 g, which consisted primarily of palmitic acid and oleic acid. The engineered strain Xsp8 was introduced with two heterologous genes from Streptomyces: xylA, encoding xylose isomerase, and xylB, encoding xylulokinase. We further demonstrated that in addition to the introduction and the concomitant expression of heterologous xylA and xylB genes, there is another molecular target in the R. opacus genome which fully enables the functionality of xylA and xylB genes to generate the robust xylose-fermenting strain capable of efficiently producing TAGs at high xylose concentrations. Conclusion We successfully engineered a R. opacus strain that is capable of completely utilizing high concentrations of xylose or mixed xylose/glucose simultaneously, and substantiated its suitability for TAG production. This study demonstrates

  8. Pyrolysis of triglyceride materials for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Maher, K D; Bressler, D C

    2007-09-01

    Conversion of vegetable oils and animal fats composed predominantly of triglycerides using pyrolysis type reactions represents a promising option for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The purpose of this article was to collect and review literature on the thermo-chemical conversion of triglyceride based materials. The literature was divided and discussed as (1) direct thermal cracking and (2) combination of thermal and catalytic cracking. Typically, four main catalyst types are used including transition metal catalysts, molecular sieve type catalysts, activated alumina, and sodium carbonate. Reaction products are heavily dependant on the catalyst type and reaction conditions and can range from diesel like fractions to gasoline like fractions. Research in this area is not as advanced as bio-oil and bio-diesel research and there is opportunity for further study in the areas of reaction optimization, detailed characterization of products and properties, and scale-up.

  9. Carbon neutral electricity production by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Kartik S; Lyew, Darwin; Kok, Robert; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to illustrate the use of photosynthetic microbes in a microbial fuel cell to produce electricity without the requirement of an external carbon source. This research here describes the use of a cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803, to produce electricity without any net CO(2) production in a two-chambered MFC. Conditions for optimum electricity production were determined through standardizing operating parameters. A maximum power density of 6.7mWm(-3)(anode chamber volume) was achieved under high intensity lighting (10,000lux). Light intensity and wavelength directly affected electricity production, indicating the pivotal role played by photosynthesis. The maximum removal of CO(2) was 625mmolm(-3) over 20h under high intensity light. The results presented here will contribute to the understanding of how cyanobacteria can be exploited for the direct conversion of CO(2) to electric current. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million-gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing motor fuel alcohol from corn in a 100 million gallon per year plant to be constructed in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana is evaluated. The evaluation includes a detailed process design using proven technology, a capital cost estimate for the plant, a detailed analysis of the annual operating cost, a market study, a socioeconomic, environmental, health and safety analysis, and a complete financial analysis. Several other considerations for production of ethanol were evaluated including: cogeneration and fuel to be used in firing the boilers; single by-products vs. multiple by-products; and use of boiler flue gas for by-product drying.

  11. BioFuelDB: a database and prediction server of enzymes involved in biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nikhil; Gupta, Ankit; Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-01-01

    In light of the rapid decrease in fossils fuel reserves and an increasing demand for energy, novel methods are required to explore alternative biofuel production processes to alleviate these pressures. A wide variety of molecules which can either be used as biofuels or as biofuel precursors are produced using microbial enzymes. However, the common challenges in the industrial implementation of enzyme catalysis for biofuel production are the unavailability of a comprehensive biofuel enzyme resource, low efficiency of known enzymes, and limited availability of enzymes which can function under extreme conditions in the industrial processes. We have developed a comprehensive database of known enzymes with proven or potential applications in biofuel production through text mining of PubMed abstracts and other publicly available information. A total of 131 enzymes with a role in biofuel production were identified and classified into six enzyme classes and four broad application categories namely 'Alcohol production', 'Biodiesel production', 'Fuel Cell' and 'Alternate biofuels'. A prediction tool 'Benz' was developed to identify and classify novel homologues of the known biofuel enzyme sequences from sequenced genomes and metagenomes. 'Benz' employs a hybrid approach incorporating HMMER 3.0 and RAPSearch2 programs to provide high accuracy and high speed for prediction. Using the Benz tool, 153,754 novel homologues of biofuel enzymes were identified from 23 diverse metagenomic sources. The comprehensive data of curated biofuel enzymes, their novel homologs identified from diverse metagenomes, and the hybrid prediction tool Benz are presented as a web server which can be used for the prediction of biofuel enzymes from genomic and metagenomic datasets. The database and the Benz tool is publicly available at http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/biofueldb& http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/biofueldb.

  12. Scale up of fuel ethanol production from sugar beet juice using loofa sponge immobilized bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ogbonna, J C; Mashima, H; Tanaka, H

    2001-01-01

    Production of fuel ethanol from sugar beet juice, using cells immobilized on loofa sponge was investigated. Based on ethanol productivity and ease of cell immobilization, a flocculating yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR2 was selected for ethanol production from sugar beet juice. It was found that raw sugar beet juice was an optimal substrate for ethanol production, requiring neither pH adjustment nor nitrogen source supplement. When compared with a 2 l bubble column bioreactor, mixing was not sufficient in an 8 l bioreactor containing a bed of sliced loofa sponges and consequently, the immobilized cells were not uniformly distributed within the bed. Most of the cells were immobilized in the lower part of the bed and this resulted in decreased ethanol productivity. By using an external loop bioreactor, constructing the fixed bed with cylindrical loofa sponges, dividing the bed into upper, middle and lower sections with approximately 1 cm spaces between them and circulating the broth through the loop during the immobilization, uniform cell distribution within the bed was achieved. Using this method, the system was scaled up to 50 l and when compared with the 2 l bubble column bioreactor, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in ethanol productivity and yield. By using external loop bioreactor to immobilize the cells uniformly on the loofa sponge beds, efficient large scale ethanol production systems can be constructed.

  13. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  14. SpxA1 Involved in Hydrogen Peroxide Production, Stress Tolerance and Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Ge, Xiuchun; Wang, Xiaojing; Patel, Jenishkumar R.; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis. Spx proteins are a group of global regulators that negatively or positively control global transcription initiation. In this study, we characterized the spxA1 gene in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA1 null mutant displayed opaque colony morphology, reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, and reduced antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans UA159 relative to the wild type strain. The ΔspxA1 mutant also demonstrated decreased tolerance to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. Further analysis revealed that ΔspxA1 also exhibited a ∼5-fold reduction in competitiveness in an animal model of endocarditis. Microarray studies indicated that expression of several oxidative stress genes was downregulated in the ΔspxA1 mutant. The expression of spxB and nox was significantly decreased in the ΔspxA1 mutant compared with the wild type. These results indicate that spxA1 plays a major role in H2O2 production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in S. sanguinis SK36. The second spx gene, spxA2, was also found in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA2 null mutant was found to be defective for growth under normal conditions and showed sensitivity to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. PMID:22768210

  15. SpxA1 involved in hydrogen peroxide production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Ge, Xiuchun; Wang, Xiaojing; Patel, Jenishkumar R; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis. Spx proteins are a group of global regulators that negatively or positively control global transcription initiation. In this study, we characterized the spxA1 gene in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA1 null mutant displayed opaque colony morphology, reduced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, and reduced antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans UA159 relative to the wild type strain. The ΔspxA1 mutant also demonstrated decreased tolerance to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses. Further analysis revealed that ΔspxA1 also exhibited a ∼5-fold reduction in competitiveness in an animal model of endocarditis. Microarray studies indicated that expression of several oxidative stress genes was downregulated in the ΔspxA1 mutant. The expression of spxB and nox was significantly decreased in the ΔspxA1 mutant compared with the wild type. These results indicate that spxA1 plays a major role in H(2)O(2) production, stress tolerance and endocarditis virulence in S. sanguinis SK36. The second spx gene, spxA2, was also found in S. sanguinis SK36. The spxA2 null mutant was found to be defective for growth under normal conditions and showed sensitivity to high temperature, acidic and oxidative stresses.

  16. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-02-26

    The relationship between grain boundary character and fission product migration is identified as an important knowledge gap in order to advance the understanding of fission product release from TRISO fuel particles. Precession electron diffraction (PED), a TEM-based technique, was used in this study to quickly and efficiently provide the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation, grain boundary type (low or high angle) and whether the boundary is coincident site lattice (CSL) – related, in irradiated SiC. Analysis of PED data showed the grain structure of the SiC layer in an irradiated TRISO fuel particle from the AGR-1 experimentmore » to be composed mainly of twin boundaries with a small fraction of low angle grain boundaries (<10%). In general, fission products favor precipitation on random, high angle grain boundaries but can precipitate out on low angle and CSL-related grain boundaries to a limited degree. Pd is capable of precipitating out on all types of grain boundaries but most prominently on random, high angle grain boundaries. Pd-U and Pd-Ag precipitates were found on CSL-related as well as random high angle grain boundaries but not on low angle grain boundaries. In contrast, precipitates containing only Ag were found only on random, high angle grain boundaries but not on either low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.« less

  17. Production of fuel ethanol from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Iwanaga, Tomohiro; Sho, Tomohiro; Kida, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    An efficient process for the production of fuel ethanol from bamboo that consisted of hydrolysis with concentrated sulfuric acid, removal of color compounds, separation of acid and sugar, hydrolysis of oligosaccharides and subsequent continuous ethanol fermentation was developed. The highest sugar recovery efficiency was 81.6% when concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis was carried out under the optimum conditions. Continuous separation of acid from the saccharified liquid after removal of color compounds with activated carbon was conducted using an improved simulated moving bed (ISMB) system, and 98.4% of sugar and 90.5% of acid were recovered. After oligosaccharide hydrolysis and pH adjustment, the unsterilized saccharified liquid was subjected to continuous ethanol fermentation using Saccharomycescerevisiae strain KF-7. The ethanol concentration, the fermentation yield based on glucose and the ethanol productivity were approximately 27.2 g/l, 92.0% and 8.2 g/l/h, respectively. These results suggest that the process is effective for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.

    The relationship between grain boundary character and fission product migration is identified as an important knowledge gap in order to advance the understanding of fission product release from TRISO fuel particles. Precession electron diffraction (PED), a TEM-based technique, was used in this study to quickly and efficiently provide the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation, grain boundary type (low or high angle) and whether the boundary is coincident site lattice (CSL) – related, in irradiated SiC. Analysis of PED data showed the grain structure of the SiC layer in an irradiated TRISO fuel particle from the AGR-1 experimentmore » to be composed mainly of twin boundaries with a small fraction of low angle grain boundaries (<10%). In general, fission products favor precipitation on random, high angle grain boundaries but can precipitate out on low angle and CSL-related grain boundaries to a limited degree. Pd is capable of precipitating out on all types of grain boundaries but most prominently on random, high angle grain boundaries. Pd-U and Pd-Ag precipitates were found on CSL-related as well as random high angle grain boundaries but not on low angle grain boundaries. In contrast, precipitates containing only Ag were found only on random, high angle grain boundaries but not on either low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.« less

  19. Emission characteristics of a premix combustor fueled with a simulated partial-oxidation product gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A two-stage gas turbine combustor concept employing a very fuel-rich partial oxidation stage is being explored for broadening the combustion margin between ultralow emissions and the lean stability limit. Combustion and emission results are presented for a series of experiments where a simulated partial oxidation product gas was used in a premix combustor operated with inlet air state conditions typical of cruise power for high-performance aviation engines (12 atm and 850 F). Ultralow NOx, CO, and HC emissions and an extended lean burning limit were achieved simultaneously.

  20. The "trapped fraction" and interfacial jumps of concentration in fission products release from coated fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Rusinkevich, A. A.; Taran, M. D.

    2018-01-01

    The FP Kinetics computer code [1] designed for calculation of fission products release from HTGR coated fuel particles was modified to allow consideration of chemical bonding, effects of limited solubility and component concentration jumps at interfaces between coating layers. Curves of Cs release from coated particles calculated with the FP Kinetics and PARFUME [2] codes were compared. It has been found that the consideration of concentration jumps at silicon carbide layer interfaces allows giving an explanation of some experimental data on Cs release obtained from post-irradiation heating tests. The need to perform experiments for measurement of solubility limits in coating materials was noted.

  1. The costs of production of alternative jet fuel: A harmonized stochastic assessment.

    PubMed

    Bann, Seamus J; Malina, Robert; Staples, Mark D; Suresh, Pooja; Pearlson, Matthew; Tyner, Wallace E; Hileman, James I; Barrett, Steven

    2017-03-01

    This study quantifies and compares the costs of production for six alternative jet fuel pathways using consistent financial and technical assumptions. Uncertainty was propagated through the analysis using Monte Carlo simulations. The six processes assessed were HEFA, advanced fermentation, Fischer-Tropsch, aqueous phase processing, hydrothermal liquefaction, and fast pyrolysis. The results indicate that none of the six processes would be profitable in the absence of government incentives, with HEFA using yellow grease, HEFA using tallow, and FT revealing the lowest mean jet fuel prices at $0.91/liter ($0.66/liter-$1.24/liter), $1.06/liter ($0.79/liter-$1.42/liter), and $1.15/liter ($0.95/liter-$1.39/liter), respectively. This study also quantifies plant performance in the United States with a Renewable Fuel Standard policy analysis. Results indicate that some pathways could achieve positive NPV with relatively high likelihood under existing policy supports, with HEFA and FPH revealing the highest probability of positive NPV at 94.9% and 99.7%, respectively, in the best-case scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pyrolysis of plastic waste for liquid fuel production as prospective energy resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharuddin, S. D. A.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. W.; Aroua, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    The worldwide plastic generation expanded over years because of the variety applications of plastics in numerous sectors that caused the accumulation of plastic waste in the landfill. The growing of plastics demand definitely affected the petroleum resources availability as non-renewable fossil fuel since plastics were the petroleum-based material. A few options that have been considered for plastic waste management were recycling and energy recovery technique. Nevertheless, several obstacles of recycling technique such as the needs of sorting process that was labour intensive and water pollution that lessened the process sustainability. As a result, the plastic waste conversion into energy was developed through innovation advancement and extensive research. Since plastics were part of petroleum, the oil produced through the pyrolysis process was said to have high calorific value that could be used as an alternative fuel. This paper reviewed the thermal and catalytic degradation of plastics through pyrolysis process and the key factors that affected the final end product, for instance, oil, gaseous and char. Additionally, the liquid fuel properties and a discussion on several perspectives regarding the optimization of the liquid oil yield for every plastic were also included in this paper.

  3. Solid waste from Swine wastewater as a fuel source for heat production.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung-Ho; Kumar, Sanjay; Ra, ChangSix

    2012-11-01

    This study was to evaluate the feasibility of recycling the solids separated from swine wastewater treatment process as a fuel source for heat production and to provide a data set on the gas emissions and combustion properties. Also, in this study, the heavy metals in ash content were analyzed for its possible use as a fertilizer. Proximate analysis of the solid recovered from the swine wastewater after flocculation with organic polymer showed high calorific (5,330.50 kcal/kg) and low moisture (15.38%) content, indicating that the solid separated from swine wastewater can be used as an alternative fuel source. CO and NOx emissions were found to increase with increasing temperature. Combustion efficiency of the solids was found to be stable (95 to 98%) with varied temperatures. Thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) showed five thermal effects (four exothermic and one endothermic), and these effects were distinguished in three stages, water evaporation, heterogeneous combustion of hydrocarbons and decomposition reaction. Based on the calorific value and combustion stability results, solid separated from swine manure can be used as an alternative source of fuel, however further research is still warranted regarding regulation of CO and NOx emissions. Furthermore, the heavy metal content in ash was below the legal limits required for its usage as fertilizer.

  4. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogenmore » from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.« less

  5. Life cycle assessment of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from corn stover via fast pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C.

    2013-06-01

    This life cycle assessment evaluates and quantifies the environmental impacts of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from the fast pyrolysis and upgrading of corn stover. Input data for this analysis come from Aspen Plus modeling, a GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model database and a US Life Cycle Inventory Database. SimaPro 7.3 software is employed to estimate the environmental impacts. The results indicate that the net fossil energy input is 0.25 MJ and 0.23 MJ per km traveled for a light-duty vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Bio-oil production requires the largest fossil energy input. The net global warming potential (GWP) is 0.037 kg CO2eq and 0.015 kg CO2eq per km traveled for a vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Vehicle operations contribute up to 33% of the total positive GWP, which is the largest greenhouse gas footprint of all the unit processes. The net GWPs in this study are 88% and 94% lower than for petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel (2005 baseline), respectively. Biomass transportation has the largest impact on ozone depletion among all of the unit processes. Sensitivity analysis shows that fuel economy, transportation fuel yield, bio-oil yield, and electricity consumption are the key factors that influence greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. 26 CFR 1.1031(a)-1 - Property held for productive use in trade or business or for investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exception from the general rule requiring the recognition of gain or loss upon the sale or exchange of property. Under section 1031(a)(1), no gain or loss is recognized if property held for productive use in a...) to be excluded from the application of all of subchapter K is treated as an interest in each of the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1031(a)-1 - Property held for productive use in trade or business or for investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exception from the general rule requiring the recognition of gain or loss upon the sale or exchange of property. Under section 1031(a)(1), no gain or loss is recognized if property held for productive use in a...) to be excluded from the application of all of subchapter K is treated as an interest in each of the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1031(a)-1 - Property held for productive use in trade or business or for investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... exception from the general rule requiring the recognition of gain or loss upon the sale or exchange of property. Under section 1031(a)(1), no gain or loss is recognized if property held for productive use in a...) to be excluded from the application of all of subchapter K is treated as an interest in each of the...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1031(a)-1 - Property held for productive use in trade or business or for investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exception from the general rule requiring the recognition of gain or loss upon the sale or exchange of property. Under section 1031(a)(1), no gain or loss is recognized if property held for productive use in a...) to be excluded from the application of all of subchapter K is treated as an interest in each of the...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1031(a)-1 - Property held for productive use in trade or business or for investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... general rule requiring the recognition of gain or loss upon the sale or exchange of property. Under section 1031(a)(1), no gain or loss is recognized if property held for productive use in a trade or... excluded from the application of all of subchapter K is treated as an interest in each of the assets of the...

  11. [Factors of work environment and employment of workers in production of fuels and solvents at the oil refinery].

    PubMed

    Chebotarev, P A; Kharlashova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Factors of the industrial environment and labor activity of workers of manufacture propellants and solvents at the oil refining enterprise. Working conditions of workers at all installations of manufacture No 1 JSC "Naftan" of Novopolotsk of Byelorussia (production of fuels and solvents). Hygienic evaluation of working conditions of persons working in the production of fuels and solvents at the oil refinery. Sanitary description of the production with hygienic analysis of project design and technological documentation, qualitative and quantitative characteristics of conventional methods in the work environment and working process of employees in the workplace for the main modes of operation of the equipment. The working environment of refineries is influenced by a number of simultaneously acting factors, which have different material nature and characteristics of the action on the human body, the workers in production of fuels and solvents at the refinery, are exposed to a variety of hazardous and dangerous factors of production, a chemical factor is prevalent, of course.

  12. Transportation fuel production by combination of LDPE thermal cracking and catalytic hydroreforming

    SciTech Connect

    Escola, J.M., E-mail: josemaria.escola.saez@urjc.es; Aguado, J.; Serrano, D.P.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • h-Beta samples were impregnated with Ni nitrate to achieve Ni contents of 1.5%, 4%, 7% and 10%. • Larger and more easily reducible metal particles were obtained on Ni 7%/h-Beta and Ni 10%/h-Beta. • Higher Ni contents increased the amount of gases at the expenses of diesel fractions. • Maximum selectivity to automotive fuels (∼81%) was obtained with Ni 7%/h-Beta. • Ni loading also enhanced olefins saturation up to Ni 7%/h-Beta. - Abstract: Fuel production from plastics is a promising way to reduce landfilling rates while obtaining valuable products. The usage of Ni-supported hierarchical Beta zeolite (h-Beta) formore » the hydroreforming of the oils coming from LDPE thermal cracking has proved to produce high selectivities to gasoline and diesel fuels (>80%). In the present work, the effect of the Ni loading on Ni/h-Beta is investigated in the hydroreforming of the oils form LDPE thermal cracking. h-Beta samples were impregnated with Ni nitrate, calcined and reduced in H{sub 2} up to 550 °C to achieve different Ni contents: 1.5%, 4%, 7% and 10%. Larger and more easily reducible metal particles were obtained on Ni 7%/h-Beta and Ni 10%/h-Beta. Hydroreforming tests were carried out in autoclave reactor at 310 °C, under 20 bar H{sub 2}, for 45 min. Ni content progressively increased the amount of gases at the expenses of diesel fractions, while gasoline remained approximately constant about 52–54%. Maximum selectivity to automotive fuels (∼81%) was obtained with Ni 7%/h-Beta. Ni loading also enhanced olefins saturation up to Ni 7%/h-Beta. High cetane indices (71–86) and octane numbers (89–91) were obtained over all the catalysts. Regarding the different studied Ni contents, Ni 7%/h-Beta constitutes a rather promising catalyst for obtaining high quality fuels from LDPE thermal cracking oils.« less

  13. Presence and biological activity of antibiotics used in fuel ethanol and corn co-product production.

    PubMed

    Compart, D M Paulus; Carlson, A M; Crawford, G I; Fink, R C; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Dicostanzo, A; Shurson, G C

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are used in ethanol production to control bacteria from competing with yeast for nutrients during starch fermentation. However, there is no published scientific information on whether antibiotic residues are present in distillers grains (DG), co-products from ethanol production, or whether they retain their biological activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to quantify concentrations of various antibiotic residues in DG and determine whether residues were biologically active. Twenty distillers wet grains and 20 distillers dried grains samples were collected quarterly from 9 states and 43 ethanol plants in the United States. Samples were analyzed for DM, CP, NDF, crude fat, S, P, and pH to describe the nutritional characteristics of the samples evaluated. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of erythromycin, penicillin G, tetracycline, tylosin, and virginiamycin M1, using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Additionally, virginiamycin residues were determined, using a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved bioassay method. Samples were extracted and further analyzed for biological activity by exposing the sample extracts to 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/mL concentrations of sentinel bacterial strains Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115. Extracts that inhibited bacterial growth were considered to have biological activity. Physiochemical characteristics varied among samples but were consistent with previous findings. Thirteen percent of all samples contained low (≤1.12 mg/kg) antibiotic concentrations. Only 1 sample extract inhibited growth of Escherichia coli at 10(4) CFU/mL, but this sample contained no detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues. No extracts inhibited Listeria monocytogenes growth. These data indicate that the likelihood of detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues in DG is low; and if detected, they are found in very low concentrations. The inhibition in only 1 DG

  14. Peak Locations and Relative Phase of Different Decay Modes of the a 1 Axial Vector Resonance in Diffractive Production

    SciTech Connect

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis; Berger, Edmond L.

    2015-05-01

    We show that a single I = 1 spin-parity J(PC) = 1(++) a(1) resonance can manifest itself as two separated mass peaks, one decaying into an S-wave rho pi system and the second decaying into a P-wave f(0)(980)pi system, with a rapid increase of the phase difference between their amplitudes arising mainly from the structure of the diffractive production process. This study clarifies questions related to the mass, width, and decay rates of the a(1) resonance raised by the recent high statistics data of the COMPASS Collaboration on a 1 production in pi N -> pi pi pi N atmore » high energies.« less

  15. Details of the Construction and Production of Fuel Pumps and Fuel Nozzles for the Airplane Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubenetsky, W S

    1936-01-01

    This report presents investigations into the design and construction of fuel pumps for diesel engines. The results of the pump tests on the engines showed that, with a good cut-off, accurate injection, assured by the proper adjustment of the pump elements, there is a decrease in the consumption of fuel and hence an increase in the rated power of the engine. Some of the aspects investigated include: cam profile, coefficient of discharge, and characteristics of the injection system.

  16. Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of shale-derived refinery products and jet fuels and of experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Bailey, B. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was conducted of Ashland shale oil refinery products, experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels, and of related isoprenoid model compounds. Supercritical fluid chromatography techniques using carbon dioxide were developed on a preparative scale, so that samples could be quantitatively separated into saturates and aromatic fractions for study by NMR. An optimized average parameter treatment was developed, and the NMR results were analyzed in terms of the resulting average parameters; formulation of model mixtures was demonstrated. Application of novel spectroscopic techniques to fuel samples was investigated.

  17. Tunable UV Laser Photolysis of NF2: Quantum Yield for NF(a1 delta) Production.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-25

    UV Laser Photolysis of NF2: Quantum Yield for NF(a A) Production ’v0 LR. F. HEIDNER, H . HELVAJIAN , 4and J. B. KOFFEND Aerophysics Laboratory...experiments, the chemistry of NF2 with various hydrocarbons has been studied. It has also been shown that the addition-elimination reaction between H and NF2...COMPLI R LEN SP, 3 ,HAND L BE AM~ H O [ I , , i 1 CAIHOC IAM COOLED GaAs CAPACITANCE PHOTOTUIBE MANOMETER _ LENS /’~ ~L + . ANMEE _.... BANDPASS FILTER

  18. Electrocatalytic processing of renewable biomass-derived compounds for production of chemicals, fuels and electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Le

    The dual problems of sustaining the fast growth of human society and preserving the environment for future generations urge us to shift our focus from exploiting fossil oils to researching and developing more affordable, reliable and clean energy sources. Human beings had a long history that depended on meeting our energy demands with plant biomass, and the modern biorefinery technologies realize the effective conversion of biomass to production of transportation fuels, bulk and fine chemicals so to alleviate our reliance on fossil fuel resources of declining supply. With the aim of replacing as much non-renewable carbon from fossil oils with renewable carbon from biomass as possible, innovative R&D activities must strive to enhance the current biorefinery process and secure our energy future. Much of my Ph.D. research effort is centered on the study of electrocatalytic conversion of biomass-derived compounds to produce value-added chemicals, biofuels and electrical energy on model electrocatalysts in AEM/PEM-based continuous flow electrolysis cell and fuel cell reactors. High electricity generation performance was obtained when glycerol or crude glycerol was employed as fuels in AEMFCs. The study on selective electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol shows an electrode potential-regulated product distribution where tartronate and mesoxalate can be selectively produced with electrode potential switch. This finding then led to the development of AEMFCs with selective production of valuable tartronate or mesoxalate with high selectivity and yield and cogeneration of electricity. Reaction mechanisms of electrocatalytic oxidation of ethylene glycol and 1,2-propanediol were further elucidated by means of an on-line sample collection technique and DFT modeling. Besides electro-oxidation of biorenewable alcohols to chemicals and electricity, electrocatalytic reduction of keto acids (e.g. levulinic acid) was also studied for upgrading biomass-based feedstock to biofuels while

  19. Investigation of the Feasibility of Utilizing Gamma Emission Computed Tomography in Evaluating Fission Product Migration in Irradiated TRISO Fuel Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-10-01

    In the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the TRISO particle fuel serves as the primary fission product containment. However the large number of TRISO particles present in proposed HTGRs dictates that there will be a small fraction (~10 -4 to 10 -5) of as manufactured and in-pile particle failures that will lead to some fission product release. The matrix material surrounding the TRISO particles in fuel compacts and the structural graphite holding the TRISO particles in place can also serve as sinks for containing any released fission products. However data on the migration of solid fission products through these materialsmore » is lacking. One of the primary goals of the AGR-3/4 experiment is to study fission product migration from failed TRISO particles in prototypic HTGR components such as structural graphite and compact matrix material. In this work, the potential for a Gamma Emission Computed Tomography (GECT) technique to non-destructively examine the fission product distribution in AGR-3/4 components and other irradiation experiments is explored. Specifically, the feasibility of using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS) system for this GECT application is considered. To test the feasibility, the response of the PGS system to idealized fission product distributions has been simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Previous work that applied similar techniques during the AGR-1 experiment will also be discussed as well as planned uses for the GECT technique during the post irradiation examination of the AGR-2 experiment. The GECT technique has also been applied to other irradiated nuclear fuel systems that were currently available in the HFEF hot cell including oxide fuel pins, metallic fuel pins, and monolithic plate fuel.« less

  20. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  1. Hybrid photocathodes for solar fuel production: coupling molecular fuel-production catalysts with solid-state light harvesting and conversion technologies.

    PubMed

    Cedeno, Diana; Krawicz, Alexandra; Moore, Gary F

    2015-06-06

    Artificial photosynthesis is described as the great scientific and moral challenge of our time. We imagine a future where a significant portion of our energy is supplied by such technologies. However, many scientific, engineering and policy challenges must be addressed for this realization. Scientific challenges include the development of effective strategies to couple light absorption, electron transfer and catalysis for efficient conversion of light energy to chemical energy as well as the construction and study of structurally diverse assemblies to carry out these processes. In this article, we review recent efforts from our own research to develop a modular approach to interfacing molecular fuel-production catalysts to visible-light-absorbing semiconductors and discuss the role of the interfacing material as a protection layer for the catalysts as well as the underpinning semiconductor. In concluding, we briefly discuss the potential benefits of a globally coordinated project on artificial photosynthesis that interfaces teams of scientists, engineers and policymakers. Further, we offer cautions that such a large interconnected organization should consider. This article is inspired by, and draws largely from, an invited presentation given by the corresponding author at the Royal Society at Chicheley Hall, home of the Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Buckinghamshire on the themed meeting topic: 'Do we need a global project on artificial photosynthesis?'

  2. Metabolic Engineering of Oleaginous Yeasts for Production of Fuels and Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuobo; Zhao, Huimin

    2017-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been increasingly explored for production of chemicals and fuels via metabolic engineering. Particularly, there is a growing interest in using oleaginous yeasts for the synthesis of lipid-related products due to their high lipogenesis capability, robustness, and ability to utilize a variety of substrates. Most of the metabolic engineering studies in oleaginous yeasts focused on Yarrowia that already has plenty of genetic engineering tools. However, recent advances in systems biology and synthetic biology have provided new strategies and tools to engineer those oleaginous yeasts that have naturally high lipid accumulation but lack genetic tools, such as Rhodosporidium, Trichosporon, and Lipomyces. This review highlights recent accomplishments in metabolic engineering of oleaginous yeasts and recent advances in the development of genetic engineering tools in oleaginous yeasts within the last 3 years. PMID:29167664

  3. Metabolic Engineering of Oleaginous Yeasts for Production of Fuels and Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Zhao, Huimin

    2017-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been increasingly explored for production of chemicals and fuels via metabolic engineering. Particularly, there is a growing interest in using oleaginous yeasts for the synthesis of lipid-related products due to their high lipogenesis capability, robustness, and ability to utilize a variety of substrates. Most of the metabolic engineering studies in oleaginous yeasts focused on Yarrowia that already has plenty of genetic engineering tools. However, recent advances in systems biology and synthetic biology have provided new strategies and tools to engineer those oleaginous yeasts that have naturally high lipid accumulation but lack genetic tools, such as Rhodosporidium , Trichosporon , and Lipomyces . This review highlights recent accomplishments in metabolic engineering of oleaginous yeasts and recent advances in the development of genetic engineering tools in oleaginous yeasts within the last 3 years.

  4. Under pressure: evolutionary engineering of yeast strains for improved performance in fuels and chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Mans, Robert; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T

    2018-04-01

    Evolutionary engineering, which uses laboratory evolution to select for industrially relevant traits, is a popular strategy in the development of high-performing yeast strains for industrial production of fuels and chemicals. By integrating whole-genome sequencing, bioinformatics, classical genetics and genome-editing techniques, evolutionary engineering has also become a powerful approach for identification and reverse engineering of molecular mechanisms that underlie industrially relevant traits. New techniques enable acceleration of in vivo mutation rates, both across yeast genomes and at specific loci. Recent studies indicate that phenotypic trade-offs, which are often observed after evolution under constant conditions, can be mitigated by using dynamic cultivation regimes. Advances in research on synthetic regulatory circuits offer exciting possibilities to extend the applicability of evolutionary engineering to products of yeasts whose synthesis requires a net input of cellular energy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced fuel production in thorium/lithium hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Pitulski, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    A consistent neutronics analysis is performed to determine the effectiveness of uranium bearing neutron multiplier zones on increasing the production of U/sup 233/ in thorium/lithium blankets for use in a tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor. The nuclear performance of these blankets is evaluated as a function of zone thicknesses and exposure by using the coupled transport burnup code ANISN-CINDER-HIC. Various parameters such as U/sup 233/, Pu/sup 239/, and H/sup 3/ production rates, the blanket energy multiplication, isotopic composition of the fuels, and neutron leakages into the various zones are evaluated during a 5 year (6 MW.y.m/sup -2/) exposure period. Although themore » results of this study were obtained for a tokomak magnetic fusion device, the qualitative behavior associated with the use of the uranium bearing neutron multiplier should be applicable to all fusion-fission hybrids.« less

  6. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  7. Comparative study of thermochemical processes for hydrogen production from biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Enrico; Masoni, Lorenzo; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2010-08-01

    Different thermochemical configurations (gasification, combustion, electrolysis and syngas separation) are studied for producing hydrogen from biomass fuels. The aim is to provide data for the production unit and the following optimization of the "hydrogen chain" (from energy source selection to hydrogen utilization) in the frame of the Italian project "Filiera Idrogeno". The project focuses on a regional scale (Tuscany, Italy), renewable energies and automotive hydrogen. Decentred and small production plants are required to solve the logistic problems of biomass supply and meet the limited hydrogen infrastructures. Different options (gasification with air, oxygen or steam/oxygen mixtures, combustion, electrolysis) and conditions (varying the ratios of biomass and gas input) are studied by developing process models with uniform hypothesis to compare the results. Results obtained in this work concern the operating parameters, process efficiencies, material and energetic needs and are fundamental to optimize the entire hydrogen chain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fission product palladium-silicon carbide interaction in htgr fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Kashimura, Satoru; Fukuda, Kousaku; Shimizu, Michio; Tayama, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Ishio

    1990-07-01

    Interaction of fission product palladium (Pd) with the silicon carbide (SiC) layer was observed in irradiated Triso-coated uranium dioxide particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) with an optical microscope and electron probe microanalyzers. The SiC layers were attacked locally or the reaction product formed nodules at the attack site. Although the main element concerned with the reaction was palladium, rhodium and ruthenium were also detected at the corroded areas in some particles. Palladium was detected on both the hot and cold sides of the particles, but the corroded areas and the palladium accumulations were distributed particularly on the cold side of the particles. The observed Pd-SiC reaction depths were analyzed on the assumption that the release of palladium from the fuel kernel controls the whole Pd-SiC reaction.

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals relevant to solar fuels production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Liu, Cunming; Qiu, Fen; Burke, Rebeckah; Krauss, Todd D.

    2017-05-01

    Artificial conversion of sunlight to chemical fuels has attracted attention for several decades as a potential source of clean, renewable energy. We recently found that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and simple aqueous Ni2+ salts in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor form a highly efficient, active, and robust system for photochemical reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy studies of electron transfer (ET) processes from the QDs to the Ni catalysts reveal extremely fast ET, and provide a fundamental explanation for the exceptional photocatalytic H2 activity. Additionally, by studying H2 production of the Ni catalyst with CdSe/CdS nanoparticles of various structures, it was determined that surface charge density plays an important role in charge transfer and ultimately H2 production activity.

  10. Life cycle assessment of biohydrogen and biomethane production and utilisation as a vehicle fuel.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Tim; Esteves, Sandra; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Maddy, Jon

    2013-03-01

    Environmental burdens for the production and utilisation of biomethane vehicle fuel or a biohydrogen/biomethane blend produced from food waste or wheat feed, based on data from two different laboratory experiments, have been compared. For food waste treated by batch processes the two stage system gave high hydrogen yields (84.2l H2kg(-1) VS added) but a lower overall energy output than the single stage system. Reduction in environmental burdens compared with diesel was achieved, supported by the diversion of waste from landfill. For wheat feed, the semi continuously fed two stage process gave low hydrogen yields (7.5l H2kg(-1) VS added) but higher overall energy output. The process delivers reduction in fossil fuel burdens, and improvements in process efficiencies will lead to reduction in CO2 burdens compared with diesel. The study highlights the importance of understanding and optimising biofuel production parameters according to the feedstock utilised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining micro-structures and micro-algae to increase lipid production for bio-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Zhu, Emilly; Mestler, Troy; Estévez-Torres, André.; Austin, Robert

    2011-03-01

    3rd generation bio-fuels like lipid producing micro-algae are a promising source of energy that could replace our dependence on petroleum. However, until there are improvements in algae oil yields, and a reduction in the energy needed for processing, algae bio-fuels are not economically competitive with petroleum. Here, we describe our work combining micro-fabricated devices with micro-algae Neochloris oleoabundans, a species first isolated on the sand dunes of Saudi Arabia. Inserting micro-algae of varying fitness into a landscape of micro-habitats allows us to evolve and select them based on a variety of conditions like specific gravity, starvation response and Nile Red fluorescence (which is a marker for lipid production). Hence, we can both estimate the production of lipids and generate conditions that allow the creation and isolation of algae which produce higher amounts of lipids, while discarding the rest. Finally, we can use micro-fabricated structures and flocculation to de-water these high lipid producing algae, reducing the need for expensive centrifugation and filtration.

  12. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 10. Jet Fuels Production By-Products, Utility and Sulfur Emissions Control Integration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION EVALUATION A-1/A-2 3-1. 3 BOILER STACK EMISSION CONTROL WITH...Appendices A - BACT Flue Gas Desulfurization Evaluation B - BACT Off- Gas Refrigeration Evaluation v LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1. Material Balance for...2. Desulfurize the flue gases from the Riley boilers when firing with high sulfur oils or lignite. Options in this category include commercial wet

  13. An Integrative Approach to Computational Modelling of the Gene Regulatory Network Controlling Clostridium botulinum Type A1 Toxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W.; Barker, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), highly potent substances responsible for botulism. Currently, mathematical models of C. botulinum growth and toxigenesis are largely aimed at risk assessment and do not include explicit genetic information beyond group level but integrate many component processes, such as signalling, membrane permeability and metabolic activity. In this paper we present a scheme for modelling neurotoxin production in C. botulinum Group I type A1, based on the integration of diverse information coming from experimental results available in the literature. Experiments show that production of BoNTs depends on the growth-phase and is under the control of positive and negative regulatory elements at the intracellular level. Toxins are released as large protein complexes and are associated with non-toxic components. Here, we systematically review and integrate those regulatory elements previously described in the literature for C. botulinum Group I type A1 into a population dynamics model, to build the very first computational model of toxin production at the molecular level. We conduct a validation of our model against several items of published experimental data for different wild type and mutant strains of C. botulinum Group I type A1. The result of this process underscores the potential of mathematical modelling at the cellular level, as a means of creating opportunities in developing new strategies that could be used to prevent botulism; and potentially contribute to improved methods for the production of toxin that is used for therapeutics. PMID:27855161

  14. An Integrative Approach to Computational Modelling of the Gene Regulatory Network Controlling Clostridium botulinum Type A1 Toxin Production.

    PubMed

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Mura, Ivan; Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W; Barker, Gary C

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), highly potent substances responsible for botulism. Currently, mathematical models of C. botulinum growth and toxigenesis are largely aimed at risk assessment and do not include explicit genetic information beyond group level but integrate many component processes, such as signalling, membrane permeability and metabolic activity. In this paper we present a scheme for modelling neurotoxin production in C. botulinum Group I type A1, based on the integration of diverse information coming from experimental results available in the literature. Experiments show that production of BoNTs depends on the growth-phase and is under the control of positive and negative regulatory elements at the intracellular level. Toxins are released as large protein complexes and are associated with non-toxic components. Here, we systematically review and integrate those regulatory elements previously described in the literature for C. botulinum Group I type A1 into a population dynamics model, to build the very first computational model of toxin production at the molecular level. We conduct a validation of our model against several items of published experimental data for different wild type and mutant strains of C. botulinum Group I type A1. The result of this process underscores the potential of mathematical modelling at the cellular level, as a means of creating opportunities in developing new strategies that could be used to prevent botulism; and potentially contribute to improved methods for the production of toxin that is used for therapeutics.

  15. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João R M; Fávaro, Léia C L; Quirino, Betania F

    2012-07-18

    The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a "waste-stream" instead of a valuable "coproduct". The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others) by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive.

  16. Evaluation of electricity production from alkaline pretreated sludge using two-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Benyi; Yang, Fang; Liu, Junxin

    2013-06-15

    Electricity production from alkaline pretreated sludge was evaluated using a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). The electricity production was found to be stable over a long period of time (approximately 17 d) with voltage outputs and power densities of 0.47-0.52 V and 46.80-55.88 mW/m(2), respectively. The anode resistance was the main internal resistance (73.2%) of MFC in the stable stage. Most soluble organic matters (proteins and carbohydrates) in the anode chamber were first degraded and converted into volatile fatty acids (0-15 d), which were then degraded and converted into electricity and methane (15-29 d). The insoluble organics were solubilized thereby decreasing the sludge concentration and reducing the sludge mass. Methane was produced in the anode chamber owing to the growth of methanogens, which did not obviously affect the electricity production. The change in humic-like substances displayed a positive correlation with the electricity production of the MFC. Microbial analysis showed that methanogens and electricity-producing bacteria co-existed mostly on the surface as well as inside the anode. Decreasing the anode resistance and increasing the anode utilization could enhance the electricity production. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Indirect Liquefaction of Coal-Biomass Mixture for Production of Jet Fuel with High Productivity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, Santosh K; McCabe, Kevin

    Coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes were advanced by testing and demonstrating Southern Research’s sulfur tolerant nickel-based reforming catalyst and Chevron’s highly selective and active cobalt-zeolite hybrid Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst to clean, upgrade and convert syngas predominantly to jet fuel range hydrocarbon liquids, thereby minimizing expensive cleanup and wax upgrading operations. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) operated by Southern Company (SC) at Wilsonville, Alabama served as the host site for the gasifier slip-stream and simulated syngas testing/demonstration. Reformer testing was performed to (1) reform tar and light hydrocarbons, (2) decompose ammonia in the presence H2S,more » and (3) deliver the required H2 to CO ratio for FT synthesis. FT Testing was performed to produce a product primarily containing C5-C20 liquid hydrocarbons and no C21+ waxy hydrocarbons with productivity greater than 0.7 gC5+/g catalyst/h, and at least 70% diesel and jet fuel range (C8-C20) hydrocarbon selectivity in the liquid product. A novel heat-exchange reactor system was employed to enable the use of the highly active FT catalyst and larger diameter reactors that results in cost reduction for commercial systems. Following laboratory development and testing, SR’s laboratory reformer was modified to operate in a Class 1 Div. 2 environment, installed at NCCC, and successfully tested for 125 hours using raw syngas. The catalyst demonstrated near equilibrium reforming (~90%) of methane and complete reforming/decomposition of tar and ammonia in the presence of up to 380 ppm H2S. For FT synthesis, SR modified and utilized a bench scale skid mounted FT reactor system (SR-CBTL test rig) that was fully integrated with a slip stream from SC/NCCC’s transport gasifier (TRIG). The test-rig developed in a previous project (DE-FE0010231) was modified to receive up to 7.5 lb/h raw syngas augmented with bottled syngas to adjust the H

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis-gc/ms of spirulina: evaluation of a highly proteinaceous biomass source for production of fuels and chemicals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyrolysis of microalgae offers a pathway towards the production of compounds derived from the thermal decomposition of triglycerides, proteins as well as lignocelluloses and their combinations thereof. When catalytically induced, this could lead to the production of fuels and chemicals including aro...

  19. Final Report: Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications (2012-2016)

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brian David; Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton; Houchins, Cassidy

    This report summarizes project activities for Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) Contract Number DE-EE0005236 to the U.S. Department of Energy titled “Transportation Fuel Cell System Cost Assessment”. The project defined and projected the mass production costs of direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles (automobiles) and 40-foot transit buses. In each year of the five-year contract, the fuel cell power system designs and cost projections were updated to reflect technology advances. System schematics, design assumptions, manufacturing assumptions, and cost results are presented.

  20. Gridded Uncertainty Maps of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Data Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. J.; Boden, T.

    2014-12-01

    With the publication of a new assessment of the uncertainty associated with the mass of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions (2014, Tellus B, 66, 23616, doi:10.3402/tellusb.v66.23616), it is now possible to extend that work with a gridded map of fossil fuel emission uncertainties. The new data product was created to be paired with the long-used, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), emission year 1751-present, one degree latitude by one degree longitude (1x1) mass of emissions data product (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp058/ndp058_v2013.html). Now, for the first time, data users will have FFCO2 emission information that represents both mass and uncertainty, each of which varies in both time and space. The new data product was constructed by examining the individual uncertainties in each of the input data sets to the gridded mass maps and then combining these individual uncertainties into an overall uncertainty for the mass maps. The input data sets include a table of the mass of FFCO2 emissions by country and year, the one degree geographic map of emissions which includes changing borders on an annual time scale and ties the mass of emissions to location, and the one degree population proxy used to distribute the mass of emissions within each country. As the three input data sets are independent of each other, their combination for the overall uncertainty is accomplished by a simple square root of the sum of the squares procedure. The resulting uncertainty data product is gridded at 1x1 and exactly overlays the 1x1 mass emission maps. The default temporal resolution is annual, but a companion product is also available at monthly time scales. The monthly uncertainty product uses the same input data sets, but the mass uncertainty is scaled as described in the monthly mass product description paper (2011, Tellus B, 63:309-327, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2011.00530.x). The gridded uncertainty maps cover emission year 1950 to 2010. The start

  1. Production of synthetic fuels using syngas from a steam hydrogasification and reforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Arun Satheesh Kumar

    This thesis is aimed at the research, optimization and development of a thermo-chemical process aimed at the production of synthesis gas (mixture of H2 and CO) with a flexible H2 to CO ratio using coupled steam hydrogasification and steam reforming processes. The steam hydrogasification step generates a product gas containing significant amounts of methane by gasifying a carbonaceous feed material with steam and internally generated H2. This product gas is converted to synthesis gas with an excess H2 to CO using the steam reformer. Research involving experimental and simulation work has been conducted on steam hydrogasification, steam reforming and the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The Aspen Plus simulation tool has been used to develop a process model that can perform heat and mass balance calculations of the whole process using built-in reactor modules and an empirical FT model available in the literature. This model has been used to estimate optimum feed ratios and process conditions for specific feedstocks and products. Steam hydrogasification of coal and wood mixtures of varying coal to wood ratios has been performed in a stirred batch reactor. The carbon conversion of the feedstocks to gaseous products is around 60% at 700°C and 80% at 800°C. The coal to wood ratio of the feedstock does not exert a significant influence on the carbon conversion. The rates of formation of CO, CO 2 and CH4 during gasification have been calculated based on the experimental results using a simple kinetic model. Experimental research on steam reforming has been performed. It has been shown that temperature and the feed CO2/CH4 ratio play a dominant role in determining the product gas H2/CO ratio. Reforming of typical steam hydrogasification product-gas stream has been investigated over a commercial steam reforming catalyst. The results demonstrate that the combined use of steam hydrogasification process with a reformer can generate a synthesis gas with a predetermined H2/CO ratio

  2. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    None

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  3. Microbial development in distillers wet grains produced during fuel ethanol production from corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Lehman, R Michael; Rosentrater, Kurt A

    2007-09-01

    Distillers grains are coproduced with ethanol and carbon dioxide during the production of fuel ethanol from the dry milling and fermentation of corn grain, yet there is little basic microbiological information on these materials. We undertook a replicated field study of the microbiology of distillers wet grains (DWG) over a 9 day period following their production at an industrial fuel ethanol plant. Freshly produced DWG had a pH of about 4.4, a moisture content of about 53.5% (wet mass basis), and 4 x 10(5) total yeast cells/g dry mass, of which about 0.1% were viable. Total bacterial cells were initially below detection limits (ca. 10(6) cells/g dry mass) and then were estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(7) cells/g dry mass during the first 4 days following production. Culturable aerobic heterotrophic organisms (fungi plus bacteria) ranged between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU/g dry mass during the initial 4 day period, and lactic acid bacteria increased from 36 to 10(3) CFU/g dry mass over this same period. At 9 days, total viable bacteria and yeasts and (or) molds topped 10(8) CFU/g dry mass and lactic acid bacteria approached 10(6) CFU/g dry mass. Community phospholipid fatty acid analysis indicated a stable microbial community over the first 4 days of storage. Thirteen morphologically distinct isolates were recovered, of which 10 were yeasts and molds from 6 different genera, 2 were strains of the lactic-acid-producing Pediococcus pentosaceus and only one was an aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, Micrococcus luteus. The microbiology of DWG is fundamental to the assessment of spoilage, deleterious effects (e.g., toxins), or beneficial effects (e.g., probiotics) in its use as feed or in alternative applications.

  4. Development of life cycle water footprints for the production of fuels and chemicals from algae biomass.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Junior, Edson; Kumar, Mayank; Pankratz, Stan; Oyedun, Adetoyese Olajire; Kumar, Amit

    2018-09-01

    This study develops life cycle water footprints for the production of fuels and chemicals via thermochemical conversion of algae biomass. This study is based on two methods of feedstock production - ponds and photobioreactors (PBRs) - and four conversion pathways - fast pyrolysis, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), conventional gasification, and hydrothermal gasification (HTG). The results show the high fresh water requirement for algae production and the necessity to recycle harvested water or use alternative water sources. To produce 1 kg of algae through ponds, 1564 L of water are required. When PBRs are used, only 372 L water are required; however, the energy requirements for PBRs are about 30 times higher than for ponds. From a final product perspective, the pathway based on the gasification of algae biomass was the thermochemical conversion method that required the highest amount of water per MJ produced (mainly due to its low hydrogen yield), followed by fast pyrolysis and HTL. On the other hand, HTG has the lowest water footprint, mainly because the large amount of electricity generated as part of the process compensates for the electricity used by the system. Performance in all pathways can be improved through recycling channels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production from a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Chen, Jingwen; Quan, Xie; Yang, Fenglin

    2010-10-01

    Enhancement of Cr (VI) reduction rate and power production from biocathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was achieved using indigenous bacteria from Cr (VI)-contaminated site as inoculum and MFC architecture with a relatively large cathode-specific surface area of 340-900 m2 m(-3). A specific Cr (VI) reduction rate of 2.4 ± 0.2 mg g(-1)VSS h(-1) and a power production of 2.4 ± 0.1 W m(-3) at a current density of 6.9 A m(-3) were simultaneously achieved at an initial Cr (VI) concentration of 39.2 mg L(-1). Initial Cr (VI) concentration and solution conductivity affected Cr (VI) reduction rate, power production and coulombic efficiency. These findings demonstrate the importance of inoculation and MFC architecture in the enhancement of Cr (VI) reduction rate and power production. This study is a beneficial attempt to improve the efficiency of biocathode MFCs and provide a good candidate of bioremediation process for Cr (VI)-contaminated sites.

  6. An alternative feedstock of corn meal for industrial fuel ethanol production: delignified corncob residue.

    PubMed

    Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Lin; Bao, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Delignified corncob residue is an industrial solid waste from xylose production using corncob as feedstock. In this study, delignified corncob residue was used as the feedstock of ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and the optimal fermentation performance was investigated under various operation conditions. The ethanol titer and yield reached 75.07 g/L and 89.38%, respectively, using a regular industrial yeast strain at moderate cellulase dosage and high solids loading. A uniform SSF temperature of 37°C at both prehydrolysis and SSF stages was tested. The fermentation performance and cost of delignified corncob residue and corn meal was compared as feedstock of ethanol fermentation. The result shows that the delignified corncob residue is competitive to corn meal as ethanol production feedstock. The study gives a typical case to demonstrate the potential of intensively processed lignocellulose as the alternative feedstock of corn meal for industrial fuel ethanol production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technoeconomic analysis of biojet fuel production from camelina at commercial scale: Case of Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund; Tabil, Lope

    2018-02-01

    This study undertakes technoeconomic analysis of commercial production of hydro-processed renewable jet (HRJ) fuel from camelina oil in the Canadian Prairies. An engineering economic model designed in SuperPro Designer® investigated capital investment, scale, and profitability of producing HRJ and co-products (biodiesel, naphtha, LPG, and propane) based on biorefinery plant sizes of 112.5-675 million L annum -1 . Under base case scenario, the minimum selling price (MSP) of HRJ was $1.06 L -1 for a biorefinery plant with size of 225 million L. However, it could range from $0.40 to $1.71 L -1 given variations in plant capacity, feedstock cost, and co-product credits. MSP is highly sensitive to camelina feedstock cost and co-product credits, with little sensitivity to capital cost, discount rate, plant capacity, and hydrogen cost. Marginal and average cost curves suggest the region could support an HRJ plant capacity of up to 675 million L annum -1 (capital investment of $167 million). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmentally sustainable production of food, feed and fuel from natural resources in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Preston, T Reg

    2009-08-01

    Responding to the challenges posed by global warming, peak oil and biofuels will require a paradigm shift in the practice of agriculture and in the role of live stock within the farming system. Farming systems should aim at maximizing plant biomass production from locally available diversified resources, processing of the biomass on farm to provide food, feed and energy and recycling of all waste materials. The approach that is the subject of this paper is that the generation of electricity can be a by-product of food/feed production. The concept is the fractionation of biomass into inedible cell wall material that can be converted to an inflammable gas by gasification, the gas in turn being the source of fuel for internal combustion engines driving electrical generators. The cell contents and related structures such as tree leaves are used as human food or animal feed. As well as providing food and feed the model is highly appropriate for decentralized small scale production of electricity in rural areas. It also offers opportunities for sequestration of carbon in the form of biochar the solid residue remaining after gasification of the biomass.

  9. Mapping Global Flows of Chemicals: From Fossil Fuel Feedstocks to Chemical Products.

    PubMed

    Levi, Peter G; Cullen, Jonathan M

    2018-02-20

    Chemical products are ubiquitous in modern society. The chemical sector is the largest industrial energy consumer and the third largest industrial emitter of carbon dioxide. The current portfolio of mitigation options for the chemical sector emphasizes upstream "supply side" solutions, whereas downstream mitigation options, such as material efficiency, are given comparatively short shrift. Key reasons for this are the scarcity of data on the sector's material flows, and the highly intertwined nature of its complex supply chains. We provide the most up to date, comprehensive and transparent data set available publicly, on virgin production routes in the chemical sector: from fossil fuel feedstocks to chemical products. We map global mass flows for the year 2013 through a complex network of transformation processes, and by taking account of secondary reactants and by-products, we maintain a full mass balance throughout. The resulting data set partially addresses the dearth of publicly available information on the chemical sector's supply chain, and can be used to prioritise downstream mitigation options.

  10. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  12. Fission products and nuclear fuel behaviour under severe accident conditions part 3: Speciation of fission products in the VERDON-1 sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, C.; Geiger, E.; Gallais-During, A.; Pontillon, Y.; Lamontagne, J.; Hanus, E.; Ducros, G.

    2017-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses on the VERDON-1 sample made it possible to obtain valuable information on fission product behaviour in the fuel during the test. A promising methodology based on the quantitative results of post-test characterisations has been implemented to assess the release fraction of non γ-emitter fission products. The order of magnitude of the estimated release fractions for each fission product was consistent with their class of volatility.

  13. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-11-15

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals and producing novel non-natural chemicals. In this paper, we review the tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering employed for the development of microorganisms for the production of various industrially useful chemicals belonging to fuels, building block chemicals, and specialty chemicals, in particular focusing on those reported in the last three years. It was aimed at providing the current landscape of systems metabolic engineering and suggesting directions to address future challenges towards successfully establishing processes for the bio-based production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential utilization of sorghum field waste for fuel ethanol production employing Pachysolen tannophilus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sathesh-Prabu, C; Murugesan, A G

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the sorghum field waste, sorghum stover could be used to produce fuel grade ethanol. The alkaline treatment of 2% NaOH for 8h removed 64% of lignin from sorghum stover. Maximum of 68 and 56 g/L of ethanol yield were obtained by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MTCC 173) and Pachysolen tannophilus (MTCC 1077) from sorghum stover under optimized condition, respectively. pH and temperature were optimized for the better growth of S. cerevisiae and P. tannophilus. A total of 51% and 48% more ethanol yield was obtained at initial sugar concentration of 200 g/L than 150 g/L by P. tannophilus and S. cerevisiae, respectively. Respiratory deficiency and ethanol tolerance of the organisms were studied. This investigation showed that sorghum field waste could be effectively used for the production of fuel ethanol to avoid conflicts between human food use and industrial use of crops. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in whichmore » experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.« less

  16. Efficient electricity production and simultaneously wastewater treatment via a high-performance photocatalytic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbiao; Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Baoxue; Li, Xuejin; Chen, Hongchong; Chen, Quanpeng; Wang, Zhongsheng; Li, Lei; Wang, Jiulin; Cai, Weimin

    2011-07-01

    A great quantity of wastewater were discharged into water body, causing serious environmental pollution. Meanwhile, the organic compounds in wastewater are important sources of energy. In this work, a high-performance short TiO(2) nanotube array (STNA) electrode was applied as photoanode material in a novel photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system for electricity production and simultaneously wastewater treatment. The results of current work demonstrate that various model compounds as well as real wastewater samples can be used as substrates for the PFC system. As a representative of model compounds, the acetic acid solution produces the highest cell performance with short-circuit current density 1.42 mA cm(-2), open-circuit voltage 1.48 V and maximum power density output 0.67 mW cm(-2). The STNA photoanode reveals obviously enhanced cell performance compared with TiO(2) nanoparticulate film electrode or other long nanotubes electrode. Moreover, the photoanode material, electrolyte concentration, pH of the initial solution, and cathode material were found to be important factors influencing the system performance of PFC. Therefore, the proposed fuel cell system provides a novel way of energy conversion and effective disposal mode of organics and serves well as a promising technology for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of fuel corrosion products using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wantuck, Paul J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Butt, Darryl P.

    1993-01-01

    Characterizing the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel material in a high-temperature hydrogen environment is critical for ascertaining the operational performance of proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. In this paper, we describe an experimental study undertaken to develop and test non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics for ultimately measuring the distribution of key gas-phase corrosion products expected to evolve during the exposure of NTP fuel to hydrogen. A laser ablation technique is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from uranium-free zirconium carbide (ZrC) and niobium carbide (NbC) forms for probing by various optical diagnostics including planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, and we describe both the actual and proposed planar LIF schemes for imaging constituents of the ablated ZrC and NbC plumes. Envisioned testing of the laser technique in rf-heated, high temperature gas streams is also discussed.

  18. Two stages catalytic pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel: production of biofuel via syncrude.

    PubMed

    Miskolczi, N; Buyong, F; Angyal, A; Williams, P T; Bartha, L

    2010-11-01

    Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of refuse derived fuels with different catalysts had been conducted in a two stages process due to its important potential value as fuel. The first stage was a pure thermal pyrolysis in a horizontal tubular reactor with feed rate of 0.5kg hourly. The second stage was a semi-batch process in the presence of catalysts. Results showed that the tested catalysts significantly have affected the quantity of products. E.g. gas yield could be increased with 350% related to the catalyst free case using ZSM-5, while that of pyrolytic oil was 115% over Y-zeolite. Gases consisted of mainly CO and CO(2) obtained from the tubular reactor, while dominantly hydrocarbons from the second stage. Ni-Mo-catalyst and Co-Mo-catalyst had shown activity in pyrolytic oil upgrading via in-situ hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Sulphur, nitrogen and chlorine level in pyrolytic oils could be significantly declined by using of catalysts.

  19. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in whichmore » experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.« less

  20. A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-07-01

    The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactorsmore » leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of

  1. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices, including diesel particulate filters (DPFs), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle,~Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep + idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photooxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary PM emissions and SOA production from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after 3 h of oxidation at typical urban VOC / NOx ratios (3 : 1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the nonmethane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas chromatography. The

  2. Pluggable microbial fuel cell stacks for septic wastewater treatment and electricity production.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Hadi; Alzate-Gaviria, Liliana; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-03-01

    Septic tanks and other decentralized wastewater treatment systems play an important role in protecting public health and water resource for remote or developing communities. Current septic systems do not have energy production capability, yet such feature can be very valuable for areas lack access to electricity. Here we present an easy-to-operate microbial fuel cell (MFC) stack that consists a common base and multiple pluggable units, which can be connected in either series or parallel for electricity generation during waste treatment in septic tanks. Lab studies showed such easy configuration obtained a power density of 142±6.71mWm(-2) when 3 units are connected in parallel, and preliminary calculation indicates that a system that costs approximately US $25 can power a 6-watt LED light for 4h per day with great improvement potential. Detailed electrochemical characterizations provide insights on system internal loss and technology advancement needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative fuel production by catalytic hydroliquefaction of solid municipal wastes, primary sludges and microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, F; Maupin, I; Lemée, L; Lavoie, J-M; Lemberton, J-L; Pouilloux, Y; Pinard, L

    2013-08-01

    An alternative fuel production was investigated through catalytic hydroliquefaction of three different carbonaceous sources: solid municipal wastes (MW), primary sludges (PS), and microalgae (MA). The reaction was carried out under hydrogen pressure, at different temperatures (330, 380 and 450°C), with a Raney nickel catalyst and two different hydrogen donor solvents: a "fossil solvent" (tetralin) and a "green solvent" (2-methyl-hydro-furan). The feeds analyses (TDA-TGA, ICP-AES, lipids quantification) showed that MW and PS had similar characteristics and physico-chemical properties, but different from those of MA. The hydroliquefaction of these feeds allowed to obtain high oil yields, with a significant energetic value, similar to that of a bio-petroleum. 2-methyl-hydro-furan was more efficient than tetralin for the treatment of the strongly bio-degraded biomasses MW and PS, while better results were obtained with tetralin in the case of MA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electricity production from beer brewery wastewater using single chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Feng, Y J; Lee, H

    2008-01-01

    The performance of electricity production from beer brewery wastewater in a single chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated. Experimental results showed that the MFCs could generate electricity from full-strength wastewater (2,239 mg-COD/L, 50 mM PBS added) with the maximum power density of 483 mW/m2 (12 W/m3) at 30 degrees C and 435 mW/m2 (11 W/m3) at 20 degrees C, respectively. Temperature was found to have bigger impact on cathode potential than anode potential. Results suggested that it is feasible to generate electricity with the treatment of beer brewery wastewater. Copyright IWA Publishing 2008.

  5. Starch saccharification and fermentation of uncooked sweet potato roots for fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Caifa; Shen, Yanhu; Ding, Tielin; Ma, Daifu; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Dongxu

    2013-01-01

    An energy-saving ethanol fermentation technology was developed using uncooked fresh sweet potato as raw material. A mutant strain of Aspergillus niger isolated from mildewed sweet potato was used to produce abundant raw starch saccharification enzymes for treating uncooked sweet potato storage roots. The viscosity of the fermentation paste of uncooked sweet potato roots was lower than that of the cooked roots. The ethanol fermentation was carried out by Zymomonas mobilis, and 14.4 g of ethanol (87.2% of the theoretical yield) was produced from 100g of fresh sweet potato storage roots. Based on this method, an energy-saving, high efficient and environment-friendly technology can be developed for large-scale production of fuel ethanol from sweet potato roots. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthetic biology: tools to design microbes for the production of chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Yang, Jina; Min, Byung Eun; Jang, Sungho; Lim, Jae Hyung; Lim, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Seong Cheol; Kim, Se Yeon; Jeong, Jun Hong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-11-01

    The engineering of biological systems to achieve specific purposes requires design tools that function in a predictable and quantitative manner. Recent advances in the field of synthetic biology, particularly in the programmable control of gene expression at multiple levels of regulation, have increased our ability to efficiently design and optimize biological systems to perform designed tasks. Furthermore, implementation of these designs in biological systems highlights the potential of using these tools to build microbial cell factories for the production of chemicals and fuels. In this paper, we review current developments in the design of tools for controlling gene expression at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels, and consider potential applications of these tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  8. Combustion of diesel fuel from a toxicological perspective. I. Origin of incomplete combustion products.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, P T; Bos, R P

    1992-01-01

    Since the use of diesel engines is still increasing, the contribution of their incomplete combustion products to air pollution is becoming ever more important. The presence of irritating and genotoxic substances in both the gas phase and the particulate phase constituents is considered to have significant health implications. The quantity of soot particles and the particle-associated organics emitted from the tail pipe of a diesel-powered vehicle depend primarily on the engine type and combustion conditions but also on fuel properties. The quantity of soot particles in the emissions is determined by the balance between the rate of formation and subsequent oxidation. Organics are absorbed onto carbon cores in the cylinder, in the exhaust system, in the atmosphere and even on the filter during sample collection. Diesel fuel contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some alkyl derivatives. Both groups of compounds may survive the combustion process. PAHs are formed by the combustion of crankcase oil or may be resuspended from engine and/or exhaust deposits. The conversion of parent PAHs to oxygenated and nitrated PAHs in the combustion chamber or in the exhaust system is related to the vast amount of excess combustion air that is supplied to the engine and the high combustion temperature. Whether the occurrence of these derivatives is characteristic for the composition of diesel engine exhaust remains to be ascertained. After the emission of the particles, their properties may change because of atmospheric processes such as aging and resuspension. The particle-associated organics may also be subject to (photo)chemical conversions or the components may change during sampling and analysis. Measurement of emissions of incomplete combustion products as determined on a chassis dynamometer provides knowledge of the chemical composition of the particle-associated organics. This knowledge is useful as a basis for a toxicological evaluation of the health hazards of

  9. An ISRU Propellant Production System to Fully Fuel a Mars Ascent Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Paz, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) will enable the long term presence of humans beyond low earth orbit. Since 2009, oxygen production from the Mars atmosphere has been baselined as an enabling technology for Mars human exploration by NASA. However, using water from the Martian regolith in addition to the atmospheric CO2 would enable the production of both liquid Methane and liquid Oxygen, thus fully fueling a Mars return vehicle. A case study was performed to show how ISRU can support NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) using methane and oxygen production from Mars resources. A model was built and used to generate mass and power estimates of an end-to-end ISRU system including excavation and extraction water from Mars regolith, processing the Mars atmosphere, and liquefying the propellants. Even using the lowest yield regolith, a full ISRU system would weigh 1.7 mT while eliminating the need to transport 30 mT of ascent propellants from earth.

  10. Tar-free fuel gas production from high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leguan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • High temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge was efficient for producing tar-free fuel gas. • Complete tar removal and volatile matter release were at elevated temperature of 1300 °C. • Sewage sludge was converted to residual solid with high ash content. • 72.60% of energy conversion efficiency for gas production in high temperature pyrolysis. • Investment and costing for tar cleaning were reduced. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was studied in a free-fall reactor at 1000–1400 °C. The results showed that the volatile matter in the sludge could be completely released to gaseous product at 1300 °C. Themore » high temperature was in favor of H{sub 2} and CO in the produced gas. However, the low heating value (LHV) of the gas decreased from 15.68 MJ/N m{sup 3} to 9.10 MJ/N m{sup 3} with temperature increasing from 1000 °C to 1400 °C. The obtained residual solid was characterized by high ash content. The energy balance indicated that the most heating value in the sludge was in the gaseous product.« less

  11. Metabolic engineering in chemolithoautotrophic hosts for the production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nybo, S Eric; Khan, Nymul E; Woolston, Benjamin M; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-07-01

    The ability of autotrophic organisms to fix CO2 presents an opportunity to utilize this 'greenhouse gas' as an inexpensive substrate for biochemical production. Unlike conventional heterotrophic microorganisms that consume carbohydrates and amino acids, prokaryotic chemolithoautotrophs have evolved the capacity to utilize reduced chemical compounds to fix CO2 and drive metabolic processes. The use of chemolithoautotrophic hosts as production platforms has been renewed by the prospect of metabolically engineered commodity chemicals and fuels. Efforts such as the ARPA-E electrofuels program highlight both the potential and obstacles that chemolithoautotrophic biosynthetic platforms provide. This review surveys the numerous advances that have been made in chemolithoautotrophic metabolic engineering with a focus on hydrogen oxidizing bacteria such as the model chemolithoautotrophic organism (Ralstonia), the purple photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodobacter), and anaerobic acetogens. Two alternative strategies of microbial chassis development are considered: (1) introducing or enhancing autotrophic capabilities (carbon fixation, hydrogen utilization) in model heterotrophic organisms, or (2) improving tools for pathway engineering (transformation methods, promoters, vectors etc.) in native autotrophic organisms. Unique characteristics of autotrophic growth as they relate to bioreactor design and process development are also discussed in the context of challenges and opportunities for genetic manipulation of organisms as production platforms. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electricity production and sludge reduction by integrating microbial fuel cells in anoxic-oxic process.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Benyi; Luo, Meng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Zuoxing; Chen, Hong; Liu, Junxin; Guo, Xuesong

    2017-11-01

    To produce energy and reduce sludge production from the treatment of municipal wastewater, four identical microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed in an anoxic-oxic (A/O) process (MFCs-A/O system). Experimental results indicated that this system enhance the removals of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN). The electricity produced by each MFC were ranged from 0.371 to 0.477V (voltage) and from 138 to 227mW/m 3 (power density) at the stable stage, when the external resistance was fixed at 1000Ω. The coulombic efficiency of the MFCs-A/O system ranged from 0.31% to 1.68% (mean=0.72%) at the stable stage, respectively. The removals of COD and TN in the MFCs-A/O system were slightly higher than those in the control system. Compared with the control system, the MFCs-A/O system can reduce waste activated sludge production and sludge yield by 24.0% and 24.2%, respectively. The experimental results indicated that the MFC constructed in A/O system improves wastewater treatment and the MFCs-A/O system can produce electricity while reducing sludge production and increasing wastewater treatment efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dye-Sensitized Hydrobromic Acid Splitting for Hydrogen Solar Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Brady, Matthew D; Sampaio, Renato N; Wang, Degao; Meyer, Thomas J; Meyer, Gerald J

    2017-11-08

    Hydrobromic acid (HBr) has significant potential as an inexpensive feedstock for hydrogen gas (H 2 ) solar fuel production through HBr splitting. Mesoporous thin films of anatase TiO 2 or SnO 2 /TiO 2 core-shell nanoparticles were sensitized to visible light with a new Ru II polypyridyl complex that served as a photocatalyst for bromide oxidation. These thin films were tested as photoelectrodes in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells. In 1 N HBr (aq), the photocatalyst undergoes excited-state electron injection and light-driven Br - oxidation. The injected electrons induce proton reduction at a Pt electrode. Under 100 mW cm -2 white-light illumination, sustained photocurrents of 1.5 mA cm -2 were measured under an applied bias. Faradaic efficiencies of 71 ± 5% for Br - oxidation and 94 ± 2% for H 2 production were measured. A 12 μmol h -1 sustained rate of H 2 production was maintained during illumination. The results demonstrate a molecular approach to HBr splitting with a visible light absorbing complex capable of aqueous Br - oxidation and excited-state electron injection.

  14. Fission products and nuclear fuel behaviour under severe accident conditions part 2: Fuel behaviour in the VERDON-1 sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, E.; Le Gall, C.; Gallais-During, A.; Pontillon, Y.; Lamontagne, J.; Hanus, E.; Ducros, G.

    2017-11-01

    Within the framework of the International Source Term Programme (ISTP), the VERDON programme aims at quantifying the source term of radioactive materials in case of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Tests were performed in a new experimental laboratory (VERDON) built in the LECA-STAR facility (CEA Cadarache). The VERDON-1 test was devoted to the study of a high burn-up UO2 fuel and FP releases at very high temperature (≈2873 K) in a reducing atmosphere. Post-test qualitative and quantitative characterisations of the VERDON-1 sample led to the proposal of a scenario explaining the phenomena occurring during the experimental sequence. Hence, the fuel and the cladding may have interacted which led to the melting of UO2-ZrO2 alloy. Although no relocation was observed during the test, it may have been imminent.

  15. Refining and blending of aviation turbine fuels.

    PubMed

    White, R D

    1999-02-01

    Aviation turbine fuels (jet fuels) are similar to other petroleum products that have a boiling range of approximately 300F to 550F. Kerosene and No.1 grades of fuel oil, diesel fuel, and gas turbine oil share many similar physical and chemical properties with jet fuel. The similarity among these products should allow toxicology data on one material to be extrapolated to the others. Refineries in the USA manufacture jet fuel to meet industry standard specifications. Civilian aircraft primarily use Jet A or Jet A-1 fuel as defined by ASTM D 1655. Military aircraft use JP-5 or JP-8 fuel as defined by MIL-T-5624R or MIL-T-83133D respectively. The freezing point and flash point are the principle differences between the finished fuels. Common refinery processes that produce jet fuel include distillation, caustic treatment, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Each of these refining processes may be the final step to produce jet fuel. Sometimes blending of two or more of these refinery process streams are needed to produce jet fuel that meets the desired specifications. Chemical additives allowed for use in jet fuel are also defined in the product specifications. In many cases, the customer rather than the refinery will put additives into the fuel to meet their specific storage or flight condition requirements.

  16. Low Cost High-H 2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S. James

    2015-07-31

    This report summarizes the technical progress made of the research project entitled “Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels,” under DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0011958. The period of performance was October 1, 2013 through July 30, 2015. The overall objectives of this project was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a systems approach for producing high hydrogen syngas from coal with the potential to reduce significantly the cost of producing power, chemical-grade hydrogen or liquid fuels, with carbon capture to reduce the environmental impact of gasification. The project encompasses several areas of study and the resultsmore » are summarized here. (1) Experimental work to determine the technical feasibility of a novel hybrid polymer/metal H2-membrane to recover pure H2 from a coal-derived syngas was done. This task was not successful. Membranes were synthesized and show impermeability of any gases at required conditions. The cause of this impermeability was most likely due to the densification of the porous polymer membrane support made from polybenzimidazole (PBI) at test temperatures above 250 °C. (2) Bench-scale experimental work was performed to extend GTI's current database on the University of California Sulfur Recovery Process-High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and recently renamed Sulfur Removal and Recovery (SR2) process for syngas cleanup including removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, such as, chlorides and ammonia. The SR2 process tests show >90% H2S conversion with outlet H2S concentrations less than 4 ppmv, and 80-90% ammonia and chloride removal with high mass transfer rates. (3) Techno-economic analyses (TEA) were done for the production of electric power, chemical-grade hydrogen and diesel fuels, from a mixture of coal- plus natural gas-derived syngas using the Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) Advanced Compact coal gasifier and a natural gas partial oxidation reactor (POX) with SR2 technology. Due to the

  17. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a “waste-stream” instead of a valuable “coproduct”. The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others) by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive. PMID:22809320

  18. H.sub.2 /C.sub.12 fuel cells for power and HCl production - chemical cogeneration

    DOEpatents

    Gelb, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    A fuel cell for the electrolytic production of hydrogen chloride and the generation of electric energy from hydrogen and chlorine gas is disclosed. In typical application, the fuel cell operates from the hydrogen and chlorine gas generated by a chlorine electrolysis generator. The hydrogen chloride output is used to maintain acidity in the anode compartment of the electrolysis cells, and the electric energy provided from the fuel cell is used to power a portion of the electrolysis cells in the chlorine generator or for other chlorine generator electric demands. The fuel cell itself is typically formed by a passage for the flow of hydrogen chloride or hydrogen chloride and sodium chloride electrolyte between anode and cathode gas diffusion electrodes, the HCl increa This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. DE-AC02-86ER80366 with the Department of Energy and the United States Government has certain rights thereto.

  19. H[sub 2]/Cl[sub 2] fuel cells for power and HCl production - chemical cogeneration

    DOEpatents

    Gelb, A.H.

    1991-08-20

    A fuel cell for the electrolytic production of hydrogen chloride and the generation of electric energy from hydrogen and chlorine gas is disclosed. In typical application, the fuel cell operates from the hydrogen and chlorine gas generated by a chlorine electrolysis generator. The hydrogen chloride output is used to maintain acidity in the anode compartment of the electrolysis cells, and the electric energy provided from the fuel cell is used to power a portion of the electrolysis cells in the chlorine generator or for other chlorine generator electric demands. The fuel cell itself is typically formed by a passage for the flow of hydrogen chloride or hydrogen chloride and sodium chloride electrolyte between anode and cathode gas diffusion electrodes. 3 figures.

  20. Coupling of a 2.5 kW steam reformer with a 1 kW el PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiak, J.; Heinzel, A.; Roes, J.; Kalk, Th.; Kraus, H.; Brandt, H.

    The University of Duisburg-Essen has developed a compact multi-fuel steam reformer suitable for natural gas, propane and butane. This steam reformer was combined with a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) and a system test of the process chain was performed. The fuel processor comprises a prereformer step, a primary reformer, water gas shift reactors, a steam generator, internal heat exchangers in order to achieve an optimised heat integration and an external burner for heat supply as well as a preferential oxidation step (PROX) as CO purification. The fuel processor is designed to deliver a thermal hydrogen power output from 500 W to 2.5 kW. The PEM fuel cell stack provides about 1 kW electrical power. In the following paper experimental results of measurements of the single components PEM fuel cell and fuel processor as well as results of the coupling of both to form a process chain are presented.

  1. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices including diesel particulate filters (DPF), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle, Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep+idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photo-oxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary and secondary fine particulate matter from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after three hours of oxidation at typical urban VOC : NOx ratios (3:1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the non-methane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas

  2. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  3. A New Data Product: Gridded Uncertainty Maps of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. J.; Boden, T.

    2015-12-01

    Gridded uncertainty maps of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions are a new data product that is currently in the process of being completed and published. This work is based on the relatively new assessment of the uncertainty associated with the mass of FFCO2 emissions (2014, Tellus B, 66, 23616, doi:10.3402/tellusb.v66.23616). The new data product was created to be paired with the long-used, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), emission year 1751-present, one degree latitude by one degree longitude (1x1) mass of emissions data product (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp058/ndp058_v2013.html). Now, data users will have FFCO2 emission information that represents both mass and uncertainty, each of which varies in both time and space. The new data product was constructed by examining the individual uncertainties in each of the input data sets to the gridded mass maps and then combining these individual uncertainties into an overall uncertainty for the mass maps. The input data sets include a table of the mass of FFCO2 emissions by country and year, the one degree geographic map of emissions which includes changing borders on an annual time scale and ties the mass of emissions to location, and the one degree population proxy used to distribute the mass of emissions within each country. As the three input data sets are independent of each other, their combination for the overall uncertainty is accomplished by a simple square root of the sum of the squares procedure. The resulting uncertainty data product is gridded at 1x1 and exactly overlays the 1x1 mass emission maps. The default temporal resolution is annual, but a companion product is also available at monthly time scales. The monthly uncertainty product uses the same input data sets, but the mass uncertainty is scaled as described in the monthly mass product description paper (2011, Tellus B, 63:309-327, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2011.00530.x). The gridded uncertainty maps cover emission year

  4. Ceria based inverse opals for thermochemical fuel production: Quantification and prediction of high temperature behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas, Danielle Courtney

    Solar energy has the potential to supply more than enough energy to meet humanity's energy demands. Here, a method for thermochemical solar energy storage through fuel production is presented. A porous non-stoichiometric oxide, ceria, undergoes partial thermal reduction and oxidation with concentrated solar energy as a heat source, and water as an oxidant. The resulting yields for hydrogen fuel and oxygen are produced in two discrete steps, while the starting material maintains its original phase. Ordered porosity has been shown superior to random porosity for thermochemical fuel production applications, but stability limits for these structures are currently undefined. Ceria-based inverse opals are currently being investigated to assess the architectural influence on thermochemical hydrogen production. Low tortuosity and continuous interconnected pore network allow for facile gas transport and improved reaction kinetics. Ceria-based ordered materials have recently been shown to increase maximum hydrogen production over non-ordered porous ceria. Thermal stability of ordered porosity was quantified using quantitative image analysis. Fourier analysis was applied to SEM images of the material. The algorithm results in an order parameter gamma that describes the degree of long range order maintained by these structures, where gamma>4 signifies ordered porosity. According to this metric, a minimum zirconium content of 20 atomic percent (at%) is necessary for these architectures to survive aggressive annealing up to 1000°C. Zirconium substituted ceria (ZSC) with Zr loadings in excess of 20at% developed undesired tetragonal phases. Through gamma, we were able to find a balance between the benefit of zirconium additions on structural stability and its negative impact on phase. This work demonstrates the stability of seemingly delicate architectures, and the operational limit for ceria based inverse opals to be 1000°C for 1microm pore size. Inverse opals having sub

  5. Energy and precious fuels requirements of fuel alcohol production. Volume 2, appendices A and B: Ethanol from grain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinblatt, H.; Reddy, T. S.; Turhollow, A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Energy currently used in grain production, the effect of ethanol production on agricultural energy consumption, energy credits for ethanol by-products, and land availability and the potential for obtaining ethanol from grain are discussed. Dry milling, wet milling, sensitivity analysis, potential for reduced energy consumption are also discussed.

  6. Bio-aviation fuel production from hydroprocessing castor oil promoted by the nickel-based bifunctional catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyang; Zhu, Qingqing; Guan, Qingxin; He, Liangnian; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bio-aviation fuel was firstly synthesized by hydroprocessing castor oil in a continuous-flow fixed-bed microreactor with the main objective to obtain the high yield of aviation fuel and determine the elemental compositions of the product phases as well as the reaction mechanism. Highest aviation range alkane yields (91.6 wt%) were achieved with high isomer/n-alkane ratio (i/n) 4.4-7.2 over Ni supported on acidic zeolites. In addition, different fuel range alkanes can be obtained by adjusting the degree of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and hydrocracking. And the observations are rationalized by a set of reaction pathways for the various product phases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of dioxins and furans for various solid fuels burnt in 25 kW automatic boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopan, František; Horák, Jiří; Krpec, Kamil; Kubesa, Petr; Dej, Milan; Laciok, Vendula

    2016-06-01

    There has been brown coal, black coal and maize straw in a pellet form burnt in an automatic boiler. Production of dibenzodioxins and dibenzofuranes, recomputated through toxicity equivalents, expressed as the emission factor relative to the fuel unit, has differentiated in a range of ca. three orders (0.05 up to 78.9 ng/kg) in dependence on a sort of the used fuel. The measured values have been compared with emission factors used for the emission inventory in the Czech Republic and Poland and with the emission limit applicable for waste incineration plants. The study has proven the influence of chlorine content in fuel on production of dioxins and furanes.

  8. Fission products and nuclear fuel behaviour under severe accident conditions part 1: Main lessons learnt from the first VERDON test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontillon, Y.; Geiger, E.; Le Gall, C.; Bernard, S.; Gallais-During, A.; Malgouyres, P. P.; Hanus, E.; Ducros, G.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the first VERDON test performed at the end of September 2011 with special emphasis on the behaviour of fission products (FP) and actinides during the accidental sequence itself. Two other papers discuss in detail the post-test examination results (SEM, EPMA and SIMS) of the VERDON-1 sample. The first VERDON test was devoted to studying UO2 fuel behaviour and fission product releases under reducing conditions at very high temperature (∼2883 K), which was able to confirm the very good performance of the VERDON loop. The fuel sample did not lose its integrity during this test. According to the FP behaviour measured by the online gamma station (fuel sight), the general classification of the FP in relation to their released fraction is very accurate, and the burn-up effect on the release rate is clearly highlighted.

  9. Fossil Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  10. Maximising electricity production by controlling the biofilm specific growth rate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Pablo; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the relationship between growth rate and electricity production in perfusion-electrode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), across a wide range of flow rates by co-measurement of electrical output and changes in population numbers by viable counts and optical density. The experiments hereby presented demonstrate, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, that the anodic biofilm specific growth rate can be determined and controlled in common with other loose matrix perfusion systems. Feeding with nutrient-limiting conditions at a critical flow rate (50.8 mL h(-1)) resulted in the first experimental determination of maximum specific growth rate μ(max) (19.8 day(-1)) for Shewanella spp. MFC biofilms, which is considerably higher than those predicted or assumed via mathematical modelling. It is also shown that, under carbon-energy limiting conditions there is a strong direct relationship between growth rate and electrical power output, with μ(max) coinciding with maximum electrical power production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Ecology: Applications in Ruminant Health and Production Research

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Jason B.; Pinchak, William E.; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Nelson, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H2) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H2in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H2 plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H2 partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research. PMID:20024685

  12. Establishment and assessment of a novel cleaner production process of corn grain fuel ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jianhua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Hongjian; Zhang, Guiying; Yang, Xizhao; Liu, Pei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2013-11-01

    An integrated corn ethanol-methane fermentation system was proposed to solve the problem of stillage handling, where thin stillage was treated by anaerobic digestion and then reused to make mash for the following ethanol fermentation. This system was evaluated at laboratory and pilot scale. Anaerobic digestion of thin stillage ran steadily with total chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 98% at laboratory scale and 97% at pilot scale. Ethanol production was not influenced by recycling anaerobic digestion effluent at laboratory and pilot scale. Compared with dried distillers' grains with solubles produced in conventional process, dried distillers' grains in the proposed system exhibited higher quality because of increased protein concentration and decreased salts concentration. Energetic assessment indicated that application of this novel process enhanced the net energy balance ratio from 1.26 (conventional process) to 1.76. In conclusion, the proposed system possessed technical advantage over the conventional process for corn fuel ethanol production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Production of bio-fuel ethanol from distilled grain waste eluted from Chinese spirit making process.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Sun, Zhaoyong; Zhang, Wenxue; Tang, Yueqin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    Distilled grain waste eluted from Chinese spirit making is rich in carbohydrates, and could potentially serve as feedstock for the production of bio-fuel ethanol. Our study evaluated two types of saccharification methods that convert distilled grain waste to monosaccharides: enzymatic saccharification and concentrated H2SO4 saccharification. Results showed that enzymatic saccharification performed unsatisfactorily because of inefficient removal of lignin during pretreatment. Concentrated H2SO4 saccharification led to a total sugar recovery efficiency of 79.0 %, and to considerably higher sugar concentrations than enzymatic saccharification. The process of ethanol production from distilled grain waste based on concentrated H2SO4 saccharification was then studied. The process mainly consisted of concentrated H2SO4 saccharification, solid-liquid separation, decoloration, sugar-acid separation, oligosaccharide hydrolysis, and continuous ethanol fermentation. An improved simulated moving bed system was employed to separate sugars from acid after concentrated H2SO4 saccharification, by which 95.8 % of glucose and 85.8 % of xylose went into the sugar-rich fraction, while 83.3 % of H2SO4 went into the acid-rich fraction. A flocculating yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae KF-7, was used for continuous ethanol fermentation, which produced an ethanol yield of 91.9-98.9 %, based on glucose concentration.

  14. The role of nisin in fuel ethanol production with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Zhang, L; Gu, Z-H; Ding, Z-Y; Shi, G-Y

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of nisin on lactobacilli contamination of yeast during ethanol fermentation and to determine the appropriate concentration required to control the growth of selected lactobacilli in a YP/glucose media fermentation model. The lowest concentration of nisin tested (5 IU ml(-1) ) effectively controlled the contamination of YP/glucose media with 10(6) CFU ml(-1) lactobacilli. Lactic acid yield decreased from 5.0 to 2. 0 g l(-1) and potential ethanol yield losses owing to the growth and metabolism of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis were reduced by 11 and 7.8%, respectively. Approximately, equal concentrations of lactic acid were produced by Lact. plantarum and Lact. brevis in the presence of 5 and 2 IU ml(-1) nisin, respectively, thus demonstrating the relatively higher nisin sensitivity of Lact. brevis for the strains in this study. No differences were observed in the final ethanol concentrations produced by yeast in the absence of bacteria at any of the nisin concentrations tested. Metabolism of contaminating bacteria was reduced in the presence of 5 IU ml(-1) nisin, resulting in reduced lactic acid production and increased ethanol production by the yeast. Bacteriocins represent an alternative to the use of antibiotics for the control of bacterial contamination in fuel ethanol plants and may be important in preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant contaminating strains. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  16. Simultaneous domestic wastewater treatment and renewable energy production using microbial fuel cells (MFCs).

    PubMed

    Puig, S; Serra, M; Coma, M; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCS) can be used in wastewater treatment and to simultaneously produce electricity (renewable energy). MFC technology has already been applied successfully in lab-scale studies to treat domestic wastewater, focussing on organic matter removal and energy production. However, domestic wastewater also contains nitrogen that needs to be treated before being discharged. The goal of this paper is to assess simultaneous domestic wastewater treatment and energy production using an air-cathode MFC, paying special attention to nitrogen compound transformations. An air-cathode MFC was designed and run treating 1.39 L d(-1) of wastewater with an organic load rate of 7.2 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) (80% removal efficiency) and producing 1.42 W m(-3). In terms of nitrogen transformations, the study demonstrates that two different processes took place in the MFC: physical-chemical and biological. Nitrogen loss was observed increasing in line with the power produced. A low level of oxygen was present in the anodic compartment, and ammonium was oxidised to nitrite and nitrate.

  17. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Besmann; M. K. Ferber; H.-T. Lin

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 um diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner andmore » outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.« less

  18. Enhanced production of nargenicin A1 and creation of a novel derivative using a synthetic biology platform.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Dipesh; Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Yi, Jeong Sang; Pokhrel, Anaya Raj; Shrestha, Biplav; Parajuli, Prakash; Shrestha, Anil; Yamaguchi, Tokutaro; Jung, Hye Jin; Kim, Seung-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2016-12-01

    Nargenicin A1, an antibacterial produced by Nocardia sp. CS682 (KCTC 11297BP), demonstrates effective activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. Hence, we attempted to enhance nargenicin A1 production by utilizing the cumulative effect of synthetic biology, metabolic engineering and statistical media optimization strategies. To facilitate the modular assembly of multiple genes for genetic engineering in Nocardia sp. CS682, we constructed a set of multi-monocistronic vectors, pNV18L1 and pNV18L2 containing hybrid promoter (derived from ermE* and promoter region of neo r ), ribosome binding sites (RBS), and restriction sites for cloning, so that each cloned gene was under its own promoter and RBS. The multi-monocistronic vector, pNV18L2 containing transcriptional terminator showed better efficiency in reporter gene assay. Thus, multiple genes involved in the biogenesis of pyrrole moiety (ngnN2, ngnN3, ngnN4, and ngnN5 from Nocardia sp. CS682), glucose utilization (glf and glk from Zymomonas mobilis), and malonyl-CoA synthesis (accA2 and accBE from Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2)), were cloned in pNV18L2. Further statistical optimization of specific precursors (proline and glucose) and their feeding time led to ~84.9 mg/L nargenicin from Nocardia sp. GAP, which is ~24-fold higher than Nocardia sp. CS682 (without feeding). Furthermore, pikC from Streptomyces venezuelae was expressed to generate Nocardia sp. PikC. Nargenicin A1 acid was characterized as novel derivative of nargenicin A1 produced from Nocardia sp. PikC by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. We also performed comparative analysis of the anticancer and antibacterial activities of nargenicin A1 and nargenicin A1 acid, which showed a reduction in antibacterial potential for nargenicin A1 acid. Thus, the development of an efficient synthetic biological platform provided new avenues for enhancing or structurally diversifying nargenicin A1 by means of pathway designing

  19. Methyl oleate deoxygenation for production of diesel fuel aliphatic hydrocarbons over Pd/SBA-15 catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Catalytic deoxygenation is a prominent process for production of renewable fuels from vegetable oil. In this work, deoxygenation of technical grade methyl oleate to diesel fuel aliphatic hydrocarbons (C15 – C18) is evaluated with several parameters including temperature, hydrogen pressure and reaction time in a stirred batch reactor over Pd/SBA-15 catalysts. Results Two different SBA-15 morphologies i.e. spherelike and necklacelike structures have been synthesize as supports for Pd active metal. It is found that Pd dispersion on necklacelike SBA-15 is higher than that of spherelike SBA-15. Notably, higher Pd dispersion on necklacelike SBA-15 provides significant deoxygenation efficiency as compared to Pd/SBA-15-spherelike. Results show that H2 pressures greatly determine the total ester conversion and selectivity to C15 – C18 aliphatic hydrocarbons. Total ester conversions with 55< selectivity to n-heptadecane are achieved using Pd/SBA-15-necklacelike at 270°C and 60 bar H2 pressure within 6 h reaction time. Gas phase study reveals that formation of C17 is generated via indirect decarbonylation when the reaction time is prolonged. Conclusions Pd/SBA-15-necklacelike catalyst exhibits good catalytic performance with high selectivity to diesellike aliphatic hydrocarbons (C15 – C18). The physicochemical properties of the Pd supported on different SBA-15 morphologies influence the deoxygenation activity of the catalysts. Furthermore, the reaction pathways are governed by the H2 pressure as well as reaction duration. PMID:24011181

  20. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Samples of irradiated MOX fuel of 44.5 GWd/tHM mean burn-up were prepared by core drilling at three different radial positions of a fuel pellet. They were subsequently heated in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer up to complete vaporisation of the sample (˜2600 K) and the release of fission gas (krypton and xenon) as well as helium was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used in parallel to investigate the evolution of the microstructure of a sample heated under the same condition up to given key temperatures as determined from the gas release profiles. A clear initial difference for fission gas release and microstructure was observed as a function of the radial position of the samples and therefore of irradiation temperature. A good correlation between the microstructure evolution and the gas release peaks could be established as a function of the temperature of irradiation and (laboratory) heating. The region closest to the cladding (0.58 < r/r0 < 0.96), designated as sample type A in Fig. 1. It represents the "cooler" part of the fuel pellet. The irradiation temperatures (Tirrad) in this range are from 854 to 1312 K (ΔT: 458 K). The intermediate radial zone of the pellet (0.42 < r/r0 < 0.81), designated sample type B in Fig. 1, has a Tirrad ranging from 1068 to 1434 K (ΔT: 365 K). The central zone of the pellet (0.003 < r/r0 < 0.41), designated sample type C in Fig. 1, which was close to the hottest part of the pellet, has a Tirrad ranging from 1442 to 1572 K (ΔT: 131 K). The sample irradiation temperatures were determined from the calculated temperature profile (exponential function) knowing the core temperature of the fuel (1573 K) [11], the standard temperature for this type of fuel at the inner side of the cladding (800 K). The average burnup was calculated with TRANSURANUS code [12] and the PA burnup is the average burnup multiplied by the ratio of the fissile Pu concentration in PA over average fissile Pu concentration in fuel [11]. Calculated

  1. Development of advanced test methods for the improvement of production standards for ceramic powders used in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Brian

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are energy conversion devices that use ceramic powders as a precursor material for their electrodes. Presently, powder manufacturers are encountering complications producing consistent precursor powders. Through various thermal, chemical and physical tests, such as DSC and XRD, a preliminary production standard will be developed.

  2. Economic analysis of fuel ethanol production from hulled barley by the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cost model was developed for fuel ethanol production from barley based on the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process (Nghiem, et al., 2008). In this process, in addition to beta-glucanases, which is added to reduce the viscosity of the barley mash for efficient mixing, another enzyme, beta-...

  3. 7 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980...

  4. 7 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980...

  5. Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA): Quarter 4 2013 Composite Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.

    2014-06-01

    This report includes the composite data products (CDPs) for early fuel cell market deployments in quarter 4 of 2013. Results are presented for ARRA (projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [ARRA]) and Combined (projects funded by DOE Interagency Agreements [IAA], Department of Defense Defense Logistics Agency [DLA], and ARRA).

  6. Mineral production and mining trends for selected non-fuel commodities in Idaho and Montana, 1905-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jeremy C.; Long, Keith R.; Assmus, Kenneth C.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Idaho and Montana state mining statistics were obtained from historical mineral production records and compiled into a continuous record from 1905 through 2001. To facilitate comparisons, the mineral production data were normalized by converting the units of measure to metric tons for all included commodities. These standardized statistical data include production rates for principal non-fuel mineral commodities from both Idaho and Montana, as well as the production rates of similar commodities for the U.S. and the world for contrast. Data are presented here in both tabular and bar chart format. Moreover, the tables of standardized mineral production data are also provided in digital format as, commodity_production.xls. Some significant historical events pertaining to the mining industry are described as well. When taken into account with the historical production data, this combined information may to help explain both specific fluctuations and general tendencies in the overall trends in the rates of mineral resource production over time.

  7. Natural Gas and Cellulosic Biomass: A Clean Fuel Combination? Determining the Natural Gas Blending Wall in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    M Wright, Mark; Seifkar, Navid; Green, William H; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-07-07

    Natural gas has the potential to increase the biofuel production output by combining gas- and biomass-to-liquids (GBTL) processes followed by naphtha and diesel fuel synthesis via Fischer-Tropsch (FT). This study reflects on the use of commercial-ready configurations of GBTL technologies and the environmental impact of enhancing biofuels with natural gas. The autothermal and steam-methane reforming processes for natural gas conversion and the gasification of biomass for FT fuel synthesis are modeled to estimate system well-to-wheel emissions and compare them to limits established by U.S. renewable fuel mandates. We show that natural gas can enhance FT biofuel production by reducing the need for water-gas shift (WGS) of biomass-derived syngas to achieve appropriate H2/CO ratios. Specifically, fuel yields are increased from less than 60 gallons per ton to over 100 gallons per ton with increasing natural gas input. However, GBTL facilities would need to limit natural gas use to less than 19.1% on a LHV energy basis (7.83 wt %) to avoid exceeding the emissions limits established by the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2) for clean, advanced biofuels. This effectively constitutes a blending limit that constrains the use of natural gas for enhancing the biomass-to-liquids (BTL) process.

  8. Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, May Yongmei

    This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity

  9. In situ gas fuel production during the treatment of textile wastewater at supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kıpçak, Ekin; Akgün, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification has recently received much attention as a potential alternative to energy conversion methods applied to aqueous/non-aqueous biomass sources, industrial wastes or fossil fuels such as coal because of the unique physical properties of water above its critical conditions (i.e. 374.8 °C and 22.1 MPa). This paper presents the results obtained for the hydrothermal gasification of textile wastewater at supercritical conditions. The experiments were carried out at five reaction temperatures (between 450 and 650 °C) and five reaction times (between 30 and 150 s), under a constant pressure of 25 MPa. It was found that the gaseous products contained considerable amounts of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane, propane and propylene. The maximum amount of the obtained gaseous product was 1.23 mL per mL textile wastewater, at a reaction temperature of 600 °C, with a reaction time of 150 s. At this state, the product comprised 13.02% hydrogen, 38.93% methane, 4.33% ethane, 0.10% propane, 0.01% propylene, 7.97% carbon monoxide, 27.22% carbon dioxide and 8.00% nitrogen. In addition, a 62.88% decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) content was observed and the color of the wastewater was removed. Moreover, for the hydrothermal decomposition of the textile wastewater, a first-order reaction rate was designated with an activation energy of 50.42 (±2.33) kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 13.29 (±0.41) s(-1).

  10. Jointly optimizing selection of fuel treatments and siting of forest biomass-based energy production facilities for landscape-scale fire hazard reduction.

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Daugherty; Jeremy S. Fried

    2007-01-01

    Landscape-scale fuel treatments for forest fire hazard reduction potentially produce large quantities of material suitable for biomass energy production. The analytic framework FIA BioSum addresses this situation by developing detailed data on forest conditions and production under alternative fuel treatment prescriptions, and computes haul costs to alternative sites...

  11. Benefits of production extension and shifting with thermal storage for a 1MW CSP-ORC plant in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennouna, El Ghali; Mimet, Abdelaziz; Frej, Hicham

    2016-05-01

    The importance of thermal storage for commercial CSP (concentrated Solar Power) plants has now become obvious, this regardless of the solar technology used and the power cycle. The availability of a storage system to a plant operator brings a lot of possibilities for production management, cash flow optimization and grid stabilizing. In particular, and depending on plant location and local grid strategy, thermal storage can contribute, when wisely used, to control production and adapt it to the demand and / or power unbalances and varying prices. Storage systems design, sizing and configuration are proper to each power plant, hence systems that are now widely installed within large commercial solar plants are not necessarily suited for small scale decentralized production, and will not have the same effects. In this paper the benefits of thermal storage are studied for a 1MWe CSP plant with an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle), this plant has many specific features which call for a detail analysis about the appropriate storage design and optimum operating strategies for decentralized solutions.

  12. A feasibility study of hydrothermal treatment of rice straw for multi-production of solid fuel and liquid fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samnang, S.; Prawisudha, P.; Pasek, A. D.

    2017-05-01

    Energy use has increased steadily over the last century due to population and industry increase. With the growing of GHG, biomass becomes an essential contributor to the world energy need. Indonesia is the third rice producer in the world. Rice straw has been converted to solid fuel by Hydrothermal Treatment (HT) for electricity generation. HT is a boiling solid organic or inorganic substance in water at high pressure and temperature within a holding time. HT converts high moisture content biomass into dried, uniform, pulverized, and higher energy density solid fuels. HT can effectively transport nutrient components in biomass into a liquid product known as fertilizer. This paper deals with an evaluation of hydrothermal treatment of rice straw for solid fuel and liquid fertilizer. An investigation of rice straw characteristics were completed for Bandung rice straw with various condition of temperature, biomass-water ratio, and holding time in the purpose to find the changes of calorific value for solid product and (N, P, K, and pH) for liquid product. The results showed that solid product at 225 °C and 90 min consists in a heating value 13.8 MJ/kg equal to lignite B. Liquid product at 225 °C and 90 min had the NPK content similar to that of micronutrients compound liquid fertilizer. The dried solid product should be useful for Coal Fire Power Plant, and the liquid product is suitable for plants. This research proves that hydrothermal process can be applied to rice straw to produce solid fuel and liquid fertilizer with adequate quality.

  13. Enhancement of electricity production by graphene oxide in soil microbial fuel cells and plant microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg(-1) was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg(-1) of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m(-2), which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m(-2) generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m(-2) of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs.

  14. Enhancement of Electricity Production by Graphene Oxide in Soil Microbial Fuel Cells and Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg−1 was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg−1 of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m−2, which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m−2 generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m−2 of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs. PMID:25883931

  15. Hydrogen and electricity production from a food processing wastewater using fermentation and microbial fuel cell technologies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Eun; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from fermentation of sugars in wastewaters, but much of the organic matter remains in solution. We demonstrate here that hydrogen production from a food processing wastewater high in sugar can be linked to electricity generation using a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to achieve more effective wastewater treatment. Grab samples were taken from: plant effluent at two different times during the day (Effluents 1 and 2; 735+/-15 and 3250+/-90 mg-COD/L), an equalization tank (Lagoon; 1670+/-50mg-COD/L), and waste stream containing a high concentration of organic matter (Cereal; 8920+/-150 mg-COD/L). Hydrogen production from the Lagoon and effluent samples was low, with 64+/-16 mL of hydrogen per liter of wastewater (mL/L) for Effluent 1, 21+/-18 mL/L for Effluent 2, and 16+/-2 mL/L for the Lagoon sample. There was substantially greater hydrogen production using the Cereal wastewater (210+/-56 mL/L). Assuming a theoretical maximum yield of 4 mol of hydrogen per mol of glucose, hydrogen yields were 0.61-0.79 mol/mol for the Cereal wastewater, and ranged from 1 to 2.52 mol/mol for the other samples. This suggests a strategy for hydrogen recovery from wastewater based on targeting high-COD and high-sugar wastewaters, recognizing that sugar content alone is an insufficient predictor of hydrogen yields. Preliminary tests with the Cereal wastewater (diluted to 595 mg-COD/L) in a two-chambered MFC demonstrated a maximum of 81+/-7 mW/m(2) (normalized to the anode surface area), or 25+/-2 mA per liter of wastewater, and a final COD of <30 mg/L (95% removal). Using a one-chambered MFC and pre-fermented wastewater, the maximum power density was 371+/-10 mW/m(2) (53.5+/-1.4 mA per liter of wastewater). These results suggest that it is feasible to link biological hydrogen production and electricity producing using MFCs in order to achieve both wastewater treatment and bioenergy production.

  16. Understanding and Controlling Lignocellulosic Pyrolysis for the Production of Renewable Fuel and Chemical Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecha, Michael Brennan

    Pyrolysis is a technology for producing fuels, chemicals, and engineered carbons from renewable feedstocks like lignocellulosic biomass. This work aims to address some of the scientific and technical hurdles that need to be overcome to control the products of pyrolysis. The first section aims to address knowledge gaps regarding primary pyrolysis reactions; in this study, pine wood was acid washed and small amounts of acid were impregnated into the biomass prior to pyrolysis. Results showed that the acid mitigated fragmentation reactions caused by residual metals and had further effect on production of sugars and oligomeric lignin products. The next section aims to address knowledge gaps regarding what reactions occur in the liquid intermediate phase in biomass pyrolysis; in these studies, a novel reactor system was built which could perform thin film fast pyrolysis studies at different pressures from 4 mbar to 1 atm with cellulose, milled wood lignin, and hybrid poplar wood. The reactor was carefully characterized to achieve comparable data between the different pressures. The use of vacuum allowed for control of the residence time of cellobiosan (one of cellulose oligomeric products) in the liquid intermediate. In the vacuum cellulose pyrolysis studies, a high resolution FT-ICR-MS was used for the first time to explore reaction chemistry for this system. The Van-Krevelen diagram of the resulting oligomeric products proved to be a powerful tool to study secondary reactions in the liquid intermediate. Our results show that the secondary reactions in the liquid intermediate are dominated by dehydration, fragmentation, and cross-linking reactions. The final section aims to address single particle external heat transfer problems; in this study, 500 microm long particles of pine and aspen poplar with realistic pore and surface morphologies were modeled in COMSOL to determine how microstructure effects the external heat transfer coefficients in the laminar flow regime

  17. Transport phenomena in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells for sustainable energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in ethanol directly into electricity, are one of the most promising energy-conversion devices for portable, mobile and stationary power applications, primarily because this type of fuel cell runs on a carbon-neutral, sustainable fuel and the electrocatalytic and membrane materials that constitute the cell are relatively inexpensive. As a result, the alkaline DEFC technology has undergone a rapid progress over the last decade. This article provides a comprehensive review of transport phenomena of various species in this fuel cell system. The past investigations into how the design and structural parameters of membrane electrode assemblies and the operating parameters affect the fuel cell performance are discussed. In addition, future perspectives and challenges with regard to transport phenomena in this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  18. Advanced glycation end products, measured in skin, vs. HbA1c in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Banser, Alena; Naafs, Jolanda C; Hoorweg-Nijman, Jantine Jg; van de Garde, Ewoudt Mw; van der Vorst, Marja Mj

    2016-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are considered major contributors to microvascular and macrovascular complications in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. AGEs can be measured non-invasively with skin autofluorescence (sAF). The primary aim was to determine sAF values in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and to study correlations between sAF values and HbA1c and mean HbA1c over the year prior to measurement In children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, sAF values were measured using the AGE Reader®. Laboratory and anthropometric values were extracted from medical charts. Correlations were studied using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Multivariable linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of multiple study parameters on sAF values. The mean sAF value was 1.33 ± 0.36 arbitrary units (AU) in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 144). sAF values correlated positively with HbA1c measured at the same time (r = 0.485; p < 0.001), mean HbA1c over the year prior to measurement (r = 0.578; p < 0.001), age (r = 0.337; p < 0.001), duration of type 1 diabetes mellitus (r = 0.277; p = 0.001), serum triglycerides (r = 0.399; p < 0.001), and total cholesterol (r = 0.352; p = 0.001). sAF values were significantly higher in patients with non-white skin (1.56 vs. 1.27 AU, respectively, p = 0.001). In children with type 1 diabetes, sAF values correlate strongly with single HbA1c and mean HbA1c, making the non-invasive sAF measurement an interesting alternative to provide information about cumulative hyperglycemic states. To determine the value of sAF measurement in predicting long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications, further prospective follow-up studies are needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.; Trapp, Turner J.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  20. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    1983-06-10

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  1. Coupled production in biorefineries--combined use of biomass as a source of energy, fuels and materials.

    PubMed

    Lyko, Hildegard; Deerberg, Görge; Weidner, Eckhard

    2009-06-01

    In spite of high prices for fossil raw materials the production of biomass-based products is rarely economically successful today. Depending on the location feedstock prices are currently so high that products from renewable resources are not marketable when produced in existing process chains. Apart from the higher feedstock costs one reason is that at present no optimized production systems exist in contrast to the chemical and petrochemical industry where these systems have been established over the last decades. If we succeed in developing production systems modelled on those of petroleum refineries where we can provide a flexible coupled production of energy, fuels, materials and chemicals chances are good to enable a lastingly successful production on the basis of renewable resources. Based on examples of fat-based and sugar-based concepts ideas for platform oriented biorefineries are outlined.

  2. Electricity production and microbial biofilm characterization in cellulose-fed microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z; Steinberg, L M; Regan, J M

    2008-01-01

    Converting biodegradable materials into electricity, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present a promising technology for renewable energy production in specific applications. Unlike typical soluble substrates that have been used as electron donors in MFC studies, cellulose is unique because it requires a microbial consortium that can metabolize both an insoluble electron donor (cellulose) and electron acceptor (electrode). In this study, electricity generation and the microbial ecology of cellulose-fed MFCs were analyzed using a defined co-culture of Clostridium cellulolyticum and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that when particulate MN301 cellulose was used as sole substrate, most Clostridium cells were found adhered to cellulose particles in suspension, while most Geobacter cells were attached to the electrode. By comparison, both bacteria resided in suspension and biofilm samples when soluble carboxymethyl cellulose was used. This distinct function-related distribution of the bacteria suggests an opportunity to optimize reactor operation by settling cellulose and decanting supernatant to extend cellulose hydrolysis and improve cellulose-electricity conversion. (c) IWA Publishing 2008.

  3. Production of ZrC Matrix for Use in Gas Fast Reactor Composite Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Knight, Travis W.; Roberts, Elwyn

    2007-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is being considered as a candidate for inert matrix material in composite nuclear fuel for Gas fast reactors due to its favorable characteristics. ZrC can be produced by the direct reaction of pure zirconium and graphite powders. Such a reaction is exothermic in nature. The reaction is self sustaining once initial ignition has been achieved. The heat released during the reaction is high enough to complete the reaction and achieve partial sintering without any external pressure applied. External heat source is required to achieve ignition of the reactants and maintain the temperature close to the adiabatic temperature tomore » achieve higher levels of sintering. External pressure is also a driving force for sintering. In the experiments described, cylindrical compacts of ZrC were produced by direct combustion reaction. External induction heating combined with varying amounts of external applied pressure was employed to achieve varying degrees of density/porosity. The effect of reactant particle size on the product characteristics was also studied. The samples were characterized for density/porosity, composition and microstructure. (authors)« less

  4. Microbial Fuel Cell-driven caustic potash production from wastewater for carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    This work reports on the novel formation of caustic potash (KOH) directly on the MFC cathode locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt (kalicinite) while producing, instead of consuming electrical power. Using potassium-rich wastewater as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber, has resulted in the formation of caustic catholyte directly on the surface of the cathode electrode. Analysis of this liquid has shown to be highly alkaline (pH>13) and act as a CO2 sorbent. It has been later mineralised to kalicinite thus locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt. This work demonstrates an electricity generation method as a simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly route towards CO2 sequestration that perhaps leads to a carbon negative economy. Moreover, it shows a potential application for both electricity production and nutrient recovery in the form of minerals from nutrient-rich wastewater streams such as urine for use as fertiliser in the future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Electricity Production and Characterization of High-Strength Industrial Wastewaters in Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Afsin Y; Ozdemir, Oguz Kaan; Demir, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Bestami

    2017-06-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert electrochemical energy into electrical energy immediately and have a big potential usage for the same time wastewater treatment and energy recovery via electro-active microorganisms. However, MFCs must be efficiently optimized due to its limitations such as high cost and low power production. Finding new materials to increase the cell performance and reduce cost for MFC anodes is mandatory. In the first step of this study, different inoculation sludges such as anaerobic gum industry wastewater, anaerobic brewery wastewater and anaerobic phosphate were tested, and MFC that was set up with anaerobic gum industry wastewater inoculation sludge exhibited the highest performance. In the second step of this study, various wastewaters such as chocolate industry, gum industry and slaughterhouse industry were investigated for anode bacteria sources. Several electrochemical techniques have been employed to elucidate how wastewaters affect the MFCs' performance. Among all the mentioned wastewaters, the best performance was achieved by the MFCs fed with slaughterhouse wastewater; this device produced a maximum power density of 267 mW·m -2 .

  6. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Khunjar, Wendell O; Sahin, Asli; West, Alan C; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  7. Electricity and disinfectant production from wastewater: Microbial Fuel Cell as a self-powered electrolyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A.

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a simple and sustainable Microbial Fuel Cell as a standalone, self-powered reactor for in situ wastewater electrolysis, recovering nitrogen from wastewater. A process is proposed whereby the MFC electrical performance drives the electrolysis of wastewater towards the self-generation of catholyte within the same reactor. The MFCs were designed to harvest the generated catholyte in the internal chamber, which showed that liquid production rates are largely proportional to electrical current generation. The catholyte demonstrated bactericidal properties, compared to the control (open-circuit) diffusate, and reduced observable biofilm formation on the cathode electrode. Killing effects were confirmed using bacterial kill curves constructed by exposing a bioluminescent Escherichia coli target, as a surrogate coliform, to catholyte where a rapid kill rate was observed. Therefore, MFCs could serve as a water recovery system, a disinfectant/cleaner generator that limits undesired biofilm formation and as a washing agent in waterless urinals to improve sanitation. This simple and ready to implement MFC system can convert organic waste directly into electricity and self-driven nitrogen along with water recovery. This could lead to the development of energy positive bioprocesses for sustainable wastewater treatment.

  8. Electricity and disinfectant production from wastewater: Microbial Fuel Cell as a self-powered electrolyser

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a simple and sustainable Microbial Fuel Cell as a standalone, self-powered reactor for in situ wastewater electrolysis, recovering nitrogen from wastewater. A process is proposed whereby the MFC electrical performance drives the electrolysis of wastewater towards the self-generation of catholyte within the same reactor. The MFCs were designed to harvest the generated catholyte in the internal chamber, which showed that liquid production rates are largely proportional to electrical current generation. The catholyte demonstrated bactericidal properties, compared to the control (open-circuit) diffusate, and reduced observable biofilm formation on the cathode electrode. Killing effects were confirmed using bacterial kill curves constructed by exposing a bioluminescent Escherichia coli target, as a surrogate coliform, to catholyte where a rapid kill rate was observed. Therefore, MFCs could serve as a water recovery system, a disinfectant/cleaner generator that limits undesired biofilm formation and as a washing agent in waterless urinals to improve sanitation. This simple and ready to implement MFC system can convert organic waste directly into electricity and self-driven nitrogen along with water recovery. This could lead to the development of energy positive bioprocesses for sustainable wastewater treatment. PMID:27172836

  9. Performance of air-cathode stacked microbial fuel cells systems for wastewater treatment and electricity production.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Arriaga, Edson Baltazar; Guillen-Alonso, Yvonne; Morales-Morales, Cornelio; García-Sánchez, Liliana; Bahena-Bahena, Erick Obed; Guadarrama-Pérez, Oscar; Loyola-Morales, Félix

    2017-07-01

    Two different air-cathode stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) configurations were evaluated under continuous flow during the treatment of municipal wastewater and electricity production at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3, 1, and 0.5 d. Stacked MFC 1 was formed by 20 individual air-cathode MFC units. The second stacked MFC (stacked MFC 2) consisted of 40 air-cathode MFC units placed in a shared reactor. The maximum voltages produced at closed circuit (1,000 Ω) were 170 mV for stacked MFC 1 and 94 mV for stacked MFC 2. Different power densities in each MFC unit were obtained due to a potential drop phenomenon and to a change in chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations inside reactors. The maximum power densities from individual MFC units were up to 1,107 mW/m 2 for stacked MFC 1 and up to 472 mW/m 2 for stacked MFC 2. The maximum power densities in stacked MFC 1 and MFC 2 connected in series were 79 mW/m 2 and 4 mW/m 2 , respectively. Electricity generation and COD removal efficiencies were reduced when the HRT was decreased. High removal efficiencies of 84% of COD, 47% of total nitrogen, and 30% of total phosphorus were obtained during municipal wastewater treatment.

  10. Biomass Production from Electricity Using Ammonia as an Electron Carrier in a Reverse Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    West, Alan C.; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO2 into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production. PMID:23028643

  11. Life cycle assessment of potential biojet fuel production in the United States.

    PubMed

    Agusdinata, Datu B; Zhao, Fu; Ileleji, Klein; DeLaurentis, Dan

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to reveal to what degree biobased jet fuels (biojet) can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the U.S. aviation sector. A model of the supply and demand chain of biojet involving farmers, biorefineries, airlines, and policymakers is developed by considering factors that drive the decisions of actors (i.e., decision-makers and stakeholders) in the life cycle stages. Two kinds of feedstock are considered: oil-producing feedstock (i.e., camelina and algae) and lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., corn stover, switchgrass, and short rotation woody crops). By factoring in farmer/feedstock producer and biorefinery profitability requirements and risk attitudes, land availability and suitability, as well as a time delay and technological learning factor, a more realistic estimate of the level of biojet supply and emissions reduction can be developed under different oil price assumptions. Factors that drive biojet GHG emissions and unit production costs from each feedstock are identified and quantified. Overall, this study finds that at likely adoption rates biojet alone would not be sufficient to achieve the aviation emissions reduction target. In 2050, under high oil price scenario assumption, GHG emissions can be reduced to a level ranging from 55 to 92%, with a median value of 74%, compared to the 2005 baseline level.

  12. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  13. Fission Product Release and Survivability of UN-Kernel LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Ferber, Mattison K; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2014-01-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from range calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 m diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated with a TRISO particle as a function of fluence. Creep and swelling of the innermore » and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by measuring the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers as a function of fluence. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.« less

  14. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  15. Mutual facilitations of food waste treatment, microbial fuel cell bioelectricity generation and Chlorella vulgaris lipid production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qingjie; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Jiang, Liqun; Yu, Ze

    2016-03-01

    Food waste contains large amount of organic matter that may be troublesome for handing, storage and transportation. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was successfully constructed with different inoculum densities of Chlorella vulgaris for promoting food waste treatment. Maximum COD removal efficiency was registered with 44% and 25 g CODL(-1)d(-1) of substrate degradation rate when inoculated with the optimal initial density (150 mg L(-1)) of C. vulgaris, which were 2.9 times and 3.1 times higher than that of the abiotic cathode. With the optimum inoculum density of C. vulgaris, the highest open circuit voltage, working voltage and power density of MFC were 260 mV, 170 mV and 19151 mW m(-3), respectively. Besides the high biodiesel quality, promoted by MFC stimulation the biomass productivity and highest total lipid content of C. vulgaris were 207 mg L(-1)d(-1) and 31%, which were roughly 2.7 times and 1.2 times higher than the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  17. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  18. A quasi-Delphi study on technological barriers to the uptake of hydrogen as a fuel for transport applications-Production, storage and fuel cell drivetrain considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, David; Anghel, Alexandra T.; Huijsmans, Joep; Vuille, François

    The introduction of hydrogen in transport, particularly using fuel cell vehicles, faces a number of technical and non-technical hurdles. However, their relative importance is unclear, as are the levels of concern accorded them within the expert community conducting research and development within this area. To understand what issues are considered by experts working in the field to have significant potential to slow down or prevent the introduction of hydrogen technology in transport, a study was undertaken, primarily during 2007. Three key technology areas within hydrogen transport were selected - hydrogen storage, fuel cell drivetrains, and small-scale hydrogen production - and interviews with selected experts conducted. Forty-nine experts from 34 organisations within the fuel cell, automotive, industrial gas and other related industries participated, in addition to some key academic and government figures. The survey was conducted in China, Japan, North America and Europe, and analysed using conventional mathematical techniques to provide weighted and averaged rankings of issues viewed as important by the experts. It became clear both from the interviews and the subsequent analysis that while a primary concern in China was fundamental technical performance, in the other regions cost and policy were rated more highly. Although a few individual experts identified possible technical showstoppers, the overall message was that pre-commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles could realistically be on the road in tens of thousands within 5 years, and that full commercialisation could take place within 10-15 years, without the need for radical technical breakthroughs. Perhaps surprisingly, the performance of hydrogen storage technologies was not viewed as a showstopper, though cost was seen as a significant challenge. Overall, however, coherent policy development was more frequently identified as a major issue to address.

  19. Denitrifying bacterial communities affect current production and nitrous oxide accumulation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Puig, Sebastià; García-Lledó, Arantzazu; Trias, Rosalia; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bañeras, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite) and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A · m(-3) NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment), when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A · m(-3) NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK)/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation.

  20. Biological treatment of wastewater discharged from biodiesel fuel production plant with alkali-catalyzed transesterification.

    PubMed

    Suehara, Ken-ichiro; Kawamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Eiko; Kohda, Jiro; Nakano, Yasuhisa; Yano, Takuo

    2005-10-01

    The biological treatment of wastewater discharged from a biodiesel fuel (BDF) production plant conducting alkali catalysis transesterification was investigated. BDF wastewater has a high pH and high hexane-extracted oil and low nitrogen concentrations, and inhibits the growth of microorganisms. The biological treatment of BDF wastewater is difficult because the composition of such wastewater is not suitable for microbial growth. To apply the microbiological treatment of BDF wastewater using an oil degradable yeast, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, the pH was adjusted to 6.8 and several nutrients such as a nitrogen source (ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride or urea), yeast extract, KH2PO4 and MgSO4.7H2O were added to the wastewater. The optimal initial concentration of yeast extract was 1 g/l and the optimal C/N ratio was between 17 and 68 when using urea as a nitrogen source. A growth inhibitor was also present in the BDF wastewater, and this growth inhibitor could be detected by measuring the solid content in an aqueous phase after the hexane extraction of the wastewater. Microorganisms could not grow at solid contents higher than 2.14 g/l in the wastewater. To avoid the growth inhibition, the BDF wastewater was diluted with the same volume of water. Oil degradation in the diluted BDF wastewater was observed and the best result was obtained under the determined optimal conditions. This treatment system is simple because no controllers, except for a temperature, are necessary. These results suggest that the biological treatment system developed for BDF wastewater is useful for small-scale BDF production plants.

  1. Denitrifying Bacterial Communities Affect Current Production and Nitrous Oxide Accumulation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Puig, Sebastià; García-Lledó, Arantzazu; Trias, Rosalia; Balaguer, M. Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bañeras, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite) and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A·m−3 NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment), when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A·m−3 NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK)/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation. PMID:23717427

  2. Graphite fiber brush anodes for increased power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce; Cheng, Shaoan; Watson, Valerie; Estadt, Garett

    2007-05-01

    To efficiently generate electricity using bacteria in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), highly conductive noncorrosive materials are needed that have a high specific surface area (surface area per volume) and an open structure to avoid biofouling. Graphite brush anodes, consisting of graphite fibers wound around a conductive, but noncorrosive metal core, were examined for power production in cube (C-MFC) and bottle (B-MFC) air-cathode MFCs. Power production in C-MFCs containing brush electrodes at 9600 m2/m3 reactor volume reached a maximum power density of 2400 mW/m2 (normalized to the cathode projected surface area), or 73 W/m3 based on liquid volume, with a maximum Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 60%. This power density, normalized by cathode projected area, is the highest value yet achieved by an air-cathode system. The increased power resulted from a reduction in internal resistance from 31 to 8 Q. Brush electrodes (4200 m2/m3) were also tested in B-MFCs, consisting of a laboratory media bottle modified to have a single side arm with a cathode clamped to its end. B-MFCs inoculated with wastewater produced up to 1430 mW/m2 (2.3 W/m3, CE = 23%) with brush electrodes, versus 600 mW/m2 with a plain carbon paper electrode. These findings show that brush anodes that have high surface areas and a porous structure can produce high power densities, and therefore have qualities that make them ideal for scaling up MFC systems.

  3. Effects of sevelamer on HbA1c, inflammation, and advanced glycation end products in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime; Cai, Weijing; Goodman, Susan; Pyzik, Renata; Post, James; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Woodward, Mark; Striker, Gary E

    2012-06-01

    Increased inflammation and oxidative stress may be caused by proteins and lipids modified by cytotoxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in food. Restricting food containing elevated AGEs improves these risk factors in diabetic CKD. Because diet adherence can be problematic, this study aimed to remove cytotoxic AGEs from food already ingested and to determine whether sevelamer carbonate sequesters cytotoxic AGEs in the gut, preventing their uptake and thereby reducing AGE-induced abnormalities. This single-center, randomized, 2-month, open-label, intention-to-treat, crossover study compared sevelamer carbonate with calcium carbonate treatment in stage 2-4 diabetic CKD. Participants received 2 months of treatment with one drug, had a 1-week washout, and then received the opposite drug for 2 months. Sevelamer carbonate reduced HbA1c, serum methylglyoxal, serum (ε)N-carboxymethyl-lysine, triglycerides, and 8-isoprostanes. Total cholesterol and fibroblast growth factor 23 were reduced by sevelamer carbonate, relative to calcium carbonate. AGE receptor 1 and sirtuin 1 mRNA were increased and PMNC TNFα levels were decreased by sevelamer carbonate, but not calcium carbonate. Medications and caloric and AGE intake remained unchanged. Sevelamer carbonate reversibly bound AGE-BSA at intestinal, but not stomach, pH. Sevelamer carbonate significantly reduces HbA1c, fibroblast growth factor 23, lipids, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and markedly increases antioxidant markers, independently of phosphorus in patients with diabetes and early kidney disease. These novel actions of sevelamer carbonate on metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus may affect progression of early diabetic CKD.

  4. Effects of Sevelamer on HbA1c, Inflammation, and Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime; Cai, Weijing; Goodman, Susan; Pyzik, Renata; Post, James; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Woodward, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Increased inflammation and oxidative stress may be caused by proteins and lipids modified by cytotoxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in food. Restricting food containing elevated AGEs improves these risk factors in diabetic CKD. Because diet adherence can be problematic, this study aimed to remove cytotoxic AGEs from food already ingested and to determine whether sevelamer carbonate sequesters cytotoxic AGEs in the gut, preventing their uptake and thereby reducing AGE-induced abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This single-center, randomized, 2-month, open-label, intention-to-treat, crossover study compared sevelamer carbonate with calcium carbonate treatment in stage 2–4 diabetic CKD. Participants received 2 months of treatment with one drug, had a 1-week washout, and then received the opposite drug for 2 months. Results Sevelamer carbonate reduced HbA1c, serum methylglyoxal, serum εN-carboxymethyl-lysine, triglycerides, and 8-isoprostanes. Total cholesterol and fibroblast growth factor 23 were reduced by sevelamer carbonate, relative to calcium carbonate. AGE receptor 1 and sirtuin 1 mRNA were increased and PMNC TNFα levels were decreased by sevelamer carbonate, but not calcium carbonate. Medications and caloric and AGE intake remained unchanged. Sevelamer carbonate reversibly bound AGE-BSA at intestinal, but not stomach, pH. Conclusions Sevelamer carbonate significantly reduces HbA1c, fibroblast growth factor 23, lipids, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and markedly increases antioxidant markers, independently of phosphorus in patients with diabetes and early kidney disease. These novel actions of sevelamer carbonate on metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus may affect progression of early diabetic CKD. PMID:22461535

  5. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion. © 2014 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Community, environmental, and occupational health risks associated with fossil fuel energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Mark A.

    Short-term and long-term health risks associated with fossil fuel power production can be grouped into three broad categories: risks to the surrounding community, the natural environment and to plant workers. The results of three studies examining the primary short-term or long-term impacts of fossil fuel power plants are presented within this dissertation. The first study estimates the plausible community health effects associated with peak SO2 emissions from three coal-fired power plants in the Baltimore, Maryland area. Concentrations from mobile and stationary air monitoring were compared to human clinical studies that demonstrated respiratory morbidity. Results indicate that exposure concentrations are below levels associated with respiratory symptoms. A single measurement at one monitoring site, however, may indicate risk of asymptomatic lung function decrement for SO2-sensitive asthmatics. The second study estimates the relationship between operational, environmental and temporal factors at a Texas coastal power plant and fish and shellfish impingement. Impingement is a long-term risk to fish populations near power plants. When large quantities of water are withdrawn from water bodies for cooling, fish and shellfish may be harmed if impinged against screens intended to remove debris. In this study, impingement of fish and shellfish was best explained by dissolved oxygen concentration, sampling month and sampling time. When examined separately, temperature and sampling month were most important in explaining fish impingement, while for shellfish, sampling month and sampling time were most important. Operational factors were not significant predictors of impingement. The third study examines whether the number of worker similar exposure groups classified using observation methods was the same as groups classified using personal exposure monitoring. Using observational techniques and personal monitoring, power plant workers were grouped according to exposure

  7. Pyrolysis of forest residues: an approach to techno-economics for bio-fuel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The techno-economics for producing liquid fuels from Maine forest residues were determined from a combination of: (1) laboratory experiments at USDA-ARS’s Eastern Regional Research Center using hog fuel (a secondary woody residue produced from mill byproducts such as sawdust, bark and shavings) as a...

  8. The RDF/SRF torrefaction: An effect of temperature on characterization of the product - Carbonized Refuse Derived Fuel.

    PubMed

    Białowiec, Andrzej; Pulka, Jakub; Stępień, Paweł; Manczarski, Piotr; Gołaszewski, Janusz

    2017-12-01

    The influence of Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF)/Solid Recovery Fuel (SRF) torrefaction temperature on product characteristic was investigated. RDF/SRF thermal treatment experiment was conducted with 1-h residence time, under given temperatures: 200, 220, 240, 260, 280 and 300°C. Sawdust was used as reference material. The following parameters of torrefaction char from sawdust and Carbonized Refuse Derived Fuel (CRDF) from RDF/SRF were measured: moisture, calorific value, ash content, volatile compounds and sulfur content. Sawdust biochar was confirmed as a good quality solid fuel, due to significant fuel property increase. The study also indicated that RDF torrefaction reduced moisture significantly from 22.9% to 1.4% and therefore increased lower heating value (LHV) from 19.6 to 25.3MJ/kg. Results suggest that RDF torrefaction may be a good method for increasing attractiveness of RDF as an energy source, and it could help unify RDF properties on the market. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. SMALL-SCALE FUEL ALCOHOL PRODUCTION TO MEET UNIVERSITY VEHICLE FUEL NEEDS AND PROMOTE REGIONAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. The small scale sweet sorghum ethanol production system in Iowa has good potential for development based on an economic analysis with rates of return ranging from 12% to 32 % for ethanol prices ranging from $1.66/gal to $2.20/gal. A scale of 300 acres (121 ha) for produ...

    2. Effects of ethanol-based fuel contamination: microbial community changes, production of regulated compounds, and methane generation.

      PubMed

      Nelson, Denice K; Lapara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

      2010-06-15

      Ethanol-based fuels are becoming more heavily used, increasing the likelihood of ethanol-based fuel spills during transportation and storage. Although ethanol is well-known to be readily biodegradable, very little is known about the effects that such a spill might have on an indigenous microbial community. Of particular concern is that ethanol contamination could stimulate the growth of organisms that can generate regulated compounds and/or produce explosive quantities of methane gas. A column-based study was performed to elucidate the potential impacts of ethanol-based fuel (E85) on the indigenous microbial community during a simulated fuel spill. A continuous dilute supply of E85 resulted in profound shifts in both the bacterial and archaeal communities. The shift was accompanied by the production of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids and butanol, a compound that is regulated in groundwater by some states. Results also indicated that a continuous feed of dilute E85 generated explosive levels of methane within one month of column operation. Quantitative PCR data showed a statistically significant increase in methanogenic populations when compared to a control column. The elevated population numbers correlated to areas of the column receiving a sustained carbon load. Toxicity data indicated that microbial growth was completely inhibited (as evidenced by absence of ethanol breakdown products) at ethanol levels above 6% (v/v). These data suggest that ethanol from ethanol-based fuel can be readily degraded, but can also produce metabolic products that are regulated as well as explosive levels of methane. The core of an E85 spill may serve as a long-term source of contamination as it cannot be degraded until significant dilution has occurred.

    3. Accumulative charge separation for solar fuels production: coupling light-induced single electron transfer to multielectron catalysis.

      PubMed

      Hammarström, Leif

      2015-03-17

      The conversion and storage of solar energy into a fuel holds promise to provide a significant part of the future renewable energy demand of our societies. Solar energy technologies today generate heat or electricity, while the large majority of our energy is used in the form of fuels. Direct conversion of solar energy to a fuel would satisfy our needs for storable energy on a large scale. Solar fuels can be generated by absorbing light and converting its energy to chemical energy by electron transfer leading to separation of electrons and holes. The electrons are used in the catalytic reduction of a cheap substrate with low energy content into a high-energy fuel. The holes are filled by oxidation of water, which is the only electron source available for large scale solar fuel production. Absorption of a single photon typically leads to separation of a single electron-hole pair. In contrast, fuel production and water oxidation are multielectron, multiproton reactions. Therefore, a system for direct solar fuel production must be able to accumulate the electrons and holes provided by the sequential absorption of several photons in order to complete the catalytic reactions. In this Account, the process is termed accumulative charge separation. This is considerably more complicated than charge separation on a single electron level and needs particular attention. Semiconductor materials and molecular dyes have for a long time been optimized for use in photovoltaic devices. Efforts are made to develop new systems for light harvesting and charge separation that are better optimized for solar fuel production than those used in the early devices presented so far. Significant progress has recently been made in the discovery and design of better homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for solar fuels and water oxidation. While the heterogeneous ones perform better today, molecular catalysts based on transition metal complexes offer much greater tunability of electronic and

    4. Production of electricity from acetate or butyrate using a single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

      PubMed

      Liu, Hong; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

      2005-01-15

      Hydrogen can be recovered by fermentation of organic material rich in carbohydrates, but much of the organic matter remains in the form of acetate and butyrate. An alternative to methane production from this organic matter is the direct generation of electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Electricity generation using a single-chambered MFC was examined using acetate or butyrate. Power generated with acetate (800 mg/L) (506 mW/m2 or 12.7 mW/ L) was up to 66% higher than that fed with butyrate (1000 mg/L) (305 mW/m2 or 7.6 mW/L), demonstrating that acetate is a preferred aqueous substrate for electricity generation in MFCs. Power output as a function of substrate concentration was well described by saturation kinetics, although maximum power densities varied with the circuit load. Maximum power densities and half-saturation constants were Pmax = 661 mW/m2 and Ks = 141 mg/L for acetate (218 ohms) and Pmax = 349 mW/m2 and Ks = 93 mg/L for butyrate (1000 ohms). Similar open circuit potentials were obtained in using acetate (798 mV) or butyrate (795 mV). Current densities measured for stable power outputwere higher for acetate (2.2 A/m2) than those measured in MFCs using butyrate (0.77 A/m2). Cyclic voltammograms suggested that the main mechanism of power production in these batch tests was by direct transfer of electrons to the electrode by bacteria growing on the electrode and not by bacteria-produced mediators. Coulombic efficiencies and overall energy recovery were 10-31 and 3-7% for acetate and 8-15 and 2-5% for butyrate, indicating substantial electron and energy losses to processes other than electricity generation. These results demonstrate that electricity generation is possible from soluble fermentation end products such as acetate and butyrate, but energy recoveries should be increased to improve the overall process performance.

    5. Metabolic pathway rewiring in engineered cyanobacteria for solar-to-chemical and solar-to-fuel production from CO2.

      PubMed

      Woo, Han Min

      2018-01-01

      Photoautotrophic cyanobacteria have been developed to convert CO 2 to valuable chemicals and fuels as solar-to-chemical (S2C) and solar-to-fuel (S2F) platforms. Here, I describe the rewiring of the metabolic pathways in cyanobacteria to better understand the endogenous carbon flux and to enhance the yield of heterologous products. The plasticity of the cyanobacterial metabolism has been proposed to be advantageous for the development of S2C and S2F processes. The rewiring of the sugar catabolism and of the phosphoketolase pathway in the central cyanobacterial metabolism allowed for an enhancement in the level of target products by redirecting the carbon fluxes. Thus, metabolic pathway rewiring can promote the development of more efficient cyanobacterial cell factories for the generation of feasible S2C and S2F platforms.

    6. Production of liquid fuels out of plant biomass and refuse: Methods, cost, potential (in MIXED)

      SciTech Connect

      Woick, B.; Friedrich, R.

      1981-09-01

      Different ways of producing biomass and its conversion into high grade fuel for vehicles are reviewed with particular reference to physical and geographical factors, pertaining in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Even with the potentially small amount of biomass in the FRG, the fueling of diesel engines with rape oil or modified ethanol, which can be obtained from any cellulosic feedstock, seems to pose the fewest difficulties and promises greatest efficiency. However, the amount of fuel produced from biomass can probably only meet a very small percentage of the total amount required.

    7. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals.

      PubMed

      Zeldes, Benjamin M; Keller, Matthew W; Loder, Andrew J; Straub, Christopher T; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

      2015-01-01

      Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

    8. Materials and systems for unassisted photoelectrochemical solar fuels production (Conference Presentation)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lee, Jae Sung

      2016-10-01

      About 400 semiconductor solids are known to have photocatalytic activity for water splitting. Yet there is no single material that could satisfy all the requirements for desired photocatalysts: i) suitable band gap energy (1.7 eV< Eg < 2.3 eV) for high efficiency, ii) proper band position for reduction and/or oxidation of water, iii) long-term stability in aqueous solutions, iv) low cost, v) high crystallinity, and vi) high conductivity. Hence, in the selection of photocatalytic materials, we better start from intrinsically stable materials made of earth-abundant elements. The band bap energy is also the primary consideration to absorb ample amount of solar energy of wide wavelength spectrum. It sets the limit of theoretically maximum efficiency and it could also be extended by band engineering techniques. Upon selection of the candidate materials, we can also modify the materials for full utilization their potentials. The main path of efficiency loss in PEC water splitting process is recombination of photoelectrons and holes. We discuss the material designs including i) p-n heterojunction photoanodes for effective electron-hole separation, ii) electron highway to facilitate interparticle electron transfer, iii) metal or anion doping to improve conductivity of the semiconductor and to extend the range of light absorption, iv) one-dimensional nanomaterials to secure a short hole diffusion distance and vectoral electron transfer, and v) loading co-catalysts for facile charge separation. High efficiency has been demonstrated for all these examples due to efficient electron-hole separation. Finally, total systems for unassisted solar fuel production are demonstrated.

    9. Fetal and neonatal responses to maternal canine starvation: circulating fuels and neonatal glucose production.

      PubMed

      Kliegman, R M; Miettinen, E L; Adam, P A

      1981-06-01

      Pregnant dogs were starved for 72 hr while controls were fasted overnight. Maternal starvation significantly reduced fetal birth weight (269 +/- 7.2 versus 294 +/- 4.4 g). Total caloric deprivation had no effect on maternal or fetal blood glucose concentration at the time of delivery; however, fasting neonatal blood glucose levels were depressed during the first 9 hr of life. Starvation produced a large elevation of maternal free fatty acids (1.68 +/- 0.39 versus 0.74 +/- 0.2 mM) and ketone bodies (2.99 +/- 0.70 versus 1.04 +/- 0.48). Although fetal free fatty acids increased minimally (0.39 +/- 0.03 versus 0.22 +/- 0.07), ketone body levels were markedly elevated (2.53 +/- 0.35 versus 1.01 +/- 0.32). After birth, plasma-free fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were lower in pups of starved mothers at 3 hr, and acetoacetate was lower at 6 and 9 hr. Other alternate fuels such as amino acids demonstrated lower levels of glutamine in pups of starved mothers throughout the day (except 3 hr), whereas alanine levels declined significantly only at 24 hr (114.9 +/- 15 versus 187.6 +/- 26 microM. Glucose production was significantly depressed in pups of starved mothers at 3 (13.7 +/- 1.4 versus 22.7 +/- 3) and 9 hr (17.5 +/- 2.2 versus 26.0 +/- 2.8 mumoles/kg/min), whereas glucose clearance rates were elevated at 3, 6 and 9 hr of age. Lactate carbon incorporation into glucose increased throughout the day but was not significantly affected by prior maternal starvation.

    10. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

      PubMed Central

      Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

      2015-01-01

      Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

    11. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 3: Detailed systems and programming documentation

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

      1978-01-01

      The FORTRAN computing program predicts flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuels of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has a provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

    12. Gold nanoparticles produced in situ mediate bioelectricity and hydrogen production in a microbial fuel cell by quantized capacitance charging.

      PubMed

      Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

      2013-02-01

      Oppan quantized style: By adding a gold precursor at its cathode, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated to form gold nanoparticles that can be used to simultaneously produce bioelectricity and hydrogen. By exploiting the quantized capacitance charging effect, the gold nanoparticles mediate the production of hydrogen without requiring an external power supply, while the MFC produces a stable power density. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. N2O release from agro-biofuel production negates global warming reduction by replacing fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutzen, P. J.; Mosier, A. R.; Smith, K. A.; Winiwarter, W.

    2007-08-01

    The relationship, on a global basis, between the amount of N fixed by chemical, biological or atmospheric processes entering the terrestrial biosphere, and the total emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), has been re-examined, using known global atmospheric removal rates and concentration growth of N2O as a proxy for overall emissions. The relationship, in both the pre-industrial period and in recent times, after taking into account the large-scale changes in synthetic N fertiliser production and deforestation, is consistent, showing an overall conversion factor of 3-5%. This factor is covered only in part by the ~1% of "direct" emissions from agricultural crop lands estimated by IPCC (2006), or the "indirect" emissions cited therein. This means that the extra N2O entering the atmosphere as a result of using N to produce crops for biofuels will also be correspondingly greater than that estimated just on the basis of IPCC (2006). When the extra N2O emission from biofuel production is calculated in "CO2-equivalent" global warming terms, and compared with the quasi-cooling effect of "saving" emissions of fossil fuel derived CO2, the outcome is that the production of commonly used biofuels, such as biodiesel from rapeseed and bioethanol from corn (maize), can contribute as much or more to global warming by N2O emissions than cooling by fossil fuel savings. Crops with less N demand, such as grasses and woody coppice species have more favourable climate impacts. This analysis only considers the conversion of biomass to biofuel. It does not take into account the use of fossil fuel on the farms and for fertilizer and pesticide production, but it also neglects the production of useful co-products. Both factors partially compensate each other. This needs to be analyzed in a full life cycle assessment.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  3. Oil fuel delivery optimization for multi product and multi depot: the case of petrol station replenishment problem (PSRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surjandari, Isti; Rachman, Amar; Dianawati, Fauzia; Wibowo, R. Pramono

    2011-10-01

    With the Oil and Gas Law No. 22 of 2001, national and foreign private enterprises can invest in all sectors of Oil and Gas in Indonesia. In anticipation of this free competition, Pertamina, as a state-owned enterprises, which previously had monopolized the oil and gas business activities in Indonesia, should be able to improve services as well as the efficiency in order to compete in the free market, especially in terms of cost efficiency of fuel distribution to gas station (SPBU). To optimize the distribution activity, it is necessary to design a scheduling system and its fuel delivery routes daily to every SPBU. The determination of routes and scheduling delivery of fuel to the SPBU can be modeled as a Petrol Station Replenishment Problem (PSRP) with the multi-depot, multi-product, time windows and split deliveries, which in this study will be completed by the Tabu Search algorithm (TS). This study was conducted in the area of Bandung, the capital of West Java province, which is a big city and the neighboring city of Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. By using the fuel delivery data for one day, the results showed a decrease of 16.38% of the distance of the route compared to the current conditions, which impacted on the reduction of distribution costs and decrease the number of total trips by 5.22% and 3.83%.

  4. 78 FR 62462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) to reduce the use of fossil fuels and encourage increased production... renewable fuel to replace or reduce the quantity of fossil fuel present in transportation fuel. Under EPA's... quantity of fossil fuel present in home heating oil or jet fuel.\\3\\ In essence, additional renewable fuel...

  5. A Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Processing Design for Production of Molybdenum-99 with Crystalline Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Gary Michael

    Medical radioisotopes are used in tens of millions of procedures every year to detect and image a wide variety of maladies and conditions in the human body. The most widely-used diagnostic radioisotope is technetium-99m, a metastable isomer of technetium-99 that is generated by the radioactive decay of molybdenum-99. For a number of reasons, the supply of molybdenum-99 has become unreliable and the techniques used to produce it have become unattractive. This has spurred the investigation of new technologies that avoid the use of highly enriched uranium to produce molybdenum-99 in the United States, where approximately half of the demand originates. The first goal of this research is to develop a critical nuclear reactor design powered by solid, discrete pins of low enriched uranium. Analyses of single-pin heat transfer and whole-core neutronics are performed to determine the required specifications. Molybdenum-99 is produced directly in the fuel of this reactor and then extracted through a series of chemical processing steps. After this extraction, the fuel is left in an aqueous state. The second goal of this research is to describe a process by which the uranium may be recovered from this spent fuel solution and reconstituted into the original fuel form. Fuel recovery is achieved through a crystallization step that generates solid uranyl nitrate hexahydrate while leaving the majority of fission products and transuranic isotopes in solution. This report provides background information on molybdenum-99 production and crystallization chemistry. The previously unknown thermal conductivity of the fuel material is measured. Following this is a description of the modeling and calculations used to develop a reactor concept. The operational characteristics of the reactor core model are analyzed and reported. Uranyl nitrate crystallization experiments have also been conducted, and the results of this work are presented here. Finally, a process flow scheme for uranium

  6. Biochemical conversions of lignocellulosic biomass for sustainable fuel-ethanol production in the upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur-Campbell, Michael J.

    Biofuels are an increasingly important component of worldwide energy supply. This research aims to understand the pathways and impacts of biofuels production, and to improve these processes to make them more efficient. In Chapter 2, a life cycle assessment (LCA) is presented for cellulosic ethanol production from five potential feedstocks of regional importance to the upper Midwest — hybrid poplar, hybrid willow, switchgrass, diverse prairie grasses, and logging residues — according to the requirements of Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Direct land use change emissions are included for the conversion of abandoned agricultural land to feedstock production, and computer models of the conversion process are used in order to determine the effect of varying biomass composition on overall life cycle impacts. All scenarios analyzed here result in greater than 60% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions relative to petroleum gasoline. Land use change effects were found to contribute significantly to the overall emissions for the first 20 years after plantation establishment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the effects of biomass mixtures on overall sugar recovery from the combined processes of dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Biomass mixtures studied were aspen, a hardwood species well suited to biochemical processing; balsam, a high-lignin softwood species, and switchgrass, an herbaceous energy crop with high ash content. A matrix of three different dilute acid pretreatment severities and three different enzyme loading levels was used to characterize interactions between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yield for any species was 70% of theoretical for switchgrass, and maximum xylose yield was 99.7% of theoretical for aspen. Supplemental β-glucosidase increased glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis by an average of 15%, and total sugar recoveries for mixtures could be predicted to within 4% by linear interpolation of the pure

  7. Straight-chain halocarbon forming fluids for TRISO fuel kernel production - Tests with yttria-stabilized zirconia microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, M. P.; King, J. C.; Gorman, B. P.; Braley, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Current methods of TRISO fuel kernel production in the United States use a sol-gel process with trichloroethylene (TCE) as the forming fluid. After contact with radioactive materials, the spent TCE becomes a mixed hazardous waste, and high costs are associated with its recycling or disposal. Reducing or eliminating this mixed waste stream would not only benefit the environment, but would also enhance the economics of kernel production. Previous research yielded three candidates for testing as alternatives to TCE: 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane. This study considers the production of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) kernels in silicone oil and the three chosen alternative formation fluids, with subsequent characterization of the produced kernels and used forming fluid. Kernels formed in silicone oil and bromotetradecane were comparable to those produced by previous kernel production efforts, while those produced in chlorooctadecane and iodododecane experienced gelation issues leading to poor kernel formation and geometry.

  8. Improving conversion yield of fermentable sugars into fuel ethanol in 1st generation yeast-based production processes.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2015-06-01

    Current fuel ethanol production using yeasts and starch or sucrose-based feedstocks is referred to as 1st generation (1G) ethanol production. These processes are characterized by the high contribution of sugar prices to the final production costs, by high production volumes, and by low profit margins. In this context, small improvements in the ethanol yield on sugars have a large impact on process economy. Three types of strategies used to achieve this goal are discussed: engineering free-energy conservation, engineering redox-metabolism, and decreasing sugar losses in the process. Whereas the two former strategies lead to decreased biomass and/or glycerol formation, the latter requires increased process and/or yeast robustness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical Processing of Non-Crop Plants for Jet Fuel Blends Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, M. J.; Hepp, A. F.; McDowell, M.; Ribita, D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of Biofuels has been gaining in popularity over the past few years due to their ability to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Biofuels as a renewable energy source can be a viable option for sustaining long-term energy needs if they are managed efficiently. We describe our initial efforts to exploit algae, halophytes and other non-crop plants to produce synthetics for fuel blends that can potentially be used as fuels for aviation and non-aerospace applications. Our efforts have been dedicated to crafting efficient extraction and refining processes in order to extract constituents from the plant materials with the ultimate goal of determining the feasibility of producing biomass-based jet fuel from the refined extract. Two extraction methods have been developed based on communition processes, and liquid-solid extraction techniques. Refining procedures such as chlorophyll removal and transesterification of triglycerides have been performed. Gas chromatography in tandem with mass spectroscopy is currently being utilized in order to qualitatively determine the individual components of the refined extract. We also briefly discuss and compare alternative methods to extract fuel-blending agents from alternative biofuels sources.

  10. Nutritional characteristics of by-products originating from the Central European ethanol fuel industry for pigs.

    PubMed

    Nitrayová, S; Brestensky, M; Patrás, P; Heger, J

    2012-12-01

    Chemical composition and nutrient and energy digestibilities were determined in 4 samples of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and 1 sample of wet distillers grains (WDG) from 4 ethanol fuel manufacturers. The cereal sources used for ethanol production were wheat (Triticum aestivum; 1 sample), wheat + barley (Hordeum vulgare; 2 samples), and maize (Zea mays; 2 samples). The nutrient contents (expressed as % of DM) were variable, ranging from 30.5 to 39.5 CP, 4.4 to 12.3 fat, 7.5 to 12.9 crude fiber, 2.7 to 7.8 ash, and 0.4 to 0.9 total P. The concentration of Lys ranged from 2.05 to 5.20 g/kg DM. The diets were fed to 6 gilts (39.9 ± 1.9 kg BW) fitted with ileal T-cannulas using a 5 × 6 Youden square. Each experimental period comprised a 5-d adaptation followed by a 2-d collection of urine and feces and 1-d (24 h) collection of ileal digesta. Using acid-insoluble ash as a marker, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of nutrients and energy and AID of AA were calculated. The ATTD of N ranged from 55.7 to 83.7%. The N retention expressed as percentage of N intake ranged from 10.2 to 32.0. Except for wheat-based DDGS, the AID of N was 66.8%. The ATTD and AID values of NDF were 52.8 and 24.4%, respectively. The concentration of total P in WDG was half of values in DDGS, which likely caused its very low ATTD (1.4%). The ATTD and AID of energy ranged from 58.8 to 73.9% and from 40.6 to 54.1%, respectively. The AID of AA was greatest (P < 0.001) in WDG (71.8%) and lowest (P < 0.001) in DDGS from wheat (44.8%). In conclusion, nutrient variability among DDGS samples varies greatly, and source of origin is an important determinant of quality.

  11. Life cycle assessment of microalgae-based aviation fuel: Influence of lipid content with specific productivity and nitrogen nutrient effects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Jing; A, Lusi; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the life cycle assessments of low-N and normal culture conditions for a balance between the lipid content and specific productivity. In order to achieve the potential contribution of lipid content to the life cycle assessment, this study established relationships between lipid content (nitrogen effect) and specific productivity based on three microalgae strains including Chlorella, Isochrysis and Nannochloropsis. For microalgae-based aviation fuel, the effects of the lipid content on fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are similar. The fossil fuel consumption (0.32-0.68MJ·MJ -1 MBAF) and GHG emissions (17.23-51.04gCO 2 e·MJ -1 MBAF) increase (59.70-192.22%) with the increased lipid content. The total energy input decreases (2.13-3.08MJ·MJ -1 MBAF, 14.91-27.95%) with the increased lipid content. The LCA indicators increased (0-47.10%) with the decreased nitrogen recovery efficiency (75-50%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Purification, characterization, molecular cloning and extracellular production of a phospholipase A1 from Streptomyces albidoflavus NA297.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Daisuke; Kano, Kota; Matsumoto, Yusaku

    2012-01-01

    A novel metal ion-independent phospholipase A1 of Streptomyces albidoflavus isolated from Japanese soil has been purified and characterized. The enzyme consists of a 33-residue N-terminal signal secretion sequence and a 269-residue mature protein with a deduced molecular weight of 27,199. Efficient and extracellular production of the recombinant enzyme was successfully achieved using Streptomyces lividans cells and an expression vector. A large amount (25 mg protein, 14.7 kU) of recombinant enzyme with high specific activity (588 U/mg protein) was purified by simple purification steps. The maximum activity was found at pH 7.2 and 50 °C. At pH 7.2, the enzyme preferably hydrolyzed phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine; however, the substrate specificity was dependent on the reaction pH. The enzyme hydrolyzed lysophosphatidylcholine and not triglyceride and the p-nitrophenyl ester of fatty acids. At the reaction equilibrium, the molar ratio of released free fatty acids (sn-1:sn-2) was 63:37. The hydrolysis of phosphatidic acid at 50 °C and pH 7.2 gave apparent V max and k cat values of 1389 μmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and 630 s(-1), respectively. The apparent K m and k cat/K m values were 2.38 mM and 265 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. Mutagenesis analysis showed that Ser11 is essential for the catalytic function of the enzyme and the active site may include residues Ser216 and His218.

  13. Production of a yeast artificial chromosome for stable expression of a synthetic xylose isomerase-xylulokinase polyprotein in a fuel ethanol yeast strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was engineered to contain a polyprotein gene construct expressing xylos...

  14. Economic analysis of fuel ethanol production from winter hulled barley by the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Ramírez, Edna C; McAloon, Andrew J; Yee, Winnie; Johnston, David B; Hicks, Kevin B

    2011-06-01

    A process and cost model was developed for fuel ethanol production from winter barley based on the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process. In this process, in addition to β-glucanases, which are added to reduce the viscosity of the mash, β-glucosidase is also added to completely hydrolyze the oligomers obtained during the hydrolysis of β-glucans to glucose. The model allows determination of capital costs, operating costs, and ethanol production cost for a plant producing 40 million gallons of denatured fuel ethanol annually. A sensitivity study was also performed to examine the effects of β-glucosidase and barley costs on the final ethanol production cost. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the economic benefit of adding β-glucosidase. Lower ethanol production cost was obtained compared to that obtained without β-glucosidase addition in all cases except one where highest β-glucosidase cost allowance and lowest barley cost were used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Producer gas production of Indonesian biomass in fixed-bed downdraft gasifier as an alternative fuels for internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanjuntak, J. P.; Lisyanto; Daryanto, E.; Tambunan, B. H.

    2018-03-01

    downdraft biomass gasification reactors, coupled with reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICE) are a viable technology for small scale heat and power generation. The direct use of producer gas as fuel subtitution in an ICE could be of great interest since Indonesia has significant land area in different forest types that could be used to produce bioenergy and convert forest materials to bioenergy for use in energy production and the versatility of this engine. This paper will look into the aspect of biomass energie as a contributor to energy mix in Indonesia. This work also contains information gathered from numerous previews study on the downdraft gasifier based on experimental or simulation study on the ability of producer gas as fuels for internal combustion engines aplication. All data will be used to complement the preliminary work on biomass gasification using downdraft to produce producer gas and its application to engines.

  16. Production of Biodiesel from Thespesiapopulnea seed oil through rapid in situ transesterification - an optimization study and assay of fuel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargavi, G.; Nageswara Rao, P.; Renganathan, S.

    2018-03-01

    Biodiesel production was carried out from Thespesia populnea seed oil through rapid insitu transesterification. Influence of reaction parameters such as catalyst type and concentration, methanol to biomass ratio, co-solvent volume, temperature and agitation speed on conversion of oil into methyl esters was investigated. The effect of different co-solvents on conversion was evaluated. Optimum methyl ester conversion of 97.80% was achieved at 1.5wt% of KOH catalyst, 5.5:1 (v/w) methanol to biomass ratio, 25vol%tetrahydrofuranco-solvent, 60°C and 500 rpm within 120min of reaction time. Fuel properties of produced methyl esters were well fitted within the limits of ASTMD 6751 standards. Considering the properties of produced biodiesel, Thespesia populnea seed derived biodiesel can be used as potential alternate to fossil diesel fuel.

  17. A Brief Literature Overview of Various Routes to Biorenewable Fuels from Lipids for the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-products (NAABB) Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.

    2011-03-29

    Renewable methods of producing transportation fuels are currently the focus of numerous large research efforts across the globe. Renewable fuel produced from algal lipids is one aspect of this research that could have profound implications on future transportation fuel requirements. However, technical challenges remain in several areas of algal-lipid-based fuels. These challenges include the identification and development of robust and productive algal species as well as extraction methods to recover the produced lipids. Not the least of these technical challenges is the conversion of the algae lipids to fungible fuels. This brief literature review focuses primarily on state-of-the-art “downstream” applicationsmore » of producing fuel from fats and lipids, which can be applied to ongoing research with algae-derived lipids.« less

  18. Lactic Acid Bacteria – Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating a-(1,6) and a-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, we have developed improved...

  19. Coupling molecular catalysts with nanostructured surfaces for efficient solar fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tong

    Solar fuel generation via carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is a promising approach to meet the increasing global demand for energy and to minimize the impact of energy consumption on climate change. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable; its activation often requires the use of appropriate catalysts. In particular, molecular catalysts with well-defined structures and tunability have shown excellent activity in photochemical CO2 reduction. These homogenous catalysts, however, suffer from poor stability under photochemical conditions and difficulty in recycling from the reaction media. Heterogenized molecular catalysts, particularly those prepared by coupling molecular catalysts with solid-state surfaces, have attracted more attention in recent years as potential solutions to address the issues associated with molecular catalysts. In this work, solar CO2 reduction is investigated using systems coupling molecular catalysts with robust nanostructured surfaces. In Chapter 2, heterogenization of macrocyclic cobalt(III) and nickel (II) complexes on mesoporous silica surface was achieved by different methods. Direct ligand derivatization significantly lowered the catalytic activity of Co(III) complex, while grafting the Co(III) complex onto silica surface through Si-O-Co linkage resulted in hybrid catalysts with excellent activity in CO2 reduction in the presence of p-terphenyl as a molecular photosensitizer. An interesting loading effect was observed, in which the optimal activity was achieved at a medium Co(III) surface density. Heterogenization of the Ni(II) complex on silica surface has also been implemented, the poor photocatalytic activity of the hybrid catalyst can be attributed to the intrinsic nature of the homogeneous analogue. This study highlighted the importance of appropriate linking strategies in preparing functional heterogenized molecular catalysts. Coupling molecular complexes with light-harvesting surfaces could avoid the use of expensive molecular

  20. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEmore » EER (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP