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Sample records for a-1 high-sensitivity c-reactive

  1. Immunoanalytical characteristics of C-reactive protein and high sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Moutachakkir, Mariame; Lamrani Hanchi, Asma; Baraou, Azzedine; Boukhira, Abderrahman; Chellak, Saliha

    2017-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a polypeptide molecule belonging to the family of pentraxins. It has a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons and consists of five identical sub-units that contain each 206 amino acids. CRP is synthesized primarily by the liver in response to certain pro-inflammatory cytokines. It plays an important role in innate immunity, opsonization by its properties, complement activation and immunoglobulins receptor binding. CRP is a protein of the acute systemic inflammation and is, therefore, a prime marker of inflammation. As atherosclerosis has an inflammatory component, CRP can appreciate cardiovascular risk when analysed by more sensitive assays, that are able to measure extremely low concentrations of CRP, called high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). The CRP is quantified by immunonephelometry or immunoturbidimetry. There is no standard technique. The hs-CRP quantification is based on immunonephelemetry sensitized techniques called "immunolatex". We present in this paper the main biochemical and physiological data related to CRP, explaining the need for its quantification, the problems encountered in immunoassay and the interpretation of results.

  2. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  3. Associations of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels in Schizophrenia and Comparison Groups

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Daly, Rebecca; Glorioso, Danielle K; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by physical (mainly metabolic and cardiovascular) comorbidity and shortened lifespan. High sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP), an inflammatory marker of hepatic origin linked to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population, has been reported to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. However, the relationship of hs-CRP to psychiatric and medical risk factors, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as smoking, is not well established in schizophrenia. We assessed hs-CRP levels along with various demographic, psychiatric, and metabolic measures in 88 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 age epoch-matched comparison subjects with no history of a major psychiatric illness. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in comparison subjects. Higher hs-CRP levels in schizophrenia group were associated with female gender, more severe negative symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, and worse metabolic risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels. hs-CRP was not related to age, race, education, smoking status, antipsychotic dosage, or cognitive impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP and long-term health outcomes including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in schizophrenia. PMID:26341579

  4. Role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measurements in HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Arun; Quaiser, Saif; Khan, Ruhi

    2016-01-01

    As we herald into the 21st century, the quality of life and the repertoire of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have considerably improved. However, considerable work is still needed to educate the population about primary and secondary prevention modalities. Moreover, regular monitoring of immune response with patients on HAART with conventional biomarkers is still a problem in low resource settings which needs to be addressed. We aim to review high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a potential biomarker in this regard. PMID:27890944

  5. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is not a risk factor for venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.

    PubMed

    Hald, Erin M; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Brox, Jan; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2011-08-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is associated with risk of arterial cardiovascular disease but conflicting results have been reported on its role in venous thromboembolic disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and risk of future venous thromboembolism in a prospective cohort recruited from a general population. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured in serum samples from 6,426 men and women, aged 25-84 years, recruited from the Tromsø Study in the period 1994-1995. Incident venous thromboembolism events (n=209) were registered during a median of 12.5 years of follow up. Cox's proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for total venous thromboembolism, and for provoked and unprovoked venous thromboembolism by increasing levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. There was no increased risk of venous thromboembolism per 1 standard deviation increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hazard ratio 1.08; 95% confidence interval 0.95-1.23) or across quartiles of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P for trend 0.6) in analyses adjusted for age and gender. Further adjustment for body mass index, smoking and diabetes did not alter the risk estimates. Moreover, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not associated with venous thromboembolism in either gender specific analysis or in separate analyses of provoked and unprovoked venous thromboembolism events. In this prospective study, serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were not associated with future development of venous thromboembolism. Our findings do not suggest a causal role for C-reactive protein in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism.

  6. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) assay using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Keegan, Gemma L.; Stranik, Ondrej; Brennan-Fournet, Margaret E.; McDonagh, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescence has been extensively employed in the area of diagnostic immunoassays. A significant enhancement of fluorescence can be achieved when noble metal nanoparticles are placed in close proximity to fluorophores. This effect, referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), has the potential to produce immunoassays with a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection (LOD). In this study, we investigate the fluorescence enhancement effect of two different nanoparticle systems, large spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold edge-coated triangular silver nanoplates, and both systems were evaluated for MEF. The extinction properties and electric field enhancement of both systems were modeled, and the optimum system, spherical AgNPs, was used in a sandwich immunoassay for human C-reactive protein with a red fluorescent dye label. A significant enhancement in the fluorescence was observed, which corresponded to an LOD improvement of 19-fold compared to a control assay without AgNPs.

  7. Predictors of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-S; Singh, S; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2008-02-01

    Despite the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), little is known about the role of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) or whether ethnicity, gender, anthropometric measures and treatment can alter hsCRP levels. We evaluated the effects of treatment and demographic, anthropometric and socio-economic variables on hsCRP levels in SLE. High sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were measured using an immunoturbidimetric assay in 610 patients from the Hopkins Lupus Cohort, who were followed-up regularly. In stepwise multiple regression analyses, body mass index (BMI) [odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-2.20, P < 0.001], African-American ethnicity (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.22-3.19, P < 0.01), education (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.42-0.86, P < 0.01), statin use (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.82, P < 0.05), estrogen use (OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.19-11.22, P < 0.05), SLE Disease Activity Index score (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.09-2.87, P < 0.05) and cumulative prednisone dose (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01-1.60, P < 0.05) were significant predictors of hsCRP levels. These findings suggest that hsCRP levels should be adjusted for BMI, ethnicity, education level, disease activity and medications when conducting cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with lupus.

  8. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz; de Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes; de Quadros, Alexandre Schaan; Portal, Vera Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. Objective To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Conclusion Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent

  9. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, A; Ostovar, A; Vahdat, K; Rezaei, P; Darabi, H; Moshtaghi, D; Nabipour, I

    2017-02-01

    To explore the independent correlation between serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) in postmenopausal women. A total of 378 healthy Iranian postmenopausal women were randomly selected in a population-based study. Circulating hs-CRP levels were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and an enzymatic calorimetric method was used to measure serum levels of uric acid. Pearson correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between uric acid and hs-CRP levels. A statistically significant correlation was seen between serum levels of uric acid and log-transformed circulating hs-CRP (r = 0.25, p < 0.001). After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors (according to NCEP ATP III criteria), circulating hs-CRP levels were significantly associated with serum uric acid levels (β = 0.20, p < 0.001). After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP levels ≥3 mg/l were significantly associated with higher uric acid levels (odds ratio =1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.96). Higher serum uric acid levels were positively and independently associated with circulating hs-CRP in healthy postmenopausal women.

  10. High sensitivity C-reactive protein in airline pilots with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Rodríguez, César; Medina-Font, Juan

    2012-05-01

    Airline pilots belong to a relatively high-income, healthy population, with sedentary behavior during their flight activity, who often eat unsuitable meals. We assessed the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a population of airline pilot in order to study a possible relationship between the hs-CRP and MS. MS was established according to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. hs-CRP was classified into three categories: Low < 1 mg x L(-1); intermediate: 1-3 mg x L(-1); and high: > 3 mg x L(-1). The prevalence of MS was 14.8%. The hs-CRP level in the population studied was 1.68 +/- 1.79 mg x L(-1). hs-CRP significantly increased with age. The pilots with MS presented significantly higher hs-CRP levels (median = 1.9 with an interquartile range (IQR) = 2.5 mg x L(-1)) than the pilots without MS (median = 0.9 and IQR = 1.275 mg x L(-1)). MS significantly increased in the groups with high hs-CRP in comparison with pilots with intermediate hs-CRP levels and with those with low hs-CRP levels. A similar association was found between the levels of hs-CRP and the prevalence of MS in the three age groups. The levels of hs-CRP increased in pilots as they presented greater numbers of MS diagnostic criteria. hs-CRP rises significantly in pilots of increasing age, in pilots with MS as compared to those without the syndrome, and in pilots as they present greater numbers of MS diagnostic criteria. The prevalence of MS increased among the groups with higher levels of hs-CRP.

  11. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidoroff, Marianne; Karikoski, Riitta; Raivio, Taneli; Savilahti, Erkki; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) measurement can aid the assessment of disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: CRP levels were measured in 39 children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy [median age 12.8 years, Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 20], in 22 other children with IBD followed for acute response to glucocorticoids, and in 33 paediatric non-IBD patients. When standard CRP level was below detection limit (< 5 mg/L), hs-CRP was analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-four percent (25/39) of the children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy displayed undetectable (< 5 mg/L) standard CRP levels. Of these, the hs-CRP measurement could not differentiate between active (median, 0.2 mg/L, range, 0.007-1.37, n = 17) or quiescent (0.1 mg/L, 0.01-1.89, n = 8, P = NS) disease. Patients with ileocolonic CD had higher CRP levels (14 mg/L, 0.06-45, n = 13) than patients with no ileal involvement (0.18 mg/L, 0.01-9, n = 7, P < 0.01) or ulcerative colitis (UC) (0.13 mg/L, 0.007-23, P < 0.05). In children with active IBD treated with systemic glucocorticoids, the standard CRP was undetectable in 59% of the patients. The hs-CRP levels did not differ between patients that responded to steroid therapy and in non-responders. CONCLUSION: The measurement of hs-CRP did not prove useful in the assessment of disease activity or glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric IBD patients that had undetectable standard CRP. PMID:20556836

  12. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and mean platelet volume in paediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Anna; Tenderenda, Edyta; Taranta-Janusz, Katarzyna; Zoch-Zwierz, Walentyna

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate serum uric acid (SUA), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and mean platelet volume (MPV) in pre-hypertensive (PH) and hypertensive (HT) children and adolescents. The study group consisted of 80 patients aged 10-19 years subdivided into PH and HT groups according to mean daytime or night-time systolic or diastolic blood pressure (BP) levels (> 90th percentile, but < 95th percentile and > or = 95th percentile, respectively). The control group (C) contained 25 normotensive subjects. Serum hs-CRP level was determined by a nephelometric method (Behring); platelets (PLTs) were counted, and MPV was assessed by a Coulter Analyzer MAXM. SUA was measured with an Hitachi instrument. The median SUA and hs-CRP levels in PH and HT subjects were significantly higher than those of the controls (P < 0.01) and were higher in the HT group than in the PH group (P < 0.05). An increase in SUA above 5.5 mg/dl was associated with an increase in hs-CRP [odds ratio (OR) 4.8; confidence interval (CI) 1.3-17.4; P < 0.01]. MPV values in the PH group did not differ from those of the controls (P > 0.05), but it was significantly higher in HT patients (P < 0.01). Serum hs-CRP and MPV concentrations were positively correlated with all BP measurements except night-time diastolic blood pressure (DBP). We demonstrated that, in HT children and adolescents, increased SUA with a parallel increase in hs-CRP and PLTs with MPV is observed. Although large, multicentre, prospective studies are needed to confirm this observation, hyperuricaemia seems to be associated with an increase in hs-CRP in PH and HT patients.

  13. Modulation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein by soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    McNair, Erick D; Wells, Calvin R; Mabood Qureshi, A; Basran, Rashpal; Pearce, Colin; Orvold, Jason; Devilliers, Jacobus; Prasad, Kailash

    2010-08-01

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is synthesized mainly by hepatocytes in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) increases the expression of the cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) competes with RAGE for binding with AGEs. Hence, low sRAGE levels may increase interaction of AGEs with RAGE resulting in the increased production of cytokines. It is hypothesized that serum levels of sRAGE modulate serum levels of hs-CRP. The objectives are to determine if (i) serum levels of sRAGE are lower and those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP are higher in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients compared to control subjects; (ii) serum levels of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP are positively correlated; and (iii) sRAGE is negatively correlated with hs-CRP and TNF-alpha. The study consisted of 36 patients with NSTEMI and 30 age-matched healthy male subjects. Serum levels of sRAGE and TNF-alpha were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay and hs-CRP was measured using near infrared immunoassay. Serum levels of sRAGE were lower, while those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP were higher in patients with NSTEMI compared to controls. The levels of sRAGE were negatively correlated with those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP, while TNF-alpha was positively correlated with hs-CRP in both the control subjects and NSTEMI patients. The data suggest that sRAGE modulates the synthesis of hs-CRP through TNF-alpha.

  14. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  15. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  16. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is a marker of obesity and not of polycystic ovary syndrome per se.

    PubMed

    Gowri, Vaidyanathan; Rizvi, Syed Gauhar; Squib, Shabnam; Al Futaisi, Abdullah

    2010-12-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is more a marker of obesity than polycystic ovary syndrome itself, in particular in women >30 years of age. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles for high-sensitivity immunomagnetic detection of human C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horng, H. E.; Yang, S. Y.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Liu, C. M.; Tsai, P. S.; Yang, H. C.; Wu, C. C.

    2006-06-01

    In this work, we developed immunomagnetic detection techniques for detecting human C-reactive protein (CRP). To enhance the technique's sensitivity to human CRP, biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used as markers, and a superconductive quantum interference device gradiometer system was adapted to measure the saturated magnetization of magnetically labeled CRP-anti-CRP immune complexes. Sensitivity for human CRP was found to be as high as 1ng in 0.1ml, i.e., 10ng/ml in concentration. This sensitivity is much higher than that of conventional enzyme linked immunosorbent assay by one order of magnitude.

  18. Comparison of osteoprotegerin to traditional atherosclerotic risk factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for diagnosis of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; Pedersen, Sune H; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Bjerre, Mette; Iversen, Allan Z; Galatius, Soren; Frystyk, Jan; Jensen, Jan S

    2012-02-15

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of cardiovascular disease, but the extent of atherosclerosis in individual patients is difficult to estimate. A biomarker of the atherosclerotic burden would be very valuable. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of plasma osteoprotegerin (OPG) to clinical and subclinical atherosclerotic disease in a large community-based, cross-sectional population study. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, OPG concentrations were measured in 5,863 men and women. A total of 494 participants had been hospitalized for ischemic heart disease or ischemic stroke, and compared to controls, this group with clinical atherosclerosis had higher mean OPG (1,773 vs 1,337 ng/L, p <0.001) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (2.3 vs 1.6 mg/L, p <0.001). In a multivariate model with age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking status, estimated glomerular filtration rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and OPG, OPG remained significantly associated with clinical atherosclerosis (p <0.01); high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, in contrast, did not (p = 0.74). In the control group without clinical atherosclerosis, OPG was independently associated with hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and subclinical peripheral atherosclerosis as measured by ankle brachial index. For each doubling of the plasma OPG concentration, the risk for subclinical peripheral atherosclerosis increased by 50% (p <0.001) after multivariate adjustment. In conclusion, OPG appears to be a promising biomarker of atherosclerosis that is independently associated with traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis, subclinical peripheral atherosclerosis, and clinical atherosclerotic disease such as ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  19. High prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies and increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Watanabe, Takuya; Miyazaki, Akira; Katagiri, Takashi; Idei, Tsunenori; Iguchi, Takashi; Mimura, Masaru; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2005-04-01

    To determine the relationships between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection, carotid atherosclerosis, and dyslipidemia in patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Case control study. Showa University Karasuyama Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. One hundred twenty-four elderly subjects: 31 with VaD, 61 with AD, and 32 age-matched controls without dementia. Presence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae (immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA), the serum concentrations of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and atherogenic lipoproteins, and the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaques were determined. Age; body mass index; systolic and diastolic blood pressures; and fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A(1c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A-I, B, and E concentrations did not differ significantly between the three groups, but the mean IMT and frequency of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries, as well as the serum concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), lipoprotein(a), and lipid peroxides were significantly greater in VaD patients than in AD patients or nondemented controls. Hs-CRP concentrations and prevalence of C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA antibodies also were significantly higher in VaD patients than in AD patients and nondemented controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that carotid IMT and plaques, LDL-C, lipid peroxides, hs-CRP, and IgG and IgA C. pneumoniae seropositivity were independent risk factors for VaD. These results suggest that carotid atherosclerosis, atherogenic lipoproteins, and C. pneumoniae infection (as documented by the IgG and IgA seropositivity together with increased hs-CRP) may be VaD risk factors.

  20. Ascitic Fluid High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP). A Prognostic Marker in Cirrhosis with Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Nakul; Shukla, Samarth; Gupta, Kriti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant. Its level increases in the presence of acute or chronic inflammation and infections. High sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) is more sensitive than CRP as an inflammatory marker. High sensitive CRP has been known to be elevated in chronic liver diseases and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP). Aim The aim of the study was to establish the role of ascitic fluid high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs –CRP) as a prognostic indicator in patients with SBP. Materials and Methods A total of 100 patients with decompensated cirrhosis admitted in medicine ward and ICU were included, of which 50 patients of acute bacterial peritonitis were used as study group and 50 patients of sterile ascites were used as control group. Hs-CRP level of cases and controls were estimated. SBP cases were treated with its standard recommended antibiotic therapy and hs-CRP level was again estimated after 5 days of antibiotic therapy or at the time of discharge. Results The mean level of hs-CRP before antibiotic therapy of the patients with SBP was significantly higher than that of the patients without spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (t98=17.72; p=0.0001). The mean level of hs-CRP at 5th day or discharge after initiation of antibiotic therapy was significantly lower than that of level of hs-CRP before initiation of antibiotic therapy (p<0.05). The mean hs-CRP of the cases with poor outcome (death and prolonged hospital stay) was significantly higher than others. Conclusion Ascitic fluid hs-CRP level can be considered as a surrogate prognostic marker in cases of Cirrhosis with SBP. PMID:27190862

  1. Comparison of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A levels before and after treatment for subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Bilgir, Ferda; Topcuoglu, Tuba; Calan, Mehmet; Calan, Ozlem

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to show the effect of propylthiouracil treatment on sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels on subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism. After checking sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels of 35 patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism, each was given 50 mg tablets of propylthiouracil three times daily. After 3 months, sCD40L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fetuin-A levels were then compared to the levels before treatment. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and sCD40L levels were normal in the subclinical hyperthyroidism patients compared to the healthy controls, fetuin-A levels were statistically significantly higher (*p = 0.022). After treatment, fetuin-A levels of subclinical hyperthyroidism patients decreased statistically significantly compared to the levels before treatment (**p = 0.026). sCD40L and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels did not have a statistically significant difference compared to the control group and post-propylthiouracil treatment. In subclinical hyperthyroidism patients, high fetuin-A levels before propylthiouracil treatment and decreases in these levels after treatment in cases with subclinical hyperthyroidism indicated the possibility of preventing long-term cardiac complications with propylthiouracil treatment.

  2. Association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and abdominal aortic aneurysm: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpeng; Shen, Guanghui; Wang, Haiyang; Yao, Ye; Sun, Qingfeng; Jing, Bao; Liu, Gaoyan; Wu, Jia; Yuan, Chao; Liu, Siqi; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Shiyong; Li, Haocheng

    2017-08-24

    To evaluate the association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Medline, Cochrane, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched until 22 June 2016 using the keywords predictive factors, biomarkers, abdominal aortic aneurysm, prediction, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hsCRP. Prospective studies, retrospective studies, and cohort studies were included. Twelve case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis with a total of 8345 patients (1977 in the AAA group and 6368 in the control group). The pooled results showed that AAA patients had higher hsCRP value than the control group (difference in means = 1.827, 95% CI = 0.010 to 3.645, p = .049). Subgroup analysis found AAA patients with medium or small aortic diameter (<50 mm) had higher hsCRP plasma levels than the control group (difference in means = 1.301, 95% CI = 0.821 to 1.781, p < .001). In patients with large aortic diameter (≥50 mm), no difference was observed in hsCRP levels between the AAA and control groups (difference in means = 1.769, 95% CI = -1.387 to 4.925, p = .272). Multi-regression analysis found the difference in means of hsCRP plasma levels between AAA and control groups decreased as aortic diameter increased (slope = -0.04, p < .001), suggesting that hsCRP levels may be inversely associated with increasing aneurysm size. Our findings suggest that hsCRP levels may possibly be used as a diagnostic biomarker for AAA patients with medium or small aortic diameter but not for AAA patients with large aortic diameter. The correlation between serum hsCRP level and AAA aneurysm is not conclusive due to the small number of included articles and between-study heterogeneity.

  3. The effect of short-term cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Polona; Salobir, Barbara; Cobo, Nusret; Jug, Borut; Terčelj, Marjeta; Sabovič, Mišo

    2014-03-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an important biomarker of risk for coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the influence of short-term cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on values of hsCRP and classical risk factors, including metabolic syndrome. hsCRP and classical risk factors were measured before and after completed 2-week CR program in 30 men after AMI. The comparison group comprised 30 age-balanced healthy men, with no risk factors for coronary heart disease. As expected, in comparison to healthy individuals, patients had higher values of hsCRP; furthermore, smokers had significantly higher hsCRP values than nonsmokers. Patients had more expressed markers of metabolic syndrome and due to pharmacological therapy lower blood pressure, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). After CR was completed, a significant drop in hsCRP (P=0.006) and improvement of metabolic syndrome parameters (lower body mass index, blood pressure, LDL-C, triglycerides) was observed in nonsmokers, whereas no such changes occurred in smokers. Our study revealed that hsCRP and metabolic syndrome parameters can be substantially reduced by a 2-week CR program; however, this effect is present only in nonsmokers. Thus, all patients entering the CR program after AMI should be advised to quit smoking before entering the program to achieve optimal benefits.

  4. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, L.G.S.; Eloi-Santos, S.M.; Peixoto, S.V.; Lima-Costa, M.F.; Vidigal, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L) than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L). This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks. PMID:23011406

  5. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p < 0.01) was significant. A significant relationship between dysplasia and hs-CRP (p < 0.04) was revealed. A significant relationship between age and hs-CRP was detected (p < 0.05). Although serum hs-CRP is not a specific biomarker for gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis.

  6. Clinical and angiographic correlation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Syed; Banu, Shaheena; Jabir, Nasimudeen Rehumathbeevi; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Manjunath, Nanjappa Cholenahally; Tabrez, Shams

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation and associated ongoing inflammatory responses are considered as the critical culprits in the pathogenesis of acute atherothrombotic events such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is considered as one of the prominent clinical forms of ACS. Moreover, C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important acute phase prsotein, which may be estimated using high-sensitivity methods (hs-CRP), and its elevated level in body fluids reflects chronic inflammatory status. The circulating hs-CRP level has been proposed as a promising inflammatory marker of coronary artery disease (CAD). The present study investigated the correlation of hs-CRP level with clinical and angiographic features of STEMI, various other traditional risk factors, complications of myocardial infarction and angiographically significant CAD. Out of 190 patients with STEMI that were analyzed, the interval between symptom onset and reperfusion therapy (window period) varied from 0.5 to 24 h. The hs-CRP value was found to be higher in non-diabetic patients (0.61 mg/dl) compared with diabetic patients (0.87 mg/dl). Moreover, a significant correlation between hs-CRP and hs-troponin T was also recorded (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the mean hs-CRP values in patients with or without mortality. It is considered that the present study will increase the understanding of atherosclerosis in general and may also have clinical applications in the targeting of therapy for this harmful disease. PMID:28105138

  7. Post-surgical highly sensitive C-reactive protein and prognosis in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tibau, Ariadna; Ennis, Marguerite; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2013-10-01

    Obesity, associated with inflammation, has been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer. Research investigating the potential role of C-reactive protein (CRP), an obesity-associated systemic marker of inflammation, as a mediator of adverse prognostic effects of obesity has yielded inconsistent results. We examined the association of highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP) with obesity-related factors and breast cancer outcome. A cohort of 535 non-diabetic women diagnosed with T1-3, N0-1, M0 breast cancer, was assembled between 1989 and 1996 and followed prospectively. Circulating levels of hsCRP were analyzed on blood obtained postoperatively, prior to systemic therapy, in 501 women. Correlations and prognostic associations were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r) and Cox models. hsCRP was significantly correlated with body mass index (r = 0.60), insulin (r = 0.44), leptin (r = 0.54), and lipids, but not T or N stage, grade or estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor. At a median follow-up of 12 years, hsCRP was not associated with distant disease-free survival or overall survival in univariable [Q4 vs. Q1 hazard ratio (HR) 1.03, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.52, P = 0.9 and HR 1.27, 95 % CI 0.86-1.86, P = 0.24, respectively] or multivariable [Q4 vs Q1 HR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.66-1.59, P = 0.93 and HR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.76-1.81, P = 0.48 respectively] analyses. hsCRP was associated with age, comorbidities, and the insulin resistance syndrome but not with breast cancer outcome.

  8. Prognostic Value of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, Procalcitonin and Pancreatic Stone Protein in Pediatric Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Nie, Jun; Wu, Fu-xia; Zou, Xiu-lan; Chen, Feng-yi

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the prognostic value of procalcitonin (PCT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and pancreatic stone protein (PSP) in children with sepsis. Material/Methods A total of 214 patients with sepsis during hospitalization were enrolled. Serum levels of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were measured on day 1 of hospitalization and the survival rates of children were recorded after a follow-up of 28 days. Pearson’s correlation analysis was conducted to test the association of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP with pediatric critical illness score (PCIS). Logistic regression models were used to analyze the risk factors contributing to patients’ death. The AUC was used to determine the value of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP in the prognosis of patients with sepsis. Results The expression of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP in the dying patients was higher than in the surviving patients (p<0.001). Pearson’s correlation analysis showed that serum PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP levels were negatively correlated with PCIS (p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were independent risk factors for the prognosis of patients with sepsis (p<0.001). ROC analysis showed the AUC values of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.77–0.88), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.70–0.82), and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.67–0.79), respectively. The combined AUC value of PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP, was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.87–0.95), which was significantly increased compared with PCT, hs-CRP, or PSP (p<0.001). Conclusions The combination of serum PCT, hs-CRP, and PSP represents a promising biomarker of risk, and is a useful clinical tool for risk stratification of children with sepsis. PMID:28358790

  9. The relationship between the change in serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and IVF success.

    PubMed

    Seckin, Berna; Ozaksit, Gulnur; Batioglu, Sertac; Ozel, Murat; Aydoğan, Munube; Senturk, Bahar

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the extent of the change in high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels is related with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. A total of 69 IVF cycles using long luteal GnRH agonist protocol at the IVF unit, were prospectively studied. The serum levels of hs-CRP were measured on the day of initiation of gonadotrophin stimulation and 7 days after embryo transfer. CRP ratio was defined as the levels of CRP on day 7 of transfer/day of initiation of ovarian stimulation. Clinical pregnancy rates were examined. The mean concentrations of hs-CRP were not significantly different on the first day of ovarian stimulation and on day 7 after embryo transfer among pregnant and non-pregnant women. There was a significant rise in hs-CRP levels at 7th day after embryo transfer as compared with the first day of gonadotrophin treatment in both groups (10.58 ± 11.35 versus 3.61 ± 2.86 mg/L for pregnant women and 9.14 ± 11.36 versus 3.24 ± 2.68 mg/L for non-pregnant women, p = 0.001). In addition, the mean CRP ratio was not different between the pregnant and non-pregnant groups. Our data show that serum hs-CRP levels increase during IVF treatment, but the extent of the rise in CRP levels is not a predictive marker of IVF success.

  10. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6-dominant inflammation and ischemic stroke risk: the northern Manhattan study.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jorge M; Moon, Yeseon P; Liu, Khin M; Spitalnik, Steven; Paik, Myunghee C; Cheung, Keun; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2014-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a proinflammatory cytokine with known autoregulatory feedback mechanisms. We hypothesized that elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) relative to IL-6 confers an increased risk of ischemic stroke (IS), and low hsCRP relative to IL-6 a decreased risk, for individuals in the prospective, multiethnic, population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). Serum hsCRP and IL-6 were measured in NOMAS participants at baseline. We created a trichotomized predictor based on the dominant biomarker in terms of quartiles: hsCRP-dominant, IL-6-dominant, and codominant groups. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between inflammatory biomarker group status and risk of incident IS. Of 3298 participants, both hsCRP and IL-6 were available in 1656 participants (mean follow-up, 7.8 years; 113 incident IS). The hsCRP-dominant group had increased risk of IS (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-4.41) and the IL-6-dominant group had decreased risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.82) when compared with the referent group, after adjusting for potential confounders. Model fit was improved using the inflammation-dominant construct, over either biomarker alone. In this multiethnic cohort, when hsCRP-quartile was higher than IL-6 quartile, IS risk was increased, and conversely when IL-6 quartiles were elevated relative to hsCRP, IS risk was decreased. Construct validity requires confirmation in other cohorts.

  11. High sensitive C-reactive protein as a systemic inflammatory marker and LDH-3 isoenzyme in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nillawar, Anup N; Bardapurkar, J S; Bardapurkar, S J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory disease, mainly due to tobacco smoke. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are mandatory to diagnose COPD which shows irreversible airway obstruction. This study was aimed at understanding the behavior of biochemical parameters such as high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes in COPD. Cytoplasmic cellular enzymes, such as LDH in the extracellular space, although of no further metabolic function in this space, are of benefit because they serve as indicators suggestive of disturbances of the cellular integrity induced by pathological conditions. The lung pattern is characterized by proportional increases in isoenzymes 3, 4, and 5. Hs-CRP indicates low grade of systemic inflammation. Total (n = 45) patients of COPD (diagnosed on PFTs) were included. We followed the guidelines laid by the institute ethical committee. Investigations performed on the serum were the serum for hs-CRP, LDH isoenzymes on agarose gel electrophoresis. The results obtained showed that the value of hs-CRP was 4.6 ± 0.42 mg/L. The isoenzymes pattern was characterized by an increase in LDH-3 and LDH-4 fractions. This is evident even in those patients with normal LDH (n = 13) levels. This study states that there is a moderate positive correlation in between CRP and LDH-3 (r = 0.33; P = 0.01). Raised LDH-3 levels do not correlate with FEV(1) % (forced expiratory volume in first second) predicted. Moreover, it associates positively with hs-CRP and smoking status and negatively with body mass index. This underlines the potential of these parameters to complement the present system of staging which is solely based upon FEV(1) % predicted.

  12. Calcium dobesilate reduces endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein serum levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Adl, Farzad Hami; Andalib, Dima; Khojasteh-Jafari, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the benefits of calcium dobesilate (CaD) administration on endothelial function and inflammatory status in patients with diabetic retinopathy through measurement of serum levels of endothelin-1 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Methods In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 90 patients with either severe nonproliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy and with blood glucose level of 120–200 mg/dl were randomly allocated to treatment with either CaD tablets (500 mg daily) or placebo for 3 months. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and macular status were performed before the study. The serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP were evaluated in both groups before and at the third month of the trial. Results The median serum level of hsCRP significantly differed between the groups 3 months following the CaD or placebo administration (2.2 mg/l in the CaD group versus 3.7 mg/l in the placebo group, p=0.01). The mean endothelin-1 serum level was 0.69±0.32 pg/ml in the CaD group and 0.86±0.30 pg/ml in the placebo group (p=0.01). Furthermore, in the CaD group, the serum levels of both endothelin-1 and hsCRP were significantly decreased 3 months after administration of CaD (p<0.001). Conclusions Administration of the CaD in the patients with diabetic retinopathy may reduce the serum levels of endothelin-1 and hsCRP. This might imply amelioration of the endothelial function and inflammatory status following CaD therapy in these patients. PMID:23335852

  13. Whole grains are associated with serum concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein among premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Audrey J; Mumford, Sunni L; Rovner, Alisha J; Zhang, Cuilin; Chen, Liwei; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Perkins, Neil J; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2010-09-01

    In premenopausal women, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations have been associated with an increased risk of negative reproductive outcomes. Whole grain consumption has been associated with lower CRP concentrations in older women; however, less is known about this relationship in younger women. We investigated whether whole grain intake was associated with serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) concentrations in young women. BioCycle was a prospective cohort study conducted at the University of Buffalo from 2005 to 2007, which followed 259 healthy women aged 18-44 y for or= 1 serving/d had 12.3% lower hs-CRP concentrations (P = 0.02) compared with nonconsumers. Women who consumed >or= 1 serving/d of whole grain had a lower probability of having moderate (P = 0.008) or elevated (P = 0.001) hs-CRP according to the AHA criteria compared with nonconsumers. Given that elevated concentrations of hs-CRP have been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes and pregnancy complications, interventions targeting whole grain consumption may have the potential to improve health status among young women.

  14. High sensitivity C-reactive protein and endothelial function in Chilean patients with history of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Gutiérrez, Miguel; Talesnik, Eduardo; Godoy, Iván; Kraus, Jonathan; Hoyos, Rodrigo; Arnaiz, Pilar; Acevedo, Mónica

    2008-07-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) produces endothelial inflammation, which may lead to dilatation and aneurysms of coronary and peripheral arteries. Previous studies have suggested that these patients can present endothelial dysfunction that can predispose to coronary vascular events late after KD. The purpose of this study was to determine the cardiovascular risk profile and endothelial function of Chilean children with history of KD. In a prospective case-control study, 11 patients with history of KD (age 10.6 +/- 2.0 years, interval from initial episode 8.1 +/- 3.6 years) and 11 healthy, age-, gender-, and BMI z score-matched controls were evaluated with blood pressure (BP), a fasting lipid profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery (FMD). One KD patient (9.1%) had persistent coronary aneurysms. There was a significant difference of mean and log-transformed concentrations of hsCRP between case and control groups (2.3 +/- 3.0 vs 0.5 +/- 0.3 mg/l, P = 0.045). None of the patients with elevated hsCRP had persistent coronary arterial lesions. No difference was found in systolic BP z score between the case and control groups. Diastolic BP z score was significantly higher in cases than controls (P = 0.039). There were no significant differences of FMD between cases and controls. Mean fasting total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides in cases were normal, with no significant difference vs controls. This study shows that Chilean children with history of KD have increased levels of hsCRP, possibly reflecting persistent low-grade inflammation. The prognostic value of hsCRP in KD patients deserves further investigation.

  15. Association between adherence to dietary recommendations and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Aila J; Saraheimo, Markku; Freese, Riitta; Forsblom, Carol; Mäkimattila, Sari; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, may in turn impact systemic inflammation. We therefore assessed whether adherence to the dietary recommendations is associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations in type 1 diabetes. Cross-sectional data from 677 FinnDiane study participants (48% men, mean±standard deviation age 46±13years) were included. Dietary intake was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire. A diet score, with higher values denoting better adherence to the recommendations, was calculated. Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured, and individuals with hs-CRP <1.0mg/l, and hs-CRP >3.0 but ≤10.0mg/l were compared. Men and women with high hs-CRP had higher BMI, waist circumference, and triglyceride concentration, but lower HDL-cholesterol concentration. Adjusted for BMI, mean diet score was higher in the low hs-CRP group, both in men (10.8±3.6 vs. 9.9±3.8, p=0.023) and women (12.7±3.4 vs. 11.6±3.5, p=0.021). After further adjustments with potential confounding factors, the difference remained significant only in men. A diet that more closely adheres to the dietary recommendations is associated with lower hs-CRP in men. A prudent diet may help reduce systemic inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise-induced changes in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Carlsen, Christian Malchau; Mattsson, Nick; Ruwald, Martin H; Binici, Zeynep; Sajadieh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. We wanted to investigate the effects of exercise on high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) in subjects who were suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Blood samples were obtained before, 5 minutes after, and 20 hours after an exercise test in 155 subjects who were suspected of CAD. Coronary anatomy was evaluated by computed tomography coronary angiography and/or coronary angiography. Results Median baseline hs-CRP was higher in subjects with ≥50% coronary artery lumen diameter stenosis (n=41), compared with non-CAD-subjects (n=114), 2.93 mg/L (interquartile range 1.03–5.06 mg/L) and 1.30 mg/L (interquartile range 0.76–2.74 mg/L), respectively, P=0.007. In multivariate analyses testing conventional risk factors, hs-CRP proved borderline significant, odds ratio =2.32, P=0.065. Adding baseline hs-CRP to the results of the exercise test did not improve the diagnostic evaluation. Baseline natural logarithm (Ln) hs-CRP was positively associated with body mass index and baseline Ln-transformed hs troponin T levels, and negatively associated with the daily life activity level. An increase in hs-CRP of 0.13 mg/L (interquartile range 0.05–0.24 mg/L) from baseline to 5 minutes after peak exercise was found (P<0.0001), but the increase was not associated with presence of CAD. From baseline to 20 hours after exercise, no increase in hs-CRP was found. Conclusion In conclusion, hs-CRP was not independently associated with CAD. Hs-CRP increased immediately as a response to the exercise, and the increase was modest and not associated with CAD. The results indicate that exercise has potential to cause unwanted variations in hs-CRP and that exercise prior to hs-CRP measurements in subjects included in epidemiological studies, therefore, should be avoided. PMID:24715762

  17. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Rocha, Natália Galito; da Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. Objective To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. Methods One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. Results The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (psex < 0.01). Conclusions Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions. PMID:27027366

  18. Changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels after laparoscopic gastric stapling procedures versus laparoscopic gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Young, Monica; Villamere, James; Shih, Anderson; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2014-10-01

    Obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are risk factors for the development of coronary artery disease. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an inflammatory biomarker that has been shown to be an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The aim of the current study was to examine the changes in cardiovascular risk profile in morbidly obese patients who underwent laparoscopic gastric stapling procedures (bypass and sleeve) compared with laparoscopic gastric banding. Levels of hs-CRP were measured preoperatively and at 12 to 24 months postoperatively. Based on hs-CRP levels, cardiovascular risk was categorized as low (less than 1 mg/L), moderate (1 to 3 mg/L), or high (greater than 3 mg/L). A total of 52 patients underwent gastric stapling procedures and 49 underwent gastric banding and both had preoperative and postoperative hs-CRP levels measured. There were no significant differences in age, gender, or preoperative body mass index (BMI) between groups. At baseline, 48.0 per cent of patients undergoing gastric stapling and 38.8 per cent of patients undergoing gastric banding had moderate or high cardiovascular risk. BMI at 24 months was significantly lower in the gastric stapling compared with the gastric banding group (30.4 ± 5.4 vs 36.1 ± 5.5 kg/m(2), respectively, P < 0.01). Of the patients with elevated cardiovascular risk, 64.0 per cent of gastric stapling versus 57.8 per cent of gastric banding patients had a reduction in risk category at 12 to 24 months follow-up, whereas 1.9 per cent of patients undergoing gastric stapling versus 4.1 per cent of patients undergoing gastric banding had an increase in risk category. The mean reduction in hs-CRP level for patients with elevated cardiovascular risk was greater for gastric stapling compared with gastric banding procedures (-1.10 ± 0.94 mg/L vs -0.67 ± 0.82 mg/L, respectively, P < 0.05). Cardiovascular risk improved in the majority of patients after bariatric surgery, but a more

  19. [Diagnostic value of determination of the blood concentrations of serotonin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with tick-borne encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Sumlivaia, O N; Vorob'eva, N N; Karakulova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows the informative value of changes in the serum levels of serotonin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 44 patients in the acute period of tickborne encephalitis. Group 1 included 35 patients with non-paralytic neuroinfection; Group 2 comprised 9 patients with paralytic neuroinfection. The serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein increased and that of serotonin decreased in relation to the form and severity of the disease at its height. The elevated level of the former and the low concentration of the latter may serve as an early predictor of the development of a severe paralytic form. Investigating their serum concentrations should be included into an examination plan for patients with acute tick-borne encephalitis.

  20. A 1-year lifestyle intervention for weight loss in individuals with type 2 diabetes reduces high C-reactive protein levels and identifies metabolic predictors of change

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss reduced elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese individuals with diabetes and identified metabolic and fitness predictors of hs-CRP change. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look A...

  1. Association between Resting Heart Rate and Inflammatory Markers (White Blood Cell Count and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein) in Healthy Korean People.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Chul; Seo, Inho; Kim, Shin-Hye; Lee, Yong-Jae; Ahn, Song Vogue

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and an elevated resting heart rate underlies the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. We hypothesized an association between resting heart rate and subclinical inflammation. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the KoGES-ARIRANG (Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population) cohort study, and was then divided into quartiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured by white blood cell count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for muscle mass, body fat proportion, and adiponectin in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables, using the clinical cut point of the highest quartile of white blood cell count (≥7,900/mm(3)) and ≥3 mg/dL for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Participants had a mean age of 56.3±8.1 years and a mean resting heart rate of 71.4±10.7 beats/min; 39.1% were men. In a fully adjusted model, an increased resting heart rate was significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count and higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both continuous (P for trend <0.001) and categorical (P for trend <0.001) models. An increased resting heart rate is associated with a higher level of subclinical inflammation among healthy Korean people.

  2. Molecular switching fluorescence based high sensitive detection of label-free C-reactive protein on biochip.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinul; Yu, Hyunung; Lee, Hee Gu; Kang, Seong Ho

    2010-11-15

    A novel detection technique on biochip for the quantification of label-free C-reactive protein (CRP) based on molecular switching of fluorescence (MSF) is demonstrated by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It alters fluorescence intensity of fluoreseinamine isomer 1 (FAI) upon binding with its specific ligand, O-phosphorylethanolamine (PEA). In the MSF-based detection, FAI was used as an ink, printed on a 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GPTS)-coated glass coverslip. With the addition of GPTS conjugated PEA solution to the FAI-printed coverslip, the fluorescence intensity was remarkably decreased. Addition of CRP increased fluorescence intensity linearly in the range of 800 aM to 500 fM (R=0.997). The MSF-based biochip assay for the estimation of CRP in human sera showed ∼200 times increased detection sensitivity in less than a third of the time to obtain results using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This biochip detection is a promising new technique for the quantification of CRP molecules from trace amounts of clinical samples.

  3. Effects of aerobic and resistance training on abdominal fat, apolipoproteins and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in adolescents with obesity: the HEARTY randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Alberga, A S; Prud'homme, D; Kenny, G P; Goldfield, G S; Hadjiyannakis, S; Gougeon, R; Phillips, P; Malcolm, J; Wells, G; Doucette, S; Ma, J; Sigal, R J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic training, resistance training, or both on abdominal subcutaneous fat (subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT)) (deep and superficial), visceral fat (visceral adipose tissue (VAT)), apolipoproteins A-1 and B (ApoA-1, ApoB), ApoB/ApoA-1 ratio and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP) in post-pubertal adolescents with obesity. After a 4-week supervised moderate-intensity exercise run-in period, 304 postpubertal adolescents with overweight (body mass index (BMI) ⩾85th percentile for age and sex+diabetes risk factor) or obesity (⩾95th BMI percentile) aged 14-18 years were randomized to four groups for 22 weeks (5 months): aerobic training, resistance training, combined training or a non-exercising control. This study used a randomized controlled design. All groups received dietary counseling designed to promote healthy eating with a maximum daily energy deficit of 250 kcal. Abdominal fat (SAT and VAT) at the level of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae (L4-L5) was measured by magnetic resonance imaging and ApoA-1, ApoB and HSCRP were measured after a 12-h fast at baseline and after 6 months. Changes in SAT at L4-L5 were -16.2 cm(2) in aerobic (P=0.04 vs control), -22.7 cm(2) in resistance (P=0.009 vs control) and -18.7 cm(2) in combined (P=0.02 vs control). Combined training reduced ApoB levels from 0.81±0.02 to 0.78±0.02 g l(-1) (P=0.04 vs control) and ApoB/ApoA-1 ratio from 0.67±0.02 to 0.64±0.02 (P=0.02 vs control and P=0.04 vs aerobic). There were no significant differences in VAT, ApoA-1 or HSCRP levels between groups. Aerobic and resistance training and their combination decreased abdominal SAT in adolescents with obesity. Combined training caused greater improvements in ApoB/ApoA-1 ratio compared with aerobic training alone.

  4. Resting Serum Concentration of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) in Sportsmen and Untrained Male Adults.

    PubMed

    Niyi-Odumosu, F A; Bello, O A; Biliaminu, S A; Owoyele, B V; Abu, T O; Dominic, O L

    2017-03-06

    There is an inverse relationship between regular physical activity and concentration of serum inflammatory markers, with variations in resting CRP in trained and untrained subjects. The effect of acute and prolonged exercises has been studied on inflammatory markers with dearth of information and controversies on the resting serum values of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). Therefore, this study sought to identify and compare variations that occur in serum levels of high sensitivity CRP in groups of sportsmen (6) and physically active untrained subjects. Eighty-one healthy male participants made up of 21 untrained (control), 10 footballers, 10 athletes, 10 karates, 10 volleyballers, 10 basketballers, and 10 baseballers voluntarily participated in the study. Participants rested while in sitting position for about 30 minutes during which blood pressures and heart rates were taken. 5 mls of venous blood was withdrawn from the antecubital vein of the participants (aseptically) between 7:00 and 10:00 am into lithium heparin bottles following an overnight fast. The supernatant was decanted and centrifuged at 3000 rpm, serum was collected and stored at -20ºC prior to biochemical assay which was done with the use of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits for hs-CRP. Differences in the means within the sporting groups were analysed using one-way ANOVA while the difference between the trained sportsmen and untrained young adults was analysed using the independent T-test. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The Mean ±SEM age, weight, height, and BMI of the participants were 22.0±0.8 years, 64.1±2.2 kg, 1.74±0.3 m, and 20.6±0.2 kg/m2 respectively. The resting concentration of hs-CRP (µg/ml) was 1.0±0.2 in the untrained, 2.6±0.7 in footballers, 3.6±2.1 in track athletes, 2.4±0.5 in basketballers, 2.2±0.5 in volleyballers, 2.4±1.3 in baseballers, and 1.7±0.5 in karate respectively. There was no significant difference in the resting hs-CRP amongst the

  5. High-sensitive C-reactive protein level and oxidative stress-related status in former athletes in relation to traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pihl, E; Zilmer, K; Kullisaar, T; Kairane, C; Pulges, A; Zilmer, M

    2003-12-01

    To analyze systemic and cellular oxidative stress-related indices as well as C-reactive protein level in former top-level athletes in relation to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. A cross-sectional study was performed in 53 former male athletes and 25 sedentary controls (age range: 39-59 years). We measured anthropometric factors (BMI, fat percentage, WHR), resting blood pressure (SBP, DBP), serum cholesterol (CHOL), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total antioxidant status (TAS), oxidized LDL-C (oxLDL), diene conjugates (DC), glutathione redox status, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and leisure-time physical activity. Physically active former athletes had significantly lower mean overweight (BMI, fat percentage, WHR), better spectrum of atherogenesis indicators (CHOL, HDL-C, TG, TG:HDL-C ratio) and lower oxidative stress (oxLDL, oxLDL:LDL-C ratio, DC) values than sedentary ex-athletes. No significant differences in these variables were found between the sedentary ex-athletes and control group. Significant associations were found between physical activity (METs), SBP, DBP, hypertension, CHOL, HDL-C, TG, TG:HDL-C ratio, oxLDL, oxLDL:LDL-C ratio, DC and hsCRP. A physically active lifestyle is related to a lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile including a substantially lower systemic and cellular oxidative stress status as well as C-reactive protein level in middle-aged men. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Incremental predictive value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for incident hypertension: the Hypertension-Diabetes Daegu Initiative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Chun, Byung Yeol; Chae, Shung Chull

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and incident hypertension. Study subjects were 452 Koreans who were enrolled in a cohort study. Log-transformed hs-CRP (odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.39; p = 0.035) was an independent predictor of incident hypertension. Inclusion of hs-CRP showed significant increase in the area under the curve from 0.697 to 0.720 (p = 0.042), the net reclassification improvement (0.394, p < 0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (0.0111, p = 0.045). The hs-CRP added incremental value to the combination of systolic blood pressure and conventional risk factors in predicting incident hypertension.

  7. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  8. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels. PMID:27630402

  9. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein: A delicate sentinel elevated in drug-free acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shujuan; Tan, Yunlong; Yao, Shangwu; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Xiong, Jing

    2016-12-30

    Increased levels of high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) have been reported in schizophrenia, but to date, no study is designed to examine serum hsCRP in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia, an extreme state that requires immediate diagnosis and medical treatment. Serum hsCRP levels were assessed in 32 clinically acutely agitated patients and 42 healthy control subjects matched for demographic properties. Further, serum hsCRP levels in acutely agitated patients were compared with control subjects and with the levels after the patients were treated with anti-psychiatric medications. Meanwhile, the influence of clinical subtypes, family history, and gender, as well as the levels of white blood cell (WBC) counts were also considered. In results, serum hsCRP levels were significantly higher in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia than in healthy subjects. The elevation of serum hsCRP in patients was not affected by gender, family history (P>0.05), and clinical classification of schizophrenia (P>0.05). However, the elevation of hsCRP was suppressed by the medical treatment for schizophrenia with acute agitation (P<0.05). In addition, WBC counts, another inflammation-related indicator, were also increased significantly in acutely agitated patients compared with healthy subjects, consistent with the elevation of serum hsCRP. In conclusion, hsCRP is an important indicator of immune alterations in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and has potential to be developed into a sensitive marker for the acute agitation in schizophrenia.

  10. One-step kinetics-based immunoassay for the highly sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in less than 30 min.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Czilwik, Gregor; van Oordt, Thomas; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Marion Schneider, E; Luong, John H T

    2014-07-01

    This article reveals a rapid sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the highly sensitive detection of human C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. It employs a one-step kinetics-based highly simplified and cost-effective sandwich ELISA procedure with minimal process steps. The procedure involves the formation of a sandwich immune complex on capture anti-human CRP antibody-bound Dynabeads in 15 min, followed by two magnet-assisted washings and one enzymatic reaction. The developed sandwich ELISA detects CRP in the dynamic range of 0.3 to 81 ng ml(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.4 ng ml(-1) and an analytical sensitivity of 0.7 ng ml(-1). It detects CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood and serum with high analytical precision, as confirmed by conventional sandwich ELISA. Moreover, the results of the developed ELISA for the determination of CRP in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma samples of patients are in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional ELISA. The developed immunoassay has immense potential for the development of rapid and cost-effective in vitro diagnostic kits.

  11. Prognostic role of serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from the ITACa trial

    PubMed Central

    Scarpi, Emanuela; Maltoni, Paolo; Dorizzi, Romolo M.; Passardi, Alessandro; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Cortesi, Pietro; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Marisi, Giorgia; Amadori, Dino; Lucchesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of C-reactive protein are (CRP) higher in patients with neoplastic conditions and numerous studies have been performed to clarify the etiologic and prognostic role of the high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) in cancer. Our study was conducted on patients enrolled in the prospective randomized “Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa)” to assess hs-CRP levels and their impact on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Serum samples from 132 ITACa patients were collected at baseline and 2 months after starting first-line chemotherapy. The supernatant was immediately transferred to cryovials and stored at −80°C. After thawing, hs-CRP was measured with the Cobas c501 analyzer. High levels of hs-CRP (≥ 13.1 mg/L) were associated with poorer median PFS (p < 0.0001) and OS (p < 0.0001) than low hs-CRP levels (< 13.1 mg/L). hs-CRP values in 107 patients were evaluated again after 2 months of therapy, revealing that patients with low hs-CRP levels in both baseline and second serum samples had the best median PFS and OS. Our study confirms the prognostic value of hs-CRP in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26848624

  12. Crevicular and serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-4 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Minal; Pradeep, A R; Priyanka, N; Kalra, Nitish; Naik, Savitha B

    2014-06-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that are involved in destruction of the periodontal structures. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of MCP-4 and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in periodontal health and disease and to find a correlation between MCP-4 and hsCRP in GCF and serum. 40 subjects (20 males and 20 females) were selected and divided into three groups based on clinical parameters and radiologic parameters: Group 1 (10 healthy); Group 2 (15 gingivitis subjects) and Group 3 (15 chronic periodontitis subjects). The levels of serum and GCF MCP-4 were determined by ELISA and hsCRP levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry method. The mean GCF and serum concentration of MCP-4 were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and least in group 1. Similarly, the mean hsCRP concentrations were highest for group 3 and least in group 1. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between serum and GCF MCP-4 and hsCRP levels and periodontal parameters. The levels of MCP-4 and hsCRP increased from healthy to periodontitis. It can be proposed that MCP-4 and hsCRP are the potential biomarkers of inflammation in periodontal health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lymphocyte count was significantly associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia independently of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in apparently healthy Japanese.

    PubMed

    Oda, Eiji; Kawai, Ryu; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between leukocyte subtype counts and hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia. Logistic regressions using hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia as a dependent variable and total leukocyte, basophil, eosinophil, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts as an independent variable were calculated adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), smoking, drinking, and physical activity in apparently healthy Japanese men (1,803) and women (1,150). The odds ratio (OR) of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia for total leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts, the OR of hypertriglyceridemia for total leukocyte, eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, and the OR of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia for total leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significant in men, and the OR of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, for lymphocyte count, and the OR of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia for eosinophil count were significant in women. Lymphocyte count was significantly associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia independently of hs-CRP in apparently healthy Japanese.

  14. Association of Serum Pentraxin-3 and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein with the Extent of Coronary Stenosis in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Vuković-Dejanović, Vesna; Bogavac-Stanojević, Nataša; Spasić, Slavica; Spasojević-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Kalimanovska-Oštrić, Dimitra; Topalović, Mirko; Jelić-Ivanović, Zorana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We compared factors of inflammation – high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and pentraxin-3 (PTX3), and we explored their relationship with coronary artery disease (CAD). Also, we tested the usefulness of hsCRP and PTX3 in the risk assessment of coronary stenosis development and the diagnostic ability of these biomarkers to detect disease severity. Methods The study group consisted of 93 CAD patients undergoing coronary angiography. Patients were divided into CAD(0), representing subclinical stenosis, and CAD (1–3), representing significant stenosis in one, two or three vessels. Results We determined the concentration of lipid status parameters, hsCRP and PTX3. We found significantly lower PTX3 and hsCRP concentrations in CAD(0) than in CAD(1–3) group. Concentration of PTX3 showed an increasing trend with the increasing number of vessels affected. The area under ROC curve (AUC) for the combinations of hsCRP and PTX3 with lipid parameters had useful accuracy for detecting CAD(1–3) patients (AUC=0.770, p<0.001). Conclusion PTX3 is a promising independent diagnostic marker for identifying patients with CAD, and a useful indicator of disease progression. In all the analyses PTX3 showed better performance than hsCRP. A combination of PTX3, hsCRP with the lipid status parameters provides risk stratification of the development of coronary stenosis and better classification than their individual application. PMID:28356853

  15. Cinnamon may have therapeutic benefits on lipid profile, liver enzymes, insulin resistance, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Askari, Faezeh; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2014-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent cause of hepatic injury in the world. One of the most important therapeutic strategies for this disease is modulating insulin resistance and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that supplementation with cinnamon exerts an insulin sensitizer effect in patients with NAFLD. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with two parallel groups, fifty patients with NAFLD were randomized to receive daily supplementation with either two capsules of cinnamon (each capsule contain 750 mg cinnamon) or 2 placebo capsules, daily for 12 weeks. During the intervention, all patients were given advice on how to implement a balanced diet and physical activity into their daily lives. In the treatment group (P < .05), significant decreases in HOMA (Homeostatic Model Assessment) index, FBS (fasting blood glucose), total cholesterol, triglyceride, ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), GGT (gamma glutamine transpeptidase), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were seen, but there was no significant change in serum high-density lipoproteins levels (P = .122). In both groups, low-density lipoproteins decreased significantly (P < .05). In conclusion, the study suggests that taking 1500 mg cinnamon daily may be effective in improving NAFLD characteristics.

  16. Are serum gamma-glutamyl transferase, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and ischaemia-modified albumin useful in diagnosing PCOS?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Keskin, Ugur; Ozturk, Ozlem; Ulubay, Mustafa; Alanbay, İbrahim; Aydin, Aytekin; Yenen, Müfit Cemal

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the serum levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Fifty-three patients with PCOS were included in our study along with 40 women with no PCOS as the control group. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI). GGT levels were significantly higher in the women with PCOS than the women in the control group (p < 0.05). They were also significantly higher in the PCOS women who were normoweight and overweight than the normoweight and overweight women in the control group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the circulating levels of hsCRP and IMA between the women with PCOS and the controls or between the normoweight and overweight subgroups. GGT may be associated with the diagnosis of PCOS when the threshold is set at >15.5 U/L. With the application of this threshold, raised GGT levels had 83% sensitivity (95% CI 0.70-0.90) and 67.5% specificity (95% CI 0.52-0.79), for the diagnosis of PCOS. In our study, GGT levels were elevated in the PCOS patients independent of BMI and could thus be an important marker of PCOS.

  17. A combination of palm oil tocotrienols and citrus peel polymethoxylated flavones does not influence elevated LDL cholesterol and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, J P; Heine, S; Hahn, A

    2015-11-01

    Lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects have been individually described for tocotrienols (TTs) and polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs). This study investigated low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C)- and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)-reducing effects of combined TT-PMF treatment in low doses in hypercholesterolemic individuals with subclinical inflammation. In the double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 240 Caucasians with LDL-C ⩾3.36 mmol/l and hsCRP ⩾1 mg/l were enrolled and randomized into group S1 (12 mg/day TT and 103 mg/day PMF), group S2 (27 mg/day TT and 32 mg/day PMF) or placebo. Twenty-three subjects dropped out of the study, 13 were excluded from the analysis because of lack of compliance. A total of 204 subjects per-protocol analysis were included. After 12 weeks of treatment, no significant differences in LDL-C levels (primary outcome) were observed between groups. LDL-C levels significantly decreased in all intervention groups (S1: -5.2%, S2: -4.8% and P: -4.2%). Total cholesterol and hsCRP (secondary outcome) did not change significantly. PMF-TT supplements had no effect beyond that of placebo on elevated LDL-C and hsCRP levels.

  18. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  19. Association between the AGTR1 polymorphism +1166A>C and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, Petra; Henningsson, Susanne; Olsson, Marie; Baghaei, Fariba; Rosmond, Roland; Holm, Göran; Eriksson, Elias; Ekman, Agneta

    2009-01-08

    Genetic factors have been shown to influence high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, however, which genes that are involved in this process remains to be clarified. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is of importance for the regulation of inflammation, and blockade of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AGTR1) influences hsCRP levels. These findings prompted us to investigate whether a polymorphism in the AGTR1 gene may influence hsCRP levels. Additionally, a polymorphism in the CRP gene that has previously been shown to influence hsCRP levels was genotyped. Serum levels of hsCRP were measured in 270 42-year-old women recruited from the population registry. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed: +1166A>C and +1444C>T of the AGTR1 and CRP gene, respectively. The A allele of the AGTR1 polymorphism +1166A>C was dose-dependently associated with higher hsCRP levels (p=0.014, adjusted for confounding factors and multiple comparisons). hsCRP levels were not significantly influenced by the CRP +1444C>T genotype; however, an interaction between the two studied polymorphisms with respect to hsCRP levels was observed (p=0.018). The significant association between the AGTR1 polymorphism and hsCRP levels, which appears to be independent of anthropometric and metabolic traits, is yet another indication of a direct influence of RAS on inflammation.

  20. Pro-inflammatory triggers in childhood obesity: correlation between leptin, adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in a group of obese Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marinho, Joana; Vaz Silva, Patrícia; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric obesity is increasingly prevalent in the Portuguese population. Adipocyte dysfunction results in the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators that are responsible for the low-grade inflammatory process that characterizes obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between markers of adiposity, inflammation and adipokines in a Portuguese obese pediatric population. One hundred and twenty children of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, were included in this study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy normal-weight children. The variables analyzed were age, gender, body mass index, waist circumference, fat mass percentage, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), leptin and adiponectin. There were significant differences between controls and obese children for all parameters analyzed. In the obese group, after controlling for age and gender, hs-CRP (p=0.041), adiponectin (p=0.019) and leptin (p<0.001) still showed significant statistical differences. A direct correlation was found between hs-CRP, leptin, body mass index and waist circumference, the strongest being with leptin (r=0.568; p<0.001). This trend remained statistically significant, regardless of gender or pubertal age. Considering the role of leptin, adiponectin and hs-CRP in the genesis of endothelial dysfunction, they may be used in clinical practice for risk stratification, as well as in the assessment of weight control programs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of febuxostat on insulin resistance and expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Yuan, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yuewu

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of febuxostat on IR and the expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with primary gout. Forty-two cases of primary gout patients without uric acid-lowering therapy were included in this study. After a physical examination, 20 age- and sex-matched patients were included as normal controls. The levels of fasting insulin (INS), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and hs-CRP were determined. IR was assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Gout patients had higher levels of UA, INS, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP than normal controls (P < 0.05). After 4-, 12-, and 24-week febuxostat treatments, UA and hs-CRP concentrations were significantly lower than baseline (P < 0.05). INS and HOM-IR decreased slightly after a 4-week treatment with febuxostat but declined significantly after 12 and 24 weeks of treatment. Importantly, hs-CRP values positively correlated with those of HOMA-IR (r = 0.353, P = 0.018) and INS (r = 0.426, P = 0.034). Our findings confirm that IR exists in gout patients and implicate that febuxostat can effectively control the level of serum UA and increase insulin sensitivity in primary gout patients.

  2. Contribution of apolipoprotein A-I to the reduction in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels by different statins: comparative study of pitavastatin and atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Recently, investigation may have focused on modification of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) associated with anti-inflammatory effect for the potential prevention of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of atorvastatin and pitavastatin on serum apoA-I levels and to investigate the role of apoA-I in the anti-inflammatory effect of statin. We conducted a 6-month, prospective, randomized, open-label study in which we assigned hypercholesterolemic patients to a pitavastatin group (n = 52; 2 mg/day) or an atorvastatin group (n = 52; 10 mg/day) to investigate the effects of these two statins on the serum apoA-I levels and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the changes in the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or hs-CRP levels, but the change in apoA-I in the pitavastatin group was significantly greater than in the atorvastatin group (5.3 vs. 1.4 %; p = 0.0001). A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the percent change in (Δ) serum apoA-I level was an independent predictor of the Δ serum hs-CRP (standard correlation coefficient = -0.198; p = 0.047). However, there was a significant negative correlation between the Δ apoA-I levels and Δ hs-CRP levels in the pitavastatin group (r = -0.283, p = 0.042), but not the atorvastatin group (r = -0.133, p = 0.356). The results suggest that the contribution of apoA-I to the reduction in serum hs-CRP levels by these two statins may be different. A decrease in hs-CRP level accompanied by an increase in apoA-I level may be involved in the pleiotropic effects of pitavastatin.

  3. Standardization of high-sensitivity immunoassays for measurement of C-reactive protein; II: Two approaches for assessing commutability of a reference material.

    PubMed

    Kimberly, Mary M; Caudill, Samuel P; Vesper, Hubert W; Monsell, Elizabeth A; Miller, W Greg; Rej, Robert; Rifai, Nader; Dati, Francesco; Myers, Gary L

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated the commutability of a proposed reference material (PRM), with a formulation based on dilution of Certified Reference Material 470 (CRM470), for 24 high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) methods. We also investigated whether calibration by use of PRM was effective in harmonizing results. A set of 40 native clinical samples was measured along with PRM and 3 dilutions of PRM. We used weighted least-squares polynomial regression (WLS/PR) to perform comparisons between all method combinations and to calculate normalized residuals for the PRM. The PRM was considered noncommutable if any of the normalized residuals for a method pair was >2. Correspondence analysis (CA) was used to explore the multidimensional relationships between methods and samples to evaluate if the PRM had properties similar to native clinical samples. Clinical sample results from the methods for which PRM was commutable were recalibrated based on the PRM results, and ANOVA was used to estimate the CVs before and after recalibration. After omitting data for 9 methods because of poor precision or procedural flaws, we used data from the 15 remaining methods to evaluate commutability. Using both WLS/PR and CA we found that PRM was noncommutable with 1 method. We found modest improvement in total and among-method CVs when PRM was used to harmonize the results from the 14 methods for which it was commutable. A PRM with a formulation based on dilution of CRM470 was commutable with native clinical samples for 14 of 15 hsCRP methods that had acceptable precision. For those methods the use of PRM may contribute to improved harmonization of results for native clinical samples.

  4. Increased interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in pediatric epilepsy patients with frequent, refractory generalized motor seizures.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Nobustune; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Fujii, Yuji; Kobayashi, Masao

    2015-02-01

    Recently, it was found that chronic inflammation contributes to the pathomechanism of diverse chronic diseases in various organs. There is accumulating evidence that inflammatory processes affect the pathophysiology of epilepsy. We investigated inflammatory markers to determine the chronic inflammatory process underlying the pathophysiology of intractable epilepsy presenting with frequent motor seizures in children. In total, 29 patients with epilepsy and 15 children as control subjects were enrolled. Patients were divided into the DS (daily generalized motor seizures) and the IS (intermittent seizures) groups. Blood levels of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), plasma pentraxin 3 (PTX3), serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-β1 were evaluated in all participants. Hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in the DS group (0.149 ± 0.161 mg/dL) than in either the IS or control group (0.0156 ± 0.0136 and 0.0253 ± 0.0288 mg/dL, p<0.005 and p<0.05, respectively), while there was no significant difference between the IS and control groups. The IL-6 level was also significantly higher in the DS group (8.022 ± 0.161 pg/mL) than in either the IS or the control group (7.783 ± 0.0563 and 7.864 ± 0.072 pg/mL; p<0.005 and p<0.05, respectively). There were no significant differences in PTX3, TNF-α, or IL-1β levels. Our results suggest that daily generalized motor seizures result in elevated IL-6 levels, leading to increased CRP. A systemic inflammatory response in intractable patients with frequent generalized motor seizures may affect their prognosis. We may need therapeutic strategies, including methods to control the inflammatory process, to treat intractable epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly sensitive and accurate detection of C-reactive protein by CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-based fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanbing; Wu, Ruili; Feng, Kunrui; Li, Jinjie; Mao, Qing; Yuan, Hang; Shen, Huaibin; Chai, Xiangdong; Li, Lin Song

    2017-05-02

    The conventional and widely used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), due to specificity and high-sensitivity, were suitable in vitro diagnosis. But enzymes are vulnerable to the external conditions, and the complex operation steps limit its application. Semiconductor quantum dots have been successfully used in biological and medical research due to the high photoluminescence and high resistance to photobleaching. In this study, we have developed a novel quantum dot-labeled immunosorbent assay for rapid disease detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). The assay for the detection of CRP can provide a wide analytical range of 1.56-400 ng/mL with the limit of detection (LOD) = 0.46 ng/mL and the limit of quantification = 1.53 ng/mL. The precision of the assay has been confirmed for low coefficient of variation, less than 10% (intra-assay) and less than 15% (inter-assay). The accuracy of assay meets the requirements with the recoveries of 95.4-105.7%. Furthermore, clinical samples have been collected and used for correlation analysis between this FLISA and gold standard Roche immunoturbidimetry. It shows excellent accurate concordance and the correlation coefficient value (R) is as high as 0.989 (n = 34). This in vitro quantum dot-based detection method offers a lower LOD and a wide liner detection range than ELISA. The total reaction time is only 50 min, which is much shorter than the commercialization ELISA (about 120 min). All of the results show that a convenient, sensitive, and accurate fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay method has been well established for the detection of CRP samples. Therefore, this method has immense potential for the development of rapid and cost-effective in vitro diagnostic kits.

  6. Increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and lactic acid in stroke patients with internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dan; Hu, Di; Zhang, Qin; Sun, Yufang; Li, Jimei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO) causes high annual rates of mortality and morbidity. It has been established that atherosclerosis is the normal cause of ICAO. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis may involve blood lipids, inflammatory factors and other biomarkers, the aim of this study was to assess the changes in these biomarkers and investigate the relationship between these biomarkers and the development of ICAO in stroke patients. Material and methods A total of 89 ischaemic stroke inpatients with ICAO (ICAO group) and 89 without ICAO (control group) were studied, retrospectively. The serum was collected from each patient on the 3rd day of admission, to measure the lipid parameters and biomarkers, e.g. high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and lactic acid (LA). Histories were taken including age, gender, smoking history, and disease history. Additional analysis was carried out to compare between the genders and evaluate the association between certain biomarkers and ICAO. Results Among the 89 ICAO cases in this study, the serum levels of hs-CRP, ESR and LA were significantly higher than those in the control group (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences were found in the mean levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, HDL cholesterol or glucose, or the known risk factors. Gender also had no influence on these biomarkers. Logistic regression analysis indicated that hs-CRP, ESR and LA were significantly associated with ICAO (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that hs-CRP, ESR and LA are associated with ICAO in ischaemic stroke patients, but gender has no effect. Therefore, Hs-CRP, ESR and LA may be useful in the early detection of patients with ICAO. PMID:27279846

  7. The value of time-averaged serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in prediction of mortality and dropout in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Chen, Chao-Yu; Li, Yi-Jung; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a useful biomarker for prediction of long-term outcomes in patients undergoing chronic dialysis. This observational cohort study evaluated whether the time-averaged serum high-sensitivity CRP (HS-CRP) level was a better predictor of clinical outcomes than a single HS-CRP level in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). We classified 335 patients into three tertiles according to the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level and followed up regularly from January 2010 to December 2014. Clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular events, infection episodes, newly developed malignancy, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), dropout (death plus conversion to hemodialysis), and mortality were assessed. During a 5-year follow-up, 164 patients (49.0%) ceased PD; this included 52 patient deaths (15.5%), 100 patients (29.9%) who converted to hemodialysis, and 12 patients (3.6%) who received a kidney transplantation. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test revealed a significantly worse survival accumulation in patients with high time-average HS-CRP levels. A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, older age, and the occurrence of cardiovascular events were independent mortality predictors. A higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, the occurrence of cardiovascular events, infection episodes, and EPS were important predictors of dropout. The receiver operating characteristic analysis verified that the value of the time-average HS-CRP level in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout was superior to a single serum baseline HS-CRP level. This study shows that the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level is a better marker than a single baseline measurement in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout in PD patients.

  8. Relation of uric acid to serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Tanya; Blaha, Michael J; Nasir, Khurram; Silverman, Michael G; Tota-Maharaj, Rajesh; Carvalho, Jose A M; Conceição, Raquel D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Santos, Raul D

    2012-12-15

    Increased uric acid (UA) is strongly linked to cardiovascular disease. However, the independent role of UA is still debated because it is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors including obesity and metabolic syndrome. This study assessed the association of UA with increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), increased ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL), sonographically detected hepatic steatosis, and their clustering in the presence and absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We evaluated 3,518 employed subjects without clinical cardiovascular disease from November 2008 through July 2010. Prevalence of hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L was 19%, that of TG/HDL ≥3 was 44%, and that of hepatic steatosis was 43%. In multivariable logistic regression after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and confounders, highest versus lowest UA quartile was associated with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 2.28, p = 0.04), TG/HDL ≥3 (OR 3.29, 95% CI 2.36 to 4.60, p <0.001), and hepatic steatosis (OR 3.10, 95% CI 2.22 to 4.32, p <0.001) independently of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Association of UA with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L became nonsignificant in analyses stratified by obesity. Ascending UA quartiles compared to the lowest UA quartile demonstrated a graded increase in the odds of having 2 or 3 of these risk conditions and a successive decrease in the odds of having none. In conclusion, high UA levels were associated with increased TG/HDL and hepatic steatosis independently of metabolic syndrome and obesity and with increased hs-CRP independently of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlation of MCP-4 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a marker of inflammation in obesity and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Priyanka, N

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence worldwide and has emerged as a strong risk factor for periodontal disease. Conversely, the remote effects of periodontal disease on various systemic diseases have been proposed. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of MCP-4 and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in obese and non-obese subjects with chronic periodontitis and to find a correlation between MCP-4 and hsCRP in GCF and serum. Forty subjects (20 males and 20 females) were selected and divided into four groups (10 subjects in each group), based on clinical parameters: group NOH (non-obese healthy), group OH (obese healthy), Group NOCP (non-obese with chronic periodontitis) and group OCP (obese with chronic periodontitis). The levels of serum and GCF MCP-4 were determined by ELISA and hsCRP levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry method. The mean GCF and serum concentration of MCP-4 was highest for group OCP followed by group NOCP, group OH (in GCF); group OH, group NOCP(in serum) and least in group NOH. The mean hsCRP concentration was highest for group OCP followed by group OH, group NOCP and group NOH. A significant positive correlation was found between serum and GCF MCP-4 and hsCRP levels. GCF MCP-4 concentrations increased in periodontal disease compared to health and correlated positively with the severity of disease indicating it as a novel marker of periodontal disease. The serum concentration of MCP-4 was found to be more in obese group as compared to nonobese group indicating it as a marker of obesity. Furthermore, based on the positive correlation of MCP-4 and hsCRP found in this study, it can be proposed that MCP-4 and hsCRP may be the markers linking chronic inflammation in obesity and periodontal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The value of time-averaged serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in prediction of mortality and dropout in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Jung; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose C-reactive protein (CRP) is a useful biomarker for prediction of long-term outcomes in patients undergoing chronic dialysis. This observational cohort study evaluated whether the time-averaged serum high-sensitivity CRP (HS-CRP) level was a better predictor of clinical outcomes than a single HS-CRP level in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Patients and methods We classified 335 patients into three tertiles according to the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level and followed up regularly from January 2010 to December 2014. Clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular events, infection episodes, newly developed malignancy, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), dropout (death plus conversion to hemodialysis), and mortality were assessed. Results During a 5-year follow-up, 164 patients (49.0%) ceased PD; this included 52 patient deaths (15.5%), 100 patients (29.9%) who converted to hemodialysis, and 12 patients (3.6%) who received a kidney transplantation. The Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and log-rank test revealed a significantly worse survival accumulation in patients with high time-average HS-CRP levels. A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, older age, and the occurrence of cardiovascular events were independent mortality predictors. A higher time-averaged serum HS-CRP level, the occurrence of cardiovascular events, infection episodes, and EPS were important predictors of dropout. The receiver operating characteristic analysis verified that the value of the time-average HS-CRP level in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout was superior to a single serum baseline HS-CRP level. Conclusion This study shows that the time-averaged serum HS-CRP level is a better marker than a single baseline measurement in predicting the 5-year mortality and dropout in PD patients. PMID:28860785

  11. Simvastatin enhances the antihypertensive effect of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Possible role of nitric oxide, oxidative stress, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Zaher, Ahmed O; Elkoussi, Alaa Eldin A; Abudahab, Lotfy H; Elbakry, Mohammed H; Elsayed, Elsayed Abu-Elwafa

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the effects of simvastatin on the blood pressure and on the antihypertensive activity of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients were evaluated. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals, repeated administration of simvastatin slightly but significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure, enhanced its progressive reductions induced by repeated administration of ramipril and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Concomitantly, repeated administration of simvastatin, ramipril or simvastatin in combination with ramipril to these animals, increased nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased the elevated serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. The effects of combined treatment were greater than those of simvastatin or ramipril alone. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients, repeated administration of ramipril decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased NO production, and decreased the elevated serum MDA and hs-CRP levels. Addition of simvastatin to ramipril therapy enhanced these effects and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Simvastatin but not ramipril inhibited the contractile responses of isolated aortic rings induced by angiotensin 11. l-arginine and acetylcholine enhanced, while l-NAME inhibited effects of simvastatin, and simvastatin in combination with ramipril on these contractile responses. These findings suggest that simvastatin exerts antihypertensive effect and enhances the antihypertensive effect of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. In addition to its cholesterol-lowering effect, the ability of simvastatin to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction through increasing NO bioavailability and through suppression of oxidative stress and vascular inflammation and its ability to enhance the effect of ramipril on these parameters may play a pivotal role in these effects. © 2011 The Authors Fundamental and

  12. Effect of Atorvastatin on Serum Levels of Total Cholesterol and High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein in High-Risk Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming Yu; Xue, Feng Hua; Teng, Shi Chao; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Jing; Yin, Feng; Gu, Hong Yue

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of atorvastatin on serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and total cholesterol in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients in Asia. By searching English and Chinese language-based electronic databases (ie, PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, SpringerLink, Wiley, Web of Science, Wanfang database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP database), we identified 13 studies relevant to our topic of interest. Data were collected from the 13 studies and analyzed with Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (version 2.0, Biostat Inc., Englewood, New Jersey). Initially, our database searches retrieved 356 studies (45 in English, 311 in Chinese). Thirteen studies were selected for the meta-analysis following stringent criteria. The data included 1239 patients with AF, of whom 634 were treated with atorvastatin and included in the treatment group, and 605 patients were treated with conventional treatment and included in the control group. The results of our meta-analysis suggested that the serum levels of hs-CRP (mg/L) and total cholesterol (mmol/L) in the treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group (hs-CRP: standardized mean difference = 0.962; 95% CI, 0.629-1.295, P < 0.001; total cholesterol: standardized mean difference = 1.400; 95% CI, 0.653-2.146, P < 0.001). The findings of this study suggest that atorvastatin may be very effective in decreasing serum levels of hs-CRP and total cholesterol to prevent cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Associations of Apolipoprotein A, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Fasting Plasma Insulin in Obese Children With and Without Family History of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karabouta, Zacharoula; Papandreou, Dimitrios; Makedou, Areti; Rousso, Israel; Athanassiadou, Fani

    2016-01-01

    Background The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased from 4.2% to 6.7% during the last two decades. Pediatric obesity is a major health problem, which is dramatically increasing in Greece. A variety of inflammatory variables have been also found to associate with cardiometabolic (CV) risk in obese children. The purpose of this study was to identify and examine the effects of possible CV risk factors in obese and non-obese children with and without family history (FH) of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods Sixty-eight (68) healthy children and adolescents aged 7 - 13 years participated in the study. Anthropometrical and biochemical indexes were obtained from all children as well as FH of CVD. Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels were found statistically significantly higher in the obese group compared to the non-obese one. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were observed to be statistically significantly lower in the obese children compared to their normal peers. Conclusions Apolipoprotein A, hsCRP and FPI levels were significantly higher in the obese children with FH of CVD compared to the ones without FH of CVD. TC and SBP were found to be independently associated with obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.965, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.935 - 2.97, P < 0.031 and OR: 1.045, 95% CI: 1.016 - 1.074, P < 0.002, respectively). PMID:27222670

  14. Human serum amyloid A (SAA) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in preterm newborn infants with nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lannergård, A; Larsson, A; Friman, G; Ewald, U

    2008-08-01

    Human serum amyloid A (SAA) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and their relation to suggestive nosocomial infections (NIs) were investigated in very preterm (VPT) newborn infants. In a retrospective analysis, information of suggestive NI was matched to levels of SAA and hsCRP in 224 serum samples from 72 VPT newborn infants. As a control group, 35 healthy-term newborn infants were chosen. Of the 224 serum samples, 145 samples were not associated with nosocomial infections. However, 79 were associated with NI: of these 79, 42 were found to be culture-proven NI. Trimmed mean (alpha= 0.05) levels for SAA and hsCRP in VPT newborn infants were higher than in control term newborn infants (1.74, 2.67 mg/L vs. 0.78, 0.16 mg/L; p = 0.01 and <0.0001, respectively), and higher in the NI group than in the non-NI group (5.14, 5.74 mg/L vs. 1.03, 1.18; p < 0.01 and <0.0001; respectively). The areas under the curve (AUC) for hsCRP, calculated from the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves, was greater (0.816; 95% CI 0.759-0.864) than for SAA (0.610; 95% CI 0.543-0.675). Identifying and monitoring of bacterial and fungal infections in VPT might be further improved by the use of SAA and hsCRP.

  15. The association of high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and other biomarkers with cardiovascular disease in patients treated for HIV: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population, but its role as a predictive marker in HIV-positive patients remains unclear. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether hsCRP or other biomarkers are independent predictors of CVD risk in HIV-infected patients. Methods Retrospective, nested case–control study. HIV-positive men and women (35–69 years of age) receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were included. Cases (n = 35) had a major CVD event. Controls (n = 74) free from CVD events for at least 5 years from starting ART were matched on diabetes and smoking. HsCRP, D-dimer, P-selectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured. Results High hsCRP was associated with CVD risk, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HIV replication and the type of ART received at the time of sampling (adjusted odds ratio 8.00 [1.23-51.94] comparing >3.3 mg/L with <0.9 mg/L; P = 0.03). Higher IL-6 and P-selectin levels were also independently associated with increased CVD risk, although the association was weaker than for hsCRP. Higher total cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol increased CVD risk, independent of hsCRP. Conclusion hsCRP may be a useful additional biomarker to predict CVD risk in HIV-infected patients receiving cART. PMID:24004495

  16. Clinical significance of combined liver function and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measurement in children with hand-foot-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Han, F X; Gao, J H; Gai, J H

    2016-09-23

    Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common pediatric disease responsible for the development of rashes or herpes on the hand, foot, and mouth. Severe complications of HFMD include myocarditis, pulmonary edema, aseptic meningoencephalitis, and even death. Therefore, early diagnosis of HFMD is of particular importance. In this study, we determined the clinical value of the combined detection of liver function and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) expression in children with HFMD. Three hundred children with HFMD were recruited to this study between July 2013 and July 2015 and divided into the mild and severe HFMD groups (N = 150 per group). The liver function [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels] and hs-CRP expression were evaluated using standardized tests, and the clinical value of combined detection of these indices (in parallel and serially) was determined. Patients in the severe HFMD group showed significantly higher levels of ALT, AST, ALP, and hs-CRP compared to those in the mild HFMD group (P < 0.05). The hs-CRP and liver function tests had low specificity and sensitivity, respectively. However, parallel combined detection improved the sensitivity and negative predicted value of these indices, whereas serial combined detection improved the specificity and positive predicted value. In conclusion, hs-CRP and liver function play a major role in the diagnosis of HFMD (and identifying its severity), and serial combined detection of these indices enhances the positive predicted value, and could be employed to diagnose severe HFMD at an earlier stage.

  17. Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27597810

  18. Usefulness of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein to Predict Mortality in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, José; Lopez, Faye L.; Montes, Ramón; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Astor, Brad C.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a marker for risk of cardiovascular and overall mortality, but information about the association between hs-CRP and mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is scarce. A total of 293 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study with a history of AF and available hs-CRP levels were studied. During a median time follow-up of 9.4 years, 134 participants died (46%). The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality associated with the highest vs. the lowest tertile of hs-CRP was 2.52; 95% CI 1.49–4.25 after adjusting for age, sex, history of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors. A similar trend was observed for cardiovascular mortality (57 events) (HR=1.90; 95% CI 0.81–4.45). CHADS2 score was also associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: the adjusted HR were, respectively, 3.39 (95% CI 1.91–6.01) and 8.71, (95% CI 2.98–25.47) comparing those with CHADS2>2 versus CHADS2=0. Adding hs-CRP to a predictive model including CHADS2 score was associated with an improvement of the C-statistic for total mortality (from 0.627 to 0.677) and for cardiovascular mortality (from 0.700 to 0.718). In conclusion, high levels of hs-CRP constitute an independent marker for risk of mortality in AF patients. PMID:21962993

  19. Relationship between ankle brachial index (ABI), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and initial disability level in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chotik-anuchit, Songkram; Nilanont, Yongchai; Poungvarin, Niphon

    2011-02-01

    Relationship between high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), Ankle Brachial index (ABI), severity of atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic stroke has been well documented. Studies concerning the association of ABI, hs-CRP and initial disability level in acute ischemic stroke are scarce. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP, ABI and level of initial disability in acute stroke setting. We conducted a prospective observational study in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of onset. Initial ABI, hs-CRP were measured. Disability level was assessed at admission and 3 months using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and the National Institue of Health Stroke scale (NIHSS). Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. This study included 36 patients with a mean +/-SD age of 67.8 +/- 9.3 years. Sixteen (44.4%) were male. Median NIHSS and mRS were 10 and 4 respectively. Correlation between initial ABI and hs-CRP was poor (r(s) = -0.11, p = 0.57). There was a significant negative relationship between ABI and mRS at 0 and 3 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.45 (p = 0.006) and -0.41 (p = 0.02), respectively. There was a significant inverse relationship between ABI and initial stroke disability. However, correlation coefficient indicated only fair agreement beyond chance. This findings suggest that ABI may be used as a clinical predictor of initial disability level in acute stroke.

  20. Circulating miR-145 is associated with plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lihua; Hao, Fang; Wang, Weihua; Qu, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Stroke is a major cerebrovascular disease threatening human health and life with high morbidity, disability and mortality. We aimed to find effective biomarkers for the early diagnosis on stroke. Nine previously reported stroke-associated miRNAs (miR-21, miR-23a, miR-29b, miR-124, miR-145, miR-210, miR-221, miR-223 and miR-483-5p) were measured by quantitative real time-PCR, and plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum interleukin 6 (IL-6), the pro-inflammation markers in brain injury, were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 146 acute ischemic stroke patients and 96 healthy blood donors. We found that serum miR-145 was significantly increased within 24 h after stroke onset and serum miR-23a and miR-221 were decreased in patients. Moreover, serum miR-145 was strong positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP and moderate positively correlated with serum IL-6. Meanwhile, serum miR-23a and miR-221 were moderate negatively correlated with plasma hs-CRP but not serum IL-6. Importantly, the combination of hs-CRP and serum miR-145 gained a better sensitivity/spectivity for prediction of acute ischemia stroke (area under receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.794 to 0.896). Conclusively, our preliminary findings indicate that serum miR-145 upregulated in acute ischemic stroke might be a new biomarker for acute ischemia stroke evaluation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Canakinumab to Improve Exercise Capacity in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Elevated High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein (Hs-CRP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Prior Acute Myocardial Infarction; Evidence of Systemic Inflammation (C Reactive Protein Plasma >2 mg/l); Reduced Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (<50%); Symptoms of Heart Failure (NYHA Class II-III)

  2. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein is Related to Central Obesity and the Number of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Jamaican Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Nadia R.; Ferguson, Trevor S.; Bennett, Franklyn I.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger-Coleman, Novie O. M.; Jackson, Maria D.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen E.; Wilks, Rainford J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has been shown to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) endpoints and is associated with CVD risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. This study evaluated the association between hsCRP and CVD risk factors among Afro-Caribbean young adults in Jamaica. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Jamaica 1986 Birth Cohort Study. Data were collected between 2005 and 2007 when participants were 18–20 years old. All participants completed an interviewer administered questionnaire and had anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measurements performed. Fasting blood samples were collected for measurement of glucose, lipids, and hsCRP. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with high hsCRP. Results: Analyses included 342 men and 404 women with mean age 18.8 ± 0.6 years. Approximately 15% of the participants had high risk hsCRP (>3 mg/L), with a higher prevalence among women (20 vs. 9%; p < 0.001). The prevalence of elevated hsCRP increased with body mass index category, high waist circumference (WC), high triglycerides, low high density lipoprotein, and lower parental education among women, but only for high WC and lower parental education among men. In logistic regression models controlling for sex and parental education, high WC was associated with significantly higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 7.8, 95% CI 4.8–12.9, p < 0.001). In a similar model, high hsCRP was also associated with the number of metabolic syndrome components. Compared to participants with no metabolic syndrome component, having one metabolic syndrome component was associated with a twofold higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3–3.8, p = 0.005), while having three components was associated with a 14-fold higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 13.5, 95% CI 2.4–76.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: High hsCRP is common among Jamaican young adults and is strongly

  3. Correlations between the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and cardiovascular risk factors in Korean adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus: the CALLISTO study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Suk Min; Baek, Sang Hong; Jeon, Hui Kyung; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Hyung Seop; Rha, Seung Woon; Park, Jong Seon; Seong, In Whan; Ahn, Young Keun; Yoon, Jung Han; Cha, Tae Joon

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and cardiovascular risk factors in Korean adults. We reviewed 1,561 patients with cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus with hsCRP levels measured within the past year. Four cardiovascular risk groups were determined: low (<10%, 0-1 risk), moderate (<10%, >2 risk), high (10-20%) and very high (>20%) risk, according to the number of risk factors and the Framingham/NCEP ATP III risk score. The correlations between the hsCRP level and cardiovascular risk factors (age, smoking, hypertension, lipid profiles and familial history of premature coronary heart disease) were investigated. The mean and median hsCRP (mg/L) levels were 1.32 ± 9.69 and 0.29 (range: 0.01-7.48), respectively. Men had a higher median level of hsCRP than women (p<0.001). The levels of hs CRP significantly increased from the low to the very high risk group (0.15, 0.23, 0.27 and 0.47, respectively) and were significantly correlated with age, the level of glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index (BMI), the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL-C ratio, the LDL-C/total cholesterol (TC) ratio, the HDL-C/TC ratio, the HDL-C/triglyceride (TG) ratio and the TC/TG ratio. Neither smoking, the LDL-C level nor the TG level affected the hsCRP level. In a multivariate regression analysis, age, the HDL-C level, the LDL-C/TC ratio and BMI were found to be independently correlated with the hsCRP level. There is a significant relationship between the degree of cardiovascular risk and the hsCRP level in Korean adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. Assessing the hsCRP levels may thus provide additive value in predicting cardiovascular risks.

  4. Utility of the combination of serum highly-sensitive C-reactive protein level at discharge and a risk index in predicting readmission for acute exacerbation of COPD*,**

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun; Zhu, Hong; Shen, Ning; Han, Xiang; Chen, Yahong; He, Bei

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Frequent readmissions for acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are an independent risk factor for increased mortality and use of health-care resources. Disease severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level are validated predictors of long-term prognosis in such patients. This study investigated the utility of combining serum CRP level with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) exacerbation risk classification for predicting readmission for AECOPD. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of consecutive patients hospitalized for AECOPD at Peking University Third Hospital, in Beijing, China. We assessed patient age; gender; smoking status and history (pack-years); lung function; AECOPD frequency during the last year; quality of life; GOLD risk category (A-D; D indicating the greatest risk); and serum level of high-sensitivity CRP at discharge (hsCRP-D). RESULTS: The final sample comprised 135 patients. Of those, 71 (52.6%) were readmitted at least once during the 12-month follow-up period. The median (interquartile) time to readmission was 78 days (42-178 days). Multivariate analysis revealed that serum hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D were independent predictors of readmission (hazard ratio = 3.486; 95% CI: 1.968-6.175; p < 0.001 and hazard ratio = 2.201; 95% CI: 1.342-3.610; p = 0.002, respectively). The ordering of the factor combinations by cumulative readmission risk, from highest to lowest, was as follows: hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C. CONCLUSIONS: Serum hsCRP-D and GOLD classification are independent predictors of readmission for AECOPD, and their predictive value increases when they are used in combination. PMID:25410837

  5. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Complements Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid Prognostication in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Large-Scale Retrospective and Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Li, Chao-Feng; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Lai, Xiao-Ping; He, Yun; Xu, Yun-Xiu-Xiu; Hu, Dong-Peng; Wen, Shi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Tuan; Chen, Wen-Hui; Liu, Huai; Guo, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Ting; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ping; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of combining the assessment of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) with that of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV DNA) in the pretherapy prognostication of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and Methods: Three independent cohorts of NPC patients (training set of n=3113, internal validation set of n=1556, and prospective validation set of n=1668) were studied. Determinants of disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival were assessed by multivariate analysis. Hazard ratios and survival probabilities of the patient groups, segregated by clinical stage (T1-2N0-1M0, T3-4N0-1M0, T1-2N2-3M0, and T3-4N2-3M0) and EBV DNA load (low or high) alone, and also according to hs-CRP level (low or high), were compared. Results: Elevated hs-CRP and EBV DNA levels were significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival in both the training and validation sets. Associations were similar and remained significant after excluding patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic hepatitis B. Patients with advanced-stage disease were segregated by high EBV DNA levels and high hs-CRP level into a poorest-risk group, and participants with either high EBV DNA but low hs-CRP level or high hs-CRP but low EBV DNA values had poorer survival compared with the bottom values for both biomarkers. These findings demonstrate a significant improvement in the prognostic ability of conventional advanced NPC staging. Conclusion: Baseline plasma EBV DNA and serum hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with survival in NPC patients. The combined interpretation of EBV DNA with hs-CRP levels led to refinement of the risks for the patient subsets, with improved risk discrimination in patients with advanced-stage disease.

  6. Achievement of specified lipid and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with two statins in Chinese patients with hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cheng; Hu, Miao; Wu, Yong-Jian; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-09-13

    Statins reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Rosuvastatin 10 mg daily appears to be more potent in reducing LDL-C than simvastatin 40 mg, but the relative effect of these two statin doses on hsCRP is unknown. Chinese hyperlipidaemic patients with high cardiovascular risk or familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) were treated with rosuvastatin 10 mg and simvastatin 40 mg daily in an open-label crossover study. Lipid profiles were measured off treatment and after at least 4 weeks treatment with each of the two statins and hsCRP levels were measured on treatment with both statins. Both treatments were well tolerated in 247 patients (age 55.7 ± 11.1 years; 100 male; 140 with FH) with good treatment compliance. There were statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) for rosuvastatin versus simvastatin for LDL-C reduction (-52.4 ± 11.9 % vs. -47.7 ± 10.8 %) and on-treatment LDL-C (2.62 ± 0.99 mmol/L vs. 2.86 ± 0.97 mmol/L), respectively, but the on-treatment hsCRP levels (1.33 ± 1.37 mg/L vs. 1.41 ± 1.57 mg/L, P > 0.05) were not significantly different. The lipid target (LDL-C <2.6 mmol/L) was achieved by 52.9 % with rosuvastatin compared with 42.6 % with simvastatin (P < 0.05). The proportions of patients attaining hsCRP targets of < 2 and < 1 mg/L were similar with the two statins (57.1 % and 74.6 % for rosuvastatin vs. 57.1 % and 80.1 % for simvastatin, P > 0.05). A significantly greater proportion of patients achieved LDL-C targets with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared to simvastatin 40 mg in Chinese patients with hypercholesterolaemia, but there was no significant difference in achieving hsCRP target levels with the two statins.

  7. A comparison of osteoprotegerin with adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) as a marker for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Eoin P; Ashley, David T; Davenport, Colin; Penugonda, Lakshmi; Kelleher, Grainne; Devlin, Niamh; Crowley, Rachel; O'Shea, Paula; Agha, Amar; Thompson, Chris J; O'Gorman, Donal J; Smith, Diarmuid

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with low adiponectin and elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to be elevated in type 2 diabetes, but whether it reflects underlying IR is unclear. We aimed to compare the ability of serum OPG with adiponectin and hsCRP to act as a marker for IR in individuals with normal and abnormal glucose tolerance. 115 men underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. OPG, hsCRP and adiponectin were measured using ELISA. IR was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Men with abnormal glucose tolerance (n=38) were older (58.3±11.2 vs 47.3±11.4 years, P<.001), had higher body mass index (BMI) (31.1±2.9 vs 27.9±3.2 kg/m(2), P<.001) and were more insulin resistant (median (I.Q.) HOMA-IR 5.88 (3.38) vs 1.13 (1.14), P<.001) than those with normal glucose tolerance (n=77). After adjustment for age and BMI, OPG (6.28 (2.32) vs 5.16 (1.86) pmol/L, P<.001) and hsCRP (2.07 (5.47) vs 0.78 (1.05) mg/L, P<.001) were higher and adiponectin (3.02±1.17 vs 4.78±2.38 μg/mL, P<.001) was lower in those with AGT. After adjustment for age and BMI, adiponectin (r=-0.317, P<.001) and hsCRP (r=0.318, P<.001), but not OPG (r=0.126, P=.196) correlated with HOMA-IR. On multiple linear regression analysis, adiponectin and hsCRP but not OPG were independent predictors of HOMA-IR. OPG is higher in individuals with abnormal glucose tolerance, but unlike adiponectin and hsCRP, does not correlate with HOMA-IR, suggesting its elevation within this cohort of individuals is due to factors other than insulin resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Elevated High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels Independent of Obesity: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkwan; Lee, Seok Jun; Choi, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Lee, Seung Gwan; Shin, Chol

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) has been recognized as a common health problem, and increasing obesity rates have led to further remarkable increases in the prevalence of OSA, along with more prominent cardiovascular morbidities. Though previous studies have reported an independent relationship between elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and OSA, the issue remains controversial owing to inadequate consideration of obesity and various confounding factors. So far, few population based studies of association between OSA and hsCRP levels have been published. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether OSA is associated with increased hsCRP levels independent of obesity in a large population-based study. A total of 1,835 subjects (968 men and 867 women) were selected from a larger cohort of the ongoing Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). Overnight polysomnography was performed on each participant. All participants underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses, including analysis of lipid profiles and hsCRP levels. Based on anthropometric data, body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) were calculated and fat mass (FM) were measured by means of multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Mild OSA and moderate to severe OSA were defined by an AHI >5 and ≥15, respectively. The population was sub-divided into 3 groups based on the tertile cut-points for the distribution of hsCRP levels. The percentage of participants in the highest tertile of hsCRP increased dose-dependently according to the severity of OSA. After adjustment for potential confounders and obesity-related variables (BMI, WHR, and body fat) in a multiple logistic model, participants with moderate to severe OSA had 1.73-, 2.01-, and 1.61-fold greater risks of being in the highest tertile of hsCRP levels than participants with non-OSA, respectively. Interaction between obesity (BMI ≥25kg/m2) and the

  9. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is predictive of successful cardioversion for atrial fibrillation and maintenance of sinus rhythm after conversion.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Arakawa, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Tatsushi; Kodama, Itsuo; Hishida, Hitoshi

    2006-04-14

    Cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most effective treatment for the restoration of sinus rhythm (SR). Recently, an elevated level of hs-CRP has been shown to be associated with AF burden, suggesting that inflammation increases the propensity for persistence of AF. We examined whether the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was predictive of the outcome of cardioversion for AF. One hundred and six patients with a history of symptomatic AF lasting > or =1 day (age 63+/-14 years, mean+/-S.D.) underwent cardioversion. Echocardiography and hs-CRP assay were performed immediately prior to cardioversion. SR was restored in 84 patients (79%). By using selected cutoff values, multiple discriminant analysis revealed significant associations between successful cardioversion and a shorter duration of AF (AF duration< or =36 days, odds ratio (OR), 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97-0.99), smaller left atrial diameter (left atrial diameter< or =40 mm, OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71-0.94), better-preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction> or =60%, OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86-0.99), and lower hs-CRP level (hs-CRP< or =0.12 mg/dL, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.51). During a follow-up period of 140+/-144 days, AF recurred in 64 patients (76%). By using a cutoff value of hs-CRP> or =0.06 mg/dL, Cox proportional-hazards regression model found that only hs-CRP level was an independent predictor of AF recurrence (OR 5.30, 95% CI 2.46-11.5) after adjustment for coexisting cardiovascular risks. When patients were divided by the hs-CRP level of 0.06 mg/dL, percentage of maintenance of SR below and above the cutoff was 53% and 4%, respectively (log-rank test, p<0.0001). hs-CRP level determined prior to cardioversion represents an independent predictor of both successful cardioversion for AF and the maintenance of SR after conversion.

  10. Reduction in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Ischemic Stroke by Statin Treatment: Hs-CRP Sub-Study in J-STARS.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Origasa, Hideki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2017-10-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins on recurrent stroke remain unclear. We investigated the effects of pravastatin on high-sensitivity C-reactive proteins (Hs-CRP) in ischemic stroke, and explored the impact of Hs-CRP on recurrent stroke and vascular events. This randomized open-label trial was ancillary to the J-STARS trial. One thousand and ninety-five patients with non-cardiogenic ischemic stroke were assigned to the pravastatin (n=545) or control groups (n=550). The primary and secondary endpoints were serum Hs-CRP reduction and stroke recurrence, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic ones, respectively. Onset of vascular events and each stroke subtype in relation to Hs-CRP levels were also determined. In the pravastatin treatment group, Hs-CRP levels (median 711 µg/L, IQR 344-1500) significantly decreased 2 months later (median 592 µg/L, IQR 301-1390), and they remained significantly lower until the end of the study. However, in the control group, baseline Hs-CRP levels were similar to those 2 months later. The reduction of Hs-CRP levels from the baseline to 2 months in the pravastatin group was statistically significant compared with the control (p=0.007). One SD increase in log-transformed Hs-CRP increased the risk of stroke recurrence (HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.97-1.40) and vascular events (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51). With an Hs-CRP cut-off of 1000 µg/L, higher Hs-CRP significantly increased the risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.03-2.17)and vascular events (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.23-2.29). In non-cardiogenic ischemic stroke, pravastatin treatment may reduce vascular inflammation as assessed by Hs-CRP, and higher Hs-CRP levels appeared to increase the risk of recurrent stroke and vascular events.

  11. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations among patients with and without diabetes in a multiethnic population of Singapore: CREDENCE Study

    PubMed Central

    Dalan, Rinkoo; Jong, Michelle; Chan, Siew-Pang; Hawkins, Robert; Choo, Robin; Lim, Brenda; Tan, May L; Leow, Melvin KS

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations differ between Chinese, Malays, and Indians with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and to look for an association with demographic, metabolic and therapeutic variables. Methods Phase 1: We retrieved records of 50 Chinese, 51 Malay, and 67 Indian individuals who had routine health screening blood tests. Phase 2: We recruited 111 Chinese, 68 Malays, and 67 Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus and measured their hs-CRP in addition to standard laboratory tests. Results Phase 1: The median hs-CRP was 0.6 mg/L (0.2–6.2) in Chinese, 1.2 mg/L (0.2–7.9) in Malays, and 1.9 mg/L (0.2–10.0) in Indians. The Indians had higher hs-CRP compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) when adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), lipids, blood pressure, and smoking, and a significant correlation was seen between female sex, smoking status, fasting glucose and triglyceride concentration, and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities. Phase 2: The median hs-CRP was 1.2 mg/L (0.2–9.9) in Chinese, 2.2 mg/L (0.2–9.0) in Malays, and 2.3 mg/L (0.2–9.8) in Indians. Indians had higher hs-CRP when compared to Chinese (P < 0.05) and a significant correlation was seen between BMI, female gender, diabetes, and the use of metformin and hs-CRP in all three ethnicities (P < 0.05) when adjusted for the above variables and use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB), statin, metformin, rosiglitazone, sulfonylurea, glinides, acarbose, and insulin. Conclusion hs-CRP concentrations are significantly higher in Indians compared to the Chinese (in both the diabetic and nondiabetic individuals) after adjustment for the various demographic, metabolic, and therapeutic variables. PMID:21437088

  12. Assessment of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein tests for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis B-associated liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Na; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Zhen-Hui; Wu, Li-Gang; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Xia; Hu, Yan-Chao; Yan, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qi; Ding, Xiang-Chun; Xie, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor worldwide, with high morbidity and mortality. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and the majority (~80%) of hepatocellular carcinoma patients in China exhibit co-morbidity with HBV-associated liver cirrhosis. The goal of reliable early diagnostic and prognostic techniques for HBV-associated HCC remains unrealized. The aim of the present study was to explore the efficacy of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) tests in the early diagnosis of HCC in patients with HBV-associated liver cirrhosis. A cohort of 493 patients with HBV-associated liver disease was divided into three groups: Chronic HBV (CHB) group; liver cirrhosis without HCC (LC) group; and liver cirrhosis with HCC (HCC) group. A further 47 healthy individuals comprised the healthy control (CN) group. Comparative analyses of clinical symptoms, histopathology, ultrasound imagery, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, biochemistry [α-fetoprotein (AFP) and liver function enzymes], and hs-CRP tests were conducted across these four groups. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that CRP is strongly expressed in HCC tumor tissue, but is not expressed elsewhere. Analyses of the correlations between serum hs-CRP levels and HCC clinical parameters indicated that there was no correlation between serum hs-CRP levels, tumor Edmondson grade, tumor-node-metastasis stage and AFP status. Serum hs-CRP and AFP levels were found to be significantly elevated in the HCC group compared to those in the LC, CHB and CN groups (P<0.01). Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed that measurement of serum hs-CRP could differentiate HCC from HBV-associated liver cirrhosis, as well as increase the accuracy of HCC diagnoses. Additionally, measurement of hs-CRP and AFP together improved diagnostic accuracy for HCC compared with either test alone. Serum hs-CRP could have

  13. Associations of cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in early radiographic knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Yang, Ye; Deng, Zhen-han; Ding, Xiang; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is possibly related to osteoarthritis (OA) progression and a variety of OA-related symptoms. This study aimed to examine associations between cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP in early radiographic knee OA. Design Cross-sectional health examination survey. Setting This primary study was conducted in a health examination centre in China. Participants 936 (656 men and 280 women) patients with early radiographic knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Smoking status was classified into four levels based on daily smoking habit: 0/day, 1–10/day, 11–20/day and >20/day. Betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption status was divided into ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. Early radiographic knee OA was defined as Kellgren Lawrence (K-L) grade 1 or 2 in at least one leg, and elevated hsCRP was assessed as ≥3.0 mg/L. Results After adjustment for a number of potential confounding factors, a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and hsCRP was observed in the multivariable model. The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of elevated hsCRP (≥3.0 mg/L) in the second (1–10/day, n=133), third (11–20/day, n=59) and highest (>20/day, n=104) cigarette smoking categories were 1.54 (95% CI 0.91 to 2.61), 1.27 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.79) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.20 to 3.64), respectively, compared with the non-smoker category (n=640). In addition, there was a positive dose–response relationship between cigarette smoking and elevated hsCRP (p for trend=0.01). No significant associations between betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP were observed in the multivariable model. Conclusions This study indicated that cigarette smoking was positively associated with serum hsCRP level in patients with early radiographic knee OA. However, in view of the nature of cross-sectional designs, the results need to be confirmed by

  14. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease: a report from a large Persian cohort.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed Mr; Tayefi, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Heidari-Bakavoli, Ali R; Moohebati, Mohsen; Parizadeh, Seyyed Mr; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Ferns, Gordon Aa; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and is associated with a heightened inflammatory state. A raised serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, is also known to associate with cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the relationship between the presence of metabolic syndrome and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in a large representative Persian population cohort without a history of cardiovascular disease. Methods The MASHAD study population cohort comprised 9778 subjects, who were recruited from the city of Mashhad, Iran, between 2007 and 2008. Several cardiovascular risk factors were measured in this population without cardiovascular disease. Individuals were categorized into quartiles of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration: first quartile - 0.72 (0.59-0.85) (median [range]) mg/L, second quartile - 1.30 (1.14-1.4) mg/L, third quartile - 2.29 (1.92-2.81) mg/L and fourth quartile - 6.63 (4.61-11.95) mg/L, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in each quartile was determined using either International Diabetes Federation or Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was highest in the fourth quartile for serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (1220 subjects [50.0%]), and significantly higher than that in the first quartile (reference group) (634 subjects [25.9%]) ( P < 0.001). A positive smoking habit (OR, 1.47 [1.26-1.70], P < 0.001) and the presence of either metabolic syndrome-International Diabetes Federation (OR, 1.35 [1.18-1.55], P < 0.001) or metabolic syndrome-ATPIII (OR, 1.40 [1.18-1.50], P < 0.001) were strong predictors of a fourth quartile for serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration. Conclusions There was a significant association between high concentrations of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and the presence of metabolic syndrome among

  15. Clomiphene Citrate Treatment Cycle Outcomes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients Based on Basal High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kahyaoglu, Serkan; Yumuşak, Omer Hamid; Ozyer, Sebnem; Pekcan, Meryem Kuru; Erel, Merve; Cicek, Mahmut Nedim; Erkaya, Salim; Tasci, Yasemin

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is highly associated with an ovulatory infertility, features of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Serum concentrations of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were significantly higher in obese than in non-obese PCOS patients at baseline, suggesting a relationship between elevated hs-CRP levels and obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether cycle day 3 hs-CRP levels before clomiphene citrate (CC) treatment would predict cycle outcomes in women with PCOS. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among 84 infertile women with PCOS who were treated with CC at Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between January 2014 and January 2015. Based on the exclusion criteria, cycle outcomes of remaining 66 infertile women with PCOS treated with CC were analyzed. The hs-CRP levels and insulin resistance indexes were evaluated on day 3 of the CC treatment cycle. The primary outcome measures were number of preovulatory follicles measuring≥17 mm and pregnancy rates. Results The mean ± SD age of the patients was 24.0 ± 3.8 years (range 18-36). The mean ± SD body mass index (BMI) of the patients was 25.7 ± 4.9 (range 17-43). Fifty patients developed dominant follicle (75%) and 5 patients established clinical pregnancy during the study (clinical pregnancy rate: 7%). The mean ± SD baseline hs-CRP, fasting insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) values of the patients with and without dominant follicle generation during treatment cycle were 6.42 ± 7.05 and 4.41 ± 2.95 (P=0.27), 11.61 ± 6.94 and 10.95 ± 5.65 (P=0.73), 2.68 ± 1.79 and 2.41 ± 1.30 (P=0.58), respectively. The mean ± SD baseline hs-CRP, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR values of the patients with and without clinical pregnancy establishment following treatment cycle were 6.30 ± 2.56 and 5.90 ± 6.57 (P=0.89), 11

  16. "Poor man's risk factor": correlation between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and socio-economic class in patients of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Rishi; Puri, Aniket; Makhija, Aman; Singhal, A; Ahuja, A; Mukerjee, S; Dwivedi, S K; Narain, V S; Saran, R K; Puri, V K

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed as one of the factors responsible for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) at present is the strongest marker of inflammation. We did a study to assess the correlation of hs-CRP with socio-economic status (SES) in patients of CAD presenting as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Baseline hs-CRP of 490 patients of ACS was estimated by turbidimetric immunoassay. Patients were stratified by levels of hs-CRP into low (<1 mg/L); intermediate (1-3 mg/L) or high (>3 mg/L) groups and in tertiles of 0-0.39 mg/L, 0.4-1.1 mg/L and >1.1 mg/L, respectively. Classification of patient into upper (21.4%), middle (45.37 percent) and lower (33.3%) SES was based on Kuppuswami Index which includes education, income and profession. Presence or absence of traditional risk factors for CAD diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking was recorded in each patient. Mean levels of hs-CRP in lower, middle and upper SES were 2.3 +/- 2.1 mg/L, 0.8 +/- 1.7 mg/L and 1.2 +/- 1.5 mg/L, respectively. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in low SES compared with both upper SES (p = 0.033) and middle SES (p = 0.001). Prevalence of more than one traditional CAD risk factors was seen in 13.5%, 37.5% and 67.67 percent; in patient of lower, middle and upper SES. It was observed that multiple risk factors had a linear correlation with increasing SES. Of the four traditional risk factors of CAD, smoking was the only factor which was significantly higher in lower SES (73%) as compared to middle (51.67 percent;) and upper (39.4%) SES. We found that 62.3%, 20.8% and 26.5% patients of low, middle and upper SES had hs-CRP values in the highest tertile. Median value of the Framingham risk score in low, middle and upper SES as 11, 14 and 18, respectively. We observed that at each category of Framingham risk, low SES had higher hs-CRP. We conclude from our study that patient of lower SES have significantly higher levels of

  17. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a serum predictor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease based on the Akaike Information Criterion scoring system in the general Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kogiso, Tomomi; Moriyoshi, Yuriko; Shimizu, Satoru; Nagahara, Hikaru; Shiratori, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been developed and used as a marker to predict coronary vascular diseases in metabolic syndrome (MS). We investigated whether serum hs-CRP concentration was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) scoring system, using patients from the human dry dock program. From 2004 to 2005, 1254 subjects visited our human dry dock annual checkup program. We excluded from this study individuals with markers of viral hepatitis and those whose alcohol consumption was more than 20 g/week. Finally, 230 subjects (93 men and 137 women) were investigated. Serum hs-CRP concentrations were measured using a highly sensitive latex agglutination assay system. The AIC scoring system with the CATDAP-20 program was introduced to evaluate the parameters that are present frequently in NAFLD. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasound sonography in 35.4% of the men and 18.9% of the women. High serum hs-CRP concentrations were observed in women with NAFLD (normal: NAFLD = 0.45:1.47 mg/l, P < 0.05). Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and body weight had the three lowest AIC score (P = 4.5e(-19) to 2.6e(-16)). hs-CRP was the third lowest variable among the serum markers associated with NAFLD (P = 2.3e(-6)) In addition, the hs-CRP concentration was correlated strongly with triglyceride values in females with NAFLD and with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and waist/hip ratio in males with NAFLD (P < 0.05). The serum hs-CRP concentration was a strong predictor for NAFLD with a low AIC score and correlated with serum markers that indicated lipid and glucose metabolism.

  18. No further gain can be achieved by calculating Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with high-sensitivity assay of C-reactive protein because of high intraindividual variability of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Inger M.J.; Emamifar, Amir; Andreasen, Rikke A.; Antonsen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) is commonly used to evaluate disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is a guide to treatment decision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lower reporting limit for C-reactive protein (CRP), with respect to intraindividual biological variability, on the calculation of DAS28 and subsequent patient classification. This study consists of 2 sections: a theoretical consideration discussing the performance of CRP in calculating DAS28 taking intraindividual biological variation and lower reporting limit for CRP into account and a cross-sectional study of RA patients applying our theoretical results. Therefore, we calculated DAS28 twice, with the actual CRP values and CRP = 9 mg/L, the latter to elucidate the positive effects of reducing the lower reporting limit of CRP from <10 to <3 mg/L. Lower-reporting limit of <10 mg/L leads to overestimate DAS28. However, reducing lower reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L results in optimizing DAS28 calculation. Further lowering of reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L does not increase the precision of DAS28 owing to the relatively large intraindividual biological variation. Five hundred twelve patients were included. There was a significant difference between recalculated and patients DAS28 (P < 0.001). One hundred nine patients had DAS28 deviation (compatible to remission to low: 66, low to moderate: 39. and moderate to high: 4). Owing to significant impact of intraindividual biologic variation on DAS28 and patient classification, special attention should be paid to calculate DAS28 when CRP values are within normal range. Furthermore, we conclude that results of different studies evaluating DAS28 and treatment response are not comparable if the reporting limits of CRP are unknown. PMID:28072726

  19. Association Between Smoking and Serum GlycA and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Kianoush, Sina; Bittencourt, Marcio; Lotufo, Paulo; Bensenor, Isabela; Jones, Steven R; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Toth, Peter; Otvos, James D; Tibuakuu, Martin; Hall, Michael E; Harada, Paulo H N; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-08-23

    Inflammation is suggested to be a central feature of atherosclerosis, particularly among smokers. We studied whether inflammatory biomarkers GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with cigarette smoking. A total of 11 509 participants, 6774 from the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) and 4735 from ELSA-Brasil (The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health) were included. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between multiple measures of smoking behavior and the inflammatory biomarkers, GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, using regression models adjusted for demographic, anthropometric, and clinical characteristics. Participants were 57.7±11.1 years old and 46.4% were men. Never, former, and current smokers comprised 51.7%, 34.0%, and 14.3% of the population, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted mean absolute difference in GlycA levels (μmol/L) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were higher for former (4.1, 95% CI, 1.7-6.6 μmol/L) and current smokers (19.9, 95% CI, 16.6-23.2 μmol/L), compared with never smokers. Each 5-unit increase in pack-years of smoking was associated with higher GlycA levels among former (0.7, 95% CI, 0.3-1.1 μmol/L) and current smokers (1.6, 95% CI, 0.8-2.4 μmol/L). Among former smokers, each 5-year increase in time since quitting smoking was associated with lower GlycA levels (-1.6, 95% CI, -2.4 to -0.8 μmol/L) and each 10-unit increase in number of cigarettes/day was associated with higher GlycA among current smokers (2.8, 95% CI, 0.5-5.2 μmol/L). There were similar significant associations between all measures of smoking behavior, and both log-transformed GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Acute and chronic exposure to tobacco smoking is associated with inflammation, as quantified by both GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. These biomarkers may have utility for the study and regulation of novel and traditional tobacco products. © 2017 The Authors

  20. Effect of pioglitazone therapy on high sensitive C-reactive protein and lipid profile in diabetic patients with renal transplantation; a randomize clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Arashnia, Rana; Roohi-Gilani, Kobra; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Nikjoo, Niloofar; Bahramifar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation has a major role in disease lead to renal failure and diabetes mellitus, controlling inflammation in diabetic kidney receivers could decrease morbidity and mortality. Objectives: This study designed for evaluating the efficacy of pioglitazone on C-reactive protein and lipid profile in diabetic kidney transplant receivers. Patients and Methods: In this double blinded clinical trial, 58 diabetic renal transplant receivers, in first month after transplantation, randomized into two groups; receiving insulin and pioglitazone (15 mg tablet daily, group A); and insulin and placebo (group B). Blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI) and laboratory data compared in before and after 4-month treatment in two groups by SPSS. Results: Fifty-eight patients with mean age of 44.15 ± 2 years included. There were no significant difference between groups in demographic data and other baseline measured variables (P > 0.05) .The mean weigh and BMI were slightly increased in group A and decreased in group B. The mean hs-CRP was decreased 4.82 mg/dL in group A and 1.93 mg/dL in group B (P = 0.007). The mean total serum cholesterol was significantly decreased 34 mg/dL in group A and 18.07 mg/dL in group B (P = 0.027). The mean serum HDL-C was significantly increased 13.31 mg/dL in group A and 5.89 mg/dl in group B (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Pioglitazone seems to be a safe drug for reducing serum lipids and CRP in kidney transplant receivers with diabetes mellitus in short term. Long term effect of this drug could be evaluated in future studies. PMID:25964889

  1. High levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid can predict disease severity in patients with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Turker, Yasin; Ekinozu, Ismail; Turker, Yasemin; Akkaya, Mehmet

    2014-11-01

    Both high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) and uric acid (UA) levels are known to be increased in heart failure patients and are associated with poorer functional capacity and adverse outcome. The role of these markers in patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) is less clear. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hs-CRP, UA and organic MR. We also assessed whether hs-CRP and UA levels are correlated with symptoms of MR, severity of MR, LV remodeling and outcome during follow-up. A total of 200 consecutive patients (87 men [43.5%]; mean age 61.6±12.5 years) with moderate or severe isolated and organic MR were included in the study. All the patients were assessed clinically and were managed and treated with standard medical therapy according to evidence-based practice guidelines. Patients were categorized according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class. We assessed and graded the severity of MR using a multiparametric approach. hs-CRP was measured with chemiluminescent immunometric assay using an IMMULITE® 1000 autoanalyzer (Siemens, Germany). Serum UA levels were analyzed using a Cobas® 6000 autoanalyzer (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany). Mean UA levels increased significantly with NYHA class: 4.46±1.58 mg/dl for patients in NYHA class I, 5.91±1.69 mg/dl for class II, 6.31±2.16 mg/dl for class III and 8.86±3.17 mg/dl for class IV (p<0.001). Mean UA levels also increased significantly with increased severity of MR (moderate 5.62±1.9 mg/dl, moderate to severe 5.56±1.2 mg/dl, severe 7.38±3.4 mg/dl, p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between UA level and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (r=0.40; p<0.001), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (r=0.297; p=0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r=0.195, p=0.036), whereas hs-CRP was not correlated with these parameters. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis LVEF, NYHA class and UA levels were the only independent predictors of death

  2. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Adolfo; Chen, Haiying; Lacy, Mary E.; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies on the association between hs-CRP and incident type 2 diabetes among African Americans have been inconclusive. We examined the association between hs-CRP and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort (Jackson Heart Study). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS hs-CRP was measured in 3,340 participants. Incident diabetes was defined by fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or A1C ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) at follow-up. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident diabetes, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes family history, alcohol, HDL, triglycerides, hypertension status, hypertension medications, physical activity, BMI, HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMAIR), and waist circumference. RESULTS Participants (63% women) were aged 53.3 ± 12.5 years. During a median follow-up of 7.5 years, 17.4% developed diabetes (23.1/1,000 person-years, 95% CI 21.3–25.1). After adjustment, the HR (hs-CRP third vs. first tertile) was 1.64 (95% CI 1.26–2.13). In separate models, further adjustment for BMI and waist circumference attenuated this association (HR 1.28 [95% CI 0.97–1.69] and 1.35 [95% CI 1.03–1.78, P < 0.05 for trend], respectively). Upon adding HOMAIR in the models, the association was no longer significant. In adjusted HOMAIR-stratified analysis, the hs-CRP–diabetes association appeared stronger in participants with HOMAIR <3.0 compared with HOMAIR ≥3.0 (P < 0.0001 for interaction). The association was also stronger among nonobese participants, although not significant when adjusted for HOMAIR. CONCLUSIONS Low-grade inflammation, as measured by hs-CRP level, may have an important role in the development of diabetes among African Americans with a lesser degree of insulin resistance. PMID:26068864

  3. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Effoe, Valery S; Correa, Adolfo; Chen, Haiying; Lacy, Mary E; Bertoni, Alain G

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies on the association between hs-CRP and incident type 2 diabetes among African Americans have been inconclusive. We examined the association between hs-CRP and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort (Jackson Heart Study). hs-CRP was measured in 3,340 participants. Incident diabetes was defined by fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or A1C ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) at follow-up. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident diabetes, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes family history, alcohol, HDL, triglycerides, hypertension status, hypertension medications, physical activity, BMI, HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMAIR), and waist circumference. Participants (63% women) were aged 53.3 ± 12.5 years. During a median follow-up of 7.5 years, 17.4% developed diabetes (23.1/1,000 person-years, 95% CI 21.3-25.1). After adjustment, the HR (hs-CRP third vs. first tertile) was 1.64 (95% CI 1.26-2.13). In separate models, further adjustment for BMI and waist circumference attenuated this association (HR 1.28 [95% CI 0.97-1.69] and 1.35 [95% CI 1.03-1.78, P < 0.05 for trend], respectively). Upon adding HOMAIR in the models, the association was no longer significant. In adjusted HOMAIR-stratified analysis, the hs-CRP-diabetes association appeared stronger in participants with HOMAIR <3.0 compared with HOMAIR ≥3.0 (P < 0.0001 for interaction). The association was also stronger among nonobese participants, although not significant when adjusted for HOMAIR. Low-grade inflammation, as measured by hs-CRP level, may have an important role in the development of diabetes among African Americans with a lesser degree of insulin resistance. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. The diagnostic utility of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for predicting rheumatoid arthritis in anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-negative patients with recent-onset undifferentiated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Kazuya; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Fujisawa, Shin-Ichi; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Komori, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies are well-established serological markers that show high sensitivity and specificity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are associated with bone erosions of RA. However, some patients subsequently progress to RA even if there is no presence of anti-CCP antibodies in an early stage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic utility of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and IgM rheumatoid factor for predicting RA in anti-CCP-negative patients with recent-onset undifferentiated arthritis (UA). Baseline levels of those markers were measured at the entry of the study. A total of 99 patients with UA were included, among them 44 patients (44.4 %) had been classified as having RA by a skilled rheumatologist at some point during 1-year follow-up. Of these 99 patients, 34 patients (34.3 %) had anti-CCP antibodies and 65 patients (65.7 %) had no anti-CCP antibodies. Eleven patients who were anti-CCP-negative developed RA. We compared sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of serum markers of these anti-CCP-negative RA patients. The combined usage of MMP-3 with hsCRP is relatively superior to other markers as predictors of RA.

  5. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and its relationship with components of polycystic ovary syndrome in Indian adolescent women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Hassan, Saqib; Nisar, Sobia; Shamas, Nasir; Rashid, Aafia; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Douhat, Syed; Mudassar, Syed; Jan, Vicar M; Rashid, Fouzia

    2014-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a risk marker for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), limited data are available on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and its relationship with components of PCOS especially in Indian women. The objective was to determine serum hs-CRP concentration in adolescent women with and without PCOS and to assess possible correlations of serum hs-CRP levels with components of PCOS in Indian women. One hundred and sixty women with PCOS and sixty non-PCOS women having normal menstrual cycles were included. Clinical assessment included anthropometry, Ferriman-Gallwey (FG) score and blood pressure (BP) measurement. Laboratory evaluation included estimation of T4, TSH, LH, FSH, total testosterone, prolactin, cortisol, 17OHP, hs-CRP, lipid profile, and insulin, and glucose after 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) and glucose intolerance was calculated. FG score, LH, FSH, total Testosterone, HOMA-IR and QUICKI were significantly different among women with or without PCOS (p < 0.01). Although hs-CRP levels showed a higher trend in women having PCOS, there was no significant difference between the groups (p > 0.05). A significant and positive correlation was found between hs-CRP and body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.308, p < 0.01) among PCOS group. The results in Indian adolescent women suggest that hs-CRP levels may not per se be associated with PCOS, rather can be related to fat mass in this subset of subjects.

  6. Longitudinal association of C-reactive protein and Haemoglobin A1c over 13 years: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer--Norfolk study.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Kaptoge, Stephen; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2015-05-22

    Type-2 diabetes is associated with systemic inflammation and higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. However, the longitudinal association of CRP and haemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c) has not been described in large prospective studies. Understanding such associations may shed light on the role of inflammation in development of type-2 diabetes and its complications such as cardiovascular diseases. EPIC-Norfolk is a cohort study of men and women aged 40-79 years at time of recruitment (1993-1997). Serum CRP (mg/l) was measured using a high-sensitivity assay at baseline and 13-years follow-up. HbA1c (%) was measured at baseline, 4, and 13 years. Participants were excluded if they were diagnosed with diabetes or were taking diabetes medication. Data on at least one measurement of CRP and HbA1c was available for 14228 participants (55 % of the cohort). In the cross-sectional analysis of baseline data, a 1-SD higher loge-CRP (about three-fold higher CRP) was associated with 0.06 (95 % CI 0.04, 0.08) higher HbA1c (%) adjusted for potential confounders. In longitudinal analysis using multivariable linear mixed models, change in CRP over 13 years was to a similar extent positively associated with increase in HbA1c, such that 1-SD higher longitudinal change in loge-CRP was associated with 0.04 (95 % CI 0.02, 0.05) increase in HbA1c. In this study we found longitudinal observational evidence suggesting that increase in systemic inflammation is associated with an increase in HbA1c and thus systemic inflammation may have a role in development of type-2 diabetes and its complications.

  7. Baseline characteristics of participants in the JUPITER trial, a randomized placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among individuals with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Khurmi, Nardev S; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-12-01

    The Justification for the Use of statins in Primary prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among persons with average to low levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol who are at increased cardiovascular risk due to elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A total of 17,802 persons with LDL cholesterol<130 mg/dl (3.36 mmol/L) and hs-CRP>or=2 mg/L were recruited from 26 countries and randomly allocated to 20 mg/day rosuvastatin or placebo. In contrast to previous studies of statin therapy in primary prevention, JUPITER is evaluating a group with modest plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol (median 108 mg/dl, interquartile range 94 to 119). Further, the trial includes 6,801 women (38.2%) and 5,577 participants with metabolic syndrome (32.1%). Thus, in addition to broadening our understanding of statin therapy and inflammation, the JUPITER trial will provide important and clinically relevant information on primary prevention among patients who do not currently qualify for lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, as 20 mg of rosuvastatin can reduce LDL cholesterol by up to 50%, JUPITER will also provide crucial safety data for several thousand patients who should achieve LDL cholesterol levels<50 mg/dl on a long-term basis.

  8. Correlation of human S100A12 (EN-RAGE) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as gingival crevicular fluid and serum markers of inflammation in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Martande, Santosh S; Singh, Sonender Pal; Suke, Deepak Kumar; Raju, Arjun P; Naik, Savitha B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels and correlation of human S100A12 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in chronic periodontitis (CP) subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 44 subjects were divided into three groups: group 1 had 10 periodontally healthy subjects, group 2 consisted of 17 CP subjects and group 3 had 17 type 2 DM subjects with CP. GCF and serum levels of human S100A12 and hs-CRP were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoturbidimetric analysis, respectively. The clinical outcomes evaluated were gingival index, probing depth and clinical attachment level and the correlations of the two inflammatory mediators with clinical parameters were evaluated. Both human S100A12 and hs-CRP levels increased from group 1 to group 2 to group 3. The GCF and serum values of both these inflammatory mediators correlated positively with each other and with the periodontal parameters evaluated (p < 0.05). Human S100A12 and hs-CRP can be considered as possible GCF and serum markers of inflammatory activity in CP and DM.

  9. Effect of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, interleukin-6, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Soliemani, Alireza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Tabatabaizade, Mashallah; Mianehsaz, Elaheh; Tamadon, Mohamadreza

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. This study was conducted to determine the effect of statins on the serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCPR). MATERIALS AND METHODS. This randomized clinical trial was carried out on 95 hemodialysis patients divided into three groups of atorvastatin, 10 mg; simvastatin, 20 mg; and lovastatin, 40 mg, daily, administered for 2 months. Levels of serum HSCRP, IL-6, and LDLC were all measured before and after the study period. RESULTS. At baseline, 59% of the hemodialysis patients presented with elevated HSCRP, 46.3% them had increased IL-6, and 26.3% had an increased LDLC level. The three drugs were capable to lower the level of HSCRP, among which atorvastatin had the highest effect size (41.8% reduction, P = .001). Lovastatin stood in the next (37.6% reduction, P = .02), while HSCRP reduction was not significant in the simvastatin group (25% reduction, P = .14). Neither of the drugs significantly reduced IL-6 levels. Effects of atorvastatin and simvastatin on the LDLC levels were significant, while lovastatin had a marginal effect. CONCLUSIONS. Use of statins resulted in CRP reduction in patients on hemodialysis. Atorvastatin was much more effective than lovastatin, while CRP reduction was not significant by simvastatin. However, simvastatin had the greatest impact on LDLC. None of these drugs could reduce IL-6 levels within 2 months.

  10. High-Sensitive C-Reactive Protein Levels in a Group of Syrian University Male Students and Its Associations with Smoking, Physical Activity, Anthropometric Measurements, and Some Hematologic Inflammation Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In Syria, health risk data on young males are limited. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors along with C-reactive protein levels measured by high-sensitive method (hsCRP) in a group of healthy males of university students (n = 101, 18–25 years old). Participants' anthropometric characteristics; alcohol drinking, smoking, and physical activity habits; parents medical history; and some inflammatory biomarkers were inspected for their associations with hsCRP. Results. Regarding hsCRP level, 19 participants were at average (1–3 mg/L) and 13 were at high (>3 mg/L) risk of CVD. Nonparametric statistical tests (p value < 0.05) revealed that hsCRP level was higher in participants who had high body mass index (BMI), had high BMI with high waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or did not practice sport frequently. Unexpectedly, it did not vary between smokers and nonsmokers. In general, it correlated positively with anthropometric and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) measurements. Nevertheless, it negatively correlated with sports practicing in overall and nonsmoker groups and in participants whose parents were without medical history. Finally, when participants with high BMI were smokers, did not practice sport frequently, or had a parent with medical history, their hsCRP levels were higher than others who had the same circumstances but with low BMI. PMID:28487812

  11. Soluble endothelial protein C receptor and high sensitivity C reactive protein levels as markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: their role in the prediction of vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Amal; Al-Bukhari, T A M A; Al-Pakistani, H A; Shalaby, Maged; Halawani, Saeed H; Bajuaifer, Nada; Teama, Shirin H

    2014-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important factor in the pathogenesis of micro and macrovascular complications. We aimed to measure soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR) and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) levels as markers of endothelial damage in both types of diabetes mellitus and to determine if they can be used as predictors of vascular complications. Fifty patients with DM, 20 with type 1 and 30 with type 2 as well as 30 healthy subjects were included. All were subjected to measurement of sEPCR and hsCRP by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. sEPCR and hsCRP were significantly increased when compared to the control group in both types of DM. sEPCR was a significant predictor of macrovascular complications and thrombosis in type 1 p=0.02, and p=0.015, respectively. hsCRP was a significant predictor of macrovascular complications in type 2 p=0.04. Patients with type 1 and type 2 DM exhibit higher sEPCR and hsCRP levels compared to healthy controls which suggesting endothelial damage. sEPCR could be used as a predictor of macrovascular complications and thrombosis in type 1 DM, whereas, hsCRP might be used as a predictor of macrovascular complications in type 2 DM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein as Determinants of Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Coronary Heart Disease: In Search of the Best Predictor.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Mónica; Varleta, Paola; Kramer, Verónica; Valentino, Giovanna; Quiroga, Teresa; Prieto, Carolina; Parada, Jacqueline; Adasme, Marcela; Briones, Luisa; Navarrete, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular (CV) disease. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) also predicts CV disease. There are no reports comparing these markers as predictors of MS. Methods. Cross-sectional study comparing Lp-PLA2 and hsCRP as predictors of MS in asymptomatic subjects was carried out; 152 subjects without known atherosclerosis participated. Data were collected on demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and hsCRP and Lp-PLA2 activity levels. A logistic regression analysis was performed with each biomarker and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for MS. Results. Mean age was 46 ± 11 years, and 38% of the subjects had MS. Mean Lp-PLA2 activity was 185 ± 48 nmol/mL/min, and mean hsCRP was 2.1 ± 2.2 mg/L. Subjects with MS had significantly higher levels of Lp-PLA2 (P = 0.03) and hsCRP (P < 0.0001) than those without MS. ROC curves showed that both markers predicted MS. Conclusion. Lp-PLA2 and hsCRP are elevated in subjects with MS. Both biomarkers were independent and significant predictors for MS, emphasizing the role of inflammation in MS. Further research is necessary to determine if inflammation predicts a higher risk for CV events in MS subjects.

  13. Comparison of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein as Determinants of Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Coronary Heart Disease: In Search of the Best Predictor

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Mónica; Kramer, Verónica; Adasme, Marcela; Briones, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular (CV) disease. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) also predicts CV disease. There are no reports comparing these markers as predictors of MS. Methods. Cross-sectional study comparing Lp-PLA2 and hsCRP as predictors of MS in asymptomatic subjects was carried out; 152 subjects without known atherosclerosis participated. Data were collected on demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and hsCRP and Lp-PLA2 activity levels. A logistic regression analysis was performed with each biomarker and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for MS. Results. Mean age was 46 ± 11 years, and 38% of the subjects had MS. Mean Lp-PLA2 activity was 185 ± 48 nmol/mL/min, and mean hsCRP was 2.1 ± 2.2 mg/L. Subjects with MS had significantly higher levels of Lp-PLA2 (P = 0.03) and hsCRP (P < 0.0001) than those without MS. ROC curves showed that both markers predicted MS. Conclusion. Lp-PLA2 and hsCRP are elevated in subjects with MS. Both biomarkers were independent and significant predictors for MS, emphasizing the role of inflammation in MS. Further research is necessary to determine if inflammation predicts a higher risk for CV events in MS subjects. PMID:26089902

  14. Association of stem cell factor and high-sensitivity C reactive protein concentrations in crevicular fluid and serum in patients with chronic periodontitis with and without type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Nitish; Pradeep, Avani R; Priyanka, Ningappa; Kumari, Minal

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify whether there is any correlation between the levels of high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) and stem cell factor (SCF) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 40 subjects were divided into 3 groups: 10 periodontally healthy subjects (Group 1), 15 CP patients (Group 2), and 15 type 2 DM patients with CP (Group 3). Levels of hs-CRP and SCF in GCF and serum were quantified using different techniques. The clinical outcomes evaluated were gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL), and the correlations of the two inflammatory mediators with clinical parameters were evaluated. The levels of these inflammatory mediators increased continuously from group 1 to group 2, and to group 3. The serum levels of both hs-CRP and SCF were correlated with PD in patients with CP (P < 0.05). SCF levels were correlated with PD in Group 3 (P < 0.05). The fact that the levels of hs-CRP and SCF were highest in DM patients with CP suggests that the presence of a systemic condition has a profound effect on the levels of inflammatory mediators, both locally at sites of periodontal disease, and elsewhere.

  15. Relation of adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein to pulse-wave velocity and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in the general population.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chou, Pesus; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2009-05-15

    The roles of metabolic syndrome and chronic subclinical inflammation in arterial stiffening and the development of heart failure remain to be elucidated. Whether adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were independently related to brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (ba-PWV) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in the general population were investigated. Eligible study subjects were 445 Chinese residents aged > or =40 years who participated in a community-based survey, underwent examination of ba-PWV, and had complete data of serum adiponectin, hs-CRP (<10 mg/L), and NT-pro-BNP. Adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, was independently related to ba-PWV (standardized regression parameter -0.107, p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, and number of metabolic syndrome components were accounted for. On the other hand, ba-PWV, adiponectin, and hs-CRP were independently related to NT-pro-BNP (standardized regression parameters 0.116, 0.188, and 0.094, respectively; all p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, number of metabolic syndrome components, and renal function were accounted for. In conclusion, adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, is independently associated with both ba-PWV and NT-pro-BNP in the general population. Because adiponectin, hs-CRP, ba-PWV, and NT-pro-BNP may represent markers for metabolic syndrome, chronic subclinical inflammation, arterial stiffness, and ventricular dysfunction, respectively, our results suggest that adiponectin may directly modulate both arterial stiffening and ventricular dysfunction. In contrast, hs-CRP may independently contribute to ventricular dysfunction, but not arterial stiffening.

  16. Epicardial adipose tissue relating to anthropometrics, metabolic derangements and fatty liver disease independently contributes to serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein beyond body fat composition: a study validated with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yau-Huei; Yun, Chun-Ho; Yang, Fei-Shih; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Wu, Yih-Jer; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Tin-Yu; Bezerra, Hiram G; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2012-02-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) measured by echocardiography has been proposed to be associated with metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risks. However, its independent association with fatty liver disease and systemic inflammation beyond clinical variables and body fat remains less well known. The relationships between EAT and various factors of metabolic derangement were retrospectively examined in consecutive 359 asymptomatic subjects (mean age, 51.6 years; 31% women) who participated in a cardiovascular health survey. Echocardiography-derived regional EAT thickness from parasternal long-axis and short-axis views was quantified. A subset of data from 178 randomly chosen participants were validated using 16-slice multidetector computed tomography. Body fat composition was evaluated using bioelectrical impedance from foot-to-foot measurements. Increased EAT was associated with increased waist circumference, body weight, and body mass index (all P values for trend = .005). Graded increases in serum fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and alanine transaminase levels were observed across higher EAT tertiles as well as a graded decrease of high-density lipoprotein (all P values for trend <.05). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for identifying metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease were 0.8 and 0.77, with odds ratio estimated at 3.65 and 2.63, respectively. In a multivariate model, EAT remained independently associated with higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fatty liver disease. These data suggested that echocardiography-based epicardial fat measurement can be clinically feasible and was related to several metabolic abnormalities and independently associated fatty liver disease. In addition, EAT amount may contribute to systemic inflammation beyond traditional cardiovascular risks and body fat composition. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Lipidaemia and High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Levels in Non-obese Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Zhao, Qing; Luo, Qin; Tang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of obesity and medication on the relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and lipidaemia and systemic inflammation is not fully understood for various reasons. The aim of the present study is to determine the effects of 12 months of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on lipid profiles and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in non-obese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and OSA. We consecutively recruited 78 non-obese subjects with newly diagnosed CAD and moderate-to-severe OSA who were taking lipid-lowering medication. Patients were randomised to CPAP treatment or the control group. The patients' lipids and the hs-CRP level were measured at baseline and at follow-up. Seventy patients completed the study. The CPAP and control groups had similar characteristics at baseline. The mean duration of CPAP treatment was 4.2±1.1h/night. There was no significant difference in the lipids or hs-CRP levels at 12 months (both, P>0.05). The apnoea-hypopnoea index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were significantly lower in the CPAP treatment group than in the control group (both, P<0.05). Continuous positive airway pressure treatment in non-obese patients with CAD and OSA who are taking standardised lipid-lowering treatment does not significantly decrease the lipid or hs-CRP levels. In addition, there are no relationships found between the severity of OSA and the lipid profiles. However, the status of OSA and daytime sleepiness improved significantly in the CPAP group. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02127177. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D Predicts All-Cause and Cardiac Mortality in Females with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Comparison with Brain Natriuretic Peptide and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A.; León de la Fuente, Ricardo A.; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjoern; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may not only reflect disease but may also serve as a prognostic indicator. Our aim was to assess the gender-specific utility of vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] to predict all-cause and cardiac death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to compare its prognostic utility to brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Blood samples were harvested on admission in 982 patients. Forty percent were women (65.9 ± 12.6 years). Mortality was evaluated in quartiles of 25(OH)D, BNP, and hsCRP, respectively, during a 5-year follow-up, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and seventy-three patients died; 78 were women. In 92 patients (37 women), death was defined as cardiac. In women, the univariate hazard ratio (HR) for total death of 25(OH)D in Quartile (Q) 2 versus Q1, Q3 versus Q1, and Q4 versus Q1 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.33–0.93), 0.29 (95% CI 0.15–0.55), and 0.13 (95% CI 0.06–0.32), respectively. In females, it was an independent predictor of total and cardiac death, whereas BNP and hsCRP were less gender-specific. No gender differences in 25(OH)D were noted in a reference material. Accordingly, vitamin D independently predicts mortality in females with suspected ACS. PMID:24349821

  19. Serum Albumin and High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein are Independent Risk Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease in Middle-Aged Japanese Individuals: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Sachimi; Kitamura, Akihiko; Imano, Hironori; Cui, Renzhe; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Muraki, Isao; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is important to explore predictive markers other than conventional cardiovascular risk factors for early detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD), a major risk factor for end-stage renal failure. We hypothesized that serum albumin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be independent markers, and examined their associations with the risk of CKD. Methods: We examined the associations of serum albumin and hs-CRP levels with the risk of incident CKD, in 2535 Japanese adults aged 40–69 years without CKD at baseline during a median 9.0-year follow-up after adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors. Results: During the follow-up period, 367 cases of CKD developed. In multivariable analyses adjusted for known risk factors, the CKD hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest versus lowest quartiles of serum albumin levels were 0.69 (0.40–1.17) for men and 0.42 (0.28–0.64) for women. Corresponding values for hs-CRP were 0.95 (0.54–1.67) for men and 1.85 (1.25 -2.75) for women. The association of combined serum albumin and hs-CRP with the risk of CKD was examined for women. The hazard ratio was 1.72 (1.17–2.54) for low versus higher albumin levels at lower hs-CRP levels, but such an association was not observed at high hs-CRP level. The hazard ratio was 1.96 (1.44–2.66) for high versus lower hs-CRP levels at higher serum albumin levels, but such association was not observed at low serum albumin level. Conclusion: Both low serum albumin and high hs-CRP levels were predictive of CKD for women. PMID:26911856

  20. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Along With Myo-Inositol on High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Insulin Resistance in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Deepti; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish Chander; Singhal, Savita Rani; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy and medical treatment on the level of a serologic marker of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Women with PCOS and CP (n = 60) were randomly divided into two groups. The test group was treated with scaling and root planing (SRP) and myo-inositol (MI). The control group was treated with MI and given oral hygiene instructions. Anthropometric, metabolic, and periodontal parameters were assessed at baseline and re-evaluated at 3 and 6 months. All parameters of both groups at 6 months were compared with 25 systemically and periodontally healthy females (group A). Periodontal parameters were significantly improved in the test group compared with the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P <0.001). A statistically significant reduction was observed in hsCRP and HOMA in both groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P <0.05). However, significantly more improvement in hsCRP (P <0.05) and a statistically comparable reduction in HOMA (P >0.05) was observed in the test group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 months. Both the test and control group showed significant consistent improvement in metabolic parameters at 3- and 6-month follow-up, which was further comparable to group A. SRP together with medical treatment results in a greater reduction of systemic inflammatory burden compared with medical treatment alone in management of women with PCOS and CP.

  1. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentrations and Association of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Concentrations With Incident Coronary Heart Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gen-Min; Liu, Kiang; Colangelo, Laura A; Lakoski, Susan G; Tracy, Russell P; Greenland, Philip

    2016-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in numerous but not all observational studies, and whether low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) alter this association is unknown. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012), we prospectively assessed the association of hs-CRP concentrations with incident CHD in participants who did not receive lipid-lowering therapy, as well as in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (n = 3,106) and those with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or greater (n = 1,716) at baseline (2000-2002). Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to assess the associations after adjustment for socioeconomic status, traditional risk factors, body mass index, diabetes, aspirin use, kidney function, and coronary artery calcium score. Loge hs-CRP was associated with incident CHD in participants with LDL-C concentrations of 130 mg/dL or higher (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.60) but not in those with LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.05; P for interaction = 0.003). As a whole, loge hs-CRP was not associated with incident CHD in participants who had not received lipid-lowering therapy at baseline (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.20) and who had mean LDL-C concentrations less than 130 mg/dL. These findings suggest that LDL-C concentrations might be a moderator of the contribution of hs-CRP to CHD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of blackberry (Morus nigra L.) consumption on serum concentration of lipoproteins, apo A-I, apo B, and high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein and blood pressure in dyslipidemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaee, Sahar Keshtkar; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Tahavorgar, Atefeh; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Katebi, Davod; Mohammadi, Vida

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated blackberry (Persian mulberry) effects on apo A-I, apo B, high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in dyslipidemic patients. Materials and Methods: In this 8-week randomized clinical trial, 72 dyslipidemic patients were randomly divided into two groups: Intervention (300 mL/day blackberry juice with pulp) and control group (usual diets). Before and after the intervention, fasting blood samples were taken from both groups and serum concentration of lipoprotein, apo A-I and apo B, serum lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], and triglyceride), hs-CRP were measured. Blood pressure before and after the study was measured with a mercury manometer. Results: At week 8 in the intervention group, apo A-I and HDL increased significantly (P = 0.015, P = 0.001, respectively), apo B and hs-CRP decreased significantly (P = 0.044, P = 0.04, respectively). Mean changes in apo A-I and HDL and apo B/apo A-I ratio were significant between the groups (P = 0.005, P = 0.014, and P = 0.009, respectively). After 8 weeks, there was a significant difference between hs-CRP mean values (P = 0.01) of the groups. At week 8, SBP decreased significantly (P = 0.005) in the intervention group with no significant differences for SBP mean values between the groups. No significant changes were observed in other lipid parameters and DBP in the intervention group and between the groups. Conclusion: Blackberry consumption may exert beneficial effects on apolipoproteins, blood pressure, and inflammatory markers in individuals with lipid disorders. PMID:26622259

  3. Associations of Self-Reported Sleep Quality with Circulating Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10, Interleukin 6, and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wan-Yu; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is very common in menopausal women and poor sleep quality has been linked to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of poor sleep quality on health outcomes of menopausal women remains unclear. This study evaluated the relationships between sleep quality and inflammation in menopausal women. This cross-sectional study enrolled 281 healthy women aged 45 to 60 years. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure quality of sleep. Multiplex assays were used to measure the levels of 9 cytokines in morning fasting plasma samples. Other variables measured in this study included clinical characteristics and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). The study was performed at a medical center. The 281 participants comprised 79 (28%) perimenopausal women and 202 (72%) postmenopausal women. Global PSQI scores were positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP levels (P = 0.012) and were marginally associated with interferon gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP10), interleukin 6 (IL6), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1β) levels. After adjusting for age, body mass index, menopause duration, and follicle stimulating hormone, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that high PSQI scores and sleep efficiency < 65% were associated with elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP, IP10, and IL6. In addition, sleep duration < 5 hours was associated with high hs-CRP levels. Our data show that poor sleep quality and low sleep efficiency are associated with elevated levels of circulating inflammatory factors IP10, IL6 and hs-CRP and that short sleep duration is associated with high levels of hs-CRP in menopausal women. These findings provide novel evidence that poor sleep quality is linked to low-grade systemic inflammation in menopausal women.

  4. Associations of Self-Reported Sleep Quality with Circulating Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10, Interleukin 6, and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sleep disturbance is very common in menopausal women and poor sleep quality has been linked to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of poor sleep quality on health outcomes of menopausal women remains unclear. This study evaluated the relationships between sleep quality and inflammation in menopausal women. Participants and design This cross-sectional study enrolled 281 healthy women aged 45 to 60 years. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure quality of sleep. Multiplex assays were used to measure the levels of 9 cytokines in morning fasting plasma samples. Other variables measured in this study included clinical characteristics and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Setting The study was performed at a medical center. Results The 281 participants comprised 79 (28%) perimenopausal women and 202 (72%) postmenopausal women. Global PSQI scores were positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP levels (P = 0.012) and were marginally associated with interferon gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP10), interleukin 6 (IL6), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1β) levels. After adjusting for age, body mass index, menopause duration, and follicle stimulating hormone, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that high PSQI scores and sleep efficiency < 65% were associated with elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP, IP10, and IL6. In addition, sleep duration < 5 hours was associated with high hs-CRP levels. Conclusion Our data show that poor sleep quality and low sleep efficiency are associated with elevated levels of circulating inflammatory factors IP10, IL6 and hs-CRP and that short sleep duration is associated with high levels of hs-CRP in menopausal women. These findings provide novel evidence that poor sleep quality is linked to low-grade systemic inflammation in menopausal women. PMID:28060925

  5. Comparison of insulin resistance and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels according to the fasting blood glucose subgroups divided by the newly recommended criteria for fasting hyperglycemia in 10059 healthy Koreans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Young-Choon; Lee, Won-Young; Jung, Chan-Hee; Sung, Ki-Chul; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Oh, Ki-Won; Kim, Sun-Woo

    2006-02-01

    The increment for the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance warrants lowering the cutoffs of normoglycemia to help predict the future development of diabetes. The aim of this study was to find out whether insulin resistance and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a nontraditional cardiovascular risk factor, were related to the fasting glucose level, even in normoglycemic range that was categorized by the newly recommended criteria by the American Diabetes Association. Among the participants undergoing medical checkup program at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 10059 subjects (5535 men and 4524 women; mean age, 45 years) with normal fasting glucose levels, as defined by the newly recommended criteria (<5.6 mmol/L), were enrolled in this study. The blood pressures, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, lipid batteries, and hsCRP levels were checked. The homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check indexes (QUICKI) were calculated. All subjects were subdivided into 4 groups according to the fasting glucose level. The HOMA-IR, QUICKI, and log-transformed (log) hsCRP, or log(hsCRP), level significantly increased according to the increment in fasting glucose, and these associations were consistent after adjustment for age and BMI, except for the log(hsCRP) (P = .124 after adjustment). Log(hsCRP) increased as the HOMA-IR increased and as the QUICKI decreased, and when multiple regression analysis was done with log(hsCRP) as the dependent variable, age, high BMI, male sex, high HOMA-IR, hypertriglyceridemia, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were the significant predictor for log(hsCRP). In conclusion, the insulin resistance indexes and hsCRP increased gradually even in the normal fasting glucose range, as categorized by the newly recommended criteria for abnormal fasting glucose levels, supporting the rationale for expanding the range of fasting

  6. Effect of simvastatin on the antihypertensive activity of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients: role of nitric oxide, oxidative stress, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Zaher, Ahmed O; Elkoussi, Alaa Eldin A; Abudahab, Lotfy H; Elbakry, Mohammed H; Elsayed, Elsayed Abu-Elwafa

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated whether simvastatin has antihypertensive activity and can enhance the antihypertensive effect of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were induced in rats by L-NAME and cholesterol-enriched diet, respectively. In these animals, repeated administration of simvastatin decreased the systolic blood pressure, enhanced its progressive reductions induced by repeated administration of losartan, and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Concomitantly, repeated administration of simvastatin, losartan, or simvastatin in combination with losartan to these animals increased nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased the elevated serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. Effects of combined treatment were greater than those of simvastatin or losartan alone. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients, repeated administration of losartan decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased NO production, and decreased the elevated serum MDA and hs-CRP levels. Addition of simvastatin to losartan therapy enhanced these effects and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Simvastatin inhibited the contractile responses of isolated aortic rings induced by angiotensin II and enhanced the inhibitory effect of losartan on this preparation. l-arginine and acetylcholine enhanced, while L-NAME inhibited the effects of simvastatin, losartan, and their combination on these contractile responses. Thus, simvastatin exerts antihypertensive effect in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and enhances the antihypertensive effect of losartan in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Besides, its cholesterol-lowering effect, the ability of simvastatin to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction through increasing NO bioavailability and through suppression of oxidative stress and vascular inflammation may play an important role in these

  7. Energy balance and macronutrient distribution in relation to C-reactive protein and HbA1c levels among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bawadi, Hiba; Katkhouda, Rami; Al-Haifi, Ahmad; Tayyem, Reema; Elkhoury, Cosette Fakih; Jamal, Zeina

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently growing evidence indicates that obesity and diabetes are states of inflammation associated with elevated circulation of inflammatory mediators. Excess adiposity and oxidative stress, induced by feeding, may also lead to a state of low-grade inflammation. Objective This study aimed at investigating energy balance and distribution in relation to low-grade inflammation among patients with type 2 diabetes. Design A cross-sectional study included 198 male and female patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients’ weight, height, waist circumference, total body fat and truncal fat percent, energy, and macronutrient intake were measured. Venous blood specimens were collected, and levels of HbA1c and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were determined. Results After adjusting for covariates (body mass index, total body fat, and truncal fat), energy balance was positively correlated with hs-CRP and HbA1c. A positive energy balance was also associated with increased waist circumference and truncal fat percent (p<0.05). Total energy intake, percent energy from fat (p=0.04), and percent energy from proteins (p=0.03), but not percent energy from carbohydrates (p=0.12), were also correlated with higher hs-CRP levels among poorly glycemic-controlled patients. Conclusion Positive energy balance is associated with elevations in hs-CRP. Increased energy intake and increased percentages of energy from fat and protein are associated with elevated hs-CRP among patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27238554

  8. The Evaluation of the Impact of Age, Skin Tags, Metabolic Syndrome, Body Mass Index, and Smoking on Homocysteine, Endothelin-1, High-sensitive C-reactive Protein, and on the Heart.

    PubMed

    El Safoury, Omar Soliman; Ezzat, Marwa; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Shoukry, Nadia; Badawy, Ehssan

    2013-07-01

    Skin tags (STs) are small, pedunculated skin-colored or brown papules that occur around any site where skin folds occur. The literature is short of comprehensive and controlled clinical studies aimed to evaluate the atherogenic risk factors in patients with STs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of age, STs, metabolic syndrome (METs), body mass index (BMI), and smoking on homocysteine (Hcy), endothelin-1 (ET-1), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and on cardiovascular diseases. This study included 30 cardiac patients with STs, 30 non-cardiac patients with STs, and 30 healthy controls with neither heart disease nor STs. History of smoking, measurement of height, weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, STs number, color, acanthosis nigricans, estimation of serum level of fasting glucose, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, high-dense lipoproteins (HDL), Hcy, ET-1, Hs-CRP, and the presence of the METs were elicited in the three groups. Regarding the Hcy, ET-1, and Hs-CRP, the cardiac-STs group showed the highest levels and the control group showed the least (P < 0.001). The percents of patients with METs were 56.7% in the cardiac-STs, 40% in the non-cardiac-STs, and 0% in the control group (P < 0.001). Mean BMI exceeded the limit of obesity in the cardiac-STs group (30.9 ± 3.9) and the non-cardiac-STs group (32.6 ± 6) and was normal in the control group (24.7 ± 2.8). Hyperpigmented STs were present in 66.7% of the cardiac-STs group. Multivariate regression analysis for the independent effectors on Hcy level were the presence of STs (P < 0.001), METs (P = 0.001), and BMI (P = 0.024). Regarding ET-1, the effectors were the presence of STs and METs (P = 0.032). For Hs-CRP, effectors were the presence of STs (P < 0.001) and smoking (P = 0.040). Multivariate logistic regression of the predictors of cardiac disease showed that the independent predictors of the occurrence of cardiac disease were BMI (P < 0.001), STs (P = 0.002), and

  9. The Evaluation of the Impact of Age, Skin Tags, Metabolic Syndrome, Body Mass Index, and Smoking on Homocysteine, Endothelin-1, High-sensitive C-reactive Protein, and on the Heart

    PubMed Central

    El Safoury, Omar Soliman; Ezzat, Marwa; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Shoukry, Nadia; Badawy, Ehssan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Skin tags (STs) are small, pedunculated skin-colored or brown papules that occur around any site where skin folds occur. The literature is short of comprehensive and controlled clinical studies aimed to evaluate the atherogenic risk factors in patients with STs. Aim of Work: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of age, STs, metabolic syndrome (METs), body mass index (BMI), and smoking on homocysteine (Hcy), endothelin-1 (ET-1), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and on cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: This study included 30 cardiac patients with STs, 30 non-cardiac patients with STs, and 30 healthy controls with neither heart disease nor STs. History of smoking, measurement of height, weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, STs number, color, acanthosis nigricans, estimation of serum level of fasting glucose, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, high-dense lipoproteins (HDL), Hcy, ET-1, Hs-CRP, and the presence of the METs were elicited in the three groups. Results: Regarding the Hcy, ET-1, and Hs-CRP, the cardiac-STs group showed the highest levels and the control group showed the least (P < 0.001). The percents of patients with METs were 56.7% in the cardiac-STs, 40% in the non-cardiac-STs, and 0% in the control group (P < 0.001). Mean BMI exceeded the limit of obesity in the cardiac-STs group (30.9 ± 3.9) and the non-cardiac-STs group (32.6 ± 6) and was normal in the control group (24.7 ± 2.8). Hyperpigmented STs were present in 66.7% of the cardiac-STs group. Multivariate regression analysis for the independent effectors on Hcy level were the presence of STs (P < 0.001), METs (P = 0.001), and BMI (P = 0.024). Regarding ET-1, the effectors were the presence of STs and METs (P = 0.032). For Hs-CRP, effectors were the presence of STs (P < 0.001) and smoking (P = 0.040). Multivariate logistic regression of the predictors of cardiac disease showed that the independent predictors of the occurrence of

  10. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein and High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein in Non-Diabetic, Pre-Diabetic and Diabetic Patients in the Acute Phase of the First Myocardial Infarction Treated by Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Trifunović, Danijela; Stanković, Sanja; Marinković, Jelena; Banović, Marko; Đukanović, Nina; Vasović, Olga; Vujisić-Tešić, Bosiljka; Petrović, Milan; Stepanović, Jelena; Đorđević-Dikić, Ana; Beleslin, Branko; Nedeljković, Ivana; Tešić, Milorad; Ostojić, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are elevated in diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Little is known about their dynamics in the acute phase of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), especially in relation to the presence of DM and pre-diabetes (pre-DM). This study aimed to analyze time-dependent changes in ox-LDL and hs-CRP regarding the presence of pre-DM and DM in STEMI patients treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Methods In 103 consecutive patients with the first anterior STEMI ox-LDL and hs-CRP were measured before pPCI, on day 2 and day 7 after pPCI. Results Patients were classified into: non-diabetics, pre-diabetics and diabetics. In each group the maximal ox-LDL concentration was found on admission, decreased on day 2 and reached the lowest values on day 7 (p<0.001). Diabetics had the highest ox-LDL concentrations compared to pre-diabetics and non-diabetics (on admission: p=0.028, on day 2: p=0.056, on day 7: p=0.004). hs-CRP concentration rose from admission, reached its peak on day 2 and decreased on day 7, in each group (p<0.001). Significant differences in hs-CRP concentrations were found between non-diabetics and pre-diabetics on admission (p=0.018) and day 2 (p=0.026). In a multivariate analysis DM was an independent determinant of high ox-LDL concentrations. Both ox-LDL and hs-CRP significantly correlated with Killip class, left ventricular ejection fraction, NT-proBNP and peak troponin I. Conclusions In patients with the first STEMI treated by pPCI there were significant differences in ox-LDL and hs-CRP concentrations between non-diabetics, pre-diabetics and diabetics. Ox-LDL and hs-CRP concentrations were related to heart failure parameters. PMID:28356828

  11. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein does not improve the differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes: A grey zone analysis.

    PubMed

    Bellanné-Chantelot, C; Coste, J; Ciangura, C; Fonfrède, M; Saint-Martin, C; Bouché, C; Sonnet, E; Valéro, R; Lévy, D-J; Dubois-Laforgue, D; Timsit, J

    2016-02-01

    Low plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been suggested to differentiate hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha-maturity-onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes (F-YT2D) remains a difficult challenge. Thus, this study assessed the added value of hs-CRP to distinguish between the two conditions. This prospective multicentre study included 143 HNF1A-MODY patients, 310 patients with a clinical history suggestive of HNF1A-MODY, but not confirmed genetically (F-YT2D), and 215 patients with T2D. The ability of models, including clinical characteristics and hs-CRP to predict HNF1A-MODY was analyzed, using the area of the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and a grey zone approach was used to evaluate these models in clinical practice. Median hs-CRP values were lower in HNF1A-MODY (0.25mg/L) than in F-YT2D (1.14mg/L) and T2D (1.70mg/L) patients. Clinical parameters were sufficient to differentiate HNF1A-MODY from classical T2D (AUROC: 0.99). AUROC analyses to distinguish HNF1A-MODY from F-YT2D were 0.82 for clinical features and 0.87 after including hs-CRP. For the grey zone analysis, the lower boundary was set to miss<1.5% of true positives in non-tested subjects, while the upper boundary was set to perform 50% of genetic tests in individuals with no HNF1A mutation. On comparing HNF1A-MODY with F-YT2D, 65% of patients were classified in between these categories - in the zone of diagnostic uncertainty - even after adding hs-CRP to clinical parameters. hs-CRP does not improve the differential diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY and F-YT2D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide and high sensitive C-reactive protein predict 2-year all cause mortality in chest pain patients: a prospective observational study from Salta, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of the Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). We have addressed whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in admission samples may improve risk stratification in chest pain patients with suspected ACS. Methods We included 982 patients consecutively admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS at nine hospitals in Salta, Northern Argentina. Total and cardiac mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow up period. Patients were divided into quartiles according to BNP and hsCRP levels, respectively, and inter quartile differences in mortality were statistically evaluated applying univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 119 patients died, and the BNP and hsCRP levels were significantly higher among these patients than in survivors. In a multivariable Cox regression model for total death and cardiac death in all patients, the hazard ratio (HR) in the highest quartile (Q4) as compared to the lowest quartile (Q1) of BNP was 2.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-4.35), p = 0.009 and 3.34 (95% CI, 1.26-8.85), p = 0.015, respectively. In the TnT positive patients (TnT > 0.01 ng/mL), the HR for total death and cardiac death in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.07-4.18), p = 0.031 and 3.42 (95% CI, 1.13-10.32), p = 0.029, respectively. The HR for total death for hsCRP in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 1.97 (95% CI, 1.17-3.32), p = 0.011, but this biomarker did not predict cardiac death (p = 0.21). No prognostic impact of these two biomarkers was found in the TnT negative patients. Conclusion BNP and hsCRP may act as clinically useful biomarkers when obtained at admission in a population with suspected ACS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01377402. PMID:21958326

  13. Daily consumption of grapefruit for 6 weeks reduces urine F2-isoprostanes in overweight adults with high baseline values but has no effect on plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Dow, Caitlin A; Wertheim, Betsy C; Patil, Bhimanagouda S; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, in part due to heightened inflammatory/oxidative processes. Results from epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that citrus, and grapefruit in particular, may have a role in promoting vascular health, although clinical trial data are lacking. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory/antioxidant effects of habitual grapefruit consumption in 69 overweight/obese men and women and in a subsample of participants with MetS (n = 29). Participants were randomly assigned to either a grapefruit group in which they consumed a low bioactive diet plus 1.5 grapefruit/d for 6 wk (n = 37, n = 14 with MetS) or to a control condition in which a low bioactive diet devoid of citrus was consumed (n = 32, n = 15 with MetS). Plasma soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and urinary F2-isoprostanes were evaluated before and after the intervention phase. F2-isoprostane concentrations were not different in the grapefruit versus control arm after the intervention (12.4 ± 6.4 vs. 15.9 ± 9.0 ng/mg creatinine, P = 0.16), whereas plasma hsCRP concentrations tended to be lower in the grapefruit versus control arm postintervention (2.1 ± 1.5 vs. 2.8 ± 2.0 mg/L, P = 0.09). In adults with MetS, grapefruit consumption tended to result in lower postintervention F2-isoprostane concentrations compared with the control condition (12.0 ± 4.5 vs. 18.3 ± 10.9 ng/mg creatinine, P = 0.06). Furthermore, those with high baseline F2-isoprostane concentrations experienced significant reductions in this biomarker in response to grapefruit consumption (P = 0.021). Change in sVCAM-1 concentrations did not vary by treatment arm nor were there differences between arms postintervention. These results suggest that intake of grapefruit twice daily for 6 wk does not significantly reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, although there is a

  14. GlycA, a novel proinflammatory glycoprotein biomarker, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are inversely associated with sodium intake after controlling for adiposity: the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease study.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Eke G; Connelly, Margery A; Vart, Priya; Otvos, James D; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Dullaart, Robin Pf

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which dietary sodium intake may confer alterations in the inflammatory status is unclear. GlycA is a novel proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-measured biomarker of systemic inflammation, which is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We determined associations of the inflammatory markers GlycA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with 24-h sodium excretion. A cross-sectional, population-based study was performed in 3935 subjects who were not using an antihypertensive medication, lipid-lowering drugs, or a glucose-lowering treatment. Urinary sodium excretion was calculated as the mean of two 24-h urine excretions. Linear regression models were used, with 24-h sodium excretion as an independent variable and GlycA or ln hsCRP as a dependent variable. The mean ± SD sodium excretion was 143.0 ± 53.4 mmol/24 h. The GlycA concentration was 343.6 ± 58.7 μmol/L, and the geometric mean of the hsCRP concentration was 1.20 mg/L (95% CI: 1.16, 1.25 mg/L). In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, GlycA and ln hsCRP were not significantly associated with 24-h sodium excretion [B: 1.23 (95% CI: -0.67, 3.13; P = 0.21) and 0.03 (95% CI: -0.004, 0.07; P = 0.08), respectively, per 1-SD increase]. After additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI), both GlycA (B: -2.76; 95% CI: -4.65, -0.86; P = 0.004) and ln hsCRP (B: -0.07; 95% CI: -0.11, -0.04; P < 0.001) were inversely associated with 24-h sodium excretion. These associations were similar if adjustment was performed for waist circumference instead of BMI or if additional adjustment was performed for relevant clinical and laboratory variables and were particularly present in men. The proinflammatory biomarkers GlycA and hsCRP are inversely related to higher 24-h sodium excretion when taking into account the variation in adiposity. These inverse relations remain present after taking into account other covariates. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Negative Association of Circulating MicroRNA-126 with High-sensitive C-reactive Protein and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Nan; Yan, You-You; Guo, Zi-Yuan; Jiang, Ya-Juan; Liu, Lu-Lu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) causes endothelial damage, resulting in an inflammatory response with elevation of markers such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which are associated with restenosis after PCI. Evidence suggests that microRNA-126 (miR-126) plays an important role in vascular inflammation, but its correlation with PCI-mediated inflammation has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of PCI on circulating miR-126 and inflammation markers such as hs-CRP and VCAM-1. Methods: We enrolled 130 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Second Hospital of Jilin University from October 2015 to December 2015. Among them, 82 patients with CAD, defined as at least one major epicardial vessel with >70% stenosis who planned to undergo PCI, were divided into acute coronary syndrome (ACS) group (46 patients) and stable angina (SA) group (36 patients). Forty-eight patients confirmed by coronary angiography without PCI were used as controls. The plasmas of all patients were collected prior to PCI and at 30 min, 24 h, and 72 h after PCI. The plasma VCAM-1 and hs-CRP were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the miR-126 was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Plasma concentrations of hs-CRP and VCAM-1 in patients with either ACS (n = 46) or SA (n = 36) were significantly higher than in controls (n = 48) (P < 0.01) prior to PCI, and increased further at 24 h and 72 h after PCI, compared with prior PCI. Moreover, VCAM-1 was positively correlated with balloon time and pressure. In contrast, the plasma concentration of miR-126 was significantly lower in patients with CAD than in controls, and further decreased with time post-PCI. A negative correlation was observed between miR-126 and hs-CRP and VCAM-1 at 72 h after PCI. Conclusion: There was a negative correlation of miR-126 with the PCI

  16. Daily Consumption of Grapefruit for 6 Weeks Reduces Urine F2-Isoprostanes in Overweight Adults with High Baseline Values but Has No Effect on Plasma High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein or Soluble Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1123

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Caitlin A.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Patil, Bhimanagouda S.; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, in part due to heightened inflammatory/oxidative processes. Results from epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that citrus, and grapefruit in particular, may have a role in promoting vascular health, although clinical trial data are lacking. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory/antioxidant effects of habitual grapefruit consumption in 69 overweight/obese men and women and in a subsample of participants with MetS (n = 29). Participants were randomly assigned to either a grapefruit group in which they consumed a low bioactive diet plus 1.5 grapefruit/d for 6 wk (n = 37, n = 14 with MetS) or to a control condition in which a low bioactive diet devoid of citrus was consumed (n = 32, n = 15 with MetS). Plasma soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and urinary F2-isoprostanes were evaluated before and after the intervention phase. F2-isoprostane concentrations were not different in the grapefruit versus control arm after the intervention (12.4 ± 6.4 vs. 15.9 ± 9.0 ng/mg creatinine, P = 0.16), whereas plasma hsCRP concentrations tended to be lower in the grapefruit versus control arm postintervention (2.1 ± 1.5 vs. 2.8 ± 2.0 mg/L, P = 0.09). In adults with MetS, grapefruit consumption tended to result in lower postintervention F2-isoprostane concentrations compared with the control condition (12.0 ± 4.5 vs. 18.3 ± 10.9 ng/mg creatinine, P = 0.06). Furthermore, those with high baseline F2-isoprostane concentrations experienced significant reductions in this biomarker in response to grapefruit consumption (P = 0.021). Change in sVCAM-1 concentrations did not vary by treatment arm nor were there differences between arms postintervention. These results suggest that intake of grapefruit twice daily for 6 wk does not significantly reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, although there is a

  17. No further gain can be achieved by calculating Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with high-sensitivity assay of C-reactive protein because of high intraindividual variability of C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional study and theoretical consideration.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Inger M J; Emamifar, Amir; Andreasen, Rikke A; Antonsen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) is commonly used to evaluate disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is a guide to treatment decision.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lower reporting limit for C-reactive protein (CRP), with respect to intraindividual biological variability, on the calculation of DAS28 and subsequent patient classification.This study consists of 2 sections: a theoretical consideration discussing the performance of CRP in calculating DAS28 taking intraindividual biological variation and lower reporting limit for CRP into account and a cross-sectional study of RA patients applying our theoretical results. Therefore, we calculated DAS28 twice, with the actual CRP values and CRP = 9 mg/L, the latter to elucidate the positive effects of reducing the lower reporting limit of CRP from <10 to <3 mg/L.Lower-reporting limit of <10 mg/L leads to overestimate DAS28. However, reducing lower reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L results in optimizing DAS28 calculation. Further lowering of reporting limit for CRP to <3 mg/L does not increase the precision of DAS28 owing to the relatively large intraindividual biological variation.Five hundred twelve patients were included. There was a significant difference between recalculated and patients DAS28 (P < 0.001). One hundred nine patients had DAS28 deviation (compatible to remission to low: 66, low to moderate: 39. and moderate to high: 4).Owing to significant impact of intraindividual biologic variation on DAS28 and patient classification, special attention should be paid to calculate DAS28 when CRP values are within normal range. Furthermore, we conclude that results of different studies evaluating DAS28 and treatment response are not comparable if the reporting limits of CRP are unknown.

  18. Strategies for vascular disease prevention: the role of lipids and related markers including apolipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins (LDL)-particle size, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA₂) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)).

    PubMed

    Dallmeier, Dhayana; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the treatment of dyslipidemias. However, half of cardiovascular events occur in individuals with average or low cholesterol levels and there is still a considerable residual risk with 70% of patients having an event despite statin treatment. In the era of personalized medicine there is increased interest in the incorporation of individual biomarkers in risk score algorithms in order to improve cardiovascular risk stratification followed by the prompt initiation of preventive measures. Since the 2001 third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment on High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of lipid related biomarkers such as non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, lipoprotein(a), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, and C-reactive protein. This article tries to summarize the most recent results in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Canadian Trial of Carbohydrates in Diabetes (CCD), a 1-y controlled trial of low-glycemic-index dietary carbohydrate in type 2 diabetes: no effect on glycated hemoglobin but reduction in C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Wolever, Thomas M S; Gibbs, Alison L; Mehling, Christine; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Connelly, Philip W; Josse, Robert G; Leiter, Lawrence A; Maheux, Pierre; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; Rodger, N Wilson; Ryan, Edmond A

    2008-01-01

    The optimal source and amount of dietary carbohydrate for managing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are unknown. We aimed to compare the effects of altering the glycemic index or the amount of carbohydrate on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in T2DM patients. Subjects with T2DM managed by diet alone (n=162) were randomly assigned to receive high-carbohydrate, high-glycemic-index (high-GI), high-carbohydrate, low-glycemic-index (low-GI), or low-carbohydrate, high-monounsaturated-fat (low-CHO) diets for 1 y. The high-GI, low-GI, and low-CHO diets contained, respectively, 47%, 52%, and 39% of energy as carbohydrate and 31%, 27%, and 40% of energy as fat; they had GIs of 63, 55, and 59, respectively. Body weight and HbA1c did not differ significantly between diets. Fasting glucose was higher (P=0.041), but 2-h postload glucose was lower (P=0.010) after 12 mo of the low-GI diet. With the low-GI diet, overall mean triacylglycerol was 12% higher and HDL cholesterol 4% lower than with the low-CHO diet (P<0.05), but the difference in the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol disappeared by 6 mo (time x diet interaction, P=0.044). Overall mean CRP with the low-GI diet, 1.95 mg/L, was 30% less than that with the high-GI diet, 2.75 mg/L (P=0.0078); the concentration with the low-CHO diet, 2.35 mg/L, was intermediate. In subjects with T2DM managed by diet alone with optimal glycemic control, long-term HbA1c was not affected by altering the GI or the amount of dietary carbohydrate. Differences in total:HDL cholesterol among diets had disappeared by 6 mo. However, because of sustained reductions in postprandial glucose and CRP, a low-GI diet may be preferred for the dietary management of T2DM.

  20. C-Reactive protein predicts acute myocardial infarction during high-risk noncardiac and vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Martins, Oscar M; Fonseca, Vicente F; Borges, Ivan; Martins, Vaierio; Portal, Vera Lucia; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2011-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events in a wide range of clinical contexts. However, the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictive marker for perioperative acute myocardial infarction during noncardiac surgery is not yet clear. The present study investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels as predictors of acute myocardial infarction risk in patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery. This concurrent cohort study included patients aged ≥ 50 years referred for high-risk noncardiac surgery according to American Heart Association/ACC 2002 criteria. Patients with infections were excluded. Electrocardiograms were performed, and biomarkers (Troponin I or T) and/or total creatine phosphokinase and the MB fraction (CPK-T/MB) were evaluated on the first and fourth days after surgery. Patients were followed until discharge. Baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were compared between patients with and without acute myocardial infarction. A total of 101 patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, including 33 vascular procedures (17 aortic and 16 peripheral artery revascularizations), were studied. Sixty of the patients were men, and their mean age was 66 years. Baseline levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were higher in the group with perioperative acute myocardial infarction than in the group with non-acute myocardial infarction patients (mean 48.02 vs. 4.50, p = 0.005). All five acute myocardial infarction cases occurred in vascular surgery patients with high CRP levels. Patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery, especially vascular surgery, and presenting elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are at increased risk for perioperative acute myocardial infarction.

  1. Effects of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and HDL in serum of subjects with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Anne Carolina Eleutério; Carneiro, Valéria Martins de Araújo; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in the sera and its association with body mass index and high density lipoprotein in subjects with severe periodontitis. Methods Sera from 28 subjects (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) with severe periodontitis and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to periodontal therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9-12 months). Oral and systemic parameters such as the number of blood cells, glucose examination, lipid profile, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels accessed by high-sensitivity immunonephelometry assay, were included. Results Before therapy, in the periodontitis group, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was statistically lower than in the control group (P<0.0216). After therapy, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was significantly higher (65.22%) (P<0.0339). The mean value for body mass index was statistically lower in subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL (24.63±4.19), compared with those with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >0.3 mg/dL (28.91±6.03) (P<0.0411). High density lipoprotein presented a mean value statistically higher after therapy (P<0.0027). Conclusion In systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis, periodontal therapy was associated with decreased levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and increase of high density lipoprotein in serum. The clinical trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.br/, No. RBR-24T799. PMID:24896165

  2. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). MATERIAL AND METHODS We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. RESULTS Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD.

  3. C-Reactive Protein: Clinical and Epidemiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, María Sofía; Toledo, Alexandra; Añez, Roberto; Torres, Yaquelín; Apruzzese, Vanessa; Silva, Carlos; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    An important etiopathogenic component of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis, with inflammation being an essential event in the pathophysiology of all clinical pictures it comprises. In recent years, several molecules implicated in this process have been studied in order to assess cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. C-reactive protein is a plasmatic protein of the pentraxin family and an acute phase reactant, very useful as a general inflammation marker. Currently, it is one of the most profoundly researched molecules in the cardiovascular field, yet its clinical applicability regarding cardiovascular risk remains an object of discussion, considered by some as a simple marker and by others as a true risk factor. In this sense, numerous studies propose its utilization as a predictor of cardiovascular risk through the use of high-sensitivity quantification methods for the detection of values <1 mg/L, following strict international guidelines. Increasing interest in these clinical findings has led to the creation of modified score systems including C-reactive protein concentrations, in order to enhance risk scores commonly used in clinical practice and offer improved care to patients with cardiovascular disease, which remains the first cause of mortality at the worldwide, national, and regional scenarios. PMID:24653858

  4. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  5. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  6. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-03-26

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases.

  7. Specific C-reactive protein measurements in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toman, Nidal; Buschmann, Alexandra; Muehlberger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The early detection of postoperative signs of infection can help to obviate serious consequences. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a highly sensitive measure of inflammatory changes. Concise knowledge of standard concentrations of CRP after various operations would allow the differentiation between a physiological rise and the interpretation of CRP as a warning sign. The aim of this study was to establish standard curves for CRP reactivity for common operations in plastic surgery and to assess the validity of CRP as a prognostic indicator of infective complications. Four groups of 30 patients each had either breast reduction, abdominoplasty, submuscular breast augmentation or exchange of breast implants. CRP concentrations were measured once preoperatively and on eight consecutive days postoperatively. CRP peak values were found throughout postoperative days 3 to 5. Concentrations on days 2 and 7 were significantly different from day 4 (p<0.04). Patients who had no sharp decline in CRP after its peak developed complications in their future postoperative course. There was significant correlation between the amount of resected tissue and CRP concentrations (r=0.78, p<0.005). Our results suggest that knowledge of standard alterations in postoperative CRP concentrations increases the early detection of complications. No sharp decline in CRP after day 5 is a warning sign. The use of specific standard curves allows a comparative assessment of actual, individual concentrations of CRP.

  8. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases. PMID:25237625

  9. C-Reactive protein in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Kanda, T; Yamauchi, Y; Hasegawa, A; Iwasaki, T; Arai, M; Suzuki, T; Kobayashi, I; Nagai, R

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is poor, although clinical features are variable. Prediction of outcome has been difficult in individual patients based on laboratory data. In some patients with DCM, myocardial damage secondary to viral or immune-mediated myocardial inflammation may persist. To objectively assess inflammation, we measured plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in 188 patients with idiopathic DCM over 5-8 years. All had dyspnea and fatigue at rest; all patients had a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% by echocardiography or by contrast or radionuclide ventriculography. We divided these patients into two groups: patients dying within 5 years following admission (n = 49) and the remainder surviving for at least 5 years (n = 139). CRP concentrations in the patients dying early were significantly higher than in the long-term survivors (1. 05 +/- 1.37 vs. 0.49 +/- 1.04 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Sixty-two percent of the patients with CRP>1.0 died within 5 years. In addition to other laboratory tests including electrocardiography and echocardiography, routine CRP measurements proved to be valuable for identifying high-risk patients who require special treatment strategies.

  10. Diagnostic strategies for C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Harriëtte; Vrijkotte, Tanja GM; Meijer, Piet; Kluft, Cees; de Geus, Eco JC

    2002-01-01

    Background Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has been identified in prospective epidemiological research as an independent risk marker for cardiovascular disease. In this paper, short-term biological variation of CRP is documented and a strategy to test the reliability of a single CRP sample is proposed. Methods Data were obtained from three groups of healthy volunteers: men, no oral contraceptives (OC-)using women and OC-using women. Blood samples were obtained 3 times in men and twice in women during a workweek. Results and discussion CRP values were highest in the OC-using women, followed by the men, and lowest in the no OC-using women. Averaged over the three groups the within-subject coefficients of variation (CVi) was 49.24% for CRP, and 29.90% for lnCRP. Using the repeated measures, individual samples were identified that reflected a 'suspicious' unreliable high value, i.e. a value that was more than 2 standard deviations higher than the lowest value obtained from the same subject. In an a posteriori analysis, three strategies to identify these suspicious high CRP values were then tested. In terms of maximizing detection of suspicious values and minimizing unnecessary resampling, best results were obtained for the most pragmatic criterion of using an absolute level, stratified for gender, and OC-use, to decide whether a second sample should be obtained. Conclusion A single high CRP value must be followed by re-sampling when it is above 1.75 mg/l for men, above 1.00 mg/l for no OC-using women, and above 2.00 mg/l for OC-using women. PMID:12049676

  11. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; MacFadyen, Jean G; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2008-11-20

    Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels but without hyperlipidemia might benefit from statin treatment. We randomly assigned 17,802 apparently healthy men and women with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels of less than 130 mg per deciliter (3.4 mmol per liter) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels of 2.0 mg per liter or higher to rosuvastatin, 20 mg daily, or placebo and followed them for the occurrence of the combined primary end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, arterial revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina, or death from cardiovascular causes. The trial was stopped after a median follow-up of 1.9 years (maximum, 5.0). Rosuvastatin reduced LDL cholesterol levels by 50% and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels by 37%. The rates of the primary end point were 0.77 and 1.36 per 100 person-years of follow-up in the rosuvastatin and placebo groups, respectively (hazard ratio for rosuvastatin, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46 to 0.69; P<0.00001), with corresponding rates of 0.17 and 0.37 for myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.70; P=0.0002), 0.18 and 0.34 for stroke (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.79; P=0.002), 0.41 and 0.77 for revascularization or unstable angina (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.70; P<0.00001), 0.45 and 0.85 for the combined end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.69; P<0.00001), and 1.00 and 1.25 for death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.97; P=0.02). Consistent effects were observed in all subgroups evaluated. The rosuvastatin group did not have a significant increase in myopathy or cancer but did have a higher

  12. Clinical relevance for lowering C-reactive protein with statins.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The role of statins in the protection of atherosclerosis and reducting cardiovascular (CV) events is well established. On the other hand, the role of inflammation in the propagation and propensity to CV events has also been demonstrated. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) which is involved in the immunologic process of inflammation has received the interest for its use in screening and risk reclassification. However, evidence for its causal relationship with atherothrombosis is lacking, and even more, knowing that statins influence on the reduction of CRP levels, a relevant evidence of their clinical benefits in this regard is also lacking. This article reviews four different key points regarding the issue, to better understand the current state and application of the treatment with statins in order to achieve benefits from lowering CRP's levels regarding CV diseases: (1) the mechanisms of reduction of CRP levels by statins; (2) the role of statin-mediated CRP reduction in the atherosclerotic plaque regression; (3) the role in the prevention of CV diseases; and (4) the role in case of secondary prevention. With this basis, the reduction of CRP levels should be interpreted as a reduction of inflammatory burden thus its clinical benefits could be more interesting in secondary prevention. KEY MESSAGES It could be admitted a role of statin-mediated CRP diminution to reduce the rate of progression in atherosclerotic plaque. In general, and in the absence of specific clinical trials, the role of statins by lowering CRP and consequently, preventing cardiovascular events may be superior in case of secondary prevention because a more pronounced state of inflammation and regardless of its levels at baseline.

  13. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Albu, E; Miller, B M; Choi, Y; Lakhanpal, S; Murthy, R N; Gerst, P H

    1994-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein was measured in 56 patients hospitalized with a suspected diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Based on these determinations, four groups of patients were defined: Group A = 26 patients with acute appendicitis who had a C-reactive protein level higher than 2.5 mg/dl. Group B = 4 patients with a C-reactive protein level lower than 2.5 mg/dl who, after surgery based on a presumed diagnosis of acute appendicitis, were found to have a normal appendix. Group C = 22 patients with nonspecific abdominal pain, 18 (72 percent) of whom had an elevated C-reactive protein level, although in only 4 (7.1 percent) were these levels higher than 2.5 percent mg/dl. Group D = 4 patients who had diseases other than acute appendicitis. It is concluded that an increase in C-reactive protein levels to more than 2.5 mg/dl is not a definite indicator of acute appendicitis. However, if the C-reactive protein level in blood drawn 12 hours after the onset of symptoms is less than 2.5 mg/dl, acute appendicitis can be excluded.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866....5270 C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A C-reactive protein... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids...

  15. [Inflammation study in unstable angina and myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation. Value of ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein].

    PubMed

    Borrás Pallé, S; Gómez Martínez, E; Romero Rodrigo, A; Campos Ferrer, C; Molina, E; Valentín Segura, V

    2002-06-01

    To analyse the inflammatory state in Acute Coronary Syndromes without ST-segment elevation by means of the value of the High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and other markers of inflammation. To assess if there are differences between unstable angina and myocardial infarction and if it has prognostic value of cardiovascular complications during one year follow up. 61 patients diagnosed of Acute Coronary Syndrome without ST-segment elevation were studied: mean age of 67 +/- 11 years old, 26% women. The value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and other inflammatory markers (leukocytes and fibrinogen) were analysed and were compared in those patients with unstable angina versus myocardial infarction without ST elevation. Follow up during one year of cardiovascular complications (death with cardiac origin, infarction, refractory ischemia or rehospitalization because of cardiovascular cause) and its relation with the inflammatory markers. 75% of the patients showed increased levels of High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (> 2 mg/l). 47 patients (77%) were diagnosed of Infarction without ST elevation and the remainders of Unstable Angina. There were no statistically significant differences between subgroups, neither in the median value of the C-reactive protein: 4.49 mg/l in infarction versus 4.5 mg/l in Angina (p = ns) nor in the percentage of patients with high levels of C-reactive protein (77% in infarction versus 71% in Angina). With regard to the other inflammatory markers (fibrinogen and leukocytes) no differences between subgroups were found. None of the inflammatory markers showed predictive value about the appearance of the composite end-point during one year follow up. The high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is elevated in patients with Acute coronary syndromes without ST-segment elevation, but no difference in the inflammatory state of patients with unstable angina versus myocardial infarction without ST elevation was found. In our series, these markers

  16. The relationship between usual coffee consumption and serum C-reactive protein level in a Japanese female population.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Sano, Yoshiko; Maekawa, Mizuho; Fujiwara, Shinji; Hamada, Taku; Sakane, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Usual coffee consumption may decrease insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes incidence, and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. As a mechanism, coffee-induced lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for the development of these diseases, can be considered. The associations between coffee consumption and CRP should be established by studies on various populations, yet studies in Japanese people, who do not necessarily consume as much coffee daily, are limited. In total, 459 community-living Japanese women, aged 23-83 years, were investigated. Clinical data including age, body mass index, blood pressure, HbA(1c), serum high sensitive CRP (hsCRP) and lifestyle habits, such as coffee consumption, were included in the analyses. All analyses were performed in two groups of the population, i.e., age < 60 and > or = 60 years. Significantly lower levels of hsCRP were observed in the group of > or = 1 cup/day than in that of < 1 cup/day in the respective groups of < 60 years (p = 0.001) and > or = 60 years (p < 0.0001). In multiple regression analysis, coffee consumption was significantly, independently and inversely correlated to log-hsCRP in the respective groups of < 60 years (p = 0.017) and > or = 60 years (p < 0.0001). It was noteworthy that the benefits of coffee consumption, even if > or = 1 cup/day, on serum hsCRP levels were confirmed in Japanese women, following similarly to other ethnic data.

  17. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  18. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  19. Effects of atorvastatin on human c reactive protein metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goals were to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled...

  20. Optimization of fluoroimmunoassay against C-reactive protein exploiting immobilized-antigen glass slide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2013-03-01

    An optimization experiment for an indirect-competitive (IC) fluoroimmunoassay (FIA) against C-reactive protein (CRP) was conducted exploiting an immobilized-antigen glass slide and an anti-CRP antibody tagged with fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). The optimized conditions for the IC FIA were as follows: time and concentration of treatment with glutaraldehyde, 30 min and 1.5%, respectively; time of reaction with coating antigen and concentration of coating antigen for immobilization, 1 h and 0.1 mg/mL, respectively; concentration of FSNP-anti-CRP antibody conjugate coupled by the biotin-avidin interaction, the bioconjugate, for immune reaction, 0.250 mg/mL; concentration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for blocking and time of blocking with BSA, 3% and 30 min, respectively. By using the glass slide, a highly sensitive detection against CRP was possible with the limit of detection below 0.1 ng/mL.

  1. Deletion of C-reactive protein ameliorates experimental cerebral malaria?

    PubMed Central

    Szalai, Alexander J.; Barnum, Scott R.; Ramos, Theresa N.

    2014-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) level correlates with parasitemia and severity of malaria, but whether this reflects causality remains unknown. Methods Using CRP-transgenic and CRP-deficient mice we compared the onset and severity of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). Results CRP-deficient mice were most resistant to ECM. Conclusions CRP might contribute to the development of cerebral malaria, rather than protect against it. PMID:25002461

  2. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael

    2015-06-01

    C-reactive protein is a better indicator of inflammation than the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It is more sensitive and responds more quickly to changes in the clinical situation. False negative and false positive results are more common when measuring the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Renal disease, female sex and older age increase the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate has value in detecting low-grade bone infection, and in monitoring some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. C-reactive protein, marker for evaluation of systemic inflammatory response in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mihu, D; Costin, N; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Blaga, Ligia Daniela; Pop, Raluca Bogdana

    2008-01-01

    Determination by a high sensitivity technique of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a sensitive marker of inflammation in women with preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy and investigation of the relationship between CRP and the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome. The study included 40 women with preeclampsia and 40 control subjects with normal pregnancies in the last trimester of pregnancy. The serum CRP concentration was determined using the universal high sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. The serum CRP concentration was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in preclampsia (5.69 +/- 1.8 mg/L) compared to normal pregnancy (2.89 +/- 1.2 mg/L). In women with preeclampsia, CRP correlated positively and significantly with diastolic blood pressure, proteinuria and uric acid levels. Maternal CRP values also correlated negatively and significantly with fetal weight at birth. Our results demonstrate that serum CRP is increased in preeclampsia and represents a marker of the severity of the preeclamptic syndrome and of fetal weight at birth. Taking into consideration these observations and the fact that CRP testing is rapid and relatively inexpensive, we recommend the use of this acute phase reagent in clinical practice, in all women with preeclampsia in order to establish the prognosis of the disease.

  4. Immunoassay of C-reactive protein by hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence using integrated electrodes with hydrophobic sample confinement.

    PubMed

    Ylinen-Hinkka, T; Niskanen, A J; Franssila, S; Kulmala, S

    2011-09-19

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was determined in the concentration range 0.01-10 mg L(-1) using hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with devices combining both working and counter electrodes and sample confinement on a single chip. The sample area on the electrodes was defined by a hydrophobic ring, which enabled dispensing the reagents and the analyte directly on the electrode. Immunoassay of CRP by HECL using integrated electrodes is a good candidate for a high-sensitivity point-of-care CRP-test, because the concentration range is suitable, miniaturisation of the measurement system has been demonstrated and the assay method with integrated electrodes is easy to use. High-sensitivity CRP tests can be used to monitor the current state of cardiovascular disease and also to predict future cardiovascular problems in apparently healthy people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Longitudinal association of C-reactive protein and lung function over 13 years: The EPIC-Norfolk study.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Kaptoge, Stephen; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is known to be associated with systemic inflammation. We examined the longitudinal association of C-reactive protein (CRP) and lung function in a cohort of 18,110 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer in Norfolk who were 40-79 years of age at baseline (recruited in 1993-1997) and followed-up through 2011. We assessed lung function by measuring forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) at baseline, 4 years, and 13 years. Serum CRP levels were measured using a high-sensitivity assay at baseline and the 13-year follow up. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of loge-CRP and lung function were examined using multivariable linear mixed models. In the cross-sectional analysis, 1-standard-deviation increase in baseline loge-CRP (about 3-fold higher CRP on the original milligrams per liter scale) was associated with a -86.3 mL (95% confidence interval: -93.9, -78.6) reduction in FEV1. In longitudinal analysis, a 1-standard-deviation increase in loge-CRP over 13 years was also associated with a -64.0 mL (95% confidence interval: -72.1, -55.8) decline in FEV1 over the same period. The associations were similar for FVC and persisted among lifetime never-smokers. Baseline CRP levels were not predictive of the rate of change in FEV1 or FVC over time. In the present study, we found longitudinal observational evidence that suggested that increases in systemic inflammation are associated with declines in lung function.

  6. The Association of C-Reactive Protein and Physical Activity Among a Church-Based Population of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Swann Arp; Wirth, Michael D.; Khan, Samira; Murphy, E. Angela; Heiney, Sue P.; Davis, Lisa C.; Davis, Briana; Drayton, Ruby F.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Blair, Steven M.; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Regular physical activity can reduce systemic inflammation and, thereby, the burden of chronic inflammatory-related conditions. This study examined whether regular physical activity, measured subjectively (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity [RAPA]) and objectively (Bodymedia’s SenseWear® activity monitor [SWA]), is associated with inflammatory or glycemic control markers. Methods Subjects were 345 participants of the Healthy Eating and Active Living in the Spirit (HEALS) lifestyle intervention among African-American (AA) churches in South Carolina in 2009. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between both subjectively- and objectively- measured physical activity and inflammatory markers including high sensitivity c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results Those who participated in regular physical activity (RAPA) had lower CRP values compared to those who were sedentary (2.3 vs. 3.8 mg/L, p<0.01). Lower levels of CRP or IL-6 were observed among those in the highest quartile of active energy expenditure (CRP: 2.0 vs. 3.6 mg/L, p=0.01) or moderate-vigorous physical activity minutes (CRP=1.7 vs. 4.5 mg/L, p<0.01; IL-6=1.5 vs. 2.1 pg/mL, p=0.01) compared to their lowest respective quartiles as measured by the SWA. Conclusion Physical activity may improve chronic inflammation, which is a primary pathophysiological mechanism for numerous chronic disorders, especially among minority populations. PMID:26007295

  7. High-sensitivity magnetic profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, R.R.

    1983-05-01

    A high sensitivity rubidium 87 magnetometer, designed and built by the author, is used at sea to make magnetic profiles over subsurface structures of interest. The Texas AandM University Research Vessel GYRE was used to launch, tow and recover a nonmagnetic fiberglass skiff that carried the magnetometer. To avoid magnetic field disturbances of the GYRE, the skiff with the magnetometer was towed 600 ft behind the ship. Loran C, and sometimes SATNAV, position data were used to determine the ship location. Two recording depth finders using 3.5 kHz and 12 kHz respectively were used to profile the bottom. Time marks were plotted on the magnetic and sonar data in accordance with WWV time signals received on 10 MHz. (15 MHz and 5 MHz were also available if there happened to be poor radio transmission at 10 MHz). Magnetic data were recorded in digital form on a strip chart recorder, using the last two digits of the six digit resonance frequency of the Rb 87 atoms.

  8. Mouse C-Reactive Protein and Endotoxin-Induced Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L. T.; Higginbotham, R. D.

    1965-01-01

    Patterson, L. T. (University of Texas, Galveston), and R. D. Higginbotham. Mouse C-reactive protein and endotoxin-induced resistance. J. Bacteriol. 90:1520–1524. 1965.—The relationship between the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the sera of mice and resistance to Staphylococcus aureus infection after the injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin was studied. The CRP level was essentially unchanged at 6 hr after endotoxin, and resistance was slightly decreased. At 24 hr after endotoxin, both CRP levels and resistance were increased. Since the increase in the CRP level and resistance appeared to be associated, it was of interest that, when mouse CRP was tested for in vitro reactions with several strains of bacteria, cells of all species of gram-positive bacteria tested (including S. aureus) were agglutinated by CRP. E. coli was not agglutinated under the conditions of the test. It is proposed that mouse CRP is an opsonin, and possibly a lysin, and is involved in nonspecific resistance to infection with S. aureus. PMID:5322718

  9. C-reactive protein as a marker of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna; Mahendra, Muktishree

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory response and cause the release of cytokines; this results in periodontal destruction and initiation of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRP). This study set out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRP that can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular disease. Based on their periodontal status, 45 patients were divided into three groups. The following clinical parameters were recorded: plaque index, gingival index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels. Scoring was done on six tooth surfaces for all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. The results indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared to controls.

  10. C-reactive protein is associated with disability independently of vascular events: the Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Dhamoon, Mandip S; Cheung, Ying-Kuen; Moon, Yeseon P; Wright, Clinton B; Willey, Joshua Z; Sacco, Ralph; Elkind, Mitchell Sv

    2017-01-15

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with cardiovascular events and mortality, but the association of CRP with functional status is not well defined. We hypothesised that serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP are associated with long-term trajectories of functional status independently of vascular risk factors and stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) occurring during follow-up. Prospective, population-based. Northern Manhattan Study. Stroke-free participants aged ≥40 years. Annual assessments of disability with the Barthel index (BI) for a median of 13 years. BI was analysed as a continuous variable (range 0–100). Baseline demographics, risk factors and laboratory studies were collected, including CRP (n = 2,240). Separate generalised estimating equation models estimated standardised associations between CRP and (i) baseline functional status and (ii) change in function over time, adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, social variables, cognition, and depression measured at baseline, and stroke and MI occurring during follow-up. Mean age was 69 (SD 10) years, 36% were male, 55% Hispanic, 75% hypertensive and 21% diabetic; 337 MIs and 369 first strokes occurred during follow-up. Mean CRP level was 5.24 mg/l (SD 8.86). logCRP was associated with baseline BI (−0.34 BI points per unit logCRP, 95% confidence interval −0.62, −0.06) but not with change over time. In this large population-based study, higher serum CRP levels were associated with higher baseline disability, even when adjusting for baseline covariates and stroke and MI occurring during follow-up. Systemic inflammation may contribute to disability independently of clinical vascular events.

  11. Cross-Sectional and Prospective Associations between Physical Activity and C-Reactive Protein in Males

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Aírton J.; Pellanda, Lúcia C.; Bielemann, Renata M.; Gigante, Denise P.; Hallal, Pedro C.; Horta, Bernardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is conflicting evidence about the association between physical activity and inflammatory markers. Few prospective studies are available, particularly from low and middle-income countries. This study was aimed at assessing the cross-sectional and prospective associations between physical activity and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in males belonging to the 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study. Methods The sample comprised 2,213 males followed up at the ages of 18 and 23 years. We performed high sensitivity CRP assays; we used a cut-off of 3 mg/L in categorical analyses. We measured physical activity by self-report at ages 18 and 23 years. Body mass index and waist circumference were studies as possible mediators. Results CRP levels above the 3mg/L cut-off were found in 13.3% (95%CI: 11.7; 14.8) of the individuals. We found no evidence for an association between physical activity (leisure-time or all-domains) and either continuous (geometrical mean) or categorical CRP. We confirmed these null findings in (a) prospective and cross-sectional analyses; (b) trajectories analyses. Conclusions There was no association between CRP levels and physical activity levels in early adulthood in a large birth cohort. Little variability in CRP at this early age is the likely explanation for these null findings. PMID:25961844

  12. Pentraxin 3 increase is much less pronounced than C-reactive protein increase after surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn; Larsson, Anders

    2011-10-01

    Pentraxin 3 is an acute phase marker that belongs to the same protein family as C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to compare the acute phase reactions of pentraxin 3 and CRP in humans. High sensitivity CRP and pentraxin 3 were analyzed in blood samples from orthopedic surgery (n = 29) and coronary bypass patients (n = 21). The samples were collected prior to surgery and 4 and 30 days after surgery, respectively. Both CRP and pentraxin 3 were significantly increased at day 4. Median pentraxin 3 values increased from 4,021 to 7,459 pg/mL in the orthopedic group and from 4,637 pg/mL to 10,419 pg/mL in the coronary bypass group while CRP increased from 6.3 mg/L to 151.6 mg/L and from 5.7 mg/L to 176.3 mg/L in the same groups. Pentraxin 3 shows a much smaller increment in humans in comparison with CRP.

  13. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein using optical fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, S; Vasu, K S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2015-03-15

    An accurate and highly sensitive sensor platform has been demonstrated for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The CRP detection has been carried out by monitoring the shift in Bragg wavelength (ΔλB) of an etched FBG (eFBG) coated with an anti-CRP antibody (aCRP)-graphene oxide (GO) complex. The complex is characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A limit of detection of 0.01mg/L has been achieved with a linear range of detection from 0.01mg/L to 100mg/L which includes clinical range of CRP. The eFBG sensor coated with only aCRP (without GO) show much less sensitivity than that of aCRP-GO complex coated eFBG. The eFBG sensors show high specificity to CRP even in the presence of other interfering factors such as urea, creatinine and glucose. The affinity constant of ∼1.1×10(10)M(-1) has been extracted from the data of normalized shift (ΔλB/λB) as a function of CRP concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. C-Reactive Protein: An In-Depth Look into Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Núñez, Victoria; Añez, Roberto; Torres, Yaquelin; Toledo, Alexandra; Chacín, Maricarmen; Silva, Carlos; Pacheco, Enrique; Rojas, Joselyn; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the adult population worldwide, with atherosclerosis being its key pathophysiologic component. Atherosclerosis possesses a fundamental chronic inflammatory aspect, and the involvement of numerous inflammatory molecules has been studied in this scenario, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a plasma protein with strong phylogenetic conservation and high resistance to proteolysis, predominantly synthesized in the liver in response to proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF. CRP may intervene in atherosclerosis by directly activating the complement system and inducing apoptosis, vascular cell activation, monocyte recruitment, lipid accumulation, and thrombosis, among other actions. Moreover, CRP can dissociate in peripheral tissue—including atheromatous plaques—from its native pentameric form into a monomeric form, which may also be synthesized de novo in extrahepatic sites. Each form exhibits distinct affinities for ligands and receptors, and exerts different effects in the progression of atherosclerosis. In view of epidemiologic evidence associating high CRP levels with cardiovascular risk—reflecting the biologic impact it bears on atherosclerosis—measurement of serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP has been proposed as a tool for assessment of cardiovascular risk. PMID:27433484

  15. Impact of the dietary fatty acid intake on C-reactive protein levels in US adults.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Gao, Hong-Kai; Vatanparast, Hassan; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the effects of diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur through mechanisms involving subclinical inflammation. We assessed whether reported dietary fatty acid intake correlates with a serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration in a population-based sample of US men and women.In this cross-sectional analysis, participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and restricted to those with available data on dietary intake, biochemical and anthropometric measurements from 2001 to 2010. All statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights by using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY).Of the 17,689 participants analyzed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample, 44.9 years in men, and 46.5 years in women (P = 0.047). The age-, race-, and sex-adjusted mean dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), PUFAs 18:2 (octadecadienoic), and PUFAs 18:3 (octadecatrienoic) monotonically decreased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001), whereas dietary cholesterol increased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001)This study provides further evidence of an association between fatty acid intake and subclinical inflammation markers. hs-CRP concentrations are likely modulated by dietary fatty acid intake. However, the causality of this association needs to be demonstrated in clinical trials.

  16. Association Between Use of Specialty Dietary Supplements and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Peters, Ulrike; Rehm, Colin D.; White, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that certain specialty dietary supplements have antiinflammatory properties, though evidence in humans remains limited. Data on a nationally representative sample of 9,947 adults from the 1999–2004 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to assess the associations between specialty supplement use and inflammation, as measured by serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration. Using survey-weighted multivariate linear regression, significant reductions in hs-CRP concentrations were associated with regular use of glucosamine (17%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 7, 26), chondroitin (22%, 95% CI: 8, 33), and fish oil (16%, 95% CI: 0.3, 29). No associations were observed between hs-CRP concentration and regular use of supplements containing methylsulfonylmethane, garlic, ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto, or pycnogenol. These results suggest that glucosamine and chondroitin supplements are associated with reduced inflammation in humans and provide further evidence to support an inverse association between use of fish oil supplements and inflammation. It is important to further investigate the potential antiinflammatory role of these supplements, as there is a need to identify safe and effective ways to reduce inflammation and the burden of inflammation-related diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23139249

  17. Physical functioning related to C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels in mid-life women

    PubMed Central

    Tomey, Kristin; Sowers, MaryFran; Zheng, Huiyong; Jackson, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether subclinical inflammatory markers high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen are related to measures of physical functioning in midlife women. Our sample included 543 participants in the Michigan site of Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Predictors included CRP from serum and fibrinogen from plasma. Performance-based outcomes included measures of gait, hand grip strength, flexibility, stair climb, 40-foot walk, and chair rise. Perception of physical functioning was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 questionnaire. Regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates. Cross-sectional associations were identified between higher CRP and more time spent in double support (with both feet on the floor while walking), shorter forward reach, slower 2-lb lift, and slower stair climb. Higher CRP and fibrinogen were associated with worse perceived functioning in cross-sectional analyses. Predictive associations across time were found between higher CRP and increased time spent in double support, diminishing forward reach distance and grip strength and worse perceived physical functioning. Predictive associations across time were also found between higher fibrinogen and greater time spent in double support, slower stair climb and worse perceived physical functioning. Our results suggest that inflammatory processes are associated with poor physical functioning in midlife women. PMID:19819323

  18. No Reduction of Atherosclerosis in C-reactive Protein (CRP)-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Teupser, Daniel; Weber, Odile; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Sass, Kristina; Thiery, Joachim; Fehling, Hans Jörg

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a phylogenetically highly conserved plasma protein, is the classical acute phase reactant in humans. Upon infection, inflammation, or tissue damage, its plasma level can rise within hours >1000-fold, providing an early, nonspecific disease indicator of prime clinical importance. In recent years, another aspect of CRP expression has attracted much scientific and public attention. Apart from transient, acute phase-associated spikes in plasma concentration, highly sensitive measurements have revealed stable interindividual differences of baseline CRP values in healthy persons. Strikingly, even modest elevations in stable baseline CRP plasma levels have been found to correlate with a significantly increased risk of future cardiovascular disease. These observations have triggered intense controversies about potential atherosclerosis-promoting properties of CRP. To directly assess potential effects of CRP on atherogenesis, we have generated CRP-deficient mice via gene targeting and introduced the inactivated allele into atherosclerosis-susceptible ApoE−/− and LDLR−/− mice, two well established mouse models of atherogenesis. Morphometric analyses of atherosclerotic plaques in CRP-deficient animals revealed equivalent or increased atherosclerotic lesions compared with controls, an experimental result, which does not support a proatherogenic role of CRP. In fact, our data suggest that mouse CRP may even mediate atheroprotective effects, adding a cautionary note to the idea of targeting CRP as therapeutic intervention against progressive cardiovascular disease. PMID:21149301

  19. Impact of the dietary fatty acid intake on C-reactive protein levels in US adults

    PubMed Central

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Gao, Hong-Kai; Vatanparast, Hassan; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Growing evidence suggests that the effects of diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur through mechanisms involving subclinical inflammation. We assessed whether reported dietary fatty acid intake correlates with a serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration in a population-based sample of US men and women. In this cross-sectional analysis, participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and restricted to those with available data on dietary intake, biochemical and anthropometric measurements from 2001 to 2010. All statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights by using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). Of the 17,689 participants analyzed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample, 44.9 years in men, and 46.5 years in women (P = 0.047). The age-, race-, and sex-adjusted mean dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), PUFAs 18:2 (octadecadienoic), and PUFAs 18:3 (octadecatrienoic) monotonically decreased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001), whereas dietary cholesterol increased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001) This study provides further evidence of an association between fatty acid intake and subclinical inflammation markers. hs-CRP concentrations are likely modulated by dietary fatty acid intake. However, the causality of this association needs to be demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:28207502

  20. Emotional reactivity, functioning, and C-reactive protein alterations in remitted bipolar patients: Clinical relevance of a dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Dargél, Aroldo A; Godin, Ophelia; Etain, Bruno; Hirakata, Vânia; Azorin, Jean-Michel; M'Bailara, Katia; Bellivier, Frank; Bougerol, Thierry; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Passerieux, Christine; Aubin, Valerie; Courtet, Philippe; Leboyer, Marion; Henry, Chantal

    2017-08-01

    Inter-episode mood instability has increasingly been considered in bipolar disorder. This study aimed to investigate emotional reactivity as a major dimension for better characterizing remitted bipolar patients with subthreshold mood symptoms and functional status. This study also aimed to investigate whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation, could be a biological marker of emotional dysregulation in bipolar disorder (BD). Cross-sectional study of 613 subjects who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition criteria for BD recruited from the FondaMental Advanced Centers of Expertise in Bipolar Disorders cohort from 2009 to 2014. All patients had been in remission for at least 3 months before assessment. Patients were classified into three groups according to levels of emotional reactivity. Emotional reactivity was assessed by using the Multidimensional Assessment of Thymic States, and functional status was assessed by the Functioning Assessment Short Test. Clinical characteristics and blood sample were collected from all patients. In total, 415 (68%) patients had abnormal emotional reactivity. Independent of potential confounders, including age, gender and subthreshold mood symptoms, serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were significantly higher in patients with emotional hyper-reactivity (median = 4.0 mg/L, interquartile range = 2.7-5.6), and with emotional hypo-reactivity (median = 3.0 mg/L, interquartile range = 1-4) compared with patients with normal emotional reactivity (median = 0.95 mg/L, interquartile range = 0.4-1.9, p < 0.001). Patients with emotional hyper-reactivity showed significant cognitive functioning impairment ( p < 0.001). Emotional reactivity appears to be a relevant dimension for better characterizing remitted bipolar patients with subthreshold mood symptoms. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein may be an

  1. Association of the ER22/23EK polymorphism in the glucocorticoid receptor gene with survival and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Feelders, Richard A; van den Beld, Annewieke W; Uitterlinden, André G; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Ester, Wietske; Brinkmann, Albert O; Grobbee, Diederick E; de Jong, Frank H; Pols, Huibert A P; Koper, Jan W; Lamberts, Steven W J

    2004-08-01

    We recently demonstrated that a polymorphism in codons 22 and 23 of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with relative glucocorticoid resistance, greater insulin sensitivity, and lower total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In the present study, we investigated whether the ER22/23EK polymorphism is associated with survival, cholesterol levels, and two predictors of mortality: serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 levels. We studied 402 men (mean [+/- SD] age, 77.8 +/- 3.6 years). C-reactive protein was measured by a highly sensitive method using a latex-enhanced immunoephelometric assay. Interleukin 6 was determined by a commercially available immulite assay. After a follow-up of 4 years, 73 (19%) of 381 noncarriers died, while none of the 21 ER22/23EK carriers had died (P = 0.03). C-reactive protein levels were about 50% lower in ER22/23EK carriers (P = 0.01). There were no differences in interleukin 6 levels. Carriers of the ER22/23EK polymorphism have better survival than noncarriers, as well as lower C-reactive protein levels.

  2. C-reactive protein as a predictor of chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erik J; Muller, Corinna L; Sartorius, Jennifer A; White, David R; Maslow, Arthur S

    2012-10-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CAM) affects many pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Finding a serum factor that could accurately predict the presence of CAM could potentially lead to more efficient management of PPROM and improved neonatal outcomes. To determine if C-reactive protein (CRP) is an effective early marker of CAM in patients with PPROM. A retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with PPROM at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, between January 2005 and January 2009. Nonparametric statistical tests (ie, Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman rank correlation) were used to compare distributions that were skewed. Characteristics of the study population were compared using 2-sample t tests for continuous variables and Fisher exact tests for discrete variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate receiver operating characteristic curves and obtain area under the curve estimates in stepwise fashion for predicting histologic CAM. A secondary analysis compared the characteristics among patients with clinical CAM, histologic CAM, or non-CAM. The total population of 73 women was subdivided into patients with histologic CAM (n=26) and patients without histologic CAM (ie, no evidence of CAM on placental pathology; n=47). There was no difference between groups in CRP levels, days of pregnancy latency, white blood cell count, smoking status, antibiotic administration, or steroid benefit. The group with histologic CAM delivered at earlier gestational ages: mean (standard deviation) age was 29.5 (4.4) weeks vs 31.9 (3.5) weeks (P=.02). For our primary analysis, we found no difference in CRP levels (P=.32). Receiver operating characteristic curve plots of CRP levels, temperature at delivery, and white blood cell count resulted in an area under the curve estimate of 0.696, which was 70% predictive of histologic CAM. In the secondary analysis, after adjusting for gestational age, the estimated hazard ratio for CRP change

  3. C-Reactive Protein in Human Atherogenesis: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24799767

  4. C-reactive protein in human atherogenesis: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Oliver; Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Graf, Matthias; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  5. Role of C reactive protein (CRP) in leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hribal, Marta Letizia; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Sesti, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Increased plasma levels of both leptin and C reactive protein (CRP) have been reported in a number of conditions, including obesity, and have been linked to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes and increased cardiovascular risk; interestingly these two biomarkers appear to be able to reciprocally regulate their bioavailability, through complex mechanisms that have not been completely clarified yet. Here we first review clinical evidence suggesting not only that the circulatory levels of CRP and leptin show an independent correlation, but also that assessing them in tandem may result in an increased ability to predict cardiovascular disease. We summarize also molecular studies showing that leptin is able to promote CRP production from hepatocytes and endothelial cells in vitro and discuss the studies addressing the possibility that in vivo leptin administration may be able to modulate plasma CRP levels. Furthermore, we describe two studies demonstrating that CRP directly binds leptin in extra-cellular settings, thus impairing its biological actions. Finally we report genetic evidence that common variations at the leptin receptor locus are associated with CRP blood levels. Overall, the data reviewed here show that the chronic elevation of CRP observed in obese subjects may worsen leptin resistance, contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, and highlight a potential link between conditions, such as leptin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, that may be amenable of pharmacological treatment targeted to the disruption of leptin-CRP interaction.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees

    PubMed Central

    Cattafesta, Monica; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani

    2016-01-01

    Background The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP) is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program’s – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). Results A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68) of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11–0.34). Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001) and stratified by sex (P=0.004) than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001), triglycerides (P=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007), and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. Conclusion us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care. PMID:27274294

  7. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  8. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively, while serum CRP levels ranged between 2.0 and 8.6μg/mL and between 0.3 and 162.3μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively. Milk and serum CRP levels were higher in both clinical and subclinical mastitis when compared with healthy controls (P<0.05 in all cases). However, no significant differences were recorded in CRP concentrations between clinical and subclinical cases. Based on these results, it could be concluded that serum and milk CRP could be useful in order to diagnose canine mastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. C-Reactive Protein and Cognition Are Unrelated to Leukoaraiosis

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Fabricio Correia; Rosset, Idiane; Moriguchi, Emilio Hideyuki; Picon, Paulo Dornelles; Chaves, Marcia Lorena Fagundes; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2014-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with leukoaraiosis in elderly brain. However, several studies indicate that leukoaraiosis is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. It is unknown how the effect of CRP on cognition is mediated by leukoaraiosis. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between serum levels of CRP, the presence of leukoaraiosis, and cognitive impairment in a population of coronary patients over 50 years old. CRP levels explained 7.18% (P: 0.002) of the variance of the MMSE. The adjustment for the presence of leukoaraiosis little changed this variance (5.98%, P: 0.005), indicating that only a small portion of the CRP influence on cognition was mediated via leukoaraiosis. Patients with CRP levels ≥5.0 had 2.9 (95% CI: 1.26–6.44) times more chance to present cognitive impairment (P: 0.012). We found that elevated serum levels of CRP were associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment in elderly and it was not mediated by presence of leukoaraiosis. PMID:24587705

  10. C-reactive protein, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Meinarde, Leonardo; Hillman, Macarena; Rizzotti, Alina; Basquiera, Ana Lisa; Tabares, Aldo; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The association between inflammation, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has not been studied so far. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) is related to low platelet count and PDA. This was a retrospective study of 88 infants with a birth weight ≤1500 g and a gestational age ≤30 weeks. Platelet count, CRP, and an echocardiogram were assessed in all infants. The subjects were matched by sex, gestational age, and birth weight. Differences were compared using the χ(2), t-test, or Mann-Whitney U-test, as appropriate. Significant variables were entered into a logistic regression model. The association between CRP and platelets was evaluated by correlation and regression analysis. Platelet count (167 000 vs. 213 000 µl(-1), p = 0.015) was lower and the CRP (0.45 vs. 0.20 mg/dl, p = 0.002) was higher, and the platelet count correlated inversely with CRP (r = -0.145, p = 0.049) in the infants with vs. without PDA. Only CRP was independently associated with PDA in a logistic regression model (OR 64.1, 95% confidence interval 1.4-2941, p = 0.033).

  11. C-reactive protein modulates human lung fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiko; Kohyama, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Takami, Kazutaka; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Desaki, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Rennard, Stephen I; Takizawa, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been classically used as a marker of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CRP on migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) to human plasma fibronectin (HFn). Using the blindwell chamber technique, CRP inhibited HFL-1 migration in a dose-dependent fashion (at 1 microg/mL, inhibition: 32.5% +/- 7.1%; P < .05). Western blot analysis showed that CRP inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in the presence of HFn. Moreover, the MAPK inhibitors SB202190 (25 microM) and SB203580 (25 microM) inhibited HFn-induced cell migration, suggesting an important role of p38 MAPK in HFn-induced migration. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CRP is mediated by blocking MAPK. In summary, this study demonstrates that CRP directly modulates human lung fibroblasts migration. Thus, CRP may contribute to regulation of wound healing and may be endogenous antifibrotic factor acting on lung fibrosis.

  12. Sleep Duration and C-Reactive Protein in US Adults.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael R; Churilla, James R

    2017-04-01

    To use gender-stratified logistic regression analysis to examine the associations between elevated C-reactive protein (CRP; >3-10 mg/L) and sleep duration. The study sample included male (n = 5033) and female (n = 4917) adult (20 years old and older) participants in the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Sleep duration was categorized as short (≤6 hours/day), adequate (7-8 hours/day), or long (≥9 hours/day). Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, race, smoking status, physical activity, and waist circumference. Analysis revealed significantly (P = 0.0151) higher odds of elevated CRP in men reporting ≤6 hours/day of sleep (odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.52) when compared with a referent group of men reporting 7 to 8 hours/day of sleep. Similar associations were not revealed in women. Short sleep duration was significantly associated with elevated serum CRP concentration independent of waist circumference and moderate physical activity in men but not in women.

  13. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    King, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Background Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walkability effects. Purpose This paper assesses within-neighborhood correlation of CRP, and whether three features of walkable urban form (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) are associated with CRP levels. Methods CRP measures (n=610) and sociodemographic data come from the 2001–3 Chicago Community Adult Health Study, linked with objective built environment data. Results Within-neighborhood correlations of CRP are greater than those of related health measures. A one standard deviation increase in residential density predicts significantly higher log CRP (e.g. β=0.11, p<.01) in Chicago, while a one standard deviation increase in land use mix predicts significantly lower CRP (e.g. β=−0. 19, p<0.01). Street connectivity is unrelated to CRP in this highly walkable city. Discussion Results suggest residential density may be a risk factor for inflammation, while greater walkability of mixed land use areas may be protective. It may be that negative aspects of density overcome the inflammatory benefits of walking. PMID:24096140

  14. Neighborhood walkable urban form and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    King, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walkability effects. This paper assesses within-neighborhood correlation of CRP, and whether three features of walkable urban form (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) are associated with CRP levels. CRP measures (n=610) and sociodemographic data come from the 2001-3 Chicago Community Adult Health Study, linked with objective built environment data. Within-neighborhood correlations of CRP are greater than those of related health measures. A one standard deviation increase in residential density predicts significantly higher log CRP (e.g. β=0.11, p<.01) in Chicago, while a one standard deviation increase in land use mix predicts significantly lower CRP (e.g. β=-0. 19, p<0.01). Street connectivity is unrelated to CRP in this highly walkable city. Results suggest that residential density may be a risk factor for inflammation, while greater walkability of mixed land use areas may be protective. It may be that negative aspects of density overcome the inflammatory benefits of walking. © 2013.

  15. Serum C-Reactive Protein in Children with Liver Disease and Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Kalvandi, Gholamreza; Honar, Naser; Geramizadeh, Bita; Ataollahi, Maryam; Rahmani, Asghar; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of peritonitis as a complication of cirrhosis is an important clinical problem. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate serum C-reactive protein levels as a diagnostic factor for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in child patients with liver disease. Methods In this study, 150 children diagnosed with liver disease and ascites upon admission to Nemazee Teaching Hospital (Shiraz, Iran) were examined. Patients were divided into spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and sterile ascetic fluid groups according to the PMN count ≥ 250/mm3 in the ascetic fluids. Routine laboratory tests were conducted and quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured for all of the patients. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of CRP was evaluated for diagnosis of SBP. Results Of 150 cirrhotic patients, 109 patients presented without SBP (52.29% male, mean age: 5.02 ± 4.49 years) and 41 patients presented with SBP (51.21% male, mean age: 4.71 years). Cell counts, protein levels, albumin levels, and lactate dehydrogenize (LDH) levels of the ascetic fluid and serum samples in the SBP group were higher than the rates for those without SBP (P < 0.05(. The mean ± SD of CRP in the SBP group (36.89 ± 23.43) increased significantly compared to the rate among those without SBP (21.59 ± 15.43, P = 0.001). The percentages for sensitivity and specificity of CRP, the diagnosis of SBP based on the PMN count ≥ 250/mm3, and cultured ascites were 69.23%, 90.25%, 88.43%, and 84.32%, respectively. The areas under the curve of CRP for SBP based on the PMN count ≥ 250/mm3 and cultured ascites was 0.94 (CI 95%: 0.90 to 0.96) and 0.85 (CI 95%: 0.84 to 0.92), respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our study showed that CRP is a marker with high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of SBP in cirrhotic children. PMID:27795726

  16. High sensitivity measurement of CRP and disease progression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Koskinen, J O; Laaksonen, M; Hänninen, A; Lilius, E-M; Waris, M

    2005-07-12

    The authors measured serum C-reactive protein (CRP) serially in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who participated the PRISMS study using a high-sensitivity technique. CRP values were similar in patients with MS and in healthy controls but higher during MS relapses than in remission (p = 0.010). CRP levels were lower during treatment with high-dose interferon beta 1a than placebo (p = 0.035) and higher during first 12 months of study in patients who progressed by year 4 compared with stable patients (p = 0.007).

  17. SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum.

    PubMed

    Aray, Ayda; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Arjmand, Mojtaba; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Cennamo, Nunzio; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood; Zeni, Luigi; Baldini, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    A plastic optical fibre biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is proposed. The biosensor was integrated into a home-made thermo-stabilized microfluidic system that allows avoiding any thermal and/or mechanical fluctuation and maintaining the best stable conditions during the measurements. A working range of 0.006-70 mg L(-1) and a limit of detection of 0.009 mg L(-1) were achieved. These results are among the best compared to other SPR-based biosensors for CRP detection, especially considering that they were achieved in a real and complex medium, i.e. serum. In addition, since the sensor performances satisfy those requested in physiologically-relevant clinical applications, the whole biosensing platform could well address high sensitive, easy to realize, real-time, label-free, portable and low cost diagnosis of CRP for future lab-on-a-chip applications. 3D sketch (left) of the thermo-stabilized home-made flow cell developed to house the SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor. Exemplary response curve (shift of the SPR wavelength versus time) of the proposed biosensor (right) for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The association between burnout, depression, anxiety, and inflammation biomarkers: C-reactive protein and fibrinogen in men and women.

    PubMed

    Toker, Sharon; Shirom, Arie; Shapira, Itzhak; Berliner, Shlomo; Melamed, Samuel

    2005-10-01

    Following the demonstrated association of employee burnout or vital exhaustion with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk, the authors investigated the possibility that one of the mechanisms linking burnout with CVD morbidity is microinflammation, gauged in this study by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and fibrinogen concentrations. Their sample included 630 women and 933 men, all apparently healthy, who underwent periodic health examinations. The authors controlled for possible confounders including 2 other negative affective states: depression and anxiety. In women, burnout was positively associated with hs-CRP and fibrinogen concentrations, and anxiety was negatively associated with them. In men, depression was positively associated with hs-CRP and fibrinogen concentrations, but not with burnout or anxiety. Thus, burnout, depression, and anxiety are differentially associated with microinflammation biomarkers, dependent on gender.

  19. The Strength of Family Ties: Perceptions of Network Relationship Quality and Levels of C-Reactive Proteins in the North Texas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, John M.; Smith, Timothy W.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Taylor, Daniel J.; Allison, Matthew; Ahn, Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the quality of one’s social relationships has been linked to important physical health outcomes, less work has been conducted examining family and friends that differ in their underlying positivity and negativity. Purpose The main aim of this study was to examine the association between supportive, aversive, and ambivalent family/friends with levels of C-reactive proteins. Methods Three hundred participants from the North Texas Heart Study completed the social relationships index and a blood draw to assess high-sensitivity C-reactive proteins (hs-CRPs). Results After standard controls, the number of supportive family members predicted lower hs-CRP levels, whereas the number of ambivalent family members predicted higher hs-CRP levels. These links were independent of depressive symptoms and perceived stress. Conclusions These data highlight the importance of considering specific types of relationships and their underlying positive and negative aspects in research on social ties and physical health. PMID:25804556

  20. Measurement of serum C reactive protein concentration after bone marrow transplantation for leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I F; Worsley, A M; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Goldman, J M; Galton, D; Pepys, M B

    1984-01-01

    C reactive protein concentration was measured serially in 19 patients with leukaemia after bone marrow transplantation. Six episodes of graft versus host disease occurred in the presence of fever but with no evidence of infection, and these were associated with C reactive protein concentrations as high as 200 mg/l. C reactive protein values were also increased in 12 febrile episodes associated with infection, in seven of which graft versus host disease was also present. C reactive protein concentrations are of no value in differentiating infection from graft versus host disease, but in both cases they may be useful as an objective index of response to appropriate treatment. PMID:6365979

  1. Effects of atorvastatin on human C-reactive protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Thongtang, Nuntakorn; Diffenderfer, Margaret R; Ooi, Esther M M; Asztalos, Bela F; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2013-02-01

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goal was to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind, cross over study. Subjects underwent a 15-h primed-constant infusion with deuterated leucine after 8 weeks of placebo and 80 mg/day of atorvastatin. CRP was isolated from lipoprotein deficient plasma, (density > 1.21 g/ml) by affinity chromatography. Isotopic enrichment was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Kinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Paired t test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were used to compare differences between placebo and atorvastatin. Compared with placebo, atorvastatin decreased median CRP pool size by 28.4% (13.31 ± 3.78 vs 10.26 ± 3.93 mg; p = 0.16), associated with a median CRP fractional catabolic rate increase of 39.9% (0.34 ± 0.06 vs 0.50 ± 0.11 pools/day; p = 0.09), with no significant effect on median CRP production rate (0.050 ± 0.01 vs 0.049 ± 0.01 mg/kg/day; p = 0.78). Our data indicate that maximal doses of atorvastatin lower plasma CRP levels by substantially decreasing the median CRP plasma residence time from 2.94 days to 2.0 days, with no significant effect on the median CRP production rate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of C-reactive protein with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Christianson, Teresa J.H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation is suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and may also be involved in the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined the association of inflammatory markers in serum or plasma with prevalent MCI and MCI subtypes in a population-based sample. Methods Olmsted County, MN, residents aged 70–89 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. Information ascertained for each participant was reviewed by an expert panel of neuropsychologists, physicians, and nurses, and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα), and adiponectin were measured at baseline. Results Among 313 subjects with MCI and 1,570 cognitively normal subjects, a CRP level in the upper quartile (> 3.3 mg/L) was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.01) and with non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.12–3.78) after adjusting for age, sex, and years of education. However, there was no association with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.81–1.82). No association was observed with the other inflammatory markers. Conclusions Plasma CRP is associated with prevalent MCI and with na-MCI in elderly, non-demented persons in the population-based setting. These findings suggest an involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of MCI. PMID:19751919

  3. Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Hales, C.A.; Thompson, B.T.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F. )

    1989-12-01

    Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04 +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.

  4. Positive maternal C-reactive protein predicts neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Park, Koo In; Lee, Chul

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of maternal inflammatory marker: C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting early onset neonatal sepsis (that occurring within 72 hours after birth). 126 low birth weight newborns (gestation 32±3.2 wk, birth weight 1887±623 g) and their mothers were included. Neonates were divided into sepsis group (n=51) including both proven (positive blood culture) and suspected (negative blood culture but with more than 3 abnormal clinical signs), and controls (n=75). Mothers were subgrouped into CRP positive ≥1.22 mg/dL (n=48) and CRP negative <1.22 mg/dL (n=78) group, determined by Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, and odds ratio was calculated for neonatal sepsis according to maternal condition. Maternal CRP was significantly higher in neonatal sepsis group than in control (3.55±2.69 vs. 0.48±0.31 mg/dL, p=0.0001). Maternal CRP (cutoff value >1.22 mg/dL) had sensitivity 71% and specificity 84% for predicting neonatal sepsis. Maternal CRP positive group had more neonatal sepsis than CRP negative group (71% vs. 29%, p<0.001). Odds ratio of neonatal sepsis in maternal CRP positive group versus CRP negative group was 10.68 (95% confidence interval: 4.313-26.428, p<0.001). The risk of early onset neonatal sepsis significantly increased in the case of positive maternal CRP (≥1.22 mg/dL). In newborn of CRP positive mother, the clinician may be alerted to earlier evaluation for possible neonatal infection prior to development of sepsis.

  5. Gender Differences in C - reactive protein and Muscle Strengthening Activity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Michael R.; Johnson, Tammie M.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Ford, Earl S.; Boyer, William R.; Churilla, James R.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We sought to examine the gender differences between C-reactive protein (CRP) and muscle strengthening activity (MSA) in U.S. adults (≥20 years of age). METHODS The sample (n=9,135) included participants in the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Three categories of reported MSA participation were created: no MSA (referent group), some MSA (≥1 to <2 days/week), and meeting the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommendation (≥2 days/week). The dependent variable was elevated CRP (>3 to 10 mg/L). RESULTS Gender stratified analysis revealed significantly lower odds of having elevated CRP for women reporting some MSA (OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45–0.83, P=0.0023), or volumes of MSA meeting the DHHS recommendation (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.54–0.82, P=0.0004). Significantly lower odds of men having elevated CRP was observed in those reporting MSA volumes meeting the recommendation (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.61–0.88, P=0.0011). Following adjustment for WC these odds remained significant in men but not women. CONCLUSIONS Women reporting any MSA were found to have lower odds of having elevated CRP when compared to those reporting no MSA prior to adjustment for WC. Significantly lower odds in men were only observed in those meeting the recommendation. These results suggest that WC may mediate the associations between MSA and CRP and this relationship may be stronger in women. PMID:26963135

  6. Purification of recombinant C-reactive protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Avinash; Singh, Sanjay K.; Hammond, David J.; Gang, Toh B.; Ngwa, Donald N.; Pathak, Asmita; Agrawal, Alok

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an evolutionarily conserved protein, a component of the innate immune system, and an acute phase protein in humans. In addition to its raised level in blood in inflammatory states, CRP is also localized at sites of inflammation including atherosclerotic lesions, arthritic joints and amyloid plaque deposits. Results of in vivo experiments in animal models of inflammatory diseases indicate that CRP is an anti-pneumococcal, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-arthritic and an anti-amyloidogenic molecule. The mechanisms through which CRP functions in inflammatory diseases are not fully defined; however, the ligand recognition function of CRP in its native and non-native pentameric structural conformations and the complement-activating ability of ligand-complexed CRP have been suggested to play a role. One tool to understand the structure-function relationships of CRP and determine the contributions of the recognition and effector functions of CRP in host defense is to employ site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants for experimentation. For example, CRP mutants incapable of binding to phosphocholine are generated to investigate the importance of the phosphocholine-binding property of CRP in mediating host defense. Recombinant CRP mutants can be expressed in mammalian cells and, if expressed, can be purified from the cell culture media. While the methods to purify wild-type CRP are well established, different purification strategies are needed to purify various mutant forms of CRP if the mutant does not bind to either calcium or phosphocholine. In this article, we report the methods used to purify pentameric recombinant wild-type and mutant CRP expressed in and secreted by mammalian cells. PMID:1460031

  7. C-reactive protein makes human endothelium stiff and tight.

    PubMed

    Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Urbanova, Katarina; Blanqué, Anja; Wilhelmi, Marianne; Schillers, Hermann; Kliche, Katrin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Eva; Oberleithner, Hans

    2011-02-01

    Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human blood accompanies inflammatory processes, including cardiovascular diseases. There is increasing evidence that the acute-phase reactant CRP is not only a passive marker protein for systemic inflammation but also affects the vascular system. Further, CRP is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and the development of hypertension. Another crucial player in atherosclerotic processes is the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone. Even in low physiological concentrations, it stimulates the expression and membrane insertion of the epithelial sodium channel, thereby increasing the mechanical stiffness of endothelial cells. This contributes to the progression of endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, the hypothesis was tested that the acute application of CRP (25 mg/L), in presence of aldosterone (0.5 nmol/L; 24 hour incubation), modifies the mechanical stiffness and permeability of the endothelium. We found that endothelial cells stiffen in response to CRP. In parallel, endothelial epithelial sodium channel is inserted into the plasma membrane, while, surprisingly, the endothelial permeability decreases. CRP actions are prevented either by the inhibition of the intracellular aldosterone receptors using spironolactone (5 nmol/L) or by the inactivation of epithelial sodium channel using specific blockers. In contrast, inhibition of the release of the vasodilating gas nitric oxide via blockade of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway has no effect on the CRP-induced stiffening of endothelial cells. The data indicate that CRP enhances the effects of aldosterone on the mechanical properties of the endothelium. Thus, CRP could counteract any decrease in arterial blood pressure that accompanies severe acute inflammatory processes.

  8. Development of a synchronous enzyme-reaction system for a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Kuniyo; Ueno, Iori; Yokoyama, Shin-ichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    A synchronous enzyme-reaction system using water-soluble formazan and a non-enzymatic electron mediator was developed and applied to an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The reaction system consists of four steps: (I) dephosphorylation of NADP(+) to produce NAD(+) by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), (II) reduction of NAD(+) to produce NADH with oxidation of ethanol to yield acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), (III) reduction of water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1) to produce formazan by NADH via 1-methoxy-5-methyl-phenazinium methyl sulfate (PMS), and (IV) re-reduction of NAD(+) to produce NADH by ADH. During each cycle, one molecule of tetrazolium is converted to one molecule of formazan. The concentration of formazan during the reaction was given by second-order polynomials of the reaction time. Kinetic studies strongly suggested that the synchronous enzyme-reaction system had the potential to detect an analyte at the attomole level in EIA. On the basis of the kinetic studies, optimal conditions for EIA incorporating the synchronous system were examined. NADP(+) was purified thoroughly to remove minor traces of NAD(+) in the preparation, and an ADH preparation contaminated with the lowest level of ALP activity was used. When the synchronous system was applied to a sandwich-type EIA for human C-reactive protein, the protein was detected with a sensitivity of 50 attomole per well of a micro-titer plate (0.1 ml) in a 1-h reaction. In addition, EIA with water-soluble formazan showed a more quantitative and sensitive result than that with insoluble formazan. These findings indicated that the (WST-1)-PMS system introduced in this study has a great potential for highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay.

  9. Meat Consumption and Its Association With C-Reactive Protein and Incident Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.; Kuijsten, Anneleen; Tigcheler, Basia; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Feskens, Edith J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether intake of different types of meat is associated with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our analysis included 4,366 Dutch participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During a median follow-up period of 12.4 years, 456 diabetes cases were confirmed. Intake of red meat, processed meat, and poultry was derived from a food frequency questionnaire, and their association with serum high-sensitivity CRP was examined cross-sectionally using linear regression models. Their association with risk of type 2 diabetes was examined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, including age, sex, family history of diabetes, and lifestyle and dietary factors. RESULTS An increment of 50 g of processed meat was associated with increased CRP concentration (βprocessed meat = 0.12; P = 0.01), whereas intake of red meat and poultry was not. When comparing the highest to the lowest category of meat intake with respect to diabetes incidence, the adjusted relative risks were as follows: for red meat (1.42 [95% CI 1.06–1.91]), for processed meat (1.87 [1.26–2.78]), and for poultry (0.95 [0.74–1.22]). Additional analysis showed that the associations were not affected appreciably after inclusion of CRP into the model. After adjustment for BMI, however, the association for red meat attenuated to 1.18 (0.88–1.59). CONCLUSIONS Intake of processed meat is associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes. It appears unlikely that CRP mediates this association. PMID:22596177

  10. Relationships among changes in C-reactive protein and cardiovascular disease risk factors with lifestyle interventions.

    PubMed

    Young, D; Camhi, S; Wu, T; Hagberg, J; Stefanick, M

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), are cross-sectionally associated with traditional CVD risk factors and are being considered as an emerging CVD risk factor. In a secondary data analysis, we examined changes in CRP and several CVD risk factors after one-year diet and physical activity interventions to assess whether CRP changed concurrently with other risk factors, or was independent of the traditional risk factors. Data were analyzed from 143 men and 133 women with dyslipidemia who were randomized to one-year interventions of low-fat diet only, physical activity only, diet plus physical activity, or control. Plasma high-sensitivity CRP, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), fasting and 2-hr blood glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and waist circumference were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict CRP change based on other risk factor changes, controlling for age, race, alcohol intake, and hormone replacement therapy. Treatment groups were combined for analysis. Baseline mean (SD) CRP levels were 1.3 ± 1.3 (men) and 1.9 ± 1.8 mg/L (women), with mean changes of -0.11 ± 1.3 and -0.17 ± 1.5 mg/L, respectively. Plasma CRP change was negatively associated with TG change in men (p = 0.003) and women (p = 0.05), positively associated with change in systolic BP in men (p = 0.01), but was not associated with changes in the other risk factors. Dietary and/or physical activity induced changes in CRP may be largely independent of traditional CVD risk factors in persons with dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p < 0.0001). Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 1.4 mmHg and 0.8 mmHg, respectively (both p ≤ 0.038). The misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h SBP was primarily explained by an increase in SBP during the wake period (+1.7 mmHg; p = 0.017), whereas the misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h DBP was primarily explained by an increase in DBP during the sleep opportunity (+1.8 mmHg; p = 0.005). Circadian misalignment per se increases hs-CRP and blood pressure in shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  12. C-Reactive Protein Levels Among U.S. Adults Exposed to Parental Incarceration.

    PubMed

    Boch, Samantha J; Ford, Jodi L

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have linked childhood adversity to low-grade inflammation via C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This study analyzed the association between low-grade inflammation and prior biological parental incarceration. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994-2008) were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression models. Measures included high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP (<3 mg/L = reference, 3-10 mg/L = low-grade inflammation, and >10 mg/L = acute inflammation), parent incarceration occurring in the child's lifetime, and frequency and timing of incarceration with respect to child's age (0-18 years or >18 years vs. never) of incarceration. Analyses were stratified by child's gender. Final sample sizes were n = 5,396 males and n = 6,447 females for maternal incarceration and n = 4,956 males and n = 5,860 females for paternal incarceration. In models with and without potential mediators, females whose fathers were ever incarcerated were more likely to have hs-CRP levels of 3-10 mg/L than females whose fathers were never incarcerated (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.09, 1.91]). Additionally, daughter's age (<18 years; AOR: 1.48, 95% CI: [1.11, 1.97]) and frequency of father's incarceration were significant (AOR: 1.24, 95% CI: [1.04, 1.49]). No mediating effects were observed. Males whose fathers were incarcerated when they were ≥18 years were less likely to have hs-CRP levels of 3-10 mg/L than those whose father was never incarcerated; the association was nonsignificant in the mediated model. Further investigation is needed on the physiological effects of exposure to parental incarceration and interventions to support children.

  13. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Results: Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Conclusion: Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. PMID:27759823

  14. The association between serum C-reactive protein and macronutrients and antioxidants intake in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kooshki, A; Samadipour, E; Akbarzadeh, R

    2015-01-01

    Background:Despite the high levels of inflammation in hemodialysis patients and the effects of diet on systemic inflammation, such as the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, few studies have evaluated the relationship of macronutrients and antioxidants intake with serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Therefore, this study assessed the relationship between serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) with macronutrients and antioxidants intake and serum albumin. Methods:This cross-sectional study used census sampling to select 75 hemodialysis patients (35 men and 40 women) who attended the hemodialysis department of Vaseie Hospital of Sabzevar, Iran. After obtaining the written consent, all the patients were interviewed and dietary data was collected by using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 160 food items. Diet analysis was performed with Nutritionist IV. Before being connected to the dialysis machine, 5 cc fasting blood samples were obtained from all participants and serum hs-CRP and albumin levels were measured. All the statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS -for Windows, version 16.0. Results:The patients’ mean body mass index was 20.09 ± 3.27 kg/ m2. The participants’ intake of antioxidants and all macronutrients, except for carbohydrates and proteins, was less than the standard levels. Moreover, the hs-CRP had significant inverse relationships with serum albumin (P=0.0001) and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy (P=0.002) and protein (P=0.0001). Conclusion:Our findings indicated hs-CRP levels of hemodialysis patients to have significant inverse relationships with serum albumin and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy and protein.

  15. C-Reactive protein, a valuable predictive marker in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Sundaram, Varun; Sundaram, Vivek; Mathew, Milly; Leslie, Nancy; Sathiah, Vijiaboobbathi

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to look for correlation between the markers for malnutrition and inflammation, and atherosclerosis in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This observational study involved 100 predialysis patients (age 57 +/- 12 years) from the out-patient and in-patient departments over a span of two years. Informed consent was obtained from all the study patients. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was assayed as a marker of chronic inflammation. Nutritional status was assessed using serum albumin and body mass index (BMI). Clinical and laboratory data were collected and a carotid doppler study was performed using duplex ultrasonography method to look for carotid artery stenosis. Renal function was assessed by calculating the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by the MDRD-2 formula. These data were later analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test and the students' t test. The mean GFR was 28.3 +/- 16.4 mL/min/1.73m 2 . The mean value of CRP was 14.3 +/- 11.4 mg /L. Sixty-seven percent of patients had elevated CRP (> 6 mg/L) levels. Patients with higher CRP levels showed lower mean serum albumin levels (3.2 +/- 0.7 gm/dL) (P < 0.01). Only three patients had evidence of hemodynamically significant carotid disease (lumen diameter < 50%) with no statistical significance. Low serum albumin levels were associated with low hemoglobin levels (< 10 gm/dL), low GFR and presence of diabetes mellitus. Our results indicate that a high degree of inflammation and malnutrition exists in predialysis patients as seen by high CRP values and low serum albumin levels. Synergism of these factors could contribute to atherosclerosis in CKD apart from the classic risk factors. To our knowledge, this is the first study, which has compared these markers of inflammation in predialysis patients in developing countries.

  16. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  17. Surface plasmon resonance-based immunoassay for human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Vashist, S K; Schneider, E M; Luong, J H T

    2015-07-07

    A rapid and highly-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based immunoassay (IA) has been developed and validated for detecting human C-reactive protein (CRP), a specific biomarker for inflammatory and metabolic disorders, and infections. The 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)-activated protein A/G (Pr A/G) was diluted in 1% (v/v) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), dispensed on a KOH-treated gold (Au)-coated SPR chip, and incubated for 30 min. The Pr A/G functionalized Au SPR chip was then bound to anti-human CRP capture antibody (Ab), blocked with bovine serum albumin, and subsequently used for the detection of CRP. The highly-simplified oriented Ab immobilization strategy enabled the leach-proof binding of capture Ab in 5-fold shorter time than conventional procedures. The developed IA detected 1.2-80 ng mL(-1) of CRP with a limit of detection (LOD) and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1.2 ng mL(-1) and 4.6 ng mL(-1), respectively. It detected CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood, serum and plasma as well as the CRP levels in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma samples of patients with the same precision as the clinically-accredited analyzer-based IA and conventional CRP sandwich ELISA. The Ab-bound SPR chips stored at 4 °C retained their functional activity for 10 weeks, resulting in significant reduction in the overall analysis time.

  18. Body fat distribution and C-reactive protein--a principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A; Lopes, C; Severo, M; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Barros, H

    2011-05-01

    To assess, using principal component analysis, the independent associations of general, central and peripheral subcutaneous fat with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), in men and women from the general population. We studied 833 women and 486 men, randomly selected from the non-institutionalized population of Porto, Portugal, with information on hs-CRP (≤10 mg/l) and anthropometrics (1999-2003). Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and a skinfold composite index to estimate the proportion of arm subcutaneous fat (PSFA), were ascertained by trained personnel. Beta regression coefficients were obtained from generalized linear models with adjustment for the main confounders. Direct associations were found between BMI, WC, WHR and hs-CRP. PSFA was inversely associated with hs-CRP in women (β=-0.080, p-trend=0.010). Since the anthropometric measures were strongly correlated, we used principal component analysis to identify new independent anthropometric factors. The first one, representing a generalized fat distribution (high BMI and WC), was directly associated with hs-CRP (β=0.226, p-trend<0.001 in women; β=0.138, p-trend=0.002 in men). The second factor, characterized by a high PSFA, showed an inverse association with hs-CRP in women (β=-0.071, p-trend=0.048). The third factor, representing a central pattern of fat distribution (low BMI, but high WC and high WHR), was directly associated with hs-CRP in men (β=0.090, p-trend=0.005). A central pattern of fat distribution is directly associated with hs-CRP levels in men, while a high proportion of peripheral subcutaneous fat seems to be inversely associated with hs-CRP, but only in women. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations of big endothelin-1 and C-reactive protein in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Hui; Sun, Wei; Yao, Yan; Hou, Bing-Bo; Qiao, Yu; Zhang, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, the association between inflammation (as indexed by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) and endothelial function [as indexed by big endothelin-1 (ET-1)] in AF patients remains unclear. We enrolled 128 patients with lone AF, among which 83 had paroxysmal AF, and 45 had persistent AF. Eighty-two age- and gender-matched controls of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia without AF history were evaluated. Plasma hs-CRP, big ET-1 levels and other clinical characteristics were compared among the groups. Patients with persistent AF had higher hs-CRP concentrations than those with paroxysmal AF (P < 0.05), both groups had higher hs-CRP level than controls (P < 0.05). Patients with persistent AF had higher big ET-1 level than those with paroxysmal AF, although the difference did not reach the statistical significance (P > 0.05), and both groups had higher big ET-1 levels than controls (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analyses revealed hs-CRP as an independent determinant of AF (P < 0.001). Further adjusted for big ET-1, both big ET-1 and hs-CRP were independent predictors for AF (P < 0.001), but the odds ratio for hs-CRP in predicting AF attenuated from 8.043 to 3.241. There was a positive relation between hs-CRP level and big ET-1 level in paroxysmal AF patients (r = 0.563, P < 0.05), however, the relationship in persistent AF patients was poor (r = 0.094, P < 0.05). Both plasma hs-CRP and big ET-1 levels are elevated in lone AF patients, and are associated with AF. In paroxysmal lone AF patients, there were significant positive correlations between plasma hs-CRP level and big ET-1 level.

  20. Production of modified C-reactive protein in U937-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ciubotaru, Irina; Potempa, Lawrence A; Wander, Rosemary C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) has been proposed to be a strong independent predictor for cardiovascular disease. This circulating form of CRP (native CRP or nCRP) is well described. Recently, the existence of a conformationally distinct isoform of CRP (modified CRP or mCRP) has been reported. The relevance of each CRP isoform to atherosclerotic disease is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the natural expression of CRP in undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated macrophages, cells known to contribute to atherogenesis in vivo, and to determine whether transcribed CRP was expressed as nCRP or mCRP. Macrophages were generated from U937 monocytes using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Differentiated macrophages were further stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated cells, CRP expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and CRP protein production was measured by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (cellular CRP) or high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (secreted CRP). CRP transcript was minimally expressed in undifferentiated cells. Expression increased markedly in macrophages during differentiation and was not affected by LPS at 24 hrs. Cellular CRP protein increased in a time-dependent manner after LPS stimulation, and this induction was mediated via interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta. A small amount of secreted CRP was detected in the media of differentiated cells, but it was not significantly increased after LPS stimulation. Using specific monoclonal antibodies, our data indicate that cellular CRP is directly translated as the mCRP rather than the nCRP isomer. These results indicate that U937-derived macrophages are a good cell model to further study the production of mCRP under conditions relevant for the atherogenic process.

  1. Relation of circulating C-reactive protein to progression of aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Santos, Jose L; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Cruz, Ignacio; Arribas, Antonio; Villacorta, Eduardo; Cascon, Manuel; Palacios, Igor F; Martin-Luengo, Candido

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation and predicts outcome in apparently healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease. Systemic inflammation is present in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether CRP levels predict the progression of AS severity. Blood samples for high-sensitivity CRP measurements and echocardiographic data were obtained in 43 patients (70% men; mean age 73 +/- 8 years) with asymptomatic degenerative AS at study entry. On the basis of repeat echocardiographic assessment at 6 months, patients were grouped as (1) slow progressors (a decrease in aortic valve area [AVA] <0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity <0.15 m/s) and (2) rapid progressors (a decrease in AVA > or =0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity > or =0.15 m/s). Plasma CRP levels were significantly higher in rapid progressors than slow progressors (median 5.1 [range 2.3 to 11.3] vs 2.1 [range 1.0 to 3.1] mg/L, p = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, CRP levels >3 mg/L were independently associated with rapid AS progression (odds ratio 9.1, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 37.3). In conclusion, CRP levels are higher in patients with degenerative AS who show rapid valve disease progression. These findings suggest that inflammation may have a pathogenic role in degenerative AS.

  2. Disposable immunosensors for C-reactive protein based on carbon nanotubes field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Justino, Celine I L; Freitas, Ana C; Amaral, José P; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Cardoso, Susana; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-04-15

    Label-free immunosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (NTFET) devices were developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) which is currently the best validated inflammatory biomarker associated with cardiovascular diseases. The immunoreaction principle consists in the direct adsorption of CRP specific antibodies (anti-CRP) to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) networks. Such anti-CRP are the molecular receptors of CRP antigens which, in turn, can be detected by the developed NTFET devices in a linear dynamic range of 10(-4)-10(2) μg/mL. Thus, typical values of CRP (in blood serum) for healthy persons (<1 μg/mL), and higher levels (>5 μg/mL) corresponding to pathological states, can be both detected with the NTFET immunosensors, becoming an advantageous alternative as the basis for the development of analytical instrumentation for assessment of risk of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. A log-log linear regression was applied to the experimental data with a correlation coefficient of r=0.9962 (p<0.001), and there is no statistical difference (from ANOVA) between individual NTFET devices (p=0.9582), demonstrating acceptable reproducibility. According to the experimental results, the estimate of detection limit (LOD, 10(-4)μg/mL) is 3-fold lower than that of some conventional immunoassay techniques for blood serum (e.g., LOD of 0.2 μg/mL for high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and the dynamic range (10(-4)-10(2)μg/mL) is about 6-fold higher. Furthermore, this simple and low-cost methodology allows the use of sample volumes as low as 1 μL for the label-free detection of CRP.

  3. Association between serum levels of C-reactive protein and personality traits in women

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Susanne; Baghaei, Fariba; Rosmond, Roland; Holm, Göran; Landén, Mikael; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Ekman, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    Background While low-grade inflammation has consistently been observed in subjects with depression, studies on the possible relationship between inflammation and other aspects of brain function are as yet sparse. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible association between serum levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and personality traits. Methods In this study, serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP were determined by ELISA in a population of 270 42-year-old women recruited from the population registry who had been assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Self-reported previous or ongoing depression was also recorded. Unpaired two-tailed t-tests were used for comparison between two groups and correlations were evaluated by the calculation of Pearson's r-coefficient. Results The temperament trait harm avoidance was positively (r = 0.227, p < 0.05) and the character trait self-directedness was negatively (r = -0.261, p < 0.01) associated with serum levels of CRP (p-values corrected for multiple comparisons). The correlations between the personality traits and CRP were observed also after exclusion of subjects reporting ongoing depression (n = 26). Whereas women reporting ongoing depression showed significantly increased levels of CRP as compared to non-depressed women (n = 155), women reporting a history of depression displayed no significant difference in CRP levels as compared to women that reported that they had never been depressed. Conclusion Serum levels of CRP in women was found to be associated with the personality traits harm avoidance and self-directedness. In addition, moderately elevated levels may be a state dependent marker of depression. PMID:18384670

  4. Effect of memantine on C-reactive protein and lipid profiles in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui Hua; Chen, Po See; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Huang, San-Yuan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2017-10-15

    Balance in the immune system plays roles in bipolar disorder (BD) and its metabolic co-morbidities. Memantine is an NMDA receptor antagonist with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of memantine adjunct treatment on metabolic status of BD are unclear. During the 12 weeks period, a total of 191 BD patients were enrolled and split into valproate (VPA) + placebo and VPA + memantine (5mg/day) arms. The fasting plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and metabolic indices were assessed. BD patients were stratified according to their initial CRP level. A cut-off value of initial CRP level of 2322ng/mL discriminated the waist circumference in these BD patients after 12-week VPA treatment. In the high CRP (> 2322ng/mL) group, patients in the VPA + memantine arm had a significantly decreased in their CRP (p= 0.009), total cholesterol (p= 0.002), LDL (p= 0.002) levels, BMI (p= 0.001), and waist circumference (p< 0.001), compared to those in the VPA + placebo arm. However, analysis of the low CRP group did not showed the effect. We recruited BD patients in depressed states and the sample size was relative small. The effects of the fixed dose of memantine on metabolic indices were 12-week follow up in BD patients treated with VPA. BD patients with high initial CRP levels receiving memantine adjunct treatment have a reduced risk of inflammation and metabolic imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the long-term outcome for memantine adjunct therapy in BD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. C-reactive protein variability is associated with vascular access outcome in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Hung; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Wang, Chun-Yeh; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te

    2017-04-27

    Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access failure is one of the most important causes of morbidity and contributes to the cost of dialysis care. There is paucity of data evaluating long-term monitoring of C-reactive protein (CRP) on outcome of HD vascular access. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether variability of serum CRP level was associated with vascular access failure rate over a 7-year period. A total of 318 HD patients were included. Their demographic data, co-morbidities and biochemical data were reviewed and collected. Serum high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) level was measured every 6 months. Patients were divided into three groups according to their serial hs-CRP levels. Patients with their hs-CRP below 2 mg/L were defined as low group (n=65, 20.4%) and those with higher than 4 mg/L were defined as high (n=39, 12.3%). The rest were classified as fluctuated hs-CRP group (n=214, 67.3%). Treatment of vascular access failure includes angioplasty and access re-creation. Their body mass index, indicators of dialysis adequacy and serum albumin and hs-CRP levels differed significantly among three groups. The annual vascular access failure rate was significantly higher in fluctuated hs-CRP group than in high hs-CRP group (0.41 vs 0.36, P=.037). Serum albumin was a significant associate of vascular access failure. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated patients with high or fluctuated hs-CRP had shorter free interval of vascular access failure than low hs-CRP group. HD patients with fluctuated hs-CRP levels were associated with increased vascular access failure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Association of desaturase activity and C-reactive protein in European children.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Maike; Börnhorst, Claudia; Schwarz, Heike; Risé, Patrizia; Galli, Claudio; Moreno, Luis A; Pala, Valeria; Russo, Paola; Veidebaum, Toomas; Tornaritis, Michael; Fraterman, Arno; De Henauw, Stefaan; Eiben, Gabriele; Lissner, Lauren; Molnár, Dénes; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Desaturase enzymes influence the fatty acid (FA) composition of body tissues and their activity affects the conversion rate of saturated to monounsaturated FA and of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) to long-chain PUFA. Desaturase activity has further been shown to be associated with inflammation. We investigate the association between delta-9 (D9D), delta-6 (D6D) and delta-5 desaturase (D5D) activity and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) in young children. In the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) cohort study children were examined at baseline (T0) and after 2 y (T1). D9D, D6D, and D5D activities were estimated from T0 product-precursor FA ratios. CRP was measured at T0 and T1. In a subsample of 1,943 children with available information on FA, CRP, and covariates, the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of desaturase activity and CRP were analyzed. Cross-sectionally, a D9D increase of 0.01 units was associated with a 11% higher risk of having a serum CRP ≥ Percentile 75 (P75) (OR, 99% CI: 1.11 (1.01; 1.22)) whereas D6D and D5D were not associated with CRP. No significant associations were observed between baseline desaturase activity and CRP 2 y later. Cross-sectionally, our results indicate a positive association of D9D and CRP independent of weight status. High D9D activity may increase the risk of subclinical inflammation which is associated with metabolic disorders. As D9D expression increases with higher intake of saturated FA and carbohydrates, dietary changes may influence D9D activity and thus CRP. However, it remains to be investigated whether there is a causal relationship between D9D activity and CRP.

  7. C-Reactive Protein Genotypes Affect Baseline, but not Exercise Training–Induced Changes, in C-Reactive Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Obisesan, Thomas O.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Phillips, Tracey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Phares, Dana A.; Prior, Steven J.; Hagberg, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to determine whether C-reactive protein (CRP) gene variants affect baseline and training-induced changes in plasma CRP levels. Methods and Results Sixty-three sedentary men and women aged 50 to 75 years old underwent baseline testing (VOmax, body composition, CRP levels). They repeated these tests after 24 weeks of exercise training while on a low-fat diet. The CRP +219G/A variant significantly associated with CRP levels before and after training after accounting for the effects of demographic and biological variables. CRP −732A/G genotype was significantly related on a univariate basis to CRP levels after training. The CRP +29T/A variant did not affect CRP levels before or after training. In regression analyses, the +219 and −732 variants each had significant effects on CRP levels before and after training. Subjects homozygous for the common A/G −732/+219 haplotype exhibited the highest CRP levels, and having the rare allele at either site was associated with significantly lower CRP levels. CRP levels decreased significantly with training (−0.38±0.18 mg/L; P=0.03). However, none of the CRP variants was associated with the training-induced CRP changes. Conclusion CRP +219G/A and −732A/G genotypes and haplotypes and exercise training appear to modulate CRP levels. However, training-induced CRP reductions appear to be independent of genotype at these loci. PMID:15271790

  8. C - Reactive Protein, Inflammatory Conditions and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Ravi; Gona, Philimon; Nam, Byung-Ho; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Wilson, Peter W. F.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Background It is uncertain to what extent high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations reflect the presence of inflammatory conditions in the community. Methods We evaluated 3782 Framingham participants (mean age 55 years; 52% women) free of baseline cardiovascular disease. Logistic regression models examined the prevalence of common inflammatory conditions by CRP categories whereas a separate matched case-referent analysis evaluated the prevalence of uncommon inflammatory conditions. Cox models were used to assess the influence of common inflammatory conditions on relations between CRP and incident cardiovascular disease. Results Common inflammatory conditions were reported by nearly half of the participants; these individuals were more likely to have markedly-high CRP concentrations (>10mg/L, P for trend=0.001). In multivariable models, there were increased odds of having at least one common inflammatory condition with CRP concentrations of 1–3.0, 3.01–10, and >10mg/L, compared to the referent category (<1mg/L); the respective odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 1.41 (1.07–1.86), 1.45 (1.07–2.98) and 1.64 (1.09–2.47) in men, and 1.08 (0.82–1.43), 1.07 (0.80–1.44) and 1.38 (0.97–1.96) in women. In case-referent analyses, uncommon inflammatory conditions were more common in individuals with CRP >10mg/L compared to those with CRP <1mg/L (12.1% versus 6.6%; P=0.0001). In multivariable models, higher CRP categories were not associated with incident cardiovascular disease, and with additional adjustment for inflammatory conditions, results remained unchanged. Conclusion There is high prevalence of common and uncommon inflammatory conditions in individuals with high CRP concentrations. Higher CRP concentrations should be interpreted with caution in cardiovascular disease risk assessment. PMID:18060926

  9. Serum levels of procalcitonin and high sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with long-term mortality in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, You-Mei; Liu, Xue-Yuan

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the prognostic value of systemic inflammation, as measured by the inflammatory biomarkers PCT and Hs-CRP, to predict the long-term mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We prospectively studied 374 patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted within 24h after the onset of symptoms. Serum levels of PCT, Hs-CRP and NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) were measured at the time of admission. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 year. The prognostic value of PCT to predict the mortality within one year was compared with Hs-CRP, NIHSS and with other known outcome predictors. In the 64 non-survival patients, serum PCT levels were significantly (P<0.0001) higher compared with those in survival patients. Multivariate COX regression analysis showed that log-transformed PCT and Hs-CRP were independent mortality predictors with adjusted hazard ratio of 4.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.42-6.30) and 15.37 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.25-41.08). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of PCT and Hs-CRP were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.85-0.93) and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.59-0.77) for mortality, respectively. Serum levels of PCT and HS-CRP at admission were independent predictor of long-term mortality after ischemic stroke in a Chinese sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Study of Association of Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) and the Highly Sensitive C - Reactive Protein (hsCRP) in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    K.O., Thejaswini; M.S, Roopakala; G., Dayananda; S.P, Chandrakala; Kumar K.M., Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) objectively assesses the lower extremity arterial perfusion. A low ABI suggests atherosclerosis and Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). PAD is more common in individuals with type2 Diabetes mellitus (Type2 DM). Inflammatory markers are found to be associated with Type2 DM. But the association of the inflammatory markers with the atherosclerotic burden remains poorly defined. Aims: To compare the ABI and the hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients with those in the normal subjects and to study the association of serum hsCRP with ABI in the Type 2 DM patients and in normal subjects. Methods: The subjects were 40 Type2 DM and 40 age, sex and BMI matched normal subjects who were aged between 45-60 yrs. The subjects were assigned to two different groups, Group1- the Type2 DM patients and Group2- the healthy controls. The serum hsCRP levels were determined by the turbidimetry method (BIOSYSTEMS) and the ABI values were determined by using the traditional continuous wave (CW) Doppler of NICOLET VERSALAB. Statistical Analysis: The data was analyzed by using the Student’s t test (two tailed; independent) to find the significance of the study parameters between the two groups. Pearson’s Correlation was used to find the correlation of serum hsCRP with the ABI in the two groups. Results: The ABI showed a significantly low value (P=0.035*) and the serum hsCRP showed a trend towards a significant increase (p = 0.069+) in the type2diabetics as compared to those in the normals. There was a significant negative correlation between ABI and hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients (r=-0.560, p<0.001**). However, such correlation was not observed in the normal subjects. Conclusion: As serum hsCRP is associated with ABI in the type2 DM patients, inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:23450165

  11. A Study of Association of Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) and the Highly Sensitive C - Reactive Protein (hsCRP) in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    K O, Thejaswini; M S, Roopakala; G, Dayananda; S P, Chandrakala; Kumar K M, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) objectively assesses the lower extremity arterial perfusion. A low ABI suggests atherosclerosis and Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). PAD is more common in individuals with type2 Diabetes mellitus (Type2 DM). Inflammatory markers are found to be associated with Type2 DM. But the association of the inflammatory markers with the atherosclerotic burden remains poorly defined. To compare the ABI and the hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients with those in the normal subjects and to study the association of serum hsCRP with ABI in the Type 2 DM patients and in normal subjects. The subjects were 40 Type2 DM and 40 age, sex and BMI matched normal subjects who were aged between 45-60 yrs. The subjects were assigned to two different groups, Group1- the Type2 DM patients and Group2- the healthy controls. The serum hsCRP levels were determined by the turbidimetry method (BIOSYSTEMS) and the ABI values were determined by using the traditional continuous wave (CW) Doppler of NICOLET VERSALAB. The data was analyzed by using the Student's t test (two tailed; independent) to find the significance of the study parameters between the two groups. Pearson's Correlation was used to find the correlation of serum hsCRP with the ABI in the two groups. The ABI showed a significantly low value (P=0.035*) and the serum hsCRP showed a trend towards a significant increase (p = 0.069+) in the type2diabetics as compared to those in the normals. There was a significant negative correlation between ABI and hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients (r=-0.560, p<0.001**). However, such correlation was not observed in the normal subjects. As serum hsCRP is associated with ABI in the type2 DM patients, inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  12. High Sensitivity deflection detection of nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak; Ashby, Paul

    2009-10-28

    A critical limitation of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the lack of a high-sensitivity position detection mechanism. We introduce a noninterferometric optical approach to determine the position of nanowires with a high sensitivity and bandwidth. Its physical origins and limitations are determined by Mie scattering analysis. This enables a dramatic miniaturization of detectable cantilevers, with attendant reductions to the fundamental minimum force noise in highly damping environments. We measure the force noise of an 81{+-}9??nm radius Ag{sub 2}Ga nanowire cantilever in water at 6{+-}3??fN/{radical}Hz.

  13. GlycA, a Pro-Inflammatory Glycoprotein Biomarker, and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: Relationship with C-Reactive Protein and Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Eke G; Riphagen, Ineke J; Connelly, Margery A; Otvos, James D; Bakker, Stephan J L; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2015-01-01

    GlycA is a novel nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-measured biomarker of systemic inflammation. We determined whether GlycA is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in men and women, examined whether this association with CVD is modified by renal function, and compared this association with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). A prospective cohort study was performed among 4,759 subjects (PREVEND study) without a history of CVD and cancer. Incident CVD was defined as the combined endpoint of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cox regression analyses were used to examine associations of baseline GlycA and hsCRP with CVD. 298 first CVD events occurred during a median follow-up of 8.5 years. After adjustment for clinical and lipid measures the hazard ratio (HR) for CVD risk in the highest GlycA quartile was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.05-2.37, P for trend = 0.004). This association was similar after further adjustment for renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin excretion). After additional adjustment for hsCRP, GlycA was still associated with incident CVD (HR: 1.16 per SD change (95% CI, 1.01-1.33), P = 0.04). Similar results were obtained for hsCRP (HR per SD change after adjustment for GlycA: 1.17 (95% CI 1.17 (95% CI, 1.01-3.60), P = 0.04). CVD risk was highest in subjects with simultaneously higher GlycA and hsCRP (fully adjusted HR: 1.79 (95% CI, 1.31-2.46), P<0.001). GlycA is associated with CVD risk in men and women, independent of renal function. The association of GlycA with incident CVD is as strong as that of hsCRP.

  14. Evaluation of serial C-reactive protein measurements after surgical treatment of pleural empyema

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Israel Lopes; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Choi, Esther Mihwa; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Serial C-reactive protein measurements have been used to diagnose and monitor the response to therapy in patients with pneumonia and other infectious diseases. Nonetheless, the role of C-reactive protein measurement after surgical treatment for pleural empyema is not well defined. The aim of this study is to describe the behavior of C-reactive protein levels after the surgical treatment of pleural empyema and to correlate this parameter with the patient's prognosis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with pleural empyema treated by either chest-tube drainage or surgery from January 2006 to December 2008. C-reactive protein levels were recorded preoperatively and 2 and 7 days postoperatively. The clinical outcome was binary: success or failure (mortality or the need for repeated pleural intervention). RESULTS: The study group comprised fifty-two patients. The median C-reactive protein values were as follows: 146 mg/L (pre-operative), 134 mg/L (post-operative day 2), and 116 mg/L (post-operative day 7). There was a trend toward a decrease in these values during the first week after surgery, but this difference was only statistically significant on day 7 after surgery. Over the first week after surgery, the C-reactive protein values decreased similarly in both groups (successful and failed treatment). No correlation between the preoperative C-reactive protein level and the clinical outcome was found. CONCLUSIONS: We observed that, in contrast to other medical conditions, C-reactive protein levels fall slowly during the first postoperative week in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for pleural empyema. No correlation between the perioperative C-reactive protein level and the clinical outcome was observed. PMID:22473405

  15. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HRpeak: 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak: 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO2VT: 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels. PMID:24760118

  16. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Leal, A M O

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3 ± 22.3 vs 135.1 ± 25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HRpeak: 149 ± 12 vs 139 ± 10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak: 24.2 ± 3.2 vs 18.9 ± 2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO2VT: 14.1 ± 3.4 vs 12.2 ± 2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels.

  17. Fast bedside measurement of blood count and C-reactive protein in newborns compared with conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Rongioletti, M; Majolini, M B; Collegiani, V; Vaccarella, C; Notarmuzi, M L; Cortesi, M; Pasqualetti, P; Cicchese, M; Agostino, R; Liumbruno, G M

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal complete blood count (CBC) and high plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with neonatal infections and could be helpful in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and to monitor the antibiotic treatment. The aim of this work is to evaluate and compare the performance of a bedside analyzer for blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) with a conventional analyzer in a neonatal population. 150 capillary or venous blood samples of term and preterm newborns were processed on an ABX-MicrosCRP200 analyzer and on a SysmexXE2100 (conventional hematology analyzer) for CBC, leukocyte differential, reticulocytes, and nucleated red blood cells (NRBC); high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) was performed on a ModularPE. The differences between complete blood count and CRP were regressed against their means and assessed by means of intra-class-correlation. The intra-class-correlation for white blood cell (WBC) was 0.98, for hemoglobin 0.97, for hematocrit 0.96, for mean corpuscular volume 0.95, and for platelet 0.98. ABX-MicrosCRP200 overestimated the WBC (+1.27 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001), hematocrit (+1.80%; p < 0.001), and platelet (+13.55 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001). The intra-class-correlation for CRP was high (0.97), without systematic difference between the two values (p = 0.64). The agreement between the two methods was high for both tests. However, the SD of the difference for WBC and platelet could be clinically important in leukopenic or thrombocytopenic newborns.

  18. High sensitivity knitted fabric strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Juan; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe

    2016-10-01

    Wearable sensors are increasingly used in smart garments for detecting and transferring vital signals and body posture, movement and respiration. Existing fabric strain sensors made from metallized yarns have low sensitivity, poor comfort and low durability to washing. Here we report a knitted fabric strain sensor made from a cotton/stainless steel (SS) fibre blended yarn which shows much higher sensitivity than sensors knitted from metallized yarns. The fabric feels softer than pure cotton textiles owing to the ultrafine stainless steel fibres and does not lose its electrical property after washing. The reason for the high sensitivity of the cotton/SS knitted fabric sensor was explored by comparing its sensing mechanism with the knitted fabric sensor made from metallized yarns. The results show that the cotton/SS yarn-to-yarn contact resistance is highly sensitive to strain applied to hooked yarn loops.

  19. Developments of highly sensitive DNA sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Naoya

    2011-09-01

    The large enhancements of optical properties of the dye-intercalated DNA lead us to apply the dye-intercalated DNA as various sensors with a high sensitivity to detect environmentally toxic gases such as dioxine, NOx or carbon monoxide. This paper retorts on DNA sensors for the further applications of DNA as materials. Also, bio-medical applications of DNA sensors such as a glucose sensor are reported.

  20. Low Cost, Low Power, High Sensitivity Magnetometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Guedes , A.; et al., 2008: Hybrid - LOW COST, LOW POWER, HIGH SENSITIVITY MAGNETOMETER A.S. Edelstein*, James E. Burnette, Greg A. Fischer, M.G...Edelstein, 2004; Burnette, 2008), we suggested a method for mitigating the problem of 1/f noise. We and others ( Guedes , 2008) have been utilizing...6. Guedes , A.; et al., 2008: Hybrid - 3magnetoresistive/microelectromechanical devices for static field modulation and sensor 1/f noise

  1. High sensitivity neutron detector for Z

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, L.E.; Porter, J.L. Jr.; Simpson, W.W.; Vargas, M.F.; Zagar, D.M.; Hartke, R.; Buersgens, F.; Symes, D.R.; Ditmire, T.

    2004-10-01

    We have developed, calibrated, and tested a high sensitivity neutron detector that can be operated in the harsh x-ray bremsstrahlung environment that exists in experiments conducted on the 20 MA Z z-pinch facility located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The detector uses a scintillator coupled to a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube detector and extensive x-ray shielding.

  2. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Frédéric; Biston, Patrick; Piagnerelli, Michael

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen) and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen). We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D) and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F). The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death. PMID:28226029

  3. Usefulness of C-reactive protein in monitoring the severe community-acquired pneumonia clinical course.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luís; Póvoa, Pedro; Almeida, Eduardo; Fernandes, Antero; Mealha, Rui; Moreira, Pedro; Sabino, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the C-reactive protein level, the body temperature and the white cell count in patients after prescription of antibiotics in order to describe the clinical resolution of severe community-acquired pneumonia. A cohort of 53 consecutive patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia was studied. The C-reactive protein levels, body temperature and white cell count were monitored daily. By day 3 a C-reactive protein level 0.5 times the initial level was a marker of poor outcome (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.59). Patients were divided according to their C-reactive protein patterns of response to antibiotics, into fast response, slow response, nonresponse, and biphasic response. About 96% of patients with a C-reactive protein pattern of fast response and 74% of patients with a slow response pattern survived, whereas those patients with the patterns of nonresponse and of biphasic response had a mortality rate of 100% and 33%, respectively (P < 0.001). On day 3 of antibiotic therapy, a decrease in C-reactive protein levels by 0.31 or more from the previous day's level was a marker of good prognosis (sensitivity, 0.75; specificity, 0.85). Daily C-reactive protein measurement after antibiotic prescription is useful in identification, as early as day 3, of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients with poor outcome. The identification of the C-reactive protein pattern of response to antibiotic therapy was useful in the recognition of the individual clinical course, either improving or worsening, as well as the rate of improvement, in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  4. The significance of C-reactive protein levels in women with premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M A; Zinaman, M J; Lowensohn, R I; Moawad, A H

    1985-02-15

    In a prospective study of 100 patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes, clinical chorioamnionitis was present in 18 and histologic chorioamnionitis was present in 63. Patients who were managed conservatively for premature rupture of membranes were monitored by C-reactive protein determination, white blood cell and differential counts, maternal temperature, and fetal heart tone. C-reactive protein was measured nephelometrically (Immuno-chemistry Analyzer II, Beckman). Elevated C-reactive protein levels correlated well with both the pathologic and the clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis. Elevated C-reactive protein levels (at least 12 to 24 hours before delivery) were more sensitive than other standard laboratory or clinical tests in predicting chorioamnionitis both by clinical and pathologic criteria. When C-reactive protein values were normal, clinical chorioamnionitis was rarely found, whereas pathologically diagnosed chorioamnionitis was found half of the time. We conclude that although the C-reactive protein level is a very sensitive predictor of infectious morbidity in premature rupture of membranes, its specificity is not high.

  5. The impact of an exercise intervention on C - reactive protein during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Marquis; Braun, Barry; Marcus, Bess H; Stanek, Edward; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-24

    C-reactive protein (CRP) during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials suggest that exercise programs may be associated with reductions in CRP in non-pregnant populations; however, such studies have not been conducted among pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an individually-tailored motivationally-matched exercise intervention on CRP in pregnant women. The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You study was a randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in women at increased risk. Women were randomized to either a 12-week exercise intervention (n = 84) or a comparison health and wellness intervention (n = 87). High sensitivity CRP (mg/dL) was measured using a commercial immunoassay kit. Physical activity was measured using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on change in CRP using an intent-to-treat approach. CRP decreased (-0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.07) from pre- to post-intervention in the exercise arm (p = 0.14) and increased (0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.07, 0.24) (p = 0.64) in the health and wellness arm; however the between group difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Findings did not differ according to ethnic group or pre-pregnancy body mass index. In a secondary analysis based on self-reported physical activity, women who decreased their time spent in sports/exercise experienced a mean increase in CRP (0.09 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.14, 0.33), whereas women who maintained or increased their sports/ exercise experienced a mean decrease in CRP (-0.08 mg/dL, 95 % CI: -0.23, 0.08) (p = 0.046). Findings from this randomized trial in an ethnically and socio-economically diverse population of pregnant women were consistent with a positive impact

  6. The role of C-reactive protein in innate and acquired inflammation: new perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Trial, JoAnn; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Entman, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The participation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in host defense against microorganisms has been well described. More controversial has been its role in chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Our recent publications explain the reasons for some of the confusion concerning CRP as a risk factor for disease and whether it is pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. We found that two isoforms of CRP, pentameric (pCRP) and monomeric (mCRP), on microparticles (MPs), were not measureable by standard clinical assays. When we investigated MPs by imaging cytometry in plasma from controls versus patients with peripheral artery disease, we found that MPs from endothelial cells bearing mCRP were elevated. This elevation did not correlate with the soluble pCRP measured by high-sensitivity CRP assays. The data suggest that detection of mCRP on MPs may be a more specific marker in diagnosis, measurement of progression, and risk sensitivity in chronic disease. In an in vitro model of vascular inflammation, pCRP was anti-inflammatory and mCRP was pro-inflammatory for macrophage and T cell polarization. When we further investigated pCRP under defined conditions, we found that pCRP in the absence of a phosphocholine ligand had no inflammatory consequences. When combined with phosphocholine ligands, pCRP signaled through two Fcγ receptors (FcγRI and FcγRII) via phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (pSYK) to activate monocytes. Phosphocholine itself, when bound to pCRP, induced a congruent M2 macrophage and Th2 response. Phosphocholine is also the head group on the lipid phosphatidylcholine, which can become oxidized. Liposomes bearing oxidized phosphatidylcholine without pCRP promoted a uniform M1 macrophage and Th1 pro-inflammatory response. When oxidized liposomes were bound to pCRP, there was a disjunction in the macrophage and T cell response: monocytes matured into M2 macrophages, but the T cells polarized into a Th1 phenotype. The CRP-bound liposomes signaled

  7. Elevated C-reactive protein levels and metabolic syndrome in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Volpato, Stefano; Galvani, Matteo; Blè, Alessandro; Bandinelli, Stefania; Corsi, Anna Maria; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Guralnik, Jack M.; Fellin, Renato; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and “low grade” systemic inflammation (LGSI) are very common findings in the older population. Although MS and LGSI have been associated in adults, it is not known what is the real contribution of MS, and its single components, to LGSI in older persons, due to the potential confounding effect of comorbidity and aging. We investigated the relationship between increased C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels, a marker of LGSI, and MS in 1044 older (≥65 years) community dwelling Italian individuals enrolled the InChianti study. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the NCEP-ATP III-AHA/NHLBI criteria. High sensitivity CRP (hs.CRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and defined as high when >3 mg/L. The overall prevalence of MS was 31%. The prevalence of high hs.CRP was 54.5% in subjects with, and 41.3% in those without MS (p < 0.001). MS was associated with high hs.CRP levels after adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.46-2.55). Compared to subjects with MS and no LGSI, individuals with MS and LGSI were characterized by higher waist circumference, BMI, and HOMA score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels in subjects with MS (waist circumference III vs. I tertile OR: 2.60, 95% CI: 1.79-3.77) independent of age, gender, and important confounding variables including comorbidity. Additional analyses, conducted with and without dichotomization of hs.CRP levels, confirmed the central role of waist circumference in the LGSI phenomenon, independent of gender and diagnosis of MS. We conclude that in older individuals, MS is associated with LGSI, but the association is mainly supported by a strong independent correlation between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels. In the absence of this specific MS component, it seems that the contribution of MS to LGSI would be modest at best. PMID:18845301

  8. Rosuvastatin for primary prevention in older persons with elevated C-reactive protein and low to average low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels: exploratory analysis of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Robert J; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Shepherd, James; Ridker, Paul M

    2010-04-20

    Randomized data on statins for primary prevention in older persons are limited, and the relative hazard of cardiovascular disease associated with an elevated cholesterol level weakens with advancing age. To assess the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin in persons 70 years or older. Secondary analysis of JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 1315 sites in 26 countries randomly assigned participants in JUPITER. Among the 17 802 participants randomly assigned with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels less than 3.37 mmol/L (<130 mg/dL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels of 2.0 mg/L or more without cardiovascular disease, 5695 were 70 years or older. Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive 20 mg of rosuvastatin daily or placebo. The primary end point was the occurrence of a first cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke, arterial revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina, or death from cardiovascular causes). The 32% of trial participants 70 years or older accrued 49% (n = 194) of the 393 confirmed primary end points. The rates of the primary end point in this age group were 1.22 and 1.99 per 100 person-years of follow-up in the rosuvastatin and placebo groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.82]; P < 0.001). Corresponding rates of all-cause mortality in this age group were 1.63 and 2.04 (hazard ratio, 0.80 [CI, 0.62 to 1.04]; P = 0.090). Although no significant heterogeneity was found in treatment effects by age, absolute reductions in event rates associated with rosuvastatin were greater in older persons. The relative rate of any serious adverse event among older persons in the rosuvastatin versus placebo group was 1.05 (CI, 0.93 to 1.17). Effect estimates from this exploratory analysis with age cut-point chosen after trial completion should be viewed in

  9. Cooled membrane for high sensitivity gas sampling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruifen; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-04-18

    A novel sample preparation method that combines the advantages of high surface area geometry and cold surface effect was proposed to achieve high sensitivity gas sampling. To accomplish this goal, a device that enables the membrane to be cooled down was developed for sampling, and a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer was used for separation and quantification analysis. Method development included investigation of the effect of membrane temperature, membrane size, gas flow rate and humidity. Results showed that high sensitivity for equilibrium sampling, such as limonene sampling in the current study could be achieved by either cooling down the membrane and/or using a large volume extraction phase. On the other hand, for pre-equilibrium extraction, in which the extracted amount was mainly determined by membrane surface area and diffusion coefficient, high sensitivity could be obtained by using thinner membranes with a larger surface and/or a higher sampling flow rate. In addition, humidity showed no significant influence on extraction efficiency, due to the absorption property of the liquid extraction phase. Next, the limit of detection (LOD) was found, and the reproducibility of the developed cooled membrane gas sampling method was evaluated. Results showed that LODs with a membrane diameter of 19mm at room temperature sampling were 9.2ng/L, 0.12ng/L, 0.10ng/L for limonene, cinnamaldehyde and 2-pentadecanone, respectively. Intra- and inter-membrane sampling reproducibility revealed RSD% lower than 8% and 13%, respectively. Results uniformly demonstrated that the proposed cooled membrane device could serve as an alternative powerful tool for future gas sampling.

  10. High-sensitivity bunch charge monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, N. I.; Fateev, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    The conceptual design for a high-sensitivity bunch charge monitor is presented. The device operates with short, spaced bunches. For optimal performance, the bunch duration should be less than 10 ns and bunch spacing should be more than 100 ns. Sensitivity of the monitor is close to 10 V per nanocoulomb. The equivalent scheme and the output signal shape are also presented. Such a monitor seems to be promising for the bunch charge measurements of beams like those in TESLA or ILC projects.

  11. [Clinical interpretation of high sensitivity troponin T].

    PubMed

    Alquézar Arbé, Aitor; Santaló Bel, Miguel; Sionis, Alessandro

    2015-09-21

    Determination of cardiac troponin (cTn) is necessary for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation. However Tnc can be released in other clinical situations. The development of high-sensitive cTn T assays (hs-cTnT) improves the management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. Here, we provide an overview of the diverse causes of hs-cTnT elevation and recommend strategies for the clinical interpretation of the test result. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly sensitive terahertz sensor for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Suk; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Seok; Chung, Youngchul; Seo, Minah

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we present a new type of non-contact detection method for glucose molecule using nano antenna array based bio sensing chip that operates at terahertz frequency range (0.5 - 2.5 THz). Localized and hugely enhanced transmitted terahertz field by nano antenna array in the sensing chip induced enhancement of absorption coefficient of glucose molecule that enables us to detect even very small volume of molecules. Nano antenna based terahertz sensing chip can be expected to offer accurate identification of glucose level as a non-invasive and painless sensing tool with high sensitivity.

  13. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C.; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R.; Towers, G. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state. PMID:25393688

  14. Site-directed immobilisation of antibody fragments for detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Albers, Willem M

    2006-01-15

    C-reactive protein, CRP antibody Fab'-fragments have been attached on pre-cleaned gold slides and protein repellent polymers have been used to block the remaining free space in between the antibody fragments. At optimal conditions the antibody fragments are site-directly immobilised on the surface and non-specific binding is reduced. The amount of Fab'-fragments in the polymer host monolayer has been optimised for various buffers. Binding of CRP to Fab'-fragment/polymer layers produced in phosphate buffered saline decreased with NaCl salt concentration. In a 1M NaCl phosphate buffer, the antibodies seem to be randomly oriented on the surface with a similar response to CRP as that of an antibody F(ab)(2)-fragment layer. In a 150 mM NaCl phosphate buffer, on the other hand, the fragments seem to be site-directly oriented and the response to CRP was fivefold. The highest response to CRP was obtained to a layer with a Fab'-fragment concentration of 60 microg/ml. CRP could be detected in a concentration range of 1 ng/ml to 50 microg/ml from a standard solution in phosphate buffer and in a range of 4 ng/ml to 50 microg/ml from serum/PBS. CRP was, moreover, successfully detected in patient samples with good reproducibility. The layer would thus be sensitive enough to analyse the CRP concentration in human serum for predicting cardiovascular disease.

  15. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  16. [C-reactive protein as a biochemical marker of cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    González-Jiménez, Emilio; Montero-Alonso, Miguel A; Schmidt-Ríovalle, Jacqueline

    2013-11-01

    The first objective of this study was to analyze the metabolic profile of the population to be studied. The second one was to ascertain whether there was a significant association between the nutritional status of the subjects and the serum level of C-reactive protein. Finally, the third objective was to discover whether there was a correlation between C-reactive protein serum levels and waist to hip ratio values. The sample was composed of 1001 adolescents, 9-17 years of age, from 18 schools in the provinces of Granada and Almeria. Their nutritional status was determined by means of anthropometric evaluation. For the metabolic study, a blood sample was collected from each subject by venipuncture. An analysis was performed of C-reactive protein, basal glycemia, ceruloplasmin, glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c), basal insulin, serum levels of lipoprotein (a), and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The biochemical study reflected a normal metabolic profile with serum levels of C-reactive protein, basal glycemia, ceruloplasmin, glycated hemoglobin, basal insulin, lipoprotein (a) and non-esterified fatty acids slightly higher in the male subjects. The results of our studied showed that there was a statistically significant association (p < 0.05; F = 3.701) between the nutritional status of the subjects and serum levels of C-reactive protein. A statistically significant association (F = 9.008; p < 0.005) was also found between serum levels of C-reactive protein and waist to hip ratio values. The C-reactive protein associated either with nutritional status or the waist to hip ratio is an effective biochemical marker of cardiovascular risk among the population of adolescents in our study. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterojunction phototransistor for highly sensitive infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Mohsen; Park, Min-Su; Tan, Chee Leong; Rabinowitz, Cobi; Wheaton, Skyler; Mohseni, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we have proposed a model for the ultimate physical limit on the sensitivity of the heterojunction bipolar phototransistors (HPTs). Based on our modeling we have extracted the design criteria for the HPT for high sensitivity application. HPT with the submicron emitter and base area has the potential to be used for the low number photon resolving in near-infrared (NIR) wavelength. However, in practice, the quality of materials, processing, and the passivation plays an important role in the realization of the highly sensitive HPT. For short wave infrared (SWIR) HPTs based on lattice matched InGaAs to InP is studied. For these devices, conditions to reach to the highest possible sensitivity is examined. We have made an HPT based on InGaAs collector and base on the InP substrate. After developing proper processing combination of wet and dry etching and the surface passivation for the device we made an imager with 320x256 pixels based with a 30m pixel pitch. The imager shows the sensitivity less the 30 photons for each pixel with the frame rate more than 1K frames per second.

  18. High sensitive materials in medical holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanlou, A.; Snashall, E.; Osanlou, O.; Osanlou, R.; Mirlis, E.; Shi, Lishen; Bjelkhagen, H.

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivity is defined in relation to the energy required to perform holographic recording. High sensitivity in silver halide materials is their main advantage over other similarly high resolving power holographic recording materials. This work reports progress on the development of silver halide based 'true colour holographic imaging', under a microscope. A thin layer of ultrafine grains of silver halide crystals of around 10 nm average diameter, dispersed in a colloid and coated on a substrate is used as the recording media. The significance of this method so far, is in its ability to produce 'true colour' three-dimensional images of specimen. The recordings have an appreciable depth, permitting the observer to scan through the image under a microscope, as one might with a real specimen sample. Current methods could perform ' True colour holographic imaging' directly under a microscope. The recording methodology has the potential for deeper complex and scattering media imaging, using very small pulses of appropriate laser wavelengths. The methodology, using novel nanosize panchromatic recording media consisting of dispersed fine nano grain crystals, could potentially revolutionise related medical imaging techniques. Future development of digital media will allow it to be utilized in this manner.

  19. High sensitivity intravascular photoacoustic imaging of macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Yantsen, Evgeniya; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    In atherosclerosis, tracking and locating the activity of macrophages that are highly involved in plaque development will help to identify the pathology of the disease. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has shown potential to detect atherosclerosis and to determine plaque composition. Furthermore, using optical absorbers as contrast agents, IVPA can also be used for molecular imaging. In this paper, we study the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles as contrast agent for high sensitivity IVPA imaging of macrophages. The artery was modeled using a cylindrical tube made out of polyvinyl alcohol. Within the vessel wall, several compartments were made to mimic plaques. After incubating murine macrophages with 50 nm spherical gold nanoparticles overnight, macrophages loaded with particles were filled into the compartments of the arterial phantoms. Because of the plasmon resonance coupling of aggregated nanoparticles inside the macrophages, these macrophages can be detected by IVPA imaging using 680 nm wavelength. The sensitivity of the molecular IVPA imaging was tested using phantoms with different concentrations of nanoparticles and macrophages. Finally, to address the feasibility of in-vivo IVPA imaging with gold nanoparticles, the viability of the macrophages loaded with nanoparticles exposed to laser irradiation was studied. The results show that IVPA imaging can safely image macrophages loaded with gold nanoparticles with relatively high sensitivity.

  20. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Sarano, Maurice Enriquez-; McEvoy, John W

    2017-01-16

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality.

  1. Serum C-reactive protein in asthma and its ability in predicting asthma control, a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Monadi, Mahmoud; Firouzjahi, Alireza; Hosseini, Amin; Javadian, Yahya; Sharbatdaran, Majid; Heidari, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in asthma and its association with disease severity has been investigated in many studies. This study aimed to determine serum hs-CRP status in asthma versus healthy controls and to examine its ability in predicting asthma control. Methods: Serum CRP was measured by ELISA method using a high sensitive CRP kit. Severity of asthma was determined using Asthma Control Test. Spearman and chi square tests were used for association and correlation respectively. The predictive ability was determined by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Accuracy was determined by determination of area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: A total of 120 patients and 115 controls were studied. Median serum hs-CRP in asthma was higher than control (P=0.001. In well controlled asthma the hs-CRP decreased significantly compared with poorly controlled (P=0.024) but still was higher than control (P=0.017). Serum hs-CRP at cutoff level of 1.45 mg/L differentiated the patients and controls with accuracy of 63.5 % (AUC= 0.635±0.037, P=0.001). Serum hs-CRP ≤ 2.15 mg/L predicted well controlled asthma with accuracy of 62.5% (AUC= 0.625±0.056, p=0.025). After adjusting for age, sex, weight and smoking, there was an independent association between serum hs-CRP >1.45 mg/L and asthma by adjusted OR=2.49, p=0.018). Conclusion: These findings indicate that serum hs-CRP in asthma is higher than healthy control and increases with severity of asthma and decreases with. Thus, serum hs-CRP measurement can be helpful in predicting asthma control and treatment response. PMID:26958331

  2. Crevicular fluid and serum concentrations of progranulin and high sensitivity CRP in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, N; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Arjun, P; Naik, Savitha B; Pradeep, A R

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to correlate the serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of progranulin (PGRN) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). PGRN and hs CRP levels were estimated in 3 groups: healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 DM with chronic periodontitis. The mean PGRN and hs CRP concentrations in serum and GCF were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and the least in group 1. PGRN and hs CRP may be biomarkers of the inflammatory response in type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis.

  3. Crevicular Fluid and Serum Concentrations of Progranulin and High Sensitivity CRP in Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, N.; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Arjun, P.; Naik, Savitha B.; Pradeep, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to correlate the serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of progranulin (PGRN) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Design. PGRN and hs CRP levels were estimated in 3 groups: healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 DM with chronic periodontitis. Results. The mean PGRN and hs CRP concentrations in serum and GCF were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and the least in group 1. Conclusion. PGRN and hs CRP may be biomarkers of the inflammatory response in type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis. PMID:24191130

  4. Serum C-reactive protein concentration and measures of adiposity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zaciragić, Asija; Huskić, Jasminko; Hadzović-Dzuvo, Almira; Valjevac, Amina; Avdagić, Nesina; Mulabegović, Nedzad

    2007-11-01

    We investigated serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) and measures of adiposity in 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (15 male, 15 female) and 30 age and sex-matched apparently healthy subjects. CRP concentration was determined by laser nephelometry (BN II Analyzer) and CardioPhase high-sensitivity CRP (DADE BEHRING) was used as reagent which consists of polystyrene particles coated with mouse monoclonal antibodies to CRP. Results have shown that serum CRP concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was statistically significantly higher compared to control group of healthy subjects (p<0,05). Body mass index (BMI) correlated significantly with serum concentration of CRP in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (r=0.614; p<0.001). Statistically significant positive correlation was also found between waist to hip ratio and serum CRP concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (r=0.426; p<0.05). Elevated serum CRP concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is probably caused by the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation in these patients. It is possible that determined increase of CRP concentration reflects activation of innate immune system components in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Implications of established association between measures of adiposity and serum CRP level in type 2 diabetes mellitus remain unclear.

  5. Effect of nutritional status and dietary patterns on human serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-11-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Elevated copper, hs C-reactive protein and dyslipidemia in drug free schizophrenia: Relation with psychopathology score.

    PubMed

    Devanarayanan, Sivasankar; Nandeesha, Hanumanthappa; Kattimani, Shivanand; Sarkar, Siddharth; Jose, Jancy

    2016-12-01

    Inflammation, dyslipidemia and altered copper levels have been reported in several psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, their association with the severity of psychopathology in schizophrenia is yet to be established. The present study was designed to assess the serum levels of copper, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and lipid profile and to explore their association with psychopathology scores in schizophrenia. 40 cases and 40 controls were included in the study. Serum copper, hs-CRP and lipid profile were estimated in all the subjects. Disease severity was assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Copper, hs-CRP, total cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol were significantly increased and HDL-Cholesterol was significantly reduced in schizophrenia cases when compared with controls. Copper was positively correlated with hs-CRP (r=0.338, p=0.003). Total cholesterol was significantly correlated with PANSS total (r=0.452, p=0.003) and negative symptom scores (r=0.337, p=0.033). Triacylglycerol was positively correlated with general psychopathology symptom score (r=0.416, p=0.008). Copper and hs-CRP were increased and correlated well with each other in schizophrenia cases. Though total cholesterol and triacylglycerol showed positive association with severity of the psychopathology, copper and hs-CRP were not associated with the disease severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adipokines, C-reactive protein and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - results from a population- based ALS registry in Germany.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Gabriele; Peter, Raphael S; Rosenbohm, Angela; Koenig, Wolfgang; Dupuis, Luc; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Ludolph, Albert C

    2017-06-29

    To investigate the associations of leptin, adiponectin and high-sensitive (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) with risk and prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Data from a population-based case-control study in Southern Germany (10/2010-6/2014) of 289 ALS patients (mean age of 65.7 (SD 10.5) years, 59.5% men) and 506 controls were included. During median follow-up of 14.5 months of 279 ALS patients 104 (53.9% men, 68.9 (10.3) years) died. Serum samples were measured for leptin, adiponectin and hs-CRP. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate ALS risk. Survival models were used to appraise the prognostic value. ALS patients were characterized by lower levels of school education, BMI and smoking prevalence. Adjusted for covariates, leptin was inversely associated with ALS risk (top vs. bottom quartile: OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.80), while for adiponectin a positive association was found (OR 2.89; 95% CI 1.78-4.68). Among ALS patients increasing leptin concentrations were associated with longer survival (p for trend 0.002), while for adiponectin no association was found (p for trend 0.55). For hs-CRP no association was found. Leptin and adiponectin, two key hormones regulating energy metabolism, were strongly and independently related with ALS risk. Leptin levels were further negatively related with overall survival of ALS patients.

  8. Associations of monocytes, neutrophil count, and C-reactive protein with maximal oxygen uptake in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Ryoma; Shono, Naoko; Inoue, Teruo; Tsuruta, Toshiyuki; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Increased aerobic capacity can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This study was designed to elucidate whether aerobic capacity is associated with inflammatory status. The subjects included 90 overweight women [age, 51.5±10.7 yrs; body mass index (BMI), 28.1±2.5] with coronary risk factors who were outpatients at our institution. A multistage graded submaximal exercise stress test was performed on an electric bicycle ergometer to determine the estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max). Univariate regression analyses showed that monocyte, neutrophil counts, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were correlated with fasting triglycerides, fasting insulin, BMI, and waist circumference, while VO(2) max was negatively associated with monocyte and neutrophil counts, but not with hs-CRP. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis demonstrated a strong association of monocyte count with the fasting triglyceride and VO(2) max (r(2)=0.260, p<0.0001). Neutrophil count was also found to be associated with fasting triglyceride and fasting insulin (r(2)=0.114, p<0.0001), while hs-CRP was associated with fasting triglyceride and waist circumference (r(2)=0.151, p<0.0001). These results suggest that VO(2) max is a sensitive factor that reflects the inflammatory status and might support cardiovascular protective effects of aerobic exercise in overweight women.

  9. Effect of Nutritional Status and Dietary Patterns on Human Serum C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Concentrations12

    PubMed Central

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. PMID:26567198

  10. [Relationship of food groups intake and C-reactive protein in healthy adults from Mexicali, Baja California, México].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esparza, Josefina; Robinson-Navarro, Octavio; Ortega-Vélez, María Isabel; Diaz-Molina, Raúl; Carrillo-Cedillo, Eugenia Gabriela; Soria-Rodriguez, Carmen G

    2013-09-01

    The high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an important biomarker in inflammatory processes. The objective was to analyze the relationship between the concentrations of hs-CRP in adults from a northern Mexico region with their typical food intake patterns. A sample of 72 university professors underwent clinical and anthropometric assessments and their hs-CRP levels were quantified with an immunoenzymometric assay. Additionally, they filled out a food intake frequency questionnaire, from which the servings of different food groups were obtained with the ESHA software. The average age of participants was 49.75 +/- 10.05 years and the average hs-CRP concentration was 1.66 (0.97, 3.52) mg/L. The value of the association between fruit consumption and hs-CRP level was protective, according to the logistic regression analysis, being the Odds Ratio (OR) 0.23 (95% CI: 0.05, 1.03); while for vegetables the OR was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.12, 3.68). Furthermore, high protein content foods, dairy products, oils and fats were associated with elevated levels of hs-CRP. In conclusion, in our study, the intake of some food groups like fruits and vegetables, and to a lesser extent cereals, were associated with low values of hs-PCR.

  11. PLASMA LEVELS OF INFLAMMATORY MARKERS NEOPTERIN, SIALIC ACID AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN PREGNANCY AND PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    von Versen-Hoeynck, Frauke M.; Hubel, Carl A.; Gallaher, Marcia J.; Gammill, Hilary S.; Powers, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the cellular inflammatory marker of activated macrophages and monocytes, neopterin (NEO) and the acute phase inflammatory markers sialic acid (SA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are elevated in pregnancy and further elevated in the pregnancy syndrome preeclampsia. Methods Maternal plasma concentrations of NEO, SA and CRP were measured by high sensitivity ELISA or HPLC in 20 non-pregnant women, 40 women with uncomplicated pregnancies, 50 women with transient hypertension of pregnancy alone, 49 women with small for gestational age (SGA) infants without preeclampsia, and 47 women with preeclampsia. Results The mean concentration of plasma NEO, SA and CRP were all significantly elevated in all groups of pregnant women compared to non-pregnant women (p<0.001 for all). In addition, maternal plasma NEO concentrations were further elevated in women with preeclampsia compared to the other groups of pregnant women (p<0.01). As expected, the acute phase inflammatory markers CRP and SA correlated positively with each other. However, CRP was also correlated with the activated macrophage and monocyte marker NEO in women with transient hypertension of pregnancy and women with preeclampsia (p<0.05). Conclusion The inflammatory markers NEO, SA and CRP are all elevated during pregnancy. However, only NEO, a marker of macrophage and monocyte activation, was further elevated in women with preeclampsia. These data suggest that there is a striking increase in inflammation during pregnancy, and cellular immune activation is further elevated during preeclampsia. PMID:19282816

  12. C reactive protein and procalcitonin: reference intervals for preterm and term newborns during the early neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Claudio; Natale, Fabio; Pascone, Roberto; Osborn, John F; Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; De Curtis, Mario

    2011-05-12

    There is still no study evaluating the influence of gestational age (GA) per se on C reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) reference intervals. We therefore investigated how length of gestation, age (hours), and prenatal and perinatal variables might influence the levels of CRP and PCT. We also determined 95% age-specific reference intervals for CRP and PCT in healthy preterm and term babies during the early neonatal period. One blood sample (one observation per neonate) was taken for CRP and PCT from each newborn between birth and the first 4 (for term), or 5 days (for preterm newborns) of life by using a high-sensitive CRP and PCT assays. Independently of gender and sampling time, GA had a significantly positive effect on CRP, and a significantly negative effect on PCT. Compared with healthy term babies, healthy preterm babies had a lower and shorter CRP response, and, conversely, an earlier, higher, and longer PCT response. CRP reference intervals were affected by a number of pro-inflammatory risk factors. Age- and GA-specific reference ranges for both CRP and PCT should be taken into account to optimize their use in the diagnosis of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [C-reactive protein level and rate of detection of autoantibodies to beta(1)-adrenoreceptors in patients with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Bekbosynova, M S; Nikitina, T Ia; Golitsyn, S P; Novikova, D S; Loladze, N V; Masenko, V P; Tonevitskiĭ, A G

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) and prevalence of autoantibodies against beta(1)-adrenoreceptors (abeta(1)-AR) in patients with cardiac supraventricular arrhythmias we studied 53 patients with arrhythmias and 20 healthy control subjects. Patients with idiopathic arrhythmias (atrial fibrillation or flutter and atrial tachycardia, n=35) comprised group I. Group II was formed of 15 patients with supraventricular arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or chronic myocarditis. Patients of group III (n=23) had supraventricular arrhythmias and arterial hypertension (AH). CRP concentration was determined by recently developed well standardized high sensitivity method. abeta(1)-AR were detected in blood serum by direct immunoassay. Synthetic fragment containing 26 amino acids of abeta(1)-AR second loop was used as antigen. Patients with supraventricular arrhythmias and DCM or chronic myocarditis had higher median CRP (8.0 mg/1) than patients with idiopathic arrhythmias (0.78 mg/l), with supraventricular arrhythmias and AH (1.57 mg/l), or control group (0.6 mg/l). Groups I, II and III showed similar prevalence of ab1-AR (51.4, 40.0, 52.2%, respectively), that was significantly higher than in control subjects (10%) (p<0.005). These results provide evidence of the possible presence of autoimmune and/or inflammatory processes that may be involved in the genesis of supraventricular arrhythmias.

  14. Comparison of optomagnetic and AC susceptibility readouts in a magnetic nanoparticle agglutination assay for detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Fock, Jeppe; Parmvi, Mattias; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Donolato, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-02-15

    There is an increasing need to develop biosensor methods that are highly sensitive and that can be combined with low-cost consumables. The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is attractive because their detection is compatible with low-cost disposables and because application of a magnetic field can be used to accelerate assay kinetics. We present the first study and comparison of the performance of magnetic susceptibility measurements and a newly proposed optomagnetic method. For the comparison we use the C-reactive protein (CRP) induced agglutination of identical samples of 100nm MNPs conjugated with CRP antibodies. Both methods detect agglutination as a shift to lower frequencies in measurements of the dynamics in response to an applied oscillating magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility method probes the magnetic response whereas the optomagnetic technique probes the modulation of laser light transmitted through the sample. The two techniques provided highly correlated results upon agglutination when they measure the decrease of the signal from the individual MNPs (turn-off detection strategy), whereas the techniques provided different results, strongly depending on the read-out frequency, when detecting the signal due to MNP agglomerates (turn-on detection strategy). These observations are considered to be caused by differences in the volume-dependence of the magnetic and optical signals from agglomerates. The highest signal from agglomerates was found in the optomagnetic signal at low frequencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. C-reactive protein, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in Portuguese adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agostinis Sobrinho, Cesar Aparecido; Moreira, Carla Marisa Maia; Mota, Jorge Augusto Pinto da Silva; Santos, Rute Marina Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the association of physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration in adolescents. The sample included 386 Portuguese adolescents (n = 207, female), age 12-18 years, assessed in the year 2012. The PA was assessed with the use of accelerometers, and the cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by the Fitnessgram Pacer test. Blood samples were collected after a 10-hour fasting, and high-sensitivity PCR concentration was further assessed. Significant associations between CRP and cardiorespiratory fitness were found for females (r = -0.313; p < 0.001) and males (r = -0.163; p < 0.05); however, when adjusted by the BMI, the associations remained significant only for females (r = -0.215; p < 0.001). Regarding the association between CRP and PA, no significant associations were found for both genders. Therefore, CRP is apparently negatively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness, with differences between males and females; for females it seems less dependent than BMI.

  16. Are oxidized low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein markers of atherosclerosis in nephrotic children?

    PubMed

    Rybi-Szumińska, A; Wasilewska, A; Michaluk-Skutnik, J; Osipiuk-Remża, B; Fiłonowicz, R; Zając, M

    2015-12-01

    Lipid disorders are known to be linked to disturbance in oxidative reactions and play an important role in the progression and complications of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). The aim of this study was to assess oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) serum concentrations and other parameters of lipid metabolism in children with INS during relapse and remission of proteinuria. The examination was performed on 23 children and adolescents diagnosed with INS. Reference group consisted of 22 participants. The study was carried out twice: in the relapse of INS (A) and in remission of proteinuria during glucocorticoid treatment (B). OxLDL was higher in INS patients, in both examinations when compared with reference participants. hs-CRP showed no differences between nephrotic and healthy children. We found higher concentration of oxLDL in children, who where frequent relapsers. Cholesterol, triglycerides/high density lipoprotein cholesterol and platelets were higher in INS patients (both A and B) in comparison with healthy children. We observed presence of pro-atherogenic lipid profile in INS. Elevation of oxLDL may reflect increased oxidative stress and higher risk of atherosclerosis in INS, therefore it seems to be relevant to find patients of risk of atherosclerosis to consider lipid lowering treatment with antioxidants.

  17. Correlation between C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Vein and Coronary Sinus in Stable and Unstable Angina

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Weverton Ferreira; Ramires, José Antonio Franchini; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho; Strunz, Célia Maria Cassaro; Mangione, José Armando

    2015-01-01

    Background High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is commonly used in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risk. However, a correlation has not yet been established between the absolute levels of peripheral and central hs-CRP. Objective To assess the correlation between serum hs-CRP levels (mg/L) in a peripheral vein in the left forearm (LFPV) with those in the coronary sinus (CS) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a diagnosis of stable angina (SA) or unstable angina (UA). Methods This observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted at the Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clinicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, and at the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, where CAD patients referred to the hospital for coronary angiography were evaluated. Results Forty patients with CAD (20 with SA and 20 with UA) were included in the study. Blood samples from LFPV and CS were collected before coronary angiography. Furthermore, analysis of the correlation between serum levels of hs-CRP in LFPV versus CS showed a strong linear correlation for both SA (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and UA (r = 0.976, p < 0.001) and for the entire sample (r = 0.985, p < 0.001). Conclusion Our data suggest a strong linear correlation between hs-CRP levels in LFPV versus CS in patients with SA and UA. PMID:25494014

  18. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  19. High-sensitivity detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Pushkarsky, Michael B; Dunayevskiy, Ilya G; Prasanna, Manu; Tsekoun, Alexei G; Go, Rowel; Patel, C Kumar N

    2006-12-26

    We report high-sensitivity detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy where the laser radiation is obtained from a continuous-wave room temperature high-power quantum cascade laser in an external grating cavity geometry. The external grating cavity quantum cascade laser is continuously tunable over approximately 400 nm around 7.3 microm and produces a maximum continuous-wave power of approximately 200 mW. The IR spectroscopic signature of TNT is sufficiently different from that of nitroglycerine so that unambiguous detection of TNT without false positives from traces of nitroglycerine is possible. We also report the results of spectroscopy of acetylene in the 7.3-microm region to demonstrate continuous tunability of the IR source.

  20. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Toke R.; Hansen, Ole; Olsen, Jakob L.; Vesborg, Peter; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2009-12-15

    A novel microfabricated chemical reactor for highly sensitive measurements of catalytic activity and surface kinetics is presented. The reactor is fabricated in a silicon chip and is intended for gas-phase reactions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 bar. A high sensitivity is obtained by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally. A corresponding theoretical model is presented, and the gas flow through an on-chip flow-limiting capillary is predicted to be in the intermediate regime. The experimental data for the gas flow are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical model. At typical experimental conditions, the total gas flow through the reaction zone is around 3x10{sup 14} molecules s{sup -1}, corresponding to a gas residence time in the reaction zone of about 11 s. To demonstrate the operation of the microreactor, CO oxidation on low-area platinum thin film circles is employed as a test reaction. Using temperature ramping, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 {mu}m{sup 2} are conveniently characterized with the device.

  1. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Toke R.; Olsen, Jakob L.; Vesborg, Peter; Chorkendorff, Ib; Hansen, Ole

    2009-12-01

    A novel microfabricated chemical reactor for highly sensitive measurements of catalytic activity and surface kinetics is presented. The reactor is fabricated in a silicon chip and is intended for gas-phase reactions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 bar. A high sensitivity is obtained by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally. A corresponding theoretical model is presented, and the gas flow through an on-chip flow-limiting capillary is predicted to be in the intermediate regime. The experimental data for the gas flow are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical model. At typical experimental conditions, the total gas flow through the reaction zone is around 3×1014 molecules s-1, corresponding to a gas residence time in the reaction zone of about 11 s. To demonstrate the operation of the microreactor, CO oxidation on low-area platinum thin film circles is employed as a test reaction. Using temperature ramping, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 μm2 are conveniently characterized with the device.

  2. C-reactive protein and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein levels in dogs infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kwak, I; Iqbal, Z; Kociba, G; Mott, J; Chichanasiriwithaya, W

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate whether acute-phase protein responses occur in dogs infected with Ehrlichia canis, C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) levels were serially measured in the plasma of five dogs experimentally inoculated with E. canis and 10 sham-inoculated or noninoculated control dogs. The CRP concentration was measured by a canine-specific capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the AAG concentration was measured by a canine-specific radial immunodiffusion method. In all E. canis-inoculated dogs, a 3.3- to 6.5-fold increase in the plasma CRP concentration and a 1.9- to 8.6-fold increase in the plasma AAG concentration over the preinoculation level occurred at days 4 to 6 postexposure. Despite the persistence of E. canis and high antibody titers, both CRP and AAG concentrations gradually declined to preexposure levels by day 34 postexposure. E. canis-infected dogs had mild and transient clinical signs which resolved without treatment by day 14 postexposure. The CRP and AAG concentrations in control inoculated or nontreated dogs remained within the normal range throughout the experimental period. Of 12 dogs naturally infected with E. canis, 75% had greater than 50 micrograms of CRP per ml and 83% had greater than 500 micrograms of AAG per ml. All of these 12 dogs had chronic and severe clinical signs of canine ehrlichiosis. Thus, elevations in the levels of acute-phase proteins occur in both acute and chronic canine ehrlichiosis. Determination of CRP and AAG concentrations may help in assessing the severity of inflammatory damage in dogs with E. canis infections. PMID:8027343

  3. Estradiol inhibits vascular endothelial cells pro-inflammatory activation induced by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Émilie; Cloutier, Isabelle; Tardif, Kim; DonPierre, Geneviève; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    In addition of being an important inflammatory biomarker and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, much evidence indicates that the C-reactive protein (CRP) contributes to the atherosclerosis development process. This plasmatic protein synthesized by hepatocytes in response to inflammation and tissue injury induces pro-inflammatory molecules' expression by endothelial cells (ECs). Previous studies showed that the 17β-estradiol (E2) has beneficial effects on vascular cells by reducing in vitro pro-inflammatory molecules expressions in EC. Therefore, we hypothesize that E2 blocks or reduces CRP-mediated inflammatory responses by modulating endogenous production of CRP in EC and/or activation mechanisms. Using human aortic ECs (HAECs), we first evaluated CRP production by vascular EC and second demonstrated its self-induction. Indeed, recombinant human CRP stimulation induces a fivefold increase of CRP expression. A 1-h pre-treatment of E2 at a physiologic dose (10(-9 )M) leads to an important decrease of CRP production suggesting a partial blockage of its amplification loop mechanism. Furthermore, in HAEC, E2 reduces the secretion of the most potent agonist of CRP induction, the IL-6, by 21 %. E2 pre-treatment also decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules IL-8, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 induced by CRP and involved in leukocytes recruitment. In addition, we demonstrated that E2 could restore vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated EC migration response impaired by CRP suggesting another pro-angiogenic property of this hormone. These findings suggest that E2 can interfere with CRP pro-inflammatory effects via activation signals using its rapid, non-genomic pathway that may provide a new mechanism to improve vascular repair.

  4. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. Avaliar a associação entre obesidade e níveis de proteína c-reativa ultrassensível (PCR-us) em pacientes com insuficiência cardiac admitidos em um hospital terciário. Estudo transversal com amostragem consecutiva de pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca hospitalizados. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e o estado nutricional foi avaliado por meio de indicadores como índice de massa corporal (em kg/m2), circunferência da cintura (em cm), razão cintura-quadril, dobra cutânea tricipital (em mm) e dobra cutânea subescapular (em mm). Circunferência do pescoço (em cm) foi aferida bem como n

  5. Demonstration of high sensitivity laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Christian, Kent D.; Field, Christopher T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on a high sensitivity semiconductor laser ranging system developed for the Gravity and Magnetic Earth Surveyor (GAMES) for measuring variations in the planet's gravity field. The GAMES laser ranging instrument (LRI) consists of a pair of co-orbiting satellites, one which contains the laser transmitter and receiver and one with a passive retro-reflector mounted in an drag-stabilized housing. The LRI will range up to 200 km in space to the retro-reflector satellite. As the spacecraft pair pass over the spatial variations in the gravity field, they experience along-track accelerations which change their relative velocity. These time displaced velocity changes are sensed by the LRI with a resolution of 20-50 microns/sec. In addition, the pair may at any given time be drifting together or apart at a rate of up to 1 m/sec, introducing a Doppler shift into the ranging signals. An AlGaAs laser transmitter intensity modulated at 2 GHz and 10 MHz is used as fine and medium ranging channels. Range is measured by comparing phase difference between the transmit and received signals at each frequency. A separate laser modulated with a digital code, not reported in this paper, will be used for coarse ranging to unambiguously determine the distance up to 200 km.

  6. Highly sensitive beam steering with plasmonic antenna

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we design and study a highly sensitive beam steering device that integrates a spiral plasmonic antenna with a subwavelength metallic waveguide. The short effective wavelength of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) mode supported by the metallic waveguide is exploited to dramatically miniaturize the device and improve the sensitivity of the beam steering. Through introducing a tiny displacement of feed point with respect to the geometrical center of the spiral plasmonic antenna, the direction of the radiation can be steered at considerably high angles. Simulation results show that steering angles of 8°, 17° and 34° are obtainable for a displacement of 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm, respectively. Benefiting from the reduced device size and the shorter SPP wavelength, the beam steering sensitivity of the beam steering is improved by 10-fold compared with the case reported previously. This miniature plasmonic beam steering device may find many potential applications in quantum optical information processing and integrated photonic circuits. PMID:25091405

  7. Face Transplantation in a Highly Sensitized Recipient.

    PubMed

    Chandraker, Anil; Arscott, Ramon; Murphy, George; Lian, Christine; Bueno, Ericka; Marty, Francisco; Rennke, Helmut; Milford, Edgar; Tullius, Stefan; Pomahac, Bodhan

    2016-05-01

    Face transplantation was performed in a highly sensitized recipient with positive preoperative crossmatch and subsequent antibody-mediated rejection. The recipient was a 45-year-old female with extensive conventional reconstructions after chemical burns over the majority of the body. Residual quality of life and facial functions were poor. Levels of circulating anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies were high, and panel reactive antibody score was 98%. A potential donor was identified; however, with positive T and B cell flow crossmatches. The transplant team proceeded with face transplantation from this donor, under tailored immune suppression and with available salvage options. The operation was successful. Plasmapheresis and induction immune suppression (i.e., thymoglobulin followed by mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids) were provided. Five days later, there was significant facial swelling, rising anti-HLA antibody titers, and unprecedented evidence of C4d deposits on skin. High doses of steroids and thymoglobulin were provided; however, rejection increased such that by day 19 it was diagnosed grade III in the BANFF scale. After stopping thymoglobulin because of serum sickness, combination therapy of plasmapheresis, eculizumab, bortezomib, and alemtuzumab was provided. HLA antibody levels decreased while swelling and redness improved. At 3 months, there were no longer signs of rejection on biopsy.

  8. Highly sensitive beam steering with plasmonic antenna.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen

    2014-08-05

    In this work, we design and study a highly sensitive beam steering device that integrates a spiral plasmonic antenna with a subwavelength metallic waveguide. The short effective wavelength of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) mode supported by the metallic waveguide is exploited to dramatically miniaturize the device and improve the sensitivity of the beam steering. Through introducing a tiny displacement of feed point with respect to the geometrical center of the spiral plasmonic antenna, the direction of the radiation can be steered at considerably high angles. Simulation results show that steering angles of 8°, 17° and 34° are obtainable for a displacement of 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm, respectively. Benefiting from the reduced device size and the shorter SPP wavelength, the beam steering sensitivity of the beam steering is improved by 10-fold compared with the case reported previously. This miniature plasmonic beam steering device may find many potential applications in quantum optical information processing and integrated photonic circuits.

  9. Highly sensitive direct conversion ultrasound interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Grossmann, John; Suslov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    Being invented more than fifty years ago, the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique has proven itself as a valuable and indispensable non-destructive tool to explore elastic properties of materials in engineering and scientific tasks. We propose a new design for the instrument based on mass-produced integral microchips. In our design the radiofrequency echo-pulse signal is processed by AD8302 RF gain and phase detector (www.analog.com).Its phase output is linearly proportional to the phase difference between the exciting and response signals. The gain output is proportional to the log of the ratio of amplitudes of the received to the exciting signals. To exclude the non-linear fragments and to enable exploring large phase changes, we employ parallel connection of two detectors, fed by in-phase and quadrature signals respectively. The instrument allowed us exploring phase transitions with precision of ΔV / V ~10-7 (V is the ultrasound speed). The high sensitivity of the logarithmic amplifiers embedded into AD8302 requires good grounding and screening of the receiving circuitry.

  10. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  11. C-reactive Protein as a Potential Biomarker of Residual Obstructive Sleep Apnea Following Adenotonsillectomy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Kaditis, Athanasios G.; Verhulst, Stijn L.; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is first-line treatment for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), with most children having improvements in polysomnography (PSG). However, many children have residual OSA following AT as determined through PSG. Identification of a biomarker of residual disease would be clinically meaningful to detect children at risk. We hypothesize serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an inflammatory biomarker, is predictive of residual OSA following AT. Methods: PSG was performed both preoperatively and postoperatively on children undergoing AT for the diagnosis of OSA. HsCRP serum concentrations were determined in all children pre-AT, and in most children post-AT. Resolution of OSA after AT was defined by a post-AT apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 1.5/h total sleep time (TST). Residual OSA was defined as a post-AT AHI > 5/h TST, which is considered clinically significant. Results: AT significantly improved the AHI from 15.9 ± 16.4 to 4.1 ± 5.3/h TST in 182 children (P < 0.001). Of 182 children, residual OSA (post-AT AHI > 5) was seen in 46 children (25%). Among children who had hsCRP levels measured pre- and post-AT (n = 155), mean hsCRP levels pre-AT were 0.98 ± 1.91 mg/L and were significantly reduced post-AT (0.63 ± 2.24 mg/dL; P = 0.011). Stratification into post-AT AHI groups corresponding to < 1.5/h TST, 1.5/h TST < AHI < 5/h TST, and AHI > 5/h TST revealed post-AT hsCRP levels of 0.09 ± 0.12, 0.57 ± 2.28, and 1.49 ± 3.34 mg/L with statistical significance emerging comparing residual AHI > 5/h TST compared to post-AT AHI < 1.5/h TST (P = 0.006). Hierarchical multivariate modeling confirmed that pre-AT AHI and post-AT hsCRP levels were most significantly associated with residual OSA. Conclusions: Even though AT improves OSA in most children, residual OSA is frequent. Assessment of post-AT hsCRP levels emerges as a potentially useful biomarker predicting residual OSA. Citation: Bhattacharjee R, Kheirandish

  12. C-reactive protein and genetic variants and cognitive decline in old age: The PROSPER Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, have been associated with cognitive impairment in old age. However, it is unknown whether CRP is causally linked to cognitive decline. Within the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) tri...

  13. Elevated maternal C-reactive protein and increased risk of schizophrenia in a national birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Sarah; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Leiviskä, Jaana; Kellendonk, Christoph; McKeague, Ian W; Brown, Alan S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate an association between early gestational C-reactive protein, an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and schizophrenia in a large, national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. A nested case-control design from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Schizophrenia cohort was utilized. A total of 777 schizophrenia cases (schizophrenia, N=630; schizoaffective disorder, N=147) with maternal sera available for C-reactive protein testing were identified and matched to 777 control subjects in the analysis. Maternal C-reactive protein levels were assessed using a latex immunoassay from archived maternal serum specimens. Increasing maternal C-reactive protein levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with schizophrenia in offspring (adjusted odds ratio=1.31, 95% confidence interval=1.10-1.56). This finding remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders, including maternal and parental history of psychiatric disorders, twin/singleton birth, urbanicity, province of birth, and maternal socioeconomic status. This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. LIFESTYLE DETERMINANTS OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN MIDDLE-AGED, URBAN CHINESE MEN

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Raquel; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Elasy, Tom; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhang, Xianglan; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae; Li, Honglan; Xu, Wang Hong; Yang, Gong; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), common in aging populations, are associated with higher risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes and coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between lifestyle factors and high CRP among middleaged men living in Shanghai, China. PMID:21111583

  15. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. Ethnic/racial differences in the association between social support and levels of C-reactive proteins in the North Texas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Bert N; Ruiz, John M; Smith, Timothy W; Smyth, Joshua M; Taylor, Daniel J; Allison, Matthew; Ahn, Chul

    2016-01-01

    Perceived social support has been reliably related to lower rates of morbidity and mortality. However, studies modeling C-reactive protein (CRP) as an important biological pathway linking social support to health have produced inconsistent results. Given purported ethnic/racial differences in sensitivity to social resources, the present study tested if ethnicity/race moderated the link between perceived support and CRP in a diverse community sample of 300 participants from the North Texas Heart Study. Consistent with prior research, there was no overall link between social support and CRP levels. However, the association between social support and high sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels was moderated by ethnicity/race as perceived support predicted lower hs-CRP levels primarily in African Americans. These results suggest the importance of considering how ethnicity/race may inform models on the complex biological mechanisms linking social support to health. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. GlycA, a Pro-Inflammatory Glycoprotein Biomarker, and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: Relationship with C-Reactive Protein and Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Gruppen, Eke G.; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Connelly, Margery A.; Otvos, James D.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective GlycA is a novel nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-measured biomarker of systemic inflammation. We determined whether GlycA is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in men and women, examined whether this association with CVD is modified by renal function, and compared this association with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Research design and methods A prospective cohort study was performed among 4,759 subjects (PREVEND study) without a history of CVD and cancer. Incident CVD was defined as the combined endpoint of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cox regression analyses were used to examine associations of baseline GlycA and hsCRP with CVD. Results 298 first CVD events occurred during a median follow-up of 8.5 years. After adjustment for clinical and lipid measures the hazard ratio (HR) for CVD risk in the highest GlycA quartile was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.05–2.37, P for trend = 0.004). This association was similar after further adjustment for renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin excretion). After additional adjustment for hsCRP, GlycA was still associated with incident CVD (HR: 1.16 per SD change (95% CI, 1.01–1.33), P = 0.04). Similar results were obtained for hsCRP (HR per SD change after adjustment for GlycA: 1.17 (95% CI 1.17 (95% CI, 1.01–3.60), P = 0.04). CVD risk was highest in subjects with simultaneously higher GlycA and hsCRP (fully adjusted HR: 1.79 (95% CI, 1.31–2.46), P<0.001). Conclusion GlycA is associated with CVD risk in men and women, independent of renal function. The association of GlycA with incident CVD is as strong as that of hsCRP. PMID:26398105

  1. High sensitivity amplifier/discriminator for PWC's

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.

    1983-01-01

    The facility support group at Fermilab is designing and building a general purpose beam chamber for use in several locations at the laboratory. This pwc has 128 wires per plane spaced 1 mm apart. An initial production of 25 signal planes is anticipated. In proportional chambers, the size of the signal depends exponentially on the charge stored per unit of length along the anode wire. As the wire spacing decreases, the capacitance per unit length decreases, thereby requiring increased applied voltage to restore the necessary charge per unit length. In practical terms, this phenomenon is responsible for difficulties in constructing chambers with less than 2 mm wire spacing. 1 mm chambers, therefore, are frequently operated very near to their breakdown point and/or a high gain gas containing organic compounds such as magic gas is used. This argon/iso-butane mixture has three drawbacks: it is explosive when exposed to the air, it leaves a residue on the wires after extended use and is costly. An amplifier with higher sensitivity would reduce the problems associated with operating chambers with small wire spacings and allow them to be run a safe margin below their breakdown voltage even with an inorganic gas mixture such as argon/CO2, this eliminating the need to use magic gas. Described here is a low cost amplifier with a usable threshold of less than 0.5 ..mu..A. Data on the performance of this amplifier/discriminator in operation on a prototype beam chamber are given. This data shows the advantages of the high sensitivity of this design.

  2. Inflammation and psychotropic drugs: the relationship between C-reactive protein and antipsychotic drug levels.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Gudrun; Shams, Mohamed E E; Unterecker, Stefan; Falter, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In psychiatric clinical practice, there is a need to identify psychotropic drugs whose metabolisms are prone to be altered with increased inflammatory activity in an individual patient. The aim of this study was to find out whether elevated serum levels (≥5 mg/l) of C-reactive protein (CRP), an established laboratory marker of infection and inflammation, are associated with increased serum concentrations of the atypical antipsychotic drugs clozapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Therapeutic drug monitoring request forms of patients whose antipsychotic drug concentrations had been measured under conditions of normal (<5 mg/l) and pathological (>5 mg/l) levels of C-reactive protein were retrospectively screened. The serum concentrations in relation to the daily doses [concentration per dose (C/D) (ng/mL/mg)] and the metabolic ratios [ratio of concentrations (metabolite/drug)] were compared intraindividually by the Wilcoxon signed rank test. To the study effects of the intensity of infections on drug concentrations, C-reactive protein and C/D levels were submitted to Spearman's correlation analysis. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein were found in 105 patients. They were significantly associated with elevated values in C/D for clozapine (n = 33, P < 0.01) and risperidone (n = 40, P < 0.01). A trend for an increase was found for quetiapine (n = 32, P = 0.05). Median increases were 48.0 % (clozapine), 11.9 % (quetiapine), and 24.2 % (active moiety of risperidone), respectively. In patients who exhibit signs of inflammation or infection with increased C-reactive protein values during psychopharmacological treatment, especially under clozapine and risperidone, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommendable in order to minimize the risk of intoxications due to elevated drug concentrations.

  3. Magnesium Status and Its Relationship with C-Reactive Protein in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Raquel Soares; Cruz, Kyria Jayanne Clímaco; Morais, Jennifer Beatriz Silva; Severo, Juliana Soares; de Freitas, Taynáh Emannuelle Coelho; Veras, Antonio Lobão; da Rocha Romero, Amanda Batista; Colli, Célia; do Nascimento Nogueira, Nadir; Torres-Leal, Francisco Leonardo; do Nascimento Marreiro, Dilina

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between magnesium status and C-reactive protein concentration in obese and nonobese women. This cross-sectional study included 131 women, aged between 20 and 50 years, who were divided into two groups: obese (n=65) and control (n=66) groups. Magnesium intake was monitored using 3-day food records and NutWin software version 1.5. The plasma, erythrocyte, and urinary magnesium concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. C-reactive protein concentration in serum was measured by immunoturbidimetric assay. The mean values of the magnesium content in the diet were lower than those recommended, though there was no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). The mean concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte magnesium were within the normal range, with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Urinary excretion of this mineral was less than the reference values in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). The mean concentration of serum C-reactive protein was within the normal range in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). There was a positive correlation between urinary magnesium and serum C-reactive protein (p=0.015). Obese patients ingest low dietary magnesium content, which seems to induce hypomagnesuria as a compensatory mechanism to keep plasma concentrations of the mineral at adequate levels. The study shows a positive correlation between urinary magnesium concentrations and serum C-reactive protein, suggesting the influence of hypomagnesuria on this inflammatory protein in obese women.

  4. Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-Pore Size Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2017-04-13

    In this study, we developed a pore size/pore area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the pore size of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-pore area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing pore-size and non-pore area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily.

  5. Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-Pore Size Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a pore size/pore area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the pore size of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-pore area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing pore-size and non-pore area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily. PMID:28406469

  6. Pulmonary Arterial Pressure Response During Exercise in COPD: A Correlation with C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP)

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Janos; Palinkas, Attila; Lajko, Imre; Horváth, Ildikó; Boda, Krisztina; Somfay, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Background: The non-invasive assessment of pulmonary haemodynamics during exercise provides complementary data for the evaluation of exercise tolerance in patients with COPD. Methods: Exercise echocardiography in the semi-supine position was performed in 27 patients with COPD (C) with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 36±12% predicted and 13 age and gender-matched non-COPD subjects (NC). COPD patients also underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with gas exchange detection (CPET). Furthermore, serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, was also measured. Results: The maximal work rate (WRmax) and aerobic capacity (VO2peak) were significantly reduced (WRmax: 77±33 Watt, VO2peak: 50±14 %pred) in COPD. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs) was higher in COPD versus controls both at rest (39±5 vs. 31±2 mmHg, p<0.001), and at peak exercise (72±12 vs. 52±8 mmHg, p<0.001). In 19 (70%) COPD patients, the increase in PAPs was above 22 mmHg. The change in pressure (dPAPs) correlated with hsCRP (r2=0.53, p<0.0001) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r2=0.18, p<0.001). Conclusion: PAPs at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in COPD patients and correlated with higher hsCRP. This may indicate a role for systemic inflammation and hyperinflation in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov webpage with NCT00949195 registration number. PMID:27019674

  7. C-reactive protein and its relation to high blood pressure in overweight or obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Juliana Andreia F.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.; Cardoso, Anajás da Silva; Gonzaga, Nathalia Costa; Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira; Ramos, André Luiz C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and high blood pressure (BP) in overweight or obese children and adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 184 overweight or obese children and adolescents aged from two to 18 years old, from April, 2009 to April, 2010. The classification of nutritional status used the body mass index (BMI). Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention curve, individuals were classified as: overweight (BMI between the 85th-95th percentiles), obesity (BMI between 95th-97th percentiles) and severe obesity (BMI >97th percentile). Abnormal values were considered for systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic (DBP) if ≥90th percentile of the BP curve recommended for children and adolescents in the V Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension, for waist circumference (WC) if ≥90th percentile of the curve established by the National Cholesterol Education Program, and for high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) if >3mg/dL. To evaluate the association of inadequate values of CRP and the studied groups, chi-square test and analysis of variance were applied, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 and adopting a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the evaluated sample, 66.3% were female, 63.5%, non-white, 64.1% had severe obesity, 78.3% had altered WC and 70.6% presented high BP. There was a significant association of CRP high levels with altered WC and BMI ≥97th percentile. In adolescents, high CRP was related to high SBP. CRP mean values were higher in individuals with elevated SBP. CONCLUSIONS Inadequate values of hs-CRP were associated with severe obesity and high SBP in the studied population. These markers can be used to identify children and adolescents at higher risk for developing atherosclerosis. PMID:24142315

  8. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. Methods The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18–22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC); Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. Results The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%). The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L) was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04). TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10). TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02), as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02). Conclusions Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results. PMID:23110638

  9. Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joy E; Neylan, Thomas C; Epel, Elissa; O'Donovan, Aoife

    2016-03-01

    Mounting evidence highlights specific forms of psychological stress as risk factors for ill health. Particularly strong evidence indicates that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma exposure increase risk for physical and psychiatric disorders, and there is emerging evidence that inflammation may play a key role in these relationships. In a population-based sample from the Health and Retirement Study (n=11,198, mean age 69 ± 10), we examine whether childhood adversity, adulthood trauma, and the interaction between them are associated with elevated levels of the systemic inflammatory marker high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, education, and year of data collection, as well as other possible confounds in follow-up sensitivity analyses. In our sample, 67% of individuals had experienced at least one traumatic event during adulthood, and those with childhood adversity were almost three times as likely to have experienced trauma as an adult. Childhood adversities and adulthood traumas were independently associated with elevated levels of hsCRP (β=0.03, p=0.01 and β=0.05, p<0.001, respectively). Those who had experienced both types of stress had higher levels of hsCRP than those with adulthood trauma alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [-0.003, -0.12], p=0.04, but not compared to those with childhood adversity alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [0.03, -0.16], p=0.19. There was no interaction between childhood and adulthood trauma exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine adulthood trauma exposure and inflammation in a large population-based sample, and the first to explore the interaction of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with inflammation. Our study demonstrates the prevalence of trauma-related inflammation in the general population and suggests that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma are independently associated with elevated inflammation.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with acute ischemic stroke, C-reactive protein, and short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Lehmann, Márcio Francisco; Oliveira, Sayonara Rangel; Flauzino, Tamires; Delongui, Francieli; de Araújo, Maria Caroline Martins; Dichi, Isaias; Delfino, Vinícius Daher; Mezzaroba, Leda; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is associated with acute ischemic stroke, inflammatory markers, and short-term outcome. 168 acute ischemic stroke patients and 118 controls were included. The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was applied up to 8 h of admission (baseline) and after three-months follow-up, and blood samples were obtained up to 24 h of admission to evaluate serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D [25(OH)D] and inflammatory markers. Vitamin D levels classified the individuals in sufficient (VDS ≥ 30.0 ng/mL), insufficient (VDI 20.0-29.9 ng/mL), and deficient (VDD < 20.0 ng/mL) status. Patients had lower levels of 25(OH)D, higher frequency of VDD (43.45% vs. 5.08%, OR: 16.64, 95% CI: 5.66-42.92, p < 0.001), and higher inflammatory markers than controls (p < 0.05). Patients with VDD showed increased high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels than those with VDS status (p = 0.043); those with poor outcome presented with lower 25(OH)D levels than those with good outcome (p = 0.008); moreover, 25(OH)D levels were negatively correlated with mRS after three-months follow-up (r = -0.239, p = 0.005). The associations between VDD and higher hsCRP levels and between 25(OH)D levels and poor outcome at short-term in acute ischemic stroke patients suggest the important role of vitamin D in the inflammatory response and pathophysiology of this ischemic event.

  11. Inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein and radiotherapy-induced early adverse skin reactions in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Lally, Brian E; Hu, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American women. Postsurgery adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) significantly reduced the local recurrence rate. However, many patients develop early adverse skin reactions (EASR) that impact quality of life and treatment outcomes. We evaluated an inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), in predicting RT-induced EASRs in 159 patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. In each patient, we measured pre- and post-RT plasma CRP levels using a highly sensitive ELISA CRP assay. RT-induced EASRs were assessed at weeks 3 and 6 using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (v3.0). Associations between EASRs and CRP levels were assessed using logistic regression models after adjusting for potential confounders. RT-induced grade 2+ EASRs were observed in 8 (5%) and 80 (50%) patients at weeks 3 and 6 (end of RT), respectively. At the end of RT, a significantly higher proportion of African Americans developed grade 3 EASRs (13.8% vs. 2.3% in others); grade 2+ EASRs were significantly associated with: change of CRP > 1 mg/L [odds ratio (OR), 2.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-5.95; P = 0.04], obesity (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.03-4.21; P = 0.04), or combined both factors (OR, 5.21; 95% CI, 1.77-15.38; P = 0.003). This is the first study to demonstrate that an inflammatory biomarker CRP is associated with RT-induced EASRs, particularly combined with obesity. Future larger studies are warranted to validate our findings and facilitate the discovery and development of anti-inflammatory agents to protect normal tissue from RT-induced adverse effects and improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Variation of C-reactive protein levels in adolescents: association with sleep-disordered breathing and sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Emma K; Rosen, Carol L; Kirchner, H Lester; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Emancipator, Judith L; Johnson, Nathan L; Zambito, Anna Marie V; Tracy, Russell P; Jenny, Nancy S; Redline, Susan

    2005-04-19

    There is increasing evidence that sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, is an important predictor of future cardiovascular events. The goal of this study was to quantify the associations of SDB, sleep duration, and CRP in adolescents to better understand the role of SDB in CVD risk. Adolescents (n=143; age, 13 to 18 years; 36% black; 50% female) with a wide range of SDB severity underwent polysomnography and measurement of high-sensitivity CRP. SDB was quantified with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation measures. Sleep duration was estimated from 7-day actigraphy. The independent and dose-response associations of SDB with CRP were addressed through linear mixed-effects models. Forty-eight percent were overweight or obese, and 12% had SDB (AHI > or =5). CRP levels varied with increasing body mass index and SDB. After adjustment for body mass index , age, sex, and race, mean CRP levels were 0.50, 0.43, 0.97, and 1.66 mg/L for SDB severity levels of AHI <1, 1 to 4.9, 5 to 14.9, and > or =15, respectively (P=0.0049, AHI > or =15 versus <1). Adjusted mean CRP levels demonstrated a dose response with SDB above a threshold AHI of 5. This association was partially explained by overnight hypoxemia and less so by sleep duration. In adolescents free of known CVD, an AHI > or =5 is associated with increasing levels of CRP, suggesting that pediatric SDB may confer additional CVD risk beyond that of obesity.

  13. [Relationship between serum levels of C-reactive protein and alpha1-antitrypsin and insulin resistance in obese women].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Alvarado, María Matilde; Sánchez Roitz, César

    2014-09-01

    Adipose tissue produces cytokines involved in insulin resistance (IR) such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha and proinflammatory molecules such as C reactive protein (CRP). alpha1-antitrypsin is an inflammation-sensitive plasma protein. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between serum CRP high-sensitivity (CRPhs) and alpha1-antitrypsin levels with IR indices in obese Venezuelan women. The study population consisted of 15 normal weight women (BMI 21.8 +/- 1.9 kg/m2) and 15 obese women (BMI 35.3 +/- 5.3 kg/m2). Obese and lean women underwent a 2 h-75 g oral glucose tolerance test and the following indices were calculated: homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), homeostatic model assessment of beta cell function (HOMA-beta), Matsuda Index and Insulinogenic Index. The relationship between serum CRPhs and alpha1-antitrypsin levels and these indices were determined. Obese women had higher CRPhs levels (p = 0.001) compared with normal weight women. In obese women, serum CRPhs levels were positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.73, p = 0.0021), HOMA-beta (r = 0.53, p = 0.031) and negatively correlated with the Matsuda Index (r = -0.60, p = 0.017). No correlation between serum levels of alpha1-antitrypsin and IR indices in the obese group and the lean group was observed. There was a relation between serum CRPhs levels and insulin resistance, suggesting a role of subclinical inflammation in IR.

  14. Elevated C-reactive protein is associated with severe periodic leg movements of sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Rye, David B; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed; Bliwise, Donald L

    2012-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder in which urges to move the legs are felt during rest, are felt at night, and are improved by leg movement. RLS has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may be a mediator of this relationship. We evaluated systemic inflammation and PLMs in RLS patients to further assess cardiovascular risk. 137 RLS patients had PLM measurements taken while unmedicated for RLS. Banked plasma was assayed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Mean (SD) PLM index was 19.3 (22.0). PLMs were unrelated to TNF-a and IL-6, but were modestly correlated with logCRP (r(129)=0.19, p=0.03). Those patients with at least 45PLMs/h had an odds ratio of 3.56 (95% CI 1.26-10.03, p=0.02, df=1) for having elevated CRP compared to those with fewer than 45PLMs/h. After adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory disorders, CRP-lowering medications, and body mass index, the OR for those with ≥ 45PLMs/h was 8.60 (95% CI 1.23 to 60.17, p=0.03, df=10). PLMs are associated with increased inflammation, such that those RLS patients with at least 45PLMs/h had more than triple the odds of elevated CRP than those with fewer PLMs. Further investigation into PLMs and inflammation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein is associated with severe periodic leg movements of sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Rye, David B.; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed; Bliwise, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder in which urges to move the legs are felt during rest, are felt at night, and are improved by leg movement. RLS has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may be a mediator of this relationship. We evaluated systemic inflammation and PLMs in RLS patients to further assess cardiovascular risk. Methods 137 RLS patients had PLM measurements taken while unmedicated for RLS. Banked plasma was assayed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Results Mean (SD) PLM index was 19.3 (22.0). PLMs were unrelated to TNF-a and IL-6, but were modestly correlated with log CRP (r(129) = 0.19, p = 0.03). Those patients with at least 45 PLMs/hour had an odds ratio of 3.56 (95% CI 1.26 to 10.03, p = 0.02, df = 1) for having elevated CRP compared to those with fewer than 45 PLMs/hour. After adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory disorders, CRP-lowering medications, and body mass index, the OR for those with ≥ 45 PLMs/hour was 8.60 (95% CI 1.23 to 60.17, p = 0.03, df = 10). Conclusions PLMs are associated with increased inflammation, such that those RLS patients with at least 45 PLMs/hour had more than triple the odds of elevated CRP than those with fewer PLMs. Further investigation into PLMs and inflammation is warranted. PMID:22750520

  16. The cost-effectiveness of C-reactive protein testing and rosuvastatin treatment for patients with normal cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Patrick, Amanda R; Glynn, Robert J; Avorn, Jerry

    2011-02-15

    We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of applying the JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) trial results into clinical practice. The JUPITER trial found that rosuvastatin reduces vascular events in apparently healthy subjects with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The implications of expanding treatment recommendations based on these results have not been evaluated. We constructed a cost-effectiveness model of men ≥ 50 years and women ≥ 60 years with LDL cholesterol levels of <130 mg/dl and no known cardiovascular disease. We compared: 1) hs-CRP testing followed by rosuvastatin treatment for patients with hs-CRP levels ≥ 2.0 mg/l; and 2) usual care (i.e., no testing and no treatment). Estimates of treatment effectiveness were based on the JUPITER trial and were varied in sensitivity analyses. Among patients with LDL <130 mg/dl and hs-CRP levels ≥ 2.0 mg/l, rosuvastatin had an incremental cost-effectiveness of $25,198 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained compared to usual care. If the effectiveness of rosuvastatin were 50% of that observed in JUPITER, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio would increase to $50,871 per QALY. Implementing this strategy only in patients with a Framingham risk score ≥ 10% yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness of $14,205 per QALY. Among such intermediate-risk patients, a JUPITER-based strategy becomes cost-saving at a rosuvastatin price of < $0.86 per day. Rosuvastatin treatment for JUPITER-eligible patients appears to be cost-effective, particularly among those with a Framingham risk score ≥ 10%. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of c-reactive protein in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis in a tertiary care hospital in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Musoke, R; Macharia, W M; Revathi, G

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis in a tertiary care Newborn Unit in Kenya. Cross-sectional study. Newborn Unit, Kenyatta National Hospital. All neonates admitted to Newborn Unit, Kenyatta National Hospital during the study period with suspected sepsis based on specified clinical criteria. Of the 310 infants, there were 83 episodes of proven sepsis and 94 episodes of probable sepsis. Using the standard CRP cut-off value of 5 mg/dl, a sensitivity of 95.2% in proven sepsis and 98.9% for probable septic episodes were noted. In proven sepsis, a specificity of 85.3%, positive predictive value of 80.6%, and a negative predictive value of 96.5% were noted. In probable sepsis, a specificity of 83.3%, positive predictive value of 80.9% and a negative predictive value of 99.1% were noted. The overall accuracy in proven sepsis was 96.5%, and in probable sepsis was noted to be 99.1%. Sub-analysis showed a lower positive predictive value (61.5%) for early onset sepsis compared to 93% for late onset sepsis. Repeat CRP tests were done in 33 babies. Twenty two of the 29 with proven/probable infection had a ten-fold increase in CRP levels, but levels were noted to be low or reducing in seven (24.1%) babies showing signs of improvement clinically. Using a receiver operator characteristic curve, the optimal cut-off point for CRP was found to be 5 mg/dl. Serum CRP is an accurate indicator of neonatal sepsis, with high sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, at the standard cut-off of 5. CRP is a better screening test for late-onset than early-onset neonatal sepsis. The standard recommended CRP cut -off point of 5 is appropriate for local use.

  18. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using reflectometric interference spectroscopy-based sensing system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Woo; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Kurihara, Yoshikazu; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-05-30

    Reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) is a label-free, time-resolved technique, and suitable for detecting antibody-antigen interaction. This work describes a continuous flow biosensor for C-reactive protein (CRP), involving an effective immobilization method of a monoclonal antibody against CRP (anti-CRP) to achieve highly sensitive RIfS-based detection of CRP. The silicon nitride-coated silicon chip (SiN chip) for the RIfS sensing was first treated with trimethylsilylchloride (TMS), followed by UV-light irradiation to in situ generation of homogeneous silanols on the surface. Following amination by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, carboxymethyldextran (CMD) was grafted, and subsequently, protein A was immobilized to create the oriented anti-CRP surface. The immobilization process of protein A and anti-CRP was monitored with the RIfS system by consecutive injections of an amine coupling reagent, protein A and anti-CRP, respectively, to confirm the progress of each step in real time. The sensitivity was enhanced when all of the processes were adopted, suggesting that the oriented immobilization of anti-CRP via protein A that was coupled with the grafted CMD on the aminated surface of TMS-treated SiN chip. The feasibility of the present sensing system was demonstrated on the detection of CRP, where the silicon-based inexpensive chips and the simple optical setup were employed. It can be applied to other target molecules in various fields of life science as a substitute of surface plasmon resonance-based expensive sensors.

  19. Association of C-Reactive Protein (rs1205) Gene Polymorphism with Susceptibility to Psoriasis in South Indian Tamils

    PubMed Central

    Sudhesan, Anjana; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Ananthanarayanan, Palghat Hariharan; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Satheesh, Santhosh; Chandrasekaran, Adithan; Devaraju, Panneer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a multi-factorial heritable T-helper Th-1/Th-17 mediated inflammatory disease, affecting the skin. It is associated with co-morbidities such as Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is a good inflammatory marker. CRP rs1205 polymorphism is associated with circulating plasma CRP levels. Although there is association between the rs1205 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and CVD, there are no prior reports regarding the association of CRP rs1205 SNP with psoriasis susceptibility. Aim To study the association of the genetic variant rs1205 in the CRP gene with susceptibility to the disease and protein levels in South Indian Tamils with psoriasis. Materials and Methods In this case-control genetic study, 300 cases of psoriasis and 300 age and gender matched controls were genotyped for CRP SNP rs1205 using Taq Man 5’allele discrimination assay at Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India from February 2014 to January 2016. Plasma high sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were estimated by ELISA. Disease severity was assessed by Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI). Results CRP genetic variation rs1205 was not associated with psoriasis risk in our South Indian Tamil population. However, the circulating levels of hs-CRP was significantly higher in patients with psoriasis, as compared with controls (p < 0.0001) and the protein levels were significantly associated with disease severity, as assessed by PASI scoring. No genotype was found significantly associated with PASI or CRP levels. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma CRP levels are higher in patients with psoriasis and correlate with disease severity, whilst CRP rs1205 is not associated with susceptibility to psoriasis in South Indian Tamils. PMID:27891353

  20. Race/ethnicity moderates the relationship between depressive symptom severity and C-reactive protein: 2005-2010 NHANES data.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephanie M; Stewart, Jesse C

    2014-10-01

    Because few studies have examined depression facets or potential moderators of the depression-inflammation relationship, our aims were to determine whether particular depressive symptom clusters are more strongly associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and whether race/ethnicity moderates these relationships. We examined data from 10,149 adults representative of the U.S. population (4858 non-Hispanic White, 1978 non-Hispanic Black, 2260 Mexican American, 1053 Other Hispanic) who participated in the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2010. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and high-sensitivity serum CRP was quantified by latex-enhanced nephelometry. Total (p<.001), somatic (p<.001), and nonsomatic (p=.001) depressive symptoms were each positively related to serum CRP in individual models. However, in the simultaneous model that included both symptom clusters, somatic symptoms (p<.001), but not nonsomatic symptoms (p=.98), remained associated with serum CRP. Evidence of moderation by race/ethnicity was also observed, as six of the nine depressive symptoms×race/ethnicity interactions were significant (ps<.05). Among non-Hispanic Whites, the pattern of results was identical to the full sample; only somatic symptoms (p<.001) remained related to serum CRP in the simultaneous model. No relationships between total, somatic, or nonsomatic symptoms and serum CRP were observed among the non-Hispanic Black, Mexican American, or Other Hispanic groups. Our findings indicate that the link between depressive symptoms and systemic inflammation may be due to the somatic symptoms of sleep disturbance, fatigue, appetite changes, and psychomotor retardation/agitation and may be strongest among non-Hispanic Whites.

  1. Oxidative Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident (Ischaemic Stroke): The role of Ginkgo biloba extract.

    PubMed

    Thanoon, Imad A-J; Abdul-Jabbar, Hilmy As; Taha, Dhia A

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischaemic stroke patients by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and highly-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the early post-ischaemic period, and to determine the role of Ginkgo biloba therapy in correcting the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. This study was conducted at Ibn Seena Hospital, Mosul City, Iraq and included 31 cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients and 30 healthy controls. Ischaemic stroke patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 15) received conventional therapy; group II (n = 16) received conventional therapy with G. biloba (1500 mg/day) for 30 days. Blood samples were obtained from patients and controls before treatment and assays done of serum levels of MDA, TAS, and hsCRP. For CVA patients, a post-treatment blood sample was taken and the same parameters reassessed. Compared with the controls, patients' serum levels of MDA, and hsCRP were significantly higher (P ≤0.001) and TAS significantly lower. Group I and II patients reported a significant reduction in serum levels of MDA and hsCRP and a significant increase in serum levels of TAS, in comparison with pre-treatment levels. There was no significant difference (P = 0.19) in serum MDA levels between groups I and II, whereas, serum TAS levels were significantly higher (P ≤0.01) and hsCRP significantly lower (P ≤0.01) in group II. Acute stroke is associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the early period. G. biloba plays a potential role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammatory response.

  2. Associations between Serum C-reactive Protein and Serum Zinc, Ferritin, and Copper in Guatemalan School Children

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vinh Q.; Stein, Aryeh D.; DiGirolamo, Ann M.; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C.; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Grant, Frederick K.; Villalpando, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation affects trace nutrient concentrations, but research on copper and particularly in children is limited. We assessed associations between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and zinc, iron, copper, and other biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin, and albumin), in 634 healthy 6- to 11-year-old Guatemalan schoolchildren. CRP was measured by a standardized, high-sensitive method. For significant associations with CRP, we stratified nutrient concentrations across categories of CRP and compared concentrations above and below several CRP cutoff points (0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/L), and then adjusted values using correction factors (ratios of geometric means of the nutrients in the low and high groups). Prevalence of serum zinc (<65 μg/dL0, ferritin (<15 μg/L), and copper (<90 μg/dL) deficiency were 21%, 2.1%, and 23.8%, respectively. Median (25th and 75th percentiles) CRP was 0.56 (0.26 and 1.54) mg/L. CRP concentration was positively associated with ferritin and copper concentrations (r=0.23 and 0.29, respectively; P<0.0001) but not with zinc and other bio-markers (P>0.05). Regardless of CRP cutoffs, high (> cutoff) vs. low (≤ cutoff) CRP levels had higher ferritin and copper concentrations and lower prevalence of copper deficiency of <90 μg/dL (P<0.05). Adjustment for inflammation had the greatest influence on recalculated prevalence for the CRP 0.5 mg/L cutoff. The low ferritin prevalence hardly changed (from 2.1% to 2.5%) while the low copper prevalence changed appreciably (from 23.8% to 31.2%). In conclusion, CRP was positively associated with ferritin and copper but not with zinc concentrations. Adjustment for inflammation had little effect on low ferritin prevalence, low to begin with, and a large impact on low copper prevalence. High-sensitive CRP methods and the use of very low CRP cutoffs may be more accurate than traditional CRP methods in the adjustment of serum copper concentrations for inflammation in healthy school children. PMID:22354676

  3. Associations between serum C-reactive protein and serum zinc, ferritin, and copper in Guatemalan school children.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vinh Q; Stein, Aryeh D; DiGirolamo, Ann M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Grant, Frederick K; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2012-08-01

    Inflammation affects trace nutrient concentrations, but research on copper and particularly in children is limited. We assessed associations between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and zinc, iron, copper, and other biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin, and albumin), in 634 healthy 6- to 11-year-old Guatemalan schoolchildren. CRP was measured by a standardized, high-sensitive method. For significant associations with CRP, we stratified nutrient concentrations across categories of CRP and compared concentrations above and below several CRP cutoff points (0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/L), and then adjusted values using correction factors (ratios of geometric means of the nutrients in the low and high groups). Prevalence of serum zinc (<65 μg/dL0, ferritin (<15 μg/L), and copper (<90 μg/dL) deficiency were 21%, 2.1%, and 23.8%, respectively. Median (25th and 75th percentiles) CRP was 0.56 (0.26 and 1.54) mg/L. CRP concentration was positively associated with ferritin and copper concentrations (r = 0.23 and 0.29, respectively; P < 0.0001) but not with zinc and other biomarkers (P > 0.05). Regardless of CRP cutoffs, high (> cutoff) vs. low (≤ cutoff) CRP levels had higher ferritin and copper concentrations and lower prevalence of copper deficiency of <90 μg/dL (P < 0.05). Adjustment for inflammation had the greatest influence on recalculated prevalence for the CRP 0.5 mg/L cutoff. The low ferritin prevalence hardly changed (from 2.1% to 2.5%) while the low copper prevalence changed appreciably (from 23.8% to 31.2%). In conclusion, CRP was positively associated with ferritin and copper but not with zinc concentrations. Adjustment for inflammation had little effect on low ferritin prevalence, low to begin with, and a large impact on low copper prevalence. High-sensitive CRP methods and the use of very low CRP cutoffs may be more accurate than traditional CRP methods in the adjustment of serum copper concentrations for inflammation in healthy school children.

  4. How accurate are leukocyte indices and C-reactive protein for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Orlando; Ohlsson, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is often difficult to make. Treatment on the basis of clinical suspicion and risk factors may result in overtreatment. A previous review of the usefulness of C-reactive protein and leukocyte indices concluded that these test results should be interpreted with caution. The present paper reviews and, when appropriate, revises, in light of new information, the conclusions reached in the previous systematic review of the topic. PMID:20401235

  5. Effects of nutritional supplementation on periodontal parameters, carotenoid antioxidant levels, and serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Cheema, Abida T; Zingale, Joseph A; Chambers, David W; Lundergan, William P

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of nutrition in periodontal disease. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of a nutritional supplement on gingival inflammation, bleeding, probing depth, clinical attachment level, carotenoid antioxidant level, and C-reactive protein. The test supplement, consisting of a standard multivitamin formula, as well as several phytonutrients associated with antiinflammatory/antioxidant effects, provided modest benefits in reducing inflammation; however, further studies with larger populations and longer intervention are warranted.

  6. Evaluation of a C-reactive protein latex agglutination detection test with sera from patients with sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Arko, R J; Thompson, S E

    1984-01-01

    A total of 149 sera, including 79 pre- and posttreatment sera from 33 patients with disseminated gonococcal infections, 18 from patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections, 6 from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, 4 from patients with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections, and 42 from normal volunteers, were examined for C-reactive protein with a latex agglutination C-reactive protein detection kit (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Results were quantitated with LC-Partigen C-reactive protein radial immuno-diffusion plates (Calbiochem-Behring, La Jolla, Calif.). Positive latex agglutination results were observed in all of the pretreatment sera and some of the posttreatment sera of patients with disseminated gonococcal infections and in two sera from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, which corresponded to quantitative C-reactive protein levels in the radial immunodiffusion plates. C-reactive protein levels were not detectable in the serum samples from normal volunteers or patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections or genital chlamydial infections. Positive latex agglutination occurred as early as 20 s in sera with high C-reactive protein levels, and all positive results were observed within 90 s of the 3-min test limit. Positive latex test results were obtained with C-reactive protein levels as low as 1 mg/dl (10 micrograms/ml). PMID:6440907

  7. Postprandial response of adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein to a high-fat dietary load.

    PubMed

    Poppitt, Sally D; Keogh, Geraldine F; Lithander, Fiona E; Wang, Yu; Mulvey, Tom B; Chan, Yih-Kai; McArdle, Brian H; Cooper, Garth J S

    2008-04-01

    Circulating levels of adiponectin are low in obesity and metabolic disorders associated with increasing fat mass including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Body fat stores may be positively related to intake of dietary fat, but little is known of mechanisms by which serum adiponectin may be regulated through diet. We investigated acute effects of a high-fat load and changes in fatty acid saturation on circulating adiponectin and associated mediators of inflammation including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein (CRP). A high-fat test meal (59 +/- 4 g fat; 71% of energy as fat) containing a high ( approximately 71:29) or low ( approximately 55:45) ratio of saturated:unsaturated fatty acids was given at breakfast on two occasions. Blood samples were collected at 0 (baseline), 1, 3, and 6 h for measurement of adiponectin, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and high-sensitivity CRP. A fat-exclusion lunch, snack, and dinner were also given and blood samples collected at 10 and 24 h. Eighteen healthy, lean men completed the trial. There was no evidence of acute change in circulating adiponectin in response to the lipid bolus or a differential effect of fatty acid saturation on adiponectin, high-sensitivity CRP, or IL-6 (P > 0.05). IL-6 increased over 6 h on both treatments (time, P < 0.05). TNF-alpha decreased on the high saturated:unsaturated fatty acid treatment (treatment by time, P < 0.05). There were no significant correlations between circulating adiponectin and insulin on either dietary treatment in these normoglycemic subjects. Acute changes in the content of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids had no adverse effect on postprandial circulation of the adipose-related factors adiponectin, IL-6, TNF-alpha, or high-sensitivity CRP.

  8. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data.

    PubMed

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Shah, Tina; Engert, James C; Clarke, Robert; Davey-Smith, George; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Sandhu, Manjinder; Anand, Sonia; Pepys, Mark B; Smeeth, Liam; Whittaker, John; Casas, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Simon G; Hingorani, Aroon D; Danesh, John

    2011-02-15

    To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease. Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of individual participant data from 47 epidemiological studies in 15 countries. 194 418 participants, including 46 557 patients with prevalent or incident coronary heart disease. Information was available on four CRP gene tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3093077, rs1205, rs1130864, rs1800947), concentration of C reactive protein, and levels of other risk factors. Risk ratios for coronary heart disease associated with genetically raised C reactive protein versus risk ratios with equivalent differences in C reactive protein concentration itself, adjusted for conventional risk factors and variability in risk factor levels within individuals. CRP variants were each associated with up to 30% per allele difference in concentration of C reactive protein (P<10(-34)) and were unrelated to other risk factors. Risk ratios for coronary heart disease per additional copy of an allele associated with raised C reactive protein were 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.87 to 1.00) for rs3093077; 1.00 (0.98 to 1.02) for rs1205; 0.98 (0.96 to 1.00) for rs1130864; and 0.99 (0.94 to 1.03) for rs1800947. In a combined analysis, the risk ratio for coronary heart disease was 1.00 (0.90 to 1.13) per 1 SD higher genetically raised natural log (ln) concentration of C reactive protein. The genetic findings were discordant with the risk ratio observed for coronary heart disease of 1.33 (1.23 to 1.43) per 1 SD higher circulating ln concentration of C reactive protein in prospective studies (P=0.001 for difference). Human genetic data indicate that C reactive protein concentration itself is unlikely to be even a modest causal factor in coronary heart disease.

  9. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  10. Polygenic Overlap Between C-Reactive Protein, Plasma Lipids, and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Rahul S; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Dehghan, Abbas; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; McEvoy, Linda K; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Karow, David S; Brewer, James B; Hess, Christopher P; Williams, Julie; Sims, Rebecca; O'Donovan, Michael C; Choi, Seung Hoan; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; DeStefano, Anita L; van der Lee, Sven J; Psaty, Bruce M; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Launer, Lenore; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hardy, John; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; White, Linda R; Sando, Sigrid B; Rongve, Arvid; Witoelar, Aree; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T; Snaedal, Jon; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M

    2015-06-09

    Epidemiological findings suggest a relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD), inflammation, and dyslipidemia, although the nature of this relationship is not well understood. We investigated whether this phenotypic association arises from a shared genetic basis. Using summary statistics (P values and odds ratios) from genome-wide association studies of >200 000 individuals, we investigated overlap in single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with clinically diagnosed AD and C-reactive protein (CRP), triglycerides, and high- and low-density lipoprotein levels. We found up to 50-fold enrichment of AD single-nucleotide polymorphisms for different levels of association with C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride single-nucleotide polymorphisms using a false discovery rate threshold <0.05. By conditioning on polymorphisms associated with the 4 phenotypes, we identified 55 loci associated with increased AD risk. We then conducted a meta-analysis of these 55 variants across 4 independent AD cohorts (total: n=29 054 AD cases and 114 824 healthy controls) and discovered 2 genome-wide significant variants on chromosome 4 (rs13113697; closest gene, HS3ST1; odds ratio=1.07; 95% confidence interval=1.05-1.11; P=2.86×10(-8)) and chromosome 10 (rs7920721; closest gene, ECHDC3; odds ratio=1.07; 95% confidence interval=1.04-1.11; P=3.38×10(-8)). We also found that gene expression of HS3ST1 and ECHDC3 was altered in AD brains compared with control brains. We demonstrate genetic overlap between AD, C-reactive protein, and plasma lipids. By conditioning on the genetic association with the cardiovascular phenotypes, we identify novel AD susceptibility loci, including 2 genome-wide significant variants conferring increased risk for AD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Association between nutritional status, C-reactive protein, adiponectin and HOMA-AD in Brazilian children.

    PubMed

    Gomes Domingos, Ana Luiza; Luiz Lins Machado-Coelho, George; Pinheiro Volp, Ana Carolina; Luiz Pereira de Oliveira, Fernando; Santana Caldas, Ivo; Nascimento de Freitas, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    In children, the presence of obesity is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases on the adulthood. To evaluate the association of anthropometry, body composition, clinical variables and biochemical profile with C-reactive protein and adiponectin levels, and insulin resistance in children in the municipality of Nova Era, Brazil. Nested case-control study following a crosssectional study. We evaluated 178 children, 57 of them classified as obese and 121 as normal-weight from a population of 1024 schoolchildren 6 to 10 years old: Blood samples were collected after 12-hour fast to obtain serum and plasma. We collected anthropometric and body composition measures, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data. Sexual maturation was assessed according to the stage of sexual development. We performed Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's correlation, Spearman's test and multiple linear regression analysis. Independent variables with p < 0.05 were included in the multiple regression model. Residual analysis was performed to assess model validity. Among obese children, C-reactive protein levels were associated with triacylglycerol levels and body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 27.6%, p < 0.001). Adiponectin was associated with HOMA-IR, HOMAAD and body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 75.5%, p < 0.001). HOMA-AD index was associated with HOMA-IR, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure and weight (R2 adjusted = 90.7%, p < 0.001). Significant associations were found between body composition, anthropometry, clinical variables, biochemical profile and adiponectin and C-reactive protein levels and insulin resistance in obese and normal-weight children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Early diagnosis of neonatal septicemia by hematologic scoring system, C-reactive protein and serum haptoglobin.

    PubMed

    Khair, K B; Rahman, M A; Sultana, T; Roy, C K; Rahman, M Q; Ahmed, A N

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal septicemia is one of the major health problems throughout the world. Infections are frequent and important cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal period. The objective of the present study was to find out the role of hematologic scoring system (HSS), C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin in the early diagnosis of neonatal septicemia. This is a descriptive consisted of 100 neonates admitted at neonatal ICU, BSMMU, who were clinically suspected sepsis. The hematological parameter, C-reactive protein and haptoglobin were measured in all cases. Blood culture was done as the gold standard for diagnosis of neonatal septicemia. There were 12 out of 100 neonates (12%) who had culture proven sepsis and they were predominantly preterm and very low birth weight. On evaluation of various hematological parameters total leukocyte count, total neutrophil count, immature to total neutrophil ratio (>0.2), immature to mature neutrophil ratio (>0.3), total immature count, platelet count were found to have optimal sensitivities and negative predictive values. Using these values hematologic scoring system (HSS) was formulated according to Rodwell et al. Score ≥4 was found sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 60%. C-reactive protein (CRP) had sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 74%. Haptoglobin was not found significant (p<0.05) with sepsis and sensitivity was very low. But Combination of score ≥4 and CRP showed sensitivity of 75%, specificity 85%, positive predictive value (PPV) 41% and negative positive value (NPV) 96%. HSS and CRP are useful test to differentiate the septicemic from non septicemic neonates and also provide a effective guideline to make decisions regarding judicious use of antibiotic therapy. But haptoglobin level was not found useful for screening of sepsis.

  13. Utility of haematological parameters and C-reactive protein in the detection of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Manucha, V; Rusia, U; Sikka, M; Faridi, M M A; Madan, N

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate various haematological parameters, individually and in combination, to formulate a haematological scoring system (HSS, defined by Rodwell et al.), which can then be used to screen for sepsis in neonates who are clinically suspected of infection.1 The study cohort consisted of 150 neonates (from birth to 3 days old) with clinically suspected infection. Blood was collected by peripheral venepuncture in all neonates. A complete blood count, differential leucocyte count, total leucocyte count (TLC), total neutrophil count (TNC), immature neutrophil count, band form count and platelet count were performed. Immature total neutrophil count (I/T) and immature/mature neutrophil count (I/M) ratios were then obtained. C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured semiquantitatively and blood culture and antibiotic sensitivity were performed in each case. The haematological parameters were compared individually and in combination (by HSS) with CRP. Twenty-one (14%) neonates had blood culture proven sepsis. On evaluation of various haematological parameters, TLC < 10 x 109/L, TNC < 8 x 109/L, I/M > 0.25, I/T > 0.14, band count > 15% and platelet count < 150 x 109 were found to have optimal sensitivities and negative predictive values (NPV). Using these values, an HSS was formulated. A haematological score > or = 3 had a sensitivity of 86% and NPV of 96%. C-reactive protein as a single test had a sensitivity of 76% and NPV of 96%. A combination of CRP with haematological parameters decreased the sensitivity and NPV of the HSS. A haematological score can be obtained by a complete blood count and examination of peripheral blood smear, thus permitting an objective assessment of haematological changes that occur in a neonate suspected of sepsis. C-reactive protein does not have any advantage over HSS, either as a single test or in combination.

  14. Correlation of C-reactive protein and body mass index with diabetic retinopathy in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipayan; Ghosh, Sambuddha; Roy, Debesh

    2015-01-01

    Association of C-reactive protein (CRP) and body mass index (BMI) with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has conflicting reports. Sixty diabetes patients each with DR (Group A), no DR (Group B) and 60 healthy volunteers (control, group C) were studied. CRP was measured. BMI was calculated. Significant difference in CRP was observed between groups A & B (p=0.000) and A & C (p=0.007). No significant difference in BMI was observed. Central macular thickness correlated positively with CRP and negatively with BMI. We observed strong association of CRP with DR and no significant relationship between DR and BMI. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Presence of C-reactive protein in the development of acute mumps infection. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Strati, I; Copelovici, Y; Cajal, N; Marinescu, G; Vulcan, V

    1987-01-01

    Investigations conducted on subjects with epidemic parotitis serologically confirmed (hemagglutination inhibition) allowed the detection of amounts of C reactive protein (Crp) higher than the normal level in 34% of the serum samples collected during the first twelve days of illness. After that, the Crp gradually decreased. The results showed that Crp is present in more than 40% of the subjects with uncomplicated mumps and in 55 to 75% of the cases with such complications as meningitis or orchitis. In most of the subjects, the Crp was found only in the first sample, but not in the second. Nevertheless, high amounts were found later, simultaneously with anti-mumps antibodies.

  16. A fluorescent immunoassay for the determination of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Bolzoni, L.; Giannetti, A.; Porro, G.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2009-05-01

    The discrimination of viral and bacterial sepsis is an important issue in intensive care patients. For this purpose, the simultaneous measurements of different analytes such as C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), myeloperoxidase, interleukines and neopterin, are necessary. A novel optical platform was designed and realised for the implementation of fluorescence-based immunoassays. The core of the optical platform is a plastic biochip, formed by a series of microchannels each of them devoted to the determination of a single analyte. Sandwich assays for CRP and PCT spiked in serum were performed in order to demonstrate the reliability of a multi-array device.

  17. C reactive protein rapid assay techniques for monitoring resolution of infection in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R I; Stone, P C; Hudson, A G; Stuart, J

    1984-01-01

    Three rapid assay techniques (latex agglutination, laser nephelometry, and EMIT enzyme immunoassay) have been evaluated for serial monitoring of the serum C reactive protein (CRP) concentration in immunosuppressed patients with fever. Radial immunodiffusion assay was used as a reference method. Latex agglutination reliably distinguished between normal and raised serum CRP concentrations. Enzyme immunoassay also provided a result within minutes, showed particularly close correlation (r = 0.967) with the reference method, and was free from interference by lipaemic or icteric sera. In 27% of 55 episodes of fever studied serially in immunosuppressed patients, the enzyme immunoassay provided clinically useful information by indicating incomplete resolution of infection despite resolution of fever. PMID:6430971

  18. Synovial Fluid C-reactive Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Wang, Qi; Li, Rui; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the main cause of failure following total joint arthroplasty. Until now, the diagnosis of PJI is still confronted with technical limitations, and the question of whether synovial fluid biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), can provide high value in the diagnosis of PJI remains unanswered and, therefore, was the aim of the study. Methods: First, we conducted a systematic review on CRP in the diagnosis of PJI by searching online databases using keywords such as “periprosthetic joint infection”, “synovial fluid”, and “C-reactive protein”. Eligible studies providing sufficient data to construct 2 × 2 contingency tables were then selected based on the list of criteria and the quality of included studies was assessed subsequently. Finally, the reported sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and the area under the SROC (AUSROC) were pooled together and used to evaluate overall diagnostic performance. Results: Seven studies were included in our review, six of which comprising a total of 456 participants were further investigated in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–0.96), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.93), and 101.40 (95% CI: 48.07–213.93), respectively. The AUSROC was 0.9663 (standard error, 0.0113). Conclusions: Synovial fluid CRP is a good biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27503025

  19. Electrochemical detection of high-sensitivity CRP inside a microfluidic device by numerical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyudo; Park, Insu; Kwon, Kiwoon; Kwon, Taeyun; Seo, Jongbum; Chang, Woo-Jin; Nam, Hakhyun; Cha, Geun Sig; Choi, Moon Hee; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-04-01

    The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), a classic acute phase plasma protein, increases rapidly in response to tissue infection or inflammation, especially in cases of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Thus, highly sensitive monitoring of the CRP concentration plays a pivotal role in detecting these diseases. Many researchers have studied methods for the detection of CRP concentrations such as optical, mechanical, and electrochemical techniques inside microfluidic devices. While significant progress has been made towards improving the resolution and sensitivity of detection, only a few studies have systematically analyzed the CRP concentration using both numerical and experimental approaches. Specifically, systematic analyses of the electrochemical detection of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) inside a microfluidic device have never been conducted. In this paper, we systematically analyzed the electrochemical detection of CRP modified through the attachment of an alkaline phosphatase (ALP-labeled CRP) using ELISA inside a chip. For this analysis, we developed a model based on antigen-antibody binding kinetics theory for the numerical quantification of the CRP concentration. We also experimentally measured the current value corresponding to the ALP-labeled CRP concentration inside the microfluidic chip. The measured value closely matched the calculated value obtained by numerical simulation using the developed model. Through this comparison, we validated the numerical simulation methods, and the calculated and measured values. Lastly, we examined the effects of various microfluidic parameters on electrochemical detection of the ALP-labeled CRP concentration using numerical simulations. The results of these simulations provide insight into the microfluidic electrochemical reactions used for protein detection. Furthermore, the results described in this study should be useful for the design and optimization of

  20. Physical activity, sleep, and C-reactive protein as markers of positive health in resilient older men.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alison J; Hoyt, Robert E; Linnville, Steven E; Moore, Jeffery L

    2016-09-01

    This study explored whether physical activity and sleep, combined with the biomarker C-reactive protein, indexed positive health in older men. Many were former prisoners of war, with most remaining psychologically resilient and free of any psychiatric diagnoses. Activity and sleep were recorded through actigraphy in 120 veterans (86 resilient and 34 nonresilient) for 7 days. Resilient men had higher physical activity, significantly lower C-reactive protein levels, and 53 percent had lower cardiac-disease risk compared to nonresilient men. Sleep was adequate and not associated with C-reactive protein. Results suggest continued study is needed in actigraphy and C-reactive protein as means to index positive health.

  1. C-reactive Protein as a Potential Biomarker of Residual Obstructive Sleep Apnea Following Adenotonsillectomy in Children.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Kaditis, Athanasios G; Verhulst, Stijn L; Gozal, David

    2016-02-01

    Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is first-line treatment for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), with most children having improvements in polysomnography (PSG). However, many children have residual OSA following AT as determined through PSG. Identification of a biomarker of residual disease would be clinically meaningful to detect children at risk. We hypothesize serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an inflammatory biomarker, is predictive of residual OSA following AT. PSG was performed both preoperatively and postoperatively on children undergoing AT for the diagnosis of OSA. HsCRP serum concentrations were determined in all children pre-AT, and in most children post-AT. Resolution of OSA after AT was defined by a post-AT apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 1.5/h total sleep time (TST). Residual OSA was defined as a post-AT AHI > 5/h TST, which is considered clinically significant. AT significantly improved the AHI from 15.9 ± 16.4 to 4.1 ± 5.3/h TST in 182 children (P < 0.001). Of 182 children, residual OSA (post-AT AHI > 5) was seen in 46 children (25%). Among children who had hsCRP levels measured pre- and post-AT (n = 155), mean hsCRP levels pre-AT were 0.98 ± 1.91 mg/L and were significantly reduced post-AT (0.63 ± 2.24 mg/dL; P = 0.011). Stratification into post-AT AHI groups corresponding to < 1.5/h TST, 1.5/h TST < AHI < 5/h TST, and AHI > 5/h TST revealed post-AT hsCRP levels of 0.09 ± 0.12, 0.57 ± 2.28, and 1.49 ± 3.34 mg/L with statistical significance emerging comparing residual AHI > 5/h TST compared to post-AT AHI < 1.5/h TST (P = 0.006). Hierarchical multivariate modeling confirmed that pre-AT AHI and post-AT hsCRP levels were most significantly associated with residual OSA. Even though AT improves OSA in most children, residual OSA is frequent. Assessment of post-AT hsCRP levels emerges as a potentially useful biomarker predicting residual OSA. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Intraoperative synovial C-reactive protein is as useful as frozen section to detect periprosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Buttaro, Martin A; Martorell, Gabriel; Quinteros, Mauricio; Comba, Fernando; Zanotti, Gerardo; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Synovial quantification of C-reactive protein (SCRP) has been recently published with high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. However, to our knowledge, no studies have compared the use of this test with intraoperative frozen section, which is considered by many to be the best intraoperative test now available. We asked whether intraoperative SCRP could lead to comparable sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values as intraoperative frozen section in revision total hip arthroplasty. A prospective study was performed including 76 patients who underwent hip revision for any cause. SCRP quantification (using 9.5 mg/L as denoting infection) and the analysis of frozen section of intraoperative samples (five or more polymorphonuclear leukocytes under high magnification in 10 fields) were performed in all the patients. The definitive diagnosis of an infection was determined according to the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS). In this group, 30% of the patients were diagnosed with infection using the MSIS criteria (23 of 76 patients). With the numbers available, there were no differences between SCRP and frozen section in terms of their ability to diagnose infection. The sensitivity of SCRP was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70.8%-98.6%), the specificity was 94% (95% CI, 84.5%-98.7%), the positive predictive value was 87% (95% CI, 66.3%-97%), and the negative predictive value was 96% (95% CI, 87%-99.4%); the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were the same using frozen sections to diagnose infection. The positive likelihood ratio was 16.36 (95% CI, 5.4-49.5), indicating a low probability of an individual without the condition having a positive test, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.10 (95% CI, 0.03-0.36), indicating low probability of an individual without the condition having a negative test. We found that quantitative SCRP had similar diagnostic value as

  3. Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: a cross-sectional population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joy E.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Epel, Elissa; O’Donovan, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence highlights specific forms of psychological stress as risk factors for ill health. Particularly strong evidence indicates that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma exposure increase risk for physical and psychiatric disorders, and there is emerging evidence that inflammation may play a key role in these relationships. In a population-based sample from the Health and Retirement Study (n = 11,198, mean age 69 ± 10), we examine whether childhood adversity, adulthood trauma, and the interaction between them are associated with elevated levels of the systemic inflammatory marker high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, education, and year of data collection, as well as other possible confounds in follow-up sensitivity analyses. In our sample, 67% of individuals had experienced at least one traumatic event during adulthood, and those with childhood adversity were almost three times as likely to have experienced trauma as an adult. Childhood adversities and adulthood traumas were independently associated with elevated levels of hsCRP (β = 0.03, p = 0.01 and β = 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Those who had experienced both types of stress had higher levels of hsCRP than those with adulthood trauma alone, Estimate = −0.06, 95% CI [−0.003, −0.12], p = 0.04, but not compared to those with childhood adversity alone, Estimate = −0.06, 95% CI [0.03, −0.16], p = 0.19. There was no interaction between childhood and adulthood trauma exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine adulthood trauma exposure and inflammation in a large population-based sample, and the first to explore the interaction of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with inflammation. Our study demonstrates the prevalence of trauma-related inflammation in the general population and suggests that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma are independently associated with elevated inflammation. PMID:26616398

  4. Maternal serum C-reactive protein concentration and intra-amniotic inflammation in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Musilova, Ivana; Stepan, Martin; Bestvina, Tomas; Pliskova, Lenka; Zednikova, Barbora; Jacobsson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in pregnancies complicated by preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) in relation to the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and/or intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI). Methods Two hundred and eighty-seven women with singleton pregnancies complicated by PPROM between 2014 and 2016 were included in this study. Maternal blood and amniotic fluid samples were collected at the time of admission. Maternal serum CRP concentration was measured using a high-sensitivity immunoturbidimetric assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration was measured using a point-of-care test. MIAC was diagnosed based on a positive polymerase chain reaction result for Ureaplasma species, Mycoplasma hominis, and/or Chlamydia trachomatis and for the 16S rRNA gene. IAI was characterized by an amniotic fluid IL-6 concentration of ≥ 745 pg/mL. Result Women with MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP concentrations than did women without (with MIAC: median 6.9 mg/L vs. without MIAC: median 4.9 mg/L; p = 0.02; with IAI: median 8.6 mg/L vs. without IAI: median 4.7 mg/L; p < 0.0001). When women were split into four subgroups based on the presence of MIAC and/or IAI, women with the presence of both MIAC and IAI had higher maternal serum CRP than did women with IAI alone, with MIAC alone, and women without MIAC and IAI (both MIAC and IAI: median: 13.1 mg/L; IAI alone: 6.0 mg/L; MIAC alone: 3.9 mg/L; and without MIAC and IAI: median 4.8 mg/L; p < 0.0001). The maternal serum CRP cutoff value of 17.5 mg/L was the best level to identify the presence of both MIAC and IAI, with sensitivity of 47%, specificity of 96%, positive predictive value of 42%, negative predictive value of 96%, and the positive likelihood ratio of 10.9. Conclusion The presence of both MIAC and IAI was associated with the highest maternal serum CRP concentrations. Maternal serum CRP concentration in women with PPROM at the time of

  5. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Reimann, M J; Ljungvall, I; Hillström, A; Møller, J E; Hagman, R; Falk, T; Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Olsen, L H

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent. The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum concentrations of CRP, determined using a novel automated canine-specific high-sensitivity CRP assay (Gentian hsCRP), were associated with severity of MMVD and selected clinical variables in dogs. The study included 188 client-owned dogs with different severities of MMVD. Dogs were classified based on ACVIM consensus statement guidelines (group A, n = 58; group B1, n = 56; group B2, n = 38; group C, n = 36). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF; group C) had significantly higher CRP concentrations (median, 2.65 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, 1.09-5.09) compared to dogs in groups A (median, 0.97 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.97; P = 0.001), B1 (median, 0.78 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.73, P <0.0001) and B2 (median, 0.60 mg/L; quartile 1-quartile 3, <0.50-1.23; P <0.0001). Other variables reflecting disease severity, including left atrial to aortic root ratio (P = 0.0002, adjusted r(2) = 0.07) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter normalised for bodyweight (P = 0.0005, adjusted r(2) = 0.06), were positively associated with CRP concentration, but the association disappeared if dogs with CHF were excluded from analysis. In conclusion, slightly higher CRP concentrations were found in dogs with CHF whereas severity of asymptomatic MMVD showed no association with CRP concentrations.

  6. Associations of overall sitting time and TV viewing time with fibrinogen and C reactive protein: the AusDiab study.

    PubMed

    Howard, Bethany J; Balkau, Beverley; Thorp, Alicia A; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W

    2015-02-01

    Sedentary behaviour is associated with increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Plasma fibrinogen and C reactive protein (CRP)-key inflammatory and/or haemostatic markers-may contribute to this association; however, few studies have examined their relationships with sedentary behaviours. We examined associations of overall sitting and TV viewing time with fibrinogen and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP). Plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP were measured in 3086 Australian adults (mean age: 55±12 years) who participated in the 2004-2005 AusDiab (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle) study. Multiple linear regression analyses examined cross-sectional associations of self-reported overall sitting and TV viewing time (h/day) with plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP, adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioural and medical treatments and conditions as potential covariates. Overall sitting time and TV viewing time were positively associated with plasma fibrinogen (sitting: β: 0.02 g/L, 95% CI (0.01 to 0.02); TV time: 0.03 g/L (0.02 to 0.05)) and hsCRP (sitting: 2.4% (1.2% to 3.6%); TV time: 4.5% (1.7% to 7.4%)). Associations were independent of leisure-time physical activity, but after adjusting for waist circumference, they remained for fibrinogen, but for hsCRP were attenuated to the null. Interactions were observed for gender×TV (p=0.011) with fibrinogen (associations in women only) and for waist circumference×TV (p=0.084) with hsCRP (associations in low-risk only). Overall sitting time was positively associated with plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP in men and women; associations of TV viewing time with fibrinogen were observed in women only. Abdominal adiposity-mediated associations for hsCRP but not for fibrinogen. Prospective and intervention studies are needed to establish likely causality and elucidate potential mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and C reactive protein among middle-aged community residents: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Isao; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Sato, Shinichi; Shimamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Masamitsu; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-06-01

    There are conflicting results for the association between obstructive sleep apnoea and raised C reactive protein (CRP) levels. A study was undertaken to investigate whether nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, a surrogate marker for obstructive sleep apnoea, was associated with CRP levels among a community-dwelling Japanese population. Among participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS), 1422 male and 2466 female community residents aged 40-69 years were tested during sleep. No nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia were defined using 3% oxygen desaturation index cut-off points at 5 and 15 events/h, respectively. High-sensitivity CRP levels were measured using a latex particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. Multivariate analysis was adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, current alcohol intake, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus and menopausal status for women. Multivariable-adjusted mean CRP levels among men were 0.70 mg/l (95% CI 0.65 to 0.75) for no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.74 to 0.89) for mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and 0.84 mg/l (95% CI 0.70 to 1.00) for moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (p for trend=0.03). The values for women were 0.59 mg/l (95% CI 0.57 to 0.62), 0.66 mg/l (95% CI 0.59 to 0.73) and 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.62 to 1.03), respectively (p for trend=0.008). Compared with no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, the prevalence of a high CRP level (>or=1.0 mg/l) was 1.4-1.7-fold higher for mild to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia in both sexes. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia is associated with raised serum CRP levels among middle-aged Japanese subjects.

  8. From C-Reactive Protein to Interleukin-6 to Interleukin-1: Moving Upstream To Identify Novel Targets for Atheroprotection.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M

    2016-01-08

    Plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) predict vascular risk with an effect estimate as large as that of total or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Further, randomized trial data addressing hsCRP have been central to understanding the anti-inflammatory effects of statin therapy and have consistently demonstrated on-treatment hsCRP levels to be as powerful a predictor of residual cardiovascular risk as on-treatment levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Yet, although hsCRP is clinically useful as a biomarker for risk prediction, most mechanistic studies suggest that CRP itself is unlikely to be a target for intervention. Moving upstream in the inflammatory cascade from CRP to interleukin (IL)-6 to IL-1 provides novel therapeutic opportunities for atheroprotection that focus on the central IL-6 signaling system and ultimately on inhibition of the IL-1β-producing NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome. Cholesterol crystals, neutrophil extracellular traps, atheroprone flow, and local tissue hypoxia activate the NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome. As such, a unifying concept of hsCRP as a downstream surrogate biomarker for upstream IL-1β activity has emerged. From a therapeutic perspective, small ischemia studies show reductions in acute-phase hsCRP production with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra and the IL-6 receptor blocker tocilizumab. A phase IIb study conducted among diabetic patients at high vascular risk indicates that canakinumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-1β, markedly reduces plasma levels of IL-6, hsCRP, and fibrinogen with little change in atherogenic lipids. Canakinumab in now being tested as a method to prevent recurrent cardiovascular events in a randomized trial of 10 065 post-myocardial infarction patients with elevated hsCRP that is fully enrolled and due to complete in 2017. Clinical trials using alternative anti

  9. Significant Increase in C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A in the Early Hours of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Negreva, Mariya; Georgiev, Svetoslav; Prodanova, Krasimira

    2016-02-01

    A number of data have been accumulated on inflammation in persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). Our aim was to study the process in paroxysmal AF (PAF) by measuring plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA) and fibrinogen in dynamics. The markers were investigated in 51 patients (26 males and 25 females; 59.84 ± 1.60 years) at hospital admission (baseline), 24 hours and 28 days after sinus rhythm restoration. Fifty-two controls (26 males and 26 females; 59.50 ± 1.46 years) were selected. At baseline, hs-CRP and SAA concentrations were higher in patients (8.12 ± 0.82 vs. 5.57 ± 0.21 mg/L, P = 0.003; 16.04 ± 0.93 vs. 5.12 ± 0.23 ng/mL, P < 0.001, respectively) and these changes persisted 24 hours after sinus rhythm restoration (8.16 ± 0.71 vs. 5.57 ± 0.21 mg/L, P < 0.001; 12.99 ± 0.75 vs. 5.12 ± 0.23 ng/mL, P < 0.001, respectively). On the 28th day, no significant difference was measured (5.42 ± 0.29 vs. 5.57 ± 0.21 mg/L, P = 0.68; 5.89 ± 0.38 vs. 5.12 ± 0.23 ng/mL, P = 0.08, respectively). At any measurement, fibrinogen levels did not differ between patients and controls (3.30 ± 0.17 vs. 3.22 ± 0.11 g/L, P = 0.70; 3.32 ± 0.11 vs. 3.22 ± 0.11 g/L, P = 0.52; 3.24 ± 0.13 vs. 3.22 ± 0.11 g/L, P = 0.90, respectively). PAF is associated with dynamics in hs-CRP and SAA plasma levels. The results suggest that inflammation is closely related to the arrhythmia initiation.

  10. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on C-reactive protein levels: The Ramipril C-Reactive pRotein Randomized evaluation (4R) trial results

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subodh; Lonn, Eva M; Nanji, Alykhan; Browne, Kevin; Ward, Richard; Robertson, Annette; Conradson, Heather; Hildebrand, Kathy; Brant, Rollin; Anderson, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) predict cardiovascular risk and may represent a target for treating and/or monitoring risk-reduction strategies. The effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on CRP levels has not been adequately studied. METHODS: A total of 264 men and women, with CRP levels of 2 mg/L or greater and no history of cardiovascular disease, were enrolled in a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 10 mg/day of ramipril (n=132) or placebo (n=132) for 12 weeks. The main outcome measure was the change in CRP levels from baseline to 12 weeks in the ramipril- versus placebo-treated patients. RESULTS: The mean (± SD) age was 53±9 years (60% men). Baseline demographics were similar between the volunteers allocated to receive either placebo or ramipril. The geometric mean CRP at baseline was 3.84 mg/L (95% CI 3.62 mg/L to 4.06 mg/L). The percentage change in geometric mean CRP values over 12 weeks was −13.2% (95% CI −22.3% to −3.2%) in the placebo group compared with −21.1% (95% CI −29.9% to −11.2%) in the ramipril group (P nonsignificant), indicating no significant reduction in the primary end point of the trial. CONCLUSIONS: A 12-week ramipril treatment protocol for healthy middle-aged volunteers did not lower CRP levels compared with placebo. However, because of the inherent variability of CRP levels, a much larger study is required to exclude a small treatment effect. PMID:19584979

  11. Interactions of C-reactive protein with the complement system. II. C- reactive protein-mediated consumption of complement by poly-L-lysine polymers and other polycations

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Cationic homopolymers of poly-L-lysine were found to activate complement (C) via C-reactive protein (CRP) and deplete C3 and C5 as well as early-acting C components. Maximum C consumption was obtained with polymers of 2,000-8,000 daltons; polymers of 1,700, 11,000, and 23,000 daltons were intermediate in reactivity, while L-lysine, lysyl-L- lysine, tetra-L-lysine, and polymers of 70,000-400,000 daltons lacked significant C-consuming activity. Naturally occurring polycations which consumed C in the presence of CRP included myelin basic proteins, cationic proteins of rabbit leukocytes, and both lysine- and arginine- rich histones; poly-L-arginine polymers of 17,000 but not 65,000 daltons also were C-consuming. Polycations without such reactivity included poly-L-orithine (5,000 and 165,000 daltons), egg white and human lysozymes, and Polybrene. The polycations which failed to induce C consumption via CRP, inhibited its consumption by both active polycations and by C-polysaccharide (CPS). The relative inhibitory capacity of phosphorylcholine and polycations in CPS- and polycations- CRP systems was consistent with the concept that phosphate esters and polycations react at the same or an overlapping combining site. The ability of certain polycations to activate C via CRP increases the potential for initiation of host reactions via C. The capacity of other polycations to inhibit C activation via CRP introduces a potential for physiologic or pharmacologic manipulation. These considerations would seem to expand the potential role of CRP in the initiation and modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:809531

  12. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and wound infections in elective colorectal surgery: C-reactive protein as a predictor for incisional SSI.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Yajima, Reina; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acknowledged marker of infections. For early detection of postoperative infections, CRP levels may be a useful marker. In this study, the CRP response with respect to wound infections (incisional surgical site infection (SSI)) in elective colorectal surgery was examined to define the role of serum CRP as a predictor of incisional SSI. One hundred forty-eight patients who underwent elective colorectal resection were identified for inclusion in this study. The outcome of interest was incisional SSI. Twenty-eight patients with incisional SSI were compared to a subgroup of 118 patients with an uneventful postoperative course, and the correlation between postoperative serum CRP levels and incisional SSI in colorectal surgery was investigated. For uneventful cases, the CRP rose postoperatively to a maximum on the third day, and the concentrations then returned to near normal levels on postoperative day (POD) 7. In incisional SSI cases, persistent elevation or a second rise in CRP concentrations was seen. Although no statistically significant differences in CRP concentrations were seen on POD 1 or 3, the initial rise in CRP of cases with incisional SSI was relatively higher compared to uneventful cases. A deviation became obvious at POD 7. A cut-off level of 36 mg/L on POD 7 was recorded (sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 83.1%) for incisional SSI. Our results suggest that elevated serum CRP levels are correlated with incisional SSI. Persistent CRP elevation is predictive of incisional SSI in colorectal surgery if pneumonia or anastomotic leakage are unlikely or excluded.

  13. Structure and functionalities of the human c-reactive protein compared to the zebrafish multigene family of c-reactive-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Bello-Perez, Melissa; Falco, Alberto; Medina, Regla; Encinar, Jose Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; Perez, Luis; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-04-01

    Because of the recent discovery of multiple c-reactive protein (crp)-like genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with predicted heterogeneous phospholipid-binding amino acid sequences and heterogeneous transcript expression levels in viral survivors and adaptive-deficient mutants, zebrafish constitute an attractive new model for exploring the evolution of these protein's functions, including their possible participation in fish trained immunity. Circulating human CRP belongs to the short pentraxin family of oligomeric proteins that are characteristic of early acute-phase innate responses and is widely used as a clinical inflammation marker. In contrast to pentameric human CRP (pCRP), zebrafish CRPs are trimeric (tCRP); however monomeric CRP (mCRP) conformations may also be generated when associated with cellular membranes as occurs in humans. Compared to human CRP, zebrafish CRP-like proteins show homologous amino acid sequence stretches that are consistent with, although not yet demonstrated, cysteine-dependent redox switches, calcium-binding spots, phosphocholine-binding pockets, C1q-binding domains, regions interacting with immunoglobulin Fc receptors (FcR), unique mCRP epitopes, mCRP binding peptides to cholesterol-enriched rafts, protease target sites, and/or binding sites to monocyte, macrophage, neutrophils, platelets and/or endothelial cells. Amino acid variations among the zebrafish CRP-like multiprotein family and derived isoforms in these stretches suggest that functional heterogeneity best fits the wide variety of aquatic pathogens. As occurs in humans, phospholipid-tagged tCRP-like multiproteins might also influence local inflammation and induce innate immune responses; however, in addition, different zebrafish tCRP-like proteins and/or isoforms might fine tune new still unknown functions. The information reviewed here could be of value for future studies not only to comparative but also medical immunologists and/or fisheries sectors. This review also

  14. Pleiotropy of C-reactive Protein Gene Polymorphisms with C-reactive Protein Levels and Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Twins

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shaoyong; Lampert, Rachel; Zhao, Jinying; Bremner, James Douglas; Miller, Andrew; Snieder, Harold; Lee, Forrester; Khan, Durreshahwar; Goldberg, Jack; Vaccarino, Viola

    2009-01-01

    Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are both predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD), and are correlated with each other. We examined whether these two phenotypes share a common genetic substrate and investigated the relations of the CRP gene polymorphisms with both CRP levels and HRV indices. We examined 236 male twins free of symptomatic CAD, with mean age (±SD) of 54 years (±2.9). Plasma CRP levels were measured and frequency domain measures of HRV were assessed using a 24-hour ECG recording, including ultra-low, very-low, low and high frequency power (ULF, VLF, LF, and HF). Three SNPs in the CRP gene were genotyped. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between CRP and HRV, as well as the genotype-phenotype association. Bivariate structural equation modeling was performed to estimate the genetic and environmental correlations between CRP and HRV, and the explanatory effect of CRP gene polymorphisms on the CRP-HRV association. Both CRP (h2=0.76) and HRV indices (h2=0.56–0.64) showed high heritability. Higher CRP levels were significantly associated with lower HRV. A robust genetic correlation was found between CRP and ULF (rG=−0.3, P=0.001). One CRP SNP (rs1205) was significantly associated with both CRP (P=0.003) and ULF (P=0.005) and explained 11% of the genetic covariance between them. In conclusion, reduced HRV is significantly correlated with increased CRP plasma levels and this correlation is due, in large part, to common genetic influences. A polymorphism in the CRP gene contributes to both CRP levels and HRV. PMID:19962488

  15. C-reactive protein levels at the onset of labour and at day 3 post-partum in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    De Meeus, J B; Pourrat, O; Gombert, J; Magnin, G

    1998-01-01

    To record maternal serum C-reactive protein levels during normal onset of labour and normal puerperium and to evaluate if inflammation or infection could be predicted during these two periods when serum C-reactive protein is increased. Eighty-five pregnant women were enrolled in a longitudinal prospective study and had a blood sample to assess serum C-reactive protein levels on admission to the labour ward for normal onset of labour and at day three post-partum. Inclusion criteria were no previous history, a normal single pregnancy, normal vaginal delivery and an uneventful post-partum course. Twelve non-pregnant women of the same age constitued a control group. An automatic Behring Nephelometer was used to measure serum C-reactive protein concentrations. The Student's t-test (significance p < 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. C-reactive protein was significantly increased during the onset of labour (4.10 +/- 2.79 mg/L) and reached very high levels during the post-partum period (24.07 +/- 18.28 mg/L) compared to the standard normal serum C-reactive protein level in a population of non-pregnant women of the same age (2.39 +/- 0.07 mg/L). Increased serum C-reactive protein has been reported to be a marker for subclinical infection during pregnancy in various situations including premature labour and premature rupture of membranes and for complications occurring during puerperium such as thrombophlebitis, thromboembolism or endometritis. This interpretation depends on which upper limit is considered as abnormal. Because serum C-reactive protein was raised during the onset of labour, values of less than 10 mg/L could not be considered as a marker for infection during this period. Elevated serum concentrations of estrogen, progestogen and prostaglandins during labour might be one explanation for those physiological changes. Normal vaginal delivery could be compared to a surgical procedure and tissue injury consecutive to vaginal birth as reflected by a dramatic

  16. Salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Omran, Ahmed; Maaroof, Abdallah; Saleh, Mai H; Abdelwahab, Amina

    2017-07-20

    To assess the applicability of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Prospective case-control study of 70 full-term neonates, 35 with sepsis (20 with proven sepsis and 15 with clinical sepsis) and 35 healthy controls. Serum and salivary C-reactive protein concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio were measured by automated blood cell counter. This study showed statistically significant difference of mean salivary C-reactive protein between septic neonates and controls (12.0±4.6ng/L vs. 2.8±1.2ng/L) respectively. At a cut-off point of 3.48ng/L, salivary C-reactive protein showed 94.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Salivary C-reactive protein also showed good predictive accuracy for predicting elevated serum C-reactive protein values in septic neonates. Mean platelet volume and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio showed significant difference between septic neonates and controls (10.2±1.2fL vs.8.0±0.5fL; 2.9±1.7 vs. 1.6±0.4, respectively). At a cut-off point of 10.2fL, mean platelet volume presented 80% sensitivity and specificity. At a cut-off point of 2.7, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio presented 80% sensitivity and 57.1% specificity. This study provides support for further studies on the usefulness of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Significance of C-reactive protein during febrile neutropenia in pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Avabratha, K Shreedhara; Rau, A T K; Venkataravanamma, P; Rau, Aarthi

    2009-09-01

    Fifty episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN) in 33 children with malignancies were studied to evaluate the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as an indicator of infection, and the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. Nineteen FN episodes occurred in children with documented infection whereas, 9 and 22 episodes occurred with probable infection and fever of unknown origin, respectively. CRP positivity during episodes of documented and probable infection was significantly higher than with febrile episodes of unknown origin. Blood culture was positive in 15 episodes; of these, CRP was positive in 11. CRP declined to normal on 7th day of antibiotic therapy. CRP is a useful indicator of infection in neutropenic children and also in determining the efficacy of antibiotic therapy.

  18. Evaluation of serum levels of C-reactive protein after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barretto, João Maurício; Loures, Fabrício Bolpato; Albuquerque, Rodrigo Sattamini Pires E; Bezerra, Filipe das Neves; Faro, Rafael Vinagre; Cavanellas, Naasson Trindade

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the behavior of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the first three weeks after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and define the factors related to its variation. We evaluated the CRP values in 103 patients undergoing primary TKA. Serum CRP was measured on the day before surgery, and on the third and twenty-first days after the procedure. PCR showed sudden increase on the third day after surgery, reaching the mean value of 111.9 mg/L, median 75.9 mg/L. Only one-third of the patients returned to normal levels in the third week. In the immediate postoperative period, CRP was not correlated with body mass index (BMI), age, gender, blood transfusion, or complications. Serum CRP remains high in the third week after TKA in most patients, and this change is primarily related to surgical trauma.

  19. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kotulska, Anna; Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Grosicka, Anida; Kubicka, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126). There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists. PMID:27407254

  20. C-reactive protein in the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Førsvoll, Jostein A; Oymar, Knut

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) during febrile episodes in children with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis syndrome (PFAPA). All CRP values during typical episodes of fever in children diagnosed with PFAPA during a 3 years period were retrospectively registered. In 16 children with PFAPA, a total of 87 CRP values were registered during 38 episodes of fever. The mean of the maximum CRP during each episode was 185 mg/L (SD: 69.4, range: 45-322). Values of CRP were elevated throughout the whole period of fever, with higher values on days 2-4 compared to day 1. Levels of CRP are substantially increased during febrile episodes in children with PFAPA. High levels of CRP may suggest a role for immunological mechanisms in PFAPA, and may raise the suspicion of PFAPA when measured in children with periodic fever of unknown origin.

  1. Mollusc C-reactive protein crosses species barrier and reverses hepatotoxicity of lead in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Agarwal, Soumik; Kundu, Rakesh; Maitra, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2013-08-01

    Achatina fulica C-reactive protein (ACRP) reversed the toxic effects of lead nitrate both in vivo in mice and in vitro in rat hepatocytes restoring the basal level of cell viability, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and superoxides. Cytotoxicity was also significantly ameliorated in rat hepatocytes by in vitro pre-treatments with individual subunits (60, 62, 90 and 110 kDa) of ACRP. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining showed significant reduction in the number of apoptotic hepatocytes pre-treated with ACRP. ACRP induced restoration of mitochondrial membrane potential was remarkable. ACRP pre-treatment prevented Pb-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. The antagonistic effect of ACRP may be due to scavenging of reactive oxygen species which maintained the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status. The results suggest that ACRP crosses the species barrier and it may be utilized as a viable exogenous agent of cytoprotection against heavy metal related toxicity.

  2. Polymorphism of the C-reactive protein gene is associated with mortality in bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Carita; Huttunen, Reetta; Syrjänen, Jaana; Laine, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Hurme, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important molecule in the defence against bacterial infections. To discover if variation in the CRP gene is associated with clinical outcome of bacteraemia, we investigated 147 microbiologically verified bacteraemia patients (mean age 59 y, range 19-93 y) and determined whether CRP -717A>G, +1059G>C or +1444C>T single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with clinical outcome of bacteraemia and/or CRP concentration caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-haemolytic streptococci or Escherichia coli. The patients were genotyped for CRP gene polymorphisms, CRP was measured and clinical outcomes were recorded. The CRP -717A>G, a promoter region polymorphism was strongly associated with mortality from Streptococcus pneumoniae but did not correlate with plasma CRP concentration. These results suggest that mortality from Streptococcus pneumoniae may be associated with polymorphism of the promoter region of the CRP gene.

  3. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and its Association with Periodontal Disease: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Tushika; Pandey, Anita; D, Deepa; Asthana, Ashish K

    2014-07-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of the gums characterised by a loss of attachment between the tooth and bone, and bone loss. C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation is a part of the acute phase response to acute and chronic inflammation. Many epidemiological studies have shown that serum CRP levels were elevated in patients with chronic periodontitis. CRP levels increase to hundreds of μg/ml within hours following infection. It out-performs erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in terms of responsiveness and specificity for inflammation. While CRP elevation is suggestive of inflammation or infection in the appropriate clinical context, it can also occur with obesity and renal dysfunction. Conversely, a lack of CRP elevation in inflammation may be seen with hepatic failure, as well as during flares of conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for C-reactive protein using colloidal semiconducting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Härmä, Harri; Toivonen, Juha; Soini, Juhani T; Hänninen, Pekka; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2011-01-01

    Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  5. Detection of C-reactive protein in evanescent wave field using microparticle-tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Jui; Sheen, Horn-Jiunn; Liu, Yi-Hsing; Tsai, Jing-Fa; Wu, Tzu-Heng; Wu, Kuang-Chong; Lin, Shiming

    2010-09-07

    A new technique is developed to measure the nanoparticles' brownian motions by employing microparticle-tracking velocimetry (micro-PTV) in evanescent wave field, which can provide high signal-to-noise ratio images for analyzing nanoparticles' movements. This method enables real-time detection of C-reactive proteins (CRPs) during the rapid interaction between CRPs and anti-CRP-coated nanobeads as CRP concentrations are related to the nanobeads' brownian velocity in the equilibrium state. The smallest observable nanobeads with 185 nm were utilized in this experiment to detect CRP concentrations as low as 0.1 microg/mL even in a high-viscosity solution. Further, the dissociation constant, K(D), can be evaluated based on the experimental results.

  6. Extreme Sleep Durations and Increased C-Reactive Protein: Effects of Sex and Ethnoracial Group

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Jackson, Nicholas; Sands-Lincoln, Megan; Pandey, Abhishek; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesize that extremes of sleep duration are associated with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker for cardiovascular disease risk. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Population-based research. Participants: Nationally representative sample of 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (n = 5,587 adults). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Associations between CRP and self-reported total sleep time (TST) were examined. Explanatory models considered contributions of sex, age, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), and BMI squared (BMI2). Models also explored the role of insomnia symptoms, sleep apnea, active medical illness, and antidiabetic/antihypertensive treatment. Differential patterns among race/ethnicity groups were examined using interactions and stratified analyses. Nonlinear relationships between CRP and TST were assessed using polynomial and multinomial regression models (< 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and > 9 h). Linear and squared terms were significant in all models in the complete sample, with notable differences by sex and ethnoracial group. Overall, in models adjusted for sociodemographics and BMI, different patterns were observed for non-Hispanic white (elevated CRP for < 5 h and > 9 h), black/African-American (elevated CRP for < 5 h and 8 h), Hispanic/Latino (elevated CRP for > 9 h), and Asian/ Other (higher in 9 and > 9 h and lower in 5 h and 6 h) groups. Ethnoracial groups also demonstrated patterning by sex. Conclusion: In a representative sample of American adults, elevated CRP was associated with extreme sleep durations. Sex, race/ethnicity, sleep disorders, and medical comorbidity influenced these associations. Differences in CRP along these dimensions should be considered in future research on sleep related disparities influencing cardiometabolic disease risk. Citation: Grandner MA; Buxton OM; Jackson N; Sands M; Pandey A; Jean-Louis G. Extreme sleep durations and

  7. C-reactive protein by pregnancy and lactational status among Filipino young adult women

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Adair, Linda S.; Borja, Judith; McDade, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pregnancy and lactation involve adaptations in immune regulation, but little is known about cross-cultural variation in inflammatory changes during pregnancy or lactation. Here we report concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large cross-sectional sample of healthy Filipino women who vary in parity, gestational and lactational status, and who come from a population previously described as having low CRP. Methods Fasting plasma CRP was measured among female participants (ages 20.8-22.4 years) in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (n=822). Results Median CRP was 0.2 mg/L in nulliparous women and peaked at 2.0 mg/L in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. Parous but post-partum women had higher CRP compared to nulliparous women, which was largely explained by body composition differences as reflected in waist circumference and skinfold measures. Among post-partum women with infants, CRP was similar in women who were currently breastfeeding compared to those who were not. Conclusions At Cebu, women late in gestation have 10-fold higher C-reactive protein compared to nulliparous women, with no evidence that lactation is inflammatory. These population-based findings are similar with findings from prior clinic-based studies and are consistent with the maternal immunological adaptations initiated during pregnancy. The tendency of human females to spend more time than females of other great apes in gestation rather than lactation suggests that the human life history strategy involved increased time spent by reproductively aged females in a pro-inflammatory state. PMID:23180717

  8. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRP<1 mg/dL; n=156). The following indicators of aggression were compared: PANSS excitement component (PANSS-EC), restraints and suicidal behavior during hospitalization. Univariate comparisons between elevated and normal CRP levels were performed and multivariate analysis was conducted to control for relevant covariates. CRP levels significantly correlated with other laboratory markers indicating increased inflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, P<0.0001 and r=0.356, P<0.0001) respectively. Inpatients with elevated C-reactive protein displayed increased aggressive behavior compared to patients with normal CRP levels (<1 mg/dL). This was manifested by higher rates of restraint during hospitalization (χ(2)=5.22, P=0.031) and increased PANSS-EC score (U=5410.5, P=0.012). Elevated CRP levels were not associated with suicidal behavior. Multivariate analysis revealed that higher PANSS-EC score was associated with elevated CRP after controlling for the covariates age, sex, BMI and smoking. This study identified a potential biological correlate (inflammation) of a specific behavioral endophenotype (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Gender and C-reactive protein: data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort.

    PubMed

    Lakoski, Susan G; Cushman, Mary; Criqui, Michael; Rundek, Tatjana; Blumenthal, Roger S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Herrington, David M

    2006-09-01

    American Heart Association/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines support the measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) to further risk stratify individuals at intermediate risk (10%-20% 10-year risk) for heart disease. Determining gender-specific differences in CRP may alter how CRP levels are interpreted and used to determine risk. MESA is a prospective cohort consisting of 6814 men and women aged 45 to 84 years recruited from 6 US communities. Nonparametric analyses were performed to determine differences in CRP levels by gender in the entire cohort and after stratifying by use of estrogen medication (n = 944). Stratifying by median body mass index (BMI) and generalized linear models were also used to account for confounding variables associated with CRP. Overall, women had substantially higher median CRP levels compared with men (2.56 vs 1.43 mg/L, P < .0001). After excluding women using estrogen and individuals with CRP >10 mg/L, median CRP levels remained higher in women compared with men (1.85 vs 1.33 mg/L, P < .0001). When participants were stratified into high and low BMI groups, the gender difference in CRP levels remained. This pattern of higher CRP levels in women was consistent across all ethnic subgroups even after multivariable adjustment. C-reactive protein levels were higher in women compared with men despite accounting for BMI and other common confounding variables. This gender difference was maintained across all ethnic subgroups. These results suggest that evaluation of gender-specific CRP cut points to determine cardiovascular risk should be considered.

  10. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications.

  11. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein have combined utility for better predicting prognosis after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-chen; Tang, Yong; Chen, Yu; Huang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Min; Chen, Jian; Sun, Ying-gang; Li, Yi-gang

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that the elevated concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are predictive of future cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. But, the combined value of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP for predicting cardiovascular events is still unknown. Serum concentrations of Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT were measured in a prospective cohort of 425 selective ACS patients followed 3-5 years for the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or death (AMI/death). Among 425 enrolled patients, 124 patients demonstrated AMI/death. Baseline levels of Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT were significantly higher in AMI/death group than the event-free survival group. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses supported that elevations in Ox-LDL or hs-CRP predicted increased cardiovascular events risks. However, the strongest risk prediction was achieved by assessing Ox-LDL and hs-CRP together. Patients with high levels of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP were more likely to experience AMI or death than those with either Ox-LDL or hs-CRP elevated. Receiver-operating characteristic curves showed that Ox-LDL and hs-CRP have higher sensitivity and specificity than those of cTnT for predicting AMI or death. This was reflected by the AUC values for Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT, which were 0.891, 0.834, and 0.626, respectively. The combined use of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP may improve prognosis after ACS with high-sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Serum level of C-reactive protein is not a parameter to determine the difference between viral and atypical bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Durán, Anyelo; González, Andrea; Delgado, Lineth; Mosquera, Jesús; Valero, Nereida

    2016-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that increases in the circulation in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Elevated levels in serum during several infectious diseases have been reported. In this study, a highly sensitive CRP enzyme immunoassay was used to evaluate serum CRP values in patients with viral and atypical bacterial infections. Patients (n = 139) with different viral or atypical bacterial infections (systemic or respiratory) and healthy controls (n = 40) were tested for circulating CRP values. High levels of IgM antibodies against several viruses: Dengue virus (n = 36), Cytomegalovirus (n = 9), Epstein Barr virus (n = 17), Parvovirus B19 (n = 26), Herpes simplex 1 and 2 virus (n = 3) and Influenza A and B (n = 8) and against atypical bacteria: Legionella pneumophila (n = 15), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21) and Coxiella burnetii (n = 4) were found. High values of CRP in infected patients compared with controls (P < 0.001) were found; however, no significant differences between viral and atypical bacterial infections were found. Low levels of CRP in respiratory and Coxiella burnetii infections compared with exanthematic viral and other atypical bacterial infections were found. This study suggests that CRP values are useful to define viral and atypical bacterial infections compared with normal values, but, it is not useful to define type of infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Creatine kinase MM TaqI and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C gene polymorphisms influence exercise-induced C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Akimoto, Arthur K; Lordelo, Graciana S; Pereira, Luiz C S; Grisolia, Cesar K; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria de Nazaré

    2012-03-01

    Physical training induces beneficial adaptations, but exhausting exercise increases reactive oxygen species, which can cause muscular injuries with consequent inflammatory processes, implying jeopardized performance and possibly overtraining. Acute strenuous exercise almost certainly exceeds the benefits of physical activity; it can compromise performance and may contribute to increased future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in athletes. Polymorphisms in the muscle-type creatine kinase (CK-MM) gene may influence performance and adaptation to training, while many potentially significant genetic variants are reported as risk factors for CVD. Therefore, we investigated the influence of polymorphisms in CK-MM TaqI and NcoI, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and C-reactive protein (CRP G1059C) genes on exercise-induced damage and inflammation markers. Blood samples were taken immediately after a race (of at least 4 km) that took place outdoors on flat tracks, and were submitted to genotyping and biochemical evaluation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), CK, CRP and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). CK-MM TaqI polymorphism significantly influenced results of AST, CK and hs-CRP, and an association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C with CRP level was found, although these levels did not exceed reference values. The results indicate that these polymorphisms can indirectly influence performance, contribute to higher susceptibility to exercise-induced inflammation or protection against it, and perhaps affect future risks of CVD in athletes.

  14. Creatine kinase MM TaqI and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C gene polymorphisms influence exercise-induced C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Akimoto, Arthur K; Lordelo, Graciana S; Pereira, Luiz C S; Grisolia, Cesar K; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria de Nazaré

    2012-01-01

    Physical training induces beneficial adaptations, but exhausting exercise increases reactive oxygen species, which can cause muscular injuries with consequent inflammatory processes, implying jeopardized performance and possibly overtraining. Acute strenuous exercise almost certainly exceeds the benefits of physical activity; it can compromise performance and may contribute to increased future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in athletes. Polymorphisms in the muscle-type creatine kinase (CK-MM) gene may influence performance and adaptation to training, while many potentially significant genetic variants are reported as risk factors for CVD. Therefore, we investigated the influence of polymorphisms in CK-MM TaqI and NcoI, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and C-reactive protein (CRP G1059C) genes on exercise-induced damage and inflammation markers. Blood samples were taken immediately after a race (of at least 4 km) that took place outdoors on flat tracks, and were submitted to genotyping and biochemical evaluation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), CK, CRP and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). CK-MM TaqI polymorphism significantly influenced results of AST, CK and hs-CRP, and an association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C with CRP level was found, although these levels did not exceed reference values. Results indicate that these polymorphisms can indirectly influence performance, contribute to higher susceptibility to exercise-induced inflammation or protection against it, and perhaps affect future risks of CVD in athletes.

  15. Association of C-reactive protein and homocysteine with subclinical coronary plaque subtype and stenosis using low-dose MDCT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsann; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Chang, Li-Ya; Shen, Chien-Wei

    2010-10-01

    Given the uncertainty regarding the relationship of C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine (Hcy) to atherosclerotic burden, our aim was to determine whether CRP and Hcy are related to the presence of subclinical coronary plaque and stenosis. We did a cross-sectional analysis of data gathered on 1248 consecutive, newly self-referred, middle-aged subjects who underwent health check ups at China Medical University Hospital. Participants had at least one cardiac risk factor, but no known coronary heart disease. Low-dose multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) was used to measure coronary artery stenosis and identify plaque subtypes. Subjects were divided into quartiles based on levels of high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP and Hcy. hs-CRP level and Hcy level were associated with the relative proportion of plaque subtypes; Hcy level (P<0.05) but not hs-CRP level (P>0.05) was associated with prevalence of artery segment stenosis. After multivariate adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors through logistic regression analysis, neither hs-CRP level nor Hcy level was independently associated with coronary plaque subtypes and stenosis (P>0.05). Subclinical atherosclerosis is mildly increased in subjects with higher CRP and Hcy levels, but this association is not independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CRP and Hcy are poor predictors of atherosclerotic burden and coronary stenosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in plasma C-reactive protein and hemostatic factors prior to and after a first myocardial infarction with a median follow-up time of 8 years.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, Anna M; Nilsson, Torbjörn K; Weinehall, Lars; Boman, Kurt; Eliasson, Mats; Hallmans, Göran; Jansson, Jan-Håkan

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a first myocardial infarction leads to increased plasma levels of hemostatic factors and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and whether the association between theses biomarkers and myocardial infarction was greater at follow-up compared with baseline. Of more than 36,000 persons screened in northern Sweden, 78 developed a first myocardial infarction (on average 18 months after sampling) in a population-based, prospective, nested patient-referent study. Fifty of these had participated in a follow-up health survey (on average 8 and a half years between surveys) and were sex-matched and age-matched with 56 referents. The mean increases in hs-CRP, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mass, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mass, and tPA/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex concentration and von Willebrand factor among patients and referents were comparable during follow-up. Conditional logistic regression indicated that hs-CRP was not significantly associated with first myocardial infarction in a univariate analysis, whereas high plasma levels of tPA and creatinine were significantly associated with outcome at baseline and follow-up. tPA/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex was not superior to tPA as a risk marker in this study. A first myocardial infarction did not in this study induce significantly different changes in plasma levels of hs-CRP and hemostatic factors among patients compared with referents during follow-up.

  17. A new surgical technique versus an old marker: can expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty reduce C-reactive protein levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Binar, Murat; Akcam, Timur; Karakoc, Omer; Sagkan, Rahsan Ilikci; Musabak, Ugur; Gerek, Mustafa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty (ESP) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Fifty-one patients with newly diagnosed OSA were prospectively enrolled in this study. We performed ESP in twenty-three patients in the surgery group and twenty-eight patients were included in the CPAP group. Serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays before and 3 months after treatment. The relations between CRP and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), visual analog scale (VAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and saturation parameters were evaluated. Both surgical and CPAP treatments caused significant improvements in the clinical and laboratory parameters. However, only the patients whose postoperative AHI levels improved to final AHI of <5 (n = 6) after ESP, had significant decrease in their serum CRP levels (p = 0.028). CPAP group and the rest of the patients in the surgery group did not show statistically significant difference in CRP levels after treatment. We suggest that the successful surgical treatment for OSA-ESP in this study-, which provides OSA cure, can decrease serum levels of CRP and reduce possible cardiovascular morbidity.

  18. Change in Growth Differentiation Factor 15, but Not C-Reactive Protein, Independently Predicts Major Cardiac Events in Patients with Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Baldomero, Idaira F.; Bosa-Ojeda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Among the numerous emerging biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and growth-differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) have received widespread interest, with their potential role as predictors of cardiovascular risk. The concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers, however, are influenced, among others, by physiological variations, which are the natural, within-individual variation occurring over time. The aims of our study are: (a) to describe the changes in hsCRP and GDF-15 levels over a period of time and after an episode of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and (b) to examine whether the rate of change in hsCRP and GDF-15 after the acute event is associated with long-term major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE). Two hundred and Fifty five NSTE-ACS patients were included in the study. We measured hsCRP and GDF-15 concentrations, at admission and again 36 months after admission (end of the follow-up period). The present study shows that the change of hsCRP levels, measured after 36 months, does not predict MACE in NSTEACS-patients. However, the level of GDF-15 measured, after 36 months, was a stronger predictor of MACE, in comparison to the acute unstable phase. PMID:24839357

  19. Approach to the Highly Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Vranic, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with ESRD, kidney transplant offers significant survival and quality-of-life advantages compared with dialysis. But for patients seeking transplant who are highly sensitized, wait times have traditionally been long and options limited. The approach to the highly sensitized candidate for kidney transplant has changed substantially over time owing to new advances in desensitization, options for paired donor exchange (PDE), and changes to the deceased-donor allocation system. Initial evaluation should focus on determining living-donor availability because a compatible living donor is always the best option. However, for most highly sensitized candidates this scenario is unlikely. For candidates with an incompatible donor, PDE can improve the prospects of finding a compatible living donor but for many highly sensitized patients the probability of finding a match in the relatively small pools of donors in PDE programs is limited. Desensitization of a living donor/recipient pair with low levels of incompatibility is another reasonable approach. But for pairs with high levels of pathologic HLA antibodies, outcomes after desensitization for the patient and allograft are less optimal. Determining the degree of sensitization by calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) is critical in counseling the highly sensitized patient on expected wait times to deceased-donor transplant. For candidates with a high likelihood of finding a compatible deceased donor in a reasonable time frame, waiting for a kidney is a good strategy. For the candidate without a living donor and with a low probability of finding a deceased-donor match, desensitization on the waiting list can be considered. The approach to the highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate must be individualized and requires careful discussion among the transplant center, patient, and referring nephrologist. PMID:26915916

  20. Approach to the Highly Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidate.

    PubMed

    Keith, Douglas S; Vranic, Gayle M

    2016-04-07

    For patients with ESRD, kidney transplant offers significant survival and quality-of-life advantages compared with dialysis. But for patients seeking transplant who are highly sensitized, wait times have traditionally been long and options limited. The approach to the highly sensitized candidate for kidney transplant has changed substantially over time owing to new advances in desensitization, options for paired donor exchange (PDE), and changes to the deceased-donor allocation system. Initial evaluation should focus on determining living-donor availability because a compatible living donor is always the best option. However, for most highly sensitized candidates this scenario is unlikely. For candidates with an incompatible donor, PDE can improve the prospects of finding a compatible living donor but for many highly sensitized patients the probability of finding a match in the relatively small pools of donors in PDE programs is limited. Desensitization of a living donor/recipient pair with low levels of incompatibility is another reasonable approach. But for pairs with high levels of pathologic HLA antibodies, outcomes after desensitization for the patient and allograft are less optimal. Determining the degree of sensitization by calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) is critical in counseling the highly sensitized patient on expected wait times to deceased-donor transplant. For candidates with a high likelihood of finding a compatible deceased donor in a reasonable time frame, waiting for a kidney is a good strategy. For the candidate without a living donor and with a low probability of finding a deceased-donor match, desensitization on the waiting list can be considered. The approach to the highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate must be individualized and requires careful discussion among the transplant center, patient, and referring nephrologist.

  1. Analytical Glycobiology at High Sensitivity: Current Approaches and Directions

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Milos V.; Alley, William R.; Mann, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the analytical advances made during the last several years in the structural and quantitative determinations of glycoproteins in complex biological mixtures. The main analytical techniques used in the fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics involve different modes of mass spectrometry and their combinations with capillary separation methods such as microcolumn liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The needs for high-sensitivity measurements have been emphasized in the oligosaccharide profiling used in the field of biomarker discovery through MALDI mass spectrometry. High-sensitivity profiling of both glycans and glycopeptides from biological fluids and tissue extracts has been aided significantly through lectin preconcentration and the uses of affinity chromatography. PMID:22945852

  2. Highly sensitive wide bandwidth photodetectors using chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo Kang, Chang; Kyung Lee, Sang; Jin Yoo, Tae; Park, Woojin; Jung, Ukjin; Ahn, Jinho; Hun Lee, Byoung

    2014-04-01

    A photodetector generating a nearly constant photocurrent in a very wide spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared has been demonstrated using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Instability due to a photochemical reaction in the UV region has been minimized using an Al2O3 passivation layer, and a responsivity comparable to that of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite graphene photodetectors of ˜8 mA/W has been achieved at a 0.1 V bias, despite high defect density in the CVD graphene. A highly sensitive multi-band photodetector using graphene has many potential applications including optical interconnects, multi-band imaging sensors, highly sensitive motion detectors, etc.

  3. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  4. The prognostic value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and cholesterol in patients with an infection and multiple organ dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tachyla, Siarhei Anatolevich; Marochkov, Alexey Viktorovich; Lipnitski, Artur Leonidovich; Nikiforova, Yulia Gennadevna

    2017-06-01

    To establish the prognostic value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and cholesterol levels for mortality in patients with an infection and multiple organ dysfunction. A prospective case-control study was performed, including 67 patients admitted to the intensive care unit with an infection and multiple organ dysfunction in whom cholesterol, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein levels were measured on admission and during the course of treatment. The associations between in-hospital mortality and procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, and cholesterol levels were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis showed that cholesterol (odds ratio [OR], 1.858; 95% CI, 1.170-2.949; P = 0.009) and C-reactive protein (OR, 4.408; 95% CI, 2.019-9.624; P < 0.001) levels were predictors of mortality. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.774 and 95% CI of 0.693-0.855 (P < 0.001) for C-reactive protein, an AUC of 0.66 and 95% CI of 0.535-0.784 (P = 0.019) for procalcitonin, and an AUC of 0.654 and 95% CI of 0.593-0.715 (P < 0.001) for cholesterol as predictors of mortality. When combined with the bioscore system for mortality, these markers yielded an AUC of 0.845 and 95% CI of 0.770-0.921 (P < 0.001), with sensitivity of 89.1% and specificity of 83.1%. The combination of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, and cholesterol levels in a single scoring system yielded high predictive value for mortality.

  5. C-reactive protein, obesity, and the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Horvei, L D; Grimnes, G; Hindberg, K; Mathiesen, E B; Njølstad, I; Wilsgaard, T; Brox, J; Braekkan, S K; Hansen, J-B

    2016-08-01

    Essentials We performed repeated measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and obesity in a cohort study. CRP was associated with risk of myocardial infarction and venous thromboembolism. CRP was a mediator for risk of myocardial infarction in obese men and women. CRP was a partial mediator for risk of venous thromboembolism in obese women, but not in men. Background Low-grade inflammation in obesity may be a shared pathway for the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and myocardial infarction (MI). Objectives To investigate the associations between repeated measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the risks of MI and VTE, and to explore whether CRP mediated these risks in obese subjects. Methods CRP and obesity measures were collected from 15 134 subjects who participated in one or more surveys of the Tromsø study in 1994-1995, 2001-2002, or 2007-2008. Incident VTEs and MIs were registered until 1 January 2011. Time-varying Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios of MI and VTE according to categories of CRP and obesity measures. Results There were 291 VTEs and 920 MIs during follow-up. High levels of CRP (≥ 3 mg L(-1) versus < 1 mg L(-1) ) were associated with increased risks of MI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-2.26) and VTE (HR 1.84; 95% CI 1.22-2.78) in women, but only with MI in men (HR 1.93; 95% CI 1.53-2.44). All obesity measures showed stronger associations with CRP in women than in men. In obese women (body mass index [BMI] of ≥ 30 kg m(-2) versus < 25 kg m(-2) ), adjustment for CRP attenuated the risk estimate for VTE by 22%, whereas the incidence rates of VTE increased with combined categories of higher BMI and CRP. No association was found in men. Conclusions Our findings suggest that low-grade inflammation, assessed by measurement of CRP, is associated with the risks of MI and VTE, and may be a shared pathway for MI and VTE in obesity. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. High sensitivity cardiac troponin assays in the clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jarolim, Petr

    2015-04-01

    Immunoassays measuring cardiac troponins I or T have become firmly established as critical tools for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction. While most contemporary assays provide adequate diagnostic performance, the increased sensitivity and precision of the new, high sensitivity assays that have already been introduced into clinical practice, provide the potential to further shorten intervals between blood draws or the time needed to detect the first significant troponin elevation. In addition to the relatively modest benefits at the diagnostic end, the high sensitivity assays and the investigational ultrasensitive cardiac troponin assays offer improvements for predicting major adverse cardiovascular events, development of heart failure or transition to end-stage kidney disease. These novel high sensitivity assays can measure troponin concentrations in 50%-100% of healthy individuals and therefore allow for the distribution of troponin values within a healthy cohort to be measured, patient's baseline troponin levels to be monitored, and clinicians to be alerted of deteriorating cardiorenal conditions. We envisage that the high sensitivity assays will become important tools for predicting each patient's risk of future adverse events and for guiding and monitoring corresponding adjustments of preventative therapeutic interventions.

  7. Side-polished fiber based high sensitive temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prerana; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.; Nagaraju, B.

    2010-12-01

    We present a high sensitive temperature sensor based on a side-polished fiber (SPF) coupled to a tapered multimode overlay waveguide (MMOW). We have theoretically shown that the longitudinal tapering of the MMOW can be used to tune the desired wavelength range in the spectrum without any loss in the sensitivity.

  8. Novel ultra-high sensitive 'metal resist' for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toru; Tsuchihashi, Toru; Minegishi, Shinya; Kamizono, Takashi; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    This study describes the use of a novel ultra-high sensitive `metal resist' for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Herein, the development of a metal resist has been studied for improving the sensitivity when using metal-containing non-chemically amplified resist materials; such materials are metal-containing organic-inorganic hybrid compounds and are referred to as EUVL Infrastructure Development Center, Inc. (EIDEC) standard metal EUV resist (ESMR). The novel metal resist's ultra-high sensitivity has previously been investigated for use with electron beam (EB) lithography. The first demonstration of ESMR performance was presented in SPIE2015, where it was shown to achieve 17-nm lines with 1.5 mJ/cm2: equivalent in EUV lithography tool. The sensitivity of ESMR using EUV open-flame exposure was also observed to have the same high sensitivity as that when using EB lithography tool. Therefore, ESMR has been confirmed to have the potential of being used as an ultra-high sensitive EUV resist material. The metal-containing organic-inorganic hybrid compounds and the resist formulations were investigated by measuring their sensitivity and line-width roughness (LWR) improvement. Furthermore, new processing conditions, such as new development and rinse procedures, are an extremely effective way of improving lithographic performance. In addition, the optimal dry-etching selective conditions between the metal resist and spin-on carbon (SOC) were obtained. The etched SOC pattern was successfully constructed from a stacked film of metal resist and SOC.

  9. Severe multivessel coronary artery disease and high-sensitive troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Huziuk, Inga Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A key problem in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is non-invasive identification of patients with severe multivessel CAD. Determination of biomarkers that have pro-inflammatory properties (C-reactive protein – hsCRP) and indicate heart muscle ischemia (high-sensitive troponin T – hsTnT) can contribute to the improvement of stratification in this regard. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the presence of multivessel CAD in clinically stable men. Material and methods The study included 92 symptomatic men (mean age 64.05 ± 9.42 years) with preserved left ventricular function, scheduled for elective coronary angiography. Patients were divided and analyzed in two groups: with multivessel coronary artery disease (2-3-vessel disease, n = 46) vs. without multivessel coronary artery disease (n = 46). Results Patients with multivessel CAD had significantly higher levels of hsTnT (0.01 vs. 0.007, p = 0.0021) and fasting glucose (6.0 vs. 5.45, p = 0.0112). Based on the drawn ROC curves, the cut-off points were determined for hsTnT ≥ 0.0085 ng/ml and fasting plasma glucose ≥ 5.85 mmol/l. From multivariate analysis only hsTnT in concentration higher than the cut-off point enhanced the risk of multivessel CAD (OR 4.286, 95% CI: 1.79-10.263, p = 0.001). Conclusions In men with stable CAD, preserved systolic left ventricular function and non-high cardiovascular risk determined from the initial concentration of hsCRP, elevated level of hsTnT was independently associated with the risk of multivessel coronary artery disease. PMID:26336496

  10. Potential influence of Type A personality on plasma C-reactive protein levels in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chauvet-Gélinier, J-C; Trojak, B; Lemogne, C; Aho-Glélé, L-S; Brindisi, M-C; Bouillet, B; Ponavoy, E; Meille, V; Simoneau, I; Chahraoui, K; Vaillant, G; Petit, J-M; Consoli, S M; Bonin, B; Vergès, B

    2016-04-01

    Type A personality, although classically known as a factor linked to increased vascular risk, has recently been associated with increased survival in patients with diabetes. As low-grade inflammation predicts a poor outcome, the present study explored the potential associations between Type A and plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in diabetes. Type A personality was assessed by the Bortner questionnaire in people with diabetes. The association between Type A and plasma CRP levels was examined by multivariable linear regression, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was performed to determine the impact of the major clinical, biological and psychological confounders. The study included 626 participants with type 1 and type 2 diabetes from the Diabetes and Psychological Profile study. Multivariable analyses showed an independent inverse association between Type A score and CRP levels. The structural model adjusted for age, gender, diabetes type and duration, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol abuse, oral antidiabetic and statin treatments, HbA1c levels, lipids, perceived stress, anxiety and depression revealed significant associations between CRP and Type A (β=-0.135, 95% CI: -0.242, -0.028; P=0.014), BMI (β=0.194, 95% CI: 0.038, 0.350; P=0.015) and HDL cholesterol (β=-0.132, 95% CI: -0.245, -0.020; P=0.014). Our present study data indicate that Type A personality is independently associated with lower CRP levels. This lower level of inflammation might explain the better clinical outcomes associated with Type A personality in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Elevated C-reactive protein in adolescents: roles of stress and coping.

    PubMed

    Low, Carissa A; Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica

    2013-06-01

    Psychological stress can up-regulate inflammatory processes and increase disease risk. In the context of stress, differences in how individuals cope might have implications for health. The goal of this study was to evaluate associations among stress, coping, and inflammation in a sample of African American and white adolescents. Adolescents (n = 245) completed self-report measures of stressful life events and coping, provided daily diary reports of interpersonal conflict for 7 days, and provided fasting blood samples for assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP). In regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, and socioeconomic status, there were no significant associations between stress and CRP, but significant interactions between stress and coping emerged. For adolescents reporting more unpleasant stressful life events in the past 12 months, positive engagement coping was inversely associated with CRP (β= -.19, p < .05), whereas coping was not significantly associated with CRP for adolescents reporting fewer stressful life events. Positive engagement coping was significantly and inversely associated with CRP in the context of interpersonal stress, whether measured as stressful life events reflecting interpersonal conflict (e.g., arguments with parents or siblings, conflict between adults in the home, and friendship ended) or frequency of arguments with others reported in daily diaries. Disengagement coping was unrelated to CRP. Findings suggest that positive engagement coping is associated with lower levels of inflammation, but only when adolescents are challenged by significant stress.

  12. Pentraxins in innate immunity: from C-reactive protein to the long pentraxin PTX3.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Garlanda, Cecilia; Doni, Andrea; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Pentraxins are a family of multimeric pattern-recognition proteins highly conserved in evolution. Based on the primary structure of the subunit, the pentraxins are divided into two groups: short pentraxins and long pentraxins. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P-component are classic short pentraxins produced in the liver, whereas the prototype of the long pentraxin family is PTX3. Innate immunity cells and vascular cells produce PTX3 in response to proinflammatory signals and Toll-like receptor engagement. PTX3 interacts with several ligands, including growth factors, extracellular matrix components, and selected pathogens, playing a role in complement activation, facilitating pathogen recognition, and acting as a predecessor of antibodies. In addition, PTX3 is essential in female fertility acting on the assembly of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix. Thus, PTX3 is a multifunctional soluble pattern recognition receptor acting as a nonredundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity and involved in tuning inflammation, in matrix deposition and female fertility. Evidence suggests that PTX3 is a useful new serological marker, rapidly reflecting tissue inflammation and damage under diverse clinical conditions.

  13. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  14. C-reactive protein, sodium azide, and endothelial connexin43 gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Chi-Young; Su, Cheng-Huang; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tseng, Yuen-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Cheng-Ho

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the effect of C-reactive protein (CRP) and sodium azide (NaN(3)) on endothelial Cx43 gap junctions. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were treated with (a) detoxified CRP, (b) detoxified dialyzed CRP, (c) detoxified dialyzed CRP plus NaN(3), (d) NaN(3), or (e) dialyzed NaN(3). The concentration of CRP in all preparations was fixed to 25 microg/ml and that of NaN(3) in the preparations of (c) to (e) was equivalent to that contained in the 25 microg/ml CRP purchased commercially. The results showed that both the expression of Cx43 protein and gap junctional communication function post-48-h incubation were reduced and inhibited by the detoxified CRP, NaN(3), or detoxified dialyzed CRP plus NaN(3), but not by the detoxified dialyzed CRP or dialyzed NaN(3). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of cells treated for 72 h also showed a pattern of transcriptional regulation essentially the same as that for the proteins. We concluded that CRP does not have a significant effect on Cx43 gap junctions of HAEC, but NaN(3) inhibited the viability of cells and downregulate their junctions.

  15. Elevated maternal C-reactive protein and autism in a national birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Brown, A S; Sourander, A; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S; McKeague, I W; Sundvall, J; Surcel, H-M

    2014-02-01

    Autism is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with a largely unknown etiology. Inflammation during pregnancy may represent a common pathway by which infections and other insults increase risk for the disorder. Hence, we investigated the association between early gestational C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and childhood autism in a large national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. Other strengths of the cohort included nearly complete ascertainment of pregnancies in Finland (N=1.2 million) over the study period and national psychiatric registries consisting of virtually all treated autism cases in the population. Increasing maternal CRP levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with autism in offspring. For maternal CRP levels in the highest quintile, compared with the lowest quintile, there was a significant, 43% elevated risk. This finding suggests that maternal inflammation may have a significant role in autism, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  16. Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Autism in a National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan S.; Sourander, Andre; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; McKeague, Ian W.; Sundvall, Jouko; Surcel, Helja-Marja

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with a largely unknown etiology. Inflammation during pregnancy may represent a common pathway by which infections and other insults increase risk for the disorder. Hence, we investigated the association between early gestational C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and childhood autism in a large national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. Other strengths of the cohort included nearly complete ascertainment of pregnancies in Finland (N=1.2 million) over the study period and national psychiatric registries consisting of virtually all treated autism cases in the population. Increasing maternal CRP levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with autism in offspring. For maternal CRP levels in the highest quintile, compared to the lowest quintile, there was a significant, 43% elevated risk. This finding suggests that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in autism, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23337946

  17. Prediction of transplant-related complications by C-reactive protein levels before hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Nakasone, H; Oshima, K; Ishihara, Y; Wada, H; Sakamoto, K; Kawamura, K; Ashizawa, M; Machishima, T; Terasako, K; Kimura, S; Kikuchi, M; Okuda, S; Tanihara, A; Yamazaki, R; Tanaka, Y; Kanda, J; Kako, S; Nishida, J; Kanda, Y

    2013-05-01

    Various biomarkers have been investigated with regard to their ability to predict the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed 90 recipients who received HSCT between 2007 and 2011 in our institution, and evaluated the predictive value of the baseline serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels just before the initiation of conditioning for transplant-related complications after allogeneic HSCT. A receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed that the baseline serum CRP levels had an excellent predictive value for non-relapse mortality (NRM), with an area under the curve of 0.83. The sensitivity and specificity for NRM were 80% and 87%, respectively, with a cutoff of 0.6 mg/dL. With this cutoff value, multivariate analyses revealed that a higher baseline CRP level was an independent risk factor for NRM (HR 6.21, P<0.01), grade III-IV acute GVHD (HR 3.91, P=0.03) and poor overall survival (HR 3.27, P=0.0018). On the other hand, the baseline CRP level did not predict infectious events. These findings suggested that CRP levels before conditioning may be a useful predictive biomarker for poor survival.

  18. Serum C-reactive protein level in COPD patients stratified according to GOLD 2011 grading classification

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hua; Wang, Wan-Yu; Hu, Su-Xian; Shi, Yong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2011 grading classification has been used to evaluate the severity of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about the relationship between the systemic inflammation and this classification. We aimed to study the relationship between serum CRP and the components of the GOLD 2011 grading classification. Methods: C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in 391 clinically stable COPD patients and in 50 controls from June 2, 2015 to October 31, 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University. The association between CRP levels and the components of the GOLD 2011 grading classification were assessed. Results: Correlation was found with the following variables: GOLD 2011 group (0.240), age (0.227), pack year (0.136), forced expiratory volume in one second % predicted (FEV1%; -0.267), forced vital capacity % predicted (-0.210), number of acute exacerbations in the past year (0.265), number of hospitalized exacerbations in the past year (0.165), British medical Research Council dyspnoea scale (0.121), COPD assessment test score (CAT, 0.233). Using multivariate analysis, FEV1% and CAT score manifested the strongest negative association with CRP levels. Conclusions: CRP levels differ in COPD patients among groups A-D based on GOLD 2011 grading classification. CRP levels are associated with several important clinical variables, of which FEV1% and CAT score manifested the strongest negative correlation. PMID:28083044

  19. Objectively-Measured Physical Activity and C-Reactive Protein: NHANES 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, P.; Cardinal, B.; Crespo, C.; Brodowicz, G.; Andersen, R.; Sullivan, E.; Smit, E.

    2014-01-01

    The association between physical activity (PA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) is inconsistent, with nearly all studies using self-report measures of PA. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between objectively-measured PA and CRP in U.S. adults and children. Adults (N=2912) and children (N=1643) with valid accelerometer data and CRP data were included in the analyses. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the odds of meeting physical activity guidelines across CRP quartiles for children and among adults with low, average, and high CRP levels. For adults, after adjustments for age, gender, race, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), compared to those with low CRP levels, odds ratios were 0.59 (CI = 0.45–0.77) and 0.46 (CI = 0.28–0.76) for participants with average and high CRP levels, respectively. For children, after adjustments for age, gender, race, weight status, and HDL-C, compared to those in CRP quartile 1, odds ratios were 0.96 (CI = 0.5–1.84), 1.23 (CI = 0.71–2.12), and 0.79 (CI = 0.33–1.88) for participants in quartiles 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Objectively-measured PA is inversely associated with CRP in adults, with PA not related to CRP in children. PMID:21812825

  20. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  1. Neighborhood stressors and cardiovascular health: crime and C-reactive protein in Dallas, USA.

    PubMed

    Browning, Christopher R; Cagney, Kathleen A; Iveniuk, James

    2012-10-01

    We apply neighborhood-based theories of social organization and environmental stress to examine variation in a key indicator of inflammation-related cardiovascular risk-C-reactive protein (CRP). Specifically, we emphasize the potentially health-compromising role of rapid increases in the crime rate or "crime spikes" (focusing on a particularly fear-inducing crime - burglary). We also consider the extent to which the magnitude and significance of the association between burglary rate change and inflammatory processes varies by gender. Data on CRP, neighborhood of residence, and individual-level characteristics for adult women and men ages 30-65 are drawn from the 2000-2002 Dallas Heart Study. Results from neighborhood fixed effects models using piecewise linear splines to estimate short-term burglary rate change effects offer support for the hypothesis that crime spikes are associated with CRP. Specifically, we find that short-term burglary rate change is independently associated with CRP for men. Short-term burglary rate change was not associated with CRP for women. These findings shed light on the contextual processes that influence cardiovascular health and point to the potentially important role of short-term changes in environmental stressors in shaping health outcomes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Gender differences in the association between C-reactive protein, lung function impairment, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsdóttir, Inga Sif; Gíslason, Thórarinn; Thjóđleifsson, Bjarni; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Gíslason, Davíd; Jõgi, Rain; Janson, Christer

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with COPD have systemic inflammation that can be assessed by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP). In this paper we evaluated whether CRP is related to COPD, lung function and rate of lung function decline. We included 1237 randomly selected subjects (mean age 42, range 28–56 years) from three centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: Reykjavik, Uppsala and Tartu. CRP was measured at the end of the follow-up (mean 8.3 years) and the values were divided into 4 quartiles. Fifty-three non-asthmatic subjects fulfilled spirometric criteria for COPD (FEV1/FVC < 70%). COPD occurred more often in the 4th CRP quartile (OR (95% CI) 3.21 (1.13–9.08)) after adjustment for age, gender, body weight and smoking. High CRP levels were related to lower FEV1 values in both men (−437 (−596, −279) mL) and women (−144 (−243, −44) mL). The negative association between CRP and FEV1 was significantly larger in men than women (p = 0.04). The decline in FEV1 was larger (16 (5, 27) mL) in men with high CRP levels whereas no significant association between CRP and FEV1 decline was found in women. Higher CRP values are significantly associated with COPD and lower lung function in men and women. In men higher CRP values are related to a larger decline in FEV1. PMID:18268938

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular disease: The influence of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Kallergis, Eleftherios M; Moniaki, Violeta; Mauroudi, Eleni; Schiza, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common medical condition, associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of this association have not been completely understood and may be multifactorial in origin. A number of studies suggest that inflammatory processes have emerged critical in the pathogenesis of CVD in OSAS. A range of circulating inflammatory molecules has been identified and measured, with a view to assess inflammation and predict vascular damage risk, such as plasma cytokines, adhesion molecules, and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a relevant marker worthy of further study, because not only is elevated in patients with OSAS, but also is rapidly becoming a risk factor for cardiac disease. Furthermore, in selected OSAS patients, aggressive treatment of the disorder may lead to retarding or even improvement of CVD progression. However, still there is a debate on the true correlation between CRP and OSAS, as well as the clinical effect of any reduction after OSAS treatment. Further research is required to define those OSAS patients who will have a considerable reduction with treatment, as well as to understand the significance of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factor and CRP reduction in patients with OSAS. PMID:25992322

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular disease: The influence of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Kallergis, Eleftherios M; Moniaki, Violeta; Mauroudi, Eleni; Schiza, Sophia E

    2015-05-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common medical condition, associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of this association have not been completely understood and may be multifactorial in origin. A number of studies suggest that inflammatory processes have emerged critical in the pathogenesis of CVD in OSAS. A range of circulating inflammatory molecules has been identified and measured, with a view to assess inflammation and predict vascular damage risk, such as plasma cytokines, adhesion molecules, and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a relevant marker worthy of further study, because not only is elevated in patients with OSAS, but also is rapidly becoming a risk factor for cardiac disease. Furthermore, in selected OSAS patients, aggressive treatment of the disorder may lead to retarding or even improvement of CVD progression. However, still there is a debate on the true correlation between CRP and OSAS, as well as the clinical effect of any reduction after OSAS treatment. Further research is required to define those OSAS patients who will have a considerable reduction with treatment, as well as to understand the significance of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factor and CRP reduction in patients with OSAS.

  5. Hemoglobin, alkalic phosphatase, and C-reactive protein predict the outcome in patients with liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Panotopoulos, Joannis; Posch, Florian; Alici, Benjamin; Funovics, Philipp; Stihsen, Christoph; Amann, Gabriele; Brodowicz, Thomas; Windhager, Reinhard; Ay, Cihan

    2015-05-01

    Data on prognostic biomarkers in soft tissue sarcomas are scarce. The aim of the study was to define prognostic markers in patients with a liposarcoma, a subtype of sarcoma derived from adipose tissue. We restrospectively reviewed 85 patients with liposarcoma treated at our department from May 1994 to October 2011. Kaplan-Meier curves, uni-, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and competing risk analysis were performed to evaluate the association between putative biomarkers with disease-specific and overall survival. We observed a significant association between both alkalic phosphatase (ALP; subhazard ratio [SHR] per 1 unit increase: 1.35; 95%CI 1.10-1.65; p = 0.005) and C-reactive protein (CRP; SHR per 1 mg/dl increase: 2,57; 95%CI 1.36-4,86; p = 0.004) with disease-specific survival. Hemoglobin (Hb) (HR per 1 g/dl increase: 065; 95%CI 0.48-0.87; p = 0.003) was associated with overall survival. These associations prevailed after multivariable adjustment for AJCC tumor stage. This study identifies CRP and ALP as novel independent predictors of disease-specific survival in patients with liposarcoma. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Presence of multimeric isoforms of human C-reactive protein in tissues and blood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiling; Xu, Wei; Xue, Xue; Wang, Qi; Han, Lu; Li, Wenzhi; Lv, Shulan; Liu, Dong; Richards, Jendai; Shen, Zhujun; Ma, Li; Song, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The baseline concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with a wide array of human diseases. In epidemiological studies and in the clinic, CRP is typically measured as a pentamer, composed of 5 identical CRP subunits. The present study aimed to determine whether other isoforms were present in the blood by examining CRP conformations. Transgenic rats expressing human CRP under the mouse albumin promoter were generated and genotyped. Non-reducing western blotting was performed using the blood and tissues of transgenic rats and human patients. CRP concentrations in human blood were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition to the pentameric isoform, CRP was detected as a trimer and tetramer in the blood of human CRP transgenic rats. Furthermore, trimeric and tetrameric CRP was observed in various tissues, including aorta, liver, kidney, pancreas, heart and skeletal muscle. Notably, these two isoforms appeared to be age-associated, as they were detected only in the blood and tissues of older transgenic rats. The existence of additional CRP isoforms was confirmed in the blood of human patients by non-reducing western blotting. Clinical and epidemiological studies typically focus on CRP concentration. However, the results of the present study suggest that, in addition to concentration, CRP conformation may require analysis. PMID:27840940

  7. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Škop, V; Trnovská, J; Oliyarnyk, O; Marková, I; Malínská, H; Kazdová, L; Zídek, V; Landa, V; Mlejnek, P; Šimáková, M; Kůdela, M; Pravenec, M; Šilhavý, J

    2016-12-13

    Dyslipidemia and inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and liver disease. Fenofibrate has a well-known efficacy to reduce cholesterol and triglycerides. Combination with statins can ameliorate hypolipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects of fibrates. In the current study, we tested the anti-inflammatory and metabolic effects of fenofibrate alone and in combination with rosuvastatin in a model of inflammation and metabolic syndrome, using spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing the human C-reactive protein transgene (SHR-CRP transgenic rats). SHR-CRP rats treated with fenofibrate alone (100 mg/kg body weight) or in combination with rosuvastatin (20 mg/kg body weight) vs. SHR-CRP untreated controls showed increased levels of proinflammatory marker IL6, increased concentrations of ALT, AST and ALP, increased oxidative stress in the liver and necrotic changes of the liver. In addition, SHR-CRP rats treated with fenofibrate, or with fenofibrate combined with rosuvastatin vs. untreated controls, exhibited increased serum triglycerides and reduced HDL cholesterol, as well as reduced hepatic triglyceride, cholesterol and glycogen concentrations. These findings suggest that in the presence of high levels of human CRP, fenofibrate can induce liver damage even in combination with rosuvastatin. Accordingly, these results caution against the possible hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in patients with high levels of CRP.

  8. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: A moderated-mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the link between low SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD in a US sample of adults. Design We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. Main outcome measures CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1–10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (≤ 3.0 mg/L). Results Both poverty and low educational attainment were associated with elevated CRP, and these associations were primarily explained through higher levels of smoking and lower levels of exercise. In the education model, poor diet also emerged as a significant mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically-patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. PMID:20496985

  9. Isolation of human C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component.

    PubMed

    De Beer, F C; Pepys, M B

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are described for the isolation in high yield of consistent, highly purified preparations of human C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). CRP was obtained from malignant ascitic and pleural fluids by calcium-dependent affinity chromatography on pneumococcal C-polysaccharide covalently coupled to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose. It was then gel filtered on Ultrogel AcA44 (acrylamide-agarose beads) in the presence of calcium ions, combining molecular sieve chromatography with removal of contaminating SAP by its affinity of agarose. Residual trace contaminants were removed by immunoabsorption with anti-normal human serum and anti-SAP antibodies insolubilised on Sepharose and/or by absorption with Sepharose-Con A to remove glycoproteins and Blue-Sepharose to remove albumin. After a final gel filtration step on Sephacryl S-300 35-45% of the initial CRP was recovered in pure form according to biochemical and immunochemical criteria. SAP was isolated from normal serum by calcium-dependent affinity chromatography on unsubstituted Sepharose beads, followed by solid-phase immunoabsorption of contaminants and finally gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. At least 50% of the SAP in the starting material was recovered in pure form according to biochemical and immunochemical criteria. Ready availability of such preparations facilitates biochemical, biophysical and particularly biological studies of these plasma proteins.

  10. The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Alessandra M.; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Lavado, Edson L.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 ± 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 ± 0.37 and 0.68 ± 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764;p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8–360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates. PMID:16864904

  11. Localization of C-reactive protein in inflammatory lesions of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Du Clos, T W; Mold, C; Paterson, P Y; Alroy, J; Gewurz, H

    1981-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant which has been found deposited at sites of inflammation and tissue destruction. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltrates. This study describes the CRP response and the deposition of CRP in the spinal cords of rabbits with EAE. EAE was induced by a single injection of rabbit spinal cord in Freund's complete adjuvant. Serum CRP levels in experimental and adjuvant control rabbits showed cyclic elevations. An additional increase in levels of CRP in the serum was observed in the experimental group coincident with the onset of clinical disease. Deposition of CRP in spinal cord lesions of six of nine animals with EAE was demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence. CRP was seen around and within a small proportion of the cells in the acute inflammatory lesion. The amount of CRP deposition was most closely correlated with the proportion of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) in the infiltrate. No staining was observed in control animals, in experimental animals prior to the onset of clinical signs of EAE, or in clinically affected animals with exclusively mononuclear infiltration. The demonstration of CRP and PMN in acute lesions of rabbits with EAE may reflect a role for humoral mediators of inflammation in this disease. PMID:7026095

  12. Prognostic Role of C-Reactive Protein In Urological Cancers: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Cai, Xiang; Liu, Qiang; Jian, Zhong-Yu; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests serum C-reactive protein (CRP) can serve as a prognostic marker in urological cancers. However, some studies yield contradictory results. Our objective was to determine the relationship between baseline serum CRP and survival outcome in urological cancers. We searched PubMed and EMBASE databases until October 2014 without language restrictions. 44 independent studies investigating the association between baseline serum CRP and cancer-specific survival (CSS) or overall survival (OS) were selected. High CRP yielded a worse survival in renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma. Combined results of meta-analyses indicated that CRP was a prognostic factor in urological cancers (CSS: p < 0.01; OS: p < 0.01). Subgroup analyses confirmed the significant association between CRP and prognosis, regardless of race and cutoff value of CRP. Specifically, prognostic impact of CRP was also noted in patients with localized RCC treated with nephrectomy (CSS: p < 0.01) and metastatic RCC treated with molecular-targeted therapy (OS: p < 0.01). In conclusion, serum CRP is an independent prognostic factor in urological cancers and risk stratification by serum CRP level could be helpful for prognostic assessment. PMID:26235332

  13. Television viewing, C-reactive protein, and depressive symptoms in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mark; Poole, Lydia; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    There is emerging evidence for a link between sedentary behavior and mental health, although the mechanisms remain unknown. We tested if an underlying inflammatory process explains the association between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms. We conducted a two year follow-up of 4964 (aged 64.5±8.9 years) men and women from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a cohort of community dwelling older adults. Self-reported TV viewing time was assessed at baseline as a marker of leisure time sedentary behavior. The eight-item Centre of Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale was administered to measure depressive symptoms at follow-up. At baseline, TV time was associated with C-reactive protein (CRP), adjusted geometric mean CRP values were 2.94 mg/L (<2 h/d TV); 3.04 mg/L (2-4 h/d TV); 3.29 mg/L (4-6 h/d TV); 3.23 mg/L (>6 h/d TV). We observed both a direct association of TV time on CES-D score at follow-up (B=0.08, 95% CI, 0.05, 0.10) and indirect effects (B=0.07, 95% CI, 0.05, 0.08). The indirect effects were largely explained through lack of physical activity, smoking, and alcohol, but not by CRP or body mass index. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using a carbon nanofiber based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh K.; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    We report the sensitive detection of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for cardiac disease, using a carbon nanofiber based biosensor platform. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers were grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition to fabricate nanoelectrode arrays in a 3 X 3 configuration. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the CRP detection. The CV responses show a 25 % reduction in redox current upon the immobilization of anti-CRP on the electrode where as a 30% increase in charge transfer resistance is seen from EIS. Further reduction in redox current and increase in charge transfer resistance result from binding of CRP on anti-CRP immobilized surface, proportional to the concentration of the CRP target. The detection limit of the sensor is found to be ~90 pM or ~11 ng/ml, which is in the clinically relevant range. Control tests using non-specific myoglobin antigen confirmed the specificity of the present approach. PMID:24709327

  15. Obesity and C-reactive protein in various populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Joseph, L; Pilote, L

    2013-03-01

    Obesity has been associated with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation and predictor of cardiovascular risk. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the associations between obesity and CRP according to sex, ethnicity and age. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched through October 2011. Data from 51 cross-sectional studies that used body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as measure of obesity were independently extracted by two reviewers and aggregated using random-effects models. The Pearson correlation (r) for BMI and ln(CRP) was 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.42) in adults and 0.37 (CI, 0.31-0.43) in children. In adults, r for BMI and ln(CRP) was greater in women than men by 0.24 (CI, 0.09-0.37), and greater in North Americans/Europeans than Asians by 0.15 (CI, 0-0.28), on average. In North American/European children, the sex difference in r for BMI and ln(CRP) was 0.01 (CI, -0.08 to 0.06). Although limited to anthropometric measures, we found similar results when WC and WHR were used in the analyses. Obesity is associated with elevated levels of CRP and the association is stronger in women and North Americans/Europeans. The sex difference only emerges in adulthood.

  16. Predictors of C-Reactive Protein in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Wroblewski, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Inflammation plays an important role in many chronic degenerative diseases associated with aging, and social, economic, and behavioral factors that contribute to inflammation may lead to differential burdens of morbidity and mortality in later life. This study examines socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity as predictors of C-reactive protein (CRP) among older adults in the United States and considers the degree to which health behaviors, medical conditions and medication use, and psychosocial factors account for these associations. Methods. Multiple linear regression analysis of survey data for 1,580 participants, 57–85 years of age, in a population-based nationally representative sample of community-residing older adults in the United States. Results. Educational attainment, household wealth, and race/ethnicity were independently associated with CRP, with limited evidence for interactions with age. Health-related behaviors and usage of medications related to inflammation accounted for substantial proportions of these associations. Discussion. These results highlight the fundamental causes of inflammation among older adults and suggest pathways through which social disparities in inflammation may be reduced. PMID:20172904

  17. Associations between body mass index and serum levels of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tung-Wei; Lu, I-Shu; Liao, Kuo-Chen; Lai, Hsiu-Yun; Loh, Ching-Hui; Kuo, Hsu-Ko

    2009-05-01

    Obesity leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and glucose intolerance, which are phenomena of chronic inflammation. This study was performed to determine whether a higher body mass index (BMI) and central obesity are associated with low-grade inflammation. An analysis of 8 453 adults aged > or =20 years was performed. Every subject completed a household interview and a questionnaire regarding personal health, and their BMI and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level were measured. The BMI data were divided into quintiles, using multiple linear regression to estimate the relationship between CRP level and BMI quintiles. An extended-model approach was used for covariate adjustment. The association between central obesity and CRP level was examined by this method as well. After controlling for demographics, chronic diseases, health behaviours and levels of folate and vitamin B12, the beta coefficient (which represents the change of natural-log-transformed levels of CRP for each kg/m2 increase in BMI) was 0.078 (p < 0.001). The CRP levels also increased across increasing quintiles of BMI (p for trend <0.001). The beta coefficient, representing the change of natural-log-transformed levels of CRP comparing subjects with central obesity to those without, was 0.876 (p < 0.001). Higher BMIs as well as central obesity are independently associated with higher levels of CRP.

  18. [C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase as single prognostic factors of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Zrnić, Irena Krznarić; Milić, Sandra; Fisić, Elizabeta; Radić, Mladen; Stimac, Davor

    2007-01-01

    Ranson and Glasgow scores are routinely used for prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis. We undertook a prospective study to investigate the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential single predictors of severity in acute pancreatitis. In our study we included 100 patients with diagnosis of acute pancreatitis admitted to our hospital during last two years. The inclusion criteria consisted of a combination of clinical features, a typical case history, elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes and diagnosis confirmed by imaging studies (ultrasound or computerised tomography). We used Ranson score for assesment of severity and compared it with single parameters as LDH and CRP on the first and the third day after admission. Cut off values for predicting local and systemic complications were > or =3 for Ranson score, 320 IU for LDH and 5 mg/L for CRP. Ranson score showed highest sensitivity in the prediction of local and systemic complication of acute pancreatitis. Specificity and diagnostic accuracy were highest for LDH on the first day (67.74; 57%). Diagnostic accuracy for Ranson score and CRP on the third day after admission was around 50%. We can conclude that LDH and CRP are available, simple and economical biochemical parameters that can help us predict complications of acute pancreatitis in the early phase of the disease. They showed similar diagnostic accuracy as the far more clinically used Ranson score.

  19. Reduction in trunk fat predicts cardiovascular exercise training-related reductions in C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Vieira, V J; Hu, L; Valentine, R J; McAuley, E; Evans, E M; Baynard, T; Woods, J A

    2009-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine (1) if 10 months of cardiovascular exercise training (Cardio) reduces CRP in a group of older adults, (2) if such a reduction is related to improvements in trunk fat, fitness, and/or psychosocial variables, and (3) if the effect of Cardio on CRP differs between men and women. Community-dwelling residents (n=127; 60-83 yrs) were randomized to a Flex group (n=61) where they participated in 2-75 min supervised sessions per wk during which they performed non-cardiovascular flexibility and balance exercises or a Cardio group (n=66) where they participated in three supervised sessions per wk during which they performed cardiovascular exercises for approximately 45-60 min at 60-70% maximal oxygen uptake. The main outcome measures were serum CRP, cardiovascular fitness, total and central adiposity, and self-reported psychosocial function. Cardio experienced a reduction in CRP (-0.5mg/L), as well as improvements in fitness (+7%) and total (-1.5%) and central (i.e., trunk) (-2.5%) adiposity. These relationships were not modified by sex. Regression analyses indicated that only the reduction in trunk fat was significantly related to the reduction in CRP. Ten months of cardiovascular exercise training reduced CRP in previously sedentary older adults and this effect was partially mediated by a reduction in trunk fat.

  20. Thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography with bar code quantitation of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S; Lager, C; Laurell, T; Birnbaum, S

    1995-09-01

    A rapid thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatographic method for quantitation in serum of an acute phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), which can differentiate between viral and bacteria] infections, is described, where material and reagent costs are minimal. The analysis is based on the "sandwich" assay format using monoclonal antibodies directed against two sites of CRP. One of the antibodies is covalently bound to defined zones on a thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography membrane, while the other antibody is covalently bound to deeply dyed blue latex particles. After incubation (CRP sample and latex particles), the CRP-latex immunocomplex is allowed to migrate along the immunoaffinity chromatography membrane. In the presence of antigen, a sandwich is formed between the CRP-latex immunocomplex and membrane-bound antibodies, which results in the appearance of blue lines on the membrane. Antibody immobilization on the TLC membrane is made with a redesigned piezoelectric-driven ink-jet printer. The time required for the analysis is less than 10 min. Quantitation is achieved either by counting the lines visually, with scanning reflectometry, or with a modified bar code reader. The limit of detection was estimated in the low femtomolar range using the naked eye as detector.

  1. Studies on the carbohydrate moiety and on the biosynthesis of rat C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Sambasivam, H; Rassouli, M; Murray, R K; Nagpurkar, A; Mookerjea, S; Azadi, P; Dell, A; Morris, H R

    1993-05-15

    Rat C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric glycoprotein composed of five apparently identical monomers, two of which form a disulfide-linked dimer (Rasosouli, M., Sambasivam, H., Azadi, P., Dell, A., Morris, H. R., Nagpurkar, A., Mookerjea, S., and Murray, R. K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 2947-2954). In this study, the nature of the oligosaccharide chain of rat CRP was investigated by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), and general features of its biosynthetic pathway were also analyzed. FAB-MS, electrospray-mass spectrometry, and linkage analysis demonstrated that each monomer of rat CRP contained one oligosaccharide chain, predominantly a disialylated biantennary structure, attached to Asn-128. The biosynthesis of rat CRP was studied by immunoprecipitation of CRP synthesized in vitro and by cultured hepatocytes. The results revealed that each monomer of rat CRP was synthesized individually as a single-chain precursor with a cleavable signal sequence. The translocated species was sensitive to digestion by endoglycosidase H (endo H), indicating that it possessed a high mannose oligosaccharide. Rat CRP acquired the ability to bind to phosphorylcholine-Sepharose and to form the dimeric and oligomeric species prior to acquiring resistance to endo H. Studies using tunicamycin revealed that the N-linked oligosaccharide present in rat CRP was not required for formation of its dimeric component, oligomerization, ability to bind to phosphorylcholine, or secretion. The non-glycosylated rat CRP, however, was still able to bind to phosphorylcholine-Sepharose and to be secreted by hepatocytes.

  2. Reference measurement procedure development for C-reactive protein in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Eric L; Bunk, David M

    2009-10-15

    This paper describes the development of a reference measurement procedure to quantify human C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum using affinity techniques prior to tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the certification of reference materials in clinically relevant ranges. The absence of a suitable internal standard for the CRP measurement, necessary to eliminate potential measurement bias in both the affinity purification and trypsin digestion steps, was addressed using the method of standard addition. The standard addition quantification approach was combined with affinity purification, using an anti-CRP monoclonal antibody conjugated to polystyrene beads, trypsin digestion of the purified protein, and LC-MS/MS analysis of CRP tryptic peptides. The effectiveness of intact protein affinity purification was evaluated through the measurement of CRP in several serum-based CRP control materials, yielding levels that were comparable to their expected mean concentration values. Quantitative results were confirmed with an external calibration approach. This study demonstrates the feasibility of affinity purification with LC-MS/MS for the reference measurement procedure development of low abundance serum protein analytes.

  3. Validation of an immunoturbidimetric method for determination of porcine serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Saco, Yolanda; Fraile, Lorenzo; Giménez, Mercè; Canalias, Francesca; Bassols, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Measurement of porcine C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is an important tool for monitoring health and welfare in pigs. In this study, an immunoturbidimetric method from Olympus System Reagent (OSR 6147) used to measure human CRP in serum that employ a human traceable calibrator has been evaluated in porcine serum samples. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision were lower than that obtained with the porcine-specific commercially available ELISA. The expected difference in serum CRP between healthy and non-healthy pigs was detected. CRP values measured by the immunoturbidimetric method showed a good correlation with those obtained by ELISA, although differences in absolute CRP values were observed. When an in-house porcine standard was used a better agreement was obtained. In conclusion, the immunoturbidimetric method of Olympus can be used with porcine samples. The easier use of this method should facilitate the implementation of CRP serum determination for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in swine medicine. The results emphasize the need to establish species-specific standard and methods to decrease inter-laboratory discrepancies.

  4. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Eudy, A M; Vines, A I; Dooley, M A; Cooper, G S; Parks, C G

    2014-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at a median 13 months since diagnosis. Models estimated prevalence differences in the association of baseline CRP with self-reported flares, adjusting for age, sex, race and education. Active disease or flare was reported by 59% at baseline and 58% at follow-up. Higher CRP (>10 µg/ml vs. <3 µg/ml) was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval (CI): -20, 53%) higher prevalence of flare at baseline and a 26% (95% CI: -9, 62%) higher prevalence of flare at follow-up. These CRP-flare associations were notably stronger in patients with lower education at baseline and in African-Americans at follow-up. These findings suggest that CRP may be a useful marker in studies of SLE health disparities. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Periodontal inflammatory burden correlates with C-reactive protein serum level.

    PubMed

    Skaleric, Eva; Petelin, Milan; Gaspirc, Boris; Skaleric, Uros

    2012-12-01

    The aim of study was to present a new method for evaluation of the periodontal inflammatory burden, to apply the method to the adult population and to correlate it with serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). On 515 extracted teeth was measured the neck circumferences (NC). The average values of the NC were obtained for 16 male and 16 female individual tooth types. In the clinical part of this study 238 dentate subjects were included. The subgingival area, inflamed area and periodontal wound size were calculated from NC, probing depth and BOP. The sum of the inflamed and ulcerated subgingival areas of all teeth represented the total periodontal inflammatory burden of an individual. Serum levels of CRP were measured by immunochemical method. The average subgingival area in 238 subjects was calculated to be 13.11 ± 6.35 cm(2) and inflammatory burden area 9.25 ± 5.57 cm(2). The periodontal bleeding wound (p < 0.05) was significantly larger in men. The increased serum levels of CRP correlated with periodontal inflammatory burden (p < 0.05). This new method quantifies the inflammatory burden caused by periodontal disease. The size of the inflammatory burden is correlated with increased serum levels of CRP.

  6. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  7. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations.

  8. C-reactive protein level and microbial aetiology in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Clark, Tristan W; Medina, Marie-Jo; Batham, Sally; Curran, Martin D; Parmar, Surendra; Nicholson, Karl G

    2015-01-01

    Both viruses and bacteria are thought to cause exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the relative importance of each remains uncertain. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels increase during exacerbations but the relationship with aetiology is not established. We aimed to explore the relationship between serum CRP and the rate of detection of viruses and bacteria. This was a prospectively recruited, observational study of patients hospitalised with exacerbations of COPD. Nasopharyngeal swabs were tested for respiratory viruses by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Sputum and blood were collected for bacterial culture and urine tested for pneumococcal antigen. CRP levels were measured on sera. CRP and other factors associated with viral, bacterial or mixed detection were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. 264 patients with exacerbations of COPD were studied: 26% tested positive for respiratory viruses only, 13% had bacteria only, 12% had mixed viral/bacterial detection, and 49% had no pathogens detected. CRP level and temperature were strongly associated with viral detection rate (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) and mixed viral/bacterial detection rate (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively) on multivariate analysis. Bacterial detection rate was not associated with CRP level or body temperature. This study supports the role of viruses as important aetiological agents causing exacerbations of COPD.

  9. C-Reactive Protein and substance use disorders in adolescence and early adulthood: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Costello, E. Jane; Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol M.; Angold, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulated immune function and elevated inflammation markers are seen in adults with chronic diseases, including some psychiatric disorders, but evidence on inflammation in the case of drug abuse is conflicting. Objective To test the concurrent and predictive relations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and use and abuse of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis in a longitudinal, population sample of adolescents and young adults, at the period of highest increase in drug use. Methods Data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community assessed at ages 9–16, 19, and 21. Structured interviews were used to assess substance abuse symptoms and DSM-IV substance use disorders. Bloodspots were collected at each assessment and assayed for CRP. Results CRP levels were higher in the presence of nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis use and nicotine dependence. In prospective analyses, higher CRP levels predicted cannabis use and nicotine dependence, and nicotine use predicted higher CRP levels, once covariates were included in the models. Significant covariates were age, race (American Indian), and obesity. Conclusions The inter-relationship of CRP and substance abuse has implications for the later health risks associated with early drug and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:24099969

  10. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test. PMID:26491289

  11. Narrative review: Assessment of C-reactive protein in risk prediction for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Liu, Kiang; Tian, Lu; Greenland, Philip

    2006-07-04

    Some experts propose C-reactive protein (CRP) as a screening tool for prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Many epidemiologic studies show positive associations between elevated CRP levels and incident CVD. Assessment of the value of new prognostic tests, however, must rely on understanding of test characteristics rather than on associations measured by relative risks. In the case of CRP, test characteristics must be judged in the context of currently available CVD risk prediction algorithms. In this review of literature published before January 2006, the authors describe what is known about the additional utility of CRP in risk prediction. They find no definitive evidence that, for most individuals, CRP adds substantial predictive value above that provided by risk estimation using traditional risk factors for CVD. Use of CRP may add to risk estimation in a limited subset of individuals who are at intermediate predicted risk according to the Framingham risk score. The authors propose that many questions still must be addressed before CRP is incorporated into risk prediction algorithms and before universal screening with CRP can be recommended.

  12. Levels of neopterin and C-reactive protein in pregnant women with fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Erkenekli, K; Keskin, U; Uysal, B; Kurt, Y G; Sadir, S; Çayci, T; Ergün, A; Erkaya, S; Danişman, N; Uygur, D

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pregnant women with fetal growth restriction (FGR) have higher plasma neopterin and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations compared with those with uncomplicated pregnancy. A total of 34 pregnant women with FGR and 62 patients with uncomplicated pregnancy were included. Neopterin and CRP levels were measured at the time of diagnosis. The primary outcome of this study was to compare the neopterin and CRP levels in pregnant women with FGR and those with uncomplicated pregnancies. The secondary outcome of our study was to evaluate the correlation between fetal birth weight and maternal neopterin levels. The serum neopterin levels were significantly elevated in pregnant women with FGR (22.71 ± 7.70 vs 19.15 ± 8.32). However, CRP was not elevated in pregnant women with FGR (7.47 ± 7.59 vs 5.29 ± 3.58). These findings support the hypothesis that pregnancy with FGR is associated with a marked increase in macrophage activation and the natural immune system.

  13. [Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein in patients with high estrogen levels].

    PubMed

    Ricoux, R; Pontet, M; Tresca, J P; Engler, R

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of inflammatory activity in patients with a high level of estrogen is controversial because the significance of a raised estradiol level on C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations is a debated question. This prompted us to assay CRP by a sensitive Elisa in a sample of 30 patients with ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization, thus with high levels of estradiol. For 15 of these women, six to nine plasma samples were analyzed allowing a kinetic study of plasma levels of CRP, estradiol and sex steroid-binding plasma protein (SBP). No significant correlation was found between the concentrations of estradiol and CRP for the 30 patients. In the kinetic study, as mean estradiol levels rose exponentially from 50 to 1400 ng/l between day 5 and 14, the CRP level tended to vary markedly from one patient to another and sometimes from day to day, but there was never any relation with estradiol level. Furthermore, CRP did not significantly modify the slope of the regression line between estradiol concentration and the day of the menstrual cycle. In contrast, the effect of estradiol on SBP was clear, which supports the absence of estradiol effect on CRP level.

  14. [Inflammation mediators (C reactive protein) in children with proteic-energetic malnutrition and in eutrophic children].

    PubMed

    Amesty-Valbuena, Alis; Pereira, Nayda; Castillo, José L; García, Doris; Nuñez, José R; Cayana, Neyda; Morán, Aida; Parra, Maria A; Troconiz, Carmen

    2004-03-01

    A multicentrical clinical study was designed with the purpose of measuring C-reactive protein (CRP) in normal and malnourished children, with and without infection. Blood samples were collected without anticoagulant from 109 venezuelan children, between the ages of 6 months and 6 years. The statistical analysis was carried out using the t Student and ANOVA. The values of CRP were higher (80.80 +/- 38.39 mg/L) in severe malnourished infected than non-infected malnourished children (8.17 +/- 3.06 mg/L, p < 0.001). There were statistical differences between severe malnourished infected and eutrophic infected children (p < 0.001). There was also a difference between the non infected, severely malnourished children and the rest of them, although they kept their values within a normal range. These findings indicate that the malnourished child is able to produce CRP in response to infection but in a different way that the eutrophic child. In children without infection, the CRP levels were kept within the normal range.

  15. The acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A and C reactive protein in transudates and exudates.

    PubMed

    Okino, Alessandra M; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Lavado, Edson L; Lotufo, Paulo A; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 +/- 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 +/- 0.37 and 0.68 +/- 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764; p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8-360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates.

  16. Agglutination of intravenously administered phosphatidylcholine-containing lipid emulsions with serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Tugirimana, Pierrot; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Fiers, Tom; De Buyzere, Marc L; Kint, Jos; Benoit, Dominique; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is able to bind phospholipids in the presence of calcium. We wanted to investigate the reaction of CRP with various commercial fat emulsions and to explore the impact of CRP agglutination on serum CRP levels. Serum specimens were mixed with Intralipid 20% (soybean oil-based fat emulsion), Structolipid (structured oil-based fat emulsion), Omegaven (fish oil-based fat emulsion), or SMOFlipid (mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion) in Tris-calcium buffer (pH 7.5). After 30 minutes of incubation at 37°C, CRP-phospholipid complexes were turbidimetrically quantified and flow cytometric analysis was performed. Similarly, CRP complexes were monitored in vivo, following administration of fat emulsion. CRP was able to agglutinate phospholipid-containing lipid droplets present in the soybean oil-based fat emulsion and the structured oil-based fat emulsion. To a lesser extent, agglutination was observed for fish oil-containing fat emulsions, whereas no agglutination was noticed for the mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion. Results for propofol-containing emulsions were comparable. Agglutination correlated with phospholipid content of the emulsions. When in vivo agglutination occurred, plasma CRP values dropped due to consumption of CRP by phospholipid-induced agglutination. In this in vitro experiment, we demonstrated agglutination of CRP with phospholipids in various fat emulsions. Research studies are required in patients to determine which effects occur with various intravenous fat emulsions.

  17. Binding of human C-reactive protein to monocytes: analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, S P; Cleveland, R P

    1991-01-01

    An opsonic role has been proposed as a major function of C-reactive protein (CRP) in humans. In support of this hypothesis, recent radiolabelled ligand binding studies have provided evidence for the presence of specific receptors for soluble human CRP on human phagocytic cells, including neutrophils and monocytes. In order to confirm specific binding of CRP to monocytes and to quantify the percentage of such cells capable of expressing binding sites, we employed a sensitive biotin-avidin fluorescence assay to study the CRP-monocyte interaction. It was observed that 67% of monocytes bound biotinylated CRP in a dose-dependent manner, that the binding was calcium dependent, and that it could be inhibited by 60% in the presence of a greater than 20-fold excess of competing native CRP. In other experiments, neither IgG nor heat-aggregated IgG inhibited the binding of CRP to monocytes; and no significant binding to lymphocyte population could be detected. These studies confirm the ability of human CRP to bind to a majority of human monocytes in a calcium-dependent and specific manner, and provide further support for a biologically important interaction of this acute-phase protein with phagocytic cells. PMID:2025959

  18. Elevation of C-reactive protein levels in patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Rondina, Matthew T.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Semple, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities and is characterized by the onset of acute respiratory distress within six hours following blood transfusion. In most cases, donor antibodies are suggested to be involved, however, the pathogenesis is poorly understood. A two-hit model is generally assumed to underlie TRALI pathogenesis where the first hit consists of a patient predisposing factor such as inflammation and the second hit is due to donor antibodies present in the transfused blood. We recently demonstrated that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) could enhance murine anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-mediated TRALI. Whether CRP is increased in human TRALI patients which would support its role as a risk factor for human TRALI, is currently unknown. For that purpose, we measured CRP levels in the plasma of human TRALI patients and found CRP levels to be significantly elevated compared to transfused control patients. These data support the notion that CRP may be a novel first hit risk factor in human TRALI and that modulation of CRP levels could be an effective therapeutic strategy for this serious adverse event of transfusion. PMID:27793007

  19. Nonobese, exercising children diagnosed with dyslipidemia have normal C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Miguel Arturo Salazar; Vázquez, Beatriz Yadira Salazar; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Nonobese children age 10.4 ± 1.1 years diagnosed with dyslipidemia (n = 51) were compared to normal children age 10.8 ± 1.1 years (n = 38). Affected individuals had increased total cholesterol: 223 ± 23 vs 152 ± 17 mg/dl, p < 0.001; and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol: 41.9 ± 4.1 vs 57.6 ± 5.7 mg/dl, p < 0.001 and triglycerides: 90.8 ± 40.5 vs 65.7 ± 25.0 mg/dl, p < 0.002. Fasting glucose was also significantly elevated (p < 0.02). All other parameters, including blood pressure, were not statistically different between groups. The concentration of C-reactive protein was not statistically different between groups. Analysis of medical records showed that this anomaly may be related to this group (as well as the control group) performing regular, daily exercise. This activity was quantified via a self administered questionnaire, and found to be statistically identical in controls and dyslipidemic individuals. Exercise is associated with the release of antiinflammatory cytokines, therefore our results support the contention that it is a significant factor in promoting health conditions from an early stage in life. PMID:19436676

  20. Fear and C-reactive protein cosynergize annual pulse increases in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Yayon, Nadav; Waiskopf, Nir; Shapira, Itzhak; Toker, Sharon; Zaltser, David; Berliner, Shlomo; Ritov, Ya'acov; Soreq, Hermona

    2015-01-01

    Recent international terror outbreaks notably involve long-term mental health risks to the exposed population, but whether physical health risks are also anticipated has remained unknown. Here, we report fear of terror-induced annual increases in resting heart rate (pulse), a notable risk factor of all-cause mortality. Partial least squares analysis based on 325 measured parameters successfully predicted annual pulse increases, inverse to the expected age-related pulse decline, in approximately 4.1% of a cohort of 17,380 apparently healthy active Israeli adults. Nonbiased hierarchical regression analysis among 27 of those parameters identified pertinent fear of terror combined with the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein as prominent coregulators of the observed annual pulse increases. In comparison, basal pulse primarily depended on general physiological parameters and reduced cholinergic control over anxiety and inflammation, together indicating that consistent exposure to terror threats ignites fear-induced exacerbation of preexisting neuro-immune risks of all-cause mortality. PMID:25535364

  1. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  2. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  3. Do high levels of C-reactive protein in Tanzanian children indicate malaria morbidity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, N; Smith, T; Teuscher, T; Tanner, M

    1994-07-01

    Children under 6 years of age living in an area of Tanzania highly endemic for malaria were tested for C-reactive protein (CRP) in order to determine how the acute-phase response is related to malaria in children of different ages and to investigate whether serum CRP concentrations might be useful in the qualification of morbidity in such children. The median CRP level in the 629 finger-prick blood samples measured, 6.0 mg/liter, was much higher than that reported in the blood of children in Europe. The CRP concentration was correlated with recent illness reported by the parents. High CRP levels were most strongly associated with Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in children under 1 year of age. In older children, lower levels of CRP were associated with parasitemia, and fewer children had increased CRP levels attributable to parasitemia. The levels of malaria-attributable CRP appear to track the acquisition of parasitological and clinical tolerance in this area with very high levels of P. falciparum transmission. Determination of CRP levels should be useful in the rapid assessment of the overall burden of morbidity, especially in infants. In areas where malaria is endemic, CRP associated with increased parasite densities provides an objective measure of malaria-specific morbidity. This would be an efficient approach to estimating malaria morbidity risks from small-scale serological surveys.

  4. STAT3 participates in transcriptional activation of the C-reactive protein gene by interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Sun, M; Samols, D; Kushner, I

    1996-04-19

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is the major cytokine inducing transcription of human C-reactive protein (CRP) during the acute phase response. STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) family members, recently shown to be important mediators of the effects of many cytokines including IL-6, generally induce their effects by binding to palindromic sequences with TT(N)5AA motifs. We report an IL-6 responsive element in the proximal region of the human CRP 5'-flanking region that bears a TT(N)4AA motif, which we have termed CRP acute phase response element (CRP-APRE). In Hep3B cells, IL-6 but not interferon-gamma was capable of activating CAT constructs drive