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Sample records for a-1 high-sensitivity c-reactive

  1. Combined use of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-1 ratio prior to elective coronary angiography and oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhu-zhi; Geng, Deng-feng; Luo, Jin-gang; Wang, Jing-feng

    2011-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the predictive value of the combination of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apoA-1 ratio for the outcomes of coronary angiography (CAG), echocardiography and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Hs-CRP, apoB, apoA-1, and the profiles of CAG, echocardiography and OGTTs as well as traditional risk factors were measured in 1757 cardiology patients. Hs-CRP or apoB/apoA-1 ratio was significantly correlated with the presence and severity of angiographic profiles, the levels of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV mass and LV mass index, and the presence of abnormal glucose metabolism. The combination of hs-CRP and apoB/apoA-1 ratio had greater correlation with abnormal glucose metabolism than its individual components in patients with normal fasting glucose, and was an independent predictor for coronary artery disease. The combination of hs-CRP and apoB/apoA-1 ratio may be a strong predictor for coronary artery disease and abnormal glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Source-specific workplace social support and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels among Japanese workers: A 1-year prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Shimazu, Akihito; Kawakami, Norito; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prospective association between source-specific workplace social support and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in workers in Japan. We conducted a 1-year prospective cohort study with 1,487 men and 533 women aged 18-65 years. Participants worked at two manufacturing worksites in Japan and were free of major illness. We used multivariable linear regression analyses to evaluate the prospective association between supervisor and coworker support at baseline, and hs-CRP levels at follow-up. We conducted the analyses separately for men and women. For women, high supervisor support at baseline was significantly associated with lower hs-CRP levels at follow-up (β = -0.109, P < 0.01), whereas coworker support at baseline was not significantly associated with hs-CRP levels at follow-up. Associations between supervisor and coworker support and hs-CRP levels were not significant for men. Supervisor support may have beneficial effects on inflammatory markers in working women. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:676-684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Birth weight, current anthropometric markers, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein in Brazilian school children.

    PubMed

    Boscaini, Camile; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown associations of birth weight with increased concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein. This study assessed the relationship between birth weight, anthropometric and metabolic parameters during childhood, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. A total of 612 Brazilian school children aged 5-13 years were included in the study. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry. Nutritional status was assessed by body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, and glucose were measured by enzymatic methods. Insulin sensitivity was determined by the homeostasis model assessment method. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, General Linear Model, and General Linear Model for Gamma Distribution. Body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds were directly associated with birth weight (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.015, resp.). Large for gestational age children showed higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001) than small for gestational age. High birth weight is associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Large for gestational age altered high sensitivity C-reactive protein and promoted additional risk factor for atherosclerosis in these school children, independent of current nutritional status.

  4. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts mortality but not stroke

    PubMed Central

    Elkind, M S.V.; Luna, J M.; Moon, Y P.; Liu, K M.; Spitalnik, S L.; Paik, M C.; Sacco, R L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) predict stroke, vascular events, and mortality in a prospective cohort study. Background: Markers of inflammation have been associated with risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Their association with stroke is controversial. Methods: The Northern Manhattan Study includes a stroke-free community-based cohort study in participants aged ≥40 years (median follow-up 7.9 years). hsCRP and SAA were measured using nephelometry. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of markers with risk of ischemic stroke and other outcomes after adjusting for demographics and risk factors. Results: hsCRP measurements were available in 2,240 participants (mean age 68.9 ± 10.1 years; 64.2% women; 18.8% white, 23.5% black, and 55.1% Hispanic). The median hsCRP was 2.5 mg/L. Compared with those with hsCRP <1 mg/L, those with hsCRP >3 mg/L were at increased risk of ischemic stroke in a model adjusted for demographics (HR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.06–2.41), but the effect was attenuated after adjusting for other risk factors (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.78–1.86). hsCRP >3 mg/L was associated with risk of MI (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.04–2.77) and death (adjusted HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.23–1.96). SAA was not associated with stroke risk. Conclusion: In this multiethnic cohort, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was not associated with ischemic stroke, but was modestly associated with myocardial infarction and mortality. The value of hsCRP and serum amyloid A may depend on population characteristics such as age and other risk factors. GLOSSARY AHA = American Heart Association; BP = blood pressure; CDC = Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CI = confidence interval; CRP = C-reactive protein; CUMC = Columbia University Medical Center; HR = hazard ratio; hsCRP = high-sensitivity C-reactive

  5. High-sensitive factor I and C-reactive protein based biomarkers for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Du, Jian-Shi; Han, Dong-Mei; Ma, Ying

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of high-sensitive factor I and C-reactive proteins as biomarkers for coronary artery disease has been performed from 19 anticipated cohort studies that included 21,567 participants having no information about coronary artery disease. Besides, the clinical implications of statin therapy initiated due to assessment of factor I and C-reactive proteins have also been modeled during studies. The measure of risk discrimination (C-index) was increased (by 0.0101) as per the prognostic model for coronary artery disease with respect to sex, smoking status, age, blood pressure, total cholesterol level along with diabetic history characteristic parameters. The C-index was further raised by 0.0045 and 0.0053 when factor I and C-reactive proteins based information were added, respectively which finally predicted 10-year risk categories as: high (> 20%), medium (10% to < 20%), and low (< 10%) risks. We found 2,254 persons (among 15,000 adults (age ≥ 45 years)) would initially be classified as being at medium risk for coronary artery disease when only conventional risk factors were used as calculated risk. Besides, persons with a predicted risk of more than 20% as well as for persons suffering from other risk factors (i.e. diabetes), statin therapy was initiated (irrespective of their decade old predicted risk). We conclude that under current treatment guidelines assessment of factor I and C-reactive proteins levels (as biomarker) in people at medium risk for coronary artery disease could prevent one additional coronary artery disease risk over a period a decade for every 390-500 people screened.

  6. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) assay using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Keegan, Gemma L.; Stranik, Ondrej; Brennan-Fournet, Margaret E.; McDonagh, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescence has been extensively employed in the area of diagnostic immunoassays. A significant enhancement of fluorescence can be achieved when noble metal nanoparticles are placed in close proximity to fluorophores. This effect, referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), has the potential to produce immunoassays with a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection (LOD). In this study, we investigate the fluorescence enhancement effect of two different nanoparticle systems, large spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold edge-coated triangular silver nanoplates, and both systems were evaluated for MEF. The extinction properties and electric field enhancement of both systems were modeled, and the optimum system, spherical AgNPs, was used in a sandwich immunoassay for human C-reactive protein with a red fluorescent dye label. A significant enhancement in the fluorescence was observed, which corresponded to an LOD improvement of 19-fold compared to a control assay without AgNPs.

  7. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, A; Ostovar, A; Vahdat, K; Rezaei, P; Darabi, H; Moshtaghi, D; Nabipour, I

    2017-02-01

    To explore the independent correlation between serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) in postmenopausal women. A total of 378 healthy Iranian postmenopausal women were randomly selected in a population-based study. Circulating hs-CRP levels were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and an enzymatic calorimetric method was used to measure serum levels of uric acid. Pearson correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between uric acid and hs-CRP levels. A statistically significant correlation was seen between serum levels of uric acid and log-transformed circulating hs-CRP (r = 0.25, p < 0.001). After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors (according to NCEP ATP III criteria), circulating hs-CRP levels were significantly associated with serum uric acid levels (β = 0.20, p < 0.001). After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP levels ≥3 mg/l were significantly associated with higher uric acid levels (odds ratio =1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.96). Higher serum uric acid levels were positively and independently associated with circulating hs-CRP in healthy postmenopausal women.

  8. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz; de Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes; de Quadros, Alexandre Schaan; Portal, Vera Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. Objective To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Conclusion Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent

  9. Association between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and dietary intake in Vietnamese young women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ahra; Kim, Hyesook; Han, Chan-Jung; Kim, Ji-Myung; Chung, Hye-Won; Chang, Namsoo

    2014-08-01

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a strong independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We evaluated the relationship between hsCRP and dietary intake in apparently healthy young women living in southern Vietnam. Serum hsCRP was measured and dietary intake data were obtained using the 1-day 24-hour recall method in women (n = 956; mean age, 25.0 ± 5.7 years) who participated in the International Collaboration Study for the Construction of Asian Cohort of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) in 2011. Women in the high risk group (> 3 mg/L) consumed fewer fruits and vegetables, total plant food, potassium, and folate than those in the low risk group (< 1 mg/L). A multiple regression analysis after adjusting for covariates revealed a significant negative association between hsCRP and fruit and vegetable consumption. A logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) of having a high hsCRP level in women with the highest quartiles of consumption of fruits and vegetables [OR, 0.391; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.190-0.807], potassium [OR, 0.425; 95% CI, 0.192-0.939] and folate [OR, 0.490; 95% CI, 0.249-0.964] were significantly lower than those in the lowest quartiles. These results suggest that, in young Vietnamese women, an increased consumption of fruit and vegetables might be beneficial for serum hsCRP, a risk factor for future CVD events.

  10. [Relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and obesity/metabolic syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Wenpeng; Teng, Yue; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Ping; Yan, Yinkun; Mi, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To explore the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and obesity/metabolic syndrome (MetS) related factors in children. 403 children aged 10-14 and born in Beijing were involved in this study. Height, weight, waist circumference, fat mass percentage (Fat%), blood pressure (BP), hsCRP, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C) were observed among these children. hsCRP was transformed with base 10 logarithm (lgCRP). MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation 2007 definition. Associations between MetS related components and hsCRP were tested using partial correlation analysis, analysis of covariance and linear regression models. 1) lgCRP was positively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, Fat%,BP, FPG, LDL-C and TC while negatively correlated with HDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C (r = 0.102). 2) The distributions of lgCRP showed obvious differences in all the metabolic indices, in most groups, respectively. With BMI under control, close relationships between lgCRP and high blood pressure/high TG disappeared and the relationship with MetS weakened. 3) Through linear regression models, factors as waist circumference, BMI, Fat% were the strongest factors related to hsCRP, followed by systolic BP, HDL-C, diastolic BP, TG and LDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C(β = 0.045). hsCRP was correlated with child obesity, lipid metabolism and MetS. Waist circumference was the strongest factors related with hsCRP. Obesity was the strongest and the independent influencing factor of hsCRP.

  11. High-sensitive C-reactive protein and dual antiplatelet in intracranial arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiejie; Wang, Anxin; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Meng, Xia; Lin, Jinxi; Jing, Jing; Zou, Xinying; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2018-02-06

    To determine the relationship of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and the efficacy and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with and without intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) in the Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients with Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events (CHANCE) trial. A subgroup of 807 patients with both magnetic resonance angiography images and hsCRP measurement was analyzed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the interaction of hsCRP levels with the effects of dual and single antiplatelet therapy. A total of 358 (44.4%) patients had ICAS and 449 (55.6%) did not. The proportion of patients with elevated hsCRP levels was higher in the ICAS group than in the non-ICAS group (40.2% vs 30.1%, p = 0.003). There was significant interaction between hsCRP and the 2 antiplatelet therapy groups in their effects on recurrent stroke after adjustment for confounding factors in the patients with ICAS ( p = 0.012), but not in those without ( p = 0.256). Compared with aspirin alone, clopidogrel plus aspirin significantly reduced the risk of recurrent stroke only in the patients with ICAS and nonelevated hsCRP levels (adjusted hazard ratio 0.27; 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.69; p = 0.006). Similar results were observed for composite vascular events. No significant difference in bleeding was found. Presence of both ICAS and nonelevated hsCRP levels may predict better response to dual antiplatelet therapy in reducing new stroke and composite vascular events in minor stroke or high-risk TIA patients. Further large-scale randomized and controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm this finding. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Pediatric Loss of Control Eating and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Shank, Lisa M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Kelly, Nichole R; Schvey, Natasha A; Marwitz, Shannon E; Mehari, Rim D; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Broadney, Miranda M; Galescu, Ovidiu A; Pickworth, Courtney K; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-02-01

    Loss of control (LOC) eating in youth is associated with excess body weight and adiposity. After adjusting for fat mass, youth with LOC eating have higher blood pressure and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to youth without LOC eating. Increased inflammation may account for this relationship, although few data have examined this hypothesis. Therefore, this study explored the association between LOC eating and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of inflammation. We investigated hsCRP concentrations in relation to LOC eating in a convenience sample of 194 youth (age 14.3 ± 2.1 years; 63.9% female; BMI-z 1.64 ± 1.06). The presence of LOC eating in the past month was assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Serum hsCRP was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adiposity was measured by air displacement plethysmography or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We compared hsCRP in those with and without LOC eating in analyses accounting for sex, adiposity, height, depressive symptoms, and eating psychopathology. Youth with LOC eating had significantly greater hsCRP than youth without LOC eating (p = 0.02), after accounting for all covariates. The number of LOC eating episodes in the past month was positively associated with hsCRP (p = 0.01). The relationship between LOC eating and hsCRP was not mediated by depressive symptoms or eating psychopathology (ps > 0.05). Youth with disinhibited eating may manifest increased chronic inflammation. Those with LOC eating may be an important subgroup at risk for adverse health outcomes associated with both chronic inflammation and obesity. Future research should examine whether hsCRP concentrations mediate the relationship between LOC eating and its association with cardiometabolic risk.

  13. [Relationship between periodontitis and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein].

    PubMed

    Pan, Heng-biao; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Na; Jin, Dan; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Chun-mei

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as the role in the mechanisms responsible for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the relationship of peridontitis and CHD. A periodontal examination was conducted on a total of 356 subjects, and community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) was obtained from each subject. Periodontal status was categorized into TN < or =2, TN=3, TN=4 three groups according to the CPITN indexes. Fasting venous blood samples were collected from all the three group subjects, the serum hsCRP concentration and serological changes used in diagnosing CHD routinely were determined, and software of SPSS 16.0 were used to analyzed the relationship of periodontal, hsCRP concentration and routinely CHD serological indexes. In the groups of TN < or =2, TN=3 and TN=4, the hsCRP level was (1.10 +/- 1.16), (1.86 +/- 2.34), (2.25 +/- 2.75) mg x L(-1), respectively. Compared with Group TN < or =2, the concentration of hsCRP in Group TN=3 and TN=4 were higher (OR = 1.24, OR = 1.31, respectively). Compared with group hsCRP < 3.0 mg x L(-1), more calculus and deep periodontal pockets were found in the Group hsCRP > or = 3.0 mg x L(-1) (P < 0.05). The serum hsCRP level is correlated with the severity of periodontal disease.

  14. Pediatric Loss of Control Eating and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Shank, Lisa M.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Kelly, Nichole R.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Marwitz, Shannon E.; Mehari, Rim D.; Brady, Sheila M.; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Broadney, Miranda M.; Galescu, Ovidiu A.; Pickworth, Courtney K.; Yanovski, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Loss of control (LOC) eating in youth is associated with excess body weight and adiposity. After adjusting for fat mass, youth with LOC eating have higher blood pressure and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to youth without LOC eating. Increased inflammation may account for this relationship, although few data have examined this hypothesis. Therefore, this study explored the association between LOC eating and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of inflammation. Methods: We investigated hsCRP concentrations in relation to LOC eating in a convenience sample of 194 youth (age 14.3 ± 2.1 years; 63.9% female; BMI-z 1.64 ± 1.06). The presence of LOC eating in the past month was assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Serum hsCRP was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adiposity was measured by air displacement plethysmography or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We compared hsCRP in those with and without LOC eating in analyses accounting for sex, adiposity, height, depressive symptoms, and eating psychopathology. Results: Youth with LOC eating had significantly greater hsCRP than youth without LOC eating (p = 0.02), after accounting for all covariates. The number of LOC eating episodes in the past month was positively associated with hsCRP (p = 0.01). The relationship between LOC eating and hsCRP was not mediated by depressive symptoms or eating psychopathology (ps > 0.05). Conclusions: Youth with disinhibited eating may manifest increased chronic inflammation. Those with LOC eating may be an important subgroup at risk for adverse health outcomes associated with both chronic inflammation and obesity. Future research should examine whether hsCRP concentrations mediate the relationship between LOC eating and its association with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27732055

  15. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  16. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and cognitive decline: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fanfan; Xie, Wuxiang

    2018-06-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been suggested to be involved in the process of cognitive decline. However, the results from previous studies exploring the relationship between hs-CRP concentration and cognitive decline are inconsistent. We employed data from wave 2 (2004-2005) to wave 7 (2014-2015) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline (wave 2) and reassessed biennially at waves 3-7. A total of 5257 participants (54.9% women, mean age 65.4 ± 9.4 years) with baseline hs-CRP levels ranged from 0.2 to 210.0 mg/L (median: 2.0 mg/L, interquartile range: 0.9-4.1 mg/L) were studied. The mean follow-up duration was 8.1 ± 2.8 years, and the mean number of cognitive assessment was 4.9 ± 1.5. Linear mixed models show that a one-unit increment in natural log-transformed hs-CRP was associated with faster declines in global cognitive scores [-0.048 points/year, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.072 to -0.023], memory scores (-0.022 points/year, 95% CI -0.031 to -0.013), and executive function scores (-0.025 points/year, 95% CI -0.043 to -0.006), after multivariable adjustment. Compared with the lowest quartile of hs-CRP, the multivariable-adjusted rate of global cognitive decline associated with the second, third, and highest quartile was faster by -0.043 points/year (95% CI -0.116 to 0.029), -0.090 points/year (95% CI -0.166 to -0.015), -0.145 (95% CI -0.221 to -0.069), respectively (p for trend <0.001). Similarly, memory and executive function also declined faster with increasing quartiles of hs-CRP. A significant association between hs-CRP concentration and long-term cognitive decline was observed in this study. Hs-CRP might serve as a biomarker for cognitive decline.

  17. Performance of homeostasis model assessment and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for prediction of isolated post-load hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y-C; Li, H-Y; Hung, C-S; Lin, M-S; Shih, S-R; Ma, W-Y; Hua, C-H; Chuang, L-M; Sung, F-C; Wei, J-N

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate whether homeostasis model assessment and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein improve the prediction of isolated post-load hyperglycaemia. The subjects were 1458 adults without self-reported diabetes recruited between 2006 and 2010. Isolated post-load hyperglycaemia was defined as fasting plasma glucose < 7 mmol/l and 2-h post-load plasma glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/l. Risk scores of isolated post-load hyperglycaemia were constructed by multivariate logistic regression. An independent group (n = 154) was enrolled from 2010 to 2011 to validate the models' performance. One hundred and twenty-three subjects (8.28%) were newly diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus. Among those with undiagnosed diabetes, 64 subjects (52%) had isolated post-load hyperglycaemia. Subjects with isolated post-load hyperglycaemia were older, more centrally obese and had higher blood pressure, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and lower homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function than those without diabetes. The risk scores included age, gender, BMI, homeostasis model assessment, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and HbA(1c). The full model had high sensitivity (84%) and specificity (87%) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.91), with a cut-off point of 23.81; validation in an independent data set showed 88% sensitivity, 77% specificity and an area under curve of 0.89. Over half of those with undiagnosed diabetes had isolated post-load hyperglycaemia. Homeostasis model assessment and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are useful to identify subjects with isolated post-load hyperglycaemia, with improved performance over fasting plasma glucose or HbA(1c) alone. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  18. The correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein levels and erectile function among men with late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Ijima, Masashi; Nohara, Takahiro; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Izumi, Koji; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and erectile function, and assessed the clinical role of hs-CRP levels in men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome. For 77 participants, we assessed Sexual Health Inventory for men (SHIM) score, Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) score and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). We also evaluated free testosterone (FT), hs-CRP, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, waist size and blood pressure. We attempted to identify parameters correlated with SHIM score and to determine the factors affecting cardiovascular risk based on hs-CRP levels. A Spearman rank correlation test revealed that age, AMS score, IPSS and hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with SHIM score. Age-adjusted analysis revealed that hs-CRP and IPSS were the independent factors affecting SHIM score (r= -0.304 and -0.322, respectively). Seventeen patients belonged to the moderate to high risk group for cardiovascular disease, whereas the remaining 60 belonged to the low risk group. Age, FT value and SHIM score showed significant differences between the two groups. A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that SHIM score was an independent factor affecting cardiovascular risk (OR: 0.796; 95%CI: 0.637-0.995).

  19. Comparison of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A levels before and after treatment for subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Bilgir, Ferda; Topcuoglu, Tuba; Calan, Mehmet; Calan, Ozlem

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to show the effect of propylthiouracil treatment on sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels on subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism. After checking sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels of 35 patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism, each was given 50 mg tablets of propylthiouracil three times daily. After 3 months, sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels were then compared to the levels before treatment. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and sCD40L levels were normal in the subclinical hyperthyroidism patients compared to the healthy controls, fetuin-A levels were statistically significantly higher (*p = 0.022). After treatment, fetuin-A levels of subclinical hyperthyroidism patients decreased statistically significantly compared to the levels before treatment (**p = 0.026). sCD40L and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels did not have a statistically significant difference compared to the control group and post-propylthiouracil treatment. In subclinical hyperthyroidism patients, high fetuin-A levels before propylthiouracil treatment and decreases in these levels after treatment in cases with subclinical hyperthyroidism indicated the possibility of preventing long-term cardiac complications with propylthiouracil treatment.

  20. Association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and abdominal aortic aneurysm: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpeng; Shen, Guanghui; Wang, Haiyang; Yao, Ye; Sun, Qingfeng; Jing, Bao; Liu, Gaoyan; Wu, Jia; Yuan, Chao; Liu, Siqi; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Shiyong; Li, Haocheng

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Medline, Cochrane, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched until 22 June 2016 using the keywords predictive factors, biomarkers, abdominal aortic aneurysm, prediction, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hsCRP. Prospective studies, retrospective studies, and cohort studies were included. Twelve case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis with a total of 8345 patients (1977 in the AAA group and 6368 in the control group). The pooled results showed that AAA patients had higher hsCRP value than the control group (difference in means = 1.827, 95% CI = 0.010 to 3.645, p = .049). Subgroup analysis found AAA patients with medium or small aortic diameter (<50 mm) had higher hsCRP plasma levels than the control group (difference in means = 1.301, 95% CI = 0.821 to 1.781, p < .001). In patients with large aortic diameter (≥50 mm), no difference was observed in hsCRP levels between the AAA and control groups (difference in means = 1.769, 95% CI = -1.387 to 4.925, p = .272). Multi-regression analysis found the difference in means of hsCRP plasma levels between AAA and control groups decreased as aortic diameter increased (slope = -0.04, p < .001), suggesting that hsCRP levels may be inversely associated with increasing aneurysm size. Our findings suggest that hsCRP levels may possibly be used as a diagnostic biomarker for AAA patients with medium or small aortic diameter but not for AAA patients with large aortic diameter. The correlation between serum hsCRP level and AAA aneurysm is not conclusive due to the small number of included articles and between-study heterogeneity.

  1. The effect of short-term cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Polona; Salobir, Barbara; Cobo, Nusret; Jug, Borut; Terčelj, Marjeta; Sabovič, Mišo

    2014-03-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an important biomarker of risk for coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the influence of short-term cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on values of hsCRP and classical risk factors, including metabolic syndrome. hsCRP and classical risk factors were measured before and after completed 2-week CR program in 30 men after AMI. The comparison group comprised 30 age-balanced healthy men, with no risk factors for coronary heart disease. As expected, in comparison to healthy individuals, patients had higher values of hsCRP; furthermore, smokers had significantly higher hsCRP values than nonsmokers. Patients had more expressed markers of metabolic syndrome and due to pharmacological therapy lower blood pressure, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). After CR was completed, a significant drop in hsCRP (P=0.006) and improvement of metabolic syndrome parameters (lower body mass index, blood pressure, LDL-C, triglycerides) was observed in nonsmokers, whereas no such changes occurred in smokers. Our study revealed that hsCRP and metabolic syndrome parameters can be substantially reduced by a 2-week CR program; however, this effect is present only in nonsmokers. Thus, all patients entering the CR program after AMI should be advised to quit smoking before entering the program to achieve optimal benefits.

  2. High sensitivity C-reactive protein and its relationship with impaired glucose regulation in lean patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Won; Han, Ji Eun; Kim, You Shin; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2012-04-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine-metabolic disorder, also associated with the metabolic syndrome. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of low-grade chronic inflammation is a potent predictor of cardiovascular events, closely linked to metabolic syndrome features and higher in patients with PCOS. However, hs-CRP in lean patients with PCOS has not been fully evaluated and few data are available. We aimed to investigate the relation between glucose intolerance and hs-CRP levels in lean patients with PCOS, and to evaluate the possible relationship between hs-CRP and PCOS by evaluating PCOS-related metabolic abnormalities in Korean women. We consecutively recruited 115 lean (BMI < 25kg/m(2)) patients diagnosed with PCOS and 103 lean healthy controls. The PCOS group was divided two groups: impaired glucose regulation (IGR) and normal glucose tolerance group (NGT). In lean patients with PCOS, hs-CRP level was higher in the IGR group than in the NGT group (0.60 ± 1.37 versus 0.18 ± 0.46, p(Bonf) = 0.023) and other metabolic risk factors were also higher in the IGR group than in the NGT group. And there were close relationships between hs-CRP level and metabolic risk factor, such as 2 h postprandial insulin level in the lean patients with PCOS.

  3. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p < 0.01) was significant. A significant relationship between dysplasia and hs-CRP (p < 0.04) was revealed. A significant relationship between age and hs-CRP was detected (p < 0.05). Although serum hs-CRP is not a specific biomarker for gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis.

  4. Correlations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and atherosclerosis in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Anan, Futoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Umeno, Yoshikazu; Iwao, Tetsu; Yonemochi, Hidetoshi; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2007-09-01

    The elevated level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP) and aortic stiffness are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. We tested the hypothesis that the HSCRP correlates with aortic stiffness and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients. The study consisted of 46 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and high HSCRP group (0.3-1.0 mg/dl, age: 57+/-5 years, mean+/-s.d.) and a control group of 55 age-matched patients with low HSCRP group (<0.3 mg/dl, 57+/-6 years). Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was measured by automatic oscillometric method and was used as an index of atherosclerosis. The body mass index (BMI) values (P<0.05) and waist circumferences (P<0.0005) and the waist-to-hip ratios (P<0.05) were higher in the high HSCRP group than in the low HSCRP group. The BaPWV was higher in the high HSCRP group than in the low HSCRP group (P<0.0001). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG; P<0.005) and insulin concentrations (P<0.0001), and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index (P<0.0001), were higher in the high HSCRP group than in the low HSCRP group. Multiple regression analysis showed that HSCRP levels were independently predicted by BaPWV and HOMA index. Our results indicate that the elevated level of HSCRP in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes is characterized by increased aortic stiffness and insulin resistance, and that the BaPWV and HOMA index are independent predictors of HSCRP.

  5. Calcium dobesilate reduces endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein serum levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Adl, Farzad Hami; Andalib, Dima; Khojasteh-Jafari, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the benefits of calcium dobesilate (CaD) administration on endothelial function and inflammatory status in patients with diabetic retinopathy through measurement of serum levels of endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Methods In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 90 patients with either severe nonproliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy and with blood glucose level of 120–200 mg/dl were randomly allocated to treatment with either CaD tablets (500 mg daily) or placebo for 3 months. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and macular status were performed before the study. The serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP were evaluated in both groups before and at the third month of the trial. Results The median serum level of hsCRP significantly differed between the groups 3 months following the CaD or placebo administration (2.2 mg/l in the CaD group versus 3.7 mg/l in the placebo group, p=0.01). The mean endothelin-1 serum level was 0.69±0.32 pg/ml in the CaD group and 0.86±0.30 pg/ml in the placebo group (p=0.01). Furthermore, in the CaD group, the serum levels of both endothelin-1 and hsCRP were significantly decreased 3 months after administration of CaD (p<0.001). Conclusions Administration of the CaD in the patients with diabetic retinopathy may reduce the serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP. This might imply amelioration of the endothelial function and inflammatory status following CaD therapy in these patients. PMID:23335852

  6. High sensitivity C reactive protein, fibrinogen levels and the onset of major depressive disorder in post-acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lafitte, Marianne; Tastet, Sandrine; Perez, Paul; Serisé, Marie-Aimée; Grandoulier, Anne-Sophie; Aouizerate, Bruno; Sibon, Igor; Capuron, Lucile; Couffinhal, Thierry

    2015-03-18

    Major depression disorder (MDD) is a common condition in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and depression is a risk factor for mortality following an ACS. Growing evidence suggests that there is an intricate interplay between atherosclerosis, inflammation and depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of atherosclerosis-induced inflammation in the mediation of MDD. 87 patients without depression were recruited at the time of an ACS, evaluated at 3 and 7 days and followed at 1, 3 and 9 months for the occurrence of a MDD as assessed by structured interviews (MINI). At each time point, they were monitored for inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C Reactive Protein {hsCRP} and fibrinogen), cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerosis burden. Association between possible predictive characteristics and depression was assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model. The overall incidence of MDD, in this population, was 28.7% [95% CI: 19.5 - 39.4] during the 9-month follow up period. Elevated hsCRP was not associated with depression onset after an ACS (adjusted OR: 1.07 [0.77 - 1.48]; p = 0.70), and similarly no association was found with fibrinogen. Furthermore, we found no association between hsCRP, fibrinogen or atherosclerosis burden at any time-point, and the occurrence of a MDD (or HDRS-17 and MADRS). The only factor associated with depression occurrence after an ACS was a previous personal history of depression (adjusted OR: 11.02 [2.74 to 44.34]; p = 0.0007). The present study shows that after an ACS, patients treated with optimal medications could have a MDD independent of elevated hsCRP or fibrinogen levels. Personal history of depression may be a good marker to select patients who should be screened for depression after an ACS.

  7. Effects of adjunctive N-acetylcysteine on depressive symptoms: Modulation by baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Mauro; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Verri, Waldiceu A; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Baracat, Marcela; Vargas, Heber Odebrecht; Machado, Regina Célia Bueno Rezende; Pescim, Rodrigo Rossetto; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2018-05-01

    Outcomes in a RCTs of 12 weeks of theclinical efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) as an adjunctive treatment on depression and anxiety symptoms and its effects on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. A wide array of measures were made. The 17-item version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17); the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A); Sheehan Disability Scale; Quality of Life; Clinical Global Impression (CGI); anthropometrics measures; and vital signs and biochemical laboratory. There were no significant differences among the groups regarding demographic, clinical features, use of medication, metabolic syndrome and comorbidities. From baseline to week 12, individuals receiving NAC, versus placebo, had a statistically significant reduction in depressive symptoms on HDRS 17 (p < 0.01) and anxiety symptoms on HAM-A (p = 0.04), but only for individuals with levels of hs-CRP > 3 mg/L at baseline. Individuals receiving NAC with baseline levels of hs-CRP > 3 mg/L, had more significant reduction in uric acid levels compared to individuals with baseline levels of hs-CRP ≤ 3 mg/L on week 12. Participants receiving placebogained significantly more weight during the 12 weeks for baseline levels of hs-CRP ≤ 3 mg/L and hs-CRP > 3 mg/L, and individuals receiving NAC in both groups did not have significant weight change during the 12 weeks. No individuals were withdrawn from the study because of adverse event. NAC group exhibited significantly greater reduction on hs-CRP levels than placebo group from baseline to week 12. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier; NCT02252341. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Is high-sensitive C-reactive protein a biomarker for functional somatic symptoms? A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tak, Lineke M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Slaets, Joris P J; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2009-10-01

    Functional somatic symptoms (FSS) are symptoms unexplained in terms of underlying organic pathology. Alterations in the immune system function may be associated with FSS via induction of sickness behavior. We aimed to investigate whether low-grade immune system activation is positively associated with FSS in a population-based cohort of 881 adults (46% male, mean age 53.0, SD 11.4). Participants completed the somatization section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview surveying the presence of 43 FSS. Innate immune function was assessed by measuring high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Follow-up measurements of hs-CRP and FSS were performed approximately 2years later. Regression analyses, with adjustments for gender, age, body mass index, anxiety, depression, smoking, alcohol use, and frequency of exercise, did not reveal a cross-sectional association (beta=0.01, t=0.40, p=0.693) or longitudinal association (beta=-0.03, t=-0.93, p=0.352) between hs-CRP and the total number of FSS. When examining different bodily clusters of FSS, hs-CRP was not associated with the gastrointestinal FSS cluster, but the association approached statistical significance for the general FSS cluster (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.98-1.18) and musculoskeletal FSS cluster (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.99-1.17). For the latter association, exploratory analyses revealed that mainly the pure musculoskeletal complaints were responsible (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.21). We conclude that the level of hs-CRP is not a biomarker for the total number of FSS in the general population. The association between hs-CRP and musculoskeletal and general FSS needs further study.

  9. The effect of aerobic versus strength-based training on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in older adults.

    PubMed

    Martins, Raul A; Neves, Ana P; Coelho-Silva, Manuel J; Veríssimo, Manuel T; Teixeira, Ana Maria

    2010-09-01

    Increased levels of inflammatory markers, namely, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), have been associated with several chronic diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Forty-five women and men aged >64 years participated in the study and were randomly assigned to two exercise intervention groups and a non-exercising control group. The participants assigned to the exercising groups followed a 16-week exercise protocol based either on aerobic training (AT) or strength training (ST) followed by a further 16 weeks off-training period. The control group (C) remained sedentary throughout the study. Evaluation of body mass, BMI, waist circumference, aerobic endurance, lower-body strength, upper-body strength, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and hs-CRP were performed at baseline, after 16 weeks (post-training for the exercise groups) and at 32 weeks (follow-up). Both, AT and ST groups significantly increased functional fitness at the end of the exercise programs when compared to baseline values. hs-CRP concentrations were maintained throughout the study for the C group, while decreasing 10% at 16 weeks and 51% at 32 weeks for the AT group. In the ST group the hs-CRP concentrations decreased by 11 and 39% at 16 and 32 weeks, respectively. Decreases in hs-CRP concentrations were statistically significant for the AT and ST groups at the 32-week evaluation when compared to baseline. Reduction in hs-CRP concentrations seemed to be associated with strength gains and adiposity loss.

  10. Prognostic Value of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, Procalcitonin and Pancreatic Stone Protein in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Nie, Jun; Wu, Fu-Xia; Zou, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Feng-Yi

    2017-03-30

    BACKGROUND To investigate the prognostic value of procalcitonin (PCT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and pancreatic stone protein (PSP) in children with sepsis. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 214 patients with sepsis during hospitalization were enrolled. Serum levels of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were measured on day 1 of hospitalization and the survival rates of children were recorded after a follow-up of 28 days. Pearson's correlation analysis was conducted to test the association of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP with pediatric critical illness score (PCIS). Logistic regression models were used to analyze the risk factors contributing to patients' death. The AUC was used to determine the value of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP in the prognosis of patients with sepsis. RESULTS The expression of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP in the dying patients was higher than in the surviving patients (p<0.001). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that serum PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP levels were negatively correlated with PCIS (p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were independent risk factors for the prognosis of patients with sepsis (p<0.001). ROC analysis showed the AUC values of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.77-0.88), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.70-0.82), and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.67-0.79), respectively. The combined AUC value of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP, was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.87-0.95), which was significantly increased compared with PCT, hs-CRP, or PSP (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The combination of serum PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP represents a promising biomarker of risk, and is a useful clinical tool for risk stratification of children with sepsis.

  11. Estimation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with periodontal disease and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Anitha, V; Nair, Sushma; Shivakumar, V; Shanmugam, M; Priya, B Meena; Rajesh, P

    2015-01-01

    HsCRP (Highly sensitive C reactive protein) is a global indicator for future vascular events in adults detected in blood stream 48 hours before the cardiovascular event. Periodontal disease may increase blood levels of inflammatory markers like IL-6, CRP and HsCRP. Hence the aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of elevated HsCRP levels in chronic periodontitis patients. 100 patients who reported for cardiac master health check up were enrolled in the study. The periodontal status was assessed using periodontal probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. The decayed, missing and filled tooth was recorded using DMFT index. The venous samples of these patients were obtained for recording HsCRP levels. Pearson correlation was used to analyze the relationship between HsCRP level and probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and DMFT. The correlation value was 0.051, 0.025 and 0.101 respectively, the correlation is statistically significant for probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (P>0.05). Chi-square test was performed to study the association between gender and HsCRP, Diabetes Mellitus and HsCRP and Hypertension and HsCRP; the results showed that there is no significant association between any of the above mentioned factors and HsCRP level in blood. We found an increased level of HsCRP in patients with chronic periodontitis which revealed the susceptibility of these patients to cardiac diseases like myocardial infarction and stroke. Hence present day focus in the line of management of cardiac patient has changed from the periodontal perspective.

  12. High-sensitivity serum C-reactive protein levels in subjects with or without myocardial infarction or periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Persson, G Rutger; Pettersson, Thomas; Ohlsson, Ola; Renvert, Stefan

    2005-03-01

    Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsC-rp) is a non-specific marker of inflammation. Elevated hsC-rp levels are found in subjects with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Periodontitis may influence hsC-rp levels. To assess periodontal status and hsC-rp serum levels in consecutive subjects hospitalized and diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n=85) and in a group of carefully matched subjects (gender, age social, ethnic, and smoking habits) without clinical evidence of CVD (n=63). hsC-rp levels, other routine serum values, and clinical periodontal conditions were studied. Subjects with AMI had higher hsC-rp levels than control subjects (p<0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). The odds that subjects in the control group with periodontitis (30% or more sites with>4.0 mm loss of alveolar bone) had serum hsC-rp>1.8 mg/l was 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1-7.3, p<0.05). Stepwise linear regression analysis failed to include periodontal parameters in an explanatory model to hsC-rp values. Only the serum leucocyte (white blood cell (WBC)) counts were explanatory to hsC-rp values (beta standard coefficient=0.45, t=3.2, p<0.001). Serum WBC counts were significantly higher in control subjects with periodontitis (p<0.03) but not in subjects in the AMI group (p<0.57). (1) As expected, elevated serum hsC-rp concentration and serum WBC counts are associated with acute coronary heart disease. (2) Elevated serum hsC-rp values are associated with radiographically defined periodontitis in subjects with no evidence of CVD. (3) Periodontal parameters are not explanatory to elevated serum hsC-rp values if serum WBC and low-density lipoprotein counts are included in the regression model. Copyright 2005 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  13. Periodontal status and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in polycystic ovary syndrome with and without medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Surya; Tewari, Shikha; Sharma, Rajinder K; Singhal, Savita Rani; Narula, Satish C

    2014-10-01

    Recently, some studies have revealed the effect of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) on gingival inflammation. This cross-sectional study attempts to assess the periodontal status and systemic inflammation of women receiving medical treatment for PCOS and women newly diagnosed with PCOS. A total of 126 participants comprising 41 newly diagnosed patients with PCOS (PCOS-N), 45 patients with PCOS on medical treatment (PCOS-MT), and 40 systemically healthy controls (control group [CG]) were examined. Periodontal parameters, anthropometric parameters, and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were recorded. Women with newly diagnosed PCOS had increased sites with bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth, clinical attachment level (CAL), waist circumference (WC), hsCRP, and prevalence of periodontitis compared with control and PCOS-MT groups (P ≤0.05). On partial correlation analysis after controlling for confounders, BOP and CAL correlated positively and significantly with hsCRP (P = 0.01 and P = 0.005). Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that BOP and CAL (dependent variable) (P = 0.009/R(2) = 0.05 and P = 0.005/R(2) = 0.07, respectively) had significant association with hsCRP. Furthermore, hsCRP, when considered as outcome, also exhibited association with CAL and WC (P = 0.002/R(2) = 0.07 and P = 0.04/R(2) = 0.106). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the PCOS-N group had 2.88 times increased likelihood of having moderate periodontitis (adjusted odds ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 6.98). Women with newly diagnosed PCOS may have increased prevalence and likelihood for periodontitis, with higher measures of periodontal inflammation and breakdown than those on medical treatment for PCOS and systemically healthy females. Furthermore, periodontal breakdown might depend on systemic inflammation and vice versa.

  14. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is a Predictor of Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, David C; Whitbourn, Robert; MacIsaac, Andrew; Wilson, Andrew; Burns, Andrew; Palmer, Sonny; Layland, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and microvascular dysfunction (MVD) are independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with ischemic heart disease. This study aimed to assess the relationship between inflammation, MVD, and myocardial injury. Coronary microvascular function was assessed in 74 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using the index of microvascular resistance (IMR) by a pressure-temperature sensor-tipped wire. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level was quantified by rate turbidimetry. Severe MVD was defined as IMR ≥ 30. Pearson correlation was computed to assess the relationships between hsCRP, troponin, and IMR of culprit vessel. Predictors of severe MVD were assessed by regression analysis. Acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) represented 49% of the total cohort. Study cohort was divided into low C-reactive protein (CRP) (hsCRP < 3 mg/L) and high CRP (hsCRP ≥ 3 mg/L) groups. There was higher representation of smokers (78 vs. 52%), diabetics (39 vs. 18%), and ACS (61 vs. 33%), as well as higher body mass index (29.4 ± 4.6 vs. 27.2 ± 4.1) in the high CRP group. Pre-PCI and post-PCI IMR were significantly elevated in the high CRP group compared to the low CRP group (pre-PCI IMR: 29.0 ± 13.9 vs. 17.4 ± 11.1, p  < 0.0001; post-PCI IMR: 23.0 ± 16.8 vs. 15.5 ± 8.4, p  = 0.02). Peak troponin levels were significantly raised in the high CRP group (9.96 ± 17.19 vs. 1.17 ± 3.00 μg/L, p  = 0.002). There was a strong positive correlation between hsCRP and pre-PCI IMR ( r  = 0.85, p  < 0.0001). Pre- and post-PCI IMR levels were correlated with peak troponin level ( r  = 0.45, p  < 0.0001; r  = 0.33, p  = 0.005, respectively). Predictors of severe MVD include male gender (OR 3.0), diabetes (OR 3.7), smoking history (OR 4.0), ACS presentation (OR 8.5), and hsCRP ≥ 3 mg/L (OR 5.6). hsCRP is a significant predictor of

  15. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    PubMed

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p < 0.001). Serum uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p < 0.001) and higher odds for hyperglycemia (8.036; 2.178-29.647, p = 0.001) as compared to individual rise of hs-CRP or uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS.

  16. Serum cystatin C is independently associated with renal impairment and high sensitivity C-reactive protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chew, Christine; Pemberton, Philip W; Husain, Awal Al-M; Haque, Sahena; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is usually estimated using the modified Cockcroft-Gault (mCG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations. We aimed to study cystatin C (sCysC) in SLE to assess its agreement with standard renal indices and investigate factors affecting sCysC in SLE. SLE patients (≥4 ACR criteria) and healthy women from Greater Manchester were recruited and clinical assessments were undertaken. SCysC was measured using R & D Systems' ELISA. Agreement between renal measures was assessed using Deming plots and factors associated with sCysC in SLE were examined by multiple linear regression analyses. 178 patients and 68 controls had median (IQR) ages of 53 (46-61) and 50 (39-60) years, respectively. In an age-adjusted analysis, SLE patients had higher sCysC (1.16 [0.98-1.36] vs. 0.950 [0.73-1.13] mg/l; p<0.0001) and within SLE those with a history of lupus nephritis had higher sCysC (1.31 [1.10-1.66] vs. 1.11 [0.95-1.29] mg/l; p<0.005). SCysC correlated positively with serum creatinine, and inversely to renal measures (r=-0.530; p<0.0001 [mCG], and r=-0.620; p<0.0001 [MDRD]). There was closer agreement between the two eGFR measures than between either eGFR measures and sCysC. In addition to age and serum creatinine, a multivariate analysis (β, p) found that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (0.03, 0.026) was also independently associated with sCysC in SLE. In SLE, sCysC may be influenced by low grade inflammation as well as by renal dysfunction. Therefore, SCysC should not supplant current assessment of renal dysfunction in SLE.

  17. Changes of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein During Clopidogrel Therapy in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Maleki, Majid; Babaali, Nima; Abdi, Seifollah; Mohsenian, Maryam

    2016-02-01

    The crucial role of inflammation in the development and progression of atherosclerosis has been previously described. However, there is insufficient data available to demonstrate the changes in high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) during clopidogrel therapy. In the present study, we aimed to assess the changes in the inflammatory marker of coronary heart disease, i.e., hs-CRP during clopidogrel therapy, in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We also evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of clopidogrel, if any, in different groups of patients. The study population included 650 consecutive patients who underwent elective, urgent, or emergent PCI. Patients received a 300-mg loading dose of clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) and aspirin either 24 hours before the planned PCI, or immediately before the procedure in patients with urgent or emergent PCI, followed by a 75-mg daily maintenance dose for up to 12 weeks. At the end of the 12(th) week, hs-CRP was re-assessed. Six hundred-fifty patients including 386 (59.4%) male and 264 (40.6%) female subjects were enrolled in the study. The mean hs-CRP level was 15.36 ± 9.83 mg/L with a median of 14 mg/L (interquartile range 8 to 19.6 mg/L). Female, hypertensive, diabetic, and non-smoking patients had higher reductions in hs-CRP in response to clopidogrel therapy compared to male, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic and smoker patients, respectively (all P < 0.005). The changes in the hs-CRP levels were also statistically different in patients with various index events before PCI (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the mean reduction of hs-CRP between the patients without stent implantation and those with bare metal or drug-eluting stents (P = 0.07), respectively. We found that the use of clopidogrel in patients undergoing PCI had favorable effects on the suppression of hs-CRP. This effect appears to be heightened and more apparent in some group of patients with co-morbidities such as

  18. Circulating interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decrease after periodontal therapy in otherwise healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Marcaccini, Andrea M; Meschiari, César A; Sorgi, Carlos A; Saraiva, Maria C P; de Souza, Ana M; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Tanus-Santos, José E; Novaes, Arthur B; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2009-04-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with many chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, and a common chronic inflammation pathway has been suggested for these conditions. However, few studies have evaluated whether periodontal disease, in the absence of other known inflammatory conditions and smoking, affects circulating markers of chronic inflammation. This study compared chronic inflammation markers in control individuals and patients with periodontal disease and observed whether non-surgical periodontal therapy affected inflammatory disease markers after 3 months. Plasma and serum of 20 controls and 25 patients with periodontal disease were obtained prior to and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. All patients were non-smokers, they did not use any medication, and they had no history or detectable signs and symptoms of systemic diseases. Periodontal and systemic parameters included probing depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, hematologic parameters, as well as the following inflammatory markers: interleukin (IL)-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), CD40 ligand, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin), soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1. There were no differences in the hematologic parameters of the patients in the control and periodontal disease groups. Among the tested inflammatory markers, IL-6 concentrations were higher in the periodontal disease group at baseline compared to the controls (P = 0.006). Therapy was highly effective (P <0.001 for all the analyzed clinical parameters), and a decrease in circulating IL-6 and hs-CRP concentrations was observed 3 months after therapy (P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively). Our results also suggest that the CD40 ligand marker may have been different in the control and periodontal disease groups prior to the therapy (P = 0.009). In apparently otherwise healthy patients

  19. A 1-year lifestyle intervention for weight loss in individuals with type 2 diabetes reduces high C-reactive protein levels and identifies metabolic predictors of change

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss reduced elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese individuals with diabetes and identified metabolic and fitness predictors of hs-CRP change. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look A...

  20. Association of pentraxin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein as inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic periodontitis and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ramanarayana; Chinthalapani, Srikanth; Ramisetti, Arpita; Salavadhi, Shyam Sunder; Ramachandran, Radhika

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation is a common feature of both peripheral artery disease (PAD) and periodontal disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between PAD and periodontal disease by examining the levels of inflammatory cytokines, pentraxin-3 (PTX-3), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein from serum. A total of 50 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups: those with PAD (test group) and those with the non-PAD group (control group) based on ankle-brachial index values. Periodontal examinations and biochemical analysis for PTX-3 and high-sensitive C-reactive protein were performed to compare the two groups. All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18. In the clinical parameters, there is statistically significant difference present between plaque index, clinical attachment loss, and periodontal inflammatory surface area with higher mean values in patients with PAD having periodontitis. There is statistical significant ( P < 0.01) difference in all biochemical parameters ( P < 0.05) considered in the study between PAD patients and non-PAD patients with higher mean values of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and PTX-3. PTX-3 and acute-phase cytokine such as hs-CRP can be regarded as one of the best indicators to show the association between the PAD and periodontitis followed by hs-CRP, TC, very LDL (VLDL), and LDL. However, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a poor indicator for its association with chronic periodontitis and PAD.

  1. Highly-sensitive C-reactive protein, a biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk, in radically-treated differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients after repeated thyroid hormone withholding.

    PubMed

    Piciu, A; Piciu, D; Marlowe, R J; Irimie, A

    2013-02-01

    In patients radically treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, we assessed the response of highly-sensitive C-reactive protein, an inflammatory biomarker for cardiovascular risk, after thyroid hormone withholding ("deprivation"), as well as factors potentially influencing this response. We included 52 adults (mean age 45.6±14.0 years, 35 females) who were disease-free after total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and chronic thyroid hormone therapy. They were lifelong non-smokers without apparent inflammatory comorbidity, cardiovascular history beyond pharmacotherapy-controlled hypertension, anti-dyslipidemic medication, or C-reactive protein >10 mg/L in any study measurement. The index deprivation lasted ≥2 weeks, elevating serum thyrotropin >40 mIU/L or ≥100 × the individual's suppressed level. We examined the relationship of age, number of prior deprivations, and gender with the magnitude of post-deprivation C-reactive protein concentration through multivariable statistical analyses using the F test on linear regression models. Post-deprivation, C-reactive protein reached intermediate cardiovascular risk levels (based on general population studies involving chronic elevation), 1-3 mg/L, in 44.2% of patients and high-risk levels, >3 mg/L, in another 17.3%. Mean C-reactive protein was 1.77±1.50 mg/L, differing significantly in females (2.12±1.66 mg/L) vs. males (1.05±0.69 mg/L, P <0.001). In multivariable analysis, patients ≤45 years old (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval 0.164 [0.049-0.548]) were less likely, and females, more likely (3.571 [1.062-12.009]) to have post-deprivation C-reactive protein ≥1 mg/L. Thyroid hormone withdrawal frequently elevated C-reactive protein to levels that when present chronically, were associated with increased cardiovascular risk in general population studies. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Slightly elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in women with varying degrees of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Ulrica; Wikstrand, John; Bergström, Göran M L; Behre, Carl Johan; Hulthe, Johannes; Fagerberg, Björn

    2010-11-01

    We examined whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥2.0 mg/L was associated with increased intima-media thickness (IMT), plaque burden, and plaque echolucency in carotid arteries. Women (n = 635) from a population sample of 64-year-old females with varying degrees of glucose tolerance underwent risk factor assessment, measurement of hsCRP, and ultrasound examinations of the carotid arteries. Participants with hsCRP levels ≥2.0 mg/L had elevated carotid bulb IMT independently of other cardiovascular risk factors compared with those with hsCRP <2.0 mg/L. The participants with plaques in the highhsCRP group had larger total plaque area compared to those with plaque in the lower hsCRP group. Plaque echolucency did not differ between groups. High-sensitivity CRP levels ≥2.0 mg/L were accompanied by elevated IMT in the carotid bulbs independently of other cardiovascular risk factors. Total plaque area was larger among women with plaques in the high hsCRP group versus the lower hsCRP group.

  3. Association between serum uric acid, high sensitive C-reactive protein and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmadnezhad, Mahsa; Arefhosseini, Seyed Rafie; Parizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Tavallaie, Shima; Tayefi, Maryam; Darroudi, Susan; Ghazizadeh, Hamideh; Moohebati, Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Heidari-Bakavoli, Alireza; Azarpajouh, Mahmoud Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Mogharebzadeh, Vahid; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2018-05-01

    There is persuasive evidence that oxidative stress and inflammation are features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We have investigated the relationship between serum pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB), serum uric acid, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in 7,208 participants from the MASHAD study cohort, who were categorized as having MetS, or not, using International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria. Serum hs-CRP was measured by Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-enhanced immunoturbidimetry method using an Alycon analyzer (ABBOTT, Chicago, IL, USA). A colorimetric method was used to determine serum PAB. Serum PAB values were significantly higher in the individuals with MetS compared to those without (P < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a step-wise increase in mean serum PAB concentrations as the number of components of the MetS increased. The combination of features of MetS had different association with serum PAB and hs-CRP. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that body mass index (BMI, B = 2.04, P < 0.001), physical activity level (PAL, B = 18.728, P = 0.001), serum uric acid (B = -1.545, P = 0.003), and serum C-reactive protein (B = 0.663, P < 0.001) were associated with serum PAB in individuals with MetS. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that serum PAB (B = 0.002, P < 0.001, CI = 1.001-1.003), serum C-reactive protein (B = 0.007, P < 0.015, CI = 1.001-1.013), and serum uric acid (B = 0.207, P < 0.001, CI = 1.186-1.277) were all significantly associated with MetS. Serum PAB was strongly associated with serum uric acid and serum hs-CRP. Moreover, serum PAB as well as serum uric acid and serum hs-CRP were independently associated with MetS. Individual features of MetS were also associated with serum hs-CRP and PAB. © 2018 BioFactors, 44(3):263-271, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Calculating the ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score if the conventional c-reactive protein level is below the limit of detection or if high-sensitivity c-reactive protein is used: an analysis in the DESIR cohort.

    PubMed

    Machado, Pedro; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Landewé, Robert; van Gaalen, Floris A; Roux, Christian; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-02-01

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) is a composite measure of disease activity in axial spondyloarthritis. The aims of this study were to determine the most appropriate method for calculating the ASDAS using the C-reactive protein (CRP) level when the conventional CRP level was below the limit of detection, to determine how low CRP values obtained by high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) measurement influence ASDAS-CRP results, and to test agreement between different ASDAS formulae. Patients with axial spondyloarthritis who had a conventional CRP level below the limit of detection (5 mg/liter) were selected (n = 257). The ASDAS–conventional CRP with 11 different imputations for the conventional CRP value (range 0–5 mg/liter, at 0.5-mg/liter intervals) was calculated. The ASDAS-hsCRP and ASDAS using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were also calculated. Agreement between the ASDAS formulae was tested. The ASDAS-hsCRP showed better agreement with the ASDAS-CRP calculated using the conventional CRP imputation values of 1.5 and 2.0 mg/liter and with the ASDAS-ESR than with other imputed formulae. Disagreement occurred mainly in lower disease activity states (inactive/moderate disease activity). When the CRP value was <2 mg/liter, the resulting ASDAS-CRP scores may have been inappropriately low. When the conventional CRP level is below the limit of detection or when the hsCRP level is <2 mg/liter, the constant value of 2 mg/liter should be used to calculate the ASDAS-CRP score. There is good agreement between the ASDAS-hsCRP and ASDAS-ESR; however, formulae are not interchangeable.

  5. Positive association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level and diabetes mellitus among US non-Hispanic black adults.

    PubMed

    Shankar, A; Li, J

    2008-08-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a positive association between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and diabetes mellitus. However among US race-ethnicities, the putative association between CRP and diabetes mellitus in non-Hispanic Blacks is not clear. We specifically examined the association between high-sensitivity CRP level and diabetes mellitus in a representative sample of US non-Hispanic blacks. Cross-sectional study among 1,479 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 non-Hispanic black participants aged > or = 20 years. Main outcome-of-interest was the presence of diabetes mellitus (fasting plasma glucose > or = 126 mg/dL, non-fasting plasma glucose > or = 200 mg/dL, or self-reported current use of oral hypoglycemic medication or insulin) (n=204). Higher CRP levels were positively associated with diabetes mellitus, independent of smoking, waist circumference, hypertension, and other confounders. Multivariable odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence intervals (CI)] comparing elevated CRP level (>3 mg/L) to low CRP level (<1 mg/L) was 3.12 (1.77-5.48), p-trend<0.0001. This association persisted in separate analysis among men and women. The results were consistent in subgroup analyses by categories of age, smoking, body mass index, and hypertension status. In nonparametric models, the positive association between serum CRP and diabetes mellitus appeared to be present across the full range of CRP, without any threshold effect. Higher serum high-sensitivity CRP levels are positively associated with diabetes mellitus in a sample of US non-Hispanic blacks. Inflammatory processes previously shown to be related to diabetes mellitus in other race-ethnicities may be involved in non-Hispanic blacks also.

  6. Hypoadiponectinemia, elevated iron and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and their relation with prostate size in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nandeesha, H; Eldhose, A; Dorairajan, L N; Anandhi, B

    2017-09-01

    Elevated iron, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and hypoadiponectinemia are known to initiate tumour development. There is paucity of data regarding the above-mentioned parameters and their relation with prostate size in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The present study was designed to assess the levels of iron, hs-CRP and adiponectin levels and their association with prostate size in BPH patients. A total of 37 BPH cases and 36 controls were enrolled in the study. Iron, hs-CRP and adiponectin were estimated in both the groups. Iron and hs-CRP were significantly increased and adiponectin was significantly reduced in BPH cases when compared with controls. Iron (r = .397, p = .015), hs-CRP (r = .341, p = .039) and adiponectin (r = -.464, p = .004) were significantly associated with prostate size in BPH cases. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that iron acts as predictor of prostate size in BPH (R 2  = 0.395, β = 0.526, p = .001). We conclude that iron and hs-CRP are elevated and adiponectin is reduced in BPH cases and associated with prostate size. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Are serum gamma-glutamyl transferase, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and ischaemia-modified albumin useful in diagnosing PCOS?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Keskin, Ugur; Ozturk, Ozlem; Ulubay, Mustafa; Alanbay, İbrahim; Aydin, Aytekin; Yenen, Müfit Cemal

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the serum levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Fifty-three patients with PCOS were included in our study along with 40 women with no PCOS as the control group. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI). GGT levels were significantly higher in the women with PCOS than the women in the control group (p < 0.05). They were also significantly higher in the PCOS women who were normoweight and overweight than the normoweight and overweight women in the control group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the circulating levels of hsCRP and IMA between the women with PCOS and the controls or between the normoweight and overweight subgroups. GGT may be associated with the diagnosis of PCOS when the threshold is set at >15.5 U/L. With the application of this threshold, raised GGT levels had 83% sensitivity (95% CI 0.70-0.90) and 67.5% specificity (95% CI 0.52-0.79), for the diagnosis of PCOS. In our study, GGT levels were elevated in the PCOS patients independent of BMI and could thus be an important marker of PCOS.

  8. Correlation Between High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Reactive Oxygen Metabolites During A One-year Period Among Asymptomatic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with human health and the disease status. The present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal correlation between the diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) level, as an oxidative stress-related marker, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), as an inflammatory marker, during a one-year period among asymptomatic subjects. Methods The data, including anthropometric and biochemical markers, were collected at baseline and after the one-year period from 71 participants (male/female = 41/30, mean age 50 years). The correlation between the changes of the d-ROMs and hsCRP levels during the study period was examined. Results A simple correlation analysis showed a significant and positive correlation to exist between the changes of the d-ROMs and hsCRP levels (r = 0.40, P < 0.01). This significant correlation remained independent in a multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusions The present findings suggest that the relationship between the d-ROMs and hsCRP levels could be prospectively followed, and that monitoring both markers may help to better understand the cooperation of inflammation and oxidative stress in association with health and disease. Further studies are necessary to clarify the biological mechanism(s) responsible for the observed relationship. Keywords Oxidative stress; Oxygen reactive species; Inflammation; CRP PMID:22383928

  9. Effects of febuxostat on insulin resistance and expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Yuan, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yuewu

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of febuxostat on IR and the expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with primary gout. Forty-two cases of primary gout patients without uric acid-lowering therapy were included in this study. After a physical examination, 20 age- and sex-matched patients were included as normal controls. The levels of fasting insulin (INS), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and hs-CRP were determined. IR was assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Gout patients had higher levels of UA, INS, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP than normal controls (P < 0.05). After 4-, 12-, and 24-week febuxostat treatments, UA and hs-CRP concentrations were significantly lower than baseline (P < 0.05). INS and HOM-IR decreased slightly after a 4-week treatment with febuxostat but declined significantly after 12 and 24 weeks of treatment. Importantly, hs-CRP values positively correlated with those of HOMA-IR (r = 0.353, P = 0.018) and INS (r = 0.426, P = 0.034). Our findings confirm that IR exists in gout patients and implicate that febuxostat can effectively control the level of serum UA and increase insulin sensitivity in primary gout patients.

  10. Crevicular and serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-4 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Minal; Pradeep, A R; Priyanka, N; Kalra, Nitish; Naik, Savitha B

    2014-06-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that are involved in destruction of the periodontal structures. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of MCP-4 and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in periodontal health and disease and to find a correlation between MCP-4 and hsCRP in GCF and serum. 40 subjects (20 males and 20 females) were selected and divided into three groups based on clinical parameters and radiologic parameters: Group 1 (10 healthy); Group 2 (15 gingivitis subjects) and Group 3 (15 chronic periodontitis subjects). The levels of serum and GCF MCP-4 were determined by ELISA and hsCRP levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry method. The mean GCF and serum concentration of MCP-4 were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and least in group 1. Similarly, the mean hsCRP concentrations were highest for group 3 and least in group 1. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between serum and GCF MCP-4 and hsCRP levels and periodontal parameters. The levels of MCP-4 and hsCRP increased from healthy to periodontitis. It can be proposed that MCP-4 and hsCRP are the potential biomarkers of inflammation in periodontal health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cinnamon may have therapeutic benefits on lipid profile, liver enzymes, insulin resistance, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Askari, Faezeh; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2014-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent cause of hepatic injury in the world. One of the most important therapeutic strategies for this disease is modulating insulin resistance and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that supplementation with cinnamon exerts an insulin sensitizer effect in patients with NAFLD. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with two parallel groups, fifty patients with NAFLD were randomized to receive daily supplementation with either two capsules of cinnamon (each capsule contain 750 mg cinnamon) or 2 placebo capsules, daily for 12 weeks. During the intervention, all patients were given advice on how to implement a balanced diet and physical activity into their daily lives. In the treatment group (P < .05), significant decreases in HOMA (Homeostatic Model Assessment) index, FBS (fasting blood glucose), total cholesterol, triglyceride, ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), GGT (gamma glutamine transpeptidase), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were seen, but there was no significant change in serum high-density lipoproteins levels (P = .122). In both groups, low-density lipoproteins decreased significantly (P < .05). In conclusion, the study suggests that taking 1500 mg cinnamon daily may be effective in improving NAFLD characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High sensitive C-reactive protein and the risk of acute kidney injury among ST elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Yacov; Leshem-Rubinow, Eran; Steinvil, Arie; Keren, Gad; Roth, Arie; Arbel, Yaron

    2015-10-01

    Elevated periprocedural high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was shown to be associated with an increased risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) in non-myocardial infarction (MI) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), however, no information to date is present regarding its predicting role for AKI in MI patients. We evaluated whether admission serum hs-CRP levels may predict risk of AKI among ST elevation MI (STEMI) patients undergoing primary PCI. Five hundred and sixty-two patients that were admitted with STEMI and treated with primary PCI were included in the study. Serum hs-CRP levels were determined from blood samples taken prior to PCI. Patients' medical records were reviewed for occurrence of AKI, in-hospital complications and 30 days mortality. Mean age was 62 ± 16 and 455 (80 %) were males. Patients were divided into two groups, according to their admission hs-CRP values: group 1: hs-CRP ≤9 mg/l (n = 394) and group 2: hs-CRP >9 mg/l (n = 168). Patients with hs-CRP >9 mg/l had significantly higher rate of AKI following PCI (17 vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), more in-hospital complications and higher30 -day mortality rate (11 vs. 1 %; p = 0.02). In a multivariable logistic regression model admission hs-CRP level >9 mg/l was an independent predictor for AKI (OR 2.7, 95 % CI: 1.39-5.29; p = 0.001) and a strong trend for 30 day mortality (OR 4.27, 95 % CI: 0.875-21.10; p = 0.07). Admission serum hs-CRP level >9 mg/l is an independent predictor for AKI following primary PCI in STEMI patients.

  13. Comparison of procalcitonin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of sepsis and septic shock in the oldest old patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Qing; Xia, Ying; Liu, Dawei

    2017-08-01

    Although the role of serum procalcitonin (PCT) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in the diagnosis of sepsis and septic shock is well studied, it has not been investigated among oldest old patients. The aim of our study is to determine the role of PCT and hs-CRP in the assessment of sepsis and septic shock in this specific group of patients in the ICU. This is a prospective observational study. Patients >85 years of age admitted to the ICU from May 1st, 2016 to February 1st, 2017 were evaluated. Patients were divided into a sepsis and septic shock group(sepsis/SS) and a non-sepsis group. Serum levels of PCT, hs-CRP and the WBC were measured within 12 h of admission. A total of 70 patients aged 85 years and older were enrolled in this study. Fifty patients were labelled as sepsis/SS and the other 20 were labelled non-sepsis. A ROC analysis showed that the area under the curves (AUC) of hs-CRP and PCT for the discrimination of sepsis/SS patients were 0.825 (95% confidence interval[CI]: 0.73-0.92; P < 0.001) and 0.819 (95%CI:0.72-0.92; p < 0.001), respectively. In a subgroup analysis of the sepsis/SS group, 27 patients had sepsis, while the other 23 patients had septic shock. The ROC analysis showed that the AUCs of hs-CRP and PCT for the discrimination of septic shock patients from sepsis patients were 0.751 (95% CI: 0.62-0.88; P = 0.002) and 0.719 (95% CI:0.57-0.86; p = 0.007), respectively. For the oldest old patients, hs-CRP is not inferior to PCT in the diagnosis of sepsis and septic shock.

  14. Analysis of the relationship of leptin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin, insulin, and uric acid to metabolic syndrome in lean, overweight, and obese young females.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Abdul Ridha; Hasan, Haydar A; Raigangar, Veena L

    2009-02-01

    Over the last decade there has been a steady rise in obesity and co-morbidity, but little is known about the rate of metabolic dysfunction among young adults in the United Arab Emirates. Various factors have been implicated as biomarkers of metabolic syndrome. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationships of leptin, C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, insulin, and uric acid to the metabolic syndrome components in lean, overweight, and obese young females. This was a cross-sectional study of 69 apparently healthy young females, who were classified according to their body mass index (BMI) (kg/m(2)) into three groups: lean (25 and <30), and obese (>or=30). Estimated biomarkers were: leptin, insulin, adiponectin, high-sensitivity [hs]-CRP, uric acid, blood sugar, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol, and triglycerides (TG). Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were also measured. Serum leptin, hs-CRP, insulin, and uric acid increased significantly (p < 0.01) with increased BMI. Only one significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the biomarkers and the metabolic syndrome components was found in lean subjects (leptin vs. waist circumference r = 0.48) as opposed to six in the obese group (hs-CRP vs. waist circumference and systolic blood pressure [SBP], r = 0.45 and r = -0.41, respectively; insulin vs. diastolic blood pressure [DBP], r = 0.47; adiponectin vs. blood sugar, r = -0.44; and uric acid vs. waist circumference and TG, r = 0.5 and r = 0.51, respectively). Estimation of the levels of studied biomarkers could be an important tool for early detection of metabolic syndrome before the appearance of its frank components. Uric acid seems to be the most reliable biomarker to identify obese subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  15. Value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein assays in predicting atrial fibrillation recurrence: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yo, Chia-Hung; Lee, Si-Huei; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Matthew Chien-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2014-02-20

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) assays to see whether these tests are predictive of atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after cardioversion. Systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases as well as a hand search of the reference lists in the retrieved articles from inception to December 2013. This review selected observational studies in which the measurements of serum CRP were used to predict AF recurrence. An hs-CRP assay was defined as any CRP test capable of measuring serum CRP to below 0.6 mg/dL. We summarised test performance characteristics with the use of forest plots, hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves and bivariate random effects models. Meta-regression analysis was performed to explore the source of heterogeneity. We included nine qualifying studies comprising a total of 347 patients with AF recurrence and 335 controls. A CRP level higher than the optimal cut-off point was an independent predictor of AF recurrence after cardioversion (summary adjusted OR: 3.33; 95% CI 2.10 to 5.28). The estimated pooled sensitivity and specificity for hs-CRP was 71.0% (95% CI 63% to 78%) and 72.0% (61% to 81%), respectively. Most studies used a CRP cut-off point of 1.9 mg/L to predict long-term AF recurrence (77% sensitivity, 65% specificity), and 3 mg/L to predict short-term AF recurrence (73% sensitivity, 71% specificity). hs-CRP assays are moderately accurate in predicting AF recurrence after successful cardioversion.

  16. Value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein assays in predicting atrial fibrillation recurrence: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yo, Chia-Hung; Lee, Si-Huei; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Matthew Chien-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) assays to see whether these tests are predictive of atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after cardioversion. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases as well as a hand search of the reference lists in the retrieved articles from inception to December 2013. Study eligibility criteria This review selected observational studies in which the measurements of serum CRP were used to predict AF recurrence. An hs-CRP assay was defined as any CRP test capable of measuring serum CRP to below 0.6 mg/dL. Primary and secondary outcome measures We summarised test performance characteristics with the use of forest plots, hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves and bivariate random effects models. Meta-regression analysis was performed to explore the source of heterogeneity. Results We included nine qualifying studies comprising a total of 347 patients with AF recurrence and 335 controls. A CRP level higher than the optimal cut-off point was an independent predictor of AF recurrence after cardioversion (summary adjusted OR: 3.33; 95% CI 2.10 to 5.28). The estimated pooled sensitivity and specificity for hs-CRP was 71.0% (95% CI 63% to 78%) and 72.0% (61% to 81%), respectively. Most studies used a CRP cut-off point of 1.9 mg/L to predict long-term AF recurrence (77% sensitivity, 65% specificity), and 3 mg/L to predict short-term AF recurrence (73% sensitivity, 71% specificity). Conclusions hs-CRP assays are moderately accurate in predicting AF recurrence after successful cardioversion. PMID:24556243

  17. Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix(®); loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient(®); loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62-23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25-22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI.

  18. The value of time-averaged serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in prediction of mortality and dropout in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Chen, Chao-Yu; Li, Yi-Jung; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a useful biomarker for prediction of long-term outcomes in patients undergoing chronic dialysis. This observational cohort study evaluated whether the time-averaged serum high-sensitivity CRP (HS-CRP) level was a better predictor of clinical outcomes than a single HS-CRP level in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). We classified 335 patients into three tertiles according to the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level and followed up regularly from January 2010 to December 2014. Clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular events, infection episodes, newly developed malignancy, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), dropout (death plus conversion to hemodialysis), and mortality were assessed. During a 5-year follow-up, 164 patients (49.0%) ceased PD; this included 52 patient deaths (15.5%), 100 patients (29.9%) who converted to hemodialysis, and 12 patients (3.6%) who received a kidney transplantation. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test revealed a significantly worse survival accumulation in patients with high time-average HS-CRP levels. A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, older age, and the occurrence of cardiovascular events were independent mortality predictors. A higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, the occurrence of cardiovascular events, infection episodes, and EPS were important predictors of dropout. The receiver operating characteristic analysis verified that the value of the time-average HS-CRP level in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout was superior to a single serum baseline HS-CRP level. This study shows that the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level is a better marker than a single baseline measurement in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout in PD patients.

  19. The effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and heat shock protein 27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Seyed Kazem; Gang, Li Zhi; Saghebi, Seyed Ahmad; Mohammadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Mohammadi, Ghazaleh; Ferns, Gordan A; Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Razmgah, Gholamreza Ghayour; Ramazani, Zahra; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Esmaily, Habibollah; Bahrami Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Azizi, Hoda

    2014-08-01

    It has previously been reported that increased level of serum heat shock proteins (Hsps) antibody in patients with metabolic syndrome. It is possible that the expression of Hsp and inflammatory markers can be affected by cupping and traditional Chinese medicine. There is a little data investigating the effects of cupping on markers of inflammation and Hsp proteins, hence, the objective of this study was evaluation of the effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and Hsp27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome. Serum Hs-CRP and Hsp27 antibody titers were assessed in samples from 126 patients with metabolic syndrome (18-65 years of age) at baseline, and after 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. One hundred and twenty-six patients were randomly divided into the experimental group treated with wet cupping combined with dietary advice, and the control group treated with dietary advice alone using a random number table. Eight patients in case group and five subjects in control groups were excluded from the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0 software and a repeated measure ANCOVA. Serum hs-CRP titers did not change significantly between groups (p>0.05) and times (p=0.27). The same result was found for Hsp27 titers (p>0.05). Wet-cupping on the interscapular region has no effect on serum hs-CRP and Hsp27 patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of MCP-4 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a marker of inflammation in obesity and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Priyanka, N

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence worldwide and has emerged as a strong risk factor for periodontal disease. Conversely, the remote effects of periodontal disease on various systemic diseases have been proposed. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of MCP-4 and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in obese and non-obese subjects with chronic periodontitis and to find a correlation between MCP-4 and hsCRP in GCF and serum. Forty subjects (20 males and 20 females) were selected and divided into four groups (10 subjects in each group), based on clinical parameters: group NOH (non-obese healthy), group OH (obese healthy), Group NOCP (non-obese with chronic periodontitis) and group OCP (obese with chronic periodontitis). The levels of serum and GCF MCP-4 were determined by ELISA and hsCRP levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry method. The mean GCF and serum concentration of MCP-4 was highest for group OCP followed by group NOCP, group OH (in GCF); group OH, group NOCP(in serum) and least in group NOH. The mean hsCRP concentration was highest for group OCP followed by group OH, group NOCP and group NOH. A significant positive correlation was found between serum and GCF MCP-4 and hsCRP levels. GCF MCP-4 concentrations increased in periodontal disease compared to health and correlated positively with the severity of disease indicating it as a novel marker of periodontal disease. The serum concentration of MCP-4 was found to be more in obese group as compared to nonobese group indicating it as a marker of obesity. Furthermore, based on the positive correlation of MCP-4 and hsCRP found in this study, it can be proposed that MCP-4 and hsCRP may be the markers linking chronic inflammation in obesity and periodontal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relation of uric acid to serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Tanya; Blaha, Michael J; Nasir, Khurram; Silverman, Michael G; Tota-Maharaj, Rajesh; Carvalho, Jose A M; Conceição, Raquel D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Santos, Raul D

    2012-12-15

    Increased uric acid (UA) is strongly linked to cardiovascular disease. However, the independent role of UA is still debated because it is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors including obesity and metabolic syndrome. This study assessed the association of UA with increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), increased ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL), sonographically detected hepatic steatosis, and their clustering in the presence and absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We evaluated 3,518 employed subjects without clinical cardiovascular disease from November 2008 through July 2010. Prevalence of hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L was 19%, that of TG/HDL ≥3 was 44%, and that of hepatic steatosis was 43%. In multivariable logistic regression after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and confounders, highest versus lowest UA quartile was associated with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 2.28, p = 0.04), TG/HDL ≥3 (OR 3.29, 95% CI 2.36 to 4.60, p <0.001), and hepatic steatosis (OR 3.10, 95% CI 2.22 to 4.32, p <0.001) independently of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Association of UA with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L became nonsignificant in analyses stratified by obesity. Ascending UA quartiles compared to the lowest UA quartile demonstrated a graded increase in the odds of having 2 or 3 of these risk conditions and a successive decrease in the odds of having none. In conclusion, high UA levels were associated with increased TG/HDL and hepatic steatosis independently of metabolic syndrome and obesity and with increased hs-CRP independently of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Elevated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in fibromyalgia syndrome patients correlate with body mass index, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Haynes, Wanda L; Michalek, Joel E; Russell, I Jon

    2013-05-01

    The levels of several inflammatory cytokines are abnormal in many patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and may play a role in its pathogenesis. The inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with the disease activity in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but its role in FMS is unknown. We undertook this study to determine whether high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) is elevated in FMS and whether its levels relate to key biologic or clinical measures. One hundred and five patients with FMS (1990 ACR criteria) and 61 healthy normal controls (HNC) at a ratio of 2:1 were recruited. The serum concentrations of hsCRP, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The hsCRP levels were marginally higher in FMS than in HNC (p = 0.06) and its abnormality rate (>1.5 SD above the HNC mean) was significantly higher in FMS (25 %) compared with HNC (6.8 %) (p = 0.03). Serum IL-8 levels, IL-6 levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in FMS did not differ from those in HNC. Body mass index (BMI), ESR, IL-8, and IL-6 levels correlated with hsCRP levels in FMS. No associations were found between hsCRP and age, gender, ethnicity, or other clinical measures. Serum CRP levels were higher in FMS and significantly correlated with BMI, ESR, IL-8, and IL-6 levels, suggesting that inflammation may contribute to the symptoms in some FMS patients, particularly those who are obese. Weight loss and therapies directed against inflammation may be useful in the management of FMS patients with elevated hsCRP.

  3. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Canakinumab to Improve Exercise Capacity in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Elevated High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein (Hs-CRP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Prior Acute Myocardial Infarction; Evidence of Systemic Inflammation (C Reactive Protein Plasma >2 mg/l); Reduced Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (<50%); Symptoms of Heart Failure (NYHA Class II-III)

  4. Utility of the combination of serum highly-sensitive C-reactive protein level at discharge and a risk index in predicting readmission for acute exacerbation of COPD*,**

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun; Zhu, Hong; Shen, Ning; Han, Xiang; Chen, Yahong; He, Bei

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Frequent readmissions for acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are an independent risk factor for increased mortality and use of health-care resources. Disease severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level are validated predictors of long-term prognosis in such patients. This study investigated the utility of combining serum CRP level with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) exacerbation risk classification for predicting readmission for AECOPD. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of consecutive patients hospitalized for AECOPD at Peking University Third Hospital, in Beijing, China. We assessed patient age; gender; smoking status and history (pack-years); lung function; AECOPD frequency during the last year; quality of life; GOLD risk category (A-D; D indicating the greatest risk); and serum level of high-sensitivity CRP at discharge (hsCRP-D). RESULTS: The final sample comprised 135 patients. Of those, 71 (52.6%) were readmitted at least once during the 12-month follow-up period. The median (interquartile) time to readmission was 78 days (42-178 days). Multivariate analysis revealed that serum hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D were independent predictors of readmission (hazard ratio = 3.486; 95% CI: 1.968-6.175; p < 0.001 and hazard ratio = 2.201; 95% CI: 1.342-3.610; p = 0.002, respectively). The ordering of the factor combinations by cumulative readmission risk, from highest to lowest, was as follows: hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C. CONCLUSIONS: Serum hsCRP-D and GOLD classification are independent predictors of readmission for AECOPD, and their predictive value increases when they are used in combination. PMID:25410837

  5. Predicting Mortality in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor, Coronary Artery Calcium, and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim S; Divers, Jasmin; Raad, Mohamad; Xu, Jianzhao; Bowden, Donald W; Tracy, Melissa; Reiser, Jochen; Freedman, Barry I

    2018-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, outcomes in individual patients vary. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a bone marrow-derived signaling molecule associated with adverse cardiovascular and renal outcomes in many populations. We characterized the determinants of suPAR in African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus and assessed whether levels were useful for predicting mortality beyond clinical characteristics, coronary artery calcium (CAC), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). We measured plasma suPAR levels in 500 African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus enrolled in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. We used Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for clinical characteristics, CAC, and hs-CRP to examine the association between suPAR and all-cause mortality. Last, we report the change in C-statistics comparing the additive values of suPAR, hs-CRP, and CAC to clinical models for prediction of mortality. The suPAR levels were independently associated with female sex, smoking, insulin use, decreased kidney function, albuminuria, and CAC. After a median 6.8-year follow-up, a total of 68 deaths (13.6%) were recorded. In a model incorporating suPAR, CAC, and hs-CRP, only suPAR was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.63-4.34). Addition of suPAR to a baseline clinical model significantly improved the C-statistic for all-cause death (Δ0.05, 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.10), whereas addition of CAC or hs-CRP did not. In African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus, suPAR was strongly associated with mortality and improved risk discrimination metrics beyond traditional risk factors, CAC and hs-CRP. Studies addressing the clinical usefulness of measuring suPAR concentrations are warranted. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  6. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Complements Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid Prognostication in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Large-Scale Retrospective and Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Department of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou; Li, Chao-Feng

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of combining the assessment of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) with that of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV DNA) in the pretherapy prognostication of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and Methods: Three independent cohorts of NPC patients (training set of n=3113, internal validation set of n=1556, and prospective validation set of n=1668) were studied. Determinants of disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival were assessed by multivariate analysis. Hazard ratios and survival probabilities of the patient groups, segregated by clinical stage (T1-2N0-1M0, T3-4N0-1M0, T1-2N2-3M0, and T3-4N2-3M0) and EBV DNA load (low or high) alone, and alsomore » according to hs-CRP level (low or high), were compared. Results: Elevated hs-CRP and EBV DNA levels were significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival in both the training and validation sets. Associations were similar and remained significant after excluding patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic hepatitis B. Patients with advanced-stage disease were segregated by high EBV DNA levels and high hs-CRP level into a poorest-risk group, and participants with either high EBV DNA but low hs-CRP level or high hs-CRP but low EBV DNA values had poorer survival compared with the bottom values for both biomarkers. These findings demonstrate a significant improvement in the prognostic ability of conventional advanced NPC staging. Conclusion: Baseline plasma EBV DNA and serum hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with survival in NPC patients. The combined interpretation of EBV DNA with hs-CRP levels led to refinement of the risks for the patient subsets, with improved risk discrimination in patients with advanced-stage disease.« less

  7. The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and metabolic risk factors in black and white South African women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    George, Cindy; Evans, Juliet; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Olsson, Tommy; Goedecke, Julia H

    2018-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is associated with metabolic risk, however it is unclear whether the relationship is confounded by racial/ethnic differences in socioeconomic status (SES), lifestyle factors or central adiposity. The aims of the study was, (1) to investigate whether hsCRP levels differ by race/ethnicity; (2) to examine the race/ethnic-specific associations between hsCRP, HOMA-IR and serum lipids [total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoproteins (HDL-C) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL-C)]; and (3) to determine whether race/ethnic-specific associations are explained by SES, lifestyle factors or waist circumference (WC). The convenience sample comprised 195 black and 153 white apparently health women, aged 18-45 years. SES (education, assets and housing density) and lifestyle factors (alcohol use, physical activity and contraceptive use) were collected by questionnaire. Weight, height and WC were measured, and fasting blood samples collected for hsCRP, glucose, insulin, and lipids. Black women had higher age- and BMI-adjusted hsCRP levels than white women ( p  = 0.047). hsCRP was associated with HOMA-IR ( p  < 0.001), TG (p < 0.001), TC ( p  < 0.05), HDL-C (p < 0.05), and LDL-C ( p  < 0.05), independent of age and race/ethnicity. The association between hsCRP and lipids differed by race/ethnicity, such that hsCRP was positively associated with TG and LDL-C in white women, and inversely associated with HDL-C in black women. Higher hsCRP was also associated with higher TC in white women and lower TC in black women. Furthermore, when adjusting for SES and lifestyle factors, the associations between hsCRP, and TC and TG, remained, however the associations between hsCRP, and HDL-C and LDL-C, were no longer significant. Although circulating hsCRP may identify individuals at increased metabolic risk, the heterogeneity in these associations between racial/ethnic groups highlights the need for

  8. Serum expression level of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, and CA-125 as potential biomarkers for recurrence of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Suyang; Yang, Bo; Liu, Hongli; Li, Yuzhi; Li, Shengze; Ma, Ling; Liu, Jian; Guo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum expression levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and CA-125 as potential serum biomarkers for recurrence of cervical cancer. Eighty-six cervical cancer patients who received radical treatment were retrospectively included in this study from February 2011 to January 2014. Of the included 86 cases, 23 were recurred within the 36 months (recurrence group [RG]) and other 63 patients did not (non-RG [NRG]). The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were examined and compared between the two groups. The prediction recurrence sensitivity, specificity area under the receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated by STATA11.0 software (http://www.stata.com). The correlation among SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were analyzed by Pearson correlation test. The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were 1.29 (0.21-33.20) mg/mL, 4.78 (0.22-175.20) mg/mL, and 11.56 (2.028-123.66) IU/mL for NRG and 5.64 (0.50-136.80) mg/mL, 22.41 (0.56-588.90) mg/mL, and 25.41 (3.658-3687.00) IU/mL for RG, respectively. The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 in NG group were significant higher than those of NRG group (P < 0.05). The recurrence prediction sensitivity was 0.74, 0.65, and 0.74; specificity was 0.65, 0.63, and 0.58; area under the curve was 0.75, 0.66, and 0.67, respectively, for serum SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125. Significant positive correlation between SCC-Ag and hs-CRP (rpearson = 0.20, P = 0.04), SCC-Ag and CA-125 (rpearson = 0.64, P < 0.001), hs-CRP and CA-125 (rpearson= -0.13, P = 0.56) was found in the RG patients. Serum SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were higher in recurrence cervical patients which could be potential biomarkers for predicting cervical cancer recurrence risk.

  9. Vitamin D supplementation affects serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, insulin resistance, and biomarkers of oxidative stress in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Asemi, Zatollah; Samimi, Mansooreh; Tabassi, Zohreh; Shakeri, Hossein; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    Unfavorable metabolic profiles and oxidative stress in pregnancy are associated with several complications. This study was conducted to determine the effects of vitamin D supplementation on serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), metabolic profiles, and biomarkers of oxidative stress in healthy pregnant women. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 48 pregnant women aged 18-40 y old at 25 wk of gestation. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 400 IU/d cholecalciferol supplements (n = 24) or placebo (n = 24) for 9 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at study baseline and after 9 wk of intervention to quantify serum concentrations of hs-CRP, lipid concentrations, insulin, and biomarkers of oxidative stress. After 9 wk of intervention, the increases in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium concentrations were greater in the vitamin D group (+3.7 μg/L and +0.20 mg/dL, respectively) than in the placebo group (-1.2 μg/L and -0.12 mg/dL, respectively; P < 0.001 for both). Vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in serum hs-CRP (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: -1.41 vs. +1.50 μg/mL; P-interaction = 0.01) and insulin concentrations (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: -1.0 vs. +2.6 μIU/mL; P-interaction = 0.04) and a significant increase in the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index score (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: +0.02 vs. -0.02; P-interaction = 0.006), plasma total antioxidant capacity (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: +152 vs. -20 mmol/L; P-interaction = 0.002), and total glutathione concentrations (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: +205 vs. -32 μmol/L; P-interaction = 0.02) compared with placebo. Intake of vitamin D supplements led to a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: -0.65 vs. -0.12 mmol/L; P-interaction = 0.01), systolic blood pressure (vitamin D vs. placebo groups: -0.2 vs. +5.5 mm Hg; P-interaction = 0.01), and

  10. Associations of cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in early radiographic knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Yang, Ye; Deng, Zhen-han; Ding, Xiang; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-03-11

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is possibly related to osteoarthritis (OA) progression and a variety of OA-related symptoms. This study aimed to examine associations between cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP in early radiographic knee OA. Cross-sectional health examination survey. This primary study was conducted in a health examination centre in China. 936 (656 men and 280 women) patients with early radiographic knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. Smoking status was classified into four levels based on daily smoking habit: 0/day, 1-10/day, 11-20/day and >20/day. Betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption status was divided into 'Yes' or 'No'. Early radiographic knee OA was defined as Kellgren Lawrence (K-L) grade 1 or 2 in at least one leg, and elevated hsCRP was assessed as ≥ 3.0 mg/L. After adjustment for a number of potential confounding factors, a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and hsCRP was observed in the multivariable model. The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of elevated hsCRP (≥ 3.0 mg/L) in the second (1-10/day, n=133), third (11-20/day, n=59) and highest (>20/day, n=104) cigarette smoking categories were 1.54 (95% CI 0.91 to 2.61), 1.27 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.79) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.20 to 3.64), respectively, compared with the non-smoker category (n=640). In addition, there was a positive dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and elevated hsCRP (p for trend=0.01). No significant associations between betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP were observed in the multivariable model. This study indicated that cigarette smoking was positively associated with serum hsCRP level in patients with early radiographic knee OA. However, in view of the nature of cross-sectional designs, the results need to be confirmed by further prospective studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  11. [Assessment of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) as a marker of liver inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo Arturo; Morán, Segundo; Gallardo, Irazu; Milke, Pilar; Guevara-González, Luis

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) plays an important role on inflammatory processes associated to the metabolic syndrome (MS), alike of insulin sensitivity, endothelial dysfunction and fibrinolysis insufficiency. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) may be a sensible marker for the diagnosis of hepatic damage and has therefore been used as an alternative method for the noninvasive diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), especially in epidemiological studies. At the present time, the possible utility of high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) as a simple measure to detect the degree of hepatic inflammatory response during the development NAFLD in MS has not been explored. To evaluate the measurement of serologic hsCRP for the identification of hepatic inflammatory response in patients with MS. Seven hundred and forty persons (526 men and 214 women), mean age 45 +/- 11 years who were asymptomatic and otherwise seeming healthy in whom a medical questionnaire was applied underwent physical examination, laboratory testing, hepatic ultrasound and measurement of hsCRP by the immuno-turbidimetric method. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of all possible hsCRP for detecting different degrees of hepatic inflammation (ALT > 44 U/L and ALT > 88 U/L). Patients were stratified according to the presence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and ALT concentration in three groups: Group I, having MS and ALT > 44 U/L (n = 39); Group II, having ALT > 44 U/L without MS (n = 105) and Group III, having ALT < or = 44 U/L without MS (n = 596). The optimal hsCRP cut-off for detecting patients with ALT 44 U/L was 2.5 mg/L (sensibility 66%; specificity 50%) and for detecting patients with ALT > 88 U/L was 2.35 (sensibility 72%; specificity 59%). hsCRP serum concentrations in Group I were significantly higher than in Group II and Group III (p < 0.05) but no difference was found between Group II and Group III (Group I = 6.0 +/- 6.7 mg/L vs. Group

  12. Prognostic value, clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of high sensitivity C-reactive protein as a marker in primary prevention of major cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Schwarzer, Ruth; Göhler, Alexander; Grandi, Norma; Grabein, Kristin; Stollenwerk, Björn; Klauß, Volker; Wasem, Jürgen; Siebert, Uwe

    2009-05-12

    In a substantial portion of patients (= 25%) with coronary heart disease (CHD), a myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death without prior symptoms is the first manifestation of disease. The use of new risk predictors for CHD such as the high-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) in addition to established risk factors could improve prediction of CHD. As a consequence of the altered risk assessment, modified preventive actions could reduce the number of cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Does the additional information gained through the measurement of hs-CRP in asymptomatic patients lead to a clinically relevant improvement in risk prediction as compared to risk prediction based on traditional risk factors and is this cost-effective? A literature search of the electronic databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) was conducted. Selection, data extraction, assessment of the study-quality and synthesis of information was conducted according to the methods of evidence-based medicine. Eight publications about predictive value, one publication on the clinical efficacy and three health-economic evaluations were included. In the seven study populations of the prediction studies, elevated CRP-levels were almost always associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events and non-fatal myocardial infarctions or cardiac death and severe cardiovascular events. The effect estimates (odds ratio (OR), relative risk (RR), hazard ratio (HR)), once adjusted for traditional risk factors, demonstrated a moderate, independent association between hs-CRP and cardiac and cardiovascular events that fell in the range of 0.7 to 2.47. In six of the seven studies, a moderate increase in the area under the curve (AUC) could be detected by adding hs-CRP as a predictor to regression models in addition to established risk factors though in three cases this was not statistically significant. The difference [in the AUC] between the

  13. "Poor man's risk factor": correlation between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and socio-economic class in patients of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Rishi; Puri, Aniket; Makhija, Aman; Singhal, A; Ahuja, A; Mukerjee, S; Dwivedi, S K; Narain, V S; Saran, R K; Puri, V K

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed as one of the factors responsible for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) at present is the strongest marker of inflammation. We did a study to assess the correlation of hs-CRP with socio-economic status (SES) in patients of CAD presenting as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Baseline hs-CRP of 490 patients of ACS was estimated by turbidimetric immunoassay. Patients were stratified by levels of hs-CRP into low (<1 mg/L); intermediate (1-3 mg/L) or high (>3 mg/L) groups and in tertiles of 0-0.39 mg/L, 0.4-1.1 mg/L and >1.1 mg/L, respectively. Classification of patient into upper (21.4%), middle (45.37 percent) and lower (33.3%) SES was based on Kuppuswami Index which includes education, income and profession. Presence or absence of traditional risk factors for CAD diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking was recorded in each patient. Mean levels of hs-CRP in lower, middle and upper SES were 2.3 +/- 2.1 mg/L, 0.8 +/- 1.7 mg/L and 1.2 +/- 1.5 mg/L, respectively. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in low SES compared with both upper SES (p = 0.033) and middle SES (p = 0.001). Prevalence of more than one traditional CAD risk factors was seen in 13.5%, 37.5% and 67.67 percent; in patient of lower, middle and upper SES. It was observed that multiple risk factors had a linear correlation with increasing SES. Of the four traditional risk factors of CAD, smoking was the only factor which was significantly higher in lower SES (73%) as compared to middle (51.67 percent;) and upper (39.4%) SES. We found that 62.3%, 20.8% and 26.5% patients of low, middle and upper SES had hs-CRP values in the highest tertile. Median value of the Framingham risk score in low, middle and upper SES as 11, 14 and 18, respectively. We observed that at each category of Framingham risk, low SES had higher hs-CRP. We conclude from our study that patient of lower SES have significantly higher levels of

  14. Comparative study to assess whether high sensitive C-reactive protein and carotid intima media thickness improve the predictive accuracy of exercise stress testing for coronary artery disease in perimenopausal women with typical angina.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dhurjati Prasad; Das, Munna; Banerjee, Amal Kumar; Ahmed, Shageer; Majumdar, Sonali

    2008-02-01

    Anginal symptoms are less predictive of abnormal coronary anatomy in women. The diagnostic accuracy of exercise treadmill test for obstructive coronary artery disease is less in young and middle aged women. High sensitive C-reactive protein has shown a strong and consistent relationship to the risk of incident cardiovascular events. Carotid intima media thickness is a non-invasive marker of atherosclerosis burden and also predicts prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. We investigated whether incorporation of high sensitive C-reactive protein and carotid intima media thickness along with exercise stress results improved the predictive accuracy in perimenopausal non-diabetic women subset. Fifty perimenopausal non-diabetic patients (age 45 +/- 7 years) presenting with typical angina were subjected to treadmill test (Bruce protocol). Also carotid artery images at both sides of neck were acquired by B-mode ultrasound and carotid intima media thickness were measured. High sensitive C-reactive protein was measured. Of 50 patients, 22 had a positive exercise stress result. Coronary angiography done in all 50 patients revealed coronary artery disease in 10 patients with positive exercise stress result and in 4 patients with negative exercise stress result. Treadmill exercise stress test had a sensitivity of 71.4%, specificity of 66.7% and a negative predictive accuracy of 85.7% in this study group. High sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with documented coronary artery disease was not significantly different from those without coronary artery disease (4.8 +/- 0.9 mg/l versus 3.9 +/- 1.7 mg/l, p=NS). Also carotid intima media thickness was not significantly different between either of the groups with coronary artery disease positivity and negativity respectively (left: 1.25 +/- 0.55 versus 1.20 +/- 0.51 mm, p=NS; right:1.18 +/- 0.54 versus 1.15 +/- 0.41 mm, p=NS). High sensitive C-reactive protein and carotid intima media thickness were not helpful in

  15. Association Between Smoking and Serum GlycA and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Kianoush, Sina; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M; Jones, Steven R; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Toth, Peter P; Otvos, James D; Tibuakuu, Martin; Hall, Michael E; Harada, Paulo H N; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-08-23

    Inflammation is suggested to be a central feature of atherosclerosis, particularly among smokers. We studied whether inflammatory biomarkers GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with cigarette smoking. A total of 11 509 participants, 6774 from the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) and 4735 from ELSA-Brasil (The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health) were included. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between multiple measures of smoking behavior and the inflammatory biomarkers, GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, using regression models adjusted for demographic, anthropometric, and clinical characteristics. Participants were 57.7±11.1 years old and 46.4% were men. Never, former, and current smokers comprised 51.7%, 34.0%, and 14.3% of the population, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted mean absolute difference in GlycA levels (μmol/L) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were higher for former (4.1, 95% CI, 1.7-6.6 μmol/L) and current smokers (19.9, 95% CI, 16.6-23.2 μmol/L), compared with never smokers. Each 5-unit increase in pack-years of smoking was associated with higher GlycA levels among former (0.7, 95% CI, 0.3-1.1 μmol/L) and current smokers (1.6, 95% CI, 0.8-2.4 μmol/L). Among former smokers, each 5-year increase in time since quitting smoking was associated with lower GlycA levels (-1.6, 95% CI, -2.4 to -0.8 μmol/L) and each 10-unit increase in number of cigarettes/day was associated with higher GlycA among current smokers (2.8, 95% CI, 0.5-5.2 μmol/L). There were similar significant associations between all measures of smoking behavior, and both log-transformed GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Acute and chronic exposure to tobacco smoking is associated with inflammation, as quantified by both GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. These biomarkers may have utility for the study and regulation of novel and traditional tobacco products. © 2017 The Authors

  16. Distribution and determinants of serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein in a population of young adults: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    PubMed

    Raitakari, M; Mansikkaniemi, K; Marniemi, J; Viikari, J S A; Raitakari, O T

    2005-11-01

    Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) is a suggested risk marker for cardiovascular disease. We aimed at investigating the distribution and determinants of CRP levels in young adults. Population-based study. A total of 2,120 participants aged 24-39 years. Main outcome measures. Distribution of CRP, and the relationship between CRP and risk factors. CRP concentration (mean+/-SD) was 1.43+/-3.26 mg L(-1) in men, 1.36+/-2.36 mg L(-1) in women who did not use oral contraceptives (OC) and 3.69+/-6.01 mg L(-1) in women who used OCs. In total, 8.8% of men, 10.3% of non-OC user women and 35.3% of OC user women had CRP concentration >3 mg L(-1) (recommended cut-off point of high risk for cardiovascular disease). In univariate analysis, CRP was associated with obesity indices and physical activity amongst both sexes. In men, the multivariate correlates of CRP included waist circumference (P<0.0001), smoking (<0.0001) and HDL cholesterol (P=0.024) (inverse association). These three variables explained 21.9% (model R(2)) of the total variation in CRP, waist circumference having the greatest influence (partial R(2)=19.6%). In women, the multivariate correlates of CRP included OC use (P<0.0001), body mass index (BMI) (P<0.0001), triglycerides (<0.0001) and physical activity (P=0.025) (inverse association). These four variables explained 38.2% (model R(2)) of the total variation in CRP, with OC use (partial R(2)=18.4%) and BMI (partial R(2)=18.0%) having the greatest influence. The determinants of CRP level include obesity and smoking in men, and obesity, OC use and physical activity in women. About one in three of healthy women who use OCs have CRP concentration exceeding 3 mg L(-1).

  17. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein, body mass index, and serum lipids in HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Boger, Michael S; Shintani, Ayumi; Redhage, Leigh Anne; Mitchell, Valerie; Haas, David W; Morrow, Jason D; Hulgan, Todd

    2009-12-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. In the general population, highly sensitive creactive protein (hsCRP) is an established predictor of future coronary events. Little is known about its utility in chronic inflammatory conditions such as HIV infection. We assessed relationships between hsCRP and metabolic parameters over time in HIV-infected patients on ART. Data are from a prospective cohort of HIV-infected adults enrolled June 2005 to July 2007. Participants were receiving ART, had HIV-1 RNA,10,000 copies per milliliter, and no diabetes or CVD. Nonlinear mixed-effect regression models assessed relationships between body mass index (BMI), lipids, and hsCRP over time adjusting for covariates. Ninety-four individuals had data from $1 study visit. Median age was 44 years, 27% were female, 57% white, and 54% were on protease inhibitors. Median CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 RNA, and hsCRP were 502 cells per cubic millimeter, 50 copies per milliliter, and 2.94 mg/dL, respectively. Median Framingham score was 3. Multivariate analysis identified associations between increased hsCRP and greater BMI (P = 0.001), higher non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.013) and triglycerides (P = 0.017), and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.015). Among HIV-infected adults with low estimated CVD risk and virologic suppression on ART, hsCRP was elevated and independently associated with BMI and lipid changes. Future studies should assess associations between hsCRP and clinical outcomes.

  18. Concentration Study of High Sensitive C - reactive Protein and some Serum Trace Elements in Patients with Benign and Malignant Breast Tumor.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Ali-Bakhshi, Abbas; Farahani, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Background : Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in females worldwide. It accounts for 16% of all female cancers and 22.9% of invasive cancers in women. 18.2% of all cancer deaths worldwide including both males and females are from breast cancer. In this study we compared few serum elements in patients with benign and malignant breast tumor to find any related prognostic and predictive value. A case-control study was carried out in a hospital (Tehran - Iran) in 2012. Target population was divided in 2 groups; subjects with benign and malignant breast tumors. We did preoperative hematological test. Five milliliter fasting blood vein was collected, centrifuged in 3000 g for 15 minutes to obtain serum. We measured serum Calcium (Ca), Phosphorus (P), Magnesium (Mg), Zinc (Zn), and high sensitive-CRP, analyzed statistically and compared recorded elements in 2 groups by software package SPSS version 16. The level of significant was considered P < 0.05. Of 87 women, 49 cases with benign breast disease (group A) and 38 cases with breast cancer (group B) entered our study. Serum concentration of Ca, mg, and P in group A were higher than group B, however these differences were not significant. We found no significant correlation between serum Zn and type of tumor in our patients. On the other hand, a significant elevation in hs-CRP in patient with breast cancer was seen (P Value=.000). Conclusion : Our results have shown similar concentration of Ca, Mg, Zn, P and completely different hs-CRP concentration in patients with benign and malignant breast disease.

  19. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Effoe, Valery S; Correa, Adolfo; Chen, Haiying; Lacy, Mary E; Bertoni, Alain G

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies on the association between hs-CRP and incident type 2 diabetes among African Americans have been inconclusive. We examined the association between hs-CRP and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort (Jackson Heart Study). hs-CRP was measured in 3,340 participants. Incident diabetes was defined by fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or A1C ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) at follow-up. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident diabetes, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes family history, alcohol, HDL, triglycerides, hypertension status, hypertension medications, physical activity, BMI, HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMAIR), and waist circumference. Participants (63% women) were aged 53.3 ± 12.5 years. During a median follow-up of 7.5 years, 17.4% developed diabetes (23.1/1,000 person-years, 95% CI 21.3-25.1). After adjustment, the HR (hs-CRP third vs. first tertile) was 1.64 (95% CI 1.26-2.13). In separate models, further adjustment for BMI and waist circumference attenuated this association (HR 1.28 [95% CI 0.97-1.69] and 1.35 [95% CI 1.03-1.78, P < 0.05 for trend], respectively). Upon adding HOMAIR in the models, the association was no longer significant. In adjusted HOMAIR-stratified analysis, the hs-CRP-diabetes association appeared stronger in participants with HOMAIR <3.0 compared with HOMAIR ≥3.0 (P < 0.0001 for interaction). The association was also stronger among nonobese participants, although not significant when adjusted for HOMAIR. Low-grade inflammation, as measured by hs-CRP level, may have an important role in the development of diabetes among African Americans with a lesser degree of insulin resistance. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and its relationship with components of polycystic ovary syndrome in Indian adolescent women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Hassan, Saqib; Nisar, Sobia; Shamas, Nasir; Rashid, Aafia; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Douhat, Syed; Mudassar, Syed; Jan, Vicar M; Rashid, Fouzia

    2014-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a risk marker for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), limited data are available on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and its relationship with components of PCOS especially in Indian women. The objective was to determine serum hs-CRP concentration in adolescent women with and without PCOS and to assess possible correlations of serum hs-CRP levels with components of PCOS in Indian women. One hundred and sixty women with PCOS and sixty non-PCOS women having normal menstrual cycles were included. Clinical assessment included anthropometry, Ferriman-Gallwey (FG) score and blood pressure (BP) measurement. Laboratory evaluation included estimation of T4, TSH, LH, FSH, total testosterone, prolactin, cortisol, 17OHP, hs-CRP, lipid profile, and insulin, and glucose after 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) and glucose intolerance was calculated. FG score, LH, FSH, total Testosterone, HOMA-IR and QUICKI were significantly different among women with or without PCOS (p < 0.01). Although hs-CRP levels showed a higher trend in women having PCOS, there was no significant difference between the groups (p > 0.05). A significant and positive correlation was found between hs-CRP and body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.308, p < 0.01) among PCOS group. The results in Indian adolescent women suggest that hs-CRP levels may not per se be associated with PCOS, rather can be related to fat mass in this subset of subjects.

  1. Reduced high-molecular-weight adiponectin and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are synergistic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a large-scale middle-aged to elderly population: the Shimanami Health Promoting Program Study.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Osawa, Haruhiko; Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Tachibana-Iimori, Rieko; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Nakura, Jun; Miki, Tetsuro; Makino, Hideich; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2008-03-01

    In Western countries, one of the most important modifiable targets for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein that inversely associates with metabolic syndrome. Among several molecular isoforms, high-molecular-weight (HMW) complex is considered the active form. Increased serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration also associates with metabolic syndrome, and adiponectin could modulate plasma C-reactive protein levels. Here, through cross-sectional investigation, we investigated whether reduced HMW adiponectin and increased hsCRP levels in plasma are synergistically associated with metabolic syndrome. Measurement of HMW complex of adiponectin is one of the novelties of this study. We analyzed 1845 community-dwelling middle-aged to elderly subjects (62+/-13 yr). Plasma HMW adiponectin levels were measured by ELISA. Clinical parameters were obtained from the subjects' personal health records, evaluated at their annual medical check-up. Each component of metabolic syndrome, except for raised blood pressure, showed significantly lower plasma HMW adiponectin concentrations for both men and women (P<0.001). In contrast, plasma hsCRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with metabolic disorders (P<0.001). After adjusting for other confounding factors, HMW adiponectin [log normalized, odds ratio 0.084 (95% confidence interval 0.050-0.142), P<0.001] and hsCRP [3.009 (2.175-4.163), P<0.001] were identified as independent determinants of metabolic syndrome. In addition to the direct associations, we also observed a synergistic effect between these two molecules (F=11.8, P<0.001). Reduced HMW adiponectin and elevated hsCRP are synergistically associated with the accumulation of metabolic disorders. The combination of these markers would be useful for identifying at-risk populations.

  2. Urine albumin/creatinine ratio, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide--three new cardiovascular risk markers--do they improve risk prediction and influence treatment?

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michael H; Sehestedt, Thomas; Lyngbaek, Stig; Hansen, Tine W; Rasmussen, Susanne; Wachtell, Kristian; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hildebrandt, Per R; Ibsen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    In order to prioritize limited health resources in a time of increasing demands optimal cardiovascular risk stratification is essential. We tested the additive prognostic value of 3 relatively new, but established cardiovascular risk markers: N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP), related to hemodynamic cardiovascular risk factors, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), related to metabolic cardiovascular risk factors and urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), related to hemodynamic as well as metabolic risk factors. In healthy subjects with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular death lower than 5% based on HeartScore and therefore not eligible for primary prevention, the actual 10-year risk of cardiovascular death exceeded 5% in a small subgroup of subjects with UACR higher than the 95-percentile of approximately 1.6 mg/mmol. Combined use of high UACR or high hsCRP identified a larger subgroup of 16% with high cardiovascular risk in which primary prevention may be advised despite low-moderate cardiovascular risk based on HeartScore. Furthermore, combined use of high UACR or high Nt-proBNP in subjects with known cardiovascular disease or diabetes identified a large subgroup of 48% with extremely high cardiovascular risk who should be referred for specialist care to optimize treatment.

  3. Association of stem cell factor and high-sensitivity C reactive protein concentrations in crevicular fluid and serum in patients with chronic periodontitis with and without type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Nitish; Pradeep, Avani R; Priyanka, Ningappa; Kumari, Minal

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify whether there is any correlation between the levels of high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) and stem cell factor (SCF) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 40 subjects were divided into 3 groups: 10 periodontally healthy subjects (Group 1), 15 CP patients (Group 2), and 15 type 2 DM patients with CP (Group 3). Levels of hs-CRP and SCF in GCF and serum were quantified using different techniques. The clinical outcomes evaluated were gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL), and the correlations of the two inflammatory mediators with clinical parameters were evaluated. The levels of these inflammatory mediators increased continuously from group 1 to group 2, and to group 3. The serum levels of both hs-CRP and SCF were correlated with PD in patients with CP (P < 0.05). SCF levels were correlated with PD in Group 3 (P < 0.05). The fact that the levels of hs-CRP and SCF were highest in DM patients with CP suggests that the presence of a systemic condition has a profound effect on the levels of inflammatory mediators, both locally at sites of periodontal disease, and elsewhere.

  4. Correlation of human S100A12 (EN-RAGE) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as gingival crevicular fluid and serum markers of inflammation in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Martande, Santosh S; Singh, Sonender Pal; Suke, Deepak Kumar; Raju, Arjun P; Naik, Savitha B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels and correlation of human S100A12 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in chronic periodontitis (CP) subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 44 subjects were divided into three groups: group 1 had 10 periodontally healthy subjects, group 2 consisted of 17 CP subjects and group 3 had 17 type 2 DM subjects with CP. GCF and serum levels of human S100A12 and hs-CRP were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoturbidimetric analysis, respectively. The clinical outcomes evaluated were gingival index, probing depth and clinical attachment level and the correlations of the two inflammatory mediators with clinical parameters were evaluated. Both human S100A12 and hs-CRP levels increased from group 1 to group 2 to group 3. The GCF and serum values of both these inflammatory mediators correlated positively with each other and with the periodontal parameters evaluated (p < 0.05). Human S100A12 and hs-CRP can be considered as possible GCF and serum markers of inflammatory activity in CP and DM.

  5. Relation of adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein to pulse-wave velocity and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in the general population.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chou, Pesus; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2009-05-15

    The roles of metabolic syndrome and chronic subclinical inflammation in arterial stiffening and the development of heart failure remain to be elucidated. Whether adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were independently related to brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (ba-PWV) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in the general population were investigated. Eligible study subjects were 445 Chinese residents aged > or =40 years who participated in a community-based survey, underwent examination of ba-PWV, and had complete data of serum adiponectin, hs-CRP (<10 mg/L), and NT-pro-BNP. Adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, was independently related to ba-PWV (standardized regression parameter -0.107, p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, and number of metabolic syndrome components were accounted for. On the other hand, ba-PWV, adiponectin, and hs-CRP were independently related to NT-pro-BNP (standardized regression parameters 0.116, 0.188, and 0.094, respectively; all p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, number of metabolic syndrome components, and renal function were accounted for. In conclusion, adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, is independently associated with both ba-PWV and NT-pro-BNP in the general population. Because adiponectin, hs-CRP, ba-PWV, and NT-pro-BNP may represent markers for metabolic syndrome, chronic subclinical inflammation, arterial stiffness, and ventricular dysfunction, respectively, our results suggest that adiponectin may directly modulate both arterial stiffening and ventricular dysfunction. In contrast, hs-CRP may independently contribute to ventricular dysfunction, but not arterial stiffening.

  6. Involvement of inflammation in acute coronary syndromes assessed by levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and soluble vascular-cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Kazumiki; Oguchi, Sumito; Watanabe, Ikuyoshi; Kushiro, Toshio; Kanmatsuse, Katsuo

    2003-11-01

    Inflammation is important in the development of atherosclerosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and interferon-gamma which participate in collagen degradation are pathological factors in plaque vulnerability as an important mechanism underlying acute coronary syndrome. This study investigated whether inflammation is related to the onset of acute coronary syndrome. This study included 56 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS group), 104 patients with chronic coronary artery disease (S group), and 38 control subjects with no evidence of ischemic heart disease (C group). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), MMP-9, and interferon-gamma were measured in peripheral blood samples. Soluble adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1) were also measured as inflammatory markers. The hs-CRP level was significantly higher in the ACS group (44.5 mg/l) than in the S group (2.1 mg/l) and the C group (0.6 mg/l) (p < 0.0001). The MMP-9 level was also significantly higher in the ACS group (333.8 ng/ml) than in the S group (110.8 ng/ml) and the C group (72.0 ng/ml) (p < 0.0001). The VCAM-1 level was significantly higher in the ACS group (506.5 ng/ml) than in the C group (448.8 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). The ICAM-1 level and the interferon-gamma level did not differ between the groups. There was a significant positive correlation between the level of hs-CRP and the level of the collagen degradation product MMP-9 (r = 0.52) in all subjects. These results suggest that plaque destabilized by MMP-9 produced in response to inflammation participates in the mechanism of acute coronary syndrome.

  7. Effect of simvastatin on the antihypertensive activity of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients: role of nitric oxide, oxidative stress, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Zaher, Ahmed O; Elkoussi, Alaa Eldin A; Abudahab, Lotfy H; Elbakry, Mohammed H; Elsayed, Elsayed Abu-Elwafa

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated whether simvastatin has antihypertensive activity and can enhance the antihypertensive effect of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were induced in rats by L-NAME and cholesterol-enriched diet, respectively. In these animals, repeated administration of simvastatin decreased the systolic blood pressure, enhanced its progressive reductions induced by repeated administration of losartan, and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Concomitantly, repeated administration of simvastatin, losartan, or simvastatin in combination with losartan to these animals increased nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased the elevated serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. Effects of combined treatment were greater than those of simvastatin or losartan alone. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients, repeated administration of losartan decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased NO production, and decreased the elevated serum MDA and hs-CRP levels. Addition of simvastatin to losartan therapy enhanced these effects and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Simvastatin inhibited the contractile responses of isolated aortic rings induced by angiotensin II and enhanced the inhibitory effect of losartan on this preparation. l-arginine and acetylcholine enhanced, while L-NAME inhibited the effects of simvastatin, losartan, and their combination on these contractile responses. Thus, simvastatin exerts antihypertensive effect in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and enhances the antihypertensive effect of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Besides, its cholesterol-lowering effect, the ability of simvastatin to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction through increasing NO bioavailability and through suppression of oxidative stress and vascular inflammation may play an important role in these

  8. Decreased plasma neuregulin 4 concentration is associated with increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pi-Jun; Xu, Yong; Wan, Qin; Feng, Jian; Li, Hua; Gao, Chen-Lin; Yang, Jun; Zhong, Hai-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hong

    2017-12-01

    Inflammation has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This principal objective of this study was to investigate if the secretion of neuregulin 4 (Nrg4), a soluble protein associated with metabolic syndrome and subclinical cardiovascular disease, is correlated with the inflammation marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (nT2DM). A study group of 311 nT2DM patients was divided into three subgroups based on hs-CRP tertiles. Multiple linear regression was conducted to explore the association between plasma Nrg4 and hs-CRP levels. The nT2DM patients with the highest hs-CRP levels (>2.46 mg/L) exhibited higher atherogenic coefficients and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) levels, but lower levels of plasma Nrg4, as compared to those with the lowest hs-CRP levels (<0.63 mg/L). Plasma Nrg4 levels were inversely associated with white blood cell count, hs-CRP, and AIP and positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), before and after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and body fat percentage (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). hs-CRP was the factor most strongly associated with plasma Nrg4 levels. These results indicate that lower plasma Nrg4 levels may be associated with elevated hs-CRP in nT2DM patients. It generates the hypothesis that decreased levels of Nrg4 may trigger the development of atherosclerosis through its proinflammatory effects. These findings need to be confirmed by further prospective studies.

  9. Epicardial adipose tissue relating to anthropometrics, metabolic derangements and fatty liver disease independently contributes to serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein beyond body fat composition: a study validated with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yau-Huei; Yun, Chun-Ho; Yang, Fei-Shih; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Wu, Yih-Jer; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Tin-Yu; Bezerra, Hiram G; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2012-02-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) measured by echocardiography has been proposed to be associated with metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risks. However, its independent association with fatty liver disease and systemic inflammation beyond clinical variables and body fat remains less well known. The relationships between EAT and various factors of metabolic derangement were retrospectively examined in consecutive 359 asymptomatic subjects (mean age, 51.6 years; 31% women) who participated in a cardiovascular health survey. Echocardiography-derived regional EAT thickness from parasternal long-axis and short-axis views was quantified. A subset of data from 178 randomly chosen participants were validated using 16-slice multidetector computed tomography. Body fat composition was evaluated using bioelectrical impedance from foot-to-foot measurements. Increased EAT was associated with increased waist circumference, body weight, and body mass index (all P values for trend = .005). Graded increases in serum fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and alanine transaminase levels were observed across higher EAT tertiles as well as a graded decrease of high-density lipoprotein (all P values for trend <.05). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for identifying metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease were 0.8 and 0.77, with odds ratio estimated at 3.65 and 2.63, respectively. In a multivariate model, EAT remained independently associated with higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fatty liver disease. These data suggested that echocardiography-based epicardial fat measurement can be clinically feasible and was related to several metabolic abnormalities and independently associated fatty liver disease. In addition, EAT amount may contribute to systemic inflammation beyond traditional cardiovascular risks and body fat composition. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum Albumin and High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein are Independent Risk Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease in Middle-Aged Japanese Individuals: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Sachimi; Kitamura, Akihiko; Imano, Hironori; Cui, Renzhe; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Muraki, Isao; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is important to explore predictive markers other than conventional cardiovascular risk factors for early detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD), a major risk factor for end-stage renal failure. We hypothesized that serum albumin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be independent markers, and examined their associations with the risk of CKD. Methods: We examined the associations of serum albumin and hs-CRP levels with the risk of incident CKD, in 2535 Japanese adults aged 40–69 years without CKD at baseline during a median 9.0-year follow-up after adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors. Results: During the follow-up period, 367 cases of CKD developed. In multivariable analyses adjusted for known risk factors, the CKD hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest versus lowest quartiles of serum albumin levels were 0.69 (0.40–1.17) for men and 0.42 (0.28–0.64) for women. Corresponding values for hs-CRP were 0.95 (0.54–1.67) for men and 1.85 (1.25 -2.75) for women. The association of combined serum albumin and hs-CRP with the risk of CKD was examined for women. The hazard ratio was 1.72 (1.17–2.54) for low versus higher albumin levels at lower hs-CRP levels, but such an association was not observed at high hs-CRP level. The hazard ratio was 1.96 (1.44–2.66) for high versus lower hs-CRP levels at higher serum albumin levels, but such association was not observed at low serum albumin level. Conclusion: Both low serum albumin and high hs-CRP levels were predictive of CKD for women. PMID:26911856

  11. Associations of Self-Reported Sleep Quality with Circulating Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10, Interleukin 6, and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sleep disturbance is very common in menopausal women and poor sleep quality has been linked to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of poor sleep quality on health outcomes of menopausal women remains unclear. This study evaluated the relationships between sleep quality and inflammation in menopausal women. Participants and design This cross-sectional study enrolled 281 healthy women aged 45 to 60 years. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure quality of sleep. Multiplex assays were used to measure the levels of 9 cytokines in morning fasting plasma samples. Other variables measured in this study included clinical characteristics and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Setting The study was performed at a medical center. Results The 281 participants comprised 79 (28%) perimenopausal women and 202 (72%) postmenopausal women. Global PSQI scores were positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP levels (P = 0.012) and were marginally associated with interferon gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP10), interleukin 6 (IL6), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1β) levels. After adjusting for age, body mass index, menopause duration, and follicle stimulating hormone, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that high PSQI scores and sleep efficiency < 65% were associated with elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP, IP10, and IL6. In addition, sleep duration < 5 hours was associated with high hs-CRP levels. Conclusion Our data show that poor sleep quality and low sleep efficiency are associated with elevated levels of circulating inflammatory factors IP10, IL6 and hs-CRP and that short sleep duration is associated with high levels of hs-CRP in menopausal women. These findings provide novel evidence that poor sleep quality is linked to low-grade systemic inflammation in menopausal women. PMID:28060925

  12. Assessment of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and lipid levels in healthy adults and patients with coronary artery disease, with and without periodontitis--a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K R V; Ranganath, V; Naik, R; Banu, S; Nichani, A S

    2014-12-01

    Various epidemiological studies have implied that local infection may increase the levels of systemic inflammatory mediators and lipid mediators, thereby promoting atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP) and lipid levels in healthy adults and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with and without periodontitis. A total of 100 subjects were included in the study and categorized into four groups of 25 subjects each, as follows: subjects with chronic periodontitis with angiographically proven CAD; nonperiodontitis subjects with angiographically proven CAD; otherwise healthy subjects with only chronic periodontitis; and systemically and orally healthy individuals. The periodontal parameters measured included plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and marginal alveolar bone loss (which was recorded radiographically). Serum samples were collected for estimation of HsCRP, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglycerides (TGs). The serum HsCRP levels in subjects with either CAD or chronic periodontitis were elevated two-fold compared with those of healthy individuals, whereas in subjects with both diseases (CAD plus chronic periodontitis) the levels were elevated three-fold. The serum LDL level was higher, and the serum HDL level was lower, in all the test groups compared with the healthy group. No significant difference among the groups was detected in the TG levels. A persistent infection, such as chronic periodontitis, may influence changes in the systemic levels of HsCRP, LDL and HDL, which potentially have an impact on inflammation-associated atherosclerotic processes, such as CAD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Along With Myo-Inositol on High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Insulin Resistance in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Deepti; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish Chander; Singhal, Savita Rani; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy and medical treatment on the level of a serologic marker of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Women with PCOS and CP (n = 60) were randomly divided into two groups. The test group was treated with scaling and root planing (SRP) and myo-inositol (MI). The control group was treated with MI and given oral hygiene instructions. Anthropometric, metabolic, and periodontal parameters were assessed at baseline and re-evaluated at 3 and 6 months. All parameters of both groups at 6 months were compared with 25 systemically and periodontally healthy females (group A). Periodontal parameters were significantly improved in the test group compared with the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P <0.001). A statistically significant reduction was observed in hsCRP and HOMA in both groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P <0.05). However, significantly more improvement in hsCRP (P <0.05) and a statistically comparable reduction in HOMA (P >0.05) was observed in the test group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 months. Both the test and control group showed significant consistent improvement in metabolic parameters at 3- and 6-month follow-up, which was further comparable to group A. SRP together with medical treatment results in a greater reduction of systemic inflammatory burden compared with medical treatment alone in management of women with PCOS and CP.

  14. The Prognostic Value of Serum Levels of Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Patients With Increased Levels of Amino-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Hun; Seo, Yiel Hea; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Kim, Kyung Hee; Seo, Ja Young; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Hwan Tae; Park, Pil Whan

    2016-09-01

    Amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a well-established prognostic factor in heart failure (HF). However, numerous causes may lead to elevations in NT-proBNP, and thus, an increased NT-proBNP level alone is not sufficient to predict outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of two acute response markers, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), in patients with an increased NT-proBNP level. The 278 patients were classified into three groups by etiology: 1) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (n=62), 2) non-ACS cardiac disease (n=156), and 3) infectious disease (n=60). Survival was determined on day 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 60, 90, 120, and 150 after enrollment. H-FABP (P<0.001), NT-proBNP (P=0.006), hsCRP (P<0.001) levels, and survival (P<0.001) were significantly different in the three disease groups. Patients were divided into three classes by using receiver operating characteristic curves for NT-proBNP, H-FABP, and hsCRP. Patients with elevated NT-proBNP (≥3,856 pg/mL) and H-FABP (≥8.8 ng/mL) levels were associated with higher hazard ratio for mortality (5.15 in NT-proBNP and 3.25 in H-FABP). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed H-FABP was a better predictor of 60-day mortality than NT-proBNP. The combined measurement of H-FABP with NT-proBNP provides a highly reliable means of short-term mortality prediction for patients hospitalized for ACS, non-ACS cardiac disease, or infectious disease.

  15. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein does not improve the differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes: A grey zone analysis.

    PubMed

    Bellanné-Chantelot, C; Coste, J; Ciangura, C; Fonfrède, M; Saint-Martin, C; Bouché, C; Sonnet, E; Valéro, R; Lévy, D-J; Dubois-Laforgue, D; Timsit, J

    2016-02-01

    Low plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been suggested to differentiate hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha-maturity-onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes (F-YT2D) remains a difficult challenge. Thus, this study assessed the added value of hs-CRP to distinguish between the two conditions. This prospective multicentre study included 143 HNF1A-MODY patients, 310 patients with a clinical history suggestive of HNF1A-MODY, but not confirmed genetically (F-YT2D), and 215 patients with T2D. The ability of models, including clinical characteristics and hs-CRP to predict HNF1A-MODY was analyzed, using the area of the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and a grey zone approach was used to evaluate these models in clinical practice. Median hs-CRP values were lower in HNF1A-MODY (0.25mg/L) than in F-YT2D (1.14mg/L) and T2D (1.70mg/L) patients. Clinical parameters were sufficient to differentiate HNF1A-MODY from classical T2D (AUROC: 0.99). AUROC analyses to distinguish HNF1A-MODY from F-YT2D were 0.82 for clinical features and 0.87 after including hs-CRP. For the grey zone analysis, the lower boundary was set to miss<1.5% of true positives in non-tested subjects, while the upper boundary was set to perform 50% of genetic tests in individuals with no HNF1A mutation. On comparing HNF1A-MODY with F-YT2D, 65% of patients were classified in between these categories - in the zone of diagnostic uncertainty - even after adding hs-CRP to clinical parameters. hs-CRP does not improve the differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and F-YT2D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Simvastatin but not bezafibrate decreases plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A₂ mass in type 2 diabetes mellitus: relevance of high sensitive C-reactive protein, lipoprotein profile and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) electronegativity.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Alexander; de Vries, Rindert; van Leeuwen, Jeroen J J; Gautier, Thomas; van Pelt, L Joost; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Lagrost, Laurent; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2012-10-01

    Plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) levels predict incident cardiovascular disease, impacting Lp-PLA(2) as an emerging therapeutic target. We determined Lp-PLA(2) responses to statin and fibrate administration in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and assessed relationships of changes in Lp-PLA(2) with subclinical inflammation and lipoprotein characteristics. A placebo-controlled cross-over study (three 8-week treatment periods with simvastatin (40 mg daily), bezafibrate (400mg daily) and their combination) was carried out in 14 male type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma Lp-PLA(2) mass was measured by turbidimetric immunoassay. Plasma Lp-PLA(2) decreased (-21 ± 4%) in response to simvastatin (p<0.05 from baseline and placebo), but was unaffected by bezafibrate (1 ± 5%). The drop in Lp-PLA(2) during combined treatment (-17 ± 3%, p<0.05) was similar compared to that during simvastatin alone. The Lp-PLA(2) changes during the 3 active lipid lowering treatment periods were related positively to baseline levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and less LDL electronegativity (p<0.02 to p<0.01), and inversely to baseline Lp-PLA(2) (p<0.01). LpPLA(2) responses correlated inversely with changes in non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio during treatment (p<0.05 to p<0.02). In type 2 diabetes mellitus, plasma Lp-PLA(2) is likely to be lowered by statin treatment only. Enhanced subclinical inflammation and more severe dyslipidemia may predict diminished LpPLA(2) responses during lipid lowering treatment, which in turn appear to be quantitatively dissociated from decreases in apolipoprotein B lipoproteins. Conventional lipid lowering treatment may be insufficient for optimal LpPLA(2) lowering in diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein but not cystatin C predict cardiovascular events in male patients with peripheral artery disease independently of ambulatory pulse pressure.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Per H; Arpegård, Johannes; Ostergren, Jan; Svensson, Per

    2014-03-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. We have previously shown that ambulatory pulse pressure (APP) predicts CV events in PAD patients. The biomarkers amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and cystatin C are related to a worse outcome in patients with CV disease, but their predictive values have not been studied in relation to APP. Blood samples and 24-hour measurements of ambulatory blood pressure were examined in 98 men referred for PAD evaluation during 1998-2001. Patients were followed for a median of 71 months. The outcome variable was CV events defined as either CV mortality or any hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, or coronary revascularization. The predictive values of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and log(cystatin C) alone and together with APP were assessed by multivariable Cox regression. Area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) were calculated compared with a model containing other significant risk factors. During follow-up, 36 patients had at least 1 CV event. APP, log(NT-proBNP), and log(hs-CRP) all predicted CV events in univariable analysis, whereas log(cystatin C) did not. In multivariable analysis log(NT-proBNP) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.51) and log(hs-CRP) (HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.19-2.24) predicted events independently of 24-hour PP. The combination of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and average day PP improved risk discrimination (AUC = 0.833 vs. 0.736; P < 0.05) and NRI (37%; P < 0.01) when added to other significant risk factors. NT-proBNP and hs-CRP predict CV events independently of APP and the combination of hs-CRP, NT-proBNP, and day PP improves risk discrimination in PAD patients.

  18. The Evaluation of the Impact of Age, Skin Tags, Metabolic Syndrome, Body Mass Index, and Smoking on Homocysteine, Endothelin-1, High-sensitive C-reactive Protein, and on the Heart

    PubMed Central

    El Safoury, Omar Soliman; Ezzat, Marwa; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Shoukry, Nadia; Badawy, Ehssan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Skin tags (STs) are small, pedunculated skin-colored or brown papules that occur around any site where skin folds occur. The literature is short of comprehensive and controlled clinical studies aimed to evaluate the atherogenic risk factors in patients with STs. Aim of Work: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of age, STs, metabolic syndrome (METs), body mass index (BMI), and smoking on homocysteine (Hcy), endothelin-1 (ET-1), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and on cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: This study included 30 cardiac patients with STs, 30 non-cardiac patients with STs, and 30 healthy controls with neither heart disease nor STs. History of smoking, measurement of height, weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, STs number, color, acanthosis nigricans, estimation of serum level of fasting glucose, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, high-dense lipoproteins (HDL), Hcy, ET-1, Hs-CRP, and the presence of the METs were elicited in the three groups. Results: Regarding the Hcy, ET-1, and Hs-CRP, the cardiac-STs group showed the highest levels and the control group showed the least (P < 0.001). The percents of patients with METs were 56.7% in the cardiac-STs, 40% in the non-cardiac-STs, and 0% in the control group (P < 0.001). Mean BMI exceeded the limit of obesity in the cardiac-STs group (30.9 ± 3.9) and the non-cardiac-STs group (32.6 ± 6) and was normal in the control group (24.7 ± 2.8). Hyperpigmented STs were present in 66.7% of the cardiac-STs group. Multivariate regression analysis for the independent effectors on Hcy level were the presence of STs (P < 0.001), METs (P = 0.001), and BMI (P = 0.024). Regarding ET-1, the effectors were the presence of STs and METs (P = 0.032). For Hs-CRP, effectors were the presence of STs (P < 0.001) and smoking (P = 0.040). Multivariate logistic regression of the predictors of cardiac disease showed that the independent predictors of the occurrence of

  19. The Evaluation of the Impact of Age, Skin Tags, Metabolic Syndrome, Body Mass Index, and Smoking on Homocysteine, Endothelin-1, High-sensitive C-reactive Protein, and on the Heart.

    PubMed

    El Safoury, Omar Soliman; Ezzat, Marwa; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Shoukry, Nadia; Badawy, Ehssan

    2013-07-01

    Skin tags (STs) are small, pedunculated skin-colored or brown papules that occur around any site where skin folds occur. The literature is short of comprehensive and controlled clinical studies aimed to evaluate the atherogenic risk factors in patients with STs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of age, STs, metabolic syndrome (METs), body mass index (BMI), and smoking on homocysteine (Hcy), endothelin-1 (ET-1), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and on cardiovascular diseases. This study included 30 cardiac patients with STs, 30 non-cardiac patients with STs, and 30 healthy controls with neither heart disease nor STs. History of smoking, measurement of height, weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, STs number, color, acanthosis nigricans, estimation of serum level of fasting glucose, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, high-dense lipoproteins (HDL), Hcy, ET-1, Hs-CRP, and the presence of the METs were elicited in the three groups. Regarding the Hcy, ET-1, and Hs-CRP, the cardiac-STs group showed the highest levels and the control group showed the least (P < 0.001). The percents of patients with METs were 56.7% in the cardiac-STs, 40% in the non-cardiac-STs, and 0% in the control group (P < 0.001). Mean BMI exceeded the limit of obesity in the cardiac-STs group (30.9 ± 3.9) and the non-cardiac-STs group (32.6 ± 6) and was normal in the control group (24.7 ± 2.8). Hyperpigmented STs were present in 66.7% of the cardiac-STs group. Multivariate regression analysis for the independent effectors on Hcy level were the presence of STs (P < 0.001), METs (P = 0.001), and BMI (P = 0.024). Regarding ET-1, the effectors were the presence of STs and METs (P = 0.032). For Hs-CRP, effectors were the presence of STs (P < 0.001) and smoking (P = 0.040). Multivariate logistic regression of the predictors of cardiac disease showed that the independent predictors of the occurrence of cardiac disease were BMI (P < 0.001), STs (P = 0.002), and

  20. The comparison of the effects of standard 20 mg atorvastatin daily and 20 mg atorvastatin every other day on serum LDL-cholesterol and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Keleş, Telat; Akar Bayram, Nihal; Kayhan, Tuğba; Canbay, Alper; Sahin, Deniz; Durmaz, Tahir; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Diker, Erdem

    2008-12-01

    In this study, we aimed at comparing the effects of standard once daily 20 mg atorvastatin treatment with that of atorvastatin 20 mg administered every other day on serum lipids and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. Sixty-one patients with serum total cholesterol levels of above 200 mg/dl and low density lipoprotein (LDL)--cholesterol levels of above 130 mg/dl were included in this prospective, randomized study. The patients were randomized into daily treatment of 20 mg atorvastatin (standard treatment) and 20 mg atorvastatin every other day (every other day treatment) groups. Before the treatment and at each visit, serum lipids and hs-CRP levels of all the patients were measured. Statistical analyses were performed Chi-square, unpaired t and two-way repeated measurements ANOVA tests. In the every other day treatment group, there was a 36.1% reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels by the end of first month (p<0.01). At the end of three months there was further decrease of 10.2% in LDL-cholesterol levels when compared to 1 month levels (p>0.05). The LDL cholesterol levels of the group receiving 20 mg atorvastatin every day was reduced by %41 by the end of 1 month (p<0.01). At the end of three months, the difference between the changes in the all lipid parameters of the two groups was not found to be of statistical significance. In the group receiving the medication every other day, there was a 21% decrease in hs-CRP levels compared to the basal measurements at the end of first month (p<0.05). In the group, receiving the medication every day the decrease in hs-CRP levels at the end of one month was more striking (37%, p<0.05). However, the effects of both treatment arms on hs-CRP levels, did not differ significantly (p>0.05). Alternate-day dosing of atorvastatin causes a significant lipid-lowering and antiinflammatory effects similar to that of daily administration and yet may provide some cost savings.

  1. [Effects of periodontal mechanical therapy with local and systemic drugs on carotid artery and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in rats with chronic periodontitis associated with atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuyun; Chang, Le; Yue, Zijie; Lin, Mu; Shi, Xuexue; Sun, Lili

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and the pathological changes in the carotid artery after periodontal mechanical therapy with local and systemic drugs in SD rats with chronic periodontitis (CP) associated with atherosclerosis (As). Thirty-five SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (group A) and CP+As group (group B). Group B was further divided into the natural process group (B1), the periodontal mechanical treatment group (B2), the periodontal mechanical treatment plus local drugs group (B3), and the periodontal mechanical treatment plus local and systemic drugs group (B4). Each group comprised seven rats. Serum hsCRP levels were evaluated at baseline 1 week after the first periodontal therapy and 1, 3, and 5 weeks after the second periodontal therapy by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The pathological lesion in the carotid artery plaque was stained with hematine and eosin. The levels of serum hsCRP in group B1 increased gradually as time passed and became significantly higher than that of the other groups five weeks after periodontal therapy (P < 0.001). The levels of serum hsCRP in groups B2, B3, and B4 increased gradually and reached the peak 1 week after the second periodontal therapy. After that, the levels of serum hsCRP decreased gradually but were still higher than that of group A (P < 0.05). The levels of serum hsCRP in groups B3 and B4 were significantly lower than that in group B2 3 and 5 weeks after the second periodontal therapy (P < 0.001). Histologic sections revealed increased foam cell infiltration and disordered and destructed elastic fibers in groups B1 and B2. The thickness of the blood vessels in groups B3 and B4 was more uniform than that in groups B1 and B2. The elastic fibers in groups B3 and B4 were lined up in order. Direct periodontal mechanical treatment results in acute, short-term, systemic inflammation and might increase the risk

  2. Achievement of dual low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein targets more frequent with the addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin and associated with better outcomes in IMPROVE-IT.

    PubMed

    Bohula, Erin A; Giugliano, Robert P; Cannon, Christopher P; Zhou, Jing; Murphy, Sabina A; White, Jennifer A; Tershakovec, Andrew M; Blazing, Michael A; Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-09-29

    Statins lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP); addition of ezetimibe to statins further reduces LDL-C and hs-CRP. An analysis of the relationship between achieved LDL-C and hs-CRP targets and outcomes for simvastatin and ezetimibe/simvastatin was prespecified in Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT). The IMPROVE-IT trial randomly assigned 18 144 patients stabilized after acute coronary syndrome to simvastatin or ezetimibe/simvastatin. LDL-C and hs-CRP were measured at baseline and 1 month after randomization. Outcomes were assessed in those achieving one or both of the prespecified targets of LDL-C<70 mg/dL and hs-CRP<2 mg/L versus achieving neither target, adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics. An exploratory analysis examined targets of LDL-C<50 mg/dL and hs-CRP<1 mg/L. Patients meeting both targets at baseline, with no 1-month values, or with end points before 1 month were excluded. Of 15 179 patients, 39% achieved the dual LDL-C (<70 mg/dL) and hs-CRP (<2 mg/L) targets at 1 month, 14% met neither target, 14% met only the hs-CRP target, and 33% met only the LDL-C target. Those achieving dual targets had lower primary end point rates than those meeting neither target (cardiovascular death, major coronary event, or stroke; 38.9% versus 28.0%; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.73; 0.66-0.81; P<0.001). More patients treated with ezetimibe/simvastatin met dual targets than those treated with simvastatin alone (50% versus 29%, P<0.001). The association of dual-target attainment with improved outcomes was similar irrespective of treatment assignment (P-interaction=0.65). Similar findings were observed using the exploratory targets. Significantly more patients treated with ezetimibe/simvastatin met prespecified and exploratory dual LDL-C and hs-CRP targets than patients treated with simvastatin alone. Reaching both LDL-C and hs-CRP targets was associated with

  3. C-reactive protein and serum creatinine, but not haemoglobin A1c, are independent predictors of coronary heart disease risk in non-diabetic Chinese.

    PubMed

    Salim, Agus; Tai, E Shyong; Tan, Vincent Y; Welsh, Alan H; Liew, Reginald; Naidoo, Nasheen; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon P; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-08-01

    In western populations, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and to a lesser degree serum creatinine and haemoglobin A1c, predict risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data on Asian populations that are increasingly affected by CHD are sparse and it is not clear whether these biomarkers can be used to improve CHD risk classification. We conducted a nested case-control study within the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort, with incident 'hard' CHD (myocardial infarction or CHD death) as an outcome. We used data from 965 men (298 cases, 667 controls) and 528 women (143 cases, 385 controls) to examine the utility of hsCRP, serum creatinine and haemoglobin A1c in improving the prediction of CHD risk over and above traditional risk factors for CHD included in the ATP III model. For each sex, the performance of models with only traditional risk factors used in the ATP III model was compared with models with the biomarkers added using weighted Cox proportional hazards analysis. The impact of adding these biomarkers was assessed using the net reclassification improvement index. For men, loge hsCRP (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.05; 1.49) and loge serum creatinine (hazard ratio 4.82, 95% confidence interval: 2.10; 11.04) showed statistically significantly associations with CHD risk when added to the ATP III model. We did not observe a significant association between loge haemoglobin A1c and CHD risk (hazard ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.21; 16.06). Adding hsCRP and serum creatinine to the ATP III model improved risk classification in men with a net gain of 6.3% of cases (p-value = 0.001) being reclassified to a higher risk category, while it did not significantly reduce the accuracy of classification for non-cases. For women, squared hsCRP was borderline significantly (hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00; 1.03) and squared serum creatinine was significantly (hazard ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval: 1.49; 2

  4. A novel combination of ω-3 fatty acids and nano-curcumin modulates interleukin-6 gene expression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein serum levels in patients with migraine: a randomized clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Abdolahi, Mina; Sarraf, Payam; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Honarvar, Niyaz Mohammadzadeh; Hatami, Mahsa; Soveyd, Neda; Tafakhori, Abbas; Sedighiyan, Mohsen; Djalali, Mona; Jafarieh, Arash; Masoudian, Yousef; Djalali, Mahmoud

    2018-06-24

    Migraine is a disabling neuroinflammatory condition characterized by increasing the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, a proinflammatory cytokine and C-reactive protein (CRP) which considered as a vascular inflammatory mediator, disrupting the integrity of blood-brain barrier and contributing to neurogenic inflammation, and disease progression. Curcumin and ω-3 fatty acids can exert neuroprotective effects through modulation of IL-6 gene expression and CRP levels. The aim of present study is the evaluation of combined effects of ω-3 fatty acids and nano-curcumin supplementation on IL-6 gene expression and serum level and hs-CRP levels in migraine patients. Eighty episodic migraine patients enrolled in the trial and were divided into four groups as 1) combination of ω-3 fatty acids (2500 mg) plus nano-curcumin (80 mg), 2) ω-3 (2500 mg), 3) nano-curcumin (80 mg), and 4) the control (ω-3 and nano-cucumin placebo included oral paraffin oil) over a two-month period. At the beginning and the end of the study, the expression of IL-6 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and IL-6 and hs-CRP serum levels were measured, using a real-time PCR and ELISA methods, respectively. The results showed that both of ω-3 and nano-curcumin down-regulated IL-6 mRAN and significantly decreased the serum concentration. hs-CRP serum levels significantly decrease in combination and nano-curcumin within groups (P<0.05). An additive greater reduction of IL-6 and hs-CRP was observed in the combination group suggested a possible synergetic relation. It seems that, ω-3 fatty acids and curcumin supplementation can be considered a new promising target in migraine prevention. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Concordance of haemoglobin A1c, blood pressure and C-reactive protein between children and their parents in Chinese households.

    PubMed

    Dong, F; Howard, A G; Herring, A H; Adair, L S; Thompson, A L; Popkin, B M; Aiello, A E; Zhang, B; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2017-10-01

    China has the world's highest diabetes prevalence, which along with hypertension and inflammation continues to grow particularly among children. Little is known about the strength of the association of these cardiometabolic risk factors between parents and their children; thus, the potential of household-based strategies to reduce risk is unknown. The objective of the study is to examine the parent-child association for haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large, geographically diverse Chinese sample. In 940 parent-child pairs (children aged 7-17 years) who participated in the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey, we measured each individual's HbA1c and CRP using fasting blood and BP. We used sex-specific random-effects linear regression to examine the parent-child association for these risk factors, accounting for within-family clustering. Child's HbA1c was positively associated with parental HbA1c. Beta coefficients ranged from 0.06 (95% CI 0.03-0.12) for father-daughter to 0.43 (95% CI 0.28-0.58) for mother-son pairs. We also detected a positive mother-daughter association for BP and positive father-child associations for CRP. The statistically significant parent-child association for HbA1c, BP and CRP in Chinese families suggests that household-based interventions could be useful for confronting the high rates of diabetes, hypertension and inflammation in China. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  6. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c: a study in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and CRP predict HbA1c levels in a group of healthy Indonesians and a group of Indonesians treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A full-mouth periodontal examination, including probing pocket depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss, plaque index and bleeding on probing, was performed in 132 healthy Indonesians and 101 Indonesians treated for DM2. Using these data, PISA was calculated. In addition, HbA1c and CRP were analyzed. A validated questionnaire was used to assess smoking, body mass index (BMI), education and medical conditions. In regression analyses, it was assessed whether periodontitis severity and CRP predict HbA1c, controlling for confounding and effect modification (i.e., age, sex, BMI, pack years, and education). In healthy Indonesians, PISA and CRP predicted HbA1c as did age, sex, and smoking. In Indonesians treated for DM2, PISA did not predict HbA1c. Periodontitis may impair blood glucose regulation in healthy Indonesians in conjunction with elevated CRP levels. The potential effect of periodontitis on glucose control in DM2 patients may be masked by DM2 treatment. periodontitis may impair blood glucose control through exerting an inflammatory and infectious burden evidenced by increased levels of CRP.

  7. Strategies for vascular disease prevention: the role of lipids and related markers including apolipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins (LDL)-particle size, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA₂) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)).

    PubMed

    Dallmeier, Dhayana; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the treatment of dyslipidemias. However, half of cardiovascular events occur in individuals with average or low cholesterol levels and there is still a considerable residual risk with 70% of patients having an event despite statin treatment. In the era of personalized medicine there is increased interest in the incorporation of individual biomarkers in risk score algorithms in order to improve cardiovascular risk stratification followed by the prompt initiation of preventive measures. Since the 2001 third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment on High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of lipid related biomarkers such as non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, lipoprotein(a), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, and C-reactive protein. This article tries to summarize the most recent results in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Clyne, B; Olshaker, J S

    1999-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was identified in 1930 and was subsequently considered to be an "acute phase protein," an early indicator of infectious or inflammatory conditions. Since its discovery, CRP has been studied as a screening device for inflammation, a marker for disease activity, and as a diagnostic adjunct. Improved methods of quantifying CRP have led to increased application to clinical medicine. In the emergency department (ED), CRP must be interpreted in the clinical context; no single value can be used to rule in or rule out a specific diagnosis. We conclude that CRP has limited utility in the ED. It may be a useful adjunct to serial examinations in equivocal presentations of appendicitis in those centers without ready access to computed tomography (CT) scan. It may be elevated with complications or treatment failures in patients with pneumonia, pancreatitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), and urinary tract infections. In patients with meningitis, neonatal sepsis, and occult bacteremia, CRP is usually elevated. However, CRP has no role in diagnosing these clinical entities, and a normal CRP level should never delay antibiotic coverage.

  9. Serum lipids modify periodontal infection - C-reactive protein association.

    PubMed

    Haro, Anniina; Saxlin, Tuomas; Suominen, Anna-Liisa; Ylöstalo, Pekka; Leiviskä, Jaana; Tervonen, Tellervo; Knuuttila, Matti

    2012-09-01

    To investigate whether low-grade inflammation-related factors such as serum low-density (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) modify the association between periodontal infection and C-reactive protein. This study was based on a subpopulation of the Health 2000 Survey, which consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-rheumatic subjects who were 30-49 years old (n = 2710). The extent of periodontal infection was measured by means of the number of teeth with periodontal pocket ≥4 mm and teeth with periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and systemic inflammation using high sensitive C-reactive protein. The extent of periodontal infection was associated with elevated levels of C-reactive protein among those subjects whose HDL-C value was below the median value of 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C above the median value of 3.4 mmol/l. Among those with HDL-C ≥ 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C ≤ 3.4 mmol/l, the association between periodontal infection and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein was practically non-existent. This study suggests that the relation of periodontal infection to the systemic inflammatory condition is more complicated than previously presumed. The findings of this study suggest that the possible systemic effect of periodontal infection is dependent on serum lipid composition. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Effects of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and HDL in serum of subjects with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Anne Carolina Eleutério; Carneiro, Valéria Martins de Araújo; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in the sera and its association with body mass index and high density lipoprotein in subjects with severe periodontitis. Sera from 28 subjects (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) with severe periodontitis and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to periodontal therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9-12 months). Oral and systemic parameters such as the number of blood cells, glucose examination, lipid profile, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels accessed by high-sensitivity immunonephelometry assay, were included. Before therapy, in the periodontitis group, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was statistically lower than in the control group (P<0.0216). After therapy, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was significantly higher (65.22%) (P<0.0339). The mean value for body mass index was statistically lower in subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL (24.63±4.19), compared with those with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >0.3 mg/dL (28.91±6.03) (P<0.0411). High density lipoprotein presented a mean value statistically higher after therapy (P<0.0027). In systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis, periodontal therapy was associated with decreased levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and increase of high density lipoprotein in serum. The clinical trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.br/, No. RBR-24T799.

  11. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  12. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; MacFadyen, Jean G; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2008-11-20

    Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels but without hyperlipidemia might benefit from statin treatment. We randomly assigned 17,802 apparently healthy men and women with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels of less than 130 mg per deciliter (3.4 mmol per liter) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels of 2.0 mg per liter or higher to rosuvastatin, 20 mg daily, or placebo and followed them for the occurrence of the combined primary end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, arterial revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina, or death from cardiovascular causes. The trial was stopped after a median follow-up of 1.9 years (maximum, 5.0). Rosuvastatin reduced LDL cholesterol levels by 50% and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels by 37%. The rates of the primary end point were 0.77 and 1.36 per 100 person-years of follow-up in the rosuvastatin and placebo groups, respectively (hazard ratio for rosuvastatin, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46 to 0.69; P<0.00001), with corresponding rates of 0.17 and 0.37 for myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.70; P=0.0002), 0.18 and 0.34 for stroke (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.79; P=0.002), 0.41 and 0.77 for revascularization or unstable angina (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.70; P<0.00001), 0.45 and 0.85 for the combined end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.69; P<0.00001), and 1.00 and 1.25 for death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.97; P=0.02). Consistent effects were observed in all subgroups evaluated. The rosuvastatin group did not have a significant increase in myopathy or cancer but did have a higher

  13. C-reactive protein levels in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Trang N; Overstreet, Benjamin T; Rogers, Jeffrey D; Califano, Joseph V; Best, Al M; Schenkein, Harvey A

    2006-06-01

    Sera from patients with periodontal infections contain elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) compared to periodontally healthy individuals. Most studies to date have included patients with chronic periodontitis, and few investigators have studied CRP levels in subjects with aggressive periodontitis (AgP). The purpose of this study was to determine the relative levels of serum CRP in AgP patients and periodontally healthy subjects and to examine patients' characteristics that might account for intergroup differences. Serum samples were collected from 93 patients with generalized AgP (GAgP), from 97 patients with localized AgP (LAgP), and from 91 healthy controls (non-periodontitis [NP]). Periodontal examination consisted of plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, bleeding index, and attachment loss measurements. Current smoking was assessed by determination of serum cotinine levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and serum CRP levels were determined using a high-sensitivity ELISA assay. The three groups were significantly different from one another (P <0.0001). The 95% confidence interval for serum CRP concentrations were as follows: NP, 0.65919 (0.4901 to 0.8869); LAgP, 1.10138 (0.8265 to 1.468); and GAgP, 2.05318 (1.5313 to 2.7538) mg/l. CRP levels in both LAgP and GAgP subjects were significantly greater than those in NP subjects, and levels in GAgP were significantly greater than those in LAgP. Following adjustment of the data for periodontal and demographic variables and current smoking, both mean probing depth and periodontal diagnosis remained correlated with CRP levels. Patients with AgP have statistically significant elevations in serum CRP levels compared to subjects without periodontitis. Elevated CRP in these subjects might represent a contribution of periodontal infections to systemic inflammation in relatively young individuals.

  14. [C-reactive protein changes with antihypertensive and statin treatment].

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Enrique; Gómez-Belda, Ana; Costa, José A; Aragó, Miriam; Miralles, Amparo; González, Carmen; Pascual, José M

    2005-10-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the modifications of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) with antihypertensive and statin treatment in a hypertensive population with a wide range of coronary risks (CR). Retrospective follow-up study in 665 hypertensive patients: 556 (52% male) without dyslipidemia and CR (Framingham at 10 years) of 8.3 (7.6) as a control group (C) and 109 (61% male) with dyslipidemia and CR of 13.1 (8.8) who were treated with statins (T). Statins treatment was established according to NCEP-ATP-III. In both groups, the antihypertensive treatment was optimized in order to achieve blood pressure (BP) control (< 140/90 mmHg). A lipid profile and high sensitivity CRP (analyzed by nephelometry) was performed at the beginning and at the end of follow up [14.3 (3.6) months]. CRP levels were reduced in the T group -0.17 (0.2) mg/L vs. 0.14 (0.09) mg/L (p = 0.003, Mann-Whitney) in C. The lessening of CRP was not related to the reduction of lipids levels: total cholesterol (r = 0.06; p = 0.49), LDL-C (r = 0.11; p = 0.24), triglycerides (r = -0.02; p = 0.81) (Spearman), or to the reduction of systolic BP (r = -0.07; p = 0.44) and diastolic BP (r = -0.121; p = 0.21). The T group was treated with more antihypertensive drugs than C (2.2 [2.3] vs. 2.5 [1.2]; p = 0.02). Patients treated with ECA inhibitors or angiotensin II antagonist showed a tendency to decreasing the CRP levels more (p = 0.08). In hypertensive populations, statins induce a reduction of CRP levels. The reduction is not related to the lowering of lipids levels or BP values. The effect of statins on the reduction of CRP in hypertensive patients is not related to the lowering of lipids or BP.

  15. Serum C-reactive protein in the prediction of cardiovascular diseases: Overview of the latest clinical studies and public health practice.

    PubMed

    Avan, Amir; Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Tajfard, Mohammad; Ferns, Gordon

    2018-06-22

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Epidemiological studies using high-sensitivity assays for serum C-reactive protein have shown a consistent association between cardiovascular disease risk and serum C-reactive protein concentrations. C-reactive protein is a biomarker for inflammation, and has been established in clinical practice as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease events. There is evidence that serum C-reactive protein is an excellent biomarker of cardiovascular disease and is also an independent and strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events. Further characterization of the impact and influence of lifestyle exposures and genetic variation on the C-reactive protein response to cardiovascular disease events may have implications for the therapeutic approaches to reduce cardiovascular disease events. This review summarizes the studies that have examined the association between serum C-reactive protein and the risk of cardiovascular disease. We also discuss the impact of independent factors and C-reactive protein genetic polymorphisms on baseline plasma C-reactive protein levels. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reduction of C-reactive protein with isoflavone supplement reverses endothelial dysfunction in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yap-Hang; Lau, Kui-Kai; Yiu, Kai-Hang; Li, Sheung-Wai; Chan, Hiu-Ting; Fong, Daniel Yee-Tak; Tam, Sidney; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the effect of oral isoflavone supplement on vascular endothelial function in patients with established cardiovascular disease. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was performed to determine the effects of isoflavone supplement (80 mg/day, n = 50) vs. placebo (n = 52) for 12 weeks on brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in patients with prior ischaemic stroke. Compared with controls, FMD at 12 weeks was significantly greater in isoflavone-treated patients [treatment effect 1.0%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.1-2.0, P = 0.035]. Adjusted for baseline differences in FMD, isoflavone treatment was independently associated with significantly less impairment of FMD at 12 weeks (odds ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.13-0.80, P = 0.014). The absolute treatment effect of isoflavone on brachial FMD was inversely related to baseline FMD (r = -0.51, P < 0.001), suggesting that vasoprotective effect of isoflavone was more pronounced in patients with more severe endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, isoflavone treatment for 12 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum high-sensitivity (hs)-C-reactive protein level (treatment effect -1.7 mg/L, 95% CI -3.3 to -0.1, P = 0.033). Nevertheless, isoflavone did not have any significant treatment effects on nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation, blood pressure, heart rate, serum levels of fasting glucose and insulin, haemoglobin A1c, and oxidative stress as determined by serum superoxide dismutase, 8-isoprostane, and malondialdehyde (all P > 0.05). This study demonstrated that 12 week isoflavone treatment reduced serum hs-C-reactive protein and improved brachial FMD in patients with clinically manifest atherosclerosis, thus reversing their endothelial dysfunction status. These findings may have important implication for the use of isoflavone for secondary prevention in patients with cardiovascular disease, on top of conventional interventions.

  17. Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    António, Maria

    2018-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a very important biomarker of infection and inflammation for a number of diseases. Routine CRP measurements with high sensitivity and reliability are highly relevant to the assessment of states of inflammation and the efficacy of treatment intervention, and require the development of very sensitive, selective, fast, robust and reproducible assays. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are distinguished for their unique electrical and optical properties and the ability to conjugate with biomolecules. Au NP-based probes have attracted considerable attention in the last decade in the analysis of biological samples due to their simplicity, high sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, this article aims to be a critical and constructive analysis of the literature of the last three years regarding the advances made in the development of bioanalytical assays based on gold nanoparticles for the in vitro detection and quantification of C-reactive protein from biological samples. Current methods for Au NP synthesis and the strategies for surface modification aiming at selectivity towards CRP are highlighted. PMID:29597295

  18. Study of High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (HS-CRP) After Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Patients Undergoing Isolated CABG.

    PubMed

    Johari Moghadam, Adel; Azizinejad, Saied

    2016-12-01

    Although cardiac rehabilitation is known as a tool to reduce the overall risk of cardiovascular complications, its specific role in the reduction of hs-CRP as a marker of inflammation and a proven marker of cardiovascular risk needs further investigation. The present study aims at elucidating the effects of a full course of conventional cardiac rehabilitation program for the period of eight weeks, on the levels of hs-CRP in patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. In this case study, 30 consecutive patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery (isolated CABGS), and a full 8-week cardiac rehabilitation program in Tehran Heart Center, were investigated. A group of 30 similar patients, who enrolled in the same period of rehabilitation program but did not participate in practice, was considered as a control group. Serum levels of hs-CRP in both groups were measured retrospectively and in similar days before the start of rehabilitation program and at the end of it (or 8 weeks after initial registration for the control group). Levels of hs-CRP in the rehabilitation group and control group were 5.9 7.7 and 6.3 6.9 respectively before start of the program which was not statistically meaningful ( P -Value = 0.833). However, after the program, level of hs-CRP in the two tested groups changed to 2.3 5.1 and 5.7 6.1 respectively which showed a meaningful correlation ( P -Value = 0.023). These results also showed that decrease in hs-CRP level in the rehabilitated group but not in the control group was statistically meaningful (with P -Value of 0.037 and 0.0723 respectively). In patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, participating in a full course of cardiac rehabilitation for 8 weeks has resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP levels as a marker of cardiovascular risk.

  19. High-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) value with 90 days mortality in patients with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nursyamsiah; Hasan, R.

    2018-03-01

    Hospitalization in patients with chronic heart failure is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity that during treatment and post-treatment. Despite the various therapies available today, mortality and re-hospitalization rates within 60 to 90 days post-hospitalization are still quite high. This period is known as the vulnerable phase. With the prognostic evaluation tools in patients with heart failure are expected to help identify high-risk individuals, then more rigorous monitoring and interventions can be undertaken. To determine whether hs-CRP have an impact on mortality within 90 days in hospitalized patients with heart failure, an observational cohort study was conducted in 39 patients with heart failure who were hospitalized due to worsening chronic heart failure. Patients were followed for up to 90 days after initial evaluation with the primary endpoint is death. Hs-CRP value >4.25 mg/L we found 70% was dead and hs-CRP value <4.25 mg/L only 6.9% was dead whereas the survival within 90 days. p:0.000.In conclusion, there were differences in hs-CRP values between in patients with heart failure who died and survival within 90 days.

  20. Plasma Amyloid β-Protein and C-reactive Protein in Relation to the Rate of Progression of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Locascio, Joseph J.; Fukumoto, Hiroaki; Yap, Liang; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Growdon, John H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Irizarry, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine whether plasma markers of amyloid precursor protein metabolism (amyloid β-protein ending in Val-40 [Aβ40] and Ala-42 [Aβ42]), inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), and folic acid metabolism (folic acid, vitamin B12, and total homocysteine levels) are associated with the rate of cognitive and functional decline in persons with Alzheimer disease. Design Longitudinal study across a mean (SD) of 4.2 (2.6) years with assessments at approximately 6- to 12- month intervals. Setting Out patient care. Patients A cohort of 122 patients having a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer disease, each with at least 2 assessments across time. Main Outcome Measures Scores on the cognitive Information-Memory-Concentration subscale of the Blessed Dementia Scale and the functional Weintraub Activities of Daily Living Scale. Results Low plasma levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were associated with a significantly more rapid cognitive decline, as indexed using the Blessed Dementia Scale, than were high levels. Low levels of Aβ42 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were significantly associated with more rapid functional decline on the Weintraub Activities of Daily Living Scale than were high levels. These plasma markers contributed about 5% to 12% of the variance accounted for on the Blessed Dementia Scale and the Activities of Daily Living Scale by fixed-effects predictors. Measures of folic acid metabolism were not associated with changes on either the Blessed Dementia Scale or the Activities of Daily Living Scale. Conclusions Plasma markers of amyloid precursor protein metabolism and C-reactive protein may be associated with the rate of cognitive and functional decline in patients with Alzheimer disease. PMID:18541797

  1. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  2. Effects of atorvastatin on human c reactive protein metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goals were to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled...

  3. C-reactive protein, marker for evaluation of systemic inflammatory response in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mihu, D; Costin, N; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Blaga, Ligia Daniela; Pop, Raluca Bogdana

    2008-01-01

    Determination by a high sensitivity technique of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a sensitive marker of inflammation in women with preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy and investigation of the relationship between CRP and the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome. The study included 40 women with preeclampsia and 40 control subjects with normal pregnancies in the last trimester of pregnancy. The serum CRP concentration was determined using the universal high sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. The serum CRP concentration was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in preclampsia (5.69 +/- 1.8 mg/L) compared to normal pregnancy (2.89 +/- 1.2 mg/L). In women with preeclampsia, CRP correlated positively and significantly with diastolic blood pressure, proteinuria and uric acid levels. Maternal CRP values also correlated negatively and significantly with fetal weight at birth. Our results demonstrate that serum CRP is increased in preeclampsia and represents a marker of the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome and of fetal weight at birth. Taking into consideration these observations and the fact that CRP testing is rapid and relatively inexpensive, we recommend the use of this acute phase reagent in clinical practice, in all women with preeclampsia in order to establish the prognosis of the disease.

  4. Efect of periodontal disease and non surgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein. Evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Guiha, Rami; Bautista, Daniel; Caffesse, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze how anti-infectious periodontal treatment affects C reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with type 1 diabetes, and correlate baseline CRP levels with periodontal disease severity. Study Design: A cohort of fifty three subjects with type 1 diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal parameters were measured, and blood samples were obtained to evaluate high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Group 1 was treated with scaling, root planning, and systemic administration of doxycycline. Group 2 received only scaling and root planning. Results: Hs-CRP was reduced after periodontal treatment in group 1 (-0.22 mg/l) and 2 (-0.21 mg/l ) but this reduction was not statistically significant, even in the patients with the best response to periodontal treatment. However, significant correlation appeared between hs-CRP and mean probing pocket depth (PPD) (p=0, 01) and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) (p=0,03). Conclusions: Non-surgical periodontal treatment couldn’t reduce hs-CRP values, however, it was found an association between advanced periodontitis and elevated blood hs-CRP levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. It can be speculated that periodontal disease increases production of pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with type 1 diabetes, but other producing sources of these pro-inflammatory substances may exist. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 1, periodontal therapy, C reactive protein. PMID:22322513

  5. High-sensitivity ESCA instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D.; Herglotz, H.K.; Lee, J.D.

    1973-01-01

    A new electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) instrument has been developed to provide high sensitivity and efficient operation for laboratory analysis of composition and chemical bonding in very thin surface layers of solid samples. High sensitivity is achieved by means of the high-intensity, efficient x-ray source described by Davies and Herglotz at the 1968 Denver X-Ray Conference, in combination with the new electron energy analyzer described by Lee at the 1972 Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy. A sample chamber designed to provide for rapid introduction and replacement of samples has adequate facilities for various sample treatmentsmore » and conditiouing followed immediately by ESCA analysis of the sample. Examples of application are presented, demonstrating the sensitivity and resolution achievable with this instrument. Its usefulness in trace surface analysis is shown and some chemical shifts'' measured by the instrument are compared with those obtained by x-ray spectroscopy. (auth)« less

  6. C-reactive protein in degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro L; Mazzone, AnnaMaria

    2006-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve stenosis includes a range of disorder severity from mild leaflet thickening without valve obstruction, "aortic sclerosis", to severe calcified aortic stenosis. It is a slowly progressive active process of valve modification similar to atherosclerosis for cardiovascular risk factors, lipoprotein deposition, chronic inflammation, and calcification. Systemic signs of inflammation, as wall and serum C-reactive protein, similar to those found in atherosclerosis, are present in patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis and may be expression of a common disease, useful in monitoring of stenosis progression. PMID:16774687

  7. Sport-based physical activity recommendations and modifications in C-reactive protein and arterial thickness.

    PubMed

    Cayres, Suziane Ungari; de Lira, Fabio Santos; Kemper, Han C G; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Barbosa, Maurício Fregonesi; Fernandes, Romulo Araújo

    2018-04-01

    We analyzed the effects of 1 year of engagement in ≥ 300 min/week of organized sports on inflammatory levels and vascular structure in adolescents. The sample was composed of 89 adolescents (11.6 ± 0.7 years old [43 boys and 46 girls]), stratified according to engagement in ≥ 300 min/week of sport practice during at least 12 months of follow-up (n = 15, sport practice; n = 74, non-sport practice). Arterial thickness (carotid and femoral) was assessed by ultrasound scan, while high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were used to assess inflammatory status. Trunk fatness (densitometry scanner), biological maturation (age at peak height velocity), blood pressure, and skipping breakfast were treated as covariates. Independently of body fatness and biological maturation, the group engaged in sports presented a higher reduction in C-reactive protein (mean difference -1.559 mg/L [95%CI -2.539 to -0.579]) than the non-sport group (mean difference -0.414 mg/L [95%CI -0.846 to 0.017]) (p = 0.040). There was a significant relationship between changes in C-reactive protein and changes in femoral intima-media thickness in the non-sport group (r = 0.311 [95%CI 0.026 to 0.549]). Inflammation decreased in adolescents engaged in organized sports, independently of trunk fatness and biological maturation. Moreover, inflammation was related to arterial thickening only in adolescents not engaged in sports. What is Known: • Intima media thickness is a relevant marker of cardiovascular disease in pediatric groups, being affected by obesity and inflammation. • The importance of monitoring inflammatory markers from childhood is enhanced by the fact that alterations in these inflammatory markers in early life predict inflammation and alterations in carotid IMT in adulthood. What is New: • Anti-inflammatory properties related to physical exercise performed at moderate intensity, on inflammation and alterations in IMT are not clear in pediatric

  8. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5270 C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A C-reactive protein... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866...

  9. C-reactive protein as a marker of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna; Mahendra, Muktishree

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory response and cause the release of cytokines; this results in periodontal destruction and initiation of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRP). This study set out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRP that can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular disease. Based on their periodontal status, 45 patients were divided into three groups. The following clinical parameters were recorded: plaque index, gingival index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels. Scoring was done on six tooth surfaces for all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. The results indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared to controls.

  10. Impact of fulminant hepatic failure in C-reactive protein?

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Joana Pedro da Silva; Coelho, Luis Miguel da Cruz; Póvoa, Pedro Manuel Sarmento Rodrigues

    2010-12-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) refers to the rapid development of severe acute liver injury with impaired synthetic function, coagulopathy, and encephalopathy in a person who previously had a normal liver or had a well-compensated liver disease. It is a rare complication in critically ill patients and carries a very bad prognosis. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a useful marker of infection, is produced exclusively by the liver. The aim of this study was to assess CRP concentrations in patients with FHF. We prospectively identified patients with sepsis and FHF treated at the intensive care unit (ICU). Data collected included admission diagnosis, medical history, systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores. C-reactive protein and white cell count were measured at admission and then daily until ICU discharge. We included 7 patients with FHF and sepsis. Six patients died with severe multiple organ failure. Six patients were already admitted with FHF, with the remaining one being diagnosed at the 26th day of ICU stay. All patients present severe coagulopathy. In all septic patients, despite clinical deterioration, CRP levels were markedly decreased sometimes reaching undetectable levels. In septic patients with FHF, CRP is more a marker of severe liver dysfunction and should not be used as a marker of infection. As a result, in a patient admitted with a very high suspicion of infection and an abnormally low CRP concentration or with a marked CRP decline despite persistent septic shock, severe hepatic failure should be ruled out. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is Cerebrospinal Fluid C-reactive Protein a Better Tool than Blood C-reactive Protein in Laboratory Diagnosis of Meningitis in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Kalpana K.; Malla, Tejesh; Rao, K. Seshagiri; Basnet, Sahisnuta; Shah, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to test whether C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement could differentiate between different types of meningitis and become a routine test. Methods: A prospective study included 140 children admitted to Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, between July 2009 and June 2011. The subjects had a blood test and detailed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, including blood and CSF CRP levels. Results: Of those admitted, 31.1% had pyogenic meningitis (PM), 26.2% partially treated meningitis (PPM), 33% viral meningitis (VM), and 9.7% tubercular meningitis (TBM), with 26.4% controls. Organisms were isolated in 12.5% of the cases by blood culture and 25% of cases through CSF culture. Blood CRP was positive in all groups, with the highest values in PM (53.12 ± 28.88 mg/dl) and PPM (47.55 ± 34.34 mg/dl); this was not statistically significant (P = 0.08). The CSF CRP levels were significantly higher (P <0.001) in PM (45.75 ± 28.50 mg/dl) and PPM (23.11 ± 23.98 mg/dl). The sensitivity and specificity of blood CRP was 90.62%, 88.88%, 64.7%, 70% and 32.4%, 30.97%, 24.52%, 26.12% and that of CSF CRP was 96.87%, 66.66%, 20.58%, 10% and 74.73%, 63.71%, 50.94%, 55.35% for PM, PPM, VM and TBM, respectively. Conclusion: Because of its high sensitivity, both CSF CRP and blood CRP can be used to screen for bacterial meningitis (both PM and PPM). CSF CRP screening yielded results with a higher specificity than blood CRP; hence, it can be a supportive test along with CSF cytology, biochemistry, and microbiology for diagnosing meningitis. PMID:23573388

  12. Midlife C-reactive protein and risk of cognitive decline: a 31-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Danielle; David Curb, J; Masaki, Kamal H; White, Lon R; Launer, Lenore J

    2009-11-01

    There is evidence for a relationship between raised inflammatory markers, including high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), measured late in life, and an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. This study evaluates the association of midlife hs-CRP concentrations with late-life longitudinal trends in cognitive function. Data are from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HAAS), a longitudinal community-based study of Japanese American men. hs-CRP levels were measured on average 25 years before cognitive testing began in 1991. Subjects were followed from up to three follow-up examinations (mean of 6.1 years). At each exam, cognitive function was measured with the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI). This analysis includes a sub-sample of 691 subjects dementia-free in 1991. With incident dementia cases included, those with the highest quartile of hs-CRP had significantly more cognitive decline than those in the lowest quartile, after adjustment for baseline CASI score, demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. When cases were removed, there was no difference in cognitive decline by CRP quartile. This relationship was not modified by the presence of apolipoprotein E varepsilon4. These findings suggest that inflammatory mechanisms during midlife may reflect underlying processes contributing to dementia-related cognitive decline late in life.

  13. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein using optical fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, S; Vasu, K S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2015-03-15

    An accurate and highly sensitive sensor platform has been demonstrated for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The CRP detection has been carried out by monitoring the shift in Bragg wavelength (ΔλB) of an etched FBG (eFBG) coated with an anti-CRP antibody (aCRP)-graphene oxide (GO) complex. The complex is characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A limit of detection of 0.01mg/L has been achieved with a linear range of detection from 0.01mg/L to 100mg/L which includes clinical range of CRP. The eFBG sensor coated with only aCRP (without GO) show much less sensitivity than that of aCRP-GO complex coated eFBG. The eFBG sensors show high specificity to CRP even in the presence of other interfering factors such as urea, creatinine and glucose. The affinity constant of ∼1.1×10(10)M(-1) has been extracted from the data of normalized shift (ΔλB/λB) as a function of CRP concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Target for Therapy or Trouble?

    PubMed

    Kraus, Virginia B; Jordan, Joanne M

    2007-02-07

    High sensitivity serum C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has come into clinical use as a marker of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In addition to a role as a marker of disease, CRP has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of CVD. Specific small-molecule inhibitors of CRP have recently been developed with the intent of mitigating cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction. However, the use of CRP, both as a risk marker and a disease target are controversial for several reasons. Serum hs-CRP concentrations can be elevated on the basis of genetics, female gender, and non-Caucasian ethnicity. It is not clear, in these contexts, that elevations of hs-CRP have any pathological significance. As a non-specific indicator of inflammation, CRP is also not a specific indicator of a single disease state such as cardiovascular disease but elevated concentrations can be seen in association with other comorbidities including obesity and pulmonary disease. In sharp contrast to the proposed inhibition of CRP for cardiovascular disease treatment, the infusion of CRP has been shown to have profound therapeutic benefits for autoimmune disease and septic shock. The balance between the risks and benefits of these competing views of the role of CRP in disease and disease therapy is reminiscent of the ongoing controversy regarding the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for musculoskeletal disease and their cardiovascular side effects. Soon, NSAIDs may not be the only agents about which Rheumatologists and Cardiologists may spar.

  15. C-reactive protein: A differential biomarker for major depressive disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui Hua; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, I Hui; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Kao Chin; Huang, San-Yuan; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band; Chen, Po See

    2017-02-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine whether the C-reactive protein (CRP) level could be used to differentiate between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar II disorder (BD II). Methods Ninety-six healthy controls, 88 BD II and 72 MDD drug-naïve patients in their major depressive episodes were enrolled. The fasting plasma level of high-sensitivity CRP was assessed at baseline and after treatment. Results The BD II patients presented significantly higher 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores and CRP levels at baseline when adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index (P <  0.001 and P <  0.001, respectively). After treatment the CRP levels remained significantly different (P <  0.001), although the HDRS score was not significantly different between the BD II and MDD patients. A receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that a baseline CRP level of 621.6 ng/mL could discriminate between BD II and MDD, with an area under the curve of 0.816 and a sensitivity and specificity of 0.699 and 0.882, respectively. Furthermore, the baseline CRP level greater than 621.6 ng/ml had 28.2 higher odds of a diagnosis of BD II (P <  0.001, 95% confidence interval: 10.96-72.35). Conclusions The level of CRP plays a role of biomarker to differentiate between MDD and BD II depression in both their depressed and euthymic state.

  16. Obesity indices are predictive of elevated C-reactive protein in long-haul truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Laurie; Oberlin, Douglas J; Sönmez, Sevil; Labban, Jeffrey; Lemke, Michael Kenneth; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos

    2016-08-01

    Obesity rates in long-haul truck drivers have been shown to be significantly higher than the general population. We hypothesized that commercial drivers with the highest levels of general obesity and abdominal adiposity would have higher concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation. Survey and anthropometric data were collected from 262 commercial drivers. Weight, circumference measures, and blood analysis for CRP (N = 115) were conducted and compared to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. CRP values were non-normally distributed and logarithmically transformed for statistical analyses. BMI, waist circumference, sagittal abdominal diameter, and CRP were significantly higher than in the general population. Anthropometric indices that included height (BMI, waist-to-height ratio, and sagittal diameter-to-height ratio), were most predictive of CRP values. Abdominal obesity is prevalent in commercial vehicle drivers and is an important indicator of the presence of inflammation in this population. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:665-675, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. C-reactive protein and reactive oxygen metabolites in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kotani, K; Sakane, N

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the correlation between diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in subjects with or without metabolic syndrome. Cardiometabolic risk factors, d-ROMs and hs-CRP were determined in 457 women: 123 with metabolic syndrome and 334 without metabolic syndrome. The correlation between d-ROMs and hs-CRP levels was compared between the two groups. The group with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher d-ROMs and hs-CRP levels than the group without metabolic syndrome. While the d-ROMs level was significantly and positively correlated with the hs-CRP level in both groups, the correlation level between the two groups was significantly different. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for other cardiometabolic risk factors also showed significant positive correlation between dROMs and hs-CRP levels in both groups. Subjects with metabolic syndrome may have a closer relationship between inflammation and oxidative stress than subjects without metabolic syndrome, possibly reflecting their increased predisposition to atherosclerosis. Further studies are necessary to confirm the observed relationship.

  18. Relationship of C-reactive protein, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus: potential role of statins.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, David T.

    2005-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and the metabolic derangements of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are all associated with underlying inflammatory processes. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events. It adds to cardiovascular disease risk at all levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and Framingham risk scores, and elevated levels are also associated with increasing severity of the metabolic syndrome. The development of a simple, stable, noninvasive test to measure high-sensitivity CRP has provided a clinical tool that may have an important role in the identification and assessment of individuals likely to develop cardiovascular or metabolic disease. The role of CRP in predicting cardiovascular risk is less clear in African Americans, however, than in white populations. Statins and thiazolidinediones are being investigated for their potential role in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory processes involved in the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In the future, assessment of CRP levels may contribute importantly to clinical decision-making in reducing cardiovascular risk. PMID:16396052

  19. Relationship of C-reactive protein, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus: potential role of statins.

    PubMed

    Nash, David T

    2005-12-01

    Atherosclerosis and the metabolic derangements of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are all associated with underlying inflammatory processes. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events. It adds to cardiovascular disease risk at all levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and Framingham risk scores, and elevated levels are also associated with increasing severity of the metabolic syndrome. The development of a simple, stable, noninvasive test to measure high-sensitivity CRP has provided a clinical tool that may have an important role in the identification and assessment of individuals likely to develop cardiovascular or metabolic disease. The role of CRP in predicting cardiovascular risk is less clear in African Americans, however, than in white populations. Statins and thiazolidinediones are being investigated for their potential role in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory processes involved in the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In the future, assessment of CRP levels may contribute importantly to clinical decision-making in reducing cardiovascular risk.

  20. C-reactive protein in relation to early atherosclerosis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Jogestrand, Tomas; Nowak, Jacek; Söder, Per-Östen; Söder, Birgitta

    2012-02-01

    Periodontitis may affect atherosclerosis via the chronic inflammation. We investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in relation to early vascular atherosclerotic changes in non-symptomatic subjects with and without long-term periodontitis. Carotid ultrasonography with calculation of common carotid artery intima-media area (cIMA) was performed, and hsCRP and atherosclerosis risk factors were analysed in randomly chosen 93 patients with periodontitis and 41 controls. The relationship between hsCRP, cIMA and atherosclerosis risk factors was evaluated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Women displayed lower hsCRP (p < 0.05) and higher serum HDL (p < 0.001) than men. In all patients with periodontitis, cIMA values were higher than in controls. Periodontitis appeared to be a major predictor for increased cIMA (odds ratio, 3.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-12.26). Neither of these factors was significantly associated with hsCRP which thus appeared not sensitive enough to be a marker for periodontitis or atherosclerosis. Hence, irrespective of low hsCRP levels, periodontitis appeared to increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

  1. A systematic review and meta-analyses on C-reactive protein in relation to periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Spiros; Huizinga, John D; Loos, Bruno G

    2008-04-01

    Elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is regarded as a risk predictor for cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review explored the robustness of observations that CRP is elevated in periodontitis. Similarly, the effect of periodontal therapy on CRP levels was investigated. Selection of publications was based on: (1) cross-sectional (case-control) studies; (2) longitudinal (treatment) studies; (3) high-sensitivity CRP measurement; (4) median and/or mean (+/-SD) values presented; and (5) subjects with no systemic disorders. Screening of the initially 448 identified studies and reference checking resulted in 18 suitable papers. The majority of the studies showed that CRP levels are higher in patients than in controls. Often, studies showed that patients had CRP levels >2.1 mg/l. A meta-analysis of 10 cross-sectional studies showed that the weighted mean difference (WMD) of CRP between patients and controls was 1.56 mg/l (p<0.00001). Evidence from available treatment studies (n=6) showed lower levels of CRP after periodontal therapy. Eligible treatment studies in a meta-analysis demonstrated a WMD of reductions of CRP after therapy of 0.50 mg/L (95% CI 0.08-0.93) (p=0.02). There is strong evidence from cross-sectional studies that plasma CRP in periodontitis is elevated compared with controls. There is modest evidence on the effect of periodontal therapy in lowering the levels of CRP.

  2. Serum levels of C-reactive protein in adolescents with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    López, Rodrigo; Baelum, Vibeke; Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2011-04-01

    The results of several cross-sectional studies suggested a relationship between periodontitis and higher serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Most of these studies were restricted to adult study groups with severe periodontal inflammation, and the potential effects of confounding factors were frequently overlooked. A case-referent study comprised of 87 adolescent cases who presented with clinical attachment loss ≥3 mm recorded in ≥2 of 16 teeth and 73 controls who did not fulfill these criteria was nested in a fully enumerated adolescent population. Venous blood samples were obtained, and CRP levels were quantified, using a high-sensitive bead-based flow cytometric assay. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess overall differences between groups. The median serum CRP values for cases and controls were 64 ng/ml (interquartile range: 27 to 234 ng/ml) and 55 ng/ml (31 to 183 ng/ml), respectively (P = 0.8). Serum levels of CRP were not significantly higher among subjects with periodontitis than among controls. However, a statistically significant positive association between percentages of sites with bleeding on probing and log-transformed CRP values was observed.

  3. C-reactive protein as a predictor of chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erik J; Muller, Corinna L; Sartorius, Jennifer A; White, David R; Maslow, Arthur S

    2012-10-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CAM) affects many pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Finding a serum factor that could accurately predict the presence of CAM could potentially lead to more efficient management of PPROM and improved neonatal outcomes. To determine if C-reactive protein (CRP) is an effective early marker of CAM in patients with PPROM. A retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with PPROM at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, between January 2005 and January 2009. Nonparametric statistical tests (ie, Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman rank correlation) were used to compare distributions that were skewed. Characteristics of the study population were compared using 2-sample t tests for continuous variables and Fisher exact tests for discrete variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate receiver operating characteristic curves and obtain area under the curve estimates in stepwise fashion for predicting histologic CAM. A secondary analysis compared the characteristics among patients with clinical CAM, histologic CAM, or non-CAM. The total population of 73 women was subdivided into patients with histologic CAM (n=26) and patients without histologic CAM (ie, no evidence of CAM on placental pathology; n=47). There was no difference between groups in CRP levels, days of pregnancy latency, white blood cell count, smoking status, antibiotic administration, or steroid benefit. The group with histologic CAM delivered at earlier gestational ages: mean (standard deviation) age was 29.5 (4.4) weeks vs 31.9 (3.5) weeks (P=.02). For our primary analysis, we found no difference in CRP levels (P=.32). Receiver operating characteristic curve plots of CRP levels, temperature at delivery, and white blood cell count resulted in an area under the curve estimate of 0.696, which was 70% predictive of histologic CAM. In the secondary analysis, after adjusting for gestational age, the estimated hazard ratio for CRP change

  4. The prevalence of deranged C-reactive protein and albumin in patients with incurable cancer approaching death.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah; Axelsson, Bertil

    2018-01-01

    Amongst patients with incurable cancer approaching death, cachexia is common and associated with adverse outcomes. The term cachexia lacks a universally accepted definition and there is no consensus regarding which variables are to be measured. Furthermore, an elevated C-reactive protein is a common clinical challenge in this patient group. This study aims to add to the ongoing discussion regarding the definition of cancer cachexia and to study the role of C-reactive protein and s-albumin in this context. A 1-year cohort, consisting of 155 cancer patients enrolled in a specialized palliative home care team in the city of Östersund, Sweden, that were deceased during the year of 2015 was studied. Laboratory measures were studied within 0-30 and 31-60 days prior to death. C-reactive protein >10 mg/L and coinciding s-albumin <30 g/L was referred to as "laboratory cachexia". Also, the number of days from the first found "laboratory cachexia" until death was noted. The prevalence of "laboratory cachexia" was 85% 0-30 days prior to death compared to 66% 31-60 days prior to death (p<0.01). The majority of patients (75%) had an onset of "laboratory cachexia" within 0-120 days prior to death, with a median of 47 days. The median values for C-reactive protein and s-albumin within 0-30 days prior to death were 84mg/L and 23g/L respectively. Could markedly deranged values of C-reactive protein and s-albumin, such as found in this study, signal a relatively short remaining survival time in patients with incurable cancer and no clinical signs of ongoing infection? The role of "laboratory cachexia" in this context as well as the cut off values for the laboratory measures included may be further discussed.

  5. Emotional reactivity, functioning, and C-reactive protein alterations in remitted bipolar patients: Clinical relevance of a dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Dargél, Aroldo A; Godin, Ophelia; Etain, Bruno; Hirakata, Vânia; Azorin, Jean-Michel; M'Bailara, Katia; Bellivier, Frank; Bougerol, Thierry; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Passerieux, Christine; Aubin, Valerie; Courtet, Philippe; Leboyer, Marion; Henry, Chantal

    2017-08-01

    Inter-episode mood instability has increasingly been considered in bipolar disorder. This study aimed to investigate emotional reactivity as a major dimension for better characterizing remitted bipolar patients with subthreshold mood symptoms and functional status. This study also aimed to investigate whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation, could be a biological marker of emotional dysregulation in bipolar disorder (BD). Cross-sectional study of 613 subjects who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition criteria for BD recruited from the FondaMental Advanced Centers of Expertise in Bipolar Disorders cohort from 2009 to 2014. All patients had been in remission for at least 3 months before assessment. Patients were classified into three groups according to levels of emotional reactivity. Emotional reactivity was assessed by using the Multidimensional Assessment of Thymic States, and functional status was assessed by the Functioning Assessment Short Test. Clinical characteristics and blood sample were collected from all patients. In total, 415 (68%) patients had abnormal emotional reactivity. Independent of potential confounders, including age, gender and subthreshold mood symptoms, serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were significantly higher in patients with emotional hyper-reactivity (median = 4.0 mg/L, interquartile range = 2.7-5.6), and with emotional hypo-reactivity (median = 3.0 mg/L, interquartile range = 1-4) compared with patients with normal emotional reactivity (median = 0.95 mg/L, interquartile range = 0.4-1.9, p < 0.001). Patients with emotional hyper-reactivity showed significant cognitive functioning impairment ( p < 0.001). Emotional reactivity appears to be a relevant dimension for better characterizing remitted bipolar patients with subthreshold mood symptoms. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein may be an

  6. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees

    PubMed Central

    Cattafesta, Monica; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani

    2016-01-01

    Background The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP) is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program’s – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). Results A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68) of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11–0.34). Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001) and stratified by sex (P=0.004) than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001), triglycerides (P=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007), and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. Conclusion us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care. PMID:27274294

  8. Vitamin C treatment reduces elevated C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gladys; Jensen, Christopher D.; Dalvi, Tapashi B.; Norkus, Edward P.; Hudes, Mark; Crawford, Patricia B.; Holland, Nina; Fung, Ellen B.; Schumacher, Laurie; Harmatz, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory biomarker that predicts cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether vitamins C or E could reduce CRP. Healthy nonsmokers (n=396) were randomized to three groups:1000 mg/day vitamin C, 800 IU/day vitamin E, or placebo, for two months. Median baseline CRP was low, 0.85 mg/L. No treatment effect was seen when all participants are included. However, significant interaction was found, indicating that treatment effect depends on baseline CRP concentration. Among participants with CRP indicative of elevated cardiovascular risk (≥1.0 mg/L), vitamin C reduced median CRP by 25.3% vs. Placebo (p=0.02), (median reduction in the vitamin C group, 0.25 mg/L, 16.7%). These effects are similar to those of statins. The vitamin E effect was not significant. In summary, treatment with vitamin C but not E significantly reduced CRP among individuals with CRP ≥ 1.0 mg/L. Among the obese, 75% had CRP ≥ 1.0 mg/L. These data extend previous results in smokers, and identify CRP levels susceptible to reductions. Research is needed to determine whether reducing this inflammatory biomarker with vitamin C could reduce diseases associated with obesity. But research on clinical benefits of antioxidants should limit participants to persons with elevations in the target biomarkers. PMID:18952164

  9. Decreased C-reactive protein levels in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    O'Bryant, Sid E; Waring, Stephen C; Hobson, Valerie; Hall, James R; Moore, Carol B; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Massman, Paul; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2010-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that has been found to be associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) in histopathological and longitudinal studies; however, little data exist regarding serum CRP levels in patients with established AD. The current study evaluated CRP levels in 192 patients diagnosed with probable AD (mean age = 75.8 +/- 8.2 years; 50% female) as compared to 174 nondemented controls (mean age = 70.6 +/- 8.2 years; 63% female). Mean CRP levels were found to be significantly decreased in AD (2.9 microg/mL) versus controls (4.9 microg/mL; P = .003). In adjusted models, elevated CRP significantly predicted poorer (elevated) Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum of boxes (CDR SB) scores in patients with AD. In controls, CRP was negatively associated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and positively associated with CDR SB scores. These findings, together with previously published results, are consistent with the hypothesis that midlife elevations in CRP are associated with increased risk of AD development though elevated CRP levels are not useful for prediction in the immediate prodrome years before AD becomes clinically manifest. However, for a subgroup of patients with AD, elevated CRP continues to predict increased dementia severity suggestive of a possible proinflammatory endophenotype in AD.

  10. Decreased C-Reactive Protein Levels in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Bryant, Sid E.; Waring, Stephen C.; Hobson, Valerie; Hall, James R.; Moore, Carol B.; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Massman, Paul; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that has been found to be associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) in histo-pathological and longitudinal studies; however, little data exist regarding serum CRP levels in patients with established AD. The current study evaluated CRP levels in 192 patients diagnosed with probable AD (mean age = 75.8 ± 8.2 years; 50% female) as compared to 174 nondemented controls (mean age = 70.6 ± 8.2 years; 63% female). Mean CRP levels were found to be significantly decreased in AD (2.9 µg/mL) versus controls (4.9 µg/mL; P = .003). In adjusted models, elevated CRP significantly predicted poorer (elevated) Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum of boxes (CDR SB) scores in patients with AD. In controls, CRP was negatively associated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and positively associated with CDR SB scores. These findings, together with previously published results, are consistent with the hypothesis that midlife elevations in CRP are associated with increased risk of AD development though elevated CRP levels are not useful for prediction in the immediate prodrome years before AD becomes clinically manifest. However, for a subgroup of patients with AD, elevated CRP continues to predict increased dementia severity suggestive of a possible proinflammatory endophenotype in AD. PMID:19933496

  11. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively, while serum CRP levels ranged between 2.0 and 8.6μg/mL and between 0.3 and 162.3μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively. Milk and serum CRP levels were higher in both clinical and subclinical mastitis when compared with healthy controls (P<0.05 in all cases). However, no significant differences were recorded in CRP concentrations between clinical and subclinical cases. Based on these results, it could be concluded that serum and milk CRP could be useful in order to diagnose canine mastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. C-reactive protein, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Meinarde, Leonardo; Hillman, Macarena; Rizzotti, Alina; Basquiera, Ana Lisa; Tabares, Aldo; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The association between inflammation, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has not been studied so far. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) is related to low platelet count and PDA. This was a retrospective study of 88 infants with a birth weight ≤1500 g and a gestational age ≤30 weeks. Platelet count, CRP, and an echocardiogram were assessed in all infants. The subjects were matched by sex, gestational age, and birth weight. Differences were compared using the χ 2 , t-test, or Mann-Whitney U-test, as appropriate. Significant variables were entered into a logistic regression model. The association between CRP and platelets was evaluated by correlation and regression analysis. Platelet count (167 000 vs. 213 000 µl -1 , p = 0.015) was lower and the CRP (0.45 vs. 0.20 mg/dl, p = 0.002) was higher, and the platelet count correlated inversely with CRP (r = -0.145, p = 0.049) in the infants with vs. without PDA. Only CRP was independently associated with PDA in a logistic regression model (OR 64.1, 95% confidence interval 1.4-2941, p = 0.033).

  13. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees.

    PubMed

    Cattafesta, Monica; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP) is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program's - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68) of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11-0.34). Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001) and stratified by sex (P=0.004) than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001), triglycerides (P=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007), and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care.

  14. Is C-reactive protein a marker of obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Wei, Peng; Qin, Yanwen; Wei, Yongxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, distinguished by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep, with an inflammatory component. C-reactive protein (CRP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are markers of systemic inflammation and may serve as biomarkers of OSA. Methods: Scientific studies published from January 1, 2006, to January 1, 2016 were obtained via searches of PubMed, Embase, SCI, and China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) using relevant terms. Studies concerning serum CRP level/ hs-CRP in OSA patients were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Studies were included if they conform with our specific criteria of inclusion. Eligible studies were subjected to quality review, data extraction, and meta-analysis by using RevMan (version 5.2) and STATA (version 12.0). Results: There were 15 studies that met inclusion criteria that included a total of 1297 subjects. Meta-analysis revealed that serum CRP levels in the OSA group were 1.98 mmol/L higher than those in control group (95% confidence interval: 1.39–2.58, P < .01). Similarly, serum hs-CRP levels in the OSA group were 1.57 mmol/L higher than that in the control group (95% confidence interval: 0.96–2.18, P < .01). Subgroup analysis showed greater differences between OSA patients and controls in the setting of obesity (body mass index)> = 30. The total weighted mean difference (WMD) between OSA and controls within the subgroup of subjects who had a CRP was 2.10; for hs-CRP, the WMD was 2.49. Comparing OSA patients of mean apnea hypopnea index> = 15 and controls, the total WMD for the CRP subgroup was 2.19; for the hs-CRP subgroup, the WMD was 1.70. Conclusion: In our meta-analysis, serum CRP/hs-CRP levels were discovered to be higher in OSA patients compared with control subjects. Those with higher body mass index and apnea hyponea index demonstrated larger differences in CRP/hs-CRP levels. These data are consistent

  15. C-reactive protein as a marker of melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shenying; Wang, Yuling; Sui, Dawen; Liu, Huey; Ross, Merrick I; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Cormier, Janice N; Royal, Richard E; Lucci, Anthony; Schacherer, Christopher W; Gardner, Julie M; Reveille, John D; Bassett, Roland L; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Christopher I; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-04-20

    To investigate the association between blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with melanoma and overall survival (OS), melanoma-specific survival (MSS), and disease-free survival. Two independent sets of plasma samples from a total of 1,144 patients with melanoma (587 initial and 557 confirmatory) were available for CRP determination. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used to evaluate the relationship between CRP and clinical outcome. Among 115 patients who underwent sequential blood draws, we evaluated the relationship between change in disease status and change in CRP using nonparametric tests. Elevated CRP level was associated with poorer OS and MSS in the initial, confirmatory, and combined data sets (combined data set: OS hazard ratio, 1.44 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.30 to 1.59; P < .001; MSS hazard ratio, 1.51 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.36 to 1.68; P < .001). These findings persisted after multivariable adjustment. As compared with CRP < 10 mg/L, CRP ≥ 10 mg/L conferred poorer OS in patients with any-stage, stage I/II, or stage III/IV disease and poorer disease-free survival in those with stage I/II disease. In patients who underwent sequential evaluation of CRP, an association was identified between an increase in CRP and melanoma disease progression. CRP is an independent prognostic marker in patients with melanoma. CRP measurement should be considered for incorporation into prospective studies of outcome in patients with melanoma and clinical trials of systemic therapies for those with melanoma. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. C-Reactive Protein As a Marker of Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shenying; Wang, Yuling; Sui, Dawen; Liu, Huey; Ross, Merrick I.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Royal, Richard E.; Lucci, Anthony; Schacherer, Christopher W.; Gardner, Julie M.; Reveille, John D.; Bassett, Roland L.; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Christopher I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with melanoma and overall survival (OS), melanoma-specific survival (MSS), and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods Two independent sets of plasma samples from a total of 1,144 patients with melanoma (587 initial and 557 confirmatory) were available for CRP determination. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used to evaluate the relationship between CRP and clinical outcome. Among 115 patients who underwent sequential blood draws, we evaluated the relationship between change in disease status and change in CRP using nonparametric tests. Results Elevated CRP level was associated with poorer OS and MSS in the initial, confirmatory, and combined data sets (combined data set: OS hazard ratio, 1.44 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.30 to 1.59; P < .001; MSS hazard ratio, 1.51 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.36 to 1.68; P < .001). These findings persisted after multivariable adjustment. As compared with CRP < 10 mg/L, CRP ≥ 10 mg/L conferred poorer OS in patients with any-stage, stage I/II, or stage III/IV disease and poorer disease-free survival in those with stage I/II disease. In patients who underwent sequential evaluation of CRP, an association was identified between an increase in CRP and melanoma disease progression. Conclusion CRP is an independent prognostic marker in patients with melanoma. CRP measurement should be considered for incorporation into prospective studies of outcome in patients with melanoma and clinical trials of systemic therapies for those with melanoma. PMID:25779565

  17. C-reactive protein and migraine. Facts or speculations?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Migraine is a highly prevalent and frequently disabling disorder. Since the pathogenesis of this condition has a strong inflammatory component and migraine is significantly associated with cardiovascular disease, we assess whether C-reactive protein (CRP) may be epidemiologically or casually linked with migraine. An electronic search on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science produced 17 studies reporting original data about the epidemiological association between CRP and migraine (1 retrospective, 1 interventional, 14 cross-sectional and 1 both interventional and cross-sectional). When all studies reporting sufficient data about CRP values were pooled (n=12; 6980 cases and 38,975 controls), the concentration of CRP was found to be significantly higher in patients with migraine than in controls (weighted mean difference 1.12 mg/L; 95% CI 1.01-1.25 mg/L; p<0.001). In further analysis of studies containing separate data for migraine with and without aura (n=7), CRP values remained significantly higher in both migraineur patients with aura (n=1939; weighted mean difference 0.88 mg/L; 95% CI 0.63-1.14 mg/L; p<0.001) or without aura (n=2483; weighted mean difference 1.04 mg/L; 95% CI 0.78-1.30 mg/L; p<0.001) when compared with controls (n=29,354). Despite a large inter-study heterogeneity (99.3%), our analysis provides evidence of a potential epidemiological association between increased concentration of CRP and migraine, thus paving the way for further clinical investigations about therapeutic agents that may contextually decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease and reduce the burden of migraine.

  18. Asymptomatic C-reactive protein elevation in neutropenic children.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Koyama, Norihisa; Sasaki, Noriko; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) can be a life-threatening complication in children with malignancies. There is no standardized preventive treatment for childhood FN, and information on C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation in afebrile patients with neutropenia (CEAN) is limited. The aim of this study was therefore to identify the association between CEAN and FN onset, and evaluate the efficacy of broad-spectrum antibiotics for FN prophylaxis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 22 consecutive pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies (acute myeloid leukemia, n = 2; acute lymphoid leukemia, n = 20) admitted to the present institution between 2006 and 2011. CEAN was defined as CRP elevation ≥0.05 mg/dL between the two most recent blood tests with no fever. We identified CEAN before FN onset, and assessed the efficacy of broad-spectrum antibiotics for FN prevention in CEAN. FN incidence within 48 h after CEAN detection was compared between prophylactic and non-prophylactic episodes. CEAN was observed before FN onset in 20 (55.6%), of 36 FN episodes. Among the 95 analyzed CEAN episodes, broad-spectrum antibiotics had been used for 30 episodes (prophylactic episodes), whereas these antibiotics had not been used in 60 episodes (non-prophylactic episodes). Prophylactic episodes had a significantly lower FN incidence than non-prophylactic episodes (6.7% and 31%, respectively, P < 0.01) within 48 h after CEAN detection. Bacteremia was observed in three non-prophylactic episodes. Patients with CEAN are at higher risk of FN, and physicians may consider the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent FN development. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.

    1989-12-01

    Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04more » +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.« less

  20. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein among cardiology patients.

    PubMed

    Chapidze, Gulnara; Dolidze, Nino; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Kapanadze, Simon; Latsabidze, Nino; Williams, Michelle A

    2007-10-01

    Associations between inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and cardiovascular disease have been reported. Limited information, however, is available on the prevalence of MetS and its relation to inflammation among Georgian cardiology patients. We investigated MetS components (elevated blood pressure, abdominal obesity, elevated triglyceride concentrations, decreased HDL-cholesterol concentrations, and elevated fasting glucose) and their relationships with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in this population. A total of 167 patients (mean age 53.1 years, 54% male) who attended an Emergency Cardiology Center in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. In-person interviews and clinical exams, as well as laboratory studies, were conducted to characterize MetS (using the ATP III criteria) and cardiac conditions in the study population. CRP concentrations were determined using standardized immunoassays. Overall prevalence of MetS was 40.7%. Patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) had higher CRP concentrations compared with non-CHD patients. A linear relationship between increase in number of MetS components and CRP concentrations was observed among females (p value for linear trend <0.05), but not males. Further, among females, all components of MetS except HDL-C concentrations were correlated with CRP concentrations after adjustment for age and body mass index (all p values <0.05). However, among males, only abdominal obesity was significantly correlated with CRP. MetS is prevalent among Georgian cardiology patients. CRP concentrations are positively associated with MetS. Further prospective studies are required to determine whether combining MetS and CRP data may have utility in the assessment of risk for developing future cardiovascular events in both males and females.

  1. The Strength of Family Ties: Perceptions of Network Relationship Quality and Levels of C-Reactive Proteins in the North Texas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Bert N; Ruiz, John M; Smith, Timothy W; Smyth, Joshua M; Taylor, Daniel J; Allison, Matthew; Ahn, Chul

    2015-10-01

    Although the quality of one's social relationships has been linked to important physical health outcomes, less work has been conducted examining family and friends that differ in their underlying positivity and negativity. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between supportive, aversive, and ambivalent family/friends with levels of C-reactive proteins. Three hundred participants from the North Texas Heart Study completed the social relationships index and a blood draw to assess high-sensitivity C-reactive proteins (hs-CRPs). After standard controls, the number of supportive family members predicted lower hs-CRP levels, whereas the number of ambivalent family members predicted higher hs-CRP levels. These links were independent of depressive symptoms and perceived stress. These data highlight the importance of considering specific types of relationships and their underlying positive and negative aspects in research on social ties and physical health.

  2. Variation in C-reactive protein following weight loss in obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women: is there an independent contribution of lean body mass?

    PubMed

    Barsalani, R; Riesco, É; Perreault, K; Imbeault, P; Brochu, M; Dionne, I J

    2015-03-01

    We showed that obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women are characterized by higher lean body mass and elevated C-reactive protein. Although counterintuitive, we hypothesized that losses in muscle mass following caloric restriction and increase in muscle quality will be associated with improvements in glucose homeostasis through decreases in C-reactive protein. To determine 1) if improvements in C-reactive protein concentrations occurs through losses in lean body mass; and 2) if decreases in C-reactive protein levels contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity. 50 postmenopausal women (body mass index>26 kg/m(²)) with impaired glucose disposal (<7.5 mg/kg/min) completed a 6-month caloric restriction program. Outcome measures were: Glucose disposal rate: M value (by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), body composition (total, trunk, and appendicluar). LBM and FM by DXA), LBM index (LBM (kg)/height (m(2)), body fat distribution (VAT and SAT by CT scan) and plasma high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (Il-6). Significant correlations were observed between Δ hsCRP levels with Δ Il-6 (r=0.33, p≤0.05), Δ total LBM index (r=0.44, p≤0.01), Δ trunk LBM (r=0.38, p≤0.01) Δ SAT (r=0.35, p≤0.05) and ∆ glucose disposal rate (r=- 0.44, p≤0.01). After including all the correlated variables in Stepwise linear regression model, Δ LBM index was the only independent predictor of the reduction in hsCRP levels (R(2)=0.20, p≤0.01). Losses in total lean body mass are independently associated with improvements in inflammatory state (CRP levels) in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose disposal. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular disease prediction.

    PubMed

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Pennells, Lisa; Wood, Angela M; White, Ian R; Gao, Pei; Walker, Matthew; Thompson, Alexander; Sarwar, Nadeem; Caslake, Muriel; Butterworth, Adam S; Amouyel, Philippe; Assmann, Gerd; Bakker, Stephan J L; Barr, Elizabeth L M; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Benjamin, Emelia J; Björkelund, Cecilia; Brenner, Hermann; Brunner, Eric; Clarke, Robert; Cooper, Jackie A; Cremer, Peter; Cushman, Mary; Dagenais, Gilles R; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Dankner, Rachel; Davey-Smith, George; Deeg, Dorly; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Engström, Gunnar; Folsom, Aaron R; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Gallacher, John; Gaziano, J Michael; Giampaoli, Simona; Gillum, Richard F; Hofman, Albert; Howard, Barbara V; Ingelsson, Erik; Iso, Hiroyasu; Jørgensen, Torben; Kiechl, Stefan; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kromhout, Daan; Kuller, Lewis H; Lawlor, Debbie A; Meade, Tom W; Nissinen, Aulikki; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Onat, Altan; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Psaty, Bruce M; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Rosengren, Annika; Salomaa, Veikko; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Shea, Steven; Ford, Ian; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Strandberg, Timo E; Tipping, Robert W; Tosetto, Alberto; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Wennberg, Patrik; Westendorp, Rudi G; Whincup, Peter H; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Woodward, Mark; Lowe, Gordon D O; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M; Pepys, Mark B; Thompson, Simon G; Danesh, John

    2012-10-04

    There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events. We analyzed data from 52 prospective studies that included 246,669 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease to investigate the value of adding CRP or fibrinogen levels to conventional risk factors for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. We calculated measures of discrimination and reclassification during follow-up and modeled the clinical implications of initiation of statin therapy after the assessment of CRP or fibrinogen. The addition of information on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a prognostic model for cardiovascular disease that included age, sex, smoking status, blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total cholesterol level increased the C-index, a measure of risk discrimination, by 0.0050. The further addition to this model of information on CRP or fibrinogen increased the C-index by 0.0039 and 0.0027, respectively (P<0.001), and yielded a net reclassification improvement of 1.52% and 0.83%, respectively, for the predicted 10-year risk categories of "low" (<10%), "intermediate" (10% to <20%), and "high" (≥20%) (P<0.02 for both comparisons). We estimated that among 100,000 adults 40 years of age or older, 15,025 persons would initially be classified as being at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event if conventional risk factors alone were used to calculate risk. Assuming that statin therapy would be initiated in accordance with Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (i.e., for persons with a predicted risk of ≥20% and for those with certain other risk factors, such as diabetes, irrespective of their 10-year predicted risk), additional targeted assessment of CRP or fibrinogen levels in the 13,199 remaining participants at intermediate risk could help prevent approximately 30 additional cardiovascular events over the course of 10 years. In a study of people

  4. Physical Functional Capacity and C-Reactive Protein in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szortyka, Michele Fonseca Vieira; Cristiano, Viviane Batista; Ceresér, Keila Maria; Francesconi, Lenise Petter; Lobato, Maria Inês; Gama, Clarissa; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe, debilitating mental disorder that affects both the physical health and the functional capacity of patients, causing great impairment throughout the life course. Although physical and cognitive impairments may represent different expressions of a single systemic inflammatory process, little is known about the relationship between motor function and schizophrenia. To evaluate physical functional capacity in patients with schizophrenia and ascertain whether it correlates with markers of inflammation, disease severity, and pharmacotherapy. Cross-sectional study using a convenience sampling strategy. Forty patients with stable schizophrenia, undergoing treatment, were recruited from the Outpatient Program of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, University Hospital linked to Public Health System. Physical functional capacity was assessed by the 6-min walk test (6MWT), and inflammatory markers were measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) and Von Willebrand factor. Mean functional capacity and clinical variables differed among patients and Brazilian population regarding heart rate (p = 0.004), diastolic (p = 0.001) and systolic (p < 0.001) blood pressure, respiratory rate (p < 0.001), CRP (p = 0.015), Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion scores (BSPE) (p < 0.001), and 6MWT both in men (p < 0.001) and women (p = 0.024). Additionally, 6MWT and dyspnea in BSPE were positively associated with CRP (r = -0.369, p = 0.019) and (r = -0.376, p = 0.017) and (r = 0.354, p = 0.025 and r = 0.535, p < 0.001, respectively). The present study detected significant association between measures of functional impairment and markers of inflammation, especially elevated CRP in a group of stable outpatients with DSM-IV and ICD10 diagnosis of schizophrenia. Possible explanations for the associations could be linked to continued use of antipsychotics, although underlying neuroinflammatory mechanisms directly

  5. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids in evaluation of the amount of injury to body tissues. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ....5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids in evaluation of the amount of injury to body tissues. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ....5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids in evaluation of the amount of injury to body tissues. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ....5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids in evaluation of the amount of injury to body tissues. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ....5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. Association of desaturase activity and C-reactive protein in European children.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Maike; Börnhorst, Claudia; Schwarz, Heike; Risé, Patrizia; Galli, Claudio; Moreno, Luis A; Pala, Valeria; Russo, Paola; Veidebaum, Toomas; Tornaritis, Michael; Fraterman, Arno; De Henauw, Stefaan; Eiben, Gabriele; Lissner, Lauren; Molnár, Dénes; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Desaturase enzymes influence the fatty acid (FA) composition of body tissues and their activity affects the conversion rate of saturated to monounsaturated FA and of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) to long-chain PUFA. Desaturase activity has further been shown to be associated with inflammation. We investigate the association between delta-9 (D9D), delta-6 (D6D) and delta-5 desaturase (D5D) activity and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) in young children. In the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) cohort study children were examined at baseline (T0) and after 2 y (T1). D9D, D6D, and D5D activities were estimated from T0 product-precursor FA ratios. CRP was measured at T0 and T1. In a subsample of 1,943 children with available information on FA, CRP, and covariates, the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of desaturase activity and CRP were analyzed. Cross-sectionally, a D9D increase of 0.01 units was associated with a 11% higher risk of having a serum CRP ≥ Percentile 75 (P75) (OR, 99% CI: 1.11 (1.01; 1.22)) whereas D6D and D5D were not associated with CRP. No significant associations were observed between baseline desaturase activity and CRP 2 y later. Cross-sectionally, our results indicate a positive association of D9D and CRP independent of weight status. High D9D activity may increase the risk of subclinical inflammation which is associated with metabolic disorders. As D9D expression increases with higher intake of saturated FA and carbohydrates, dietary changes may influence D9D activity and thus CRP. However, it remains to be investigated whether there is a causal relationship between D9D activity and CRP.

  10. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-04-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p < 0.0001). Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 1.4 mmHg and 0.8 mmHg, respectively (both p ≤ 0.038). The misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h SBP was primarily explained by an increase in SBP during the wake period (+1.7 mmHg; p = 0.017), whereas the misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h DBP was primarily explained by an increase in DBP during the sleep opportunity (+1.8 mmHg; p = 0.005). Circadian misalignment per se increases hs-CRP and blood pressure in shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  11. The association between serum C-reactive protein and macronutrients and antioxidants intake in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kooshki, A; Samadipour, E; Akbarzadeh, R

    2015-01-01

    Background:Despite the high levels of inflammation in hemodialysis patients and the effects of diet on systemic inflammation, such as the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, few studies have evaluated the relationship of macronutrients and antioxidants intake with serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Therefore, this study assessed the relationship between serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) with macronutrients and antioxidants intake and serum albumin. Methods:This cross-sectional study used census sampling to select 75 hemodialysis patients (35 men and 40 women) who attended the hemodialysis department of Vaseie Hospital of Sabzevar, Iran. After obtaining the written consent, all the patients were interviewed and dietary data was collected by using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 160 food items. Diet analysis was performed with Nutritionist IV. Before being connected to the dialysis machine, 5 cc fasting blood samples were obtained from all participants and serum hs-CRP and albumin levels were measured. All the statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS -for Windows, version 16.0. Results:The patients’ mean body mass index was 20.09 ± 3.27 kg/ m2. The participants’ intake of antioxidants and all macronutrients, except for carbohydrates and proteins, was less than the standard levels. Moreover, the hs-CRP had significant inverse relationships with serum albumin (P=0.0001) and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy (P=0.002) and protein (P=0.0001). Conclusion:Our findings indicated hs-CRP levels of hemodialysis patients to have significant inverse relationships with serum albumin and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy and protein. PMID:28255396

  12. The association between serum C-reactive protein and macronutrients and antioxidants intake in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kooshki, A; Samadipour, E; Akbarzadeh, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the high levels of inflammation in hemodialysis patients and the effects of diet on systemic inflammation, such as the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, few studies have evaluated the relationship of macronutrients and antioxidants intake with serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Therefore, this study assessed the relationship between serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) with macronutrients and antioxidants intake and serum albumin. Methods: This cross-sectional study used census sampling to select 75 hemodialysis patients (35 men and 40 women) who attended the hemodialysis department of Vaseie Hospital of Sabzevar, Iran. After obtaining the written consent, all the patients were interviewed and dietary data was collected by using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 160 food items. Diet analysis was performed with Nutritionist IV. Before being connected to the dialysis machine, 5 cc fasting blood samples were obtained from all participants and serum hs-CRP and albumin levels were measured. All the statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS -for Windows, version 16.0. Results: The patients' mean body mass index was 20.09 ± 3.27 kg/ m2. The participants' intake of antioxidants and all macronutrients, except for carbohydrates and proteins, was less than the standard levels. Moreover, the hs-CRP had significant inverse relationships with serum albumin (P=0.0001) and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy (P=0.002) and protein (P=0.0001). Conclusion: Our findings indicated hs-CRP levels of hemodialysis patients to have significant inverse relationships with serum albumin and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy and protein.

  13. Meat Consumption and Its Association With C-Reactive Protein and Incident Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.; Kuijsten, Anneleen; Tigcheler, Basia; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Feskens, Edith J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether intake of different types of meat is associated with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our analysis included 4,366 Dutch participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During a median follow-up period of 12.4 years, 456 diabetes cases were confirmed. Intake of red meat, processed meat, and poultry was derived from a food frequency questionnaire, and their association with serum high-sensitivity CRP was examined cross-sectionally using linear regression models. Their association with risk of type 2 diabetes was examined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, including age, sex, family history of diabetes, and lifestyle and dietary factors. RESULTS An increment of 50 g of processed meat was associated with increased CRP concentration (βprocessed meat = 0.12; P = 0.01), whereas intake of red meat and poultry was not. When comparing the highest to the lowest category of meat intake with respect to diabetes incidence, the adjusted relative risks were as follows: for red meat (1.42 [95% CI 1.06–1.91]), for processed meat (1.87 [1.26–2.78]), and for poultry (0.95 [0.74–1.22]). Additional analysis showed that the associations were not affected appreciably after inclusion of CRP into the model. After adjustment for BMI, however, the association for red meat attenuated to 1.18 (0.88–1.59). CONCLUSIONS Intake of processed meat is associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes. It appears unlikely that CRP mediates this association. PMID:22596177

  14. C-Reactive Protein and the Incidence of Macular Degeneration – Pooled Analysis of 5 Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Mitta, Vinod P.; Christen, William G.; Glynn, Robert J.; Semba, Richard D.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Schaumberg, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and future risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in US men and women. Methods We measured hsCRP in baseline blood samples from participants in five ongoing cohort studies. Patients were initially free of AMD. We prospectively identified 647 incident cases of AMD and selected age- and sex-matched controls for each AMD case (2 controls for each case with dry AMD, or 3 controls for each case of neovascular AMD). We used conditional logistic regression models to examine the relationship between hsCRP and AMD, and pooled findings using meta-analytic techniques. Results After adjusting for cigarette smoking status, participants with high (> 3 mg/L) compared with low (< 1 mg/L) hsCRP levels, had cohort-specific odds ratios (OR) for incident AMD ranging from 0.94 (95% CI 0.58-1.51) in the Physicians’ Health Study to 2.59 (95% CI 0.58-11.67) in the Women’s Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study. After testing for heterogeneity between studies (Q=5.61, p=0.23), we pooled findings across cohorts, and observed a significantly increased risk of incident AMD for high versus low hsCRP levels (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.06-2.08). Risk of neovascular AMD was also increased among those with high hsCRP levels (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.14-2.98). Conclusion Overall these pooled findings from 5 prospective cohorts add further evidence that elevated levels of hsCRP predict greater future risk of AMD. This information might shed light on underlying mechanisms, and could be of clinical utility in the identification of persons at high risk of AMD who may benefit from increased adherence to lifestyle recommendations, eye examination schedules, and therapeutic protocols. PMID:23392454

  15. Effect of memantine on C-reactive protein and lipid profiles in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui Hua; Chen, Po See; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Huang, San-Yuan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2017-10-15

    Balance in the immune system plays roles in bipolar disorder (BD) and its metabolic co-morbidities. Memantine is an NMDA receptor antagonist with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of memantine adjunct treatment on metabolic status of BD are unclear. During the 12 weeks period, a total of 191 BD patients were enrolled and split into valproate (VPA) + placebo and VPA + memantine (5mg/day) arms. The fasting plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and metabolic indices were assessed. BD patients were stratified according to their initial CRP level. A cut-off value of initial CRP level of 2322ng/mL discriminated the waist circumference in these BD patients after 12-week VPA treatment. In the high CRP (> 2322ng/mL) group, patients in the VPA + memantine arm had a significantly decreased in their CRP (p= 0.009), total cholesterol (p= 0.002), LDL (p= 0.002) levels, BMI (p= 0.001), and waist circumference (p< 0.001), compared to those in the VPA + placebo arm. However, analysis of the low CRP group did not showed the effect. We recruited BD patients in depressed states and the sample size was relative small. The effects of the fixed dose of memantine on metabolic indices were 12-week follow up in BD patients treated with VPA. BD patients with high initial CRP levels receiving memantine adjunct treatment have a reduced risk of inflammation and metabolic imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the long-term outcome for memantine adjunct therapy in BD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Augmentation index is a better marker for cardiovascular risk in young Malaysian males. A comparison of involvement of pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Aminuddin, Amilia; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Maskon, Oteh; Zakaria, Zaiton; Karim, Aminuddin A; Ngah, Wan Z; Nordin, Nor Anita M

    2014-02-01

    To determine the association between carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVCF) and augmentation index (AI) with future cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and to assess whether high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an important mediator towards these vascular changes, among young men. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from July 2011 to December 2012. Two hundred and eleven young men were recruited. The PWVCF and AI were measured using Vicorder. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by using immunological methods. The future CVD risk was assessed by Framingham risk score (FRS) and age adjusted FRS (A-FRS). Data for analysis was conducted using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 15 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The mean age of the subjects was 27.09 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 26.39-27.79) years old. Those with ≥2 risk factors had significantly higher AI [10.09 (95% CI: 9.06-11.12) versus 6.56 (95% CI: 5.54-7.57) (p=0.001), but not PWVCF 7.45 (95% CI: 7.29-7.61) m/s versus 7.29 (95% CI: 7.06-7.51) m/s, (p=0.90) when compared to the healthy subjects. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not an independent determinant for PWVCF and AI. Only AI was significantly associated with FRS and A-FRS (p=0.0001). To assess the impact of risk factors on vascular damage and for future assessment of CVD risk among the young men, AI may be a better marker than PWVCF. The increase in AI among these subjects was not related to hs-CRP.

  17. The Association Between Long Working Hours and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Older Aged Individuals: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2015.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongin; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2018-05-22

    To show the association of hs-CRP level with working hours in different age groups. We used data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of variables for elevated hs-CRP (> 3.0 mg/L) were generated with logistic regression models. Significant variables were verified with an adjusted multivariate logistic model after stratification of age groups. Working for more than 55 hours per week was associated with elevated hs-CRP level in the old-ages group (≥ 60 years old: OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.07-4.45). Working for 40-55 hours per week was associated with decreased hs-CRP in the young-ages group (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.37-0.93). Working hours appear to influence the levels of hs-CRP in individuals aged older than 60 years.

  18. Relationship Between Serum Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Level and Insulin Resistance, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Visceral Fat Mass in Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Gökçen, Belma; Bilgir, Ferda; Guler, Aslı; Calan, Mehmet; Yuksel, Arif; Aslanıpour, Behnaz; Akşit, Murat; Bozkaya, Giray

    2018-01-01

    Growing evidence suggest that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a vital role in glucose metabolism. We aimed to ascertain whether MIF levels are altered in subjects with prediabetes and also to determine the relationship between MIF and metabolic parameters as well as visceral fat mass. This cross-sectional study included 40 subjects with prediabetes and 40 age-, body mass index (BMI)- and sex-matched subjects with normal glucose tolerance. Circulating MIF levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Metabolic parameters of recruited subjects were evaluated. Visceral fat mass was measured using bioelectrical impedance method. Circulating MIF levels were found to be elevated in subjects with prediabetes compared to controls (26.46 ± 16.98 versus 17.44 ± 11.80 ng/mL, P = 0.007). MIF positively correlated with BMI, visceral fat mass and indirect indices of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. In linear regression model, an independent association was found between MIF levels and metabolic parameters, including BMI, visceral fat mass and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the odds ratio for prediabetes was higher in subjects in the highest quartile of MIF compared to those in the lowest quartile, after adjusting for potential confounders. Increased MIF levels are associated with the elevation of prediabetic risk. Copyright © 2018 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia by estimating hematological parameters and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Musalaiah, S. V. V. S.; Anupama, M.; Nagasree, M.; Krishna, Ch. Murali; Kumar, Aravind; Kumar, P. Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal tissues mount an immune inflammatory response to bacteria and their products. Certain inflammatory cytokines produced during periodontal inflammation increase the production of acute phase proteins like high‑sensitivity C‑reactive protein (hs‑CRP) and can depress erythropoietin production leading to the development of anemia. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on red blood cell (RBC) parameters and hs-CRP in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia. Materials and Methods: This is a longitudinal, interventional study with 6-month follow-up. A total of 30 subjects with anemia and chronic periodontitis with age group of 33-55 years were selected by screening hemoglobin (Hb) levels and examining periodontal findings. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded at baseline. Laboratory blood investigations were performed to evaluate RBC count, Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and red cell indices, hs-CRP at baseline. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Patients were recalled after 6 months. The clinical and hematological parameters were re-evaluated to analyze the changes after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results: The results showed that there was a significant increase in Hb levels, RBC count and PCV from baseline to 6 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. There is significant decrease in levels of ESR and hs-CRP levels after nonsurgical periodontal therapy indicating resolution of periodontal inflammation. There is a significant decrease in PPD, scores of PI and GI and significant increase in CAL gain. Minimal changes in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and MCH concentration indicated that the lower values of red cell parameters are not due to any vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but secondary to the chronic inflammatory changes associated with chronic periodontal disease. Conclusion: The present study strengthens the hypothesis that chronic periodontitis may lead to anemia and provides evidence that nonsurgical periodontal therapy can improve the anemic status and reduce levels of hs-CRP in patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:25210388

  20. Evaluation of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia by estimating hematological parameters and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Musalaiah, S V V S; Anupama, M; Nagasree, M; Krishna, Ch Murali; Kumar, Aravind; Kumar, P Mohan

    2014-07-01

    Periodontal tissues mount an immune inflammatory response to bacteria and their products. Certain inflammatory cytokines produced during periodontal inflammation increase the production of acute phase proteins like high‑sensitivity C‑reactive protein (hs‑CRP) and can depress erythropoietin production leading to the development of anemia. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on red blood cell (RBC) parameters and hs-CRP in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia. This is a longitudinal, interventional study with 6-month follow-up. A total of 30 subjects with anemia and chronic periodontitis with age group of 33-55 years were selected by screening hemoglobin (Hb) levels and examining periodontal findings. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded at baseline. Laboratory blood investigations were performed to evaluate RBC count, Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and red cell indices, hs-CRP at baseline. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Patients were recalled after 6 months. The clinical and hematological parameters were re-evaluated to analyze the changes after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. The results showed that there was a significant increase in Hb levels, RBC count and PCV from baseline to 6 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. There is significant decrease in levels of ESR and hs-CRP levels after nonsurgical periodontal therapy indicating resolution of periodontal inflammation. There is a significant decrease in PPD, scores of PI and GI and significant increase in CAL gain. Minimal changes in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and MCH concentration indicated that the lower values of red cell parameters are not due to any vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but secondary to the chronic inflammatory changes associated with chronic periodontal disease. The present study strengthens the hypothesis that chronic periodontitis may lead to anemia and provides evidence that nonsurgical periodontal therapy can improve the anemic status and reduce levels of hs-CRP in patients with chronic periodontitis.

  1. Elevated blood pressure, race/ethnicity, and C-reactive protein levels in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lande, Marc B; Pearson, Thomas A; Vermilion, Roger P; Auinger, Peggy; Fernandez, Isabel D

    2008-12-01

    Adult hypertension is independently associated with elevated C-reactive protein levels, after controlling for obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors. The objective of this study was to determine, with a nationally representative sample of children, whether the relationship between elevated blood pressure and C-reactive protein levels may be evident before adulthood. Cross-sectional data for children 8 to 17 years of age who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2004 were analyzed. Bivariate analyses compared children with C-reactive protein levels of >3 mg/L versus C-reactive protein levels. Among 6112 children, 3% had systolic blood pressure of >or=95th percentile and 1.3% had diastolic blood pressure of >or=95th percentile. Children with C-reactive protein levels of >3 mg/L had higher systolic blood pressure, compared with children with C-reactive protein levels of C-reactive protein levels. Diastolic blood pressure did not differ between groups. Linear regression analyses showed that systolic blood pressure of >or=95th percentile was independently associated with C-reactive protein levels in boys but not girls. Subset analyses according to race/ethnicity demonstrated that the independent association of elevated systolic blood pressure with C-reactive protein levels was largely limited to black boys. These data indicate that there is interplay between race/ethnicity, elevated systolic blood pressure, obesity, and inflammation in children, a finding that has potential implications for disparities in cardiovascular disease later in life.

  2. Satellite-based estimates of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter are associated with C-reactive protein in 30 034 Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zilong; Chang, Ly-Yun; Lau, Alexis K H; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chieh Chuang, Yuan; Chan, Jimmy; Lin, Changqing; Kai Jiang, Wun; Dear, Keith; Zee, Benny C Y; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong; Hoek, Gerard; Tam, Tony; Qian Lao, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is associated with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanism underlying the associations remains unclear. Atherosclerosis, the underlying pathology of cardiovascular disease, is a chronic inflammatory process. We therefore investigated the association of long-term exposure to fine PM (PM2.5) with C-reactive protein (CRP), a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation, in a large Taiwanese population. Participants were from a large cohort who participated in a standard medical examination programme with measurements of high-sensitivity CRP between 2007 and 2014. We used a spatiotemporal model to estimate 2-year average PM2.5 exposure at each participant's address, based on satellite-derived aerosol optical depth data. General regression models were used for baseline data analysis and mixed-effects linear regression models were used for repeated data analysis to investigate the associations between PM2.5 exposure and CRP, adjusting for a wide range of potential confounders. In this population of 30 034 participants with 39 096 measurements, every 5 μg/m3 PM2.5 increment was associated with a 1.31% increase in CRP [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00%, 1.63%) after adjusting for confounders. For those participants with repeated CRP measurements, no significant changes were observed between the first and last measurements (0.88 mg/l vs 0.89 mg/l, P = 0.337). The PM2.5 concentrations remained stable over time between 2007 and 2014. Long-term exposure to PM2.5 is associated with increased level of systemic inflammation, supporting the biological link between PM2.5 air pollution and deteriorating cardiovascular health. Air pollution reduction should be an important strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  3. Level of C - reactive protein as an indicator for prognosis of premature uterine contractions.

    PubMed

    Najat Nakishbandy, Bayar M; Barawi, Sabat A M

    2014-01-01

    high concentrations of maternal C-reactive protein have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and premature uterine contraction may be predicted by elevated levels of C-reactive protein. This may ultimately be simple and cost-effective enough to introduce as a low-risk screening program. an observational case control study was performed from May 1st, 2010 to December 1st, 2010 at Maternity Teaching Hospital-Erbil/ Kurdistan Region/ Iraq. The sample size was (200) cases. Hundred of them were presented with premature uterine contractions at 24(+0)-36(+6) weeks. The other hundred were control group at same gestational ages. The level of C-reactive protein was determined in both groups and both groups were followed till delivery. (93) out of (100) women with premature uterine contractions had elevated level of C-Reactive protein and 91% delivered prematurely while in the control group only (9) out of (100) women had elevated level of C-reactive protein and only 8% of them delivered preterm. Differences were statistically highly significant. C-reactive protein can be used as a biomarker in prediction of premature delivery when it is associated with premature uterine contractions. As well it can be used as a screening test to detect cases that are at risk of premature delivery.

  4. Dark chocolate effect on platelet activity, C-reactive protein and lipid profile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Miruais S; Gambert, Steven; Bliden, Kevin P; Bailon, Oscar; Singla, Anand; Anand, Singla; Antonino, Mark J; Hamed, Fatema; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2008-12-01

    Dark chocolate (DC) is one of the richest sources of flavonoids. Since DC has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system, our study examined its effect on platelet reactivity, inflammation, and lipid levels in healthy subjects. In 28 healthy volunteers, we analyzed the effect of one week of DC (providing 700 mg of flavonoids/day). The primary outcome was to determine the effects of DC consumption on platelet activity measured by flow cytometry (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]- and arachidonic acid [AA]-induced total and activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa as well as P-selectin expression). In addition to this, we measured the effect of DC on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), high-density lipid cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipid cholesterol (LDL) levels. Following seven days of regular DC ingestion, LDL fell by 6% (120 +/- 38 vs 112 +/- 37 mg/dL, P < 0.018) and HDL rose by 9% (66 +/- 23 vs 72 +/- 26 mg/dL, P < 0.0019). ADP- and AA-induced activated GPIIb/IIIa expression was reduced by DC [27.3 +/- 27.8 vs 17.4 +/- 20.5 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), P < 0.006; and 9.2 +/- 6.5 vs. 6.1 +/- 2.2 MFI, P < 0.005, respectively]. DC reduced hsCRP levels in women (1.8 +/- 2.1 vs. 1.4 +/- 1.7 mg/dL, P < 0.04). One week of DC ingestion improved lipid profiles and decreased platelet reactivity within the total group while reducing inflammation only in women. Regular dark chocolate ingestion may have cardioprotective properties. Further long-term research is warranted to evaluate the effect of flavonoids on cardiovascular health and to determine whether DC's beneficial effects are related to flavonoids or some yet unknown component. This research is based on a larger study which was presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2007.

  5. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yue; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Luben, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether daytime napping and sleep duration are linked to serum C reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker, in an older aged British population. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk study. Participants A total of 5018 men and women aged 48–92 years reported their sleep habits and had serum CRP levels measured. Outcome and measures CRP was measured (mg/L) during 2006–2011 in fresh blood samples using high-sensitivity methods. Participants reported napping habits during 2002–2004, and reported sleep quantity during 2006–2007. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine the association between napping and log-transformed CRP, and geometric mean CRP levels were calculated. Results After adjustment for age and sex, those who reported napping had 10% higher CRP levels compared with those not napping. The association was attenuated but remained borderline significant (β=0.05 (95% CI 0.00 to 0.10)) after further adjustment for social class, education, marital status, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, self-reported health, pre-existing diseases, systolic blood pressure, hypnotic drug use, depression and in women-only hormone replacement therapy use. The geometric means (95% CI) of CRP levels were 2.38 (2.29 to 2.47) mg/L and 2.26 (2.21 to 2.32) mg/L for those who reported napping and no napping, respectively. A U-shaped association was observed between time spent in bed at night and CRP levels, and nighttime sleep duration was not associated with serum CRP levels. The association between napping and CRP was stronger for older participants, and among extremes of time spent in bed at night. Conclusions Daytime napping was associated with increased CRP levels in an older aged British population. Further studies are needed to determine whether daytime napping is a cause for systemic inflammation, or if it is a symptom

  6. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yue; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Luben, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-11-11

    To explore whether daytime napping and sleep duration are linked to serum C reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker, in an older aged British population. Cross-sectional study. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk study. A total of 5018 men and women aged 48-92 years reported their sleep habits and had serum CRP levels measured. CRP was measured (mg/L) during 2006-2011 in fresh blood samples using high-sensitivity methods. Participants reported napping habits during 2002-2004, and reported sleep quantity during 2006-2007. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine the association between napping and log-transformed CRP, and geometric mean CRP levels were calculated. After adjustment for age and sex, those who reported napping had 10% higher CRP levels compared with those not napping. The association was attenuated but remained borderline significant (β=0.05 (95% CI 0.00 to 0.10)) after further adjustment for social class, education, marital status, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, self-reported health, pre-existing diseases, systolic blood pressure, hypnotic drug use, depression and in women-only hormone replacement therapy use. The geometric means (95% CI) of CRP levels were 2.38 (2.29 to 2.47) mg/L and 2.26 (2.21 to 2.32) mg/L for those who reported napping and no napping, respectively. A U-shaped association was observed between time spent in bed at night and CRP levels, and nighttime sleep duration was not associated with serum CRP levels. The association between napping and CRP was stronger for older participants, and among extremes of time spent in bed at night. Daytime napping was associated with increased CRP levels in an older aged British population. Further studies are needed to determine whether daytime napping is a cause for systemic inflammation, or if it is a symptom or consequence of underlying health problems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  7. The impact of an exercise intervention on C - reactive protein during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Marquis; Braun, Barry; Marcus, Bess H; Stanek, Edward; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-24

    C-reactive protein (CRP) during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials suggest that exercise programs may be associated with reductions in CRP in non-pregnant populations; however, such studies have not been conducted among pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an individually-tailored motivationally-matched exercise intervention on CRP in pregnant women. The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You study was a randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in women at increased risk. Women were randomized to either a 12-week exercise intervention (n = 84) or a comparison health and wellness intervention (n = 87). High sensitivity CRP (mg/dL) was measured using a commercial immunoassay kit. Physical activity was measured using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on change in CRP using an intent-to-treat approach. CRP decreased (-0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.07) from pre- to post-intervention in the exercise arm (p = 0.14) and increased (0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.07, 0.24) (p = 0.64) in the health and wellness arm; however the between group difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Findings did not differ according to ethnic group or pre-pregnancy body mass index. In a secondary analysis based on self-reported physical activity, women who decreased their time spent in sports/exercise experienced a mean increase in CRP (0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.14, 0.33), whereas women who maintained or increased their sports/ exercise experienced a mean decrease in CRP (-0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.23, 0.08) (p = 0.046). Findings from this randomized trial in an ethnically and socio-economically diverse population of pregnant women were consistent with a positive impact

  8. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  9. High sensitivity knitted fabric strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Juan; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe

    2016-10-01

    Wearable sensors are increasingly used in smart garments for detecting and transferring vital signals and body posture, movement and respiration. Existing fabric strain sensors made from metallized yarns have low sensitivity, poor comfort and low durability to washing. Here we report a knitted fabric strain sensor made from a cotton/stainless steel (SS) fibre blended yarn which shows much higher sensitivity than sensors knitted from metallized yarns. The fabric feels softer than pure cotton textiles owing to the ultrafine stainless steel fibres and does not lose its electrical property after washing. The reason for the high sensitivity of the cotton/SS knitted fabric sensor was explored by comparing its sensing mechanism with the knitted fabric sensor made from metallized yarns. The results show that the cotton/SS yarn-to-yarn contact resistance is highly sensitive to strain applied to hooked yarn loops.

  10. The Effect of Exercise Training Modality on C-reactive Protein in Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Damon L.; Johannsen, Neil M.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Type-2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and elevated C-reactive protein levels (CRP). Aerobic exercise training has been shown to improve CRP, however there are limited data evaluating the effect of other exercise training modalities (aerobic, resistance or combination training) in individuals with type-2 diabetes. Methods Participants (n=204) were randomized to an aerobic exercise (aerobic), resistance exercise (resistance) or a combination of both (combination) for nine months. CRP was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Results Baseline CRP was correlated with fat mass, waist circumference, BMI, and VO2 peak (p<0.05). CRP was not reduced following aerobic (0.16 mg·L -1, 95% CI: −1.0, 1.3), resistance (−0.03 mg·L -1, 95% CI: −1.1, 1.0) or combination (−0.49 mg·L -1, 95% CI: −1.5 to 0.6) training compared to control (0.35 mg·L -1, 95% CI: −1.0, 1.7). Change in fasting glucose (r=0.20, p=0.009), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) (r=0.21 p=0.005), and fat mass (r=0.19, p=0.016) were associated with reductions in CRP, but not change in fitness or weight (p > 0.05). There were significant trends observed for CRP among tertiles of change in HbA1C (p=0.009) and body fat (p=0.040). Conclusion Aerobic, resistance or a combination of both did not reduce CRP levels in individuals with type-2 diabetes. However, exercise related improvements in HbA1C, fasting glucose, and fat mass were associated with reductions in CRP. PMID:22157880

  11. Low Cost, Low Power, High Sensitivity Magnetometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    which are used to measure the small magnetic signals from brain. Other types of vector magnetometers are fluxgate , coil based, and magnetoresistance...concentrator with the magnetometer currently used in Army multimodal sensor systems, the Brown fluxgate . One sees the MEMS fluxgate magnetometer is...Guedes, A.; et al., 2008: Hybrid - LOW COST, LOW POWER, HIGH SENSITIVITY MAGNETOMETER A.S. Edelstein*, James E. Burnette, Greg A. Fischer, M.G

  12. Rituximab in highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munoz, A S; Rioveros, A A; Cabanayan-Casasola, C B; Danguilan, R A; Ona, E T

    2008-09-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, depletes B cells and suppresses antibody production. This study sought to describe the efficacy and safety of rituximab among seven highly sensitized kidney transplant patients. A highly sensitized patient was defined as panel-reactive antibody (PRA) >30%, more than three pregnancies, or history of positive tissue crossmatch. Demographics, immunological risk profile, and immunosuppression were collected on all highly sensitized patients transplanted from March to July 2007 and given rituximab. We noted graft function as well as clinical events posttransplantation. The seven patients included in the study showed a mean age of 39 years (range = 17-60) and a mean follow-up of 3 months (range = 1.5-5). Their average PRA was 62% with mean HLA mismatches of three. Five patients (71%) were retransplantations; one had a history of a positive crossmatch, and two had multiple pregnancies. Two had donor-specific antibody, but negative tissue crossmatches. All had living donors. Six patients received a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m2) 1 day prior to transplantation and one received two doses after 19 sessions of plasmapheresis. All were given tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids combined with induction therapy using 30 mg alemtuzumab in 33%; two doses of 20 mg basiliximab in 33%; and seven doses of 1 mg/kg/dose of daclizumab in 14%. Mean shown creatinine levels were 1.1 and 1.2 mg/dL at 1 and 6 months posttransplantation. Two recipients experienced acute humoral rejections within 1 month after transplantation. Both were given steroid pulsing, one of whom was steroid-resistant necessitating alemtuzumab therapy and plasmapheresis. Graft function of both improved with creatinine values of 1.3 mg/dL on discharge. No episodes of infection were noted. Rituximab can be safely administered and may be effective to improve outcomes among highly sensitized kidney transplant patients.

  13. Efficacy of a chairside diagnostic test kit for estimation of C-reactive protein levels in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nagarale, Girish; Ravindra, S; Thakur, Srinath; Setty, Swati

    2010-10-01

    C-reactive protein [CRP] levels increase to hundreds of mg/mL within hours following infection. Studies have shown that serum CRP levels were elevated in periodontal disease. However, in all the previous studies, CRP levels were measured by using high-sensitivity CRP assay kits with minimal detection limits of 0.1 to 3 mg/L, which was much below the normal value of 10 mg/L. These high-sensitivity CRP assays need a proper laboratory setup, and these methods cannot be used as a routine chair-side test in the dental office. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum CRP levels in subjects with periodontal disease by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit with a lower detection limit of 6 mg/L and to compare the CRP levels before and after periodontal therapy. A total of 45 systemically healthy subjects were selected for the study. Subjects were divided into three groups: group A: healthy controls, group B: gingivitis, group C: periodontitis. Serum levels of CRP were determined by using a latex slide agglutination method with commercially available kit with lower detection limit of 6 mg/L. CRP was negative in all the 15 subjects in groups A and B at baseline, 7th and 30th day. CRP was positive only in 2 subjects in Group C at baseline and 7th day. Estimation of serum CRP by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit is not of any significance in subjects with periodontitis.

  14. Efficacy of a chairside diagnostic test kit for estimation of C-reactive protein levels in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagarale, Girish; Ravindra, S.; Thakur, Srinath; Setty, Swati

    2010-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein [CRP] levels increase to hundreds of mg/mL within hours following infection. Studies have shown that serum CRP levels were elevated in periodontal disease. However, in all the previous studies, CRP levels were measured by using high-sensitivity CRP assay kits with minimal detection limits of 0.1 to 3 mg/L, which was much below the normal value of 10 mg/L. These high-sensitivity CRP assays need a proper laboratory setup, and these methods cannot be used as a routine chair-side test in the dental office. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum CRP levels in subjects with periodontal disease by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit with a lower detection limit of 6 mg/L and to compare the CRP levels before and after periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 systemically healthy subjects were selected for the study. Subjects were divided into three groups: group A: healthy controls, group B: gingivitis, group C: periodontitis. Serum levels of CRP were determined by using a latex slide agglutination method with commercially available kit with lower detection limit of 6 mg/L. Results: CRP was negative in all the 15 subjects in groups A and B at baseline, 7th and 30th day. CRP was positive only in 2 subjects in Group C at baseline and 7th day. Conclusion: Estimation of serum CRP by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit is not of any significance in subjects with periodontitis. PMID:21731244

  15. C-reactive protein, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in Portuguese adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agostinis Sobrinho, Cesar Aparecido; Moreira, Carla Marisa Maia; Mota, Jorge Augusto Pinto da Silva; Santos, Rute Marina Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the association of physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration in adolescents. The sample included 386 Portuguese adolescents (n = 207, female), age 12-18 years, assessed in the year 2012. The PA was assessed with the use of accelerometers, and the cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by the Fitnessgram Pacer test. Blood samples were collected after a 10-hour fasting, and high-sensitivity PCR concentration was further assessed. Significant associations between CRP and cardiorespiratory fitness were found for females (r = -0.313; p < 0.001) and males (r = -0.163; p < 0.05); however, when adjusted by the BMI, the associations remained significant only for females (r = -0.215; p < 0.001). Regarding the association between CRP and PA, no significant associations were found for both genders. Therefore, CRP is apparently negatively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness, with differences between males and females; for females it seems less dependent than BMI.

  16. Comparison of optomagnetic and AC susceptibility readouts in a magnetic nanoparticle agglutination assay for detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Fock, Jeppe; Parmvi, Mattias; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Donolato, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-02-15

    There is an increasing need to develop biosensor methods that are highly sensitive and that can be combined with low-cost consumables. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is attractive because their detection is compatible with low-cost disposables and because application of a magnetic field can be used to accelerate assay kinetics. We present the first study and comparison of the performance of magnetic susceptibility measurements and a newly proposed optomagnetic method. For the comparison we use the C-reactive protein (CRP) induced agglutination of identical samples of 100nm MNPs conjugated with CRP antibodies. Both methods detect agglutination as a shift to lower frequencies in measurements of the dynamics in response to an applied oscillating magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility method probes the magnetic response whereas the optomagnetic technique probes the modulation of laser light transmitted through the sample. The two techniques provided highly correlated results upon agglutination when they measure the decrease of the signal from the individual MNPs (turn-off detection strategy), whereas the techniques provided different results, strongly depending on the read-out frequency, when detecting the signal due to MNP agglomerates (turn-on detection strategy). These observations are considered to be caused by differences in the volume-dependence of the magnetic and optical signals from agglomerates. The highest signal from agglomerates was found in the optomagnetic signal at low frequencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. C-reactive protein reference percentiles among pre-adolescent children in Europe based on the IDEFICS study population.

    PubMed

    Schlenz, H; Intemann, T; Wolters, M; González-Gil, E M; Nappo, A; Fraterman, A; Veidebaum, T; Molnar, D; Tornaritis, M; Sioen, I; Mårild, S; Iacoviello, L; Ahrens, W

    2014-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is involved in a wide range of diseases. It is a powerful marker for inflammatory processes used for diagnostic and monitoring purposes. We aimed to establish reference values as data on the distribution of serum CRP levels in young European children are scarce. Reference values of high-sensitivity CRP concentrations were calculated for 9855 children aged 2.0-10.9 years, stratified by age and sex. The children were recruited during the population-based European IDEFICS study (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health Effects in Children and infantS) with 18 745 participants recruited from 2007 to 2010. In 44.1% of the children, CRP values were below or equal the detection limit of 0.2 mg/l. Median CRP concentrations showed a slight negative age trend in boys and girls, whereas serum CRP values were slightly higher in girls than in boys across all age groups. Our population-based reference values of CRP may guide paediatric practice as elevated values may require further investigation or treatment. Therefore, the presented reference values represent a basis for clinical evaluation and for future research on risk assessment of diseases associated with increased CRP levels among children.

  18. Effect of nutritional status and dietary patterns on human serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-11-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. C-reactive Protein Is Associated With Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension, and Diabetes Mellitus in US Adults.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Toth, Peter P; Banach, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has increased globally and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases that may be related to its association with inflammation. We have assessed whether the prevalence of the MetS correlates with a serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration in a population-based sample of US men and women. Participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2010. Of the 17 689 participants analyzed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample (between men and women P = .047). The prevalence of MetS, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension increased across quartiles for hsCRP (all P < .001). Moreover, we found that for the age-, race-, sex-, and smoking-adjusted logistic regression, with increasing hsCRP, the risk of having MetS increased with an odds ratio of 5.20 (95% confidence interval, 4.54-5.93, P < .001) when comparing the highest quartile of serum hsCRP with the lowest. This study provides further evidence for an association between MetS and subclinical inflammation.

  20. [Relationship of food groups intake and C-reactive protein in healthy adults from Mexicali, Baja California, México].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esparza, Josefina; Robinson-Navarro, Octavio; Ortega-Vélez, María Isabel; Diaz-Molina, Raúl; Carrillo-Cedillo, Eugenia Gabriela; Soria-Rodriguez, Carmen G

    2013-09-01

    The high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an important biomarker in inflammatory processes. The objective was to analyze the relationship between the concentrations of hs-CRP in adults from a northern Mexico region with their typical food intake patterns. A sample of 72 university professors underwent clinical and anthropometric assessments and their hs-CRP levels were quantified with an immunoenzymometric assay. Additionally, they filled out a food intake frequency questionnaire, from which the servings of different food groups were obtained with the ESHA software. The average age of participants was 49.75 +/- 10.05 years and the average hs-CRP concentration was 1.66 (0.97, 3.52) mg/L. The value of the association between fruit consumption and hs-CRP level was protective, according to the logistic regression analysis, being the Odds Ratio (OR) 0.23 (95% CI: 0.05, 1.03); while for vegetables the OR was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.12, 3.68). Furthermore, high protein content foods, dairy products, oils and fats were associated with elevated levels of hs-CRP. In conclusion, in our study, the intake of some food groups like fruits and vegetables, and to a lesser extent cereals, were associated with low values of hs-PCR.

  1. Human C-reactive protein gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome are associated with premature coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Tarek A; Mohamed, Rasha H

    2013-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome (MetS) with premature coronary artery disease (PCAD). 116 patients with PCAD (58 with MetS and 58 without MetS) and 119 controls were included in the study. CRP gene +1059 G>C polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. Serum hs-CRP was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carriers of C allele of the CRP +1059 G>C polymorphism had 3.37 fold increased risk to develop MetS in patients with PCAD. In addition CRP gene and hs-CRP levels were independent risk factors for PCAD and MetS. The present study provides new evidence that the presence of CRP +1059 G>C polymorphism and hs-CRP levels are independent determinants of PCAD and MetS in Egyptians. The results of our study suggest a synergistic effect of CRP C allele with classical risk factors such as hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia and MetS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation between C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Vein and Coronary Sinus in Stable and Unstable Angina

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Weverton Ferreira; Ramires, José Antonio Franchini; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho; Strunz, Célia Maria Cassaro; Mangione, José Armando

    2015-01-01

    Background High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is commonly used in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risk. However, a correlation has not yet been established between the absolute levels of peripheral and central hs-CRP. Objective To assess the correlation between serum hs-CRP levels (mg/L) in a peripheral vein in the left forearm (LFPV) with those in the coronary sinus (CS) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a diagnosis of stable angina (SA) or unstable angina (UA). Methods This observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted at the Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clinicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, and at the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, where CAD patients referred to the hospital for coronary angiography were evaluated. Results Forty patients with CAD (20 with SA and 20 with UA) were included in the study. Blood samples from LFPV and CS were collected before coronary angiography. Furthermore, analysis of the correlation between serum levels of hs-CRP in LFPV versus CS showed a strong linear correlation for both SA (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and UA (r = 0.976, p < 0.001) and for the entire sample (r = 0.985, p < 0.001). Conclusion Our data suggest a strong linear correlation between hs-CRP levels in LFPV versus CS in patients with SA and UA. PMID:25494014

  3. Procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein for guiding antibiotic therapy in sepsis: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carolina F; Botoni, Fernando A; Oliveira, Clara R A; Silva, Camila B; Pereira, Helena A; Serufo, José C; Nobre, Vandack

    2013-10-01

    We sought to evaluate whether procalcitonin was superior to C-reactive protein in guiding antibiotic therapy in intensive care patients with sepsis. Randomized open clinical trial. Two university hospitals in Brazil. Patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Patients were randomized in two groups: the procalcitonin group and the C-reactive protein group. Antibiotic therapy was discontinued following a protocol based on serum levels of these markers, according to the allocation group. The procalcitonin group was considered superior if the duration of antibiotic therapy was at least 25% shorter than in the C-reactive protein group. For both groups, at least seven full-days of antibiotic therapy were ensured in patients with Sequential Organ Failure Assessment greater than 10 and/or bacteremia at inclusion, and patients with evident resolution of the infectious process had antibiotics stopped after 7 days, despite biomarkers levels. Ninety-four patients were randomized: 49 patients to the procalcitonin group and 45 patients to the C-reactive protein group. The mean age was 59.8 (SD, 16.8) years. The median duration of antibiotic therapy for the first episode of infection was 7.0 (Q1-Q3, 6.0-8.5) days in the procalcitonin group and 6.0 (Q1-Q3, 5.0-7.0) days in the C-reactive protein group (p=0.13), with a hazard ratio of 1.206 (95% CI, 0.774-1.3; p=0.13). Overall, protocol overruling occurred in only 13 (13.8%) patients. Twenty-one patients died in each group (p=0.836). C-reactive protein was as useful as procalcitonin in reducing antibiotic use in a predominantly medical population of septic patients, causing no apparent harm.

  4. High sensitivity boundary layer transition detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Hoeft, T.

    1985-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer has been developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow changes from laminar to turbulent. Two experimental configurations have been used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer, open shear layer configuration and wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements have been compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of .001 the laser wavelength.

  5. High-sensitivity density fluctuation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Hoeft, T.

    1987-01-01

    A high-sensitivity differential interferometer has been developed to detect small density fluctuations over an optical path length of the order of the boundary layer thickness near transition. Two experimental configurations have been used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer: an open shear-layer configuration and a wind-tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold-wire measurements have been compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations of the order of 0.001 of the laser wavelength.

  6. Review of high-sensitivity Radon studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G.; Simgen, H.

    2017-10-01

    A challenge in many present cutting-edge particle physics experiments is the stringent requirements in terms of radioactive background. In peculiar, the prevention of Radon, a radioactive noble gas, which occurs from ambient air and it is also released by emanation from the omnipresent progenitor Radium. In this paper we review various high-sensitivity Radon detection techniques and approaches, applied in the experiments looking for rare nuclear processes happening at low energies. They allow to identify, quantitatively measure and finally suppress the numerous sources of Radon in the detectors’ components and plants.

  7. High-sensitivity silicon nanowire phototransistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Siew Li; Zhao, Xingyan; Dan, Yaping

    2014-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have emerged as a promising material for high-sensitivity photodetection in the UV, visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. In this work, we demonstrate novel planar SiNW phototransistors on silicon-oninsulator (SOI) substrate using CMOS-compatible processes. The device consists of a bipolar transistor structure with an optically-injected base region. The electronic and optical properties of the SiNW phototransistors are investigated. Preliminary simulation and experimental results show that nanowire geometry, doping densities and surface states have considerable effects on the device performance, and that a device with optimized parameters can potentially outperform conventional Si photodetectors.

  8. Highly sensitive catalytic spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Prasad, Surendra

    2008-01-01

    A new and highly sensitive catalytic kinetic method (CKM) for the determination of ruthenium(III) has been established based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of L-phenylalanine ( L-Pheala) by KMnO 4 in highly alkaline medium. The reaction has been followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance at 526 nm. The proposed CKM is based on the fixed time procedure under optimum reaction conditions. It relies on the linear relationship where the change in the absorbance (Δ At) versus added Ru(III) amounts in the range of 0.101-2.526 ng ml -1 is plotted. Under the optimum conditions, the sensitivity of the proposed method, i.e. the limit of detection corresponding to 5 min is 0.08 ng ml -1, and decreases with increased time of analysis. The method is featured with good accuracy and reproducibility for ruthenium(III) determination. The ruthenium(III) has also been determined in presence of several interfering and non-interfering cations, anions and polyaminocarboxylates. No foreign ions interfered in the determination ruthenium(III) up to 20-fold higher concentration of foreign ions. In addition to standard solutions analysis, this method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of ruthenium(III) in drinking water samples. The method is highly sensitive, selective and very stable. A review of recently published catalytic spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ruthenium(III) has also been presented for comparison.

  9. High sensitivity optical molecular imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu; Yuan, Gao; Huang, Chao; Jiang, Shixin; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Optical Molecular Imaging (OMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorescent or bioluminescence probes, OMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of the probes in vivo, which play the key role in cancer research, pharmacokinetics and other biological studies. In preclinical and clinical application, the image depth, resolution and sensitivity are the key factors for researchers to use OMI. In this paper, we report a high sensitivity optical molecular imaging system developed by our group, which can improve the imaging depth in phantom to nearly 5cm, high resolution at 2cm depth, and high image sensitivity. To validate the performance of the system, special designed phantom experiments and weak light detection experiment were implemented. The results shows that cooperated with high performance electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, precision design of light path system and high efficient image techniques, our OMI system can simultaneously collect the light-emitted signals generated by fluorescence molecular imaging, bioluminescence imaging, Cherenkov luminance and other optical imaging modality, and observe the internal distribution of light-emitting agents fast and accurately.

  10. Reduced hemoglobin and increased C-reactive protein are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Togawa, Akira; Shirai, Yoshinori; Ichiki, Noboru; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Sueishi, Makoto

    2014-02-07

    To investigate the early upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (endoscopy) significantly reduces mortality resulting from upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Upper GI bleeding was defined as 1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b according to the Forrest classification. The hemoglobin (Hb), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined at around the day of endoscopy and 3 mo prior to endoscopy. The rate of change was calculated as follows: (the result of blood examination on the day of endoscopy - the results of blood examination 3 mo prior to endoscopy)/(results of blood examination 3 mo prior to endoscopy). Receiver operating characteristic curves were created to determine threshold values. Seventy-nine men and 77 women were enrolled. There were 17 patients with upper GI bleeding: 12 with a gastric ulcer, 3 with a duodenal ulcer, 1 with an acute gastric mucosal lesion, and 1 with gastric cancer. The area under the curve (AUC), threshold, sensitivity, and specificity of Hb around the day of endoscopy were 0.902, 11.7 g/dL, 94.1%, and 77.1%, respectively, while those of CRP were 0.722, 0.5 mg/dL, 70.5%, and 73%, respectively. The AUC, threshold, sensitivity, and specificity of the rate of change of Hb were 0.851, -21.3%, 76.4%, and 82.6%, respectively, while those of CRP were 0.901, 100%, 100%, and 82.5%, respectively. Predictors for upper GI bleeding were Hb < 11.7 g/dL, reduction rate in the Hb > 21.3% and an increase in the CRP > 100%, 3 mo before endoscopy.

  11. Predictive value of high sensitivity CRP in patients with diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Michowitz, Yoav; Arbel, Yaron; Wexler, Dov; Sheps, David; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Berliner, Shlomo; Keren, Gad; George, Jacob; Roth, Arie

    2008-04-25

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been tested in patients with systolic heart failure (HF) and mixed results have been obtained with regards to its potential predictive value. However, the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with diastolic HF is not established. We studied the predictive role of high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) in patients with diastolic HF. HsCRP levels were measured in a cohort of CHF outpatients, 77 patients with diastolic HF and 217 patients with systolic HF. Concentrations were compared to a large cohort of healthy population (n=7701) and associated with the HF admissions and mortality of the patients. Levels of hsCRP did not differ between patients with systolic and diastolic HF and were significantly elevated compared to the cohort of healthy subjects even after adjustment to various clinical parameters (p<0.0001). In patients with diastolic HF, hsCRP levels associated with New York Heart Association functional class (NYHA-FC) (r=0.31 p=0.01). On univariate Cox regression model hsCRP levels independently predicted hospitalizations in patients with systolic but not diastolic HF (p=0.047). HsCRP concentrations are elevated in patients with diastolic HF and correlate with disease severity; their prognostic value in this patient population should be further investigated.

  12. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. Avaliar a associação entre obesidade e níveis de proteína c-reativa ultrassensível (PCR-us) em pacientes com insuficiência cardiac admitidos em um hospital terciário. Estudo transversal com amostragem consecutiva de pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca hospitalizados. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e o estado nutricional foi avaliado por meio de indicadores como índice de massa corporal (em kg/m2), circunferência da cintura (em cm), razão cintura-quadril, dobra cutânea tricipital (em mm) e dobra cutânea subescapular (em mm). Circunferência do pescoço (em cm) foi aferida bem como n

  13. Crevicular Fluid and Serum Concentrations of Progranulin and High Sensitivity CRP in Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, N.; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Arjun, P.; Naik, Savitha B.; Pradeep, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to correlate the serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of progranulin (PGRN) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Design. PGRN and hs CRP levels were estimated in 3 groups: healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 DM with chronic periodontitis. Results. The mean PGRN and hs CRP concentrations in serum and GCF were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and the least in group 1. Conclusion. PGRN and hs CRP may be biomarkers of the inflammatory response in type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis. PMID:24191130

  14. C-reactive protein and genetic variants and cognitive decline in old age: The PROSPER Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, have been associated with cognitive impairment in old age. However, it is unknown whether CRP is causally linked to cognitive decline. Within the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) tri...

  15. Elevated maternal C-reactive protein and increased risk of schizophrenia in a national birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Sarah; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Leiviskä, Jaana; Kellendonk, Christoph; McKeague, Ian W; Brown, Alan S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate an association between early gestational C-reactive protein, an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and schizophrenia in a large, national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. A nested case-control design from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Schizophrenia cohort was utilized. A total of 777 schizophrenia cases (schizophrenia, N=630; schizoaffective disorder, N=147) with maternal sera available for C-reactive protein testing were identified and matched to 777 control subjects in the analysis. Maternal C-reactive protein levels were assessed using a latex immunoassay from archived maternal serum specimens. Increasing maternal C-reactive protein levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with schizophrenia in offspring (adjusted odds ratio=1.31, 95% confidence interval=1.10-1.56). This finding remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders, including maternal and parental history of psychiatric disorders, twin/singleton birth, urbanicity, province of birth, and maternal socioeconomic status. This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  16. Inflammation and psychotropic drugs: the relationship between C-reactive protein and antipsychotic drug levels.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Gudrun; Shams, Mohamed E E; Unterecker, Stefan; Falter, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In psychiatric clinical practice, there is a need to identify psychotropic drugs whose metabolisms are prone to be altered with increased inflammatory activity in an individual patient. The aim of this study was to find out whether elevated serum levels (≥5 mg/l) of C-reactive protein (CRP), an established laboratory marker of infection and inflammation, are associated with increased serum concentrations of the atypical antipsychotic drugs clozapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Therapeutic drug monitoring request forms of patients whose antipsychotic drug concentrations had been measured under conditions of normal (<5 mg/l) and pathological (>5 mg/l) levels of C-reactive protein were retrospectively screened. The serum concentrations in relation to the daily doses [concentration per dose (C/D) (ng/mL/mg)] and the metabolic ratios [ratio of concentrations (metabolite/drug)] were compared intraindividually by the Wilcoxon signed rank test. To the study effects of the intensity of infections on drug concentrations, C-reactive protein and C/D levels were submitted to Spearman's correlation analysis. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein were found in 105 patients. They were significantly associated with elevated values in C/D for clozapine (n = 33, P < 0.01) and risperidone (n = 40, P < 0.01). A trend for an increase was found for quetiapine (n = 32, P = 0.05). Median increases were 48.0 % (clozapine), 11.9 % (quetiapine), and 24.2 % (active moiety of risperidone), respectively. In patients who exhibit signs of inflammation or infection with increased C-reactive protein values during psychopharmacological treatment, especially under clozapine and risperidone, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommendable in order to minimize the risk of intoxications due to elevated drug concentrations.

  17. High-sensitivity detection of TNT

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarsky, Michael B.; Dunayevskiy, Ilya G.; Prasanna, Manu; Tsekoun, Alexei G.; Go, Rowel; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2006-01-01

    We report high-sensitivity detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy where the laser radiation is obtained from a continuous-wave room temperature high-power quantum cascade laser in an external grating cavity geometry. The external grating cavity quantum cascade laser is continuously tunable over ≈400 nm around 7.3 μm and produces a maximum continuous-wave power of ≈200 mW. The IR spectroscopic signature of TNT is sufficiently different from that of nitroglycerine so that unambiguous detection of TNT without false positives from traces of nitroglycerine is possible. We also report the results of spectroscopy of acetylene in the 7.3-μm region to demonstrate continuous tunability of the IR source. PMID:17164325

  18. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  19. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Toke R.; Hansen, Ole; Department of Physics, Danish National Research Foundation's Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality

    2009-12-15

    A novel microfabricated chemical reactor for highly sensitive measurements of catalytic activity and surface kinetics is presented. The reactor is fabricated in a silicon chip and is intended for gas-phase reactions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 bar. A high sensitivity is obtained by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model catalysts which canmore » only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally. A corresponding theoretical model is presented, and the gas flow through an on-chip flow-limiting capillary is predicted to be in the intermediate regime. The experimental data for the gas flow are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical model. At typical experimental conditions, the total gas flow through the reaction zone is around 3x10{sup 14} molecules s{sup -1}, corresponding to a gas residence time in the reaction zone of about 11 s. To demonstrate the operation of the microreactor, CO oxidation on low-area platinum thin film circles is employed as a test reaction. Using temperature ramping, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 {mu}m{sup 2} are conveniently characterized with the device.« less

  20. A brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism Val66Met identifies fibromyalgia syndrome subgroup with higher body mass index and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Russell, I Jon; Liu, Ya-Guang

    2012-08-01

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results from a substitution at position 66 from valine (Val) to methionine (Met) and may predispose to human neuropsychiatric disorders. We proposed to determine whether these BDNF gene SNPs were associated with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and/or any of its typical phenotypes. Patients with FMS (N = 95) and healthy normal controls (HNC, N = 58) were studied. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The BDNF SNPs were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).The BDNF SNP distribution was 65 (68%) Val/Val, 28 (30%) Val/Met, and 2 (2%) Met/Met for FMS and 40 (69%), 17(29%), and 1 (2%) for HNC, respectively. The serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)and body mass index (BMI) in FMS were higher than in HNC. The FMS with BDNF Val66Val had significantly higher mean BMI (P = 0.0001) and hsCRP (P = 0.02) than did FMS carrying the Val66Met genotype. This pattern was not found in HNC. Phenotypic measures of subjective pain, pain threshold, depression, or insomnia did not relate to either of the BDNF SNPs in FMS. The relative distribution BDNF SNPs did not differ between FMS and HNC. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is not selective for FMS. The BDNF Val66Val SNP identifies a subgroup of FMS with elevated hsCRP and higher BMI. This is the first study to associate a BDNF polymorphism with a FMS subgroup phenotype.

  1. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein, oxidative stress, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Koromantzos, Panagiotis A; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Dereka, Xanthippi; Offenbacher, Steven; Katsilambros, Nicholas; Vrotsos, Ioannis A; Madianos, Phoebus N

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is affected by systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. The effect of periodontal therapy on these systemic factors may be related to improvement on glycemic status. The aim of the present study is to assess over a period of 6 months the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), d-8-iso prostaglandin F2a (d-8-iso) as a marker of oxidative stress, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 on patients with type 2 DM. Sixty participants with type 2 DM and moderate to severe periodontal disease were randomized into intervention (IG) and control (CG) groups. IG received scaling and root planing, whereas CG received supragingival cleaning at baseline and scaling and root planing at 6 months. Participants of both groups were evaluated at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months. Periodontal data recorded at each visit included probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, and gingival index. Blood was collected at each visit for the assay of serum glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1c), hsCRP, d-8-iso, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Although there was a trend to a reduction in hsCRP, d-8-iso and MMP-9 it did not reach statistical significance. MMP-2 levels remained unchanged after periodontal treatment. Effective non-surgical periodontal treatment of participants with type 2 DM and moderate to severe periodontal disease improved significantly A1c levels but did not result in a statistically significant improvement in hsCRP, d-8-iso, MMP-2, and MMP-9 levels.

  2. Cardiac troponin T measured with a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis and monitoring of heart injury in chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Saravia, Silvia Gilka Muñoz; Haberland, Annekathrin; Bartel, Sabine; Araujo, Raul; Valda, Gregorio; Reynaga, Diana Duchen; Ramirez, Ivan Diaz; Borges, Adrian C; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2011-02-01

    Chronic Chagas disease (15 million patients; annual incidence, 40, 000 patients; annual mortality, 12 ,500 patients) is the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America. Between 10 and 30 years after infection, 30% of patients with Chagas disease develop heart injury, which is the main reason for its high mortality. Consequently, frequent cardiac diagnostics are required for patients with Chagas disease. To minimize time-intensive and cost-intensive diagnostics, such as electrocardiography, echocardiography, and radiologic imaging, we tested the effect of measuring serum cardiac troponin T (cTnT) with a highly sensitive assay. To indicate the pathophysiologic background for cTnT release in Chagas heart injury, inflammation markers, such as C-reactive protein and interleukin 6, were measured in parallel. Serum cTnT was measured in 26 healthy subjects and in 179 patients with chronic Chagas disease who were asymptomatic (indeterminate stage, n  =  86), who were suffering from cardiomyopathy with or without megacolon (n  =  71), or who were suffering from megacolon exclusively (n  =  22). Serum cTnT was significantly higher in patients with cardiomyopathy with or without megacolon than in healthy subjects, asymptomatic subjects, and patients with megacolon, and the cTnT value was correlated with the severity of the cardiomyopathy. The lower limit of detection for the highly sensitive assay (3 ng/L) was best at distinguishing patients with, and without, heart injury. C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 were found to parallel cTnT changes in both the different Chagas groups and the cardiomyopathy groups separated by disease severity. Highly sensitive cTnT measurement has the potential to contribute to diagnosis and monitoring of heart injury in patients with chronic Chagas disease. The highly sensitive assay of cTnT release seems to be related to Chagas heart disease-specific inflammation.

  3. High sensitivity field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, Mario A.; Matheoud, Alessandro V.; Marmillod, Philippe; Liu, Youjiang; Kong, Deyi; Brugger, Jürgen; Boero, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    A high sensitivity field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer (FAIMS) was designed, fabricated, and tested. The main components of the system are a 10.6 eV UV photoionization source, an ion filter driven by a high voltage/high frequency n-MOS inverter circuit, and a low noise ion detector. The ion filter electronics are capable to generate square waveforms with peak-to-peak voltages up to 1000 V at frequencies up to 1 MHz with adjustable duty cycles. The ion detector current amplifier has a gain up to 1012 V/A with an effective equivalent input noise level down to about 1 fA/Hz1/2 during operation with the ion filter at the maximum voltage and frequency. The FAIMS system was characterized by detecting different standard chemical compounds. Additionally, we investigated the use of a synchronous modulation/demodulation technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in FAIMS measurements. In particular, we implemented the modulation of the compensation voltage with the synchronous demodulation of the ion current. The analysis of the measurements at low concentration levels led to an extrapolated limit of detection for acetone of 10 ppt with an averaging time of 1 s.

  4. Highly sensitive beam steering with plasmonic antenna

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we design and study a highly sensitive beam steering device that integrates a spiral plasmonic antenna with a subwavelength metallic waveguide. The short effective wavelength of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) mode supported by the metallic waveguide is exploited to dramatically miniaturize the device and improve the sensitivity of the beam steering. Through introducing a tiny displacement of feed point with respect to the geometrical center of the spiral plasmonic antenna, the direction of the radiation can be steered at considerably high angles. Simulation results show that steering angles of 8°, 17° and 34° are obtainable for a displacement of 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm, respectively. Benefiting from the reduced device size and the shorter SPP wavelength, the beam steering sensitivity of the beam steering is improved by 10-fold compared with the case reported previously. This miniature plasmonic beam steering device may find many potential applications in quantum optical information processing and integrated photonic circuits. PMID:25091405

  5. Demonstration of high sensitivity laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Christian, Kent D.; Field, Christopher T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on a high sensitivity semiconductor laser ranging system developed for the Gravity and Magnetic Earth Surveyor (GAMES) for measuring variations in the planet's gravity field. The GAMES laser ranging instrument (LRI) consists of a pair of co-orbiting satellites, one which contains the laser transmitter and receiver and one with a passive retro-reflector mounted in an drag-stabilized housing. The LRI will range up to 200 km in space to the retro-reflector satellite. As the spacecraft pair pass over the spatial variations in the gravity field, they experience along-track accelerations which change their relative velocity. These time displaced velocity changes are sensed by the LRI with a resolution of 20-50 microns/sec. In addition, the pair may at any given time be drifting together or apart at a rate of up to 1 m/sec, introducing a Doppler shift into the ranging signals. An AlGaAs laser transmitter intensity modulated at 2 GHz and 10 MHz is used as fine and medium ranging channels. Range is measured by comparing phase difference between the transmit and received signals at each frequency. A separate laser modulated with a digital code, not reported in this paper, will be used for coarse ranging to unambiguously determine the distance up to 200 km.

  6. Low C-Reactive Protein Levels in a Traditional West-African Population Living in a Malaria Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Ulrika K.; van Bodegom, David; May, Linda; Boef, Anna G. C.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are reported to be elevated in populations of African descent living in affluent environments compared to populations of European ancestry. However, the natural history of CRP levels in populations of African descent living under adverse environments remains largely unknown. Methods CRP levels were measured with a high sensitivity assay in 624 apparently healthy individuals who contributed blood as part of a study on innate immune responsiveness in a traditional Ghanaian population living under adverse environmental conditions in a malaria endemic area. As a comparison, we included CRP measurements from 2931 apparently healthy individuals from the Dutch population that were included in the same batch of CRP analyses. Associations between CRP and body mass index (BMI), immune responsiveness, and P. falciparum parasitaemia were investigated. Results In an age- and sex-adjusted model, CRP levels were 0.54 mg/L lower in the Ghanaian compared to the Dutch cohort (1.52 vs. 0.98 mg/L, p<0.001). When accounting for the substantially higher average BMI in the Dutch compared to the Ghanaians (25.6 vs. 18.4 kg/m2) the difference in CRP levels disappeared. BMI associated positively with CRP in the Dutch but not in the Ghanaians. In individuals with an acute phase response, CRP levels were higher in the Ghanaian compared to the Dutch cohort (24.6 vs. 17.3 mg/L, p = 0.04). Levels of CRP were positively related to immune responsiveness and P. falciparum parasitaemia (all p<0.001) among Ghanaians. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that West-Africans do not exhibit an inherently high inflammatory state. The role of genes, environment and gene-environment interaction in explaining reports of elevated CRP levels in populations of African ancestry when compared to other ethnicities living in affluent environments thus merits further investigation. PMID:23922912

  7. Association Between Mobility Mode and C-Reactive Protein Levels in Men With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Leslie R.; Stolzmann, Kelly; Nguyen, Hiep P.; Jain, Nitin B.; Zayac, Cara; Gagnon, David R.; Tun, Carlos G.; Garshick, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess clinical determinants of systemic inflammation in persons with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants As part of an epidemiologic study assessing SCI-related health conditions, 63 men with chronic SCI provided a blood sample and information regarding locomotive mode and personal habits. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure Plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). Results The mean ± standard deviation age was 56±14y, and participants were assessed 21±13y after injury. Adjusting for heart disease, hypertension, and body mass index (BMI), the mean CRP in 12 motorized wheelchair users (5.11mg/L) was not significantly greater than 23 participants who used a manual wheelchair (2.19mg/L) (P=.085) but was significantly greater than the 17 who walked with an assistive device (1.41mg/L) (P=.005) and the 12 who walked independently (1.63mg/L) (P=.027). CRP was significantly greater in participants with obesity but was not related to age, smoking, or SCI level and severity. CRP was elevated in participants reporting a urinary tract infection (UTI) or pressure ulcer within a year, but adjustment for this did not account for the elevated CRP in motorized wheelchair users. Conclusions These results suggest that CRP in chronic SCI is independently related to locomotive mode, BMI, and a history of pressure ulcers and UTI. It is suggested that future studies in SCI investigate whether modifying these factors influence systemic inflammation and cardiovascular health. PMID:18374004

  8. Accuracy of commercially available c-reactive protein rapid tests in the context of undifferentiated fevers in rural Laos.

    PubMed

    Phommasone, Koukeo; Althaus, Thomas; Souvanthong, Phonesavanh; Phakhounthong, Khansoudaphone; Soyvienvong, Laxoy; Malapheth, Phatthaphone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Paris, Daniel H; Dance, David; Newton, Paul; Lubell, Yoel

    2016-02-04

    C-Reactive Protein (CRP) has been shown to be an accurate biomarker for discriminating bacterial from viral infections in febrile patients in Southeast Asia. Here we investigate the accuracy of existing rapid qualitative and semi-quantitative tests as compared with a quantitative reference test to assess their potential for use in remote tropical settings. Blood samples were obtained from consecutive patients recruited to a prospective fever study at three sites in rural Laos. At each site, one of three rapid qualitative or semi-quantitative tests was performed, as well as a corresponding quantitative NycoCard Reader II as a reference test. We estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the three tests against a threshold of 10 mg/L and kappa values for the agreement of the two semi-quantitative tests with the results of the reference test. All three tests showed high sensitivity, specificity and kappa values as compared with the NycoCard Reader II. With a threshold of 10 mg/L the sensitivity of the tests ranged from 87-98 % and the specificity from 91-98 %. The weighted kappa values for the semi-quantitative tests were 0.7 and 0.8. The use of CRP rapid tests could offer an inexpensive and effective approach to improve the targeting of antibiotics in remote settings where health facilities are basic and laboratories are absent. This study demonstrates that accurate CRP rapid tests are commercially available; evaluations of their clinical impact and cost-effectiveness at point of care is warranted.

  9. High C reactive protein associated with increased pulse wave velocity among urban men with metabolic syndrome in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Aminuddin, Amilia; Zakaria, Zaiton; Fuad, Ahmad F; Kamsiah, Jaarin; Othman, Faizah; Das, Srijit; Kamisah, Yusof; Qodriyah, Haji S; Jubri, Zakiah; Nordin, Nor Anita M; Ngah, Wan Z

    2013-03-01

    To determine the association between carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVCF); augmentation index (AI); and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and to determine the influence of ethnicity on PWVCF and AI, and the association between high hs-CRP and increased PWV, and AI in MetS. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from September 2009 to September 2011. Three hundred and eighty men (Chinese and Malays) were recruited from the study. The PWVCF and AI were measured by Vicorder (SMT Medical, Wuerzburg, Germany). The hs-CRP level was also determined. We defined MetS using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and harmonized criteria. Malays had higher AI compared to the Malaysian Chinese. Patients with MetS had higher PWVCF (IDF criteria: 8.5 [8.3-8.7] versus 8.2 [8.0-8.4] m/s, p=0.03; harmonized criteria: 8.5 [8.4-8.7] versus 8.2 [8.0-8.4] m/s, p=0.007) and hs-CRP (IDF criteria: 0.9+/-2.0 versus 0.4+/-1.1 mg/L, p=0.0007; harmonized criteria: 0.8+/-1.9 versus 0.4+/-1.1 mg/L, p=0.002) compared to non-MetS. In subjects with MetS, those with high hs-CRP (>3 mg/L) had higher PWVCF. Augmentation index values were significantly higher in Malays compared with Malaysian Chinese. Metabolic syndrome was associated with increased PWVCF and hs-CRP. Patients with MetS and high hs-CRP were associated with higher PWVCF. The measurement of hs-CRP reflects the degree of subclinical vascular damage in MetS.

  10. Influence of low birth weight on C-reactive protein in asymptomatic younger adults: the bogalusa heart study.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Azad R; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Chen, Wei; Azevedo, Mario J; Berenson, Gerald S

    2011-03-21

    Both low birth weight, an indicator of intrauterine growth restriction, and low grade systemic inflammation depicted by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have emerged as independent predictors of cardiovascular (CV) disease and type 2 diabetes. However, information linking low birth weight and hs-CRP in a biracial (black/white) population is scant. We assessed a cohort of 776 black and white subjects (28% black, 43% male) aged 24-43 years (mean 36.1 years) enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study with regard to birth weight and gestational age data were retrieved from Louisiana State Public Health Office. Black subjects had significantly lower birth weight than white subjects (3.145 kg vs 3.441 kg, p < 0.0001) and higher hs-CRP level (3.29 mg/L vs 2.57 mg/L, p = 0.011). After adjusting for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), smoking status and race (for total sample), the hs-CRP level decreased across quartiles of increasing birth weight in white subjects (p = 0.001) and the combined sample (p = 0.002). Adjusting for sex, age, BMI, smoking status and race for the total sample in a multivariate regression model, low birth weight was retained as an independent predictor variable for higher hs-CRP levels in white subjects (p = 0.004) and the total sample (p = 0.007). Conversely, the area under the receiver operative curve (c statistic) analysis adjusted for race, sex, age, smoking status and BMI yielded a value of 0.777 with regard to the discriminating value of hs-CRP for predicting low birth weight. The deleterious effect of low birth weight on systemic inflammation depicted by the hs-CRP levels in asymptomatic younger adults may potentially link fetal growth retardation, CV disease and diabetes, with important health implications.

  11. Low C-reactive protein levels in a traditional West-African population living in a malaria endemic area.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ulrika K; van Bodegom, David; May, Linda; Boef, Anna G C; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are reported to be elevated in populations of African descent living in affluent environments compared to populations of European ancestry. However, the natural history of CRP levels in populations of African descent living under adverse environments remains largely unknown. CRP levels were measured with a high sensitivity assay in 624 apparently healthy individuals who contributed blood as part of a study on innate immune responsiveness in a traditional Ghanaian population living under adverse environmental conditions in a malaria endemic area. As a comparison, we included CRP measurements from 2931 apparently healthy individuals from the Dutch population that were included in the same batch of CRP analyses. Associations between CRP and body mass index (BMI), immune responsiveness, and P. falciparum parasitaemia were investigated. In an age- and sex-adjusted model, CRP levels were 0.54 mg/L lower in the Ghanaian compared to the Dutch cohort (1.52 vs. 0.98 mg/L, p<0.001). When accounting for the substantially higher average BMI in the Dutch compared to the Ghanaians (25.6 vs. 18.4 kg/m(2)) the difference in CRP levels disappeared. BMI associated positively with CRP in the Dutch but not in the Ghanaians. In individuals with an acute phase response, CRP levels were higher in the Ghanaian compared to the Dutch cohort (24.6 vs. 17.3 mg/L, p = 0.04). Levels of CRP were positively related to immune responsiveness and P. falciparum parasitaemia (all p<0.001) among Ghanaians. Our study demonstrates that West-Africans do not exhibit an inherently high inflammatory state. The role of genes, environment and gene-environment interaction in explaining reports of elevated CRP levels in populations of African ancestry when compared to other ethnicities living in affluent environments thus merits further investigation.

  12. Inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein and radiotherapy-induced early adverse skin reactions in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Lally, Brian E; Hu, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American women. Postsurgery adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) significantly reduced the local recurrence rate. However, many patients develop early adverse skin reactions (EASR) that impact quality of life and treatment outcomes. We evaluated an inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), in predicting RT-induced EASRs in 159 patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. In each patient, we measured pre- and post-RT plasma CRP levels using a highly sensitive ELISA CRP assay. RT-induced EASRs were assessed at weeks 3 and 6 using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (v3.0). Associations between EASRs and CRP levels were assessed using logistic regression models after adjusting for potential confounders. RT-induced grade 2+ EASRs were observed in 8 (5%) and 80 (50%) patients at weeks 3 and 6 (end of RT), respectively. At the end of RT, a significantly higher proportion of African Americans developed grade 3 EASRs (13.8% vs. 2.3% in others); grade 2+ EASRs were significantly associated with: change of CRP > 1 mg/L [odds ratio (OR), 2.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-5.95; P = 0.04], obesity (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.03-4.21; P = 0.04), or combined both factors (OR, 5.21; 95% CI, 1.77-15.38; P = 0.003). This is the first study to demonstrate that an inflammatory biomarker CRP is associated with RT-induced EASRs, particularly combined with obesity. Future larger studies are warranted to validate our findings and facilitate the discovery and development of anti-inflammatory agents to protect normal tissue from RT-induced adverse effects and improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. C-reactive protein and cold-pressor tolerance in the general population: the Tromsø Study.

    PubMed

    Schistad, Elina Iordanova; Stubhaug, Audun; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Engdahl, Bo Lars; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether increases in severity of subclinical inflammation, measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), increased experimental pain sensitivity, measured by cold-pressor tolerance, and to test whether this relationship is independent of chronic pain. A large population-based study from 2007 to 2008, the sixth Tromsø Study, provided data from 12,981 participants. For the present analysis, complete data for 10,274 participants (age: median 58 years) were available. The main outcome measure was cold-pressor tolerance, tested by placing the dominant hand in circulating cold water (3°C) for a maximum of 106 seconds. Cox proportional hazard models, treating hand withdrawal during the cold-pressor test as the event and enduring the full test time as censored data, were used to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP levels (≤3 or >3 mg/L) and cold-pressure tolerance. The fully adjusted model was controlled for age, sex, education, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, emotional distress, statin usage, and self-reported presence of chronic pain. Additional analysis was performed in participants without chronic pain. Higher levels of hs-CRP were negatively related to cold-pressor tolerance (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.37, P < 0.001), adjusted for age and sex. This relationship remained essentially unaltered after controlling for potential confounders (HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36, P < 0.001), as well as for the presence of chronic pain (HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36, P < 0.001). The present data show that subclinical inflammation is related to increased pain sensitivity, suggesting a potential role of inflammation in experimental pain which may be of importance for the development of clinical pain.

  14. Race/ethnicity moderates the relationship between depressive symptom severity and C-reactive protein: 2005-2010 NHANES data.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephanie M; Stewart, Jesse C

    2014-10-01

    Because few studies have examined depression facets or potential moderators of the depression-inflammation relationship, our aims were to determine whether particular depressive symptom clusters are more strongly associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and whether race/ethnicity moderates these relationships. We examined data from 10,149 adults representative of the U.S. population (4858 non-Hispanic White, 1978 non-Hispanic Black, 2260 Mexican American, 1053 Other Hispanic) who participated in the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2010. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and high-sensitivity serum CRP was quantified by latex-enhanced nephelometry. Total (p<.001), somatic (p<.001), and nonsomatic (p=.001) depressive symptoms were each positively related to serum CRP in individual models. However, in the simultaneous model that included both symptom clusters, somatic symptoms (p<.001), but not nonsomatic symptoms (p=.98), remained associated with serum CRP. Evidence of moderation by race/ethnicity was also observed, as six of the nine depressive symptoms×race/ethnicity interactions were significant (ps<.05). Among non-Hispanic Whites, the pattern of results was identical to the full sample; only somatic symptoms (p<.001) remained related to serum CRP in the simultaneous model. No relationships between total, somatic, or nonsomatic symptoms and serum CRP were observed among the non-Hispanic Black, Mexican American, or Other Hispanic groups. Our findings indicate that the link between depressive symptoms and systemic inflammation may be due to the somatic symptoms of sleep disturbance, fatigue, appetite changes, and psychomotor retardation/agitation and may be strongest among non-Hispanic Whites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Secondary analysis of APPLE study suggests atorvastatin may reduce atherosclerosis progression in pubertal lupus patients with higher C reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardoin, Stacy P; Schanberg, Laura Eve; Sandborg, Christy I; Barnhart, Huiman X; Evans, Greg W; Yow, Eric; Mieszkalski, Kelly L; Ilowite, Norman T; Eberhard, Anne; Imundo, Lisa F; Kimura, Yuki; Levy, Deborah; von Scheven, Emily; Silverman, Earl; Bowyer, Suzanne L; Punaro, L; Singer, Nora G; Sherry, David D; McCurdy, Deborah K; Klein-Gitelman, Marissa; Wallace, Carol; Silver, Richard M; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Higgins, Gloria C; Brunner, Hermine I; Jung, Lawrence; Soep, Jennifer B; Reed, Ann M; Thompson, Susan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Participants in the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Paediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial were randomised to placebo or atorvastatin for 36 months. The primary endpoint, reduced carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) progression, was not met but atorvastatin-treated participants showed a trend of slower CIMT progression. Post-hoc analyses were performed to assess subgroup benefit from atorvastatin therapy. Methods Subgroups were prespecified and defined by age (> or ≤15.5 years), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) duration (> or ≤24 months), pubertal status (Tanner score ≥4 as post-pubertal or <4 as pre-pubertal), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) (≥ or <110 mg/dl) and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) (≥ or <1.5 mg/l). A combined subgroup (post-pubertal and hsCRP≥1.5 mg/l) was compared to all others. Longitudinal linear mixed-effects models were developed using 12 CIMT and other secondary APPLE outcomes (lipids, hsCRP, disease activity and damage, and quality of life). Three way interaction effects were assessed for models. Results Significant interaction effects with trends of less CIMT progression in atorvastatin-treated participants were observed in pubertal (3 CIMT segments), high hsCRP (2 CIMT segments), and the combined high hsCRP and pubertal group (5 CIMT segments). No significant treatment effect trends were observed across subgroups defined by age, SLE duration, LDL for CIMT or other outcome measures. Conclusions Pubertal status and higher hsCRP were linked to lower CIMT progression in atorvastatin-treated subjects, with most consistent decreases in CIMT progression in the combined pubertal and high hsCRP group. While secondary analyses must be interpreted cautiously, results suggest further research is needed to determine whether pubertal lupus patients with high CRP benefit from statin therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00065806. PMID:23436914

  16. Effects of Radio Frequency and Ultrasound Cavitation Therapy on Serum C-reactive Protein and Pro-oxidant-Antioxidant Levels.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mahsa; Nasrfard, Samira; Nezafati, Pouya; Arabpour, Mahla; Ghaane, Narjes; Salehi, Maryam; Safarian, Mohammad; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon A; Norouzy, Abdolreza

    2016-05-01

    A combination of radio-frequency (RF) and ultrasound cavitation (UC) has been reported to reduce indices of obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of a combination of these techniques on anthropometric indices, pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB), and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). This randomized clinical trial was performed on 50 healthy women between January 2014 and June 2014 in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Participants were randomized to one of two groups, both of which received a low-calorie diet containing 500-kcal energy deficit per day. The trial group included twenty-five subjects who were assigned to the combined treatment of RF and ultrasound cavitation program of abdomen and flank areas. There were twenty-five control subjects who received the low calorie diet alone. Biochemical markers, including serum hs-CRP and PAB values, and anthropometric indices were measured in the intervention group and healthy controls. For both the intervention and control groups, waist circumference was reduced significantly by 3.76 ± 1.69 and 2.40 ± 1.04, respectively (P < 0.05). In addition, abdominal circumference was reduced by 9.5 ± 2.66 and 3.12 ± 1.88, in these groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Decrement of PAB level in the intervention group, and its increment in the control group, were not significant (P > 0.05). In addition, reductions of hs-CRP and PAB between the two studied groups during five weeks of study were not significant (P > 0.05). Although there were significant reductions in anthropometric indices following treatment with RF and UC, the effects on serum PAB or hs-CRP were no significantly different, compared to the control group. Further studies are needed to confirm the beneficial effect for the use of these techniques.

  17. Effect of Psyllium Fiber Supplementation on C-Reactive Protein: The Trial to Reduce Inflammatory Markers (TRIM)

    PubMed Central

    King, Dana E.; Mainous, Arch G.; Egan, Brent M.; Woolson, Robert F.; Geesey, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Recent evidence supports a significant association between the intake of dietary fiber and levels of inflammatory markers. The objective of this study was to determine whether daily fiber supplementation would reduce levels of inflammatory markers. METHODS This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial at a single university medical center. Participants were overweight or obese adults with no history of heart disease. The intervention was psyllium supplementation at either 7 or 14 g/d for 3 months compared with no supplements in a control group. The main outcome measure was change in level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration; secondary outcomes included changes in interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, fibrinogen levels, and white blood cell (WBC) count. Protocol completers attended at least 2 visits and took more than 75% of the prescribed fiber dose. RESULTS In this intent-to-treat analysis (n = 158), there were no significant differences between either of the 2 treatment groups and the control group in the amount of change in CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 levels or in WBC count (P>.05). In the analysis of protocol completers (n = 132), there also were no significant differences between the groups except for a small decrease in fibrinogen level in the high-fiber group (−6 mg/dL [−0.18 μmol/L] compared with 13 mg/dL [0.38 μmol/L] in the control group, P<.05). CONCLUSION Psyllium fiber supplementation did not significantly reduce CRP levels in overweight or obese individuals in this trial, and changes in other markers were not consistent. Further research is needed to determine whether other fibers or nutrients can reduce inflammatory markers. PMID:18332401

  18. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Mitsuyo; Hayabuchi, Hitomi; Goda, Toshinao; Oka, Jun; Baba, Keiko; Ohki, Kazuko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugiyamama, Yoshiko

    2012-10-30

    The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18-22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC); Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%). The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L) was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04). TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10). TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02), as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02). Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results.

  19. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. Methods The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18–22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC); Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. Results The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%). The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L) was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04). TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10). TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02), as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02). Conclusions Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results. PMID:23110638

  20. Body fat and insulin resistance independently predict increased serum C-reactive protein in hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Flavia; Dorizzi, Romolo; Castello, Roberto; Maffeis, Claudio; Spiazzi, Giovanna; Zoppini, Giacomo; Muggeo, Michele; Moghetti, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    Increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), an independent predictor of coronary heart disease, was reported in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). It remains unclear whether this finding is due to the association between PCOS and either insulin resistance, obesity, or androgen excess, which are all common features of this condition. The aims of this study were to assess whether increased serum CRP is a specific feature of PCOS and to investigate the mechanisms underlying this association. Serum high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) was measured in 86 hyperandrogenic women (age 21.6+/-4.2 years, body mass index (BMI) 23.6+/-3.5 kg/m2), 50 with PCOS and 36 with idiopathic hyperandrogenism (HA). Thirty-five BMI-matched healthy women were also studied as controls. In these subjects, endocrine and metabolic profiles were assessed. In all hyperandrogenic subjects and 14 controls, insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose clamp technique. Body fat was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Hs-CRP concentrations were higher in PCOS women (3.43+/-2.01 mg/l) than in HA subjects and healthy women (2.43+/-1.04, P<0.005; and 2.75+/-0.86 mg/l, P<0.05 respectively versus PCOS). In multiple regression analyses, increased serum hs-CRP was independently predicted by higher body fat and lower insulin sensitivity. However, in lean women, serum-free testosterone was an additional, negative, predictive variable. PCOS is accompanied by a low-grade chronic inflammation. Body fat appears the main determining factor of this finding, which is only partly explained by insulin resistance. At least in lean women, androgen excess per se seems to play an additional, possibly protective, role in this association.

  1. C-reactive protein and fibrinogen of bedridden older patients in a six-month vitamin D supplementation trial.

    PubMed

    Bjorkman, M P; Sorva, A J; Tilvis, R S

    2009-05-01

    To elucidate the association between vitamin D status, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen. Secondary analysis of a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial. Four longterm care hospitals (1215 beds) in Helsinki, Finland. 218 long-term inpatients aged over 65 years. Eligible patients (n = 218) were randomized to receive 0 IU/d, 400 IU/d, or 1200 IU/d cholecalciferol for six months. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), parathyroid hormone (PTH), high sensitive CRP, fibrinogen, amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), and carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were measured. The patients were aged (84.5 +/- 7.5 years), vitamin D deficient (25-OHD = 23 +/- 10 nmol/l), chronically bedridden and in stable general condition. The mean baseline CRP and fibrinogen were 10.86 mg/l (0.12 mg/l - 125.00 mg/l) and 4,7 g/l (2.3 g/l - 8.6 g/l), respectively. CRP correlated with ICTP (r = 0.217, p = 0.001), but not with vitamin D status. Supplementation significantly increased 25-OHD concentrations, but the changes in CRP and fibrinogen were insignificant and inconsistent. The post-trial CRP concentrations (0.23 mg/l -138.00 mg/l) correlated with ICTP (r = 0.156, p < 0.001), but no association was found with vitamin D status. The baseline and post-trial fibrinogen correlated with CRP, only. CRP concentrations are associated with bone turnover, but not with vitamin D status, and vitamin D supplementation has no major effect on CRP or fibrinogen concentrations in bedridden older patients.

  2. C-reactive protein and its relation to high blood pressure in overweight or obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Juliana Andreia F.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.; Cardoso, Anajás da Silva; Gonzaga, Nathalia Costa; Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira; Ramos, André Luiz C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and high blood pressure (BP) in overweight or obese children and adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 184 overweight or obese children and adolescents aged from two to 18 years old, from April, 2009 to April, 2010. The classification of nutritional status used the body mass index (BMI). Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention curve, individuals were classified as: overweight (BMI between the 85th-95th percentiles), obesity (BMI between 95th-97th percentiles) and severe obesity (BMI >97th percentile). Abnormal values were considered for systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic (DBP) if ≥90th percentile of the BP curve recommended for children and adolescents in the V Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension, for waist circumference (WC) if ≥90th percentile of the curve established by the National Cholesterol Education Program, and for high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) if >3mg/dL. To evaluate the association of inadequate values of CRP and the studied groups, chi-square test and analysis of variance were applied, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 and adopting a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the evaluated sample, 66.3% were female, 63.5%, non-white, 64.1% had severe obesity, 78.3% had altered WC and 70.6% presented high BP. There was a significant association of CRP high levels with altered WC and BMI ≥97th percentile. In adolescents, high CRP was related to high SBP. CRP mean values were higher in individuals with elevated SBP. CONCLUSIONS Inadequate values of hs-CRP were associated with severe obesity and high SBP in the studied population. These markers can be used to identify children and adolescents at higher risk for developing atherosclerosis. PMID:24142315

  3. Abnormal soluble CD40 ligand and C-reactive protein concentrations in hypertension: relationship to indices of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jeetesh V; Lim, Hoong Sern; Nadar, Sunil; Tayebjee, Muzahir; Hughes, Elizabeth A; Lip, Gregory Yh

    2006-01-01

    Abnormal inflammation, platelets and angiogenesis are involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). To test the hypothesis that concentrations of high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP, an index of inflammation) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, an index of platelet activation) would be abnormal in hypertension, and in turn, be related to plasma indices of angiogenesis, the angiopoietins-1 and -2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in addition to the presence or absence of CVD. Using a cross-sectional approach, we measured plasma concentrations of CRP, sCD40L, VEGF, and angiopoietins-1 and -2 in 147 patients with hypertension (85 with a history of CVD event/s, 62 CVD event-free) and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Concentrations of sCD40L (P = 0.039), CRP (P < 0.001), angiopoietin-1 (P < 0.001), angiopoietin-2 (P = 0.003) and VEGF (P < 0.001) were all greater amongst hypertensive patients than in controls. There were no significant differences in sCD40L and VEGF concentrations between hypertensive individuals with and without CVD events, but CRP and angiopoietin-1 concentrations were significantly greater amongst those with CVD events. On multiple regression analysis, sCD40L was associated with angiopoietin-2 (P = 0.01) and VEGF (P = 0.007) in hypertensive individuals, but no such associations were found within the healthy control group. In patients with hypertension, sCD40L was associated with increased circulating markers of abnormal angiogenesis (angiopoietin-2, VEGF). The interaction between sCD40L and angiogenesis may contribute to the pathophysiology of CVD in hypertension.

  4. PPARγ gene polymorphism, C-reactive protein level, BMI and periodontitis in post-menopausal Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangming; Sugita, Noriko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Hideo; Nakamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the association between the PPARγPro12Ala polymorphism and obesity. Obese individuals had higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared with those of normal weight, and PPARγ activation could significantly reduce serum high-sensitive CRP level. We have previously suggested that the Pro12Ala polymorphism represents a susceptibility factor for periodontitis, which is a known risk factor for increased CRP level. The aim was to investigate associations between PPARγ gene polymorphism, serum CRP level, BMI and/or periodontitis among post-menopausal Japanese women. The final sample in this study comprised 359 post-menopausal Japanese women. Periodontal parameters, including PD, CAL and BOP, were measured per tooth. PPARγPro12Ala genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP. Hs-CRP value was measured by a latex nephelometry assay. No significant differences in age, BMI or periodontal parameters were found between the genotypes. The percentages of sites with PD ≥ 4 mm were significantly higher among the hsCRP ≥ 1 mg/l group than the hsCRP < 1 mg/l group (p = 0.003). Positive correlations were found between serum hsCRP levels and the percentages of sites with PD ≥ 4 mm (p = 0.043) in PPARγ Ala allele carriers, and BMI (p = 0.033) in non-carriers. After adjustment for model covariates, BMI was significantly associated with serum hsCRP level. The PPARγPro12Ala polymorphism was not independently associated with periodontitis, serum CRP level or BMI in post-menopausal Japanese women. However, serum hsCRP level correlated with periodontitis in Ala allele carriers, and with BMI in non-carriers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen in Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis: A Clinico-Biochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Chandy, Swaroop; Joseph, Kiran; Sankaranarayanan, Anila; Issac, Annie; Babu, George; Wilson, Bobby; Joseph, Jumol

    2017-03-01

    Periodontal disease is characterised by chronic infection and inflammation in periodontal tissues leading to destruction of alveolar bone with subsequent tooth loss. Periodontal infections are the result of an interaction between tooth associated microbial biofilms and the host defences. Periodontal pathogens can affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to evaluate serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP), plasma fibrinogen and peripheral blood levels in healthy subjects, chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients. A total of 55 subjects, 27 males and 28 females were selected for the study. Blood samples were taken from healthy controls (n=20) and patients with chronic periodontitis (n=20) and aggressive periodontitis (n=15). The periodontal status of each patient was assessed by recording Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified (OHI-S), Bleeding Index (BI), Probing Pocket Depth (PPD) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). The levels of serum CRP were measured using high sensitivity Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and levels of plasma fibrinogen were measured using Quantitative Immunoturbidimetric assay. Data description was done in the form of mean and standard deviation and analysis of data was done using one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Students t-test to test the statistical significance between groups. The levels of serum CRP and plasma fibrinogen was increased in patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis when compared to healthy controls (p<0.001). A positive correlation was found to exist between levels of clinical parameters like OHI-S, BI, PPD and CAL when compared with CRP and fibrinogen as well as with the study groups. The finding of the present study suggests the role of serum as a diagnostic marker in inflammatory conditions and indicates that levels of CRP and fibrinogen may serve as important biomarkers for evaluating the association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d levels and C-reactive protein in persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine; Kobayashi, Jun; Johnson, C Anderson; Palmer, Paula H

    2013-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has frequently been associated with vitamin D deficiency as well as chronic inflammatory response. We tested the hypothesis of an independent relationship between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) in a cohort of HIV-positive people. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 316 HIV-positive people (181 men and 135 women) aged 16 to 60 years residing in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Serum high-sensitivity CRP concentrations and serum 25(OH)D levels were measured by the latex agglutination nephelometry method and the competitive protein-binding assay, respectively. The relationship between serum CRP concentrations and 25(OH)D serum level was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis with adjustment of potential cardiovascular and HIV-related factors. The proportions of participants with 25(OH)D serum levels <20 ng/ml, 20-30 ng/ml, and ≥30 ng/ml were 83.2%, 15.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. The mean 25(OH)D serum levels in men and women were 15.3 ng/ml and 14.4 ng/ml, respectively. Participants with a 25(OH)D serum level of <20 ng/ml had a 3.2-fold higher odds of high CRP (>3 mg/liter) compared to those with a 25(OH)D serum level of ≥20 ng/ml (p=0.005). Men and women with a 25(OH)D serum level of <20 ng/ml had 3.2- and 2.7-fold higher odds of high CRP (>3 mg/liter), respectively, compared to those with a 25(OH)D serum level of ≥20 ng/ml. The relationships remained significant only in men (p =0.02) but not in women (p=0.28). The risk of having a high level of inflammation (CRP>3 mg/liter) may be high among HIV-positive men and women with a 25(OH)D serum level of <20 ng/ml.

  7. How accurate are leukocyte indices and C-reactive protein for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Orlando; Ohlsson, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is often difficult to make. Treatment on the basis of clinical suspicion and risk factors may result in overtreatment. A previous review of the usefulness of C-reactive protein and leukocyte indices concluded that these test results should be interpreted with caution. The present paper reviews and, when appropriate, revises, in light of new information, the conclusions reached in the previous systematic review of the topic. PMID:20401235

  8. Effects of nutritional supplementation on periodontal parameters, carotenoid antioxidant levels, and serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Cheema, Abida T; Zingale, Joseph A; Chambers, David W; Lundergan, William P

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of nutrition in periodontal disease. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of a nutritional supplement on gingival inflammation, bleeding, probing depth, clinical attachment level, carotenoid antioxidant level, and C-reactive protein. The test supplement, consisting of a standard multivitamin formula, as well as several phytonutrients associated with antiinflammatory/antioxidant effects, provided modest benefits in reducing inflammation; however, further studies with larger populations and longer intervention are warranted.

  9. Acetylsalicylic acid is compounding to antiplatelet effect of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Rozalski, Marcin; Golanski, Jacek; Rychlik, Blazej; Watala, Cezary

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of inflammatory process to the modulation of platelet response to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) remains obscure. In our study, we examined the in vitro effect of C-reactive protein (CRP) on the ASA-mediated inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet reactivity. Influence of CRP on platelet responsiveness to ASA was analysed using classical turbidimetric aggregation and flow cytometry. When acting alone, both C-reactive protein and ASA inhibited collagen-dependent platelet aggregation and reduced the expressions of two platelet surface membrane activation markers: P-selectin and activated GPIIbIIIa complex. Compared to the effects observed for ASA alone, the simultaneous action of both agents lead to further reductions in platelet aggregation (by 56.7+/-1.0% vs. 14.9+/-0.6%, p<0.0001) and lowered the expressions of platelet surface membrane P-selectin (by 72.1+/-5.3% vs. 65.0+/-6.0%, p<0.01) and activated GPIIbIIIa (by 67.0+/-5.6% vs. 47.7+/-8.3%, p<0.01). In general, our findings showed for the first time the augmenting effect of native C-reactive protein in the antiplatelet action of acetylsalicylic acid. Thus, we conclude that the effectiveness of aspirin therapy may strongly depend upon the presence of native CRP in circulation.

  10. The analysis of false prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (activator: silica): Interference of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Li, Fanfan; Shu, Kuangyi; Chen, Tao; Wang, Xiaoou; Xie, Yaoqi; Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhaohua; Jin, Susu; Jiang, Minghua

    2018-05-13

    To investigate the effect of C-reactive protein on the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (different activators) in different detecting systems. The C-reactive protein and coagulation test of 112 patients with the infectious disease were determined by automation protein analyzer IMMAG 800 and automation coagulation analyzer STA-R Evolution, respectively. The pooled plasma APTT with different concentrations of C-reactive protein was measured by different detecting system: STA-R Evolution (activator: silica, kaolin), Sysmex CS-2000i (activator: ellagic acid), and ACL TOP 700 (activator: colloidal silica). In addition, the self-made platelet lysate (phospholipid) was added to correct the APTT prolonged by C-reactive protein (150 mg/L) on STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The good correlation between C-reactive protein and APTT was found on the STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The APTT on the STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system was prolonged by 24.6 second, along with increasing C-reactive protein concentration. And the APTT of plasma containing 150 mg/L C-reactive protein was shortened by 3.4-6.9 second when the plasma was mixed with self-made platelet lysate. However, the APTT was prolonged unobviously on other detecting systems including STA-R Evolution (activator: kaolin), Sysmex CS-2000i, and ACL TOP 700. C-reactive protein interferes with the detection of APTT, especially in STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The increasing in C-reactive protein results in a false prolongation of the APTT (activator: silica), and it is most likely that C-reactive protein interferes the coagulable factor binding of phospholipid. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-Pore Size Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a pore size/pore area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the pore size of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-pore area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing pore-size and non-pore area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily. PMID:28406469

  12. C-reactive protein predicts further ischemic events in first-ever transient ischemic attack or stroke patients with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Arenillas, Juan F; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Molina, Carlos A; Chacón, Pilar; Montaner, Joan; Rovira, Alex; Ibarra, Bernardo; Quintana, Manuel

    2003-10-01

    The role of inflammation in intracranial large-artery occlusive disease is unclear. We sought to investigate the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the risk of further ischemic events in first-ever transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke patients with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease. Of a total of 127 consecutive first-ever TIA or ischemic stroke patients with intracranial stenoses detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, 71 fulfilled all inclusion criteria, which included angiographic confirmation. Serum high-sensitivity CRP level was determined a minimum of 3 months after the qualifying event. Patients were followed up during 1 year after blood sampling. Thirteen patients (18.3%) with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease experienced an end point event: 9 cerebral ischemic events, 7 of which were attributable to intracranial large-artery occlusive disease, and 4 myocardial infarctions. Patients in the highest quintile of high-sensitivity CRP level had a significantly higher adjusted odds ratio for new events compared with those in the first quintile (odds ratio, 8.66; 95% CI, 1.39 to 53.84; P=0.01). A high-sensitivity CRP level above the receiver operating characteristic curve cutoff value of 1.41 mg/dL emerged as an independent predictor of new end point events (hazard ratio, 7.14; 95% CI, 1.77 to 28.73; P=0.005) and of further intracranial large-artery occlusive disease-related ischemic events (hazard ratio, 30.67; 95% CI, 3.6 to 255.5; P=0.0015), after adjustment for age, sex, and risk factors. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that a significantly lower proportion of patients with a high-sensitivity CRP >1.41 mg/dL remained free of a new ischemic event (P<0.0001). High-sensitivity CRP serum level predicts further intracranial large-artery occlusive disease-related and any major ischemic events in patients with first-ever TIA or stroke with intracranial large-artery occlusive disease. These findings

  13. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids, and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Rahul S; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; McEvoy, Linda K; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S; Brewer, James B; Hess, Christopher P; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L; van der Lee, Sven J; Psaty, Bruce M; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R; Sando, Sigrid B; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2015-06-09

    Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD), inflammation, and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Using summary statistics (P values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of >200 000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides, and high- and low-density lipoprotein levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD single-nucleotide polymorphisms for different levels of association with C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride single-nucleotide polymorphisms using a false discovery rate threshold <0.05. By conditioning on polymorphisms associated with the 4 phenotypes, we identified 55 loci associated with increased AD risk. We then conducted a meta-analysis of these 55 variants across 4 independent AD cohorts (total: n=29 054 AD cases and 114 824 healthy controls) and discovered 2 genome-wide significant variants on chromosome 4 (rs13113697; closest gene, HS3ST1; odds ratio=1.07; 95% confidence interval=1.05-1.11; P=2.86×10(-8)) and chromosome 10 (rs7920721; closest gene, ECHDC3; odds ratio=1.07; 95% confidence interval=1.04-1.11; P=3.38×10(-8)). We also found that gene expression of HS3ST1 and ECHDC3 was altered in AD brains compared with control brains. We demonstrate genetic overlap between AD, C-reactive protein, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci, including 2 genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for AD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of the C-reactive protein serum levels in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Kaustubh S; Deo, Vikas; Bhongade, Manohar L

    2010-01-01

    Several studies suggested an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). C- reactive protein is elevated in periodontitis patients and has been found to be a predictor of increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Since, CRP is known to play a role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum levels of CRP in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis. A total of 45 patients, 15 chronic periodontitis patients with atherosclerosis (Group A), 15 chronic periodontitis patients with no history of any systemic disease (Group B), and 15 clinically healthy individuals with no history of periodontal or systemic disease (Group C) within age range of 30 to 55 years were selected for the study. PI, PBI, PPD, CAL and radiographic marginal alveolar bone level were assessed in all the three groups. CRP levels were assessed with 'Turbi-latex' kit using turbidimetric analysis. The mean CAL recorded was 4.9mm in group A, 4.6mm in group B and 1.9 mm in group C. The mean radiographic marginal bone level was 45 to 50% in group A, 45 to 50% in group B and 90 to 95% in group C. Mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in group A (8.9 mg/l), as compared to group B (4.9 mg/l) as well as group C (0.9 mg/l). Within the limits of this study it was concluded that periodontitis may add to the inflammatory burden of the individual and may result in increased risk of atherosclerosis based on serum C-reactive protein concentrations.

  15. No effect of C-reactive protein on early atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E*3-leiden/human C-reactive protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Trion, A; de Maat, M P M; Jukema, J W; van der Laarse, A; Maas, M C; Offerman, E H; Havekes, L M; Szalai, A J; Princen, H M G; Emeis, J J

    2005-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. It is not clear whether CRP is causally involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Mouse CRP is not expressed at high levels under normal conditions and increases in concentration only several-fold during an acute phase response. Because the dynamic range of human CRP is much larger, apolipoprotein E*3-Leiden (E3L) transgenic mice carrying the human CRP gene offer a unique model to study the role(s) of CRP in atherosclerosis development. Atherosclerosis development was studied in 15 male and 15 female E3L/CRP mice; E3L transgenic littermates were used as controls. The mice were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet to induce atherosclerosis development. Cholesterol exposure did not differ between E3L/CRP and E3L mice. Plasma CRP levels were on average 10.2+/-6.5 mg/L in male E3L/CRP mice, 0.2+/-0.1 mg/L in female E3L/CRP mice, and undetectable in E3L mice. Quantification of atherosclerosis showed that lesion area in E3L/CRP mice was not different from that in E3L mice. This study demonstrates that mildly elevated levels of CRP in plasma do not contribute to the development of early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic E3L/CRP mice.

  16. A fluorescent immunoassay for the determination of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Bolzoni, L.; Giannetti, A.; Porro, G.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2009-05-01

    The discrimination of viral and bacterial sepsis is an important issue in intensive care patients. For this purpose, the simultaneous measurements of different analytes such as C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), myeloperoxidase, interleukines and neopterin, are necessary. A novel optical platform was designed and realised for the implementation of fluorescence-based immunoassays. The core of the optical platform is a plastic biochip, formed by a series of microchannels each of them devoted to the determination of a single analyte. Sandwich assays for CRP and PCT spiked in serum were performed in order to demonstrate the reliability of a multi-array device.

  17. C-Reactive Protein and Resistance Exercise in Community Dwelling Old Adults.

    PubMed

    Ramel, A; Geirsdottir, O G; Jonsson, P V; Thorsdottiri, I

    2015-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase reactant, has been associated with atherosclerosis and has also been discussed as a target for intervention. The effects of resistance exercise on CRP are currently not clear. The present analysis investigated the response of CRP to resistance exercise in old adults. Intervention study. Community. Old Icelandic adults (N = 235, 73.7 ± 5.7 years, 58.2% female). Twelve-week resistance exercise program (3 times/week; 3 sets, 6-8 repetitions at 75-80% of the 1-repetition maximum) designed to increase strength and muscle mass of major muscle groups. C-reactive protein (CRP). Mean CRP levels were 7.1 ± 4.6 mg/dL at baseline, thirty-six (15.6%) subjects had abnormally high CRP (>10 mg/L) values at baseline. After the resistance exercise program the overall changes in CRP were minor and not significant. However, CRP decreased considerably in participants with high CRP at baseline (-4.28 ± 9.41 mg/L; P = 0.015) but increased slightly in participants with normal CRP (0.81 ± 4.58 mg/L, P = 0.021). Our study shows that the concentrations of circulating CRP decreased considerably after a 12-week resistance exercise program in participants with abnormally high CRP at baseline, possibly reducing thus risk for future disease. CRP changed little in participants with normal CRP at the start of the study.

  18. Protein-C Reactive as Biomarker Predictor of Schizophrenia Phases of Illness? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Sarchione, Fabiola; Vellante, Federica; Fornaro, Michele; Matarazzo, Ilaria; Martinotti, Giovanni; Valchera, Alessandro; Di Nicola, Marco; Carano, Alessandro; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Perna, Giampaolo; Olivieri, Luigi; De Berardis, Domenico

    2018-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex illness in which genetic, environmental, and epigenetic components have been implicated. However, recently, psychiatric disorders appear to be related to a chronic inflammatory state, at the level of specific cerebral areas which have been found as well impaired and responsible for schizophrenia symptomatology. Hence, a role of inflammatory mediators and cytokines has been as well defined. Accordingly, the role of an acute inflammatory phase protein, the C-reactive protein (CRP) has been recently investigated. The objective of the present study is to evaluate how PCR may represent a biomarker in schizophrenia, i.e. correlated with illness phases and/or clinical manifestation and/or psychopathological severity. A systematic review was here carried out by searching the following keywords ((C-reactive protein AND ((schizophrenia) OR (psychotic disorder))) for the topics 'PCR' and 'Schizophrenia', by using MESH terms. An immune dysfunction and inflammation have been described amongst schizophrenic patients. Findings reported elevated CRP levels in schizophrenia, mainly correlated with the severity of illness and during the recrudescent phase. CRP levels are higher when catatonic features, negative symptomatology and aggressiveness are associated. CRP levels appeared not to be related to suicidal behaviour and ideation. CRP and its blood levels have been reported higher amongst schizophrenic patients, by suggesting a role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Further studies are needed to better understand if CRP may be considered a biomarker in schizophrenia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Association of canine obesity with reduced serum levels of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Angela P M; Price, Christopher A; de Oliveira, Simone T; Dos Santos, Andréa P; Campos, Rómulo; Barbosa, Patricia R; González, Félix H D

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing in dogs as well as in humans. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important tool for the detection of inflammation and/or early tissue damage and is linked to obesity in humans. The objective of the present study was to determine if serum CRP levels are altered in obese dogs. Fifteen lean (control group) and 16 overweight (obese group) dogs were examined. Blood samples were collected under fasted conditions for serum determination of CRP, glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, and fructosamine. Results indicated that obese dogs were insulin resistant because serum insulin and insulin/glucose ratios were higher than in lean dogs (P < or = 0.05). Serum CRP concentrations were lower in obese dogs than in controls (P < or = 0.001). C-reactive protein was negatively correlated with insulin/glucose ratio (R = -0.42) and cholesterol (R = -0.39; P < or = 0.05). Furthermore, levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and fructosamine were increased in the obese group compared with the control group. Based on these results, it can be postulated that CRP production is inhibited by obesity and insulin resistance in dogs.

  20. Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joy E; Neylan, Thomas C; Epel, Elissa; O'Donovan, Aoife

    2016-03-01

    Mounting evidence highlights specific forms of psychological stress as risk factors for ill health. Particularly strong evidence indicates that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma exposure increase risk for physical and psychiatric disorders, and there is emerging evidence that inflammation may play a key role in these relationships. In a population-based sample from the Health and Retirement Study (n=11,198, mean age 69 ± 10), we examine whether childhood adversity, adulthood trauma, and the interaction between them are associated with elevated levels of the systemic inflammatory marker high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, education, and year of data collection, as well as other possible confounds in follow-up sensitivity analyses. In our sample, 67% of individuals had experienced at least one traumatic event during adulthood, and those with childhood adversity were almost three times as likely to have experienced trauma as an adult. Childhood adversities and adulthood traumas were independently associated with elevated levels of hsCRP (β=0.03, p=0.01 and β=0.05, p<0.001, respectively). Those who had experienced both types of stress had higher levels of hsCRP than those with adulthood trauma alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [-0.003, -0.12], p=0.04, but not compared to those with childhood adversity alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [0.03, -0.16], p=0.19. There was no interaction between childhood and adulthood trauma exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine adulthood trauma exposure and inflammation in a large population-based sample, and the first to explore the interaction of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with inflammation. Our study demonstrates the prevalence of trauma-related inflammation in the general population and suggests that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma are independently associated with elevated inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. C-reactive protein is elevated in heart failure patients with central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    PubMed

    Schmalgemeier, Heidi; Bitter, Thomas; Fischbach, Thomas; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Manifestation of central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration is of major prognostic impact in chronic heart failure (CHF). Inflammatory processes have been linked to a progression of cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. While an association of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels to obstructive sleep apnea has been documented before, there is a lack of information regarding variation of CRP levels in patients with CSA. The objective of this study was to investigate a potential association of CRP levels to CSA severity in CHF patients. High sensitivity CRP levels were analyzed in 966 patients with CHF (BMI 26.3 ± 4.6, New York Heart Association class 2.6 ± 0.5, left ventricular ejection fraction 29.4 ± 7.9%, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, NT-proBNP, level 2,209 ± 3,315 pg/ml) without sleep-disordered breathing (SDB; Apnea-Hypopnea Index, AHI, <5/h) or various degrees of CSA, documented by in-hospital cardiorespiratory polygraphy or polysomnography. The CRP concentration in CHF patients was 0.550 ± 0.794 mg/dl in patients without SDB (AHI 0-4/h, n = 403) versus 0.488 ± 0.708 mg/dl in patients with mild CSA (AHI 5-14/h, n = 123, p = n.s.) and 0.660 ± 0.963 mg/dl in patients with moderate CSA (AHI 15-29/h, n = 160, p = n.s.). In patients with severe CSA (AHI ≥ 30/h, n = 280), significantly higher CRP concentrations were documented (0.893 ± 1.384 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Stepwise regression analysis revealed AHI, NT-proBNP and heart rate to be independently associated with elevated CRP levels. Severe CSA in CHF patients is associated with elevated levels of CRP, a systemic marker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk. This might explain in part the negative prognostic impact of CSA in these patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: a cross-sectional population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joy E.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Epel, Elissa; O’Donovan, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence highlights specific forms of psychological stress as risk factors for ill health. Particularly strong evidence indicates that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma exposure increase risk for physical and psychiatric disorders, and there is emerging evidence that inflammation may play a key role in these relationships. In a population-based sample from the Health and Retirement Study (n = 11,198, mean age 69 ± 10), we examine whether childhood adversity, adulthood trauma, and the interaction between them are associated with elevated levels of the systemic inflammatory marker high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, education, and year of data collection, as well as other possible confounds in follow-up sensitivity analyses. In our sample, 67% of individuals had experienced at least one traumatic event during adulthood, and those with childhood adversity were almost three times as likely to have experienced trauma as an adult. Childhood adversities and adulthood traumas were independently associated with elevated levels of hsCRP (β = 0.03, p = 0.01 and β = 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Those who had experienced both types of stress had higher levels of hsCRP than those with adulthood trauma alone, Estimate = −0.06, 95% CI [−0.003, −0.12], p = 0.04, but not compared to those with childhood adversity alone, Estimate = −0.06, 95% CI [0.03, −0.16], p = 0.19. There was no interaction between childhood and adulthood trauma exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine adulthood trauma exposure and inflammation in a large population-based sample, and the first to explore the interaction of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with inflammation. Our study demonstrates the prevalence of trauma-related inflammation in the general population and suggests that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma are independently associated with elevated inflammation. PMID:26616398

  3. The association of C-reactive protein with subclinical cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women.

    PubMed

    Moran, Caitlin A; Sheth, Anandi N; Mehta, C Christina; Hanna, David B; Gustafson, Deborah R; Plankey, Michael W; Mack, Wendy J; Tien, Phyllis C; French, Audrey L; Golub, Elizabeth T; Quyyumi, Arshed; Kaplan, Robert C; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2018-05-15

    HIV is a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. However, CVD risk is often underestimated in HIV-infected women. C-reactive protein (CRP) may improve CVD prediction in this population. We examined the association of baseline plasma CRP with subclinical CVD in women with and without HIV. Retrospective cohort study. A total of 572 HIV-infected and 211 HIV-uninfected women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study underwent serial high-resolution B-mode carotid artery ultrasonography between 2004 and 2013 to assess carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and focal carotid artery plaques. We used multivariable linear and logistic regression models to assess the association of baseline high (≥3 mg/l) high-sensitivity (hs) CRP with baseline CIMT and focal plaques, and used multivariable linear and Poisson regression models for the associations of high hsCRP with CIMT change and focal plaque progression. We stratified our analyses by HIV status. Median (interquartile range) hsCRP was 2.2 mg/l (0.8-5.3) in HIV-infected, and 3.2 mg/l (0.9-7.7) in HIV-uninfected, women (P = 0.005). There was no statistically significant association of hsCRP with baseline CIMT [adjusted mean difference -3.5 μm (95% confidence interval:-19.0 to 12.1)] or focal plaques [adjusted odds ratio: 1.31 (0.67-2.67)], and no statistically significant association of hsCRP with CIMT change [adjusted mean difference 11.4 μm (-2.3 to 25.1)]. However, hsCRP at least 3 mg/l was positively associated with focal plaque progression in HIV-uninfected [adjusted rate ratio: 5.97 (1.46-24.43)], but not in HIV-infected [adjusted rate ratio: 0.81 (0.47-1.42)] women (P = 0.042 for interaction). In our cohort of women with similar CVD risk factors, higher baseline hsCRP is positively associated with carotid plaque progression in HIV-uninfected, but not HIV-infected, women, suggesting that subclinical CVD pathogenesis may be different HIV-infected women.

  4. Population-based study of high plasma C-reactive protein concentrations among the Inuit of Nunavik

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Marie-Eve; Dewailly, Eric; Chateau-Degat, Marie-Ludivine; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Background The shift away from traditional lifestyle in the Inuit population over the past few decades has been associated with an increased prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure (BP) and diabetes. However, the impact of this transition on the pro-inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has not been documented. Objectives To examine the prevalence of elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations in Inuit from Nunavik in the province of Quebec (Canada) and identify anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle risk factors associated with elevated hs-CRP. Design A population-representative sample of 801 Inuit residents from 14 villages of Nunavik, aged between 18 and 74 years, was included in the analyses. Subjects participated in a clinical session and completed questionnaires on lifestyle. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for elevated hs-CRP. Results Elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥2 mg/L) were present in 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5–35.8) of the Inuit adult population and were more prevalent among women than among men (36.7% vs. 29.0%, p=0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01–1.04). The combination of older age (≥50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8–30.9). Conclusions These data indicate that elevated hs-CRP is relatively prevalent among Inuit with values that are similar to those seen in Canadian Caucasian populations. Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from

  5. Population-based study of high plasma C-reactive protein concentrations among the Inuit of Nunavik.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Marie-Eve; Dewailly, Eric; Chateau-Degat, Marie-Ludivine; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    The shift away from traditional lifestyle in the Inuit population over the past few decades has been associated with an increased prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure (BP) and diabetes. However, the impact of this transition on the pro-inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has not been documented. To examine the prevalence of elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations in Inuit from Nunavik in the province of Quebec (Canada) and identify anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle risk factors associated with elevated hs-CRP. A population-representative sample of 801 Inuit residents from 14 villages of Nunavik, aged between 18 and 74 years, was included in the analyses. Subjects participated in a clinical session and completed questionnaires on lifestyle. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for elevated hs-CRP. Elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥ 2 mg/L) were present in 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5-35.8) of the Inuit adult population and were more prevalent among women than among men (36.7% vs. 29.0%, p=0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04). The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8-30.9). These data indicate that elevated hs-CRP is relatively prevalent among Inuit with values that are similar to those seen in Canadian Caucasian populations. Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle

  6. Maternal serum C-reactive protein concentration and intra-amniotic inflammation in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Ivana; Kacerovsky, Marian; Stepan, Martin; Bestvina, Tomas; Pliskova, Lenka; Zednikova, Barbora; Jacobsson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in pregnancies complicated by preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) in relation to the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and/or intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI). Two hundred and eighty-seven women with singleton pregnancies complicated by PPROM between 2014 and 2016 were included in this study. Maternal blood and amniotic fluid samples were collected at the time of admission. Maternal serum CRP concentration was measured using a high-sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration was measured using a point-of-care test. MIAC was diagnosed based on a positive polymerase chain reaction result for Ureaplasma species, Mycoplasma hominis, and/or Chlamydia trachomatis and for the 16S rRNA gene. IAI was characterized by an amniotic fluid IL-6 concentration of ≥ 745 pg/mL. Women with MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP concentrations than did women without (with MIAC: median 6.9 mg/L vs. without MIAC: median 4.9 mg/L; p = 0.02; with IAI: median 8.6 mg/L vs. without IAI: median 4.7 mg/L; p < 0.0001). When women were split into four subgroups based on the presence of MIAC and/or IAI, women with the presence of both MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP than did women with IAI alone, with MIAC alone, and women without MIAC and IAI (both MIAC and IAI: median: 13.1 mg/L; IAI alone: 6.0 mg/L; MIAC alone: 3.9 mg/L; and without MIAC and IAI: median 4.8 mg/L; p < 0.0001). The maternal serum CRP cutoff value of 17.5 mg/L was the best level to identify the presence of both MIAC and IAI, with sensitivity of 47%, specificity of 96%, positive predictive value of 42%, negative predictive value of 96%, and the positive likelihood ratio of 10.9. The presence of both MIAC and IAI was associated with the highest maternal serum CRP concentrations. Maternal serum CRP concentration in women with PPROM at the time of admission can rule out the presence

  7. Maternal serum C-reactive protein concentration and intra-amniotic inflammation in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Musilova, Ivana; Stepan, Martin; Bestvina, Tomas; Pliskova, Lenka; Zednikova, Barbora; Jacobsson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in pregnancies complicated by preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) in relation to the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and/or intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI). Methods Two hundred and eighty-seven women with singleton pregnancies complicated by PPROM between 2014 and 2016 were included in this study. Maternal blood and amniotic fluid samples were collected at the time of admission. Maternal serum CRP concentration was measured using a high-sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration was measured using a point-of-care test. MIAC was diagnosed based on a positive polymerase chain reaction result for Ureaplasma species, Mycoplasma hominis, and/or Chlamydia trachomatis and for the 16S rRNA gene. IAI was characterized by an amniotic fluid IL-6 concentration of ≥ 745 pg/mL. Result Women with MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP concentrations than did women without (with MIAC: median 6.9 mg/L vs. without MIAC: median 4.9 mg/L; p = 0.02; with IAI: median 8.6 mg/L vs. without IAI: median 4.7 mg/L; p < 0.0001). When women were split into four subgroups based on the presence of MIAC and/or IAI, women with the presence of both MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP than did women with IAI alone, with MIAC alone, and women without MIAC and IAI (both MIAC and IAI: median: 13.1 mg/L; IAI alone: 6.0 mg/L; MIAC alone: 3.9 mg/L; and without MIAC and IAI: median 4.8 mg/L; p < 0.0001). The maternal serum CRP cutoff value of 17.5 mg/L was the best level to identify the presence of both MIAC and IAI, with sensitivity of 47%, specificity of 96%, positive predictive value of 42%, negative predictive value of 96%, and the positive likelihood ratio of 10.9. Conclusion The presence of both MIAC and IAI was associated with the highest maternal serum CRP concentrations. Maternal serum CRP concentration in women with PPROM at the time of

  8. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and C reactive protein among middle-aged community residents: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Isao; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Sato, Shinichi; Shimamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Masamitsu; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-06-01

    There are conflicting results for the association between obstructive sleep apnoea and raised C reactive protein (CRP) levels. A study was undertaken to investigate whether nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, a surrogate marker for obstructive sleep apnoea, was associated with CRP levels among a community-dwelling Japanese population. Among participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS), 1422 male and 2466 female community residents aged 40-69 years were tested during sleep. No nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia were defined using 3% oxygen desaturation index cut-off points at 5 and 15 events/h, respectively. High-sensitivity CRP levels were measured using a latex particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. Multivariate analysis was adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, current alcohol intake, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus and menopausal status for women. Multivariable-adjusted mean CRP levels among men were 0.70 mg/l (95% CI 0.65 to 0.75) for no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.74 to 0.89) for mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and 0.84 mg/l (95% CI 0.70 to 1.00) for moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (p for trend=0.03). The values for women were 0.59 mg/l (95% CI 0.57 to 0.62), 0.66 mg/l (95% CI 0.59 to 0.73) and 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.62 to 1.03), respectively (p for trend=0.008). Compared with no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, the prevalence of a high CRP level (>or=1.0 mg/l) was 1.4-1.7-fold higher for mild to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia in both sexes. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia is associated with raised serum CRP levels among middle-aged Japanese subjects.

  9. Effect of Serum C-Reactive Protein Level on Admission to Predict Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Yamamoto, Masanori; Naganuma, Toru; Araki, Motoharu; Tada, Norio; Shirai, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Higashimori, Akihiro; Mizutani, Kazuki; Tabata, Minoru; Takagi, Kensuke; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2018-04-12

    The relation between C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains unclear. To evaluate the impact of serum CRP level on mortality after TAVI, we assessed 1,016 patients with CRP who underwent TAVI and 538 patients with high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) level who underwent TAVI on admission in the OCEAN (Optimized Transcatheter Valvular Intervention)-TAVI registry. Study population was stratified into 2 groups (high/low), according to the median of CRP and hs-CRP on admission. We assessed the impact of high CRP and hs-CRP level on all-cause death after TAVI. During 2-year follow-up, all-cause death after TAVI was 9.4% in patients with CRP and 11.9% in patients with hs-CRP. Median value of serum CRP was 0.10 mg/dl in both CRP and hs-CRP. Patients with high CRP (>0.10 mg/dl) had significantly higher incidence of all-cause death compared with those with low CRP (11.5% vs 7.6%, log-rank p = 0.015). Multivariate Cox regression analysis with a time-varying covariate demonstrated that high CRP was an independent predictor of all-cause death within the first 3 months (hazard ratio 2.78, 95% CI 1.30 to 5.95) compared with from 3 months to 2 years (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.36) (P for interaction = 0.008). Inversely, these results were not observed in the stratification using hs-CRP on admission. In conclusion, high CRP on admission was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause death after TAVI, particularly within the first 3 months after TAVI. Risk stratification using CRP may be a simple and useful strategy to identify high-risk patients who undergo TAVI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Reimann, M J; Ljungvall, I; Hillström, A; Møller, J E; Hagman, R; Falk, T; Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Olsen, L H

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent. The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum concentrations of CRP, determined using a novel automated canine-specific high-sensitivity CRP assay (Gentian hsCRP), were associated with severity of MMVD and selected clinical variables in dogs. The study included 188 client-owned dogs with different severities of MMVD. Dogs were classified based on ACVIM consensus statement guidelines (group A, n = 58; group B1, n = 56; group B2, n = 38; group C, n = 36). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF; group C) had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 2.65 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, 1.09-5.09) compared to dogs in groups A (median, 0.97 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.97; P = 0.001), B1 (median, 0.78 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.73, P <0.0001) and B2 (median, 0.60 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.23; P <0.0001). Other variables reflecting disease severity, including left atrial to aortic root ratio (P = 0.0002, adjusted r(2) = 0.07) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter normalised for bodyweight (P = 0.0005, adjusted r(2) = 0.06), were positively associated with CRP concentration, but the association disappeared if dogs with CHF were excluded from analysis. In conclusion, slightly higher CRP concentrations were found in dogs with CHF whereas severity of asymptomatic MMVD showed no association with CRP concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. C-reactive protein +1444CT (rs1130864) genetic polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus and C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Delongui, Francieli; Lozovoy, Marcell Allyson Batisti; Iriyoda, Tatiana Mayiumi Veiga; Costa, Neide Tomimura; Stadtlober, Nicole Perugini; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Flauzino, Tamires; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2017-08-01

    The T rare allele of +1444CT (rs1130864) polymorphism of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with increased CRP levels in some inflammatory conditions, but its role on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility and on CRP levels in SLE patients remains uncertain. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between the rs1130864 CRP polymorphism with SLE susceptibility, disease activity, and CRP levels in SLE Brazilian patients. The study enrolled 176 SLE patients and 137 controls. SLE disease activity was assessed using the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). The rs1130864 CRP polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. SLE patients presented higher body mass index (p = 0.046) and CRP levels (p = 0.017) than controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of patients differed from controls [CC vs. CT = odds ratio (OR) 1.730, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.068-2.803, p = 0.035; CC vs. TT = OR 3.667, 95% CI 1.410-9.533, p = 0.009; C vs. T = OR 1.883, 95% CI 1.299-2.728, p = 0.001)]. Patients carrying the T allele presented higher CRP levels (p = 0.009), were more frequent Caucasians (p = 0.018), and with no use of immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.004) than those carrying the C allele. However, the SLEDAI and anti-double-stranded DNA positivity did not differ from those carrying T vs. C allele (p = 0.595 and p = 0.243, respectively). The rs1130864 CRP polymorphism was associated with SLE susceptibility and CRP levels, but not with disease activity, suggesting that this polymorphism may play a role in the pathophysiology of SLE through increasing the CRP that, probably, plays an inflammatory role in SLE pathophysiology.

  12. Mollusc C-reactive protein crosses species barrier and reverses hepatotoxicity of lead in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Agarwal, Soumik; Kundu, Rakesh; Maitra, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2013-08-01

    Achatina fulica C-reactive protein (ACRP) reversed the toxic effects of lead nitrate both in vivo in mice and in vitro in rat hepatocytes restoring the basal level of cell viability, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and superoxides. Cytotoxicity was also significantly ameliorated in rat hepatocytes by in vitro pre-treatments with individual subunits (60, 62, 90 and 110 kDa) of ACRP. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining showed significant reduction in the number of apoptotic hepatocytes pre-treated with ACRP. ACRP induced restoration of mitochondrial membrane potential was remarkable. ACRP pre-treatment prevented Pb-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. The antagonistic effect of ACRP may be due to scavenging of reactive oxygen species which maintained the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status. The results suggest that ACRP crosses the species barrier and it may be utilized as a viable exogenous agent of cytoprotection against heavy metal related toxicity.

  13. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    PubMed

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  14. Effect of turpentine oil on C-reactive protein (CRP) production in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Liu, Youchang; Iwasaki, Tadashi; Watarai, Shinobu; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    The effect of turpentine oil on C-reactive protein (CRP) production was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Serum CRP concentration was estimated by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using anti-rainbow trout CRP monoclonal antibody (mAb) AC4 and polyclonal antibody. Intracellular CRP was demonstrated by flow cytometry using anti-trout CRP mAb. Hepatocytes, head kidney macrophages, spleen lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes showed reaction against AC4, but RTG-2 fibroblastic line cells, derived from rainbow trout gonad did not. This is the first report on the detection of intracellular CRP in fish. CRP levels decreased significantly 1 day after intramuscular injection of turpentine oil and remained low for 14 days. Significant decreases in the expression of CRP in hepatocytes, head kidney macrophages and spleen lymphocytes after injection of turpentine oil were found. The reduction of serum CRP concentration after turpentine oil injection may be attributed to decreases in intracellular CRP synthesis.

  15. Discriminatory potential of C-reactive protein, cytokines, and fecal markers in infectious gastroenteritis in adults.

    PubMed

    Weh, Julia; Antoni, Christoph; Weiß, Christel; Findeisen, Peter; Ebert, Matthias; Böcker, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluates potential markers in blood and stools for their ability to distinguish bacterial from viral gastroenteritis. A total of 108 patients were prospectively recruited, of which 27 showed bacterial, 30 viral, and 51 no detectable pathogen, respectively. Cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells as well as the 2 fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin were determined. Statistics comprised Kruskal-Wallis test and U test in addition to an assessment of receiver operating characteristic. Interferon γ (IFNγ) levels were significantly increased in the viral group compared to the bacterial and nonspecific group. For the bacterial group, both fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin as well as CRP were significantly higher in comparison to the other 2 groups. To differentiate between bacterial and viral gastroenteritis, CRP, serum IFNγ, and the fecal proteins lactoferrin and calprotectin may be useful. A corresponding algorithm should be evaluated prospectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and its Association with Periodontal Disease: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Tushika; Pandey, Anita; D, Deepa; Asthana, Ashish K

    2014-07-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of the gums characterised by a loss of attachment between the tooth and bone, and bone loss. C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation is a part of the acute phase response to acute and chronic inflammation. Many epidemiological studies have shown that serum CRP levels were elevated in patients with chronic periodontitis. CRP levels increase to hundreds of μg/ml within hours following infection. It out-performs erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in terms of responsiveness and specificity for inflammation. While CRP elevation is suggestive of inflammation or infection in the appropriate clinical context, it can also occur with obesity and renal dysfunction. Conversely, a lack of CRP elevation in inflammation may be seen with hepatic failure, as well as during flares of conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. Association between C-reactive Protein and Depressive Symptoms in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Carissa A.; Cunningham, Amy Lynn; Kao, Amy H.; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; Kuller, Lewis H.; Wasko, Mary Chester M.

    2009-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence support an association between systemic inflammation and depressive symptoms. Neuroimmune pathways may account for the high prevalence of depression in individuals with inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, this relationship is complicated by factors linked to both inflammatory disease activity and mood, such as pain and physical disability. The goal of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and depressive symptoms among 173 women with RA. Somatic symptoms of depression and circulating CRP were significantly associated in regression analyses adjusted for body mass index (β= .19, p < 0.05), but this relationship was attenuated when pain and disability were included as covariates (β= .09, p = 0.24). CRP was not significantly associated with negative mood symptoms of depression. Findings suggest that depression in the context of RA may result from the overlap of somatic depressive and RA symptoms rather than neuroimmune pathways. PMID:19428978

  18. On-chip determination of C-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Phurimsak, Chayakom; Tarn, Mark D; Peyman, Sally A; Greenman, John; Pamme, Nicole

    2014-11-04

    We demonstrate the application of a multilaminar flow platform, in which functionalized magnetic particles are deflected through alternating laminar flow streams of reagents and washing solutions via an external magnet, for the rapid detection of the inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP). The two-step sandwich immunoassay was accomplished in less than 60 s, a vast improvement on the 80-300 min time frame required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the 50 min necessary for off-chip magnetic particle-based assays. The combination of continuous flow and a stationary magnet enables a degree of autonomy in the system, while a detection limit of 0.87 μg mL(-1) makes it suitable for the determination of CRP concentrations in clinical diagnostics. Its applicability was further proven by assaying real human serum samples and comparing those results to values obtained using standard ELISA tests.

  19. Extreme Sleep Durations and Increased C-Reactive Protein: Effects of Sex and Ethnoracial Group

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Jackson, Nicholas; Sands-Lincoln, Megan; Pandey, Abhishek; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesize that extremes of sleep duration are associated with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker for cardiovascular disease risk. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Population-based research. Participants: Nationally representative sample of 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (n = 5,587 adults). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Associations between CRP and self-reported total sleep time (TST) were examined. Explanatory models considered contributions of sex, age, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), and BMI squared (BMI2). Models also explored the role of insomnia symptoms, sleep apnea, active medical illness, and antidiabetic/antihypertensive treatment. Differential patterns among race/ethnicity groups were examined using interactions and stratified analyses. Nonlinear relationships between CRP and TST were assessed using polynomial and multinomial regression models (< 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and > 9 h). Linear and squared terms were significant in all models in the complete sample, with notable differences by sex and ethnoracial group. Overall, in models adjusted for sociodemographics and BMI, different patterns were observed for non-Hispanic white (elevated CRP for < 5 h and > 9 h), black/African-American (elevated CRP for < 5 h and 8 h), Hispanic/Latino (elevated CRP for > 9 h), and Asian/ Other (higher in 9 and > 9 h and lower in 5 h and 6 h) groups. Ethnoracial groups also demonstrated patterning by sex. Conclusion: In a representative sample of American adults, elevated CRP was associated with extreme sleep durations. Sex, race/ethnicity, sleep disorders, and medical comorbidity influenced these associations. Differences in CRP along these dimensions should be considered in future research on sleep related disparities influencing cardiometabolic disease risk. Citation: Grandner MA; Buxton OM; Jackson N; Sands M; Pandey A; Jean-Louis G. Extreme sleep durations and

  20. Preparation of canine C-reactive protein serum reference material: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Canalias, Francesca; Piñeiro, Matilde; Pato, Raquel; Peña, Raquel; Bosch, Lluís; Soler, Lourdes; García, Natalia; Lampreave, Fermín; Saco, Yolanda; Bassols, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The availability of a species-specific reference material is essential for the harmonization of results obtained in different laboratories by different methods. We describe the preparation of a canine C-reactive protein (cCRP) serum reference material containing purified cCRP stabilized in a serum matrix. The material can be used by manufacturers to assign values to their calibrator and control materials. The serum matrix was obtained using blood collected from healthy dogs, stabilized and submitted for a delipidation process. The reference material was prepared by diluting purified cCRP in the serum matrix containing 1.0 mol/L HEPES buffer, 3.0 mmol/L calcium chloride, 80,000 kUI/L aprotinin, and 1.0 mmol/L benzamidine hydrochloride monohydrate at a pH of 7.2, and dispensing (0.5 mL) the matrix into vials that were then frozen. The pilot batch of 200 vials was shown to be homogeneous and stable after a stability study at various temperatures and over a total time of 110 days. The prepared material was submitted to an assignment value study. Eight laboratories from different European countries participated by using the same reagents for an immunoturbidimetric method adapted for different analyzers. The obtained cCRP concentration in the reference material was 78.5 mg/L with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 4.2 mg/L. Canine C-reactive protein serum reference material has been produced that allows harmonization of results obtained by different methods and different laboratories, thus reducing the possibility of errors and misunderstandings. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  1. Correlation of C-reactive protein to severity of symptoms in acute influenza A infection

    PubMed Central

    Haran, John P; Suner, Selim; Gardiner, Fenwick

    2012-01-01

    Background: Currently there is no objective measure to determine disease severity in patients with acute influenza infection. During acute viral infections, C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be elevated. Aim: To study the relationship between the symptoms of acute influenza A infection and correlate them with the level of inflammation as measured by serum CRP levels. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: We enrolled a convenience sample of adults presenting to an urban academic emergency department (ED), who had positive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of the influenza A antigen. The subjects were excluded if they had immunosuppression, liver disease or were currently taking antiviral medication. A previously validated severity of symptom (SOS) score was calculated by asking the participants to record the severity of seven symptoms associated with influenza infection. The subjects had the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels tested during their ED visit. Statistical Analysis: A linear regression model was used with CRP as a predictor of the SOS score. Pearson's product-moment coefficient was used to measure the dependence between the two quantities. Results: Thirty-two subjects were enrolled from January through March 2009, and of those, eight patients were excluded from the analysis, leaving 24 study subjects: 58% were women, of ages 18 to 63 years, with a mean age of 31 years (95% CI 25, 37). The mean SOS score was 14.1 ranging from 6 to 21 (95% CI 12.6, 26.4). The mean CRP score was 24.6 ranging from 0 to 64.7 (95% CI 15.8, 33.4). The correlation coefficient between the SOS score and CRP levels was r = 0.65 (P=0.00056). Conclusion: The severity of symptoms associated with acute influenza A infection correlateswith the serum CRP levels. PMID:22787345

  2. Albumin and C-reactive protein have prognostic significance in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Jooyeong; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Rhee, JoongEui; Kim, Tae Youn; Na, Sang Hoon; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to determine the association of commonly used biochemical markers, such as albumin and C-reactive protein (CRP), with mortality and the prognostic performance of these markers combined with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) for mortality and adverse outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The data were gathered prospectively for patients hospitalized with CAP via the emergency department. Laboratory values, including CRP and albumin, clinical variables, and the PSI were measured. Primary outcomes were 28-day mortality and survival times. Secondary outcome was admission to the intensive care unit, vasopressor use, or the need for mechanical ventilation during the hospital stay. A total of 424 patients were included. The 28-day mortality was 13.7%. C-reactive protein and albumin were significantly different between survivors and nonsurvivors. In logistic regression analysis, CRP and albumin were independently associated with 28-day mortality (P < .05). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed improved mortality prediction by adding CRP or albumin to the PSI scale. The Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that high serum albumin (≥3.3 mg/dL) had a hazard ratio of 0.5 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-0.9), and high CRP (≥14.3 mg/dL) had a hazard ratio of 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4). For predicting secondary outcome, adding albumin to PSI increased areas under the curve significantly, but CRP did not. Albumin and CRP were associated with 28-day mortality in hospitalized patients with CAP, and these markers increased prognostic performance when combined with the PSI scale. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid and C-reactive Protein Levels as Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Annie N.; Matthews, Lois J.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the role of cardiovascular disease (CVD) markers, lipids and C-reactive protein, in age-related hearing loss over time. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Research laboratories at an academic medical center. Subjects and Methods In total, 837 older adults (mean age 67.5 years) were included. Primary dependent variables were puretone thresholds (pure-tone average [PTA]), including “narrow” PTA (0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz), “broad” PTA (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 kHz), low-frequency PTA (0.25, 0.5, 1 kHz), and high-frequency PTA (2, 3, 4, 6, 8 kHz). Repeated-measures mixed regression modeling was used to assess the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipid levels with PTAs over time. Results In a cross-sectional sample of 837 subjects, modest associations were found between triglycerides and all PTAs. Weak associations were observed between the ratio of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein and narrow PTA, broad PTA, and high-frequency PTA. However, when assessing changes in hearing and lipids over time in a longitudinal analysis, no significant associations between hearing and lipids remained. PTAs and CRP were not statistically associated when controlling for age and sex. Conclusion Associations between hearing and blood lipids have been the focus of scientific inquiry for more than 50 years. The current results suggest that the association is either spurious or too small to be of consequence in the assessment and treatment of hearing loss in older adults. Inquiry into other potential risk factors for age-related hearing loss and associations with CVD may prove more fruitful. PMID:23322627

  4. Highly sensitive nano-porous lattice biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance and interference.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Kim, Ok-Geun; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Jin; Yuan, Heng; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kim, Hak-Rin; Kang, Shin-Won

    2011-11-07

    We propose a design for a highly sensitive biosensor based on nanostructured anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates. A gold-deposited AAO substrate exhibits both optical interference and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). In our sensor, application of these disparate optical properties overcomes problems of limited sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range seen in similar biosensors. We fabricated uniform periodic nanopore lattice AAO templates by two-step anodizing and assessed their suitability for application in biosensors by characterizing the change in optical response on addition of biomolecules to the AAO template. To determine the suitability of such structures for biosensing applications, we immobilized a layer of C-reactive protein (CRP) antibody on a gold coating atop an AAO template. We then applied a CRP antigen (Ag) atop the immobilized antibody (Ab) layer. The shift in reflectance is interpreted as being caused by the change in refractive index with membrane thickness. Our results confirm that our proposed AAO-based biosensor is highly selective toward detection of CRP antigen, and can measure a change in CRP antigen concentration of 1 fg/ml. This method can provide a simple, fast, and sensitive analysis for protein detection in real-time.

  5. C-reactive protein levels and treatment resistance in schizophrenia-A Danish population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Wimberley, Theresa; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Gasse, Christiane

    2017-11-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. However, it remains unclear whether inflammatory markers are associated with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. We conducted a population-based follow-up study among individuals with a first-time schizophrenia diagnosis and a baseline C-reactive protein measurement (a commonly available marker of systemic inflammation) from 2000 to 2012. We defined treatment resistance as the earliest observed instance of either clozapine initiation or hospital admission due to schizophrenia after having received at least 2 prior antipsychotic monotherapy trials of adequate duration. We used adjusted Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios. We identified 390 individuals with a C-reactive protein measurement at first-time schizophrenia diagnosis. A nonsignificant higher median C-reactive protein (4.0 vs. 3.1 mg/L, p = .13) was observed among the 52 (13.3%) treatment-resistant individuals. Increased levels of C-reactive protein (above 3 mg/L) at baseline were not associated with treatment resistance (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval [0.56, 1.73]). C-reactive protein, as a single inflammatory marker, appears insufficient to detect treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Change in Growth Differentiation Factor 15, but Not C-Reactive Protein, Independently Predicts Major Cardiac Events in Patients with Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Baldomero, Idaira F.; Bosa-Ojeda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Among the numerous emerging biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and growth-differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) have received widespread interest, with their potential role as predictors of cardiovascular risk. The concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers, however, are influenced, among others, by physiological variations, which are the natural, within-individual variation occurring over time. The aims of our study are: (a) to describe the changes in hsCRP and GDF-15 levels over a period of time and after an episode of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and (b) to examine whether the rate of change in hsCRP and GDF-15 after the acute event is associated with long-term major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE). Two hundred and Fifty five NSTE-ACS patients were included in the study. We measured hsCRP and GDF-15 concentrations, at admission and again 36 months after admission (end of the follow-up period). The present study shows that the change of hsCRP levels, measured after 36 months, does not predict MACE in NSTEACS-patients. However, the level of GDF-15 measured, after 36 months, was a stronger predictor of MACE, in comparison to the acute unstable phase. PMID:24839357

  8. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children.

    PubMed

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine; Hedley, Paula L; Hagen, Christian Munch; Christiansen, Michael; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-03-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma concentrations of hs-CRP, Pro-MBP, and PAPP-A were measured at baseline; at days 14, 33 and 82 during weight loss; and at months 10, 16, and 28 during follow-up. Fifty-three boys and 62 girls aged 8-15 years with a median body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) at baseline of 2.78 (boys), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs-CRP/PAPP-A correlation was weak during weight fluctuations. Hs-CRP changes reflect weight changes. PAPP-A and Pro-MBP exhibited tracking during weight perturbations and may contribute as early risk markers of cardiovascular susceptibility.

  9. Prediction of gestational diabetes mellitus in the first trimester: comparison of C-reactive protein, fasting plasma glucose, insulin and insulin sensitivity indices.

    PubMed

    Ozgu-Erdinc, A Seval; Yilmaz, Saynur; Yeral, M Ilkin; Seckin, K Doga; Erkaya, Salim; Danisman, A Nuri

    2015-11-01

    To develop a predictive index based on high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting plasma insulin (FPI) measurements for early diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Healthy pregnant women who were screened for GDM during their first antenatal visit were included in this retrospective cohort study. FPG, FPI and serum hs-CRP concentrations were measured between weeks 11 and 14. A two-step glucose challenge test was carried out between gestational weeks 24 and 28. Fasting glucose/insulin ratio (FIGR), Homeostatic Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), HOMA-β indices and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) were used to estimate insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. Of the 450 women who were eligible for the study, 49 (11.2%) were diagnosed with GDM at weeks 24-28. The median FPG and hs-CRP levels were higher in the GDM diagnosed women compared to the others. Comparison of accuracy measures resulted in the highest specificity (87.2%; 95% CI 83.5-90.1) and diagnostic odds ratio (3.9; 95% CI 2.1-7.6) for hs-CRP. FPG and hs-CRP in the first trimester are correlated with later development of GDM in the pregnancy. In our study, FPG provided a better sensitivity while hs-CRP exhibited a better specificity for prediction of GDM.

  10. Creatine kinase MM TaqI and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C gene polymorphisms influence exercise-induced C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Akimoto, Arthur K; Lordelo, Graciana S; Pereira, Luiz C S; Grisolia, Cesar K; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria de Nazaré

    2012-01-01

    Physical training induces beneficial adaptations, but exhausting exercise increases reactive oxygen species, which can cause muscular injuries with consequent inflammatory processes, implying jeopardized performance and possibly overtraining. Acute strenuous exercise almost certainly exceeds the benefits of physical activity; it can compromise performance and may contribute to increased future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in athletes. Polymorphisms in the muscle-type creatine kinase (CK-MM) gene may influence performance and adaptation to training, while many potentially significant genetic variants are reported as risk factors for CVD. Therefore, we investigated the influence of polymorphisms in CK-MM TaqI and NcoI, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and C-reactive protein (CRP G1059C) genes on exercise-induced damage and inflammation markers. Blood samples were taken immediately after a race (of at least 4 km) that took place outdoors on flat tracks, and were submitted to genotyping and biochemical evaluation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), CK, CRP and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). CK-MM TaqI polymorphism significantly influenced results of AST, CK and hs-CRP, and an association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C with CRP level was found, although these levels did not exceed reference values. Results indicate that these polymorphisms can indirectly influence performance, contribute to higher susceptibility to exercise-induced inflammation or protection against it, and perhaps affect future risks of CVD in athletes.

  11. Creatine kinase MM TaqI and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C gene polymorphisms influence exercise-induced C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Akimoto, Arthur K; Lordelo, Graciana S; Pereira, Luiz C S; Grisolia, Cesar K; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria de Nazaré

    2012-03-01

    Physical training induces beneficial adaptations, but exhausting exercise increases reactive oxygen species, which can cause muscular injuries with consequent inflammatory processes, implying jeopardized performance and possibly overtraining. Acute strenuous exercise almost certainly exceeds the benefits of physical activity; it can compromise performance and may contribute to increased future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in athletes. Polymorphisms in the muscle-type creatine kinase (CK-MM) gene may influence performance and adaptation to training, while many potentially significant genetic variants are reported as risk factors for CVD. Therefore, we investigated the influence of polymorphisms in CK-MM TaqI and NcoI, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and C-reactive protein (CRP G1059C) genes on exercise-induced damage and inflammation markers. Blood samples were taken immediately after a race (of at least 4 km) that took place outdoors on flat tracks, and were submitted to genotyping and biochemical evaluation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), CK, CRP and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). CK-MM TaqI polymorphism significantly influenced results of AST, CK and hs-CRP, and an association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C with CRP level was found, although these levels did not exceed reference values. The results indicate that these polymorphisms can indirectly influence performance, contribute to higher susceptibility to exercise-induced inflammation or protection against it, and perhaps affect future risks of CVD in athletes.

  12. Insight into infection-mediated prostate damage: Contrasting patterns of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen levels during infection.

    PubMed

    Milbrandt, Melissa; Winter, Anke C; Nevin, Remington L; Pakpahan, Ratna; Bradwin, Gary; De Marzo, Angelo M; Elliott, Debra J; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Isaacs, William B; Nelson, William G; Rifai, Nader; Sokoll, Lori J; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Sutcliffe, Siobhan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate mechanisms underlying our previous observation of a large rise in serum prostate-specific antigen, a marker of prostate pathology, during both sexually transmitted and systemic infections, we measured serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, in our previous case-control study of young, male US military members and compared our findings to those for PSA. We measured hsCRP before and during infection for 299 chlamydia, 112 gonorrhea, and 59 non-chlamydial, non-gonococcal urethritis (NCNGU) cases; before and after infection for 55 infectious mononucleosis (IM) and 90 other systemic/non-genitourinary cases; and for 220-256 controls. Only gonorrhea cases were significantly more likely to have a large hsCRP rise (≥1.40 mg/L or ≥239%) during infection than controls (P < 0.01). However, gonorrhea, IM, and other systemic/non-genitourinary cases were more likely to have a rise of any magnitude up to one year post-diagnosis than controls (p = 0.038-0.077). These findings, which differ from those for PSA, suggest distinct mechanisms of elevation for hsCRP and PSA, and support both direct (eg, prostate infection) and indirect (eg, systemic inflammation-mediated prostate cell damage) mechanisms for PSA elevation. Future studies should explore our PSA findings further for their relevance to both prostate cancer screening and risk. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  14. Association of Periodontal Diseases with Elevation of Serum C-reactive Protein and Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Chitsazi, Mohammad Taghi; Pourabbas, Reza; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Ahmadi Zenouz, Gazaleh; Vatankhah, Amir Hossein

    2008-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known acute-phase reactant produced by the liver in response to inflammation caused by various stimuli. Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of tooth-supporting structures characterized by attachment loss and alveolar bone loss. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum C-reactive protein levels and periodontal diseases. The study was conducted on 166 patients referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry. The age range was between 35 and 59 years. 83 subjects with periodontitis according to NHANES III index as test group and 83 healthy individuals as controls participated in this study. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), probing depth, attachment loss and CRP levels were measured in both test and control groups. Data was analyzed with Student's t-test, odds ratio (OR), Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation coefficient, using SPSS 13.0 software. The results revealed a statistically significant difference between all of the analyzed variables in test and control groups (P < 0.05). Classifying the test subjects into two subgroups (subjects with CRP ≥ 3 mg/l and subjects with CRP < 3 mg/l), the highest OR in females belonged to WC (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 1.18-35.2, P = 0.02) and in males to obesity (OR = 4.8; 95% CI: 0.65-35.19, P = 0.05). Considering the correlation between obesity, overweight, WC and CRP with probing depth and attachment loss denoted that obesity presented the highest (r = 1, P = 0.00) and overweight the lowest (r = 0.4, P = 0.07) association. In females, CRP was related to the severity of periodontitis and attachment loss (r = 0.662, P = 0.00). Excluding overweight, the association between all the variables was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that periodontal disease is correlated with CRP elevation and dis-eases associated with obesity.

  15. Relationship of trait anger and anger expression to C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gross, Rosalyn; Groer, Maureen; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death for women worldwide. Chronic inflammation and risk factors, such as obesity, smoking, and high cholesterol, are well-established risk factors for CHD. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms by which psychosocial factors, such as general anger proneness (trait anger) and anger expression style, may be associated with proinflammatory processes that contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women. Our purpose in conducting this study was to examine the relationship of trait anger and anger expression to the proinflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP). A cross-sectional between-groups design was used to determine differences in serum levels of CRP in 42 American postmenopausal women, ages 45 to 65, who scored high on the selected anger characteristics, compared with women with lower scores. We did not find differences between high anger women and low anger women in mean levels of CRP, but we did find significant inverse relationships between CRP and some anger control characteristics. Specific health-promoting anger coping behaviors could minimize the deleterious effects of inflammatory responses in postmenopausal women.

  16. Agglutination of intravenously administered phosphatidylcholine-containing lipid emulsions with serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Tugirimana, Pierrot; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Fiers, Tom; De Buyzere, Marc L; Kint, Jos; Benoit, Dominique; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is able to bind phospholipids in the presence of calcium. We wanted to investigate the reaction of CRP with various commercial fat emulsions and to explore the impact of CRP agglutination on serum CRP levels. Serum specimens were mixed with Intralipid 20% (soybean oil-based fat emulsion), Structolipid (structured oil-based fat emulsion), Omegaven (fish oil-based fat emulsion), or SMOFlipid (mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion) in Tris-calcium buffer (pH 7.5). After 30 minutes of incubation at 37°C, CRP-phospholipid complexes were turbidimetrically quantified and flow cytometric analysis was performed. Similarly, CRP complexes were monitored in vivo, following administration of fat emulsion. CRP was able to agglutinate phospholipid-containing lipid droplets present in the soybean oil-based fat emulsion and the structured oil-based fat emulsion. To a lesser extent, agglutination was observed for fish oil-containing fat emulsions, whereas no agglutination was noticed for the mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion. Results for propofol-containing emulsions were comparable. Agglutination correlated with phospholipid content of the emulsions. When in vivo agglutination occurred, plasma CRP values dropped due to consumption of CRP by phospholipid-induced agglutination. In this in vitro experiment, we demonstrated agglutination of CRP with phospholipids in various fat emulsions. Research studies are required in patients to determine which effects occur with various intravenous fat emulsions.

  17. Blood count and C-reactive protein evolution in gastric cancer patients with total gastrectomy surgery

    PubMed Central

    CSENDES J., Attila; MUÑOZ Ch., Andrea; BURGOS L., Ana María

    2014-01-01

    Background The complete blood count (CBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are useful inflammatory parameters for ruling out acute postoperative inflammatory complications. Aim To determine their changes in gastric cancer patients submitted to total gastrectomy. Methods This is a prospective study, with 36 patients with gastric cancer who were submitted to elective total gastrectomy. On the first, third and fifth postoperative day (POD), blood count and CRP changes were assessed. Patients with postoperative complications were excluded. Results Twenty-one (58%) were men and 15 (42%) women. The mean age was 65 years. The leukocytes peaked on the 1st POD with a mean of 13,826 u/mm³, and decreased to 8,266 u/mm³ by the 5th POD. The bacilliforms peaked on the 1st POD with a maximum value of 1.48%. CRP reached its maximum level on the 3rd POD with a mean of 144.64 mg/l±44.84. Preoperative hematocrit (HCT) was 35% and 33.67% by the 5th POD. Hemoglobin, showed similar values. Conclusions Leukocytes increased during the 1st POD but reached normal values by the 5th POD. CRP peaked on the 3rd POD but did not reach normal values by the 5th POD. PMID:25626929

  18. Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Autism in a National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan S.; Sourander, Andre; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; McKeague, Ian W.; Sundvall, Jouko; Surcel, Helja-Marja

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with a largely unknown etiology. Inflammation during pregnancy may represent a common pathway by which infections and other insults increase risk for the disorder. Hence, we investigated the association between early gestational C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and childhood autism in a large national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. Other strengths of the cohort included nearly complete ascertainment of pregnancies in Finland (N=1.2 million) over the study period and national psychiatric registries consisting of virtually all treated autism cases in the population. Increasing maternal CRP levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with autism in offspring. For maternal CRP levels in the highest quintile, compared to the lowest quintile, there was a significant, 43% elevated risk. This finding suggests that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in autism, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23337946

  19. Study of Serum Levels of Leptin, C-Reactive Protein and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Hassanpour, Zahra; Pourmofatteh, Mahla

    2015-08-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and decreases appetite. However, the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of hemodialysis (HD)-related malnutrition has not been fully evaluated. The aim of study was to investigate the association between the serum leptin levels, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. This analytical descriptive study included 45 hemodialysis patients and 40 healthy subjects. Biochemical parameters and serum leptin levels were measured. The nutritional status was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the calculation of the body mass index (BMI). Serum leptin (P < 0.05) and albumin (P < 0.0001) levels and BMI (P < 0.001) of HD patients were significantly lower, while CRP levels were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.0001). HD patients consumed the lower daily servings of the food groups compared to the control subjects (P < 0.0001). A significant positive correlation between serum levels of leptin and albumin and BMI was demonstrated. No significant correlations were identified between leptin level, CRP level, and other variables. The findings suggest that low levels of leptin may be a contributory factor for malnutrition in HD patients. Further studies are required to ascertain the significance of leptin levels in relation to nutritional factors in hemodialysis patients.

  20. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  1. Diagnostic properties of C-reactive protein for detecting pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Koster, Madieke J; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Minnaard, Margaretha C; Balemans, Walter A F; Hopstaken, Rogier M; de Jong, Pim A; Verheij, Theo J M

    2013-07-01

    The diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP) level for pneumonia in children is unknown. As a first step in the assessment of the value of CRP, a diagnostic study was performed in children at an emergency department (ED). In this cross-sectional study, data were retrospectively collected from children presenting with suspected pneumonia at the ED of Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein in The Netherlands between January 2007 and January 2012. Diagnostic outcome was pneumonia yes/no according to independent radiologist. (Un)adjusted association between CRP level and pneumonia and diagnostic value of CRP were calculated. Of 687 presenting children, 286 underwent both CRP measurement and chest radiography. 148 had pneumonia (52%). The proportion of pneumonia increased with CRP level. Negative predictive values declined, but positive predictive values increased with higher CRP thresholds. Univariable odds ratio for the association between CRP level and pneumonia was 1.2 (95% CI 1.11-1.21) per 10 mg/L increase. After adjustment for baseline characteristics CRP level remained associated with pneumonia. CRP level has independent diagnostic value for pneumonia in children presenting at the ED with suspected pneumonia, but low levels do not exclude pneumonia in this setting. These results prompt evaluation of CRP in primary care children with LRTI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Body Mass Index and C-Reactive Protein in the Healthy Korean Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Won; Choi, Hyun Rim; Kim, Byung Sung; Park, Hye Soon; Yukawa, Michi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and body mass index (BMI) in elderly Korean men. A review of routine health examination records were done. Out of 671 eligible elderly men, who had their routine health examination in 2001 at a Health Promotion Center of a university hospital, 367 subjects were included after excluding inflammatory conditions. Subgroup analyses were performed on those who did not smoke and exercised regularly. Body composition, blood pressure, blood samples and radiologic examinations including chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound were obtained from each subject. Age, BMI, current smoking, regular exercise, WBC count, HDL-cholesterol, gamma glutamyl transferase were independently associated with logCRP. BMI subgroups according to the Asia-Pacific guideline did not show any difference in CRP level from each other by ANCOVA (p>0.05). However, BMI groups subdivided according to our criteria showed an association with CRP; the CRP level was lowest in the group of BMI between 18.5-19.4 and showed significant difference from BMI group of the highest BMI group (≥29.0). Since elevated CRP levels are associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease, lower BMI (18.5-19.4) levels may be advised for healthy elderly men in Korea. PMID:17043411

  3. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-reactive Protein Measurements and Their Relevance in Clinical Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bray, Christopher; Bell, Lauren N; Liang, Hong; Haykal, Rasha; Kaiksow, Farah; Mazza, Joseph J; Yale, Steven H

    2016-12-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are widely used laboratory markers of systemic inflammation. A thorough understanding of the similarities and differences between these two serological markers, including factors that affect measurements, is necessary for the proper utilization and interpretation of ESR and CRP. This review summarizes the current published literature (searched on MEDLINE through February 2016) surrounding the history and utilization of ESR and CRP, and examines factors that affect ESR and CRP measurements and discordance amongst these two inflammatory markers. As ESR and CRP lack sensitivity or specificity, these tests should be used only in combination with clinical history and physical exam for diagnosis and monitoring of pathological conditions. The clinical application of these tests in diagnosis is best applied to conditions in which there is high or low clinical probability of disease. Importantly, discrepancies between ESR and CRP measurements commonly have been reported in both inpatient and outpatient settings and this problem may be particularly prevalent in chronic inflammatory diseases. Numerous physiological factors, including noninfectious conditions and resolution of inflammation can contribute to abnormally high ESR/low CRP readings or vice versa. Although discordance may be encountered in certain settings, proper utilization of ESR and CRP measurements continues to play an important role in clinical management of many inflammatory and other conditions.

  4. Longitudinal profiling of inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein during uncomplicated and preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Kelly K; McElrath, Thomas F; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have investigated the utility of inflammation markers as predictors of preterm birth, but none have compared trends in levels between uncomplicated and preterm pregnancy. We explored longitudinal changes in plasma cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α, as well as C-reactive protein in pregnant women from a nested case-control study. IL-6 was associated with increased odds of spontaneous preterm birth, defined by presentation of spontaneous preterm labor and/or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Associations were strongest later in pregnancy. IL-10 was associated with increased odds of placentally mediated preterm birth, defined by presentation with preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction, and odds ratios were also highest near the end of pregnancy. Maternal inflammation markers were associated with increased risk of preterm birth, and relationships differed by etiology of preterm delivery and gestational age at sample collection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. C-reactive protein levels: a prognostic marker for patients with head and neck cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent advances in understanding complex tumor interactions have led to the discovery of an association between inflammation and cancer, in particular for colon and lung cancer, but only a very few have dealt with oral cancer. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the significance of preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as a parameter for development of lymph node metastases or recurrence. Materials and methods In 278 patients with oral cancer, preoperative CRP levels were compared with development of recurrence and metastasis. Results In 27 patients from the normal CRP group, and in 21 patients from the elevated CRP group, local recurrence was observed. Concerning lymph node metastases, 37 patients were in the normal group and 9 patients in the elevated CRP group. No significant correlation could be found between elevated CRP levels and metastasis (p = 0.468) or recurrence (p = 0.137). Conclusion Our findings do not appear to support a correlation between preoperative CRP levels and development of recurrence or metastases. In further studies, CRP levels in precancerous lesions and in Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) positive patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) should be studied. PMID:20673375

  6. C-reactive protein levels: a prognostic marker for patients with head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Kruse, Astrid L; Luebbers, Heinz T; Grätz, Klaus W

    2010-08-02

    Recent advances in understanding complex tumor interactions have led to the discovery of an association between inflammation and cancer, in particular for colon and lung cancer, but only a very few have dealt with oral cancer. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the significance of preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as a parameter for development of lymph node metastases or recurrence. In 278 patients with oral cancer, preoperative CRP levels were compared with development of recurrence and metastasis. In 27 patients from the normal CRP group, and in 21 patients from the elevated CRP group, local recurrence was observed. Concerning lymph node metastases, 37 patients were in the normal group and 9 patients in the elevated CRP group. No significant correlation could be found between elevated CRP levels and metastasis (p = 0.468) or recurrence (p = 0.137). Our findings do not appear to support a correlation between preoperative CRP levels and development of recurrence or metastases. In further studies, CRP levels in precancerous lesions and in Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) positive patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) should be studied.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a novel inhibitor of C-reactive protein-mediated proinflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R; Devaraj, Sridevi; Huang, Wenzhe; Lau, Edmond Y; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that high C-reactive protein (CRP) levels predict cardiovascular disease and augur a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Much in vitro and in vivo data support of a role for CRP in atherogenesis. There is an urgent need to develop inhibitors that specifically block the biological effects of CRP in vivo. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been used to discover ligands against several biological targets. In this study, we use a novel fluorescence-based screening method to screen an OBOC combinatorial library for the discovery of peptides against human CRP. Human CRP was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and human serum albumin (HuSA) was labeled with phycoerythrin (PE) and used for screening. The OBOC library LWH-01 was synthesized on TentaGel resin beads using a standard solid-phase "split/mix" approach. By subtraction screening, eight peptides that bind specifically to CRP and not to HuSA were identified. In human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) incubated with CRP, inhibitors CRPi-2, CRPi-3, and CRPi-6 significantly inhibited CRP-induced superoxide, cytokine release, and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) activity. Molecular docking studies demonstrate that CRPi-2 interacts with the two Ca(2+) ions in the single subunit of CRP. The binding of CRPi-2 is reminiscent of choline binding. Future studies will examine the utility of this inhibitor in animal models and clinical trials.

  8. Serum Bilirubin and Their Association With C-Reactive Protein in Patients With Migraine.

    PubMed

    Peng, You-Fan; Xie, Li-Qiu; Xiang, Yang; Xu, Gui-Dan

    2016-11-01

    Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been considered as a marker in assessing neurogenic inflammation of migraine patients. An inverse relationship between serum bilirubin and CRP has been observed in various diseases. Therefore, we analyzed serum bilirubin levels in migraine patients, and investigated the relationship between serum bilirubin and CRP in migraineurs. A total of 86 newly diagnosed migraine patients were consecutively recruited to this study. Significantly lower median serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin (CB) and unconjugated bilirubin were found in patients with migraine than healthy controls, and the levels of CRP were significantly higher in migraine patients than healthy controls. A negative correlation between CRP and CB was observed in patients with migraine (r = -0.255, P = 0.018). In a multiple linear regression model, the concentrations of CRP remained negatively correlated with CB. Our study demonstrates that serum bilirubin concentrations are decreased in migraineurs, and CB levels were found to be positively correlated with CRP in migraine patents. However, larger cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to establish whether serum bilirubin may be a useful biomarker for assessing neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients and eventually guiding the therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  10. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Eudy, AM; Vines, AI; Dooley, MA; Cooper, GS; Parks, CG

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at a median 13 months since diagnosis. Models estimated prevalence differences in the association of baseline CRP with self-reported flares, adjusting for age, sex, race and education. Active disease or flare was reported by 59% at baseline and 58% at follow-up. Higher CRP (>10 μg/ml vs. <3 μg/ml) was associated with a 17% (95% CI: −20, 53%) higher prevalence of flare at baseline and a 26% (95% CI: −9, 62%) higher prevalence of flare at follow-up. These CRP-flare associations were notably stronger in patients with lower education at baseline and in African Americans at follow-up. These findings suggest CRP may be a useful marker in studies of SLE health disparities. PMID:25057037

  11. The acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A and C reactive protein in transudates and exudates.

    PubMed

    Okino, Alessandra M; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Lavado, Edson L; Lotufo, Paulo A; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 +/- 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 +/- 0.37 and 0.68 +/- 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764; p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8-360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates.

  12. The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Alessandra M.; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Lavado, Edson L.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 ± 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 ± 0.37 and 0.68 ± 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764;p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8–360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates. PMID:16864904

  13. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in urinary tract infection diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui-Ying; Liu, Hua-Wei; Liu, Ji-Ling; Dong, Jun-Hua

    2014-05-30

    Urinary infections are a common type of pediatric disease, and their treatment and prognosis are closely correlated with infection location. Common clinical manifestations and laboratory tests are insufficient to differentiate between acute pyelonephritis and lower urinary tract infection. This study was conducted to explore a diagnostic method for upper and lower urinary tract infection differentiation. The diagnostic values of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed using the receiver operating characteristic curve method for upper and lower urinary tract infection differentiation. PCT was determined using chemiluminescent immunoassay. The PCT and CRP values in children with acute pyelonephritis were significantly higher than those in children with lower urinary tract infection (3.90 ± 3.51 ng/ml and 68.17 ± 39.42 mg/l vs. 0.48 ± 0.39 ng/ml and 21.39 ± 14.92 mg/l). The PCT values were correlated with the degree of renal involvement, whereas the CRP values failed to show such a significant correlation. PCT had a sensitivity of 90.47% and a specificity of 88% in predicting nephropathia, whereas CRP had sensitivity of 85.71% and a specificity of 48%. Both PCT and CRP can be used for upper and lower urinary tract infection differentiation, but PCT has higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting pyelonephritis than CRP. PCT showed better results than CRP. PCT values were also correlated with the degree of renal involvement.

  14. Serial C-reactive protein measurements in patients treated for suspected abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Mandavdhare, Harshal S; Lamoria, Sandeep; Singh, Harjeet; Kumar, Amit

    2018-06-01

    Response to treatment is often used as a criterion for the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. To determine utility of serum C reactive protein (CRP) in assessment of response to anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) in abdominal tuberculosis (ATB). We retrospectively analysed the database of patients with suspected ATB (intestinal and/or peritoneal). Response to ATT was assessed using subjective and objective (ulcer healing or ascites resolution) parameters. Serum CRP levels were estimated at baseline and then at 2 months and 6 months of ATT. One hundred and twelve patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 36.57 ± 15.04 years and 54.46% (61/112) were males. Sixty-six patients (58.92%) had intestinal, 28 (25%) had peritoneal and 18 (16.07%) had both. Eleven patients had a normal CRP at baseline while 101 had elevated levels. The CRP levels declined in 94 patients at 6 months. One patient with increased levels at 2 months had multi-drug resistant TB. Seven patients showed elevated or plateaued CRP levels on follow-up. These patients had underlying Crohn's disease (3 patients), peritoneal carcinomatosis (1), inter-current infection (1), lymphoma (1) and non-healing ulcers (1). Lack of decline in CRP may suggest alternative diagnosis or drug-resistant tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fear and C-reactive protein cosynergize annual pulse increases in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Yayon, Nadav; Waiskopf, Nir; Shapira, Itzhak; Toker, Sharon; Zaltser, David; Berliner, Shlomo; Ritov, Ya'acov; Soreq, Hermona

    2015-01-01

    Recent international terror outbreaks notably involve long-term mental health risks to the exposed population, but whether physical health risks are also anticipated has remained unknown. Here, we report fear of terror-induced annual increases in resting heart rate (pulse), a notable risk factor of all-cause mortality. Partial least squares analysis based on 325 measured parameters successfully predicted annual pulse increases, inverse to the expected age-related pulse decline, in approximately 4.1% of a cohort of 17,380 apparently healthy active Israeli adults. Nonbiased hierarchical regression analysis among 27 of those parameters identified pertinent fear of terror combined with the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein as prominent coregulators of the observed annual pulse increases. In comparison, basal pulse primarily depended on general physiological parameters and reduced cholinergic control over anxiety and inflammation, together indicating that consistent exposure to terror threats ignites fear-induced exacerbation of preexisting neuro-immune risks of all-cause mortality. PMID:25535364

  16. Reduction in trunk fat predicts cardiovascular exercise training-related reductions in C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Vieira, V J; Hu, L; Valentine, R J; McAuley, E; Evans, E M; Baynard, T; Woods, J A

    2009-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine (1) if 10 months of cardiovascular exercise training (Cardio) reduces CRP in a group of older adults, (2) if such a reduction is related to improvements in trunk fat, fitness, and/or psychosocial variables, and (3) if the effect of Cardio on CRP differs between men and women. Community-dwelling residents (n=127; 60-83 yrs) were randomized to a Flex group (n=61) where they participated in 2-75 min supervised sessions per wk during which they performed non-cardiovascular flexibility and balance exercises or a Cardio group (n=66) where they participated in three supervised sessions per wk during which they performed cardiovascular exercises for approximately 45-60 min at 60-70% maximal oxygen uptake. The main outcome measures were serum CRP, cardiovascular fitness, total and central adiposity, and self-reported psychosocial function. Cardio experienced a reduction in CRP (-0.5mg/L), as well as improvements in fitness (+7%) and total (-1.5%) and central (i.e., trunk) (-2.5%) adiposity. These relationships were not modified by sex. Regression analyses indicated that only the reduction in trunk fat was significantly related to the reduction in CRP. Ten months of cardiovascular exercise training reduced CRP in previously sedentary older adults and this effect was partially mediated by a reduction in trunk fat.

  17. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in serum by immunoprecipitation-microchip capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Ela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Wenz, Christian; Rüfer, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis represents a significant cause of mortality in intensive care units. Early diagnosis of sepsis is essential to increase the survival rate of patients. Among others, C-reactive protein (CRP) is commonly used as a sepsis marker. In this work we introduce immune precipitation combined with microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (IP-MCGE) for the detection and quantification of CRP in serum samples. First high-abundance proteins (HSA, IgG) are removed from serum samples using affinity spin cartridges, and then the remaining proteins are labeled with a fluorescence dye and incubated with an anti-CRP antibody, and the antigen/antibody complex is precipitated with protein G-coated magnetic beads. After precipitation the complex is eluted from the beads and loaded onto the MCGE system. CRP could be reliably detected and quantified, with a detection limit of 25 ng/μl in serum samples and 126 pg/μl in matrix-free samples. The overall sensitivity (LOQ = 75 ng/μl, R(2) = 0.9668) of the method is lower than that of some specially developed methods (e.g., immune radiometric assay) but is comparable to those of clinically accepted ELISA methods. The straightforward sample preparation (not prone to mistakes), reduced sample and reagent volumes (including the antibodies), and high throughput (10 samples/3 h) are advantages and therefore IP-MCGE bears potential for point-of-care diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis.

  19. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: A moderated-mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the link between low SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD in a US sample of adults. Design We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. Main outcome measures CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1–10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (≤ 3.0 mg/L). Results Both poverty and low educational attainment were associated with elevated CRP, and these associations were primarily explained through higher levels of smoking and lower levels of exercise. In the education model, poor diet also emerged as a significant mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically-patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. PMID:20496985

  20. Rapid C-reactive protein and white cell tests decrease cost and shorten emergency visits.

    PubMed

    Kokko, Eeva; Korppi, Matti; Helminen, Merja; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina

    2014-10-01

    Elevated white blood cells (WBC) in blood and C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum are often used as non-specific markers for bacterial etiology of infection in children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how rapid WBC and CRP testing influences patient flow and cost in the pediatric emergency room (ER). This study was a retrospective chart review. In all, 166 children who were treated during 3 months in the ER of a children's hospital, and in whom rapid tests for WBC and CRP were done, were included. The association between rapid testing and length of ER stay was evaluated, and the cost of rapid tests was compared with the corresponding cost if done in the hospital laboratory. Median ER stay was 147.5 min, if no examinations other than rapid CRP and WBC tests were done and if no emergency treatment was given, compared with 201.5 min for laboratory tests or emergency treatment given (P < 0.001). The respective figures were 142.5 min and 179.5 min in those 96 children discharged home (P = 0.003). The cost of rapid testing was only 41.5% of the corresponding laboratory cost. The simultaneous rapid testing of CRP and WBC in children with presumable infection decreased cost and shortened the length of ER stay, if no other examinations or emergency treatment were needed. The cost of rapid testing was less than half of the corresponding cost in laboratory. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  2. Chronic Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Mothers During the First Postpartum Year.

    PubMed

    Guardino, Christine M; Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Hobel, Calvin J; Gaines Lanzi, Robin; Schafer, Peter; Thorp, John M; Shalowitz, Madeleine U

    2017-05-01

    Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. The current study tested associations between psychosocial stress and CRP in a large sample of women during the first postpartum year. We analyzed data collected by the five-site Community Child Health Network study, which studied a predominately poor population. Participants (n = 1206 women; 54% African American, 23% white, 23% Hispanic/Latina) were recruited shortly after the birth of a child. Multiple linear regression analyses tested associations of psychosocial stress in several life domains (financial, neighborhood, family, coparenting, partner relationship, discrimination, and interpersonal violence) with log-transformed CRP concentrations at 6-month and 1-year postpartum. Forty-eight percent of participants showed evidence of elevated CRP (≥3 mg/L) at 6-month postpartum, and 46% had elevated CRP at 12-month postpartum. Chronic financial stress at 1-month postpartum predicted higher levels of CRP at 6- (b = .15, SE = .05, p = .006) and 12-month postpartum (b = .15, SE = .06, p = .007) adjusting for race/ethnicity, income, education, parity, health behaviors, and chronic health conditions, though associations became nonsignificant when adjusted for body mass index. In this low-income and ethnic/racially diverse sample of women, higher financial stress at 1-month postbirth predicted higher CRP. Study findings suggest that perceived financial stress stemming from socioeconomic disadvantage may be a particular deleterious form of stress affecting maternal biology during the year after the birth of a child.

  3. C-Reactive Protein as a Therapeutic Target in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Molins, Blanca; Romero-Vázquez, Sara; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Adan, Alfredo; Dick, Andrew D

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a retinal degenerative disease, is the leading cause of central vision loss among the elderly population in developed countries and an increasing global burden. The major risk is aging, compounded by other environmental factors and association with genetic variants for risk of progression. Although the etiology of AMD is not yet clearly understood, several pathogenic pathways have been proposed, including dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The identification of AMD susceptibility genes encoding complement factors and the presence of complement and other inflammatory mediators in drusen, the hallmark deposits of AMD, support the concept that local inflammation and immune-mediated processes play a key role in AMD pathogenesis that may be accelerated through systemic immune activation. In this regard, increased levels of circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with higher risk of AMD. Besides being a risk marker for AMD, CRP may also play a role in the progression of the disease as it has been identified in drusen, and we have recently found that its monomeric form (mCRP) induces blood retinal barrier disruption in vitro . In this review, we will address recent evidence that links CRP and AMD pathogenesis, which may open new therapeutic opportunities to prevent the progression of AMD.

  4. Inflammatory C-reactive protein and cytokine levels in asymptomatic people with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frost, Frederick; Roach, Mary Jo; Kushner, Irving; Schreiber, Peter

    2005-02-01

    To determine the relation between serologic markers of information and clinical characteristics of people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional study. Academic medical center SCI outpatient clinic. Convenience sample of 37 men with chronic SCI and 10 healthy control subjects. Not applicable. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein (CRP). The following results achieved statistical significance at P less than .05. Asymptomatic chronic SCI patients differed from referent controls with respect to serum CRP levels but not IL-6 or TNF-alpha. In SCI patients, higher levels of CRP correlated negatively with hemoglobin and albumin levels. A longer time since injury correlated with lower TNF-alpha values, whereas higher TNF-alpha levels correlated with higher serum albumin. Pressure ulcers and indwelling urinary catheters were associated with higher mean levels of CRP but not of the cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6. Intermittent urinary catheterization was associated with lower levels of CRP when compared with other methods of bladder management. Asymptomatic people with long-term SCI, especially those with indwelling urinary catheters, showed serologic evidence of a systemic inflammatory state. There was no evidence of an elevation in proinflammatory cytokines. Detection of an ongoing systemic inflammatory response in apparently healthy people with indwelling urinary catheters and small skin ulcers further supports the aggressive pursuit of catheter-free voiding options and pressure ulcer healing.

  5. C-reactive protein as a predictor of disease in smokers and former smokers: a review

    PubMed Central

    Tonstad, S; Cowan, J L

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking is a classical and a major risk factor in the development of several diseases with an inflammatory component, including cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Improvements in assays for protein markers of inflammation have led to many studies on these factors and their roles in disease. Aims: C-reactive protein (CRP) is one such marker and this review focuses on the evidence for using CRP as a diagnostic marker and how levels of this protein are modified according to the smoking status of the patient, both in terms of the current amount of cigarettes smoked and how CRP levels change following smoking cessation. Conclusions: Assay of CRP levels may be useful in monitoring disease progression and determining risk of future cardiovascular complications. However, as this marker is also an indicator of acute inflammation and challenges to the immune system, some caution must be exercised in interpreting the available data on CRP levels in patients with different chronic comorbidities. PMID:19732183

  6. Electrochemical detection of C-reactive protein using Copper nanoparticles and hybridization chain reaction amplifying signal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjun; Zhang, Wenjuan; Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2017-12-15

    In this study, a sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) is described. In design, Copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) were used for signal tag and hybridization chain reaction (HCR)amplified output signal. The immunosensor fabrication involved three steps: (i) primary antibodies (Ab 1 ) were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs); (ii) the sandwich-type structure formation contained "primary antibodies-antigen-secondary antibodies conjugated with primer (Ab 2 -S 0 )"; and (iii) long DNA concatemers intercalating amounts of Cu NPs was linked to the sandwich-type structure via hybridization reaction. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to record the response signal of the immunosensor in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Under optimal conditions, the anodic peak currents of Cu NPs at the peak potential of about 0.08V(VS.SCE) were linear with the logarithm of CRP concentration in the range of 1.0 fg mL -1 to 100 ng mL -1 with a detection limit of 0.33 fg mL -1 (at signal/noise [S/N] = 3). In addition, the practical application of immunosensor was evaluated by analyzing CRP in real human serum samples, the recoveries obtained were within 95.3%-103.8%, indicating the immunosensor possessed potential application ability for practical disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Levels of neopterin and C-reactive protein in pregnant women with fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Erkenekli, K; Keskin, U; Uysal, B; Kurt, Y G; Sadir, S; Çayci, T; Ergün, A; Erkaya, S; Danişman, N; Uygur, D

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pregnant women with fetal growth restriction (FGR) have higher plasma neopterin and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations compared with those with uncomplicated pregnancy. A total of 34 pregnant women with FGR and 62 patients with uncomplicated pregnancy were included. Neopterin and CRP levels were measured at the time of diagnosis. The primary outcome of this study was to compare the neopterin and CRP levels in pregnant women with FGR and those with uncomplicated pregnancies. The secondary outcome of our study was to evaluate the correlation between fetal birth weight and maternal neopterin levels. The serum neopterin levels were significantly elevated in pregnant women with FGR (22.71 ± 7.70 vs 19.15 ± 8.32). However, CRP was not elevated in pregnant women with FGR (7.47 ± 7.59 vs 5.29 ± 3.58). These findings support the hypothesis that pregnancy with FGR is associated with a marked increase in macrophage activation and the natural immune system.

  8. Changes in serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and thrombomodulin levels under periodontal ultrasonic debridement.

    PubMed

    Ushida, Yuka; Koshy, Geena; Kawashima, Yoko; Kiji, Makoto; Umeda, Makoto; Nitta, Hiroshi; Nagasawa, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of single-visit full-mouth mechanical debridement (FMD) and quadrant-wise mechanical debridement (QMD) on the levels of serum interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) and soluble thrombomodulin. Thirty-six subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly allocated to three groups: undergoing QMD, single-visit FMD with povidone iodine or with water. Serum IL-6 and soluble thrombomodulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and serum CRP was measured by the latex-enhanced nephelometric method. Serum IL-6 level increased significantly immediately after debridement in all the three groups, with this increase being greatest in the full-mouth groups. However, the increase in the full-mouth groups was not significantly higher than that of quadrant-wise group. In the quadrant-wise group, serum IL-6 level decreased significantly 1 month after debridement compared with baseline. Serum-soluble thrombomodulin decreased significantly in the full-mouth groups but not in the quadrant-wise group. Changes in CRP level were not significant at baseline or after debridement in all the three groups. FMD increased serum IL-6 and reduced serum-soluble thrombomodulin to a greater extent than QMD, suggesting that the former technique has stronger transient effects on systemic vascular endothelial functions than the latter.

  9. The effect of periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Shah, Samir; Budhiraja, Shilpa; Desai, Khushboo; Shah, Chirag; Mehta, Dhaval

    2013-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis in amultifactorial inflammatory disease which is caused by various microorganisms. Many studies have found close association between chronic periodontitis and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRPis an inflammatory marker which increases in all inflammatory condition. The present clinical study was designed to show the effect of periodontal treatment on the CRP levels of gingival crevicular fluid and to determine the effect of nonsurgical therapy in minimizing the CRP levels in chronic generalized periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid was collected using a micro capillary pipette that was hand calibrated at every 1 mm till 10 mm, from selected sites in the subjects on the 1st, 14th and 45th days. Decreased CRP levels of gingival crevicular fluid were observed at the end of the study. There was a 37% reduction in probing pocket depth and 45% gain in clinical attachment level and a reduction of about 57% after 14 days and 90% reduction of CRP levels in gingival crevicular fluid after 45 days. Thus, the results show that the presence of CRP level is more significant in gingival crevicular fluid and confirms the underlying inflammatory component of the disease activity in chronic periodontitis.

  10. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein levels in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Farin Kiany; Karimi, Noozhan; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Roozbeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been implicated as a possible mediator of the association between periodontitis and several systemic diseases. This study evaluated the impact of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the serum levels of CRP in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on hemodialysis. A total of 77 CKD patients on hemodialysis were included in this study. At baseline, periodontal examination was assessed for all the patients, and chronic periodontitis was defined through clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth, according to the American Association of Periodontology. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment was performed and serum levels of CRP were evaluated at baseline and 8 weeks after periodontal treatment. Periodontal treatment resulted in significant reductions in CRP levels (p < 0.001). The difference between pre- and posttreatment CRP concentrations did not show any significant relationship with the severity of periodontitis. Periodontitis is an important source of systemic inflammation in CKD patients. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment can effectively reduce the serum level of CRP in these patients.

  11. Sensitivity of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-reactive Protein in Childhood Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Markku J. T.; Kallio, Pentti E.; Peltola, Heikki

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the examination of clinical signs, several laboratory markers have been measured for diagnostics and monitoring of pediatric septic bone and joint infections. Traditionally erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte cell count have been used, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) has gained in popularity. We monitored 265 children at ages 3 months to 15 years with culture-positive osteoarticular infections with a predetermined series of ESR, CRP, and leukocyte count measurements. On admission, ESR exceeded 20 mm/hour in 94% and CRP exceeded 20 mg/L in 95% of the cases, the mean (± standard error of the mean) being 51 ± 2 mm/hour and 87 ± 4 mg/L, respectively. ESR normalized in 24 days and CRP in 10 days. Elevated CRP gave a slightly better sensitivity in diagnostics than ESR, but best sensitivity was gained with the combined use of ESR and CRP (98%). Elevated ESR or CRP was seen in all cases during the first 3 days. Measuring ESR and CRP on admission can help the clinician rule out an acute osteoarticular infection. CRP normalizes faster than ESR, providing a clear advantage in monitoring recovery. Level of Evidence: Level II, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19533263

  12. Serum C-reactive protein level in COPD patients stratified according to GOLD 2011 grading classification

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hua; Wang, Wan-Yu; Hu, Su-Xian; Shi, Yong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2011 grading classification has been used to evaluate the severity of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about the relationship between the systemic inflammation and this classification. We aimed to study the relationship between serum CRP and the components of the GOLD 2011 grading classification. Methods: C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in 391 clinically stable COPD patients and in 50 controls from June 2, 2015 to October 31, 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University. The association between CRP levels and the components of the GOLD 2011 grading classification were assessed. Results: Correlation was found with the following variables: GOLD 2011 group (0.240), age (0.227), pack year (0.136), forced expiratory volume in one second % predicted (FEV1%; -0.267), forced vital capacity % predicted (-0.210), number of acute exacerbations in the past year (0.265), number of hospitalized exacerbations in the past year (0.165), British medical Research Council dyspnoea scale (0.121), COPD assessment test score (CAT, 0.233). Using multivariate analysis, FEV1% and CAT score manifested the strongest negative association with CRP levels. Conclusions: CRP levels differ in COPD patients among groups A-D based on GOLD 2011 grading classification. CRP levels are associated with several important clinical variables, of which FEV1% and CAT score manifested the strongest negative correlation. PMID:28083044

  13. Saliva C-reactive protein as a biomarker of metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Dezayee, Zhian Mahmood Ibrahim; Al-Nimer, Marwan Salih Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) has been used in the risk assessment of coronary events. Human saliva mirrors the body's health and well-being and is noninvasive, easy to collect, and ideal for third-world countries as well as for large patient screening. This study aimed to screen the saliva CRP qualitatively in patients with diabetes (Type 1 and 2) taking in considerations, the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Center for diabetes mellitus, prospective study. A total number of 50 Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, 25 Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients, and 25 healthy subjects were recruited from the center for diabetes mellitus. Each patient was assessed clinically, and the anthropometric measures, glycemic status, and lipid profiles were determined. Stimulated salivary flow rate and saliva CRP were determined. All calculations analysis was made using Excel 2003 program for Windows. The results showed that the salivary flow rate in T1D was less than healthy subjects and T2D and CRP was found positive (6 mg/L) in 36% and 56% of patients with T1D and T2D, respectively. Saliva CRP was found to be related to the anthropometric measurement, blood pressure, and glycemic control. We conclude that saliva CRP may be used as a biomarker for metabolic syndrome and its value is obvious in T2D rather than in T1D.

  14. C-reactive protein enhances IgG-mediated phagocyte responses and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M J; Porcelijn, Leendert; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Bruin, Marrie C A; Visser, Remco; Roos, Dirk; Schasfoort, Richard B M; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2015-03-12

    Immune-mediated platelet destruction is most frequently caused by allo- or autoantibodies via Fcγ receptor-dependent phagocytosis. Disease severity can be predicted neither by antibody isotype nor by titer, indicating that other factors play a role. Here we show that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP), a ligand for Fc receptors on phagocytes, enhances antibody-mediated platelet destruction by human phagocytes in vitro and in vivo in mice. Without antiplatelet antibodies, CRP was found to be inert toward platelets, but it bound to phosphorylcholine exposed after oxidation triggered by antiplatelet antibodies, thereby enhancing platelet phagocytosis. CRP levels were significantly elevated in patients with allo- and autoantibody-mediated thrombocytopenias compared with healthy controls. Within a week, intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia led to significant decrease of CRP levels, increased platelet numbers, and clinically decreased bleeding severity. Furthermore, the higher the level of CRP at diagnosis, the longer it took before stable platelet counts were reached. These data suggest that CRP amplifies antibody-mediated platelet destruction and may in part explain the aggravation of thrombocytopenia on infections. Hence, targeting CRP could offer new therapeutic opportunities for these patients. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein as useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Yi-Yen; Sheu, Bor-Fuh; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Loke, Song-Seng; Chen, Jih-Chang; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. C-reactive protein (CRP) and long-term air pollution with a focus on ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Veronika; Wolf, Kathrin; Breitner, Susanne; Rückerl, Regina; Koenig, Wolfgang; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Cyrys, Josef; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2018-04-01

    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution contributes to the global burden of disease by particularly affecting cardiovascular (CV) causes of death. We investigated the association between particle number concentration (PNC), a marker for ultrafine particles, and other air pollutants and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as a potential link between air pollution and CV disease. We cross-sectionally analysed data from the second follow up (2013 and 2014) of the German KORA baseline survey which was conducted in 1999-2001. Residential long-term exposure to PNC and various other size fractions of particulate matter (PM 10 with size of <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, PM coarse 2.5-10 μm or PM 2.5  < 2.5 μm, respectively), soot (PM 2.5 abs: absorbance of PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (nitrogen dioxide NO 2 or oxides NO x , respectively) and ozone (O 3 ) were estimated by land-use regression models. Associations between annual air pollution concentrations and hs-CRP were modeled in 2252 participants using linear regression models adjusted for several confounders. Potential effect-modifiers were examined by interaction terms and two-pollutant models were calculated for pollutants with Spearman inter-correlation <0.70. Single pollutant models for PNC, PM 10 , PM coarse , PM 2.5 abs, NO 2 and NO x showed positive but non-significant associations with hs-CRP. For PNC, an interquartile range (2000 particles/cm 3 ) increase was associated with a 3.6% (95% CI: -0.9%, 8.3%) increase in hs-CRP. A null association was found for PM 2.5 . Effect estimates were higher for women, non-obese participants, for participants without diabetes and without a history of cardiovascular disease whereas ex-smokers showed lower estimates compared to smokers or non-smokers. For O 3 , the dose-response function suggested a non-linear relationship. In two-pollutant models, adjustment for PM 2.5 strengthened the effect estimates for PNC and PM 10 (6.3% increase per 2000 particles

  17. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  18. Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase and C-reactive Protein in Dogs Treated With Anticonvulsants (Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide).

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Viviana; Teles, Mariana; Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Rodón, Jaume; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Animals treated with anticonvulsant drugs may have increased canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPLI) values. Inflammatory conditions and specifically acute pancreatitis are of major concern in these animals. Elevation in C-reactive protein is being associated with inflammatory status in dogs and it has been correlated with the clinical severity of pancreatitis. In the present study, we investigated if there is a correlation between the cPLI increase, changes in C-reactive protein and hepatic enzymes, as well as the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) in dogs with anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital, or potassium bromide or both). Increased values of pancreas-specific lipase were found in 6.8% of the animals in treatment with anticonvulsants, and this increase is correlated with the increase in triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase, and alanine aminotransferase but not with C-reactive protein levels, which suggests a possible induction or release phenomenon rather than a clear severe AP. C-reactive protein levels did not affect cPLI values on the population studied. Only 2 animals had clinical and analytical data suggestive of AP, indicating a low prevalence (0.6%). In conclusion, cPLI may be increased in a low percentage of animals with anticonvulsants treatment and its increase may not be associated with severe AP. It may be induced by the anticonvulsants drugs; however, further studies are advised to rule out other possible causes that increased cPLI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasonography and C-reactive protein can predict the outcomes of voiding cystography after the first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Kido, Jun; Yoshida, Fuminori; Sakaguchi, Katsuya; Ueno, Yasushi; Yanai, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated whether sex, clinical variables, laboratory variables or ultrasonography predicted the presence of vesicoureteric reflux during the first episode of urinary tract infection in paediatric patients. We also aimed to define the criteria that indicated the need for voiding cystography testing. We used voiding cystography to investigate 200 patients who experienced their first urinary tract infection at our institution between 2004 and 2013 and retrospectively analysed the data by reviewing their medical records. Sex (p = 0.001), peak blood C-reactive protein levels (p < 0.001), the duration of fever after antibiotic administration (p = 0.007) and the ultrasonography findings grade (p < 0.001) were significantly different between patients with and without vesicoureteric reflux. Grade IV-V ultrasonography findings and C-reactive protein levels of ≥80 mg/L predicted vesicoureteric reflux with a sensitivity, specificity and odds ratio of 47.8%, 87.8% and 6.59 (95% confidence interval = 3.26-13.33), respectively (p < 0.001). Voiding cystography should be performed for patients with C-reactive protein levels of ≥80 mg/L and grade IV-V ultrasonography findings, but is not necessary in patients with C-reactive protein levels of <80 mg/L and grade I-III ultrasonography findings. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, G; Hutchinson, W L; Pepys, M B; Boeing, H; Muche, R; Brenner, H; Koenig, W

    2000-12-01

    To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence of diabetes and hypertension were assessed in 747 men and 956 women aged 18-89 years who were participating in the population-based National Health and Nutrition Survey, which was carried out in former West Germany in 1987-1988. There was a statistically significant positive crude correlation between C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P < 0.0001). A negative correlation was found between C-reactive protein and HDL cholesterol (R = 0.13, P < 0.0001). The age-adjusted geometric means of C-reactive protein concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P < 0.0001). The data suggest that a variety of features of the metabolic syndrome are associated with a systemic inflammatory response.

  1. Effects of Different Exercise Intensities with Isoenergetic Expenditures on C-Reactive Protein and Blood Lipid Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Te Hung; Yang, Chang Bin; Hsu, Chin Hsing

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on C-reactive protein (CRP), and whether changes in CRP levels correlated with blood lipid levels. Ten men exercised at 25%, 65%, and 85% of their maximum oxygen consumption rates. Participants' blood was analyzed for CRP and blood lipid levels before and after the exercise sessions.…

  2. C-reactive Protein is a Useful Marker for Early Prediction of Anastomotic Leakage after Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Eijiro; Matsuda, Yasunori; Gyobu, Ken; Lee, Shigeru; Kishida, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yushi; Hashiba, Ryoya; Osugi, Harushi; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2015-06-01

    Esophageal anastomotic leakage is one of the most fatal complications after esophagectomy and increases the hospitalization length. We aimed to identify a convenient clinical marker of anastomotic leakage in the early postoperative period. In total, 108 patients who underwent esophagectomy were retrospectively screened, and 96 were used to validate the overall results. All 108 patients underwent physical examinations and determination of their white blood cell count, C-reactive protein level, platelet count, fibrinogen level, fibrin degradation product level, and antithrombin III level until postoperative day 6. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 21 of the 108 patients (median detection, 8 days). The C-reactive protein level on postoperative day 3 and fibrinogen level on postoperative day 4 in the leakage group were significantly higher than those in the nonleakage group. Receiver operating characteristic curves for detection of anastomotic leakage were constructed; the cutoff value of C-reactive protein on postoperative day 3 was 8.62 mg/dL, and that of fibrinogen on postoperative day 4 was 712 mg/dL. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 23 of the 96 patients in the validation group. There was a significant difference between the leakage and nonleakage groups when the C-reactive protein threshold on postoperative day 3 was set at 8.62 mg/dL. However, there was no difference between the groups when the fibrinogen threshold on postoperative day 4 was set at 712 mg/dL. The C-reactive protein level on postoperative day 3 is a valuable predictor of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy and might allow for earlier management of this complication.

  3. C-reactive protein as a prognostic indicator for rebleeding in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Soon-Wook; Kang, Seung Hun; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, Bo-In; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-05-01

    In patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, rebleeding after an initial treatment is observed in 10-20% and is associated with mortality. To investigate whether the initial serum C-reactive protein level could predict the risk of rebleeding in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This was a retrospective study using prospectively collected data for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Initial clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and C-reactive protein levels were compared between those with and without 30-day rebleeding. A total of 453 patients were included (mean age, 62 years; male, 70.9%). The incidence of 30-day rebleeding was 15.9%. The mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in these patients than in those without rebleeding (P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve with a cutoff value of 0.5mg/dL was 0.689 (P<0.001). High serum C-reactive protein level (odds ratio, 2.98; confidence interval, 1.65-5.40) was independently associated with the 30-day rebleeding risk after adjustment for the main confounding risk factors, including age, blood pressure, and initial haemoglobin level. The serum C-reactive protein was an independent risk factor for 30-day rebleeding in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, indicating a possible role as a useful screening indicator for predicting the risk of rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of robenacoxib on the concentration of C-reactive protein in synovial fluid from dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David; Eckersall, Peter David; Waterston, Mary; Marchetti, Veronica; Rota, Alessandra; McCulloch, Eilidh; Sbrana, Silvia

    2013-03-01

    Robenacoxib is a novel and highly selective inhibitor of COX-2 in dogs and cats and because of its acidic nature is regarded as being tissue-selective. Thirty four dogs with stifle osteoarthritis secondary to failure of the cranial cruciate ligament were recruited into this study. Lameness, radiographic features, synovial cytology and C-reactive protein concentrations in serum and synovial fluid were assessed before and 28 days after commencing a course of Robenacoxib at a dose of 1 mg/kg SID. There was a significant reduction in the lameness score (P < 0.01) and an increase in the radiographic score (P < 0.05) between pre- and post-treatment assessments. There was no difference between pre- (median 1.49 mg/l; Q1-Q3 0.56-4.24 mg/L) and post - (1.10 mg/L; 0.31-1.78 mg/L) treatment serum C-reactive protein levels although synovial fluid levels were significantly reduced (pre- : 0.44 mg/L; 0.23-1.62 mg/L; post- : 0.17 mg/L; 0.05-0.49 mg/L) (P < 0.05). There was no correlation between C-reactive protein concentrations in serum and matched synovial fluid samples. Robenacoxib proved effective in reducing lameness in dogs with failure of the cranial cruciate ligament and osteoarthritis of the stifle joint. The drug also reduced levels of C-reactive protein in the synovial fluid taken from the affected stifle joint. Robenacoxib appears to reduce articular inflammation as assessed by C-reactive protein which supports the concept that Robenacoxib is a tissue-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

  5. The effect of robenacoxib on the concentration of C-reactive protein in synovial fluid from dogs with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robenacoxib is a novel and highly selective inhibitor of COX-2 in dogs and cats and because of its acidic nature is regarded as being tissue-selective. Thirty four dogs with stifle osteoarthritis secondary to failure of the cranial cruciate ligament were recruited into this study. Lameness, radiographic features, synovial cytology and C-reactive protein concentrations in serum and synovial fluid were assessed before and 28 days after commencing a course of Robenacoxib at a dose of 1 mg/kg SID. Results There was a significant reduction in the lameness score (P < 0.01) and an increase in the radiographic score (P < 0.05) between pre- and post-treatment assessments. There was no difference between pre- (median 1.49 mg/l; Q1-Q3 0.56-4.24 mg/L) and post – (1.10 mg/L; 0.31-1.78 mg/L) treatment serum C-reactive protein levels although synovial fluid levels were significantly reduced (pre- : 0.44 mg/L; 0.23-1.62 mg/L; post- : 0.17 mg/L; 0.05-0.49 mg/L) (P < 0.05). There was no correlation between C-reactive protein concentrations in serum and matched synovial fluid samples. Conclusions Robenacoxib proved effective in reducing lameness in dogs with failure of the cranial cruciate ligament and osteoarthritis of the stifle joint. The drug also reduced levels of C-reactive protein in the synovial fluid taken from the affected stifle joint. Robenacoxib appears to reduce articular inflammation as assessed by C-reactive protein which supports the concept that Robenacoxib is a tissue-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:23452411

  6. Approach to the Highly Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Vranic, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with ESRD, kidney transplant offers significant survival and quality-of-life advantages compared with dialysis. But for patients seeking transplant who are highly sensitized, wait times have traditionally been long and options limited. The approach to the highly sensitized candidate for kidney transplant has changed substantially over time owing to new advances in desensitization, options for paired donor exchange (PDE), and changes to the deceased-donor allocation system. Initial evaluation should focus on determining living-donor availability because a compatible living donor is always the best option. However, for most highly sensitized candidates this scenario is unlikely. For candidates with an incompatible donor, PDE can improve the prospects of finding a compatible living donor but for many highly sensitized patients the probability of finding a match in the relatively small pools of donors in PDE programs is limited. Desensitization of a living donor/recipient pair with low levels of incompatibility is another reasonable approach. But for pairs with high levels of pathologic HLA antibodies, outcomes after desensitization for the patient and allograft are less optimal. Determining the degree of sensitization by calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) is critical in counseling the highly sensitized patient on expected wait times to deceased-donor transplant. For candidates with a high likelihood of finding a compatible deceased donor in a reasonable time frame, waiting for a kidney is a good strategy. For the candidate without a living donor and with a low probability of finding a deceased-donor match, desensitization on the waiting list can be considered. The approach to the highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate must be individualized and requires careful discussion among the transplant center, patient, and referring nephrologist. PMID:26915916

  7. Long-term effect of antiepileptic drug switch on serum lipids and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Scott; Miller, Rachael; Shah, Krunal; Chervoneva, Inna; Nei, Maromi; Skidmore, Christopher; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies have shown that switching patients from inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to lamotrigine, levetiracetam, or topiramate reduces serum lipids and C-reactive protein (CRP). These studies were all of short duration, and some drugs, such as zonisamide, have not been investigated. We recruited 41 patients taking phenytoin or carbamazepine who were being switched to zonisamide, lamotrigine, or levetiracetam. We measured serum lipids and CRP before the switch, >6weeks after, and >6months after. An untreated control group (n=14) underwent similar measurement. We combined these data with those of our previous investigation (n=34 patients and 16 controls) of a very similar design. There were no differences in outcome measures between the two inducing AEDs nor among the three noninducing AEDs. Total cholesterol (TC), atherogenic lipids, and CRP were higher under inducer treatment than in controls. All measures were elevated under inducer treatment relative to noninducer treatment, including TC (24mg/dL higher, 95% CI: 17.5-29.9, p<0.001) and CRP (72% higher, 95% CI: 41%-111%, p<0.001). The difference between drug treatments was clinically meaningful for atherogenic lipids (16%, 95% CI: 11%-20%, p<0.001) but small for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (5%, 95% CI: 1%-9%, p<0.05). All measures were stable between 6weeks and 6months after drug switch. We demonstrate that switching from inducing to noninducing AEDs produces an enduring reduction in serum lipids and CRP. These results provide further evidence that inducing AEDs may be associated with elevated vascular disease risk. These are the first vascular risk marker data in patients taking zonisamide, which shows a profile similar to that of other noninducing AEDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma prognostic determination using pre-operative serum C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zi-Ying; Liang, Zhen-Xing; Zhuang, Pei-Lin; Chen, Jie-Wei; Cao, Yun; Yan, Li-Xu; Yun, Jing-Ping; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-10-12

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute inflammatory response biomarker, has been recognized as an indicator of malignant disease progression. However, the prognostic significance of CRP levels collected before tumor removal in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma requires further investigation. We sampled the CRP levels in 140 patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who underwent hepatectomies with regional lymphadenectomies between 2006 and 2013. A retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological data was performed. We focused on the impact of serum CRP on the patients' cancer-specific survival and recurrence-free survival rates. High levels of preoperative serum CRP were significantly associated with well-established clinicopathologic features, including gender, advanced tumor stage, and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels (P < 0.05). Univariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between high levels of serum CRP and adverse cancer-specific survival (P = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (P < 0.001). In patients with stage I/II intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, the serum CRP level was a prognostic indicator for cancer-specific survival. In patients with stage I/II or stage III/IV, the serum CRP level was a prognostic indicator for recurrence-free survival (P < 0.05). Additionally, multivariate analysis identified serum CRP level in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma as an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.05). We confirmed a significant association of elevated pre-operative CRP levels with poor clinical outcomes for the tested patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Our results indicate that the serum CRP level may represent a useful factor for patient stratification in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma management.

  9. Low carbohydrate, high fat diet increases C-reactive protein during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Janet W; Turpyn, Abigail D

    2007-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with elevated risk of heart disease and may be linked to oxidative stress in obesity. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of weight loss diet composition (low carbohydrate, high fat, LC or high carbohydrate, low fat, HC) on inflammation and to determine whether this was related to oxidative stress. Twenty nine overweight women, BMI 32.1 +/- 5.4 kg/m(2), were randomly assigned to a self-selected LC or HC diet for 4 wks. Weekly group sessions and diet record collections helped enhance compliance. Body weight, markers of inflammation (serum interleukin-6, IL-6; C-reactive protein, CRP) oxidative stress (urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2alpha, 8-epi) and fasting blood glucose and free fatty acids were measured weekly. The diets were similar in caloric intake (1357 kcal/d LC vs. 1361 HC, p=0.94), but differed in macronutrients (58, 12, 30 and 24, 59, 18 for percent of energy as fat, carbohydrate, and protein for LC and HC, respectively). Although LC lost more weight (3.8 +/- 1.2 kg LC vs. 2.6 +/- 1.7 HC, p=0.04), CRP increased 25%; this factor was reduced 43% in HC (p=0.02). For both groups, glucose decreased with weight loss (85.4 vs. 82.1 mg/dl for baseline and wk 4, p<0.01), while IL-6 increased (1.39 to 1.62 pg/mL, p=0.04). Urinary 8-epi varied differently over time between groups (p<0.05) with no consistent pattern. Diet composition of the weight loss diet influenced a key marker of inflammation in that LC increased while HC reduced serum CRP but evidence did not support that this was related to oxidative stress.

  10. C-reactive protein and familial risk for dementia: a phenotype for successful cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jeremy M; Schmeidler, James; Beeri, Michal S; Rosendorff, Clive; Sano, Mary; Grossman, Hillel T; Carrión-Baralt, José R; Bespalova, Irina N; West, Rebecca; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2012-09-11

    Identifying phenotypes for successful cognitive aging, intact cognition into late-old age (>age 75), can help identify genes and neurobiological systems that may lead to interventions against and prevention of late-life cognitive impairment. The association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with cognitive impairment and dementia, observed primarily in young-elderly samples, appears diminished or reversed in late-old age (75+ years). A family history study determined if high CRP levels in late-old aged cognitively intact probands are associated with a reduced risk of dementia in their first-degree family members, suggesting a familial successful cognitive aging phenotype. The primary sample was 1,329 parents and siblings of 277 cognitively intact male veteran probands at least 75 years old. The replication sample was 202 relatives of 51 cognitively intact community-ascertained probands at least 85 years old. Relatives were assessed for dementia by proband informant interview. Their hazard ratio (HR) for dementia as a function of the proband's log-transformed CRP was calculated using the proportional hazards model. Covarying for key demographics, higher CRP in probands was strongly associated with lower risk of dementia in relatives (HR = 0.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.74], p < 0.02). The replication sample relationship was in the same direction, stronger in magnitude, and also significant (HR = 0.15 [95% CI 0.06, 0.37], p < 0.0001). Relatives of successful cognitive aging individuals with high levels of CRP are relatively likely to remain free of dementia. High CRP in successful cognitive aging individuals may constitute a phenotype for familial-and thus possibly genetic-successful cognitive aging.

  11. C-reactive protein, APOE genotype and longitudinal cognitive change in an older population

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Thomas A. S.; Adler, Amanda L.; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; Marioni, Riccardo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: circulating measures of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with an increased risk of future cognitive decline. However, the nature of the relationship among the very old (>75 years) is unclear. Cross-sectional evidence suggests that elevated CRP may even be protective in this age group. This study examines these associations longitudinally. Methods: logistic regression was used to investigate the association between CRP and drop in cognitive performance (≥3 point change on the Mini-Mental State Examination) over a 4-year period in a population of 266 people, mean age 77 years. Results: increased levels of CRP were associated with a decreased risk of a drop in cognitive performance; however, this association was only seen in those without an APOE e4 allele [odds ratio of decline per unit increase in ln(CRP) 0.57, P = 0.04]. The magnitude of the finding remained consistent after adjustment for cardiovascular confounders (smoking, drinking, MI, stroke, diabetes, education, medication and blood pressure). For those with an e4 allele, the relationship with longitudinal cognitive decline was neither statistically significant nor in a consistent direction after controlling for acute inflammation. Conclusions: this study strengthens previous cross-sectional findings and shows elevated levels of CRP to be linked to a decreased risk of longitudinal cognitive decline in the very old. However, as with prior analyses, this was only observed in those not carrying an APOE e4 allele. Future work on larger APOE e4 allele carrying samples is required to determine the nature of the association in this population. PMID:24305621

  12. A new automated turbidimetric immunoassay for the measurement of canine C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Matilde; Pato, Raquel; Soler, Lourdes; Peña, Raquel; García, Natalia; Torrente, Carlos; Saco, Yolanda; Lampreave, Fermín; Bassols, Anna; Canalias, Francesca

    2018-03-01

    In dogs, as in humans, C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute phase protein that is rapidly and prominently increased after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. CRP measurements are used in the diagnosis and monitoring of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The study aim was to develop and validate a turbidimetric immunoassay for the quantification of canine CRP (cCRP), using canine-specific reagents and standards. A particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay was developed. The assay was set up in a fully automated analyzer, and studies of imprecision, limits of linearity, limits of detection, prozone effects, and interferences were carried out. The new method was compared with 2 other commercially available automated immunoassays for cCRP: one turbidimetric immunoassay (Gentian CRP) and one point-of-care assay based on magnetic permeability (Life Assays CRP). The within-run and between-day imprecision were <1.7% and 4.2%, respectively. The assay quantified CRP proportionally in an analytic range up to 150 mg/L, with a prozone effect appearing at cCRP concentrations >320 mg/L. No interference from hemoglobin (20 g/L), triglycerides (10 g/L), or bilirubin (150 mg/L) was detected. Good agreement was observed between the results obtained with the new method and the Gentian cCRP turbidimetric immunoassay. The new turbidimetric immunoassay (Turbovet canine CRP, Acuvet Biotech) is a rapid, robust, precise, and accurate method for the quantification of cCRP. The method can be easily set up in automated analyzers, providing a suitable tool for routine clinical use. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  13. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Valerie M; Kidney, Beverly A; Snead, Elisabeth C R; Myers, Sherry L; Jackson, Marion L

    2011-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive marker for inflammation in people and dogs. In people, an association between CRP concentration and atherosclerosis has been reported. Atherosclerosis is rare in dogs, but the Miniature Schnauzer breed may be at increased risk for developing this vascular disease. It is not known if CRP concentrations in Miniature Schnauzer dogs differ from those in other dog breeds. Our objectives were to validate an automated human CRP assay for measuring CRP in dogs and compare CRP concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs with those in non-Miniature Schnauzer breeds. Sera from 37 non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs with inflammatory disease were pooled and used to validate a human CRP immunoturbidimetric assay for measuring canine CRP. Blood was collected from 20 healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs and 41 healthy dogs of other breeds. Median serum CRP concentration of healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs was compared with that of healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. The human CRP assay measured CRP reliably with linearity between 0 and 20 mg/L. CRP concentration for healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 4.0 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-18.2 mg/L) was significantly higher than for the healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 0.1 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-10.7 mg/L); 17 of the 20 Miniature Schnauzer dogs had values that overlapped with those of the non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. Median CRP concentration of Miniature Schnauzer dogs was slightly higher than that of other breeds of dogs. A relationship between higher CRP concentration in Miniature Schnauzer dogs and idiopathic hyperlipidemia, pancreatitis, and possible increased risk for atherosclerosis remains to be determined. ©2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  14. Major depression, C-reactive protein, and incident ischemic heart disease in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Surtees, Paul G; Wainwright, Nicholas W J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2008-10-01

    To investigate how C-reactive protein (CRP) and major depressive disorder (MDD) relate to each other and to incident ischemic heart disease (IHD). Studies have shown that both depression and raised CRP concentration predict IHD and that elevated CRP is linked with increased risk of depression. A prospective case-control study of healthy men and women, aged 45 to 79 years, was undertaken within the United Kingdom European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. CRP concentration was measured for 726 (fatal or nonfatal) IHD cases and 1688 matched controls who completed a baseline MDD self-assessment, defined by restricted Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnostic criteria. Past-year MDD was associated with increased CRP concentration levels (4.31 mg/L for participants who reported episodes of MDD in the past year versus 3.65 mg/L for those who did not; p = .003), and the odds ratio for incident IHD associated with higher CRP concentration was 2.02 (comparing the top versus bottom quartile of CRP; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.52-2.68), adjusted for cigarette smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and cholesterol. The association between past-year MDD and IHD was independent of CRP (odds ratio = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.01-2.37, with adjustments as above, and additionally for CRP). Evidence from this study is supportive of an association between MDD and CRP although it suggests that CRP does not account for the association between MDD and future IHD.

  15. The mediating role of C-reactive protein and handgrip strength between obesity and walking limitation.

    PubMed

    Stenholm, Sari; Rantanen, Taina; Heliövaara, Markku; Koskinen, Seppo

    2008-03-01

    To study the association between different obesity indicators and walking limitation and to examine the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) and handgrip strength in that association. A cross-sectional, population-based study. The Health 2000 Survey with a representative sample of the Finnish population. Subjects aged 55 and older with complete data on body composition, CRP, handgrip strength, and walking limitation (N=2,208). Body composition, anthropometrics, CRP, medical conditions, handgrip strength, and maximal walking speed were measured in the health examination. Walking limitation was defined as maximal walking speed less than 1.2 m/s or difficulty walking half a kilometer. The two highest quartiles of body fat percentage and CRP and the two lowest quartiles of handgrip strength were all significantly associated with greater risk of walking limitation when chronic diseases and other covariates were taken into account. In addition, high CRP and low handgrip strength partially explained the association between high body fat percentage and walking limitation, but the risk of walking limitation remained significantly greater in persons in the two highest quartiles than in those in the lowest quartile of body fat percentage (odds ratio (OR)=1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.19-2.57 and OR=2.80, 95% CI 1.89-4.16). The prevalence of walking limitation was much higher in persons who simultaneously had high body fat percentage and low handgrip strength (61%) than in those with a combination of low body fat percentage and high handgrip strength (7%). Using body mass index and waist circumference as indicators of obesity yielded similar results as body fat percentage. Low-grade inflammation and muscle strength may partially mediate the association between obesity and walking limitation. Longitudinal studies and intervention trials are needed to verify this pathway.

  16. Targeting C-reactive protein for the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Ruth Gallimore, J.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Hawkins, Philip N.; Myers, Rebecca M.; Smith, Martin D.; Polara, Alessandra; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Ley, Steven V.; Andrew Aquilina, J.; Robinson, Carol V.; Sharif, Isam; Gray, Gillian A.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Kolstoe, Simon E.; Thompson, Darren; Wood, Stephen P.

    2006-04-01

    Complement-mediated inflammation exacerbates the tissue injury of ischaemic necrosis in heart attacks and strokes, the most common causes of death in developed countries. Large infarct size increases immediate morbidity and mortality and, in survivors of the acute event, larger non-functional scars adversely affect long-term prognosis. There is thus an important unmet medical need for new cardioprotective and neuroprotective treatments. We have previously shown that human C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein that binds to ligands exposed in damaged tissue and then activates complement, increases myocardial and cerebral infarct size in rats subjected to coronary or cerebral artery ligation, respectively. Rat CRP does not activate rat complement, whereas human CRP activates both rat and human complement. Administration of human CRP to rats is thus an excellent model for the actions of endogenous human CRP. Here we report the design, synthesis and efficacy of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane as a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CRP. Five molecules of this palindromic compound are bound by two pentameric CRP molecules, crosslinking and occluding the ligand-binding B-face of CRP and blocking its functions. Administration of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane to rats undergoing acute myocardial infarction abrogated the increase in infarct size and cardiac dysfunction produced by injection of human CRP. Therapeutic inhibition of CRP is thus a promising new approach to cardioprotection in acute myocardial infarction, and may also provide neuroprotection in stroke. Potential wider applications include other inflammatory, infective and tissue-damaging conditions characterized by increased CRP production, in which binding of CRP to exposed ligands in damaged cells may lead to complement-mediated exacerbation of tissue injury.

  17. C-reactive protein and cardiovascular risk in bipolar disorder patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marshe, Victoria S; Pira, Shamira; Mantere, Outi; Bosche, Bert; Looper, Karl J; Herrmann, Nathan; Müller, Daniel J; Rej, Soham

    2017-10-03

    New research is revealing a strong association between inflammatory markers with bipolar disorder (BD), potentially due to the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in BD. We aimed to synthesize the literature examining the association between the clinically most relevant inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with BD. MEDLINE, Embase and PsychInfo were systematically searched for all relevant English language articles published prior to April 2017. Articles were included if they examined the association between CRP and cardiovascular risk factors/disease in BD. Fifteen relevant articles were retrieved. Studies were mostly cross-sectional and heterogeneous in the cardiovascular risk factors investigated. Overall, elevated CRP was associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome, elevated body mass index, higher waist circumference, and obesity. CRP was inconsistently associated with elevated fasting glucose, insulin levels, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol levels, and low high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Atypical antipsychotic use may mediate some of these effects. No study examined CRP's association with actual cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease) in BD. In BD, CRP is associated with increases in several cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting that systemic inflammation could be a shared driving force for both outcomes of BD and cardiovascular risk. Further longitudinal research is needed in this area to verify causality, including an examination of actual cardiovascular disease. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments with anti-inflammatory effects should also be investigated, particularly in patients with increased CRP, for their potential to reduce cardiovascular risk in BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipid, lipoproteins, C-reactive protein, and hemostatic factors at baseline in the diabetes prevention program.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) appear to be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due at least in part to an increased prevalence of risk factors. We evaluated lipid, lipoprotein, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels at study entry in the largest multiethnic cohort of participants with IGT described, namely in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Measurements were performed at the baseline visit of 3,819 randomized participants of the DPP. Among 3,622 participants who were not taking lipid-lowering medicines, cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in relation to demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic measures. Major determinants of risk factors were assessed in multivariate analysis. Over 40% of participants had elevated triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and CRP levels and reduced HDL cholesterol levels. Men had higher triglyceride and tPA and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations and smaller LDL particle size than women, whereas women had higher CRP and fibrinogen levels. African Americans had less dyslipidemia but higher fibrinogen levels, and Asian Americans had lower CRP and fibrinogen levels than Caucasians and Hispanics. The surrogate measure of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) had the strongest association with HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and tPA levels and LDL particle size. BMI had the greatest influence on CRP and fibrinogen levels. Using median splits of indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion (insulin-to-glucose ratio), participants with greater insulin resistance had a more adverse CVD risk-factor profile, whereas insulin secretion had little influence on risk factors. The pattern of CVD risk factors in participants with IGT in the DPP exhibits substantial heterogeneity and is significantly influenced by race, sex, and age, as well as by obesity, glucose, and insulin measures. The degree of insulin

  19. C-reactive protein as early predictor of complications after minimally invasive colorectal resection.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzani, Corrado; Moro, Margherita; Mantovani, Guido; Lazzarini, Enrico; Conci, Simone; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Lippi, Giuseppe; Guglielmi, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and enhanced recovery programs have been increasingly adopted in colorectal surgery. The aim of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the usefulness of the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration measured on postoperative day 3 (POD-3) as an early predictor of severe complications after minimally invasive colorectal resection. From January 2014 to December 2015, 160 patients underwent resection of colorectal disease by MIS at the Division of General and Hepatobiliary Surgery, University of Verona Hospital Trust. Among these, CRP measurement was available on POD-3 in 143 patients. Conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery was necessary in 18 patients (12.6%). The mean POD-3 CRP concentration was significantly higher in patients who did than did not require conversions (205.6 ± 89.6 mg/L versus 104.6 ± 85.8 mg/L, respectively; P < 0.001), even in the absence of postoperative complications, and these patients were therefore excluded from the subsequent analysis. No deaths occurred during the study period, but complications occurred in 39 patients (31.2%). Among these, 24 patients (61.5%) developed surgery-related complications. A POD-3 CRP concentration of 120 mg/L was highly reliable for excluding the occurrence of surgery-related and severe complications. The negative predictive values for excluding surgery-related and severe complications was 86.8% and 97.7%, respectively. Assessment of the POD-3 CRP concentration after colorectal MIS is clinically significant for excluding the occurrence of surgery-related and severe complications. This measurement is a largely available, inexpensive, and easy-to-use tool that allows early and safe discharge in the setting of colorectal MIS and enhanced recovery programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lipid, Lipoproteins, C-Reactive Protein, and Hemostatic Factors at Baseline in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE — Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) appear to be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due at least in part to an increased prevalence of risk factors. We evaluated lipid, lipoprotein, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels at study entry in the largest multiethnic cohort of participants with IGT described, namely in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — Measurements were performed at the baseline visit of 3,819 randomized participants of the DPP. Among 3,622 participants who were not taking lipid-lowering medicines, cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in relation to demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic measures. Major determinants of risk factors were assessed in multivariate analysis. RESULTS — Over 40% of participants had elevated triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and CRP levels and reduced HDL cholesterol levels. Men had higher triglyceride and tPA and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations and smaller LDL particle size than women, whereas women had higher CRP and fibrinogen levels. African Americans had less dyslipidemia but higher fibrinogen levels, and Asian Americans had lower CRP and fibrinogen levels than Caucasians and Hispanics. The surrogate measure of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) had the strongest association with HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and tPA levels and LDL particle size. BMI had the greatest influence on CRP and fibrinogen levels. Using median splits of indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion (insulin-to-glucose ratio), participants with greater insulin resistance had a more adverse CVD risk-factor profile, whereas insulin secretion had little influence on risk factors. CONCLUSIONS — The pattern of CVD risk factors in participants with IGT in the DPP exhibits substantial heterogeneity and is significantly influenced by race, sex, and age, as well as

  1. Rosuvastatin Attenuates the Elevation in Blood Pressure Induced by Overexpression of Human C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuguang; Yang, Guangtian; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wang, Dao Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies demonstrated that C-reactive protein (CRP) acts as an inflammatory factor to induce endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in rats. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins suggest that they may attenuate CRP-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Methods Male SD rats were injected with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to induce overexpression of human CRP (AAV-hCRP) or GFP control (AAV-GFP). Two months after injection, rats were administered rosuvastatin by daily oral gavage (10 mg/kg) for two additional months. Blood pressure was monitored, serum hCRP concentrations were assessed by ELISA, and vascular levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), PI3K/Akt, Rho kinase, angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor, MAPK, SOD-1, and NADPH oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Results Rosuvastatin administration attenuated the increased blood pressure and loss of vascular eNOS expression in AAV-hCRP-treated rats. Rosuvastatin also activated PI3K/Akt, inhibited Rho kinase activity, and downregulated the AT1 receptor expression in aorta. Rosuvastatin reduced production of ROS through downregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22 phox and gp91 phox, and upregulation of SOD-1 expression. Conclusions Rosuvastatin attenuated the increase in blood pressure in AAV-hCRP-treated rats through endothelial protection and antioxidant effects. Our data reveals a novel mechanism through which statins may lower blood pressure and suggests the potential use of statins in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:21562509

  2. C-Reactive Protein and Prediction of 1-Year Mortality in Prevalent Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bazeley, Jonathan; Bieber, Brian; Li, Yun; Morgenstern, Hal; de Sequera, Patricia; Combe, Christian; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Gallagher, Martin; Port, Friedrich K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels remains uncommon in North America, although it is now routine in many countries. Using Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study data, our primary aim was to evaluate the value of CRP for predicting mortality when measured along with other common inflammatory biomarkers. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We studied 5061 prevalent hemodialysis patients from 2005 to 2008 in 140 facilities routinely measuring CRP in 10 countries. The association of CRP with mortality was evaluated using Cox regression. Prediction of 1-year mortality was assessed in logistic regression models with differing adjustment variables. Results Median baseline CRP was lower in Japan (1.0 mg/L) than other countries (6.0 mg/L). CRP was positively, monotonically associated with mortality. No threshold below which mortality rate leveled off was identified. In prediction models, CRP performance was comparable with albumin and exceeded ferritin and white blood cell (WBC) count based on measures of model discrimination (c-statistics, net reclassification improvement [NRI]) and global model fit (generalized R2). The primary analysis included age, gender, diabetes, catheter use, and the four inflammatory markers (omitting one at a time). Specifying NRI ≥5% as appropriate reclassification of predicted mortality risk, NRI for CRP was 12.8% compared with 10.3% for albumin, 0.8% for ferritin, and <0.1% for WBC. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the value of measuring CRP in addition to standard inflammatory biomarkers to improve mortality prediction in hemodialysis patients. Future studies are indicated to identify interventions that lower CRP and to identify whether they improve clinical outcomes. PMID:21868617

  3. Lower C-reactive protein and IL-6 associated with vegetarian diets are mediated by BMI.

    PubMed

    Jaceldo-Siegl, K; Haddad, E; Knutsen, S; Fan, J; Lloren, J; Bellinger, D; Fraser, G E

    2018-03-13

    The mechanism by which vegetarian diets are associated with less inflammation is not clear. We investigated the role of BMI as a mediator in the relationship between vegetarian diet and concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), and the cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. We used data from participants of the Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) Calibration (n = 893) and Biological Manifestations of Religion (n = 478) sub-studies. Vegetarian diet variations were determined based on reported intake of animal products assessed by FFQ. Combining all participants, the proportion of non-vegetarians (NVs), partial vegetarians (PVs), lacto-ovo vegetarians (LOVs), and strict vegetarians (SVs) was 44%, 16%, 31%, and 9%, respectively. NV and PV participants were older than other dietary groups, and non-vegetarians had the highest BMI. Mediation analyses supported the mediating effect of BMI in associations of vegetarian diet with CRP (p < 0.001 each for PV, LOV and SV), and with IL-6 (p < 0.05 each for PV, LOV and SV). Mediation by BMI was not evident between vegetarian diet and the biomarkers IL-10 and TNF-α. A direct pathway was significant only in the association between strict vegetarians and CRP (p = 0.017). The lower CRP and IL-6 concentrations among vegetarians may be mediated by BMI. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethnic differences in serum adipokine and C-reactive protein levels: the multiethnic cohort.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Conroy, S M; Ollberding, N J; Kim, Y; Lim, U; Cooney, R V; Franke, A A; Wilkens, L R; Hernandez, B Y; Goodman, M T; Henderson, B E; Kolonel, L N; Le Marchand, L; Maskarinec, G

    2014-11-01

    Ethnic disparities in metabolic disease risk may be the result of differences in circulating adipokines and inflammatory markers related to ethnic variations in obesity and body fat distribution. In a cross-sectional design, we compared serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in control subjects (321 men and 930 women) from two nested case-control studies conducted within the Multiethnic Cohort Study consisting of whites, Japanese Americans (JA), Latinos, African Americans (AA) and Native Hawaiians (NH). General linear models were applied to evaluate ethnic differences in log-transformed serum biomarker levels before and after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) at cohort entry. In comparison to whites, significant ethnic differences were observed for all biomarkers except TNF-α. JA men and women had significantly lower leptin and CRP levels than whites, and JA women also had lower adiponectin levels. Leptin was significantly higher in AA women (P < 0.01), adiponectin was significantly lower in AA men and women (P = 0.02 and P < 0.001), and CRP and IL-6 were significantly higher in AA men and women. Lower adiponectin (P < 0.0001) and CRP (P = 0.03) levels were the only biomarkers in NH women that differed from whites; no statistically significant differences were seen for NH men and for Latino men and women. When adjusted for BMI at cohort entry, the differences between the lowest and the highest values across ethnic groups decreased for all biomarkers except adiponectin in men indicating that ethnic differences were partially due to weight status. These findings demonstrate the ethnic variations in circulating adipokine and CRP levels before and after adjustment for BMI. Given the limitation of BMI as a general measure of obesity, further investigation with visceral and subcutaneous adiposity measures are warranted to elucidate ethnicity-related differences in adiposity in relation

  5. C-reactive protein in the hemolymph of Achatina fulica: interrelationship with sex steroids and metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Bose, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2000-04-01

    C-reactive protein in Achatina fulica (ACRP) is a normal component of the hemolymph. Its concentration varied from 1mg/ml in the newly hatched male, 3-5 mg/ml in the most active hermaphrodite and 1.5-2.8 mg/ml in the sedentary female showing a direct relationship of the protein with the active phase of the animal. ACRP has a molecular mass of 400 kDa and showed high absorbance in the region of 200-230 nm. It has four subunits with relative molecular masses of 110, 90, 62 and 60 kDa, respectively. Interestingly, rat platelet aggregation in vitro was significantly enhanced by ACRP in presence of 10 microM ADP and 2 mM Ca(2+) suggesting a probable role of ACRP in the aggregation of amoebocytes during the formation of plug in injured tissue. Like other vertebrate CRPs, ACRP also acts as a scavenger of chromatin fragments as evidenced by its binding to poly-L-arginine. Among the sex steroids, 4-androstenedione induces ACRP synthesis in the newly hatched male reaching the level found in the most active hermaphrodite phase (4 mg/ml). A very high molar ratio (5) of mercury binding to ACRP confirmed its sequestration property of heavy metals as observed in vertebrates. The level of metallothionein (MT) in the hemolymph gradually increased from the male to the hermaphrodite to the female, a pattern distinctly different from that of the ACRP titer. Since both MT and ACRP can sequester inorganic mercury, the high level of MT compensates functionally for the low titer of ACRP in the sedentary female.

  6. Breast feeding is related to C reactive protein concentration in adult women

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M J A; Williams, S M; Poulton, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of infant breast feeding on C reactive protein (CRP), a marker of low grade inflammation associated with cardiovascular mortality independent of serum cholesterol concentrations. Design Serum CRP, total cholesterol, anthropometric, and blood pressure measurements were performed along with assessment of infant breast feeding duration, birth weight, smoking status, adult socioeconomic status, number of health problems, and hormonal contraceptive use. Setting A New Zealand predominantly European descent community birth cohort. Participants 822 men and women aged 26 years. Main results There was a significant linear relation (p<0.001) between duration of breast feeding and adult CRP level in women. The geometric means (IQR) for CRP were 2.22 (1, 4) mg/l for women breast fed for six months or more and 3.95 (2, 8) mg/l for women not breast fed (ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69 (0.55 to 0.87). The linear association between cholesterol and breast feeding was also significant (p = 0.01), the geometric mean (IQR) total cholesterol levels being 4.62 (4.10, 5.10) for those breast fed for six months or more and 5.04 (4.5, 5.80) for those not breast fed (ratio, 95% CI: 0.92 (0.87, 0.98). There was no relation between CRP or total cholesterol and duration of breast feeding in men. Conclusions The findings of lower CRP with an increased duration of breast feeding in women suggest early postnatal nutrition may influence long term cardiovascular risk. PMID:16415265

  7. Breast feeding is related to C reactive protein concentration in adult women.

    PubMed

    Williams, M J A; Williams, S M; Poulton, R

    2006-02-01

    To assess the influence of infant breast feeding on C reactive protein (CRP), a marker of low grade inflammation associated with cardiovascular mortality independent of serum cholesterol concentrations. Serum CRP, total cholesterol, anthropometric, and blood pressure measurements were performed along with assessment of infant breast feeding duration, birth weight, smoking status, adult socioeconomic status, number of health problems, and hormonal contraceptive use. A New Zealand predominantly European descent community birth cohort. 822 men and women aged 26 years. There was a significant linear relation (p<0.001) between duration of breast feeding and adult CRP level in women. The geometric means (IQR) for CRP were 2.22 (1, 4) mg/l for women breast fed for six months or more and 3.95 (2, 8) mg/l for women not breast fed (ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69 (0.55 to 0.87). The linear association between cholesterol and breast feeding was also significant (p = 0.01), the geometric mean (IQR) total cholesterol levels being 4.62 (4.10, 5.10) for those breast fed for six months or more and 5.04 (4.5, 5.80) for those not breast fed (ratio, 95% CI: 0.92 (0.87, 0.98). There was no relation between CRP or total cholesterol and duration of breast feeding in men. The findings of lower CRP with an increased duration of breast feeding in women suggest early postnatal nutrition may influence long term cardiovascular risk.

  8. Serum C-reactive protein in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroplasty. Prospective study.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Carlos; Santana, Fernando; Marí, Raquel; Puig, Lluis; Alier, Albert

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the normalization curve of the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in elective shoulder arthroplasty. A prospective study including 58 consecutive patients who had undergone elective shoulder arthroplasty. Forty-one patients had received a Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty, 13 a Total Shoulder Arthroplasty and 4 a Hemiarthroplasty. Based on a pilot study, blood samples to determine CRP values were obtained at baseline (1 h before surgery), on the 1st, 2nd, 6th, 8th and 14th postoperative days. All the patients included presented no postoperative complications during inpatient stay or any re-admission during the three months after surgery. Mean CRP values showed a rapid increase on the 1st postoperative day (7-fold higher than the baseline in cuff tear arthropathy, 11-fold higher in primary osteoarthritis, 1-fold higher in acute fracture) and reached a peak on the 2nd postoperative day (14-fold higher than the baseline in cuff tear arthropathy, 24-fold higher in primary osteoarthritis and 2-fold higher in acute fracture). After the 2nd postoperative day CRP values began to slowly decrease reaching the normal range in the 14th postoperative day. Serum CRP levels after elective shoulder arthroplasty rapidly increase to reach a maximum peak after the 2nd surgery day and then slowly decrease to return to normality on the 14th day. Knowing the normalization curve of CRP can be a helpful tool to help in the diagnosis of acute infections in elective shoulder arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum C-reactive protein as a diagnostic biomarker in dogs with bacterial respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, S J; Laurila, H P; Lilja-Maula, L I; Melamies, M A; Rantala, M; Rajamäki, M M

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute-phase protein in dogs. Serum concentrations are low in healthy animals, but increase rapidly after inflammatory stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP concentrations in various respiratory diseases of dogs and to determine if CRP can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of bacterial respiratory diseases. A total of 106 privately owned dogs with respiratory diseases (17 with bacterial tracheobronchitis [BTB], 20 with chronic bronchitis [CB], 20 with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy [EBP], 12 with canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis [CIPF], 15 with cardiogenic pulmonary edema [CPE], and 22 with bacterial pneumonia [BP]) and 72 healthy controls. The study was conducted as a prospective cross-sectional observational study. CRP was measured in serum samples. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and laboratory findings, diagnostic imaging, and selected diagnostic methods such as cytological and microbiological analysis of respiratory samples, echocardiography, and histopathology. Dogs with BP had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 121 mg/L; interquartile range, 68-178 mg/L) than dogs with BTB (23, 15-38, P = .0003), CB (13, 8-14, P < .0001), EBP (5, 5-15, P < .0001), CIPF (17, 10-20, P < .0001), or CPE (19, 13-32, P < .0001) and healthy controls (14, 8-20, P < .0001). Dogs with BTB had significantly higher CRP concentrations than dogs with CB (P = .001) or EBP (P < .0001) and healthy controls (P = .029). These results indicate that CRP has potential for use as an additional biomarker, especially in the diagnostics of BP. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. C-Reactive Protein Levels in African Americans: A Diet and Lifestyle Randomized Community Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, James R.; Wirth, Michael; Davis, Lisa; Davis, Briana; Harmon, Brook E.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Drayton, Ruby; Murphy, E. Angela; Shivappa, Nitin; Wilcox, Sara; Adams, Swann A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Blake, Christine E.; Armstead, Cheryl A.; Steck, Susan E.; Blair, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Inflammation is linked to poor lifestyle behaviors and a variety of chronic diseases that are prevalent among African Americans, especially in the southeastern U.S. Purpose The goal of the study was to test the effect of a community-based diet, physical activity, and stress reduction intervention conducted in 2009–2012 on reducing serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in overweight and obese African-American adults. Methods An RCT intervention was designed jointly by members of African-American churches and academic researchers. In late 2012, regression (i.e., mixed) models were fit that included both intention-to-treat and post hoc analyses conducted to identify important predictors of intervention success. Outcomes were assessed at 3 months and 1 year. Results At baseline, the 159 individuals who were recruited in 13 churches and had evaluable outcome data were, on average, obese (BMI=33.1 [±7.1]) and had a mean CRP level of 3.7 (±3.9) mg/L. Reductions were observed in waist-to-hip ratio at 3 months (2%, p=0.03) and 1 year (5%, p<0.01). In female participants attending ≥60% of intervention classes, there was a significant decrease in CRP at 3 months of 0.8 mg/L (p=0.05), but no change after 1 year. No differences were noted in BMI or interleukin-6. Conclusions In overweight/obese, but otherwise “healthy,” African-American church members with very high baseline CRP levels, this intervention produced significant reductions in CRP at 3 and 12 months, and in waist-to-hip ratio, which is an important anthropometric predictor of overall risk of inflammation and downstream health effects. Trial registration This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01760902. PMID:24050419

  11. Antibiotic prescribing and C-reactive protein testing for pulmonary infections in patients with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Catharina M; Schouwenaars, Francesca M; Haagsma, Ellen; Evenhuis, Heleen M; Echteld, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Background Excessive prescribing of antibiotics in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) is common in the general population. Due to communication difficulties, it is hypothesised that prescriptions are even more commonplace in the primary care of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Point-of-care C-reactive protein (POC-CRP) testing might lead to more efficient prescribing of antibiotics. Aim To evaluate the effect of POC-CRP testing on antibiotic prescriptions for LRTIs by physicians specialising in the care of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Design and setting A prospective case-control study in four care centres for individuals with intellectual disabilities in The Netherlands. Method Between 27 October 2010 and 27 October 2011, a prospective efficiency study was performed with a base population of 1472 individuals. This population consisted of 882 individuals in whom POC-CRP tests were used and a control group (n = 590) in whom no POC-CRP test was performed. Results Of the 48 patients in the control group who were diagnosed as having an LRTI, 43 (90%) received antibiotics, compared with 59 out of the 144 patients (41%) in the case group (OR = 12.0; 95% CI = 4.1–35.3). No significant differences in outcome were found between both groups during a follow-up period of 1 month. Conclusion This study shows that the use of POC-CRP testing in patients with intellectual disabilities and LRTIs can lead to a significant reduction in antibiotic prescriptions, with no significant differences in outcome during follow-up. PMID:23643230

  12. C-reactive protein and diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Fen; Deng, Yu; Gu, Hong; Lim, Apiradee; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xi-Pu; Wang, Ning-Li; Domalpally, Amitha; Danis, Ronald; Liu, Ning-Pu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a cohort of Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Community-based observational cohort study. There were 1131 participants recruited from November 2009 to September 2011 in Desheng community in urban Beijing. Patients diagnosed T2DM were recruited and underwent a standardized evaluation consisting of a questionnaire, ocular and anthropometric examinations and laboratory investigation. The presence and severity of DR were assessed by seven fields 30° color fundus photographs. Subjects were then classified into groups with no DR, any DR, or vision-threatening DR. CRP was analyzed from serum of study subjects. A total of 1007 patients with T2DM were included for analysis, including 408 (40.5%) men and 599 (59.5%) women. The median CRP level was 1.5 mg/L for women and 1.1 mg/L for men (P=0.004, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.18-0.74). After adjusting for possible covariates, higher levels of CRP were associated with lower prevalence of any DR (P=0.02, OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35-0.89), but not associated with vision-threatening DR (P=0.62, OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.28-2.14). After stratification by sex, the inverse association between CRP and DR was found to be statistically significant in men (P=0.006, OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.16-0.73), but not in women (P=0.58, OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.29-1.16). The data drawn from a Chinese population with T2DM suggest that increasing CRP levels may be inversely associated with development of DR.

  13. Predictive value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Akpinar, Muhammed Yener; Yuksel, Mahmut; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Kacar, Sabite; Coskun, Orhan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-08-15

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases and albumin decreases in patients with inflammation and infection. However, their role in patients with acute pancreatitis is not clear. The present study was to investigate the predictive significance of the CRP/albumin ratio for the prognosis and mortality in acute pancreatitis patients. This study was performed retrospectively with 192 acute pancreatitis patients between January 2002 and June 2015. Ranson scores, Atlanta classification and CRP/albumin ratios of the patients were calculated. The CRP/albumin ratio was higher in deceased patients compared to survivors. The CRP/albumin ratio was positively correlated with Ranson score and Atlanta classification in particular and with important prognostic markers such as hospitalization time, CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In addition to the CRP/albumin ratio, necrotizing pancreatitis type, moderately severe and severe Atlanta classification, and total Ranson score were independent risk factors of mortality. It was found that an increase of 1 unit in the CRP/albumin ratio resulted in an increase of 1.52 times in mortality risk. A prediction value about CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 was found to be a significant marker in predicting mortality with 92.1% sensitivity and 58.0% specificity. It was seen that Ranson and Atlanta classification were higher in patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 compared with those with CRP/albumin ratio ≤16.28. Patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 had a 19.3 times higher chance of death. The CRP/albumin ratio is a novel but promising, easy-to-measure, repeatable, non-invasive inflammation-based prognostic score in acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. C-reactive Protein as a Predictor of Adverse outcome in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, A S; Yahya, S; Sheikh, N S; Sheikh, A A

    2012-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to reflect systemic and vascular inflammation and to predict future cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP in predicting cardiovascular outcome in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. This prospective, single-centered study was carried out by the Department of Pathology in collaboration with the Department of Cardiology, Bolan Medical College Complex Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan from January 2009 to December 2009. We studied 963 consecutive patients presenting with chest pain to Accident and Emergency Department. Patients were divided into four groups. Group-1 comprised patients with unstable angina; group-2 included patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI); group-3 comprised patients with Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (Non-STEMI) and group-4 was the control group. All four groups were followed-up for 90 days for occurrence of cardiovascular events. The CRP was elevated (>3 mg/L) among 27.6% patients in Group-1; 70.9% in group- 2; 77.9% in group-3 and 5.3% in the control group. Among cases with elevated CRP, 92.1% had a cardiac event compared to 34.3% among patients with CRP £3 mg/L (P < 0.0001). The mortality was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in group-2 (8.9%) and group-3 (11.9%) as compared to group-1 (2.1%). There was no cardiac event or mortality in Group-4. Elevated CRP is a predictor of adverse outcome in patients with acute coronary syndromes and helps in identifying patients who may be at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  15. C-reactive Protein as a Predictor of Adverse outcome in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, A. S.; Yahya, S.; Sheikh, N. S.; Sheikh, A. A

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to reflect systemic and vascular inflammation and to predict future cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP in predicting cardiovascular outcome in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. Patients and Methods: This prospective, single-centered study was carried out by the Department of Pathology in collaboration with the Department of Cardiology, Bolan Medical College Complex Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan from January 2009 to December 2009. We studied 963 consecutive patients presenting with chest pain to Accident and Emergency Department. Patients were divided into four groups. Group-1 comprised patients with unstable angina; group-2 included patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI); group-3 comprised patients with Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (Non-STEMI) and group-4 was the control group. All four groups were followed-up for 90 days for occurrence of cardiovascular events. Results: The CRP was elevated (>3 mg/L) among 27.6% patients in Group-1; 70.9% in group- 2; 77.9% in group-3 and 5.3% in the control group. Among cases with elevated CRP, 92.1% had a cardiac event compared to 34.3% among patients with CRP £3 mg/L (P < 0.0001). The mortality was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in group-2 (8.9%) and group-3 (11.9%) as compared to group-1 (2.1%). There was no cardiac event or mortality in Group-4. Conclusions: Elevated CRP is a predictor of adverse outcome in patients with acute coronary syndromes and helps in identifying patients who may be at risk of cardiovascular complications. PMID:22754634

  16. The effect of periodontal treatment on serum leptin, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuko; Komatsu, Yasutaka; Ikezawa-Suzuki, Ikuyo; Tai, Hideaki; Sugita, Noriko; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that periodontitis is closely related to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Leptin, a pleiotrophic hormone produced by adipose tissue, has been reported to be related to periodontitis. This study investigates the effects of periodontal treatment on the serum levels of leptin and other cytokines in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP). Serum samples were taken from 33 CP patients (22 non-smokers, 11 smokers) and 18 healthy subjects. The serum leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Significant differences between healthy and CP patients were found in serum leptin, IL-6, and CRP levels (P = 0.0018, P = 0.0064, and P = 0.0095, respectively). The serum leptin level was associated with mean probing depth, mean clinical attachment level, mean alveolar bone loss, and body mass index. There were significant associations between serum leptin levels and IL-6 and CRP levels. After non-surgical periodontal treatment, serum leptin, IL-6, and CRP levels were significantly decreased (mean +/- SD before and after, P value, respectively: leptin, 8.02 +/- 5.5, 7.10 +/- 4.4, P = 0.015; IL-6, 1.73 +/- 1.02, 1.36 +/- 0.73, P = 0.048; and CRP, 802.0 +/- 1065, 491.2 +/- 479.3, P = 0.047). Periodontal treatment is effective in reducing serum leptin, IL-6, and CRP levels. The results suggest that leptin, IL-6, and CRP could be mediating factors that connect metabolic syndrome and periodontitis.

  17. Changes in Periodontal Parameters and C-Reactive Protein After Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Raga, Lucía Gil; Mínguez, Ignacio; Caffesse, Raul; Llambés, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    This study assesses hormonal, inflammatory, and periodontal changes in pregnant women and postpartum in the absence of periodontal treatment, and seeks to determine any correlations among these parameters. A longitudinal, observational study of 117 pregnant women (aged 23 to 42 years) was undertaken in a private gynecologic center between weeks 32 and 35 of pregnancy and 6 to 8 weeks after delivery. Levels of progesterone and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were determined, as well as periodontal indices, including: 1) plaque index (PI); 2) bleeding on probing (BOP); 3) probing depth (PD); and 4) clinical attachment level (CAL). Postpartum progesterone and CRP declined sharply from 90.85 ± 42.51 ng/mL and 3.73 ± 4.01 mg/L to 0.77 ± 1.43 ng/mL and 1.43 ± 1.67 mg/L, respectively. There was also a significant improvement in all periodontal indices (P <0.05) with the exception of PI. During pregnancy mean BOP was 21.03%, mean PD 2.62 mm, and mean CAL 1.20 mm. After delivery mean BOP was 13.25%, mean PD 2.39 mm, and mean CAL 1.14 mm. Percentage of 1- to 3-mm pockets increased (P <0.05), while 4- to 5-mm pockets and pockets >6 mm decreased significantly (P <0.001). Reduction in CRP correlated significantly with decrease in BOP (P <0.001). Postpartum, there was a dramatic reduction in progesterone and CRP, together with an improvement in BOP, PD, and CAL in the absence of periodontal treatment. Decrease in CRP was related to an improvement in periodontal bleeding.

  18. C-reactive protein as a systemic marker of inflammation in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pejcic, A; Kesic, L J; Milasin, J

    2011-03-01

    Periodontitis has been identified as a potential risk factor for systemic pathologies such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aims of this investigation were to assess the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory factor, as well as to discover whether there is a relation to the severity of periodontitis and to the periodontopathogens. Periodontal examinations and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level measurements were performed in 50 patients with periodontitis. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding on probing index and periodontal disease status. The patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depth <4 mm. The patients with severe periodontitis had high attachment loss and pocket depth >5 mm. The control group comprised 25 volunteers with healthy gingiva, gingival sulcus <2 mm and no attachment loss. The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival plaque samples was analysed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The periodontal parameters and CRP levels were significantly higher in the patients with periodontitis. Patients who had severe periodontitis, with high levels of mean clinical attachment loss, and subjects with moderate periodontitis had higher mean CRP levels. The percentage of subjects with elevated levels of CRP >5 mg/l was greater in the higher clinical attachment loss group compared to the group with lower attachment loss. The presence of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Periodontitis and the presence of P. gingivalis are associated with an enhanced inflammatory response expressed by higher CRP levels. The association of periodontitis with CRP levels appears to be a contributing factor for CVD and might be a possible intermediate pathway in this association.

  19. The role of serum C-reactive protein in women with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2012-07-01

    Some lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) subtypes may be associated with low-grade inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the role of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in women with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A total of 197 consecutive women with non-stress urinary incontinence (non-SUI) LUTS and 18 healthy women without LUTS (normal controls) were enrolled. LUTS include urinary storage, voiding, and post-micturition symptoms. Patients with previous bladder or urethral surgery, active urinary tract infections, or possible neurogenic lesions were excluded. Serum CRP levels were measured before any treatment was given. Patients were stratified to LUTD subgroups based on a 3-day voiding diary, uroflowmetry, and selective videourodynamic studies. Median CRP levels were significantly higher in women with overactive bladder (OAB) wet (i.e., with urgency incontinence, n = 30, 0.12 mg/dl) than those in women with bladder oversensitivity (n = 68, 0.075 mg/dl, P = 0.008) and the control group (0.055 mg/dl, P = 0.032). Further analysis revealed that body mass index and maximum flow rate were two independent factors that affected CRP levels. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for using CRP to predict OAB wet was 0.55, and the most predictive cutoff point for CRP was 0.15 mg/dl (sensitivity 43.5 %, specificity 72.7 %). High serum CRP levels were found in women with OAB wet, and they were related to lower maximum urinary flow rates and higher body mass indices in non-SUI LUTD. However, serum CRP is not a suitable biomarker for discriminating between subtypes of non-SUI LUTD.

  20. C-reactive protein distribution and correlation with traditional cardiovascular risk factors in the Italian population.

    PubMed

    Casula, Manuela; Tragni, Elena; Zambon, Antonella; Filippi, Alessandro; Brignoli, Ovidio; Cricelli, Claudio; Poli, Andrea; Catapano, Alberico L

    2013-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) increases during an inflammatory response; its plasma levels are believed to be an independent predictor of future atherosclerotic disease. We report the distribution of plasma levels of CRP and its possible relationship with other cardiovascular risk factors in an Italian cohort. CRP was assessed in frozen plasma samples of 1949 participants in the CHECK study (2001-2005), which collected clinical and biochemical data from randomly selected subjects (40-79 years) in the setting of Italian general practice. Median CRP (interquartile range) was higher in women (1.42 [0.58-2.86] vs 1.28 [0.58-2.50]; p=.163), in people aged ≥ 65 years (1.74 [0.89-3.34] vs 1.11 [0.52-2.45]; p<.001), in patients with obesity (2.37 [1.27-4.15] vs 1.16 [0.52-2.41]; p<.001), metabolic syndrome (2.12 [1.16-3.72] vs 1.10 [0.50-2.38]; p<.001), or higher cardiovascular risk (2.03 [1.01-3.42] vs 1.19 [0.53-2.50]; p<.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed significant associations (R(2)=.264) of circulating log(e)CRP with body mass index, fibrinogen, apoB, age, gender, smoking habits, physical inactivity, creatinine levels, and systolic blood pressure. This study provides epidemiological data of CRP in the Italian population and reinforces the existing evidences about the close correlation between CRP and markers of inflammation and adiposity. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Moderate, but not vigorous, intensity exercise training reduces C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Higgins, Simon; Forehand, Ronald L; Schmidt, Michael D; Evans, Ellen M

    2018-06-01

    Sprint interval cycle training is a contemporary popular mode of training but its relative efficacy, under conditions of matched energy expenditure, to reduce risk factors for cardiometabolic disease is incompletely characterised, especially in young women. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative efficacy of six weeks of moderate-intensity cycling (MOD-C) and vigorous sprint-interval cycling (VIG-SIC) on lipid profile, insulin (INS) and insulin resistance using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in inactive, overweight/obese (OW/OB) young women. Participants (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 , waist circumference ≥88 cm) were randomly assigned to MOD-C (20-30 min at 60-70% of heart rate reserve(HRR)) or VIG-SIC (5-7 repeated bouts 30-second maximal effort sprints, followed by four minutes of active recovery) supervised training three days/week for six weeks, with each group matched on energy expenditure. Adiposity (%Fat) was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry. Forty-four participants (20.4 ± 1.6 years, 65.9% Caucasian, 29.8 ± 4.1 kg/m 2 ) were included in the analysis. The improvement in CRP observed in the MOD-C group was larger than the VIG-C group (p = .034). Overall, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels improved following training (p < .05); however, total cholesterol, triglyceride, INS and HOMA-IR did not improve (p > .05). These results indicate MOD-C training may be more effective in reducing CRP than VIG-SIC.

  2. Socioeconomic status discrimination and C-reactive protein in African-American and White adults.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Miriam E; Vaccarino, Viola; Dunbar, Sandra B; Pemu, Priscilla; Gibbons, Gary H; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Lewis, Tené T

    2017-08-01

    We examined the association between socioeconomic status (SES) discrimination and C-reactive protein (CRP) in a biracial cohort of middle-aged adults using an intersectionality framework. Participants were 401 African-American and White adults from a population-based cohort in the Southeastern United States. SES discrimination was self-reported with a modified Experiences of Discrimination Scale, and CRP levels were assayed from blood samples. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the associations among SES discrimination, race, education, and CRP after controlling for age, gender, racial and gender discrimination, financial and general stress, body mass index, smoking, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms. Intersectional effects were tested using race×SES discrimination, education×SES discrimination and race×education×SES discrimination interactions. Adjusting for sociodemographics, racial discrimination, gender discrimination, and all relevant two-way interaction terms, we observed a significant race×education×SES discrimination interaction (p=0.019). In adjusted models stratified by race and education, SES discrimination was associated with elevated CRP among higher educated African-Americans (β=0.29, p=0.018), but not lower educated African-Americans (β=-0.13, p=0.32); or lower educated (β=-0.02, p=0.92) or higher educated (β=-0.01, p=0.90) Whites. Findings support the relevance of SES discrimination as an important discriminatory stressor for CRP specifically among higher educated African-Americans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Variation Affects C-Reactive Protein Elevations in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Christopher J; Kaplan, Jess L; Winter, Harland S

    2018-04-28

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum marker that is used to measure disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD). However, a subset of CD patients have normal CRP during flares. In rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, genetic variants can restrict CRP elevations during flares. This study sought to determine if common CRP genetic variants affect CRP values during active CD. Subjects with CD who participated in the Partners HealthCare BioBank were genotyped for 5 common CRP genetic variants (rs2794520, rs3122012, rs3093077, rs2808635, and rs1800947). Medical records were reviewed to determine disease activity and the highest CRP value during active CD. CRP values during active infection or malignancy at the time of the test were excluded. CRP values were compared by genotype using the Mann-Whitney test. The study included 199 subjects with active CD (21 to 86 years of age). Subjects with the rs2794520 TT genotype had a lower CRP than subjects with the CC genotype (58.3 mg/L vs 28.4 mg/L, P = 0.008). Subjects with the rs1800947 CG genotype had a lower CRP than those with the CC genotype (54.3 mg/L vs 22.4 mg/L, P < 0.0001); 41.6% of TT subjects had a normal CRP compared with 24.1% of CT subjects and 16.5% of CC subjects (P = 0.041). This study demonstrates that rs2794520 and rs1800947 are associated with a restriction of CRP elevations during active CD. While CRP is typically a reliable biomarker in CD, there is a subset of CD patients with a genetically determined restriction of CRP in whom other disease markers should be utilized.

  4. Significantly Elevated C-Reactive Protein Levels After Epicardial Clipping of the Left Atrial Appendage.

    PubMed

    Verberkmoes, Niels J; Akca, Ferdi; Vandevenne, Ann-Sofie; Jacobs, Luuk; Soliman Hamad, Mohamed A; van Straten, Albert H M

    Besides mechanical and anatomical changes of the left atrium, epicardial closure of the left atrial appendage has also possible homeostatic effects. The aim of this study was to assess whether epicardial clipping of the left atrial appendage has different biochemical effects compared with complete removal of the left atrial appendage. Eighty-two patients were included and underwent a totally thoracoscopic AF ablation procedure. As part of the procedure, the left atrial appendage was excluded with an epicardial clip (n = 57) or the left atrial appendage was fully amputated with an endoscopic vascular stapler (n = 25). From all patients' preprocedural and postprocedural blood pressure, electrolytes and inflammatory parameters were collected. The mean age and left atrial volume index were comparable between the epicardial clip and stapler group (64 ± 8 years vs. 60 ± 9 years, P = non-significant; 44 ± 15 mL/m vs. 40 ± 13 mL/m, P = non-significant). Patients receiving left atrial appendage clipping had significantly elevated C-reactive protein levels compared with patients who had left atrial appendage stapling at the second, third, and fourth postoperative day (225 ± 84 mg/L vs. 149 ± 76 mg/L, P = 0.002, 244 ± 78 vs. 167 ± 76, P = 0.004, 190 ± 74 vs. 105 ± 48, P < 0.001, respectively). Patients had a significant decrease in sodium levels, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure at 24 and 72 hours after left atrial appendage closure. However, this was comparable for both the left atrial appendage clipping and stapling group. Increased activation of the inflammatory response was observed after left atrial appendage clipping compared with left atrial appendage stapling. Furthermore, a significant decrease in blood pressure was observed after surgical removal of the left atrial appendage. Whether the inflammatory response affects the outcome of arrhythmia surgery needs to be further evaluated.

  5. C-reactive protein in critically ill cancer patients with sepsis: influence of neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Several biomarkers have been studied in febrile neutropenia. Our aim was to assess C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration in septic critically ill cancer patients and to compare those with and without neutropenia. Methods A secondary analysis of a matched case-control study conducted at an oncologic medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) was performed, segregating patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. The impact of neutropenia on CRP concentrations at admission and during the first week of ICU stay was assessed. Results A total of 154 critically ill septic cancer patients, 86 with neutropenia and 68 without, were included in the present study. At ICU admission, the CRP concentration of neutropenic patients was significantly higher than in non-neutropenic patients, 25.9 ± 11.2 mg/dL vs. 19.7 ± 11.4 mg/dL (P = 0.009). Among neutropenic patients, CRP concentrations at ICU admission were not influenced by the severity of neutropenia (< 100/mm3 vs. ≥ 100/mm3 neutrophils), 25.1 ± 11.6 mg/dL vs. 26.9 ± 10.9 mg/dL (P = 0.527). Time dependent analysis of CRP from Day 1 to Day 7 of antibiotic therapy showed an almost parallel decrease in both groups (P = 0.335), though CRP of neutropenic patients was, on average, always higher in comparison to that of non-neutropenic patients. Conclusions In septic critically ill cancer patients CRP concentrations are more elevated in those with neutropenia. However, the CRP course seems to be independent from the presence or absence of neutropenia. PMID:21595932

  6. Microstructured graphene arrays for highly sensitive flexible tactile sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Niu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Hong; Leow, Wan Ru; Wang, Hua; Li, Yuangang; Zheng, Liyan; Wei, Jun; Huo, Fengwei; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-09-24

    A highly sensitive tactile sensor is devised by applying microstructured graphene arrays as sensitive layers. The combination of graphene and anisotropic microstructures endows this sensor with an ultra-high sensitivity of -5.53 kPa(-1) , an ultra-fast response time of only 0.2 ms, as well as good reliability, rendering it promising for the application of tactile sensing in artificial skin and human-machine interface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Analytical Glycobiology at High Sensitivity: Current Approaches and Directions

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Milos V.; Alley, William R.; Mann, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the analytical advances made during the last several years in the structural and quantitative determinations of glycoproteins in complex biological mixtures. The main analytical techniques used in the fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics involve different modes of mass spectrometry and their combinations with capillary separation methods such as microcolumn liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The needs for high-sensitivity measurements have been emphasized in the oligosaccharide profiling used in the field of biomarker discovery through MALDI mass spectrometry. High-sensitivity profiling of both glycans and glycopeptides from biological fluids and tissue extracts has been aided significantly through lectin preconcentration and the uses of affinity chromatography. PMID:22945852

  8. High-sensitivity CRP discriminates HNF1A-MODY from other subtypes of diabetes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tim J; Shields, Beverley M; Lawry, Jane; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2011-08-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) as a result of mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-α (HNF1A) is often misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Recent work has shown that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels are lower in HNF1A-MODY than type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or glucokinase (GCK)-MODY. We aim to replicate these findings in larger numbers and other MODY subtypes. hs-CRP levels were assessed in 750 patients (220 HNF1A, 245 GCK, 54 HNF4-α [HNF4A], 21 HNF1-β (HNF1B), 53 type 1 diabetes, and 157 type 2 diabetes). hs-CRP was lower in HNF1A-MODY (median [IQR] 0.3 [0.1-0.6] mg/L) than type 2 diabetes (1.40 [0.60-3.45] mg/L; P < 0.001) and type 1 diabetes (1.10 [0.50-1.85] mg/L; P < 0.001), HNF4A-MODY (1.45 [0.46-2.88] mg/L; P < 0.001), GCK-MODY (0.60 [0.30-1.80] mg/L; P < 0.001), and HNF1B-MODY (0.60 [0.10-2.8] mg/L; P = 0.07). hs-CRP discriminated HNF1A-MODY from type 2 diabetes with hs-CRP <0.75 mg/L showing 79% sensitivity and 70% specificity (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve = 0.84). hs-CRP levels are lower in HNF1A-MODY than other forms of diabetes and may be used as a biomarker to select patients for diagnostic HNF1A genetic testing.

  9. C-Reactive Protein on Postoperative Day 1 Is a Reliable Predictor of Pancreas-Specific Complications After Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Théophile; Birnbaum, David Jérémie; Lemoine, Coralie; Chirica, Mircea; Risse, Olivier; Berdah, Stéphane; Girard, Edouard; Moutardier, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula and pancreas-specific complications have a significant influence on patient management and outcomes after pancreatoduodenectomy. The aim of the study was to assess the value of serum C-reactive protein on the postoperative day 1 as early predictor of pancreatic fistula and pancreas-specific complications. Between 2013 and 2016, 110 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinical, biological, intraoperative, and pathological characteristics were prospectively recorded. Pancreatic fistula was graded according to the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula classification. A composite endpoint was defined as pancreas-specific complications including pancreatic fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, postoperative hemorrhage, and bile leak. The diagnostic accuracy of serum C-reactive protein on postoperative day 1 in predicting adverse postoperative outcomes was assessed by ROC curve analysis. Six patients (5%) died and 87 (79%) experienced postoperative complications (pancreatic-specific complications: n = 58 (53%); pancreatic fistula: n = 48 (44%)). A soft pancreatic gland texture, a main pancreatic duct diameter < 3 mm and serum C-reactive protein ≥ 100 mg/L on postoperative day 1 were independent predictors of pancreas-specific complications (p < 0.01) and pancreatic fistula (p < 0.01). ROC analysis showed that serum C-reactive protein ≥ 100 mg/L on postoperative day 1 was a significant predictor of pancreatic fistula (AUC: 0.70; 95%CI: 0.60-0.79, p < 0.01) and pancreas-specific complications (AUC: 0.72; 95%CI: 0.62-0.82, p < 0.01). ROC analysis showed that serum C-reactive protein ≥ 50 mg/L at discharge was a significant predictor of 90-day hospital readmission (AUC: 0.70; 95%CI: 0.60-0.79, p < 0.01). C-reactive protein levels reliably predict risks of pancreatic fistula, pancreas-specific complications, and hospital readmission, and should be inserted in risk

  10. [Serum calgranulin C is a highly sensitive autoinflammation activity indicator in patients with familial periodic fevers].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, M V; Rameev, V V; Kozlovskaya, L V; Fedorov, E S; Salugina, S O

    2016-01-01

    To determine the possibility of using the serum proinflammatory calcium-binding protein, or calgranulin C (S100A12), to assess activity and therapeutic efficiency in patients with periodic disease (PD) and other familial periodic fevers (FPFs). Thirty-five patients with PD and other FPDs, which were verified by molecular genetic study, were examined. In accordance with the disease activity, the patients were divided into 2 groups. The investigators determined the concentration of S100A12 by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay and that of other acute-phase inflammatory markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ERT), neutrophil counts, and fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations). The serum concentration of S100A12 in the stage of disease activity was 466.7 (265.22--851.7) ng/ml, which was significantly higher than in remission (244.29 (118.93--409.85) ng/ml (p=0.000002). The highest S100A12 concentrations were noted in the patients with PD; these were 758.95 (434.80--1035.95) ng/ml; the S100A12 level in the majority of PD patients even during remission remained moderately higher. An investigation of the relationship of A100A12 to genetic variants found no differences between the patients homozygous for M694V and those with other genotypes (p=0.37). Estimation of the time course of therapy-induced changes in the serum S100A12 concentration revealed its considerable reduction (р=0.0018). However, normalization of S100A12 levels was not achieved in PD. The remaining increased S100A12 concentration in these patients may be suggestive of the activity of PD despite the absence of its clinical manifestations. S100A12 as a highly sensitive marker allows more exact evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect of therapy. The S100A12 identification of the subclinical activity of autoinflammatory diseases made all the more important since traditional inflammatory markers, such as ERT, CRP, fibrinogen, and leukocyte counts, are less sensitive for these purposes. In our

  11. Dietary pattern, serum magnesium, ferritin, C-reactive protein and anaemia among older people.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological data of dietary patterns and anaemia among older Chinese remains extremely scarce. We examined the association between dietary patterns and anaemia in older Chinese, and to assess whether biomarkers of serum magnesium, C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum ferritin can mediate these associations. We analysed the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey data (2401 individuals aged ≥60 years for whom both dietary and biomarker data are available). Dietary data was obtained using 24 h-recall over three consecutive days. Fasting blood samples and anthropometry measurement were also collected. Factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Factor scores representing dietary patterns were used in Poisson regression models to explore the association between each dietary pattern and anaemia. Of the 2401 participants, 18.9% had anaemia, 1.9% had anaemia related to inflammation (AI), and 1.3% had iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA). A traditional dietary pattern (high intake of rice, pork and vegetables) was positively associated with anaemia; a modern dietary pattern (high intake of fruit and fast food) was inversely associated with anaemia. Progressively lower magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing traditional dietary quartiles; while a progressively higher magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing modern dietary quartiles (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in CRP and serum ferritin across quartiles for either dietary pattern. In the fully adjusted model, the prevalence ratio (PR) of anaemia, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile, was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.33; 2.29) for a traditional dietary pattern, and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.68; 1.16) for a modern dietary pattern. The association between dietary patterns and anaemia is mediated by serum magnesium. Traditional dietary pattern is associated with a higher prevalence of anaemia among older Chinese. Future studies need to examine whether

  12. Familial aggregation of circulating C-reactive protein in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasidevi, Arunachalam; Vellanki, Priyathama; Kunselman, Allen R; Raja-Khan, Nazia; Dunaif, Andrea; Legro, Richard S

    2013-03-01

    What is the heritability of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and their first-degree relatives? Women with PCOS and their siblings are more likely to have elevated CRP levels when both of their parents have elevated CRP. This PCOS family-based study indicates that CRP levels are likely a heritable trait. Previous studies have established that an elevated blood level of CRP is variably present in women with PCOS, and may be present independent of metabolic status. A familial based phenotyping study consisting of 81 families comprised of PCOS patients and their first-degree relatives for 305 subjects. Study conducted at an academic health center. An elevated CRP level was defined as >28.6 nmol/l. To account for familial clustering, generalized estimating equations with a logit link were used to model the association between elevated CRP levels in patients with PCOS and their siblings with their parental group (A = neither parent with elevated CRP; B = one parent with elevated CRP; C= both parents with elevated CRP), adjusting for gender, age and BMI of the offspring. We did additional heritability analyses by using a variance component estimation method for CRP levels, adjusting for sex, age and BMI. We observed elevated CRP levels in 94% of the offspring in group C, 45% in group B and 10% in group A after adjusting for age, gender and BMI of the offspring. The median BMI of the offspring in group A, B and C were 30.0, 28.7 and 31.2 kg/m², respectively. Heritability estimates of CRP levels ranged from 0.75 to 0.83 and remained significant after excluding for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our small sample size increases the possibility of a type 1 error. This is a single report in an adequately powered but limited sample size study identifying the strong heritability of CRP levels. Replication in other large family cohorts is necessary. These findings support the concept that there is an increased cardiovascular disease risk

  13. Clinical utility of C-reactive protein to predict treatment response during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chen, Virginia; Skolnik, Kate; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Wilcox, Pearce; Quon, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a systemic marker of inflammation that correlates with disease status in cystic fibrosis (CF). The clinical utility of CRP measurement to guide pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) treatment decisions remains uncertain. To determine whether monitoring CRP during PEx treatment can be used to predict treatment response. We hypothesized that early changes in CRP can be used to predict treatment response. We reviewed all PEx events requiring hospitalization for intravenous (IV) antibiotics over 2 years at our institution. 83 PEx events met our eligibility criteria. CRP levels from admission to day 5 were evaluated to predict treatment non-response, using a modified version of a prior published composite definition. CRP was also evaluated to predict time until next exacerbation (TUNE). 53% of 83 PEx events were classified as treatment non-response. Paradoxically, 24% of PEx events were characterized by a ≥ 50% increase in CRP levels within the first five days of treatment. Absolute change in CRP from admission to day 5 was not associated with treatment non-response (p = 0.58). Adjusted for FEV1% predicted, admission log10 CRP was associated with treatment non-response (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.14 to 5.91; p = 0.03) and shorter TUNE (HR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.27; p = 0.008). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of admission CRP to predict treatment non-response was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.83; p<0.001). 23% of PEx events were characterized by an admission CRP of > 75 mg/L with a specificity of 90% for treatment non-response. Admission CRP predicts treatment non-response and time until next exacerbation. A very elevated admission CRP (>75mg/L) is highly specific for treatment non-response and might be used to target high-risk patients for future interventional studies aimed at improving exacerbation outcomes.

  14. Serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell count in morbidly obese surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Bin; Lee, Yi-Chih; Ser, Kong-Han; Chen, Jung-Chien; Chen, Shu Chung; Hsieh, Hsing-Fang; Lee, Wei-Jei

    2009-04-01

    Obesity has been widely recognized as a chronic inflammatory condition and associated with elevated inflammatory indicators including C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC). Recent studies have shown elevated CRP or WBC is a significant risk factor for cardiac events and stroke but the clinical significance of CRP and WBC has not been clearly studied in morbidly obese patients. This study is aimed at the clinical significance of WBC and CRP in morbidly obese patients and the change after bariatric surgery. The study was a prospectively controlled clinical study. From December 1, 2001 to January 31, 2006, of 640 (442 females and 198 males) consecutive morbid obese patients enrolled in a surgically supervised weight loss program with at least 1 year's follow-up were examined. Of the patients, 476 (74.4%) had elevated CRP and 100 (15.6%) had elevated WBC at preoperative study. CRP and WBC were significantly related and both increased with increasing body mass index (BMI). CRP is also increased with increasing waist, glucose level, hemoglobin, albumin, Ca, insulin, C-peptide, and metabolic syndrome while WBC is increased with metabolic syndrome but decreased with increasing age. Multivariate analysis confirmed fasting glucose level and hemoglobin are independent predictors of the elevation of CRP while age is the only independent predictor for elevated WBC. Both WBC and CRP levels decreased rapidly after obesity surgery. These improvements resulted in a 69.8% reduction of CRP and 26.4% reduction of WBC 1 year after surgery. Although individuals who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass lost significantly more weight (36.8 +/- 11.7 kg vs. 17.3 +/- 10.8 kg; p = 0.000) and achieved a lower BMI (27.8 +/- 4.6 vs. 35.0 +/- 5.5; p = 0.000) than individuals who underwent laparoscopic gastric banding, there was no difference in the resolution of elevated CRP 1 year after surgery (95.9% vs. 84.5%; p = 0.169) and WBC (99.4% vs. 98.3%; p = 0.323). Both baseline

  15. Soda Intake Is Directly Associated with Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentration in Mexican Women.

    PubMed

    Tamez, Martha; Monge, Adriana; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Fagherazzi, Guy; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ortiz-Panozo, Eduardo; Yunes, Elsa; Romieu, Isabelle; Lajous, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Soda intake is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Consumption of diet sodas, often considered healthy alternatives to sodas, could also increase the likelihood of cardiovascular outcomes. This study aims to evaluate the relation between soda and diet soda and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 825 Mexican women free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and for whom serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), C-peptide, adiponectin, and leptin were available. Mean ± SD age was 45.9 ± 6.6 y, the majority of women were premenopausal (60.4%), and the prevalence of obesity was 35%. We estimated the adjusted percentage differences in biomarkers and 95% CIs by performing multiple linear regression models comparing categories of consumption for soda and diet soda adjusting for age, family history of heart disease, menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, socioeconomic status, region, smoking, physical activity, alcohol intake, and dietary patterns. In the entire study sample we observed a 50% higher serum CRP concentration in women in the highest soda intake quartile (median intake: 202.9 mL/d, IQR: 101.4, 304.3 mL/d) compared to those in the lowest (median intake: 11.8 mL/d, IQR: 0.0, 152.1 mL/d). After stratification by menopausal status, results remained significant only for premenopausal women. Premenopausal women in the highest quartile of soda intake had 56% higher CRP concentration relative to women in the lowest quartile. We observed no significant association with the other biomarkers. After further adjustment for body mass index, a potential mediator, results remained significant only for CRP. Diet soda consumption was not associated with any of the biomarkers. Consumption of soda was associated with adverse levels in a biomarker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk, serum CRP, in Mexican women. These results add to the accumulating evidence on soda and cardiovascular

  16. C-reactive protein levels in girls with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, H; Ekin, R G; Can, E; Cakmak, O; Yavascan, O; Mutlubas Ozsan, F; Helvaci, M; Zorlu, F

    2016-04-01

    Daytime lower urinary tract (LUT) conditions are identified as daytime incontinence problems for children in whom any cause of neuropathy and uropathy has been excluded. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a common marker of acute or chronic inflammation and infection. Increased CRP levels have been detected in the studies conducted on adults diagnosed with overactive bladders and interstitial cystitis. This study aimed to investigate the role of serum CRP levels in girls suffering from daytime LUT conditions. Out of the 752 patients who presented to the outpatient clinics with lower urinary tract symptoms, 709 were excluded due to: being boys, having previous urinary tract surgery, an active urinary tract infection, a neurological anomaly, a urinary system anomaly, having rheumatic disease, any chronic disease, any febrile infection over the past week, a history of constipation, and enuresis nocturna. Forty-three girls with LUT conditions and aged 8-10 years were included in the study as the patient group. Forty girls who attended the urology outpatient clinic without LUT conditions, or active urinary tract infections and any chronic disease requiring follow-up constituted the control group. Under the control of the parents, all subjects were asked to fill out 3-day voiding diaries. The voiding diaries identified frequency, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence, and functional bladder capacity data. All subjects also completed a dysfunctional voiding scoring system (DVSS). The serum CRP levels of all subjects were measured. There was a significant difference in serum CRP levels and DVSS between the patient group and the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). The mean serum CRP levels showed a significant increase when frequency and urgency scores were ≥8, the urge incontinence score was ≥2 and the DVS score DVSS was ≥14 in the voiding diaries of the patient group (Table). Lower urinary tract dysfunction is defined as a condition involving abnormalities of filling and

  17. Serum C-Reactive Protein as a Prognostic Biomarker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lizio, Andrea; Maestri, Eleonora; Sansone, Valeria Ada; Mora, Gabriele; Miller, Robert G.; Appel, Stanley H.; Chiò, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    Importance Various factors have been proposed as possible candidates associated with the prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, there is still no consensus on which biomarkers are reliable prognostic factors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of the inflammatory response that shows significant prognostic value for several diseases. Objective To examine the prognostic significance of CRP in ALS. Design, Setting, and Participants Patients’ serum CRP levels were evaluated from January 1, 2009, to June 30, 2015, in a large cohort of patients with ALS observed by an Italian tertiary multidisciplinary center. Results were replicated in an independent cohort obtained from a population-based registry of patients with ALS. A post hoc analysis was performed of the phase 2 trial of NP001 to determine whether stratification by levels of CRP improves differentiation of responders and nonresponders to the drug. Main Outcomes and Measures Serum CRP levels from the first examination were recorded to assess their effect on disease progression and survival. Results A total of 394 patients with ALS (168 women and 226 men; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 60.18 [13.60] years) were observed in a tertiary multidisciplinary center, and the analysis was replicated in an independent cohort of 116 patients with ALS (50 women and 66 men; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 67.00 [10.74] years) identified through a regional population-based registry. Serum CRP levels in the 394 patients with ALS correlated with severity of functional impairment, as measured by total score on the ALS Functional Rating Scale–Revised, at first evaluation (r = –0.14818; P = .004), and with patient survival (hazard ratio, 1.129; 95% CI, 1.033-1.234; P = .007). Similar results were found in the independent cohort (hazard ratio, 1.044; 95% CI, 1.016-1.056; P ≤ .001). Moreover, a post hoc analysis of the phase 2 trial of NP001 using the same CRP threshold showed that patients with

  18. Evaluation of serum haptoglobin and C-reactive protein in dogs with mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Planellas, Marta; Bassols, Anna; Siracusa, Carlo; Saco, Yolanda; Giménez, Mercè; Pato, Raquel; Pastor, Josep

    2009-09-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is increasing interest in measuring acute phase proteins as a tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic diseases. Although mammary neoplasms are the most common type of cancer in dogs, acute phase proteins have not been extensively evaluated in dogs with mammary tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in the dogs with mammary tumors and assess their potential association with malignancy. A retrospective study of dogs with mammary tumors was performed. Serum concentrations of CRP and Hp were determined in healthy control dogs (n=20) and dogs with mammary tumors before surgery (n=41). Mammary tumors were grouped as carcinomas (n=24), fibrosarcoma (n=1), malignant mixed tumors (n=7), benign mixed tumors (n=6), and adenomas (n=3). CRP and Hp concentrations were compared in dogs with different tumor types and were also compared based on tumor size, lymph node infiltration, skin ulceration, fixation to underlying tissue, and time between tumor identification and removal. Hp concentration was significantly (P<.043) higher in dogs with mammary tumors (median 2.03 g/L, range 0.09-2.94 g/L) compared with controls (1.38 g/L, range 0.08-3.00 g/L), but the range of values overlapped considerably. CRP concentration was higher in dogs with carcinomas (4.70 mg/L, range 0.63-128.96 mg/L) vs controls (2.11 mg/L, range 0.25-6.57 mg/L) (P=.0008) and in dogs with ulcerated skin (14.8 mg/L, range 5.7-128.9 mg/L, n=3) compared with those without ulceration (2.4 mg/L, range 0.11-30.3 mg/L, n=38) (P=.048). Serum Hp and CRP do not appear to have value in diagnosing or predicting malignancy of mammary tumors in dogs. Higher CRP concentrations in dogs with mammary carcinoma suggest a role for inflammation in this tumor type.

  19. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    SciTech Connect

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results inmore » elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway.

  20. High C-reactive protein levels are associated with depressive symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Faugere, M; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Faget-Agius, C; Lançon, C; Cermolacce, M; Richieri, R

    2018-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequently associated with schizophrenia symptoms. C - Reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, had been found elevated in patients with schizophrenia and in patients with depressive symptoms. However, the association between CRP level and depressive symptoms has been poorly investigated in patients with schizophrenia. The only study conducted found an association between high CRP levels and antidepressant consumption, but not with depressive symptoms investigated with the Calgary Depression Rating Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). The aim of this study was to evaluate CRP levels and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, and to determine whether high CRP levels are associated with depressive symptoms and/or antidepressant consumption, independently of potential confounding factors, especially tobacco-smoking and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and seven patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in this study (mean age = 35.74 years, 69.1% male gender). Depressive symptoms was investigated with the CDSS. Patients were classified in two groups: normal CRP level (≤ 3.0mg/L) and high CRP level (> 3.0mg/L). Current medication was recorded. 124 subjects (40.4%) were classified in the high CRP level group. After adjusting for confounding factors, these patients were found to have higher CDSS scores than those with normal CRP levels in multivariate analyses (p = 0.035, OR = 1.067, 95% CI = 1.004-1.132). No significant association between CRP levels and antidepressants consumption was found. The size sample is relatively small. The cut-off point for high cardiovascular risk was used to define the two groups. CRP was the sole marker of inflammation in this study and was collected at only one time point. The design of this study is cross-sectional and there are no conclusions about the directionality of the association between depression and inflammation in schizophrenia. This study found an association between high

  1. [Relationship between C-reactive protein gene polymorphaisms and chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Meng, Shu; Ding, Yi; Wu, Ya-fei

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) + 1444C/T, CRP+1059G/C polymorphisms and chronic periodontitis (CP) in a Han Chinese population. Clinical periodontal parameters [attachment loss (AL) probing depth (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP)], and serum CRP levels were examined in CP patients (n = 126) and healthy subjects (n = 113). The mean serum CRP level [(1.74 ± 1.67) mg/L] was significantly higher in the CP group than in the control group [(0.57 ± 0.39) mg/L], P < 0.001. In the control group, serum CRP levels were significantly lower in subjects with the CRP +1059 GC and CC genotypes than those with the CRP +1059 GG genotype (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between genotypes in the CP group. In CP and the control groups, serum CRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with the CRP + 1444 CT and TT genotypes compared to those with the CRP + 1444 CC genotype (P < 0.5). The percentage of CRP + 1059 C allele was 6.7% (17/252) in the CP group and 4.9% (11/226) in the control group. The percentage of CRP + 1444 T allele was 6.3% (16/252) in the CP group and 5.3% (12/226) in the control group (P > 0.5). There was no significant difference between groups in both allele frequencies (P > 0.5). The association of CRP + 1059G/C, CRP + 1444 C/T polymorphisms with CP was not found in a regression model (P > 0.5). The presence of a CRP + 1059C-allele was associated with lower serum CRP levels and the presence of a CRP + 1444T-allele was associated with higher serum CRP levels. However, the data suggested that CRP + 1059G/C, CRP + 1444 C/T polymorphisms were not significantly associated with serum CRP levels of chronic periodontitis patients in ethnic Han Chinese.

  2. The short-term effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    George, Annie Kitty; Janam, Prasanthila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent epidemiological studies have shown that periodontal infection is a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases and conditions. In addition to the conventional risk factors, chronic infection and the subsequent generation of a systemic inflammatory response may be associated with this increased risk. Aims: This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of chronic periodontitis and subsequent non-surgical periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with severe chronic generalized periodontitis. Settings and Design: Participants were selected from subjects who attended the Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantololgy, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram. Materials and Methods: Sera were obtained from 25 patients with periodontitis for baseline examination and reassessment after completion of treatment. As a control, sera were also obtained from 20 subjects without periodontitis. Interleukin-6 was determined by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) was measured using latex turbidometric immunoassay. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10. Results: The level of interleukin-6 and hsCRP in the sera of periodontitis patients was seen to be higher than those of healthy controls. Interleukin-6 level tended to decrease with improvement of the periodontal condition following treatment and approached that of control subjects, and this decline was statistically significant. The hsCRP levels also showed a decreasing trend following periodontal treatment. Conclusions: In this study, we were able to show that periodontal disease significantly affects the serum levels of systemic inflammatory markers and that non-surgical periodontal therapy could bring about a decrease in the levels of these inflammatory markers. PMID:23633770

  3. C-reactive protein as a prognostic marker after lacunar stroke: levels of inflammatory markers in the treatment of stroke study.

    PubMed

    Elkind, Mitchell S V; Luna, Jorge M; McClure, Leslie A; Zhang, Yu; Coffey, Christopher S; Roldan, Ana; Del Brutto, Oscar H; Pretell, Edwin Javier; Pettigrew, L Creed; Meyer, Brett C; Tapia, Jorge; White, Carole; Benavente, Oscar R

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers predict incident and recurrent cardiac events, but their relationship to stroke prognosis is uncertain. We hypothesized that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) predicts recurrent ischemic stroke after recent lacunar stroke. Levels of Inflammatory Markers in the Treatment of Stroke (LIMITS) was an international, multicenter, prospective ancillary biomarker study nested within Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3), a phase III trial in patients with recent lacunar stroke. Patients were assigned in factorial design to aspirin versus aspirin plus clopidogrel, and higher versus lower blood pressure targets. Patients had blood samples collected at enrollment and hsCRP measured using nephelometry at a central laboratory. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for recurrence risks before and after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and statin use. Among 1244 patients with lacunar stroke (mean age, 63.3±10.8 years), median hsCRP was 2.16 mg/L. There were 83 recurrent ischemic strokes (including 45 lacunes) and 115 major vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death). Compared with the bottom quartile, those in the top quartile (hsCRP>4.86 mg/L) were at increased risk of recurrent ischemic stroke (unadjusted HR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.30-4.96), even after adjusting for demographics and risk factors (adjusted HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.15-4.68). hsCRP predicted increased risk of major vascular events (top quartile adjusted HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.14-3.67). There was no interaction with randomized antiplatelet treatment. Among recent lacunar stroke patients, hsCRP levels predict the risk of recurrent strokes and other vascular events. hsCRP did not predict the response to dual antiplatelets. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00059306.

  4. Short-term changes in lipoprotein subclasses and C-reactive protein levels of hypertriglyceridemic adults on low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Stoernell, Colene K; Tangney, Christy C; Rockway, Susie W

    2008-07-01

    Diets designed to promote weight loss and improve atherogenic lipid profiles traditionally include a reduction in total fat and, in particular, saturated fats. This study was designed to test the efficacy of a low-fat diet vs a carbohydrate (CHO)-restricted (low-CHO) diet in hypertriglyceridemic patients on lipid profile, weight loss, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and satiety. Twenty-eight hypertriglyceridemic subjects (based on fasting triacylglycerol [TG] levels exceeding 1.69 mmol/L) were randomized to either the low-CHO or low-fat diet for 8 weeks. Fasting bloods were acquired at weeks 0 and 8 and analyzed for lipids and hs-CRP. Body weight and other anthropometric measures were also obtained. Three random 24-hour food recalls were used to assess compliance during the trial and 2 recalls before randomization to permit individualized dietary education. A significant time-by-treatment interaction was observed (P = .045), wherein the small low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were reduced by 46% in the low-CHO-assigned subjects and increased by 36% for those assigned the low-fat plan. The observed decrease in TG (18%) among low-CHO subjects, in contrast to the 4% increase for low-fat group, was not significant, nor were there significant differences in hs-CRP, overall dietary compliance, satiety, or the magnitude of body weight loss between groups (low-CHO group, -3.8% vs low-fat group, -1.6%). Favorable reductions in small low-density lipoprotein concentrations after 8 weeks suggest that a moderately restricted carbohydrate diet (20% CHO as energy) can promote a less atherogenic lipid profile when compared to the low-fat diet.

  5. The association of low birth weight with serum C reactive protein in 3‐year‐old children living in Cuba: A population‐based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fundora‐Hernández, Hermes; Batista‐Gutierrez, Lourdes; Suárez‐Medina, Ramón; de la C. Mora‐Faife, Esperanza; García‐García, Gladys; del Valle‐Infante, Ileana; Gómez‐Marrero, Liem; Britton, John; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Low birthweight is associated with a decreased risk of childhood leukemia and an increased risk of both cardiovascular disease and all‐cause mortality in adult life. Possible biological mediators include systemic innate immunity and inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that birthweight was inversely associated with serum high sensitivity C reactive protein assay (hsCRP), a measure of both innate immunity and systemic inflammation. Methods Data on birthweight and current anthropometric measures along with a range of exposures were collected at 1 and 3 years of age in a population‐based cohort study of young children living in Havana, Cuba. A total of 986 children aged 3‐years‐old provided blood samples that were analyzed for serum hsCRP levels. Results Nearly 49% of children had detectable hsCRP levels in their serum. Lower birthweight was linearly associated with the natural log of hsCRP levels (beta coefficient −0.70 mg L−1 per kg increase in birthweight, 95% CI: −1.34 to −0.06). This was attenuated but still present after adjustment for the child's sex and municipality (−0.65 mg L−1 per kg birthweight; 95% CI: −1.38 to +0.08). There were no associations between growth from birth or anthropometric measures at 3 years and systemic inflammation. Conclusions Birthweight was inversely associated with serum hsCRP levels in children aged 3 years living in Cuba. These observations provide a potential mechanism that is present at the age of 3 years to explain the association between low birthweight and both decreased childhood leukemia and increased cardiovascular disease in adults. PMID:27859847

  6. Zinc decreases C-reactive protein, lipid peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokines in elderly subjects: a potential implication of zinc as an atheroprotective agent123

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Prasad, Ananda S; Beck, Frances WJ; Fitzgerald, James T; Snell, Diane; Bao, Ginny W; Singh, Tapinder; Cardozo, Lavoisier J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress are common risk factors for atherosclerosis. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that can function as an antiinflammatory and antioxidative agent, and as such, it may have atheroprotective properties. Objective: We hypothesized that zinc down-regulates the production of atherosclerosis-related cytokines/molecules in humans. Design: To examine these effects, we conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo trial of zinc supplementation in elderly subjects. We recruited 40 healthy elderly subjects (aged 56–83 y) and randomly assigned them to 2 groups. One group was given an oral dose of 45 mg zinc/d as a gluconate for 6 mo. The other group was given a placebo. Cell culture models were conducted to study the mechanism of zinc as an atheroprotective agent. Results: After 6 mo of supplementation, the intake of zinc, compared with intake of placebo, increased the concentrations of plasma zinc and decreased the concentrations of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin (IL)-6, macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), secretory phospholipase A2, and malondialdehyde and hydroxyalkenals (MDA+HAE) in elderly subjects. Regression analysis showed that changes in concentrations of plasma zinc were inversely associated with changes in concentrations of plasma hsCRP, MCP-1, VCAM-1, and MDA+HAE after 6 mo of supplementation. In cell culture studies, we showed that zinc decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, VCAM-1, and MDA+HAE and the activation of nuclear transcription factor κB and increased antiinflammatory proteins A20 and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α in human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells and human aortic endothelial cells compared with zinc-deficient cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that zinc may have a protective effect in atherosclerosis because of its antiinflammatory and antioxidant functions

  7. Childhood maltreatment severity is associated with elevated C-reactive protein and body mass index in adults with schizophrenia and bipolar diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Aas, Monica; Dieset, Ingrid; Hope, Sigrun; Hoseth, Eva; Mørch, Ragni; Reponen, Elina; Steen, Nils Eiel; Laskemoen, Jannicke Fjæra; Ueland, Thor; Aukrust, Pål; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2017-10-01

    Several studies have described an association between childhood maltreatment and inflammatory markers in the psychotic disorders (schizophrenia [SZ] and bipolar disorder [BD]). Previous studies have been relatively small (<50 participants), and the severity of abuse and the putative influence of body mass index (BMI) have not been properly investigated. The combined effects of childhood abuse severity and clinical diagnosis on inflammatory markers were investigated in a large sample (n=483) of patients with a disorder on the psychosis spectrum and in healthy controls (HCs). Plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 [TNFR-R1], glycoprotein 130 [gp130]) were analyzed, and BMI and data on childhood trauma events, on the basis of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), were obtained from all participants. Patients had increased levels of hs-CRP (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.4), lower levels of gp130 (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.5), higher BMI (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.5) and reported more childhood maltreatment experiences (P<0.001, Cohens d=1.2) than the HC group. The severity of childhood abuse (up to three types of abuse: sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse) was associated with elevated BMI (f=8.46, P<0.001, Cohen's d=0.5) and hs-CRP (f=5.47, P=0.001, Cohen's d=0.3). Combined effects of patient status and severity of childhood abuse were found for elevated hs-CRP (f=4.76, P<0.001, Cohen's d=0.4). Differences among the groups disappeared when BMI was added to the model. Trauma-altered immune activation via elevated hs-CRP in patients with SZ and BD may be mediated by higher BMI; however, the direction of this association needs further clarification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Periodontal profile class is associated with prevalent diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and systemic markers of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Beck, James D; Moss, Kevin L; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    This paper focuses on the Periodontal Profile Class (PPC) System that may be more informative and representative of periodontitis phenotypes than current case definitions of periodontitis. This study illustrates the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other periodontal indices for studying associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions. We computed odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to compare associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions using our new PPC and two traditional indices. We used the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to determine the fit of the model and the magnitude of the contribution attributable to periodontal disease beyond traditional risk factors. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1996-1998) results were compared with results from the combined National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2014 datasets. In the ARIC Study, high gingival inflammation, tooth loss, severe tooth loss, and severe disease PPC components were significantly associated with diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin (IL)-6, while only severe disease was associated with stroke. Severe disease was associated with CHD using the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology index, and the European Periodontal index was associated with CHD and IL-6. The addition of the PPC to traditional variables associated with prevalent diabetes, stroke, CHD, and systemic measures of inflammation resulted in very strong improvement of the overall models, while the traditional indices were less likely to be associated and, if present, the associations were weaker. The PPC system provides specific insight into the individuals and periodontal characteristics of the phenotype that are associated with systemic conditions that may be useful in designing treatment interventions. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  9. Elevated C-reactive Protein Levels in Women with Bipolar Disorder may be Explained by a History of Childhood Trauma, Especially Sexual Abuse, Body Mass Index and Age.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Juliana Brum; Maes, Michael; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Ferrari, Thais Zagabria; Uehara, Marcela Keikko Spagolla; Carvalho, Andre F; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether increased levels of high-sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP) observed in individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HCs) could be influenced by a previous exposure to early life stress (ELS) independently from other explanatory or background variables, including age, body mass index (BMI), and the presence of cooccurring mental disorders. In this case-control study, we included 142 healthy controls and 92 bipolar I and II patients. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was administered in a subset of 30 female patients with BD and 31 female HCs, and plasma hs-CRP was measured in all subjects. Multivariable models adjusted the data for the possible confounding variables. Serum hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with BD compared to HCs. However, after controlling for BMI, these differences were no longer significant. Around 55% of the variance in hs-CRP was explained by cumulative and independent effects of age, BMI and childhood trauma, especially sexual abuse. Our results show that increased hs-CRP levels in BD patients are more related to childhood trauma, especially sexual abuse, age and BMI than to a diagnosis of BD per se. These data suggest that peripheral inflammation may underpin the well-known detrimental effects of childhood maltreatment and obesity in the course of BD. Hs-CRP data are difficult to interpret if they are not adjusted for effects of BMI and age. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. The influence of dietary and supplemental calcium on postprandial effects of a high-fat meal on lipaemia, glycaemia, C-reactive protein and adiponectin in obese women.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thaís da S; Antunes, Vanessa P; Leal, Priscila M; Sanjuliani, Antonio F; Klein, Márcia R S T

    2017-10-01

    Non-fasting hypertriacylglycerolaemia is a risk factor for CVD and the amount of fat in a meal seems to be the main factor influencing postprandial lipaemia. Although several studies suggest that Ca can increase faecal fat excretion, it is not known whether Ca can decrease postprandial TAG. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of dietary Ca (DC) and supplemental Ca (SC) on lipaemia, glucose metabolism, C-reactive protein (CRP) and adiponectin during postprandial period in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal. In this cross-over controlled trial, sixteen obese women aged 20-50 years were randomly assigned to receive three test meals (approximately 2900 kJ; 48 % fat): high DC (547 mg DC), high SC (HSCM; 500 mg SC-calcium carbonate) and low Ca (42 mg DC). Blood samples were collected in the fasting period and at minutes 120 and 240 after meals to evaluate total cholesterol and fractions, TAG, glucose, insulin, high-sensitivity CRP and adiponectin. Serum levels of TAG and insulin increased significantly after all test meals. Only after HSCM total cholesterol did not present a significant increase and LDL-cholesterol had a significant decrease. Postprandial glucose, HDL-cholesterol, CRP and adiponectin did not present significant changes after the three test meals. The comparative analysis of the effects of the three test meals on serum lipids, glucose, insulin, CRP and adiponectin revealed no significant meal-by-time interaction. These results suggest that in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal DC and SC do not interfere with postprandial lipaemia, glucose metabolism, CRP and adiponectin.

  11. A sensitive and innovative detection method for rapid C-reactive proteins analysis based on a micro-fluxgate sensor system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Zhi, Shaotao; Feng, Zhu; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2018-01-01

    A sensitive and innovative assay system based on a micro-MEMS-fluxgate sensor and immunomagnetic beads-labels was developed for the rapid analysis of C-reactive proteins (CRP). The fluxgate sensor presented in this study was fabricated through standard micro-electro-mechanical system technology. A multi-loop magnetic core made of Fe-based amorphous ribbon was employed as the sensing element, and 3-D solenoid copper coils were used to control the sensing core. Antibody-conjugated immunomagnetic microbeads were strategically utilized as signal tags to label the CRP via the specific conjugation of CRP to polyclonal CRP antibodies. Separate Au film substrates were applied as immunoplatforms to immobilize CRP-beads labels through classical sandwich assays. Detection and quantification of the CRP at different concentrations were implemented by detecting the stray field of CRP labeled magnetic beads using the newly-developed micro-fluxgate sensor. The resulting system exhibited the required sensitivity, stability, reproducibility, and selectivity. A detection limit as low as 0.002 μg/mL CRP with a linearity range from 0.002 μg/mL to 10 μg/mL was achieved, and this suggested that the proposed biosystem possesses high sensitivity. In addition to the extremely low detection limit, the proposed method can be easily manipulated and possesses a quick response time. The response time of our sensor was less than 5 s, and the entire detection period for CRP analysis can be completed in less than 30 min using the current method. Given the detection performance and other advantages such as miniaturization, excellent stability and specificity, the proposed biosensor can be considered as a potential candidate for the rapid analysis of CRP, especially for point-of-care platforms. PMID:29601593

  12. Multi-Ancestral Analysis of Inflammation-Related Genetic Variants and C-Reactive Protein in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Carty, Cara L.; Pankow, James S.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cheng, Iona; Durda, Peter; Ambite, JoséLuis; Deelman, Ewa; Cook, Nancy R.; Liu, Simin; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hutter, Carolyn; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Wilson, Sarah; Best, Lyle G.; Pankratz, Nathan; Hong, Ching-Ping; Cole, Shelley A.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Bůžková, Petra; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; LaCroix, Andrea; North, Kari; Jackson, Rebecca; Le Marchand, Loic; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Gross, Myron; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRP concentrations and inflammation-related traits such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. We aimed to replicate previous CRP-SNP associations, assess whether these associations generalize to additional race/ethnicity groups, and evaluate inflammation-related SNPs for a potentially pleiotropic association with CRP. Methods and Results We selected and analyzed 16 CRP-associated and 250 inflammation-related GWAS SNPs among 40,473 African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, European American, and Hispanic participants from 7 studies collaborating in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Fixed-effect meta-analyses combined study-specific race/ethnicity-stratified linear regression estimates to evaluate the association between each SNP and high-sensitivity CRP. Overall, 18 SNPs in 8 loci were significantly associated with CRP (Bonferroni-corrected p<3.1×10−3 for replication, p<2.0×10−4 for pleiotropy): Seven of these were specific to European Americans, while 9 additionally generalized to African Americans (1), Hispanics (5), or both (3); 1 SNP was seen only in African Americans and Hispanics. Two SNPs in the CELSR2/PSRC1/SORT1 locus showed a potentially novel association with CRP: rs599839 (p=2.0×10−6) and rs646776 (p=3.1×10−5). Conclusions We replicated 16 SNP-CRP associations, 10 of which generalized to African Americans and/or Hispanics. We also identified potentially novel pleiotropic associations with CRP for two SNPs previously associated with coronary artery disease and LDL cholesterol. These findings demonstrate the benefit of evaluating genotype-phenotype associations in multiple race/ethnicity groups, and of looking for pleiotropic relationships among SNPs previously associated with related phenotypes

  13. Driver mutations (JAK2V617F, MPLW515L/K or CALR), pentraxin-3 and C-reactive protein in essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Lussana, Federico; Carobbio, Alessandra; Salmoiraghi, Silvia; Guglielmelli, Paola; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Bottazzi, Barbara; Leone, Roberto; Mantovani, Alberto; Barbui, Tiziano; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2017-02-22

    The driver mutations JAK2V617F, MPLW515L/K and CALR influence disease phenotype of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and might sustain a condition of chronic inflammation. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are inflammatory biomarkers potentially useful for refining prognostic classification of MPNs. We evaluated 305 with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 172 polycythemia vera (PV) patients diagnosed according to the 2016 WHO criteria and with full molecular characterization for driver mutations. PTX3 levels were significantly increased in carriers of homozygous JAK2V617F mutation compared to all the other genotypes and triple negative ET patients, while hs-CRP levels were independent of the mutational profile. The risk of haematological evolution and death from any cause was about 2- and 1.5-fold increased in individuals with high PTX-3 levels, while the thrombosis rate tended to be lower. High hs-CRP levels were associated with risk of haematological evolution, death and also major thrombosis. After sequential adjustment for potential confounders (age, gender, diagnosis and treatments) and the presence of JAK2V617F homozygous status, high hs-CRP levels remained significant for all outcomes, while JAK2V617F homozygous status as well as treatments were the factors independently accounting for adverse outcomes among patients with high PTX3 levels. These results provide evidence that JAK2V617F mutation influences MPN-associated inflammation with a strong correlation between allele burden and PTX3 levels. Plasma levels of hs-CRP and PTX3 might be of prognostic value for patients with ET and PV, but their validation in future prospective studies is needed.

  14. C-reactive protein for predicting prognosis and its gender-specific associations with diabetes mellitus and hypertension in the development of coronary artery spasm.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Hu, Wei-Syun; Chang, Nen-Chung; Hung, Ming-Yow

    2013-01-01

    While hypertension is negatively associated with coronary artery spasm (CAS), scarce data are available on diabetes mellitus in relation to CAS. In addition, outcome prediction in patients with CAS is challenging due to the lack of appropriate biomarkers. Therefore, we sought to identify the roles that gender, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), diabetes mellitus and hypertension play in CAS development and prognosis. Patients (350 women and 547 men) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography with or without proven CAS but without obstructive stenosis were evaluated at long-term follow-up (median 102 months). Diabetic women and diabetic men with low hs-CRP levels had a low and high risk of CAS (odds ratio [OR]: 0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01-1.88 and OR: 5.02, 95% CI: 1.03-24.54, respectively). The ORs of CAS in both women and men with the highest hs-CRP tertile (>3 mg/L) reduced from 4.41 to 1.45 and 2.98 to 1.52, respectively, if they had diabetes mellitus, and from 9.68 to 2.43 and 2.60 to 1.75, respectively, if they had hypertension. Hypertension had a more negative effect on CAS development in diabetic than non-diabetic women, which was not observed in men. The highest hs-CRP tertile was an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Patients with the highest hs-CRP tertile had more coronary events than patients with the lowest hs-CRP tertitle (p = 0.021, log-rank test). Diabetes mellitus contributes to CAS development in men with low hs-CRP levels, but not in women. There are negative effects of diabetes mellitus and hypertension on CAS development in patients with high hs-CRP levels and especially in women. Elevated hs-CRP level independently predicts adverse outcomes.

  15. The association of low birth weight with serum C reactive protein in 3-year-old children living in Cuba: A population-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Josefina Venero-Fernández, Silvia; Fundora-Hernández, Hermes; Batista-Gutierrez, Lourdes; Suárez-Medina, Ramón; de la C Mora-Faife, Esperanza; García-García, Gladys; Del Valle-Infante, Ileana; Gómez-Marrero, Liem; Britton, John; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2017-05-06

    Low birthweight is associated with a decreased risk of childhood leukemia and an increased risk of both cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in adult life. Possible biological mediators include systemic innate immunity and inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that birthweight was inversely associated with serum high sensitivity C reactive protein assay (hsCRP), a measure of both innate immunity and systemic inflammation. Data on birthweight and current anthropometric measures along with a range of exposures were collected at 1 and 3 years of age in a population-based cohort study of young children living in Havana, Cuba. A total of 986 children aged 3-years-old provided blood samples that were analyzed for serum hsCRP levels. Nearly 49% of children had detectable hsCRP levels in their serum. Lower birthweight was linearly associated with the natural log of hsCRP levels (beta coefficient -0.70 mg L -1 per kg increase in birthweight, 95% CI: -1.34 to -0.06). This was attenuated but still present after adjustment for the child's sex and municipality (-0.65 mg L -1 per kg birthweight; 95% CI: -1.38 to +0.08). There were no associations between growth from birth or anthropometric measures at 3 years and systemic inflammation. Birthweight was inversely associated with serum hsCRP levels in children aged 3 years living in Cuba. These observations provide a potential mechanism that is present at the age of 3 years to explain the association between low birthweight and both decreased childhood leukemia and increased cardiovascular disease in adults. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Human Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Regular consumption of dark chocolate is associated with low serum concentrations of C-reactive protein in a healthy Italian population.

    PubMed

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Centritto, Floriana; Zito, Francesco; De Curtis, Amalia; Costanzo, Simona; Vohnout, Branislav; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2008-10-01

    Dark chocolate contains high concentrations of flavonoids and may have antiinflammatory properties. We evaluated the association of dark chocolate intake with serum C-reactive protein (CRP). The Moli-sani Project is an ongoing cohort study of men and women aged >/=35 y randomly recruited from the general population. By July 2007, 10,994 subjects had been enrolled. Of 4849 subjects apparently free of any chronic disease, 1317 subjects who declared having eaten any chocolate during the past year (mean age 53 +/- 12 y; 51% men) and 824 subjects who ate chocolate regularly in the form of dark chocolate only (50 +/- 10 y; 55% men) were selected. High sensitivity-CRP was measured by an immunoturbidimetric method. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition FFQ was used to evaluate nutritional intake. After adjustment for age, sex, social status, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, BMI, waist:hip ratio, food groups, and total energy intake, dark chocolate consumption was inversely associated with CRP (P = 0.038). When adjusted for nutrient intake, analyses showed similar results (P = 0.016). Serum CRP concentrations [geometric mean (95% CI)] univariate concentrations were 1.32 (1.26-1.39 mg/L) in nonconsumers and 1.10 (1.03-1.17 mg/L) in consumers (P < 0.0001). A J-shaped relationship between dark chocolate consumption and serum CRP was observed; consumers of up to 1 serving (20 g) of dark chocolate every 3 d had serum CRP concentrations that were significantly lower than nonconsumers or higher consumers. Our findings suggest that regular consumption of small doses of dark chocolate may reduce inflammation.

  17. Multiancestral analysis of inflammation-related genetic variants and C-reactive protein in the population architecture using genomics and epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Carty, Cara L; Pankow, James S; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Cheng, Iona; Durda, Peter; Ambite, José Luis; Deelman, Ewa; Cook, Nancy R; Liu, Simin; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hutter, Carolyn; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Wilson, Sarah; Best, Lyle G; Pankratz, Nathan; Hong, Ching-Ping; Cole, Shelley A; Voruganti, V Saroja; Bůžkova, Petra; Jorgensen, Neal W; Jenny, Nancy S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Haiman, Christopher A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Lacroix, Andrea; North, Kari; Jackson, Rebecca; Le Marchand, Loic; Hindorff, Lucia A; Crawford, Dana C; Gross, Myron; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRP concentrations and inflammation-related traits such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity. We aimed to replicate previous CRP-SNP associations, assess whether these associations generalize to additional race/ethnicity groups, and evaluate inflammation-related SNPs for a potentially pleiotropic association with CRP. We selected and analyzed 16 CRP-associated and 250 inflammation-related GWAS SNPs among 40 473 African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, European American, and Hispanic participants from 7 studies collaborating in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Fixed-effect meta-analyses combined study-specific race/ethnicity-stratified linear regression estimates to evaluate the association between each SNP and high-sensitivity CRP. Overall, 18 SNPs in 8 loci were significantly associated with CRP (Bonferroni-corrected P<3.1×10(-3) for replication, P<2.0×10(-4) for pleiotropy): Seven of these were specific to European Americans, while 9 additionally generalized to African Americans (1), Hispanics (5), or both (3); 1 SNP was seen only in African Americans and Hispanics. Two SNPs in the CELSR2/PSRC1/SORT1 locus showed a potentially novel association with CRP: rs599839 (P=2.0×10(-6)) and rs646776 (P=3.1×10(-5)). We replicated 16 SNP-CRP associations, 10 of which generalized to African Americans and/or Hispanics. We also identified potentially novel pleiotropic associations with CRP for two SNPs previously associated with coronary artery disease and/or low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. These findings demonstrate the benefit of evaluating genotype-phenotype associations in multiple race/ethnicity groups and looking for pleiotropic relationships among SNPs previously associated with related phenotypes.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency is common and associated with increased C-reactive protein in children and young adults with lupus: an Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus substudy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Tangpricha, Vin; Yow, Eric; Gurion, Reut; McComsey, Grace A; Schanberg, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological associations suggest vitamin D may play a role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Using frozen serum and data from the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial, we assessed associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and measures of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and cardiovascular risk. Baseline APPLE serum samples were used to measure 25(OH)D levels. Logistic regression models for vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D levels <20 ng/mL] were constructed using baseline variables collected as part of the trial, including race, season, latitude, disease duration, disease activity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), proteinuria, fasting lipids and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Samples were available from 201 of 221 APPLE subjects; 61/201 (30%) had vitamin D deficiency at baseline. In univariable analysis, baseline vitamin D deficiency was associated with season (p<0.01), minority status (p<0.01), body mass index (p=0.04), duration of SLE (p<0.01), SLICC damage index (p=0.04), hsCRP (p<0.01), mean-max CIMT (p=0.01), LDL-cholesterol (p=0.03) and timed urine protein (p=0.03). In multivariable modelling, vitamin D deficiency was associated with age, latitude, season, minority status, proteinuria and hsCRP. Vitamin D deficiency is common in paediatric lupus and is independently associated with elevated hsCRP, a marker of inflammation that predicts cardiovascular disease risk. Although association is not proof of causation, this association is novel in the paediatric SLE population and suggests that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to heightened inflammation and cardiovascular risk in this population. NCT00065806.

  19. C-reactive protein levels and risk of disabling dementia with and without stroke in Japanese: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    PubMed

    Chei, Choy-Lye; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Ai; Noda, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Minako; Cui, Renzhe; Imano, Hironori; Kiyama, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiko; Asada, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2014-10-01

    Studies have shown that elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts stroke, which is a risk factor for dementia. It remains, however, unclear whether hs-CRP increases risk of dementia. A prospective nested case-control study of Japanese 40-69 years of age was conducted using frozen serum samples collected from approximately 7531men and women who participated in cardiovascular risk surveys from 1984 to 1994 in one community and 1989-1995 in another community under the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS). Two control subjects per case were matched by sex, age, community, and year of serum storage. The hs-CRP was measured using a latex particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. Between 1999 and 2013, we identified 275 disabling dementia cases (96 cases with history of stroke and 179 without it). There was a positive association between hs-CRP levels and risk of dementia with history of stroke. No significant association was observed between hs-CRP levels and risk of dementia without history of stroke. After adjustment for hypertension, diabetes and other confounding variables, the positive association remained statistically significant. The multivariable odds ratios associated with 1-SD increment of log hs-CRP were 1.02 (0.87-1.20) for total dementia, 1.35 (1.02-1.79) for dementia with history of stroke, and 0.89 (0.72-1.10) for dementia without history of stroke. Elevated hs-CRP levels were associated with increased risk of disabling dementia in individuals with history of stroke but not in those without it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of metformin compared with hypocaloric diet on serum C-reactive protein level and insulin resistance in obese and overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esfahanian, Fatemeh; Zamani, Mohammad Mahdi; Heshmat, Ramin; Moini nia, Fatemeh

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of Metformin compared with a hypocaloric diet on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and markers of insulin resistance in obese and overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Forty women with body mass index ≥ 27 and PCOS were randomly allocated to receive either Metformin or hypocaloric diet and were assessed before and after a treatment period of 12 weeks. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) and markers of insulin resistance (IR), homeostasis model assessment-IR, quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index and fasting glucose to insulin ratio were evaluated in each patient. A total of 10 subjects did not complete the trial (three patients in the Metformin group and seven patients in the diet group) and a total of 30 subjects completed the trial (17 subjects in the Metformin group and 13 subjects in the diet group). Serum concentration of hs-CRP significantly decreased in both the Metformin (5.29 ± 2.50 vs 3.81 ± 1.99, P = 0.008) and diet groups (6.08 ± 2.14 vs 4.27 ± 1.60, P = 0.004). There were no significant differences in mean hs-CRP decrement between the two groups. Decrease in hs-CRP levels was significantly correlated with waist circumference in the diet group (r = 0.8, P < 0.001). The effect of a hypocaloric diet with 5-10% weight reduction on markers of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-IR, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index) was better than Metformin therapy (P = 0.001). Although weight reduction has equal efficacy with Metformin in decreasing serum hs-CRP levels, it was significantly more effective in improving insulin resistance in obese and overweight PCOS women. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Prospective associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and CRP genetic risk scores with risk of total knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis in a diverse cohort.

    PubMed

    Shadyab, A H; Terkeltaub, R; Kooperberg, C; Reiner, A; Eaton, C B; Jackson, R D; Krok-Schoen, J L; Salem, R M; LaCroix, A Z

    2018-05-22

    To examine associations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and polygenic CRP genetic risk scores (GRS) with risk of end-stage hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA), defined as incident total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) for OA. This study included a cohort of postmenopausal white, African American, and Hispanic women from the Women's Health Initiative. Women were followed from baseline to date of THR or TKR, death, or December 31, 2014. Medicare claims data identified THR and TKR. Hs-CRP and genotyping data were collected at baseline. Three CRP GRS were constructed: 1) a 4-SNP GRS comprised of genetic variants representing variation in the CRP gene among European populations; 2) a multilocus 18-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies; and 3) a 5-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels among African American women. In analyses conducted separately among each race and ethnic group, there were no significant associations of ln hs-CRP with risk of THR or TKR, after adjusting for age, body mass index, lifestyle characteristics, chronic diseases, hormone therapy use, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. CRP GRS were not associated with risk of THR or TKR in any ethnic group. Serum levels of ln hs-CRP and genetically-predicted CRP levels were not associated with risk of THR or TKR for OA among a diverse cohort of women. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum Concentrations of Interleukin-6, Procalcitonin, and C-Reactive Protein: Discrimination of Septical Complications and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome after Pediatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Neunhoeffer, Felix; Plinke, Swantje; Renk, Hanna; Hofbeck, Michael; Fuchs, Jörg; Kumpf, Matthias; Zundel, Sabine; Seitz, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Early differentiation between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is useful for therapeutic management in neonates and infants after surgery. To compare the early (first 2 days) diagnostic value of interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) after surgery in the differentiation of subsequent SIRS and septic complications. IL-6, PCT, and CRP were measured 0, 24, and 48 hours after surgery in neonates and infants with clinical suspicion of postoperative sepsis. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for SIRS/septic complications were calculated. A total of 31 out of 205 neonates and infants showed clinical signs for postoperative sepsis and underwent sepsis work-up. Nine patients developed septic complications, sixteen patients met criteria for SIRS, and six patients showed an uneventful postoperative course during the first five postoperative days. IL-6, PCT, and CRP levels increased in all subgroups after surgery and were significantly higher in the sepsis group (p < 0.05). IL-6 peaked immediately, CRP at 24 to 48 hours, and PCT at 24 hours after surgery. Sensitivity and specificity (area under the curve) for IL-6 (cutoff 673 ng/dL) were 94.4 and 75% (86.2%), for CRP (cutoff 1.48 mg/dL) 76.2 and 75.0% (88.1%), and for PCT (cutoff 16.1 mg/L) 66.7 and 57.1% (65.6%). IL-6 appears to be an early marker for severe bacterial infections with high sensitivity. IL-6 and CRP were the most reliable markers for the discrimination between SIRS and sepsis within the postoperative period. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Usefulness of baseline lipids and C-reactive protein in women receiving menopausal hormone therapy as predictors of treatment-related coronary events.

    PubMed

    Bray, Paul F; Larson, Joseph C; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Manson, Joann; Limacher, Marian C; Rossouw, Jacques E; Lasser, Norman L; Lawson, William E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Langer, Robert D; Margolis, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    Blood lipids and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are altered by hormone therapy. The goal of the present study was to determine whether lipids and hs-CRP have predictive value for hormone therapy benefit or risk for coronary heart disease events in postmenopausal women without previous cardiovascular disease. A nested case-control study was performed in the Women's Health Initiative hormone trials. Baseline lipids and hs-CRP were obtained from 271 incident patients with coronary heart disease (cases) and 707 controls. In a combined trial analysis, favorable lipid status at baseline tended to predict better coronary heart disease outcomes when using conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) with or without medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Women with a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio <2.5 had no increase in risk of coronary heart disease when using CEE with or without MPA (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 1.06), whereas women with an LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio > or =2.5 had increased risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 2.53, p for interaction = 0.02). Low hs-CRP added marginally to the value of LDL/HDL ratio <2.5 when predicting coronary heart disease benefit on hormone therapy. In conclusion, postmenopausal women with undesirable lipid levels had excess coronary heart disease risk when using CEE with or without MPA. However, women with favorable lipid levels, especially LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio <2.5, did not have increased risk of coronary heart disease with CEE with or without MPA irrespective of hs-CRP.

  4. Increased expression of C-reactive protein gene in inflamed gingival tissues could be derived from endothelial cells stimulated with interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Tomoki; Tabeta, Koichi; Kajita-Okui, Keiko; Nakajima, Takako; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested periodontitis as a risk factor for ischemic heart disease. High sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a predictor of cardiovascular risk, is elevated in periodontitis patients. Therefore, local infection-induced elevation of systemic CRP could account for the relationship between the 2 diseases. However, the underlying mechanism of CRP production in the periodontal tissues has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism of CRP production in periodontal tissues. Gene expression of CRP in gingival biopsies was analysed by quantitative PCR. Human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs), human gingival fibroblasts (HGFBs), and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were characterized for CRP-producing ability by incubating with interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R), and Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83. Gene expression of CRP is significantly elevated in periodontitis lesions compared with gingivitis lesions. HCAECs, but not HGECs and HGFBs, produced CRP in response to IL-6 and IL-1β in the presence of sIL-6R. In contrast to IL-6, the effect of IL-1β on CRP production was indirect via induction of IL-6. IL-1β was produced by HGECs and HGFBs with stimulation of P. gingivalis antigens. These results suggest that CRP induced locally by periodontal infection may play another role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, and to a much lesser extent, has the potential to modulate systemic CRP level by extra-hepatic CRP production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Short-term effects of an anti-inflammatory treatment on clinical parameters and serum levels of C-reactive protein and proinflammatory cytokines in subjects with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Lindahl, Christel; Roos-Jansåker, Ann-Marie; Lessem, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common multifactorial disease, afflicting a very large proportion of the adult population. Periodontal disease secondarily causes increases in the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other markers of inflammation. An increased level of CRP reflects an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The aim of the current randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the short-term effect of a combination of dipyridamole and prednisolone (CRx-102) on the levels of high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP, proinflammatory markers in blood, and clinical signs of periodontal disease. Fifty-seven patients with >/=10 pockets with probing depths >/=5 mm were randomized into two groups in this masked single-center placebo-controlled study: CRx-102 (n = 28) and placebo (n = 29). hs-CRP levels, inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, -1beta, -8, and -12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma [IFN-gamma]), bleeding on probing (BOP), and changes in probing depths were evaluated. The subjects received mechanical non-surgical therapy after 42 days, and the study was completed after 49 days. At day 42, the differences in the hs-CRP, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 levels between the two groups were statistically significant (P <0.05), whereas no difference was found for the other inflammatory markers. There was no change in probing depth or BOP between the two groups. The administration of CRx-102 resulted in significant decreases in hs-CRP, IFN-gamma, and IL-6, but it did not significantly change BOP or probing depths.

  6. The short-term effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    George, Annie Kitty; Janam, Prasanthila

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that periodontal infection is a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases and conditions. In addition to the conventional risk factors, chronic infection and the subsequent generation of a systemic inflammatory response may be associated with this increased risk. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of chronic periodontitis and subsequent non-surgical periodontal therapy could influence the se