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Sample records for a-1 polymer chemistry

  1. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  2. Frontiers in polymer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, A Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The article shows how the initial concept of Staudinger on linear macromolecules was expanded topologically by increasing the cross-section diameter of polymer chains and by introducing sheet polymers with planar rather than the commonly known linear repeat units. The two concrete projects addressed are the synthesis of dendronized and of two-dimensional polymers. It is explained how these novel macromolecules were achieved and which obstacles had to be overcome but also where these frontiers in polymer chemistry might lead to new insights in polymer science in general and novel applications in particular. The article also provides insights into analytical issues because both target macromolecules are in an extraordinarily high molar mass range and contrast/sensitivity issues can turn rather serious in particular for the two-dimensional polymers.

  3. Polymer Chemistry in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stucki, Roger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses why polymer chemistry should be added to the general chemistry curriculum and what topics are appropriate (listing traditional with related polymer topics). Also discusses when and how these topics should be taught. (JN)

  4. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frank W.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the physical and chemical properties of polymers and the two major methods of polymer synthesis: addition (chain, chain-growth, or chain-reaction), and condensation (step-growth or step-reaction) polymerization. (JN)

  5. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frank W.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the physical and chemical properties of polymers and the two major methods of polymer synthesis: addition (chain, chain-growth, or chain-reaction), and condensation (step-growth or step-reaction) polymerization. (JN)

  6. Cycloadditions in modern polymer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delaittre, Guillaume; Guimard, Nathalie K; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-19

    Synthetic polymer chemistry has undergone two major developments in the last two decades. About 20 years ago, reversible-deactivation radical polymerization processes started to give access to a wide range of polymeric architectures made from an almost infinite reservoir of functional building blocks. A few years later, the concept of click chemistry revolutionized the way polymer chemists approached synthetic routes. Among the few reactions that could qualify as click, the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) initially stood out. Soon, many old and new reactions, including cycloadditions, would further enrich the synthetic macromolecular chemistry toolbox. Whether click or not, cycloadditions are in any case powerful tools for designing polymeric materials in a modular fashion, with a high level of functionality and, sometimes, responsiveness. Here, we wish to describe cycloaddition methodologies that have been reported in the last 10 years in the context of macromolecular engineering, with a focus on those developed in our laboratories. The overarching structure of this Account is based on the three most commonly encountered cycloaddition subclasses in organic and macromolecular chemistry: 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, (hetero-)Diels-Alder cycloadditions ((H)DAC), and [2+2] cycloadditions. Our goal is to briefly describe the relevant reaction conditions, the advantages and disadvantages, and the realized polymer applications. Furthermore, the orthogonality of most of these reactions is highlighted because it has proven highly beneficial for generating unique, multifunctional polymers in a one-pot reaction. The overview on 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions is mostly centered on the application of CuAAC as the most travelled route, by far. Besides illustrating the capacity of CuAAC to generate complex polymeric architectures, alternative 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions operating without the need for a catalyst are described. In the area of (H)DA cycloadditions

  7. Polymer chemistry - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Droske, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    As a result of their high molecular weights, which range from several thousand to well over a million, polymers (or macromolecules) exhibit unique properties. Examples of these unusual properties and explanations for them will be highlighted in this presentation. Polymers comprise a very important class of materials which can be categorized into two groups; biopolymers and synthetic polymers. Biopolymers are essential components in biological systems and some of these, such as wool and silk, have found application as important industrial materials. Building on nature`s insights, chemists have prepared a wide variety of synthetic polymers. These materials play a major role in established as well as state-of-the-art technologies. An overview of the fundamental principles of this broad field will be presented.

  8. Physical organic chemistry of supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Serpe, Michael J; Craig, Stephen L

    2007-02-13

    Unlike the case of traditional covalent polymers, the entanglements that determine properties of supramolecular polymers are defined by very specific, intermolecular interactions. Recent work using modular molecular platforms to probe the mechanisms underlying mechanical response of supramolecular polymers is reviewed. The contributions of supramolecular kinetics, thermodynamics, and conformational flexibility to supramolecular polymer properties in solutions of discrete polymers, in networks, and at interfaces, are described. Molecule-to-material relationships are established through methods reminiscent of classic physical organic chemistry.

  9. Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, Michael J.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the case of traditional covalent polymers, the entanglements that determine properties of supramolecular polymers are defined by very specific, intermolecular interactions. Recent work using modular molecular platforms to probe the mechanisms underlying mechanical response of supramolecular polymers is reviewed. The contributions of supramolecular kinetics, thermodynamics, and conformational flexibility to supramolecular polymer properties in solutions of discrete polymers, in networks, and at interfaces, are described. Molecule-to-material relationships are established through methods reminiscent of classic physical organic chemistry. PMID:17279638

  10. Green polymer chemistry: biocatalysis and biomaterials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This overview briefly surveys the practice of green chemistry in polymer science. Eight related themes can be discerned from the current research activities: 1) biocatalysis, 2) bio-based building blocks and agricultural products, 3) degradable polymers, 4) recycling of polymer products and catalys...

  11. Green polymer chemistry: a brief review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review briefly surveys the research done on green polymer chemistry in the past few years. For convenience, these research activities can be grouped into 8 themes: 1) greener catalysis, 2) diverse feedstock base, 3) degradable polymers and waste minimization, 4) recycling of polymer products a...

  12. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Polymer Chemistry for Introductory General Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Lists polymer chemistry topics and depth of topics to be covered in general chemistry courses. Also lists topics using polymers as tools for delivering necessary concepts, discussing 11 topic areas. List of readings, information on textbook evaluation, and illustrative examination questions are included. (JN)

  13. Summer Course Promotes Polymer Chemistry for Small Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a three-week summer program teaching selected chemistry faculty how to incorporate polymer chemistry into chemistry courses. In addition to lectures, the program conducted many experiments and provided a trip to industry laboratories. (YP)

  14. Advancing Control in Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Kaila Marie

    Controlling molecular weight, architecture, and comonomer incorporation in polymers is of paramount importance for the preparation of functional materials. This dissertation will highlight the development of three strategies that improve control in macromolecular synthesis, ranging from initial polymerization to macromolecular post-modification. Controlled radical polymerization is a well-established platform for macromolecular engineering. However, many techniques require metal or sulfur additives and yield macromolecules with chain ends that are chemically reactive and thermally unstable. This dissertation presents a light-mediated method for the removal of such end groups, which is effective for a variety of chain ends as well as polymer families, both in solution and with spatial control on surfaces. Polymers with improved thermal and chemical stability can now be obtained under mild, metal-free conditions and with external regulation. To circumvent the presence of such reactive chain ends altogether, triazine-based unimolecular initiators were developed. These metal- and sulfur-free mediators are shown to control the radical polymerization of several monomer classes. Generally, the distribution of functional groups throughout the macromolecular backbone is important for numerous applications. An efficient and high-yielding strategy for the functionalization of well-defined polyethers is described herein. By controlling both the number and location of underwater adhesive catechol groups, these biomimetic macromolecules may facilitate future insights into the mechanics of mussel and underwater adhesion, and related antifouling materials.

  15. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The sub-strate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic region, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  16. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge. wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  17. Recommended ACS Syllabus for Introductory Courses in Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1982-01-01

    Provides syllabus for courses in introductory polymer chemistry (including major topics and recommended time allotments) and currently available textbooks and audio courses which may be used with the syllabus. Syllabus topics are congruent with those used in American Chemical Society (ACS) standardized examination in polymer chemistry. (Author/JN)

  18. Polymer Chemistry--An Elective in the New Leaving Chemistry Course: A Method of Teaching It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lister, G.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is suggested for teaching concepts of polymer chemistry. Laboratory activities are suggested for the major topics. Interrelationships of different industrial uses of polymers are emphasized during the course. (PS)

  19. Green polymer chemistry: Some recent developments and examples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Green polymer chemistry continues to be a popular field, with many books and publications in print. Research is being conducted in several areas within this field, including: 1) green catalysis, 2) diverse feedstock base, 3) degradable polymers and waste minimization, 4) recycling of polymer produc...

  20. The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Laren Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

  1. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  2. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  3. Post-functionalization of polymers via orthogonal ligation chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Anja S; Glassner, Mathias; Inglis, Andrew J; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-05-27

    The establishment of advanced living/controlled polymerization protocols allows for engineering synthetic polymers in a precise fashion. Combining advanced living/controlled polymerization techniques with highly efficient coupling chemistries facilitates quantitative, modular, and orthogonal functionalization of synthetic polymer strands at their chain termini as well as side-chain functionalization. The review highlights the current status of selected post-functionalization techniques of polymers via orthogonal ligation chemistries, major characteristics of the specific transformation chemistry, as well as the characterization of the products.

  4. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  5. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  6. An Introductory Polymer Chemistry Course for Plastics Technology Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Mary G.; Koch, Paul E.

    2000-09-01

    Penn State-Erie offers one of three undergraduate degree programs in plastics engineering technology in the country, which has seen considerable growth since its inception in 1989. A decision was made recently to increase the chemistry component of the program by adding a course in introductory polymer chemistry. The students have superior practical skills and experience in the handling of plastics, but are poorly equipped to deal with the properties of plastics at the molecular level. A traditional course in polymer chemistry was inappropriate for their needs, so a more visual approach was chosen, based on teaching the fundamentals of organic chemistry using a molecular drawing and modeling software package interfaced with a polymer database, which can predict polymer properties based on their structure. SciPolymer/Alchemy 2000 is a database of 630 compounds, any of which can be drawn in Alchemy, a molecular modeling and discovery program, by a click of the mouse. Students can design a new polymer in Alchemy, import it to SciPolymer, and examine its properties. The graphics are striking, so students are able to see real molecules, both big and small, and learn about their chemistry using Alchemy instead of a textbook.

  7. Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Part l (SE 538 305) covered application of classical thermodynamics, polymer crystallinity, and phase diagrams to teaching physical chemistry. This part covers statistical thermodynamics, conformation, molecular weights, rubber elasticity and viscoelasticity, and kinetics of polymerization. Eight polymer-oriented, multiple-choice test questions…

  8. Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Part l (SE 538 305) covered application of classical thermodynamics, polymer crystallinity, and phase diagrams to teaching physical chemistry. This part covers statistical thermodynamics, conformation, molecular weights, rubber elasticity and viscoelasticity, and kinetics of polymerization. Eight polymer-oriented, multiple-choice test questions…

  9. Polymer Chemistry: Introduction to an Indispensable Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teegarden, David M.

    2004-01-01

    More than half of all chemists work on some aspect of polymers. For high school teachers who want to introduce polymer science basics, properties, and uses, this book is uniquely helpful--much deeper than simple monographs or collections of experiments, but much more accessible than college texts. Divided into four sections, Polymer Chemistry…

  10. Polymer Chemistry: Introduction to an Indispensable Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teegarden, David M.

    2004-01-01

    More than half of all chemists work on some aspect of polymers. For high school teachers who want to introduce polymer science basics, properties, and uses, this book is uniquely helpful--much deeper than simple monographs or collections of experiments, but much more accessible than college texts. Divided into four sections, Polymer Chemistry…

  11. Recent advances in glycerol polymers: chemistry and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, the underlying chemistry of glycerol that provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations is described. Then, the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth are reviewed. Next, several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity are described. Fourth, the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine is described. Finally, the findings are concluded and summarized, as well as the potential opportunities for continued research efforts are discussed.

  12. Recent Advances in Glycerol Polymers: Chemistry and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, we describe the underlying chemistry of glycerol, which provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations. We then review the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth. Next, we describe several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity. Fourth, we describe the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine. Finally we conclude and summarize the findings, as well as discuss potential opportunities for continued research efforts. PMID:25308354

  13. Photoreconfigurable polymers for biomedical applications: chemistry and macromolecular engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congcong; Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2014-10-13

    Stimuli-responsive polymers play an important role in many biomedical technologies. Light responsive polymers are particularly desirable because the parameters of irradiated light and diverse photoactive chemistries produce a large number of combinations between functional materials and associated stimuli. This Review summarizes recent advances in utilizing photoactive chemistries in macromolecules for prospective use in biomedical applications. Special focus is granted to selection criterion when choosing photofunctional groups. Synthetic strategies to incorporate these functionalities into polymers and networks with different topologies are also highlighted herein. Prospective applications of these materials are discussed including programmable matrices for controlled release, dynamic scaffolds for tissue engineering, and functional coatings for medical devices. The article concludes by summarizing the state of the art in photoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including current challenges and future opportunities.

  14. Polymer chemistry: Proteins in a pill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Heather D.

    2013-07-01

    Protein drugs are important therapies for many different diseases, but very few can be administered orally. Now, a cationic dendronized polymer has been shown to stabilize a therapeutic protein for delivery to the gut.

  15. Advanced polymer chemistry of organometallic anions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, R.M.; Abney, K.D.; Balaich, G.J.; Fino, S.A.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to prepare and characterize new polymers incorporating cobalt dicarbollide. Specific goals were to prepare polymerizable cobalt dicarbollide monomers using the nucleophilic substitution route discovered in laboratories and to establish the reaction conditions required to form polymers from these complexes. This one-year project resulted in two publications (in press), and provided the foundation for further investigations into polymer synthesis and characterization using cobalt dicarbollide and other metallocarboranes. Interest in synthesizing organometallic polymers containing the cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion is motivated by their possible application as cation exchange materials for the remediation of cesium-137 and strontium-90 from nuclear wastes.

  16. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  17. Developing soluble polymers for high-throughput synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Spanka, Carsten; Wentworth, Paul; Janda, Kim D

    2002-05-01

    Soluble polymers have emerged as viable alternatives to resin supports across the broad spectrum of high-throughput organic chemistry. As the application of these supports become more widespread, issues such as broad-spectrum solubility and loading are becoming limiting factors and therefore new polymers are required to overcome such limitations. This article details the approach made within our group to new soluble polymer supports and specifically focuses on parallel libraries of block copolymers, de novo poly(styrene-co-chloromethylstyrene), PEG- stealth stars, and substituted poly(norbornylene)s.

  18. Bergman cyclization in polymer chemistry and material science.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuli; Hu, Aiguo

    2011-11-01

    Bergman cyclization of enediynes, regarded as a promising strategy for anticancer drugs, now finds its own niche in the area of polymer chemistry and material science. The highly reactive aromatic diradicals generated from Bergman cyclization can undergo polymerization acting as either monomers or initiators of other vinyl monomers. The former, namely homopolymerization, leads to polyphenylenes and polynaphthalenes with excellent thermal stability, good solubility, and processability. The many remarkable properties of these aromatic polymers have further endowed them to be manufactured into carbon-rich materials, e.g., glassy carbons and carbon nanotubes. Whereas used as initiators, enediynes provide a novel resource for high molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities. The aromatic diradicals are also useful for introducing oligomers or polymers onto pristine carbonous nanomaterials, such as carbon nano-onions and carbon nanotubes, to improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer solutions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Contributions to the Field of High Polymer Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report summarizes the activities of the authors’ contract on ’Research In High Polymer Chemistry’ for the period 1962-1972. Summarization is made by listing the scientific publications PhD dissertations that resulted from this contract. (Author)

  20. A Physical Chemistry Experiment in Polymer Crystallization Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singfield, Kathy L.; Chisholm, Roderick A.; King, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment currently used in an undergraduate physical chemistry lab to investigate the rates of crystallization of a polymer is described. Specifically, the radial growth rates of typical disc-shaped crystals, called spherulites, growing between microscope glass slides are measured and the data are treated according to polymer…

  1. A Physical Chemistry Experiment in Polymer Crystallization Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singfield, Kathy L.; Chisholm, Roderick A.; King, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment currently used in an undergraduate physical chemistry lab to investigate the rates of crystallization of a polymer is described. Specifically, the radial growth rates of typical disc-shaped crystals, called spherulites, growing between microscope glass slides are measured and the data are treated according to polymer…

  2. Green polymer chemistry: enzyme catalysis for polymer functionalization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanghamitra; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-05-21

    Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions.

  3. Detonation chemistry of glycidyl azide polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, P.; Sakata, J.; Wight, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The initial step of chemical reaction initiated by laser-generated shock waves has been observed in glycidyl azide polymer (GAP) in condensed phase. Shocks are generated by pulsed laser vaporization of thin aluminum films and launched into adjacent films of GAP at 77 K. Comparison of FTIR spectra obtained before and after shock passage shows that initial reaction involves elimination of molecular nitrogen from the azide functional groups of the polymer. The shock arrival time has been measured by a velocity interferometer as a function of thickness of GAP and laser fluence. The shock pressure has been calculated by using a universal liquid state Hugoniot. A simple model is proposed to calculate shock velocity and pressure as a function of laser fluence. The results are in agreement with experimental data.

  4. Physical chemistry of supramolecular polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Sprakel, Joris

    2012-01-21

    Supramolecular polymer networks are three-dimensional structures of crosslinked macromolecules connected by transient, non-covalent bonds; they are a fascinating class of soft materials, exhibiting properties such as stimuli-responsiveness, self-healing, and shape-memory. This critical review summarizes the current state of the art in the physical-chemical characterization of supramolecular networks and relates this knowledge to that about classical, covalently jointed and crosslinked networks. We present a separate focus on the formation, the structure, the dynamics, and the mechanics of both permanent chemical and transient supramolecular networks. Particular emphasis is placed on features such as the formation and the effect of network inhomogeneities, the manifestation of the crosslink relaxation dynamics in the macroscopic sample behavior, and the applicability of concepts developed for classical polymer melts, solutions, and networks such as the reptation model and the principle of time-temperature superposition (263 references).

  5. Crosslinking Chemistry for Fluorocarbon Ether Bibenzoxazole Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    soluble amber- colored gums which exhibited inherent viscosities in the range of 0.26 to 0.51 dl/g were obtained in yields of up to 90 percent. N -CF ) CH...dissolved to permit the formation of a viscous, amber- colored solution. The resultant gum exhibited an inherent viscosity of 0.20 dl/g. 3. POLYMER...reaction vessel. The excess copper and cuprous salts were filtered off, the organic layer separated, and the aqueous layer extracted with more

  6. Functional Conducting Polymers via Thiol-ene Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Kathleen E.; Martin, David C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate here that thiol-ene chemistry can be used to provide side-chain functionalized monomers based on 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT) containing ionic, neutral, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic side chains. All reactions gave high yields and purification could generally be accomplished through precipitation. These monomers were polymerized either chemically or electro-chemically to give soluble materials or conductive films, respectively. This strategy provides for facile tuning of the solubility, film surface chemistry, and film morphology of this class of conducting polymers. PMID:25585932

  7. Chemistry of crosslinking processes for self-healing polymers.

    PubMed

    Billiet, Stijn; Hillewaere, Xander K D; Teixeira, Roberto F A; Du Prez, Filip E

    2013-02-25

    Recent developments in material design have seen an exponential increase of polymers and polymer composites that can repair themselves in response to damage. In this review, a distinction is made between extrinsic materials, where the self-healing property is obtained by adding healing agents to the material to be repaired, and intrinsic materials, where self-healing is achieved by the material itself through its chemical nature. An overview of the crosslinking chemistries used in self-healing materials will be given, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each system. The review is not only aiming to enable researchers to compare their ongoing research with the state-of-the-art but also to serve as a guide for the newcomers, which allows for a selection of the most promising self-healing chemistries.

  8. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates, with a set of definitive examples, how polymer principles can be introduced into the first undergraduate physical chemistry course in a very natural way. The intent is to encourage introduction of polymer-related material into conventional physical chemistry courses without sacrificing any rigor associated with such courses. (JN)

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet photo-physical chemistry of hydrocarbon polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truica-Marasescu, Florina-Elena

    The purpose of this study has been to investigate fundamental processes involved in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, lambda < 200 nm)-induced modification of polymer surfaces and their physico-chemical properties. It is well known that VUV photons provide an important photochemical contribution during plasma treatments of polymers, for example: ablation of material; crosslinking and chemical modification of the near-surface region can also be performed by VUV irradiation. During the last 30 years, VUV treatments have received increasing attention, due to a few key advantages over their plasma counterparts. These include the possibility of treating commercial polymer films at atmospheric pressure, thereby alleviating the need for expensive vacuum pumps and other auxiliary equipment necessary for continuous low-pressure plasma roll-to-roll treatment of flexible substrates. Another important advantage of VUV photochemistry over plasma is that more specific surface chemistries can be achieved with monochromatic VUV radiation, due to selective (photo-) chemistries both on the solid surface and in the gas phase. The hydrocarbon polymers used for this study were well-characterized low-density polyethylene, LDPE; biaxially-oriented polypropylene, BOPP; polystyrene, PS; and poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Due to the complexity of interactions between VUV photons and polymers, especially when the latter are in a reactive gas, VUV-wavelength-dependent effects on the physico-chemical properties of irradiated polymer surfaces have been investigated under two different set of conditions, namely: VUV exposure in vacuum, and in a reactive atmosphere of low-pressure ammonia, VUV/NH3. In the former case, we investigated wavelength (lambda)-dependent material ablation ("etching") by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, as a function of the irradiation dose, D. Near-surface structural changes (the creation of unsaturation, cross-linking, etc.) and radical

  10. Optimal ATRP-Made Soluble Polymer Supports for Phosphoramidite Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Laurence; Al Ouahabi, Abdelaziz; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    Soluble polystyrene supports with optimal molecular structures for iterative phosphoramidite chemistry were prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent chain-end modification steps. The controlled radical polymerization of styrene was first performed in the presence of an 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-protected amino-functional ATRP initiator. Soluble supports of different molecular weight were prepared. Size-exclusion chromatography and NMR analysis indicated formation of well-defined polymers with controlled chain lengths and narrow dispersity. After synthesis, the bromo ω end group of the ATRP polymer was removed by dehalogenation in the presence of tributyltin hydride, and the Fmoc protecting group of the α moiety was subsequently cleaved with piperidine. The resulting α-primary amine was afterwards treated with a linker containing a carboxyl group, a cleavable ester site, and a dimethoxytrityl-protected hydroxyl group to afford ideal soluble supports for phosphoramidite chemistry. NMR analysis indicated that these chain-end modifications were quantitative. The supports were tested for the synthesis of a non-natural sequence-defined oligophosphates. High-resolution ESI-MS analysis of the cleaved oligomers indicated formation of uniform species, and thus confirmed the efficiency of the ATRP-made soluble polymer supports. In addition, the synthesis of a thymidine-loaded soluble support was achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Lithography of Polymer Nanostructures on Glass for Teaching Polymer Chemistry and Physics.

    PubMed

    Sahar-Halbany, Adi; Vance, Jennifer M; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-05-01

    As nanolithography becomes increasingly important in technology and daily life, a variety of inexpensive and creative methods toward communicating the concepts underpinning these processes in the classroom are necessary. An experiment is described that uses simple CD-Rs, C-clamps, an oven, and a freezer to provide concrete examples and insights into the chemistry and principles of nanolithography. The experiment also has flexibility, making it suitable for a range of classroom levels from high school to more advanced labs in college. Because CD-Rs are composed of grooves of polycarbonate, the experiment provides a basis for discussions and exploration into the chemistry and physics of polymers on the nanoscale.

  12. Chemistry and application of flexible porous coordination polymers*

    PubMed Central

    Bureekaew, Sareeya; Shimomura, Satoru; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs), which are microporous materials, have been given much attention from both scientific and commercial aspects regarding their application to gas storage, gas separation and catalytic reaction because of the regularity of their pore shape and pore size, accompanied with the functionality. Moreover, in recent years, flexible PCPs, which are structurally transformable depending upon external stimuli, have been attractive because they provide unique properties, dissimilar to those of zeolites. In this review, the chemistry and application of flexible crystalline PCPs are summarized and discussed. PMID:27877934

  13. Click chemistry with polymers, dendrimers, and hydrogels for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lallana, Enrique; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Sousa-Herves, Ana; Riguera, Ricardo; Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo

    2012-04-01

    During the last decades, great efforts have been devoted to design polymers for reducing the toxicity, increasing the absorption, and improving the release profile of drugs. Advantage has been also taken from the inherent multivalency of polymers and dendrimers for the incorporation of diverse functional molecules of interest in targeting and diagnosis. In addition, polymeric hydrogels with the ability to encapsulate drugs and cells have been developed for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. In the long road to this successful story, pharmaceutical sciences have been accompanied by parallel advances in synthetic methodologies allowing the preparation of precise polymeric materials with enhanced properties. In this context, the introduction of the click concept by Sharpless and coworkers in 2001 focusing the attention on modularity and orthogonality has greatly benefited polymer synthesis, an area where reaction efficiency and product purity are significantly challenged. The purpose of this Expert Review is to discuss the impact of click chemistry in the preparation and functionalization of polymers, dendrimers, and hydrogels of interest in drug delivery.

  14. Dynamic covalent chemistry approaches toward macrocycles, molecular cages, and polymers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinghua; Wang, Qi; Taynton, Philip; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-20

    polymerization. We prepared imine- or ethynylene-linked porous polymer networks, which exhibit permanent porosity with high specific surface areas. Our most recent contribution is the discovery of a recyclable polyimine material whose self-healing can be activated simply by heating or water treatment. The facile access to complex functional organic molecules through dynamic covalent chemistry has allowed us to explore their exciting applications in gas adsorption/separation, host-guest chemistry, and nanocomposite fabrication. It is clear that there are significant opportunities for improved dynamic covalent systems and their more widespread applications in materials science.

  15. Triclosan Computational Conformational Chemistry Analysis for Antimicrobial Properties in Polymers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard C

    2015-03-01

    Triclosan is a diphenyl ether antimicrobial that has been analyzed by computational conformational chemistry for an understanding of Mechanomolecular Theory. Subsequent energy profile analysis combined with easily seen three-dimensional chemistry structure models for the nonpolar molecule Triclosan show how single bond rotations can alternate rapidly at a polar and nonpolar interface. Bond rotations for the center ether oxygen atom of the two aromatic rings then expose or hide nonbonding lone-pair electrons for the oxygen atom depending on the polar nature of the immediate local molecular environment. Rapid bond movements can subsequently produce fluctuations as vibration energy. Consequently, related mechanical molecular movements calculated as energy relationships by forces acting through different bond positions can help improve on current Mechanomolecular Theory. A previous controversy reported as a discrepancy in literature contends for a possible bacterial resistance from Triclosan antimicrobial. However, findings in clinical settings have not reported a single case for Triclosan bacterial resistance in over 40 years that has been documented carefully in government reports. As a result, Triclosan is recommended whenever there is a health benefit consistent with a number of approvals for use of Triclosan in healthcare devices. Since Triclosan is the most researched antimicrobial ever, literature meta analysis with computational chemistry can best describe new molecular conditions that were previously impossible by conventional chemistry methods. Triclosan vibrational energy can now explain the molecular disruption of bacterial membranes. Further, Triclosan mechanomolecular movements help illustrate use in polymer matrix composites as an antimicrobial with two new additive properties as a toughening agent to improve matrix fracture toughness from microcracking and a hydrophobic wetting agent to help incorporate strengthening fibers. Interrelated

  16. Triclosan Computational Conformational Chemistry Analysis for Antimicrobial Properties in Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan is a diphenyl ether antimicrobial that has been analyzed by computational conformational chemistry for an understanding of Mechanomolecular Theory. Subsequent energy profile analysis combined with easily seen three-dimensional chemistry structure models for the nonpolar molecule Triclosan show how single bond rotations can alternate rapidly at a polar and nonpolar interface. Bond rotations for the center ether oxygen atom of the two aromatic rings then expose or hide nonbonding lone-pair electrons for the oxygen atom depending on the polar nature of the immediate local molecular environment. Rapid bond movements can subsequently produce fluctuations as vibration energy. Consequently, related mechanical molecular movements calculated as energy relationships by forces acting through different bond positions can help improve on current Mechanomolecular Theory. A previous controversy reported as a discrepancy in literature contends for a possible bacterial resistance from Triclosan antimicrobial. However, findings in clinical settings have not reported a single case for Triclosan bacterial resistance in over 40 years that has been documented carefully in government reports. As a result, Triclosan is recommended whenever there is a health benefit consistent with a number of approvals for use of Triclosan in healthcare devices. Since Triclosan is the most researched antimicrobial ever, literature meta analysis with computational chemistry can best describe new molecular conditions that were previously impossible by conventional chemistry methods. Triclosan vibrational energy can now explain the molecular disruption of bacterial membranes. Further, Triclosan mechanomolecular movements help illustrate use in polymer matrix composites as an antimicrobial with two new additive properties as a toughening agent to improve matrix fracture toughness from microcracking and a hydrophobic wetting agent to help incorporate strengthening fibers. Interrelated

  17. Green polymer chemistry: Synthesis of poly(disulfide) polymers and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Quinn

    The disulfide group is unique in that it presents a covalent bond that is easily formed and cleaved under certain biological conditions. While the ease of disulfide bond cleavage is often harnessed as a method of biodegradation, the ease of disulfide bond formation as a synthetic strategy is often overlooked. The objective this research was to synthesize poly(disulfide) polymers and disulfide crosslinked networks from a green chemistry approach. The intent of the green chemistry approach was to take advantage of the mild conditions applicable to disulfide bond synthesis from thiols. With anticipated use as biomaterials, it was also desired that the polymer materials could be degraded under biological conditions. Here, a new method of poly(disulfide) polymer synthesis is introduced which was inspired by the reaction conditions and reagents found in Nature. Ambient temperatures and aqueous mixtures were used in the new method. Hydrogen peroxide, one of the Nature's most powerful oxidizing species was used as the oxidant in the new polymerization reaction. The dithiol monomer, 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol was first solubilized in triethylamine, which activated the thiol groups and made the monomer water soluble. At room temperature, the organic dithiol/amine solution was then mixed with dilute aqueous hydrogen peroxide (3% by weight) to make the poly(disulfide) polymers. The presence of a two phase system (organic and aqueous phases) was critical to the polymerization reaction. As the reaction progresses, a third, polymer phase appeared. At ambient temperatures and above, this phase separated from the reaction mixture and the polymer product was easily removed from the reaction solution. These polymers reach Mn > 250,000 g/mol in under two hours. Molecular weight distributions were between 1.5 and 2.0. Reactions performed in an ice bath which remain below room temperature contain high molecular weight polymers with Mn ≈ 120,000 g/mol and have a molecular weight

  18. Coloring a Superabsorbent Polymer with Metal Ions: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaung, Jing-Fun; Chen, Yueh-Huey

    2009-01-01

    A novel undergraduate chemistry experiment involving superabsorbent polymers commonly used in diapers and other personal care products is described. Students observe the removal of divalent transition-metal ions from aqueous solutions by the polymers. With the procedures provided, students are able to color the superabsorbent polymers with metal…

  19. Coloring a Superabsorbent Polymer with Metal Ions: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaung, Jing-Fun; Chen, Yueh-Huey

    2009-01-01

    A novel undergraduate chemistry experiment involving superabsorbent polymers commonly used in diapers and other personal care products is described. Students observe the removal of divalent transition-metal ions from aqueous solutions by the polymers. With the procedures provided, students are able to color the superabsorbent polymers with metal…

  20. Click Chemistry Immobilization of Antibodies on Polymer Coated Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Chiara; Sola, Laura; Pezzullo, Margherita; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam; Riva, Benedetta; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Morasso, Carlo; Picciolini, Silvia; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-07-26

    The goal of this work is to develop an innovative approach for the coating of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a synthetic functional copolymer. This stable coating with a thickness of few nanometers provides, at the same time, stabilization and functionalization of the particles. The polymeric coating consists of a backbone of polydimethylacrylamide (DMA) functionalized with an alkyne monomer that allows the binding of azido modified molecules by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, click chemistry). The thin polymer layer on the surface stabilizes the colloidal suspension whereas the alkyne functions pending from the backbone are available for the reaction with azido-modified proteins. The reactivity of the coating is demonstrated by immobilizing an azido modified anti-mouse IgG antibody on the particle surface. This approach for the covalent binding of antibody to a gold-NPs is applied to the development of gold labels in biosensing techniques.

  1. Natural rubber (NR) biosynthesis: perspectives from polymer chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakaty, Balaka

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber is an important strategic raw material for manufacturing a wide variety of industrial products. There are at least 2,500 different latex-producing plant species; however, only Hevea brasiliensis (the Brazilian rubber tree) is a commercial source. The chemical structure of natural rubber is cis-1,4-polyisoprene, but the exact structure of the head and end groups remains unknown. Since synthetic cis-1,4-polyisoprenes cannot match the superior properties of natural rubber, understanding the chemistry behind the biosynthetic process is key to finding a possible replacement. T his chapter summarizes our current understandings from the perspective of a polymer scientist by comparing synthetic polyisoprenes to natural rubber. The chapter also highlights biomimetic polymerization, research towards a synthetic match of natural rubber and the role of natural rubber in health care.

  2. Surface chemistry mediated assembly of polymer-grafted nanorods in solution and polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Robert Charles, Jr.

    In the dissertation, I investigate ways to assemble nanorods, typically made of gold, in solution and polymer matrices by controlling surface chemistry. Gold nanorods were anisotropically functionalized with polymer on the side and alkane dithiol on the end causing the gold nanorods to spontaneously assemble in solution. The assembly could be tuned by controlling the incubation time which affected the solution absorbance due to plasmon coupling. Linked gold nanorods were cast in polymer thin films and their optical properties were imparted to the film. This anisotropic functionalization method was utilized to placed DNA or peptides on the ends of the gold nanorods allowing for reversibly assembly. In the case of DNA, assembly was reversed upon heating and could be tuned by controlling the concentration of the complimentary DNA strand. In the case of the peptide, assembly was triggered by the presence of Zn 2+ ions and could be reversed by adding in a chelater. Anisotropic modification of the nanorods could also be used to assemble organic semiconductors around the nanorods at specific facets. Here, organic semiconductors rhodamine-B, 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein, and cyanine-3 were assembled onto the surface of gold nanorods. By tuning the surface chemistry the organic semiconductors would assemble around the nanorods in different ways which resulted in unique optical properties. The dispersion of PMMA-grafted mesoscopic iron-oxide rods in polymer matrices was studied by varying the PMMA brush molecular weight (N) polymer matrix molecular weight (P), and polymer matrix type. Here, we found that the ratio of P/N and matrix type had little effect on dispersion of iron-oxide mesorods. N was found to be the main factor that determined dispersion, which is attributed to the large size of the mesorods. Long PS and short PMMA brushes were grafted to gold nanorod surfaces and the dispersion of this system in PS and PMMA was investigated by controlling matrix molecular weight

  3. Lithography of Polymer Nanostructures on Glass for Teaching Polymer Chemistry and Physics

    PubMed Central

    Sahar-Halbany, Adi; Vance, Jennifer M.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-01-01

    As nanolithography becomes increasingly important in technology and daily life, a variety of inexpensive and creative methods toward communicating the concepts underpinning these processes in the classroom are necessary. An experiment is described that uses simple CD-Rs, C-clamps, an oven, and a freezer to provide concrete examples and insights into the chemistry and principles of nanolithography. The experiment also has flexibility, making it suitable for a range of classroom levels from high school to more advanced labs in college. Because CD-Rs are composed of grooves of polycarbonate, the experiment provides a basis for discussions and exploration into the chemistry and physics of polymers on the nanoscale. PMID:21686088

  4. Chemistry of Silanes: Interfaces in Dental Polymers and Composites1

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Joseph M.; Dickens, Sabine H.; Fowler, Bruce O.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; McDonough, Walter G.

    2005-01-01

    The performance and service life of glass-or ceramic-filled polymeric composites depend on the nature of their resin, filler and interfacial phases as well as the efficacy of the polymerization process. The synergy that exists between the organic polymer matrix and the usually inorganic reinforcing filler phase is principally mediated by the interfacial/interphasial phase. This latter phase develops as a result of the dual reactivity of a silane coupling agent, (YRSiX3), a bifunctional molecule capable of reacting with the silanol groups of glass or ceramic fillers via its silane functional group (–SiX3) to form Si-O-Si- bonds to filler surfaces, and also with the resin phase by graft copolymerization via its Y functional group, usually a methacrylic vinyl group. In this paper, we explore some of the chemistry of organosilanes, especially that of functional organosilanes (or silane coupling agents as they are commonly known) that are used to mediate interfacial bonding in mineral reinforced polymeric composites. The chemistry of organosilanes can be quite complex involving hydrolytically initiated self-condensation reactions in solvents (including monomers) that can culminate in polymeric silsesquioxane structures, exchange reactions with hydroxylated or carboxylated monomers to form silyl ethers and esters, as well as the formation of silane derived interfaces by adhesive coupling with siliceous mineral surfaces. PMID:27308178

  5. CYP17A1: a biochemistry, chemistry, and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Porubek, David

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1; also P450c17and P450sccII) is a critically important enzyme in humans that catalyzes the formation of all endogenous androgens. It is an atypical cytochrome P450 enzyme in that it catalyzes two distinct types of substrate oxidation. Through its hydroxylase activity, it catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of pregnenolone to 17α-OH pregnenolone. Subsequently, through its C17,20lyase activity, it can further convert 17α-OH pregnenolone to the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone, which is a precursor to androstenedione, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. The importance of androgens in diseases such as prostate cancer has been appreciated for decades and the discovery of extra-testicular formation of androgens has helped clarify the pathology of the disease, especially the castrate- resistant disease. Therefore, specific inhibition of CYP17A1 by therapeutic intervention has been an area of considerable effort in several research laboratories. This basic research has led to the discovery of several promising drug candidates followed by the conduct of several clinical trials. Recently, all these efforts have culminated in the first approval by FDA of an inhibitor of CYP17A1 for the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Ongoing clinical trials are now evaluating the agent in earlier stages of prostate cancer and even rare forms of androgen-dependent breast cancer. Accordingly, this review focuses on the biochemistry, chemistry, and clinical inhibitors of CYP17A1.

  6. Polymer Chemistry in Science Centers and Museums: A Survey of Educational Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collard, David M.; McKee, Scott

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 129 science and technology-related centers and museums revealed a shortage of polymer chemistry exhibits. Describes those displays that do exist and suggests possibilities for future displays and exhibits. Contains 23 references. (WRM)

  7. Pyrolysis chemistry of polycarbosilane polymer precursors to ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi

    The main theme of this research work was investigation of the precursor-ceramic conversion process for some polycarbosilane polymers, (-RRsp' SiCHsb2-)sb{n}, known as the poly(silylenemethylene)s (PSMs), where R and Rsp' are either hydrogen or bridging oxygen. The pyrolysis chemistry was characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, liquid and solid state NMR spectroscopy, FTIR, and mass spectrometric analysis of the gaseous pyrolysis products. The strategy included three steps: First, linear poly(silaethylene), (SiHsb2CHsb2), PSE, was synthesized by ROP and examined as potential precursor to silicon carbide. This was one of the limiting cases where in (-RRsp' SiCHsb2-)sb{n}, R=Rsp'=H. The conversion process was studied by the examination of the gaseous species evolved during pyrolysis using a mass spectrometer. The results suggested that molecular H-transfer and elimination reactions involving silylene intermediates occurred initially and caused the crosslinking of the polymer between 300 and 420sp'C. Free radical reactions became operative and were the main mechanisms occurring above 420sp'C. The unusually high ceramic yield of linear PSE (ca. 80%) suggested that the SiHsb{x} groups in this polymer provided a latent reactivity that could be "turned on" by heating, thereby allowing the formation of a network structure that resists fragmentation. Second, polycarbosilane/siloxane hybrid polymers, (Si(O)CHsb2rbracksb{n}, were synthesized by sol-gel processing and were pyrolyzed to silicon oxycarbide ceramics. This was the other limiting case where in (-RRsp' SiCHsb2-)sb{n}, R=Rsp'=bridging or terminal oxygens. The gels were converted into silicon oxycarbides that contain a statistical distribution of the five possible SiCsb{4-x}Osb{x} environments between 600 and 1000sp'C. This rearrangement of the Si environments was attributed to the redistribution reactions involving the exchange of Si-O and Si-C bonds during the latter stages of the pyrolysis

  8. Double Modification of Polymer End Groups through Thiolactone Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Frank; Martens, Steven; Meyer, Bernhard De; Du Prez, Filip E; Espeel, Pieter

    2016-06-01

    A straightforward synthetic procedure for the double modification and polymer-polymer conjugation of telechelic polymers is performed through amine-thiol-ene conjugation. Thiolactone end-functionalized polymers are prepared via two different methods, through controlled radical polymerization of a thiolactone-containing initiator, or by modification of available end-functionalized polymers. Next, these different linear polymers are treated with a variety of amine/acrylate-combinations in a one-pot procedure, creating a library of tailored end-functionalized polymers. End group conversions are monitored via SEC, NMR, and MALDI-TOF analysis, confirming the quantitative modification after each step. Finally, this strategy is applied for the synthesis of block copolymers via polymer-polymer conjugation and the successful outcome is analyzed via LCxSEC measurements.

  9. Hyperbranched polymer films and dendrimers: Their chemistry and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingqi

    The research in this dissertation examines the chemistry and applications of dendritic polymers; specifically, hyperbranched polymer thin films and dendrimers. We examined hyperbranched, fluorinated and unfluorinated poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) films on gold substrates, poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer monolayers and dendrimer-alkanethiol mixed monolayers on gold substrates, PAMAM dendrimer/poly(anhydride) and poly(iminopropane-1,3-diyl) (Cascade) dendrimer/poly(anhydride) multilayer films on silicon, gold, and aluminum substrates, PAMAM dendrimer/metal-ion composites, and PAMAM dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoclusters in solution and on electrode surfaces. Hyperbranched PAA films have pH-dependent blocking abilities: at low pH PAA films effectively passivate Au electrodes while at high pH they are open and permeable. Fluorinated PAA films are far less permeable at any pH. Dendrimers ranging from generation 4 to 8 (G4--G8) can form highly stable and nearly close-packed monolayers and mixed monolayers with hexadecanethiol (C16SH) on surfaces. Moreover, dendrimers embedded within C16SH can act as gates of molecular dimension that control intradendrimer mass transfer of ions. Dendrimer/poly(anhydride) multilayers on surfaces were synthesized and their permeability was investigated. These composite membranes exhibit fully reversible, pH-switchable permselectivity for both cationic and anionic probe molecules because of their pH-dependent electrostatic properties. After heating, such films become highly blocking over the pH range studied due to thermally induced interdendrimer imidization, and other reactions. Finally, we show that PAMAM dendrimers can act first as templates for the preparation of transition-metal nanoclusters, and subsequently as stabilizers. Dendrimers quantitatively complex many transition-metal ions, including Cu 2+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Ru3+, and Ni2+, within their interiors. Chemical reduction of such nanocomposites results in formation of dendrimer

  10. Hydrolases in Polymer Chemistry: Chemoenzymatic Approaches to Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Andreas; Palmans, Anja R. A.

    Lipases show high activity in the polymerization of a range of monomers using ring-opening polymerization and polycondensation. The range of polymer structures from this enzymatic polymerization can be further increased by combination with chemical methods. This paper reviews the developments of the last 5-8 years in chemoenzymatic strategies towards polymeric materials. Special emphasis is on the synthesis of polymer architectures like block and graft copolymers and polymer networks. Moreover, the combination of chemical and enzymatic catalysis for the synthesis of unique chiral polymers is highlighted.

  11. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  12. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  13. Materials chemistry: Organic polymers form fuel from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Vijay S.; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-05-01

    Porous polymers have joined the ranks of light-activated catalysts that split water into hydrogen, a carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels. Their properties are easily tuned -- a big plus for the development of practically useful catalysts.

  14. Topological Polymer Chemistry Designing Complex Macromolecular Graph Constructions.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Yasuyuki

    2017-08-22

    The precision design of topologically intriguing macromolecular architectures has continuously been an attractive challenge in polymer science and polymer materials engineering. A class of multicyclic polymer topologies, including three subclasses of spiro, bridged, and fused forms, are particularly unique not only from a topological geometry viewpoint but also from their biochemical relevance to programmed folding structures. In this Account, we describe recent progress in constructing this class of macromolecules, in particular by means of an electrostatic self-assembly and covalent fixation (ESA-CF) protocol, in which ion-paired polymer self-assemblies are employed as key intermediates. All three dicyclic constructions having either 8 (spiro), manacle (bridged), or θ (fused) forms, as well as a tricyclic trefoil (spiro) graph, have been constructed by the ESA-CF process. Moreover, a triply fused-tetracyclic macromolecular K3,3 graph has been constructed using a uniform-size dendritic polymer precursor having six cyclic ammonium salt end groups carrying two units of a trifunctional carboxylate counteranion. Remarkably, the K3,3 graph is known in topological geometry as a prototypical nonplanar graph and has been identified as topologically equivalent to some multicyclic polypeptides (cyclotides) produced through the intramolecular S-S bridging with cysteine residues. A series of single cyclic (ring) polymers having one, two, and even three designated functional groups at the prescribed positions along their cyclic backbone segment (kyklo-telechelics) have also been obtained by the ESA-CF protocol. And in conjunction with a tandem alkyne-azide addition (i.e., click) and an olefin metathesis (i.e., clip) reaction, the precision design of complex multicyclic macromolecular architectures has been achieved. Thus, a series of tri-, tetra-, and even hexacyclic polymer topologies of spiro- and bridged-forms and three doubly fused-tricycle (β-, γ-, and δ-graph) forms

  15. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  16. Classical Challenges in the Physical Chemistry of Polymer Networks and the Design of New Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Sing, Michelle K; Avery, Reginald K; Souza, Bruno S; Kim, Minkyu; Olsen, Bradley D

    2016-12-20

    Polymer networks are widely used from commodity to biomedical materials. The space-spanning, net-like structure gives polymer networks their advantageous mechanical and dynamic properties, the most essential factor that governs their responses to external electrical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Despite the ubiquity of applications and a century of active research on these materials, the way that chemistry and processing interact to yield the final structure and the material properties of polymer networks is not fully understood, which leads to a number of classical challenges in the physical chemistry of gels. Fundamentally, it is not yet possible to quantitatively predict the mechanical response of a polymer network based on its chemical design, limiting our ability to understand and characterize the nanostructure of gels and rationally design new materials. In this Account, we summarize our recent theoretical and experimental approaches to study the physical chemistry of polymer networks. First, our understanding of the impact of molecular defects on topology and elasticity of polymer networks is discussed. By systematically incorporating the effects of different orders of loop structure, we develop a kinetic graph theory and real elastic network theory that bridge the chemical design, the network topology, and the mechanical properties of the gel. These theories show good agreement with the recent experimental data without any fitting parameters. Next, associative polymer gel dynamics is discussed, focusing on our evolving understanding of the effect of transient bonds on the mechanical response. Using forced Rayleigh scattering (FRS), we are able to probe diffusivity across a wide range of length and time scales in gels. A superdiffusive region is observed in different associative network systems, which can be captured by a two-state kinetic model. Further, the effects of the architecture and chemistry of polymer chains on gel nanostructure are studied. By

  17. Soluble Two-Dimensional Covalent Organometallic Polymers by (Arene)Ruthenium-Sulfur Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Coraux, Johann; Hourani, Wael; Müller, Valentin L; Lamare, Simon; Kamaruddin, Danial Aiman; Magaud, Laurence; Bendiab, Nedjma; Den Hertog, Martien; Leynaud, Olivier; Palmino, Frank; Salut, Roland; Chérioux, Frédéric

    2017-08-16

    A class of two-dimensional (2D) covalent organometallic polymers, with nanometer-scale crosslinking, was obtained by arene(ruthenium) sulfur chemistry. Their ambivalent nature, with positively charged crosslinks and lypophylic branches is the key to the often sought-for and usually hard-to-achieve solubility of 2D polymers in various kinds of solvents. Solubility is here controlled by the planarity of the polymer, which in turn controls Coulomb interactions between the polymer layers. High planarity is achieved for high symmetry crosslinks and short, rigid branches. Owing to their solubility, the polymers are easily processable, and can be handled as powder, deposited on surfaces by mere spin-coating, or suspended across membranes by drop-casting. The novel 2D materials are potential candidates as flexible membranes for catalysis, cancer therapy, and electronics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Green polymer chemistry: living dithiol polymerization via cyclic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Emily Q; Puskas, Judit E; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2012-01-09

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of disulfide polymers obtained by oxidation of 2-[2-(2-sulfanylethoxy)ethoxy]ethanethiol (DODT) using a benign, synergistic system comprised of air, dilute hydrogen peroxide and triethylamine as a catalyst that can be recycled. The dn/dc value of the polymer in THF was determined to obtain absolute molecular weight measurements. High molecular weight disulfide polymers (up to M(n) = 250000 g/mol) with polydispersity indices as low as M(w)/M(n) = 1.15 were obtained. Thermal analysis by DSC and TGA demonstrated that the rubbery polymers had a T(g) of -50 °C and began to degrade at 250 °C. Dithiothreitol reduced the polymers back to the original monomeric units in 33 h. MALDI-ToF showed the involvement of oligodisulfide rings (2-14 mers) in the polymerization that displayed the characteristics of a living/controlled polymerization; poly(DODT) was readily chain extended with 1,2-ethanedithiol. The chain extension indicates a class of living polymerization which is governed by radical recombination.

  19. Click-chemistry approaches to π-conjugated polymers for organic electronics applications

    PubMed Central

    Facchetti, Antonio; Lanari, Daniela; Santoro, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Given the wide utility of click-chemistry reactions for the preparation of simple moieties within large architecturally complex materials, this minireview article aims at surveying papers exploring their scope in the area of π-conjugated polymers for application in organic electronics to enable advanced functional properties. PMID:28567241

  20. Web Indexing with Meta Fields: A Survey of Web Objects in Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Jian; Wesley, Kathryn

    1998-01-01

    This survey of 1037 World Wide Web objects on polymer chemistry collected by four search engines (AltaVista, Lycos, Excite, Webcrawler) examined document information and use of meta fields, images, and chemical names. Found that the use of meta fields was not widespread and that knowledge of meta fields in HTML varied among Web object creators.…

  1. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  2. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  3. Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

  4. Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going. PMID:27559417

  5. Ferritin-Polymer Conjugates: Grafting Chemistry and Self-Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-26

    polymer core-shell structures by co-assembly. 9 A numbers of BNPs including cowpea mosaic virus, turnip yellow mosaic virus, and bacteriophage P22...Figure 11. Synthetic route for fluorescent crosslinkers. Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV), a plant virus with unique structural and chemical

  6. Preparation of Lanthanide-Polymer Composite Material via Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wen, Guian; Wu, Jiajie; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    Covalently attaching lanthanide complexes to the polymer backbone can effectively reduce the clustering of lanthanides and thus become an important strategy to fully unleash their potential. In this Communication, a metal-free click reaction is used for the first time to link a lanthanide complex to the polymer matrix. A diene-bearing copolymer with anthracenylmethyl methacrylate as a monomer and a dienophile-bearing lanthanide complex with 5-maleimido-1,10-phenanthroline as the second ligand are synthesized and coupled together through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition (DA). A comparative investigation demonstrates that the composite material prepared by DA click reaction shows the highest quantum yields in the same lanthanide concentration as compared to materials prepared by widely used "directly doping" and "in situ coordinating lanthanide ions with macromolecular ligand" approaches. This work suggests that the "metal-free" DA click reaction can be a promising tool in the synthesis of high efficient lanthanide functionalized polymeric materials.

  7. Organic Polymer Chemistry in the Context of Novel Processes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article was written to shed light on a series of what some have stated are not so obvious connections that link polymer synthesis in supercritical CO2 to cancer treatment and vaccines, nonflammable polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, and 3D printing. In telling this story, we also attempt to show the value of versatility in applying one’s primary area of expertise to address pertinent questions in science and in society. In this Outlook, we attempted to identify key factors to enable a versatile and nimble research effort to take shape in an effort to influence diverse fields and have a tangible impact in the private sector through the translation of discoveries into the marketplace. PMID:27725955

  8. Organic polymer chemistry in the context of novel processes

    DOE PAGES

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Mecham, Sue J.; Farrell, Crista L.

    2016-09-13

    This paper was written to shed light on a series of what some have stated are not so obvious connections that link polymer synthesis in supercritical CO2 to cancer treatment and vaccines, nonflammable polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, and 3D printing. In telling this story, we also attempt to show the value of versatility in applying one’s primary area of expertise to address pertinent questions in science and in society. In this Outlook, we attempted to identify key factors to enable a versatile and nimble research effort to take shape in an effort to influence diverse fields and havemore » a tangible impact in the private sector through the translation of discoveries into the marketplace.« less

  9. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers in Tissue Culture Flasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclose. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  10. Triazolinediones enable ultrafast and reversible click chemistry for the design of dynamic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billiet, Stijn; de Bruycker, Kevin; Driessen, Frank; Goossens, Hannelore; van Speybroeck, Veronique; Winne, Johan M.; Du Prez, Filip E.

    2014-09-01

    With its focus on synthetic reactions that are highly specific and reliable, ‘click’ chemistry has become a valuable tool for many scientific research areas and applications. Combining the modular, covalently bonded nature of click-chemistry linkages with an ability to reverse these linkages and reuse the constituent reactants in another click reaction, however, is a feature that is not found in most click reactions. Here we show that triazolinedione compounds can be used in click-chemistry applications. We present examples of simple and ultrafast macromolecular functionalization, polymer-polymer linking and polymer crosslinking under ambient conditions without the need for a catalyst. Moreover, when triazolinediones are combined with indole reaction partners, the reverse reaction can also be induced at elevated temperatures, and the triazolinedione reacted with a different reaction partner, reversibly or irreversibly dependent on its exact nature. We have used this ‘transclick’ reaction to introduce thermoreversible links into polyurethane and polymethacrylate materials, which allows dynamic polymer-network healing, reshaping and recycling.

  11. Dynamic sulfur chemistry as a key tool in the design of self-healing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roberto; Rekondo, Alaitz; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Alaitz; Casuso, Pablo; Dupin, Damien; Cabañero, Germán; Grande, Hans J.; Odriozola, Ibon

    2016-08-01

    The rich variety of reversible or dynamic covalent chemistries based on sulfur offers a unique opportunity for the design of self-healing polymer networks. The reversibility of such chemical bonds can be used to create soft systems which can self-mend at ambient conditions. Here we focus on the mechanism of three different dynamic sulfur chemistries which have been used for the development of self-healing elastomers and hydrogels: thiolate/nanoparticle exchange, aromatic disulfide exchange and gold(I)-thiolate/disulfide exchange.

  12. Advances in microwave-assisted combinatorial chemistry without polymer-supported reagents.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Palou, Rafael

    2006-08-01

    Combinatorial methodologies have dramatically changed the chemical research and discovery process, offering an unlimited source of new molecule entities to be screened for activity. The application of microwave irradiation in Combinatorial Chemistry and high-throughput synthesis has become increasingly popular. By taking advantage of this energy source, compound libraries for lead generation can be assembled in a fraction of time required by conventional thermal heating. This review focuses on the advances in developing synthetic methodologies in microwave without polymer-supported reagents suitable for combinatorial chemistry, including the advances in microwave-assisted fluorous synthesis technology.

  13. Bioinspired interface for nanobiodevices based on phospholipid polymer chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takai, Madoka

    2009-01-01

    This review paper describes novel biointerfaces for nanobiodevices. Biocompatible and non-biofouling surfaces are designed largely based on cell membrane structure, and the preparation and functioning of the bioinspired interface are evaluated and compared between living and artificial systems. A molecular assembly of polymers with a phospholipid polar group has been developed as the platform of the interface. At the surface, protein adsorption is effectively reduced and the subsequent bioreactions are suppressed. Through this platform, biomolecules with a high affinity to the specific molecules are introduced under mild conditions. The activity of the biomolecules is retained even after immobilization. This bioinspired interface is adapted to construct bionanodevices, that is, microfluidic chips and nanoparticles for capturing target molecules and cells. The interface functions well and has a very high efficiency for biorecognition. This bioinspired interface is a promising universal platform that integrates various fields of science and has useful applications. PMID:19324688

  14. Surface chemistry for molecular layer deposition of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers.

    PubMed

    George, Steven M; Yoon, Byunghoon; Dameron, Arrelaine A

    2009-04-21

    The fabrication of many devices in modern technology requires techniques for growing thin films. As devices miniaturize, manufacturers will need to control thin film growth at the atomic level. Because many devices have challenging morphologies, thin films must be able to coat conformally on structures with high aspect ratios. Techniques based on atomic layer deposition (ALD), a special type of chemical vapor deposition, allow for the growth of ultra-thin and conformal films of inorganic materials using sequential, self-limiting reactions. Molecular layer deposition (MLD) methods extend this strategy to include organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymeric materials. In this Account, we provide an overview of the surface chemistry for the MLD of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers and examine a variety of surface chemistry strategies for growing polymer thin films. Previously, surface chemistry for the MLD of organic polymers such as polyamides and polyimides has used two-step AB reaction cycles using homo-bifunctional reactants. However, these reagents can react twice and eliminate active sites on the growing polymer surface. To avoid this problem, we can employ alternative precursors for MLD based on hetero-bifunctional reactants and ring-opening reactions. We can also use surface activation or protected chemical functional groups. In addition, we can combine the reactants for ALD and MLD to grow hybrid organic-inorganic polymers that should display interesting properties. For example, using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and various diols as reactants, we can achieve the MLD of alucone organic-inorganic polymers. We can alter the chemical and physical properties of these organic-inorganic polymers by varying the organic constituent in the diol or blending the alucone MLD films with purely inorganic ALD films to build a nanocomposite or nanolaminate. The combination of ALD and MLD reactants enlarges the number of possible sequential self-limiting surface

  15. Ferritin-Polymer Conjugates: Grafting Chemistry and Integration into Nanoscale Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Y Hu; D Samanta; S Parelkar; S Hong; Q Wang; T Russell; T Emrick

    2011-12-31

    Controlled free radical polymerization chemistry is used to graft polymer chains to the corona of horse spleen ferritin (HSF) nanocages. Specifically, poly(methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC) and poly(PEG methacrylate) (polyPEGMA) chains are grafted onto the nanocages by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), in which the molecular weight of the polymer grafts is controlled by the monomer-to-initiator feed ratio. PolyMPC and polyPEGMA-grafted ferritin show a generally suppressed inclusion into diblock copolymer films relative to native ferritin, and the polymer coating is seen to mask the ferritin nanocages from antibody recognition. The solubility of polyPEGMA-coated ferritin in organic solvents enables its processing with polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers, and selective integration into the PEO domains of microphase-separated copolymer structures.

  16. Lipase-catalyzed polyester synthesis – A green polymer chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is a short comprehensive review describing in vitro polyester synthesis catalyzed by a hydrolysis enzyme of lipase, most of which has been developed for these two decades. Polyesters are prepared by repeated ester bond-formation reactions; they include two major modes, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers such as cyclic esters (lactones) and condensation polymerization via the reaction between a carboxylic acid or its ester group and an alcohol group. Polyester synthesis is, therefore, a reaction in reverse way of in vivo lipase catalysis of ester bond-cleavage with hydrolysis. The lipase-catalyzed polymerizations show very high chemo-, regio-, and enantio-selectivities and involve various advantageous characteristics. Lipase is robust and compatible with other chemical catalysts, which allows novel chemo-enzymatic processes. New syntheses of a variety of functional polyesters and a plausible reaction mechanism of lipase catalysis are mentioned. The polymerization characteristics are of green nature currently demanded for sustainable society, and hence, desirable for conducting ‘green polymer chemistry’. PMID:20431260

  17. Strategies Toward Well-Defined Polymer Nanoparticles Inspired by Nature: Chemistry versus Versatility

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles are promising delivery platforms for various biomedical applications. One of the main challenges toward the development of therapeutic nanoparticles is the premature disassembly and release of the encapsulated drug. Among the different strategies to enhance the kinetic stability of polymeric nanoparticles, shell- and core-crosslinking have been shown to provide robust character, while creating a suitable environment for encapsulation of a wide range of therapeutics, including hydrophilic, hydrophobic, metallic, and small and large biomolecules, with gating of their release as well. The versatility of shell- and core-crosslinked nanoparticles is driven from the ease by which the structures of the shell- and core-forming polymers and crosslinkers can be modified. In addition, postmodification with cell-recognition moieties, grafting of antibiofouling polymers, or chemical degradation of the core to yield nanocages allow the use of these robust nanostructures as “smart” nanocarriers. The building principles of these multifunctional nanoparticles borrow analogy from the synthesis, supramolecular assembly, stabilization, and dynamic activity of the naturally driven biological nanoparticles such as proteins, lipoproteins, and viruses. In this review, the chemistry involved during the buildup from small molecules to polymers to covalently stabilized nanoscopic objects is detailed, with contrast of the strategies of the supramolecular assembly of polymer building blocks followed by intramicellar stabilization into shell-, core-, or core–shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles versus polymerization of polymers into nanoscopic molecular brushes followed by further intramolecular covalent stabilization events. The rational design of shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles is then elaborated for therapeutic packaging and delivery, with emphasis on the polymer chemistry aspects to accomplish the synthesis of such nanoparticulate systems

  18. Physical Chemistry of High Polymers - Surface Properties of Interpenetrating Polymer Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    91 H L FRISCH OAA2977-4-0213 UNCLASSIFIED ARO 15191.3-C N PROPERTIES OF INTERPENETRATING POLYMER NETWORKSL FINAL REPORT., S~ "/ " H. L.,FRISCII i / " 0...15 ITr L S T;SifiCd 9SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Whein Data Emosted) References 1. H. L. Frisch, J. Cifaratti, R. Palma , R. Schwartz, R...Frisch, Annual Reviews of Materials Science (in press). 11. H. Ghiradella, J. Cifaretti, R. Palma and H. L. Frisch, J. Appl. Polymer Sci. 23, 1583

  19. Functionalized Polymers-Emerging Versatile Tools for Solution-Phase Chemistry and Automated Parallel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, Andreas; Monenschein, Holger; Wittenberg, Rüdiger

    2001-02-16

    As part of the dramatic changes associated with the need for preparing compound libraries in pharmaceutical and agrochemical research laboratories, industry searches for new technologies that allow for the automation of synthetic processes. Since the pioneering work by Merrifield polymeric supports have been identified to play a key role in this field however, polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis which utilizes immobilized reagents and catalysts has only recently begun to flourish. Polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis has various advantages over conventional solution-phase chemistry, such as the ease of separation of the supported species from a reaction mixture by filtration and washing, the opportunity to use an excess of the reagent to force the reaction to completion without causing workup problems, and the adaptability to continuous-flow processes. Various strategies for employing functionalized polymers stoichiometrically have been developed. Apart from reagents that are covalently or ionically attached to the polymeric backbone and which are released into solution in the presence of a suitable substrate, scavenger reagents play an increasingly important role in purifying reaction mixtures. Employing functionalized polymers in solution-phase synthesis has been shown to be extremely useful in automated parallel synthesis and multistep sequences. So far, compound libraries containing as many as 88 members have been generated by using several polymer-bound reagents one after another. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that complex natural products like the alkaloids (+/-)-oxomaritidine and (+/-)-epimaritidine can be prepared by a sequence of five and six consecutive polymer-assisted steps, respectively, and the potent analgesic compound (+/-)-epibatidine in twelve linear steps ten of which are based on functionalized polymers. These developments reveal the great future prospects of polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis.

  20. Hydrolases in Polymer Chemistry: Part III: Synthesis and Limited Surface Hydrolysis of Polyesters and Other Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guebitz, Georg M.

    Limited enzymatic surface hydrolysis of polyamides, polyethyleneterphthalates (PET) and polyacrylonitriles has been demonstrated to be a powerful and yet mild strategy for directly improving polymer surface properties (e.g., hydrophilicity) or activating materials for further processing. Recently, mechanistic details on enzymatic surface hydrolysis have become available, especially for the functionalisation of PET, which has been investigated in most detail. Generally, enzymes show a strong preference for amorphous regions of polymers. Consequently, during hydrolysis, the degree of crystallinity increases according to FTIR and DSC analysis. MALDI-TOF analysis has shown that PET hydrolases (i.e. cutinases and lipases) cleave the polymer endo-wise, in contrast to alkaline hydrolysis. As a result, an increase in the amount of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups has been found upon enzymatic hydrolysis, according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and various derivatisation and titration methods recently adapted for this purpose. These mechanistic data, combined with advances in structural and molecular biology, help to explain the considerably different activities of closely related enzymes (e.g. cutinases) on polymers.

  1. Green polymer chemistry: The role of Candida antarctica lipase B in polymer functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano Gil, Yenni Marcela

    The synthesis of functional polymers with well-defined structure, end-group fidelity and physico-chemical properties useful for biomedical applications has proven challenging. Chemo-enzymatic methods are an alternative strategy to increase the diversity of functional groups in polymeric materials. Specifically, enzyme-catalyzed polymer functionalization carried out under solventless conditions is a great advancement in the design of green processes for biomedical applications, where the toxicity of solvents and catalyst residues need to be considered. Enzymes offer several distinct advantages, including high efficiency, catalyst recyclability, and mild reaction conditions. This reseach aimed to precisely functionalized polymers using two methods: enzyme-catalyzed functionalization via polymerization and chemo-enzymatic functionalization of pre-made polymers for drug delivery. In the first method, well-defined poly(caprolactone)s were generated using alkyne-based initiating systems catalyzed by CALB. Propargyl alcohol and 4-dibenzocyclooctynol (DIBO) were shown to efficiently initiate the ring opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone under metal free conditions and yielded polymers with Mn ~4 to 24 KDa and relatively narrow molecular mass distribution. In the second methodology, we present quantitative enzyme-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and ethyl esters with poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG)s that will serve as building blocks for dendrimer synthesis, followed by introducing a new process for the exclusive gamma-conjugation of folic acid. Specifically, fluorescein-acrylate was enzymatically conjugated with PEG. Additionally, halo-ester functionalized PEGs were successfully prepared by the transesterification of alkyl halo-esters with PEGs. 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, SEC and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry confirmed the structure and purity of the products.

  2. Catechol chemistry inspired approach to construct self-cross-linked polymer nanolayers as versatile biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Deng, Jie; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Nie, Chuanxiong; He, Chao; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-12-16

    In this study, we proposed a catechol chemistry inspired approach to construct surface self-cross-linked polymer nanolayers for the design of versatile biointerfaces. Several representative biofunctional polymers, P(SS-co-AA), P(SBMA-co-AA), P(EGMA-co-AA), P(VP-co-AA), and P(MTAC-co-AA), were first synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and then the catecholic molecules (dopamine, DA) were conjugated to the acrylic acid (AA) units by the facile carbodiimide chemistry. Then, the catechol (Cat) group conjugated biofunctional polymers, named PSS-Cat, PSBMA-Cat, PEGMA-Cat, PVP-Cat, and PMTAC-Cat, were applied for the construction of self-cross-linked nanolayers on polymeric substrates via the pH induced catechol cross-linking and immobilization. The XPS spectra, surface morphology, and wettability gave robust evidence that the catechol conjugated polymers were successfully coated, and the coated substrates possessed increased surface roughness and hydrophilicity. Furthermore, the systematic in vitro investigation of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), cell viability, and antibacterial ability confirmed that the coated nanolayers conferred the substrates with versatile biological performances. The PSS-Cat coated substrate had low blood component activation and excellent anticoagulant activity; while the PEGMA-Cat and PSBMA-Cat showed ideal resistance to protein fouling and inhibition of platelet activation. The PSS-Cat and PVP-Cat coated substrates exhibited promoted endothelial cell proliferation and viability. The PMTAC-Cat coated substrate showed an outstanding activity on bacterial inhibition. In conclusion, the catechol chemistry inspired approach allows the self-cross-linked nanolayers to be easily immobilized on polymeric substrates with the stable conformation and multiple biofunctionalities. It is expected that this low-cost and facile

  3. Topological Polymer Chemistry Enters Surface Science: Linear versus Cyclic Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Morgese, Giulia; Trachsel, Lucca; Romio, Matteo; Divandari, Mohammad; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Benetti, Edmondo M

    2016-12-12

    The cyclic polymer topology strongly alters the interfacial, physico-chemical properties of polymer brushes, when compared to the linear counterparts. In this study, we especially concentrated on poly-2-ethyl-2-oxazoline (PEOXA) cyclic and linear grafts assembled on titanium oxide surfaces by the "grafting-to" technique. The smaller hydrodynamic radius of ring PEOXAs favors the formation of denser brushes with respect to linear analogs. Denser and more compact cyclic brushes generate a steric barrier that surpasses the typical entropic shield by a linear brush. This phenomenon, translates into an improved resistance towards biological contamination from different protein mixtures. Moreover, the enhancement of steric stabilization coupled to the intrinsic absence of chain ends by cyclic brushes, produce surfaces displaying a super-lubricating character when they are sheared against each other. All these topological effects pave the way for the application of cyclic brushes for surface functionalization, enabling the modulation of physico-chemical properties that could be just marginally tuned by applying linear grafts. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chemistry of porous coordination polymers having multimodal nanospace and their multimodal functionality.

    PubMed

    Seo, Joobeom; Sakamoto, Hirotoshi; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable advances in the recent development of porous coordination polymers (PCPs) or metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have paved the way toward functional chemistry having potential application such as molecular storage, separation, and catalysis. Moreover flexible PCPs, which are structurally transformable depending upon guest molecules adsorption/desorption, have received much attention because they provide unique properties, dissimilar to those of zeolites. PCPs can be categorized into structurally monomodal and multimodal classes. Monomodal PCPs possess single uniform pores in the framework. In contrast, multimodal PCPs have more than two types of pores in the framework. Interpenetrated PCPs can possess more than two types of pores with different sizes and shapes in the same framework depending on relative position of individual motifs, resulting in multimodal PCPs. Moreover, interpenetrated PCPs have several advantages, such as high thermal stability, flexibility, and ultramicropore for effective adsorption. In this review, chemistry of PCPs based on monomodal and multimodal PCPs are summarized and discussed.

  5. Polymer Chemistry: An Introduction,3rd Edition (by Malcolm P. Stevens)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Reviewed By Sonja

    2000-01-01

    This text is intended as an introductory text for a course in polymer chemistry for advanced undergraduates or graduate students, as well as an introduction to the field for industrial chemists. It is necessary to say this here even though this text is a third edition because these statements were not made in the review of the second edition (J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, A185). I would never use this volume as a text for any course, nor would I recommend it as a reference for an industrial chemist. I shall base my reasoning on Part I: Polymer Structure and Properties, pp 3-164, because it is closer to my areas of expertise than Parts II and III, which involve the synthesis and reactions of vinyl and nonvinyl polymers. It is unfortunate that a cursory glance at the table of contents of this book makes it look very appealing, especially since the third edition includes much on the newer synthetic methods, newer types of polymers like dendrimers and polyrotaxanes, and naturally occurring polymers. Furthermore, the first chapter, on basic principles, is quite good, except for a figure that purportedly shows the result of 100% reaction of an A-B monomer. The main problem with this text is fairly common among comprehensive texts written by a single author. No one can be an expert on a topic as vast as polymer chemistry, organic, analytical, and physical. Professor Stevens is an organic chemist and I think that his organic chemistry-based chapters are better than the ones that I shall critique here. I shall note just a few of the problems that I found with Part I as I read through it. Figure 2.1, which presumably shows the end-to-end distance and the radius of gyration of a flexible polymer molecule, shows something quite different from the radius of gyration. The description of vapor pressure osmometry is wrong; it is never an equilibrium measurement and thus never follows the equation given. Figure 2.9 is a diagram of an extremely old-fashioned if not obsolete gel

  6. Endothelial cell behavior on vascular prosthetic grafts: effect of polymer chemistry, surface structure, and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Sigot-Luizard, M F; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    When implanting any vascular prosthetic grafts, one important goal to ensure long-term patency is achieving complete endothelialization of the luminal surface, a process that has rarely been observed clinically in humans. Seeding vascular grafts with endothelial cells has been seen as an attractive approach but has not been clinically convincing. A determining factor may be the type of polymer and surface structure. Using organotypic culture assays, the present investigation studied the effect of different polymers, surface structures, and surface treatments on endothelial cell behavior. The materials tested were polyester (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyesterurethane (PESU), and polyetherurethane (PETU) grafts with different surface structures. The surface treatments on the PET grafts included impregnation with cross-linked albumin, collagen, and gelatin, and treatments with fluoropolymer and electrically conducting polypyrrole polymer. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets (smooth surface, plain wall) were used as controls. After incubation for 7 days at 37 degrees C, cell adhesion and migration on the different polymers and structures were as follows: woven and knitted PET (high porosity) > PTFE, PESU, PETU hydrophobic (low porosity) > PETU hydrophilic, LDPE, PDMS (no porosity). Cell density results showed no difference between polymers and porous structures and a higher cell density on smooth nonporous surfaces. Compared with the nonimpregnated PET structures, knitted PET treated with albumin, collagen, or gelatin showed slight decreases of cell adhesion. No differences in cell migration and density were reported between any of the PET grafts, except for one polyester graft with a different chemistry than Dacron, which exhibited greater cell migration and lower cell density. Polyester grafts with a fluoropolymer treatment showed lower cell adhesion and migration and higher cell density than the nontreated PET. Finally

  7. Chemistry of carbon polymer composite electrode - An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Skou, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Surface chemistry of the electrodes in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is of great importance for the cell performance. Many groups have reported that electrode preparation condition has a direct influence on the resulting electrode properties. In this work, the oxidation state of electrode components and the composites (catalyst ionomer mixtures) in various electrode structures were systematically studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Based on the spectra, when catalyst is physically mixed with Nafion ionomer, the resulting electrode surface chemistry is a combination of the two components. When the electrode is prepared with a lamination procedure, the ratio between fluorocarbon and graphitic carbon is decreased. Moreover, ether type oxide content is decreased although carbon oxide is slightly increased. This indicates structure change of the catalyst layer due to an interaction between the ionomer and the catalyst and possible polymer structural change during electrode fabrication. The surface of micro porous layer was found to be much more influenced by the lamination, especially when it is in contact with catalysts in the interphase. Higher amount of platinum oxide was observed in the electrode structures (catalyst ionomer mixture) compared to the catalyst powder. This also indicates a certain interaction between the functional groups in the polymer and platinum surface.

  8. Enabling organosilicon chemistries on inert polymer surfaces with a vapor-deposited silica layer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Ashurst, W R

    2009-10-06

    Given the large surface area-to-volume ratios commonly encountered in microfluidics applications, the ability to engineer the chemical properties of surfaces encountered in these applications is critically important. However, as various polymers are rapidly replacing glass and silicon as the chosen materials for microfluidics devices, the ability to easily modify the surface chemistry has been diminished by the relatively inert nature of some commonly employed polymer surfaces, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This paper describes the low-temperature, vapor-phase deposition of robust silica layers to PMMA, polystyrene, and PDMS surfaces, which enables the functionalization of these surfaces by standard organosilane chemistries. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the silica layers that form on these surfaces. Aqueous immersion experiments indicate that the silica layer has excellent stability in aqueous environments, which is a prerequisite for microfluidics applications, but for PMMA surfaces, low adhesion of the silica layer to the underlying substrate is problematic. For PDMS substrates, the presence of the silica layer helps to slow the process of hydrophobic recovery, which is an additional advantage.

  9. A review of electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry in polymer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hart-Smith, Gene

    2014-01-15

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based studies of synthetic polymers often characterise detected polymer components using mass data alone. However when mass-based characterisations are ambiguous, tandem MS (MS/MS) offers a means by which additional analytical information may be collected. This review provides a synopsis of two particularly promising methods of dissociating polymer ions during MS/MS: electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD, respectively). The article opens with a summary of the basic characteristics and operating principles of ECD and ETD, and relates these techniques to other methods of dissociating gas-phase ions, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID). Insights into ECD- and ETD-based MS/MS, gained from studies into proteins and peptides, are then discussed in relation to polymer chemistry. Finally, ECD- and ETD-based studies into various classes of polymer are summarised; for each polymer class, ECD- and ETD-derived data are compared to CID-derived data. These discussions identify ECD and ETD as powerful means by which unique and diagnostically useful polymer ion fragmentation data may be generated, and techniques worthy of increased utilisation by the polymer chemistry community.

  10. Robust, Uniform, and Highly Emissive Quantum Dot-Polymer Films and Patterns Using Thiol-Ene Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marcus J; Malak, Sidney T; Jung, Jaehan; Yoon, Young Jun; Lin, Chun Hao; Kim, Sunghan; Lee, Kyung Min; Ma, Ruilong; White, Timothy J; Bunning, Timothy J; Lin, Zhiqun; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2017-05-24

    This work demonstrates a facile and versatile method for generating low scattering cross-linked quantum dot (QD)-polymer composite films and patterned highly emissive structures with ultrahigh QD loading, minimal phase separation, and tunable mechanical properties. Uniform QD-polymer films are fabricated using thiol-ene chemistry, in which cross-linked polymer networks are rapidly produced in ambient conditions via fast UV polymerization in bulk to suppress QD aggregation. UV-controlled thiol-ene chemistry limits phase separation through producing highly QD loaded cross-linked composites with loadings above majority of those reported in the literature (<1%) and approaching 30%. As the QD loading is increased, the thiol and ene conversion decreases, resulting in nanocomposites with widely variable and tailorable mechanical properties as a function of UV irradiation time with an elastic modulus decreasing to 1 GPa being characteristic of reinforced elastomeric materials, in contrast to usually observed stiff and brittle materials under these loading conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the thiol-ene chemistry is compatible with soft-imprint lithography, making it possible to pattern highly loaded QD films while preserving the optical properties essential for high gain and low optical loss devices. The versatility of thiol-ene chemistry to produce high-dense QD-polymer films potentially makes it an important technique for polymer-based elastomeric optical metamaterials, where efficient light propagation is critical, like peculiar waveguides, sensors, and optical gain films.

  11. A rational route to SCM materials based on a 1-D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2011-07-07

    Thermal annealing of a discrete complex with terminal SeCN anions and monodentate coligands enforces the formation of a 1D cobalt selenocyanato coordination polymer that shows slow relaxation of the magnetization. Therefore, this approach offers a rational route to 1D materials that might show single chain magnetic behaviour.

  12. A history of HbA1c through Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gillery, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    HbA(1c) was discovered in the late 1960s and its use as marker of glycemic control has gradually increased over the course of the last four decades. Recognized as the gold standard of diabetic survey, this parameter was successfully implemented in clinical practice in the 1970s and 1980s and internationally standardized in the 1990s and 2000s. The use of standardized and well-controlled methods, with well-defined performance criteria, has recently opened new directions for HbA(1c) use in patient care, e.g., for diabetes diagnosis. Many reports devoted to HbA1c have been published in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) journal. This review reminds the major steps of HbA(1c) history, with a special emphasis on the contribution of CCLM in this field.

  13. Synthesis of new water-soluble metal-binding polymers: Combinatorial chemistry approach. 1997 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-06-01

    'The first objective of this research is to develop rapid discovery and optimization approaches to new water-soluble chelating polymers. A byproduct of the development approach will be the new, selective, and efficient metal-binding agents. The second objective is to evaluate the concept of using water and organic soluble polymers as new solid supports for combinatorial synthesis. The technology under development, Polymer Filtration (PF), is a technique to selectively remove or recover hazardous and valuable metal ions and radionuclides from various dilute aqueous streams. Not only can this technology be used to remediate contaminated soils and solid surfaces and treat aqueous wastes, it can also be incorporated into facilities as a pollution prevention and waste minimization technology. Polymer Filtration uses water-soluble metal-binding polymers to sequester metal ions in dilute solution. The water-soluble polymers have a sufficiently large molecular size that they can be separated and concentrated using commercial ultrafiltration technology. Water, small organic molecules, and unbound metals pass freely through the ultrafiltration membrane while concentrating the metal-binding polymer. The polymers can then be reused by changing the solution conditions to release the metal ions. The metal-ions are recovered in concentrated form for recycle or disposal using a diafiltration process. The water-soluble polymer can be recycled for further aqueous-stream processing. To advance Polymer Filtration technology to the selectivity levels required for DOE needs. fixture directions in Polymer Filtration must include rapid development, testing, and characterization of new metal-binding polymers. The development of new chelating molecules can be equated to the process of new drugs or new materials discovery. Thus, the authors want to build upon and adapt the combinatorial chemistry approaches developed for rapid molecule generation for the drug industry to the rapid

  14. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  15. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  16. Multiple Shape Memory Polymers Based on Laminates Formed from Thiol-Click Chemistry Based Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, M.; Wang, C.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation details the formation of polymer network trilayer laminates formed by thiol-X click chemistries, and their subsequent implementation and evaluation for quadruple shape memory behavior. Thiol-Michael addition and thiol-isocyanate-based crosslinking reactions were employed to fabricate each of the laminate’s layers with independent control of the chemistry and properties of each layer and outstanding interlayer adhesion and stability. The characteristic features of step-growth thiol-X reactions, such as excellent network uniformity and narrow thermal transitions as well as their stoichiometric nature, enabled fabrication of trilayer laminates with three distinctly different glass transition temperatures grouped within a narrow range of 100 °C. Through variations in the layer thicknesses, a step-wise modulus drop as a function of temperature was achieved. This behavior allowed multi-step programming and the demonstration and quantification of quadruple shape memory performance. As is critical for this performance, the interface connecting the layers was evaluated in stoichiometric as well as off-stoichiometric systems. It was shown that the laminated structures exhibit strong interfacial binding and hardly suffer any delamination during cyclic material testing and deformation. PMID:26234205

  17. Impact of small changes in particle surface chemistry for unentangled polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ranka, Moulik; Varkey, Nihal; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Zukoski, Charles F

    2015-02-28

    We report microstructural and rheological consequences of altering silica particle surface chemistry when the particles are suspended in unentangled polyethylene glycol with a molecular weight of 400. The particle surfaces are altered by reacting them with isobutyltrimethyoxysilane. Levels of silanization are chosen so that the particles remain dispersed in the polymer at all volume fractions studied. Our studies indicate that at the levels studied, silanization does not alter the hydrodynamic thickness of the absorbed polymer layer thickness. Rheological properties are not sensitive to levels of silanization up to particle volume fractions where the average particle separation h ∼ 6Rg (4.8 nm). At these volume fractions, composite microstructure undergoes changes associated with jamming of soft particles (decorrelations in the first peak of the particle structure factor and the onset of a non-diffusive mechanism that dominates particle density fluctuations at short times.) In the region of volume fractions where h/Rg < 6, the zero-shear rate viscosity of the composites is extremely sensitive to level of silanization with a decrease in the zero-shear rate viscosity by four orders of magnitude observed for the highest levels of silanization studied in comparison to the bare particles.

  18. Tuning filler shape, surface chemistry and ion content in nanofilled polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha V. N. R.

    We investigate how nanofiller surface chemistry and aspect ratio affect the performance of nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes. Polymer-based electrolytes are an attractive alternative to the organic electrolytes currently used in lithium ion batteries. We characterize acidic nanoparticle filled electrolytes and compare them to neutral particle-filled electrolytes previously measured in our lab. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements indicate that the highest increase in conductivity occurs at the eutectic composition (EO/Li=10) and is independent of filler surface chemistry. We measure PEO dynamics using quasi-elastic neutron scattering and do not observe any change in polymer dynamics with particle surface chemistry. When we examine the elastic incoherent structure factor associated with the rotational process, fillers are found to restrict the rotation of the highly conducting PEO6:LiClO4 tunnels. At the eutectic composition, these tunnels are stabilized at the filler surface even above PEO melting temperature. Marginal stability theory predicts formation of alternating layers of coexisting phases at the eutectic composition. We propose a new mechanism, via stabilization of alternating layers of PEO and highly conducting PEO 6:LiClO4 tunnels at the filler surface. When compared to spherical particles, more such structures would be stabilized at a filler surface with high aspect ratio. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutral gamma-Al2O3 nanowhiskers (2-4 nm in diameter and 200-400 nm in length) intensify the effect of neutral gamma-Al 2O3 nanoparticles. The diameters of the two fillers are similar, but the change in aspect ratio (1 to 100) improves conductivity by a factor of 5. This enhancement occurs at battery operation temperatures! Although the change in aspect ratio does not affect thermal transitions and segmental dynamics at optimal whisker loading, the rotation of PEO6 remnants is distinct at the eutectic composition. Because the mechanism by which

  19. Polymer surface chemistry: Surface mixtures, supported polyelectrolyte multilayers and heterogeneous chemical modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuvanartnuruks, Vipavee

    This dissertation is divided into three parts that summarize three discrete projects that are related only in their overall objective of using chemistry to rationally control polymer surface structure and properties. Each part involves polymer surface modification, but the three employ very different techniques to effect surface-chemical changes. The first part (Chapter 1) involves the preparation of surfaces containing controllable mixtures of two functionalities (alcohol/ester or hydrocarbon ester/fluorocarbon ester) from alcohol-functionalized poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PCTFE-OH) and the studies of their wetting behavior as a function of composition and structure. Contact angle analyses indicate that sequential and competitive esterifications yield mixed surfaces consisting of the two functional groups distributed randomly, while compositionally similar, patchy mixed surfaces can be prepared by partial hydrolysis/re-esterification under some specific conditions. Greater contact angle hysteresis was observed on the patchy surfaces. The second part (Chapter 2) describes the layer-by-layer deposition of cationic (polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH)) and anionic (polysodium styrenesulfonate (PSS)) polyelectrolytes onto the PCTFE-OH substrate. XPS and contact angle data indicate that the assembled layers are stratified even though the individual layers are extremely thin (0.3-4.1 A). This thickness depends both on the charge density of the first layer of PAH (controlled using pH) and the ionic strength of the PSS adsorption solution. The stoichiometry of the assembly process also varies with the ionic strength of the PSS adsorption solution. The third part (Chapter 3) involves the heterogeneous (gas-solid) chemical modification of poly(trifluoroethylene) (PFsb3E). Chlorination of PFsb3E is a surface-selective reaction and the extent of chlorination can be controlled by time and light intensity. The fluorination of PFsb3E carried out using 5% Fsb2/Nsb2 yields

  20. Zwitterionic polymer functionalization of polysulfone membrane with improved antifouling property and blood compatibility by combination of ATRP and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Lu, Ting; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Sun, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The chemical compositions are very important for designing blood-contacting membranes with good antifouling property and blood compatibility. In this study, we propose a method combining ATRP and click chemistry to introduce zwitterionic polymer of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA), negatively charged polymers of poly(sodium methacrylate) (PNaMAA) and/or poly(sodium p-styrene sulfonate) (PNaSS), to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of polysulfone (PSf) membranes. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results confirmed the successful grafting of the functional polymers. The antifouling property and blood compatibility of the modified membranes were systematically investigated. The zwitterionic polymer (PSBMA) grafted membranes showed good resistance to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion; the negatively charged polymer (PNaSS or PNaMAA) grafted membranes showed improved blood compatibility, especially the anticoagulant property. Moreover, the PSBMA/PNaMAA modified membrane showed both antifouling property and anticoagulant property, and exhibited a synergistic effect in inhibiting blood coagulation. The functionalization of membrane surfaces by a combination of ATRP and click chemistry is demonstrated as an effective route to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of membranes in blood-contact. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma Processes and Polymers: 16th International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry Taormina, Italy June 22-27, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Riccardo; Favia, Pietro; Oehr, Christian; Wertheimer, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    This volume compiles essential contributions to the most innovative fields of Plasma Processes and Polymers. High-quality contributions cover the fields of plasma deposition, plasma treatment of polymers and other organic compounds, plasma processes under partial vacuum and at atmospheric pressure, biomedical, textile, automotive, and optical applications as well as surface treatment of bulk materials, clusters, particles and powders. This unique collection of refereed papers is based on the best contributions presented at the 16th International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry in Taormina, Italy (ISPC-16, June 2003). A high class reference of relevance to a large audience in plasma community as well as in the area of its industrial applications.

  2. The effect of polymer backbone chemistry on the induction of the accelerated blood clearance in polymer modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kierstead, Paul H; Okochi, Hideaki; Venditto, Vincent J; Chuong, Tracy C; Kivimae, Saul; Fréchet, Jean M J; Szoka, Francis C

    2015-09-10

    A variety of water-soluble polymers, when attached to a liposome, substantially increase liposome circulation half-life in animals. However, in certain conditions, liposomes modified with the most widely used polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), induce an IgM response resulting in an accelerated blood clearance (ABC) of the liposome upon the second injection. Modification of liposomes with other water-soluble polymers: HPMA (poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide]), PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)), PMOX (poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)), PDMA (poly(N,N-dimethyl acrylamide)), and PAcM (poly(N-acryloyl morpholine)), increases circulation times of liposomes; but a precise comparison of their ability to promote long circulation or induce the ABC effect has not been reported. To obtain a more nuanced understanding of the role of polymer structure/MW to promote long circulation, we synthesized a library of polymer diacyl chain lipids with low polydispersity (1.04-1.09), similar polymer molecular weights (2.1-2.5kDa) and incorporated them into 100nm liposomes of a narrow polydispersity (0.25-1.3) composed of polymer-lipid/hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/diD: 5.0/54.5/40/0.5. We confirm that HPMA, PVP, PMOX, PDMA and PAcM modified liposome have increased circulation times in rodents and that PVP, PDMA, and PAcM do not induce the ABC effect. We demonstrate for the first time, that HPMA does not cause an ABC effect whereas PMOX induces a pronounced ABC effect in rats. We find that a single dose of liposomes coated with PEG and PMOX generates an IgM response in rats towards the respective polymer. Finally, in this homologous polymer series, we observe a positive correlation (R=0.84 in rats, R=0.92 in mice) between the circulation time of polymer-modified liposomes and polymer viscosity; PEG and PMOX, the polymers that can initiate an ABC response were the two most viscous polymers. Our findings suggest that polymers that do not cause an ABC effect such as, HPMA or

  3. New chemistry for the placement of chromium(III)/polymer gels in high-temperature reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, T.P.; Albonico, P.

    1994-11-01

    Coordination chemistry concepts have been used in the development of Cr[sup +3]/polymer solutions that meet the delayed-gelation requirements for in-depth treatment of high-temperature reservoirs. Use of the malonate complex of Cr[sup +3], Cr(malonate)[sub 3], provides gelation delays at elevated temperature much greater than those obtained with either the hydrated Cr[sup +3] ion or Cr(acetate)[sub 3]. Inclusion of additional, uncomplexed malonate ions in the formulations provides a means for further, and predictable, extension of the gelation time. The gelation delays obtained over the temperature range of 90 to 135 C are equal to or greater than those that can be achieved with the best gelation delay technologies described previously. The dependence of the gelation time on temperature, pH, and the Cr[sup +3] and malonate ion concentrations has been investigated. Preliminary results indicate that the thermal decomposition of the delaying ligand, malonate, plays an important role in determining the gelation rate. The use of a Cr[sup +3] complex of relatively low toxicity rather than the carcinogenic Cr[sup +6] ion to control gelation rate is an attractive feature of the new technology.

  4. Coordination chemistry of mercury(ii) with 2-pyridylnitrones: monomers to polymers.

    PubMed

    Azizpoor Fard, Mahmood; Behnia, Ava; Puddephatt, Richard J

    2017-03-14

    The coordination chemistry of mercury(ii) halides, HgX2, X = Cl, Br, I, with N-methyl-α-(2-pyridyl)nitrone, L1, and N-t-butyl-α-(2-pyridyl)nitrone, L2, is reported. The structures of 1 : 1 complexes [HgX2L], X = Cl, L = L1; X = Br, L = L2, 2 : 1 complexes [(HgX2)2L], X = Br or I, L = L1; X = Cl or I, L = L2, and a unique compound [(HgBr2)5(L2)3] have been determined. In the 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes, the ligand L1 adopts the anti conformation, and is either monodentate or bridging, while the ligand L2 adopts the syn conformation and acts as a chelate ligand. In the compound [(HgBr2)5(L2)3] the ligand L2 is present in both syn-chelate and anti-bridging bonding modes. Secondary intermolecular bonding, involving OHg or XHg interactions, can lead to association of the molecular compounds to form polymers of several kinds. In solution, the complexes are labile and the crystalline products do not necessarily reflect the reaction stoichiometry.

  5. Glycoconjugated amphiphilic polymers via click-chemistry for the encapsulation of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Christian; Kreuziger, Anna-Marlena; Alpers, Dirk; Jacobsen, Anna; Leshch, Yevgeniy; Eggers, Robin; Kloust, Hauke; Tran, Huong; Ostermann, Johannes; Schotten, Theo; Thiem, Joachim; Thimm, Julian; Weller, Horst

    2013-10-08

    Herein, we present a strategy for the glycoconjugation of nanoparticles (NPs), with a special focus on fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), recently described by us as "preassembly" approach. Therein, prior to the encapsulation of diverse nanoparticles by an amphiphilic poly(isoprene)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymer (PI-b-PEG), the terminal PEG appendage was modified by covalently attaching a carbohydrate moiety using Huisgen-type click-chemistry. Successful functionalization was proven by NMR spectroscopy. The terminally glycoconjugated polymers were subsequently used for the encapsulation of QDs in a phase transfer process, which fully preserved fluorescence properties. Binding of these nanoconstructs to the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) was studied via surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Depending on the carbohydrate moiety, namely, D-manno-heptulose, D-glucose, D-galactose, 2-deoxy-2-{[methylamino)carbonyl]amino}-D-glucopyranose ("des(nitroso)-streptozotocin"), or D-maltose, the glycoconjugated QDs showed enhanced affinity constants due to multivalent binding effects. None of the constructs showed toxicity from 0.001 to 1 μM (particle concentration) using standard WST and LDH assays on A549 cells.

  6. From polymer to small organic molecules: a tight relationship between radical chemistry and solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Danilo; Pulici, Maurizio

    2011-04-18

    Since Gomberg's discovery of radicals as chemical entities, the interest around them has increased through the years. Nowadays, radical chemistry is used in the synthesis of 75% of all polymers, inevitably establishing a close relationship with Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis. More recently, the interest of organic chemists has shifted towards the application of usual "in-solution" radical chemistry to the solid-phase, ranging from the use of supported reagents for radical reactions, to the development of methodologies for the synthesis of small molecules or potential libraries. The aim of this review is to put in perspective radical chemistry, moving it away from its origin as a synthetic means for solid supports, to becoming a useful tool for the synthesis of small molecules.

  7. Controlled structures of a 1D chiral metallosalen polymer by photo- and solvent-induced partial depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaobing; Dong, Taiwei; Li, Gao; Cui, Yong

    2011-04-07

    A 1D chiral metallosalen polymer with free pyridine groups is self-assembled and its molecular weight, conformation, architecture and optical property are controlled by depolymerization through sunlight irradiation or alcohol inclusions.

  8. Chain Gang--The Chemistry of Polymers. Hands-on Science Activities for Grades 4-12. Science in Our World, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, Mickey, Ed.

    This monograph focuses on the chemistry of polymers and enables teachers to introduce their students to the concepts and processes of industrial chemistry and relate these concepts to the consumer products students encounter daily. This teacher resource module is organized into sections that provide information on how to use the resource module,…

  9. University-School Partnerships: Polymer Chemistry Days Run at a University for 14-15 Year Olds and Their Impact on Attitudes to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, A. J.; Harrison, T. G.; Medley, M. I.; Sellou, L.; Shallcross, K. L.; Croker, S. J.; Williams, S. J.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer Chemistry days run by Bristol ChemLabS at the School of Chemistry, University of Bristol for year 10 (14-15 year olds) school students are described. Pre and post questionnaires were analysed to determine the impact on attitudes to science. There was no change in attitudes to the importance of science or practical work in science, but…

  10. Chain Gang--The Chemistry of Polymers. Hands-on Science Activities for Grades 4-12. Science in Our World, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, Mickey, Ed.

    This monograph focuses on the chemistry of polymers and enables teachers to introduce their students to the concepts and processes of industrial chemistry and relate these concepts to the consumer products students encounter daily. This teacher resource module is organized into sections that provide information on how to use the resource module,…

  11. CuAAC-Based Click Chemistry in Self-Healing Polymers.

    PubMed

    Döhler, Diana; Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2017-09-11

    Click chemistry has emerged as a significant tool for materials science, organic chemistry, and bioscience. Based on the initial concept of Barry Sharpless in 2001, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has triggered a plethora of chemical concepts for linking molecules and building blocks under ambient conditions, forming the basis for applications in autonomous cross-linking materials. Self-healing systems on the other hand are often based on mild cross-linking chemistries that are able to react either autonomously or upon an external trigger. In the ideal case, self-healing takes place efficiently at low temperatures, independent of the substrate(s) used, by forming strong and stable networks, binding to the newly generated (cracked) interfaces to restore the original material properties. The use of the CuAAC in self-healing systems, most of all the careful design of copper-based catalysts linked to additives as well as the chemical diversity of substrates, has led to an enormous potential of applications of this singular reaction. The implementation of click-based strategies in self-healing systems therefore is highly attractive, as here chemical (and physical) concepts of molecular reactivity, molecular design, and even metal catalysis are connected to aspects of materials science. In this Account, we will show how CuAAC reactions of multivalent components can be used as a tool for self-healing materials, achieving cross-linking at low temperatures (exploiting concepts of autocatalysis or internal chelation within the bulk CuAAC and systematic optimization of the efficiency of the used Cu(I) catalysts). Encapsulation strategies to separate the click components by micro- and nanoencapsulation are required in this context. Consequently, the examples reported here describe chemical concepts to realize more efficient and faster click reactions in self-healing polymeric materials. Thus, enhanced chain diffusion in (hyper

  12. Self-Restoration of Superhydrophobicity on Shape Memory Polymer Arrays with Both Crushed Microstructure and Damaged Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tong; Cheng, Zhongjun; Zhang, Enshuang; Kang, Hongjun; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Recently, self-healing superhydrophobic surfaces have become a new research focus due to their recoverable wetting performances and wide applications. However, until now, on almost all reported surfaces, only one factor (surface chemistry or microstructure) can be restored. In this paper, a new superhydrophobic surface with self-healing ability in both crushed microstructure and damaged surface chemistry is prepared by creating lotus-leaves-like microstructure on the epoxy shape memory polymer (SMP). Through a simple heating process, the crushed surface microstructure, the damaged surface chemistry, and the surface superhydrophobicity that are destroyed under the external pressure and/or O2 plasma action can be recovered, demonstrating that the obtained superhydrophobic surface has a good self-healing ability in both of the two factors that govern the surface wettability. The special self-healing ability is ascribed to the good shape memory effect of the polymer and the reorganization effect of surface molecules. This paper reports the first use of SMP material to demonstrate the self-healing ability of surface superhydrophobicity, which opens up some new perspectives in designing self-healing superhydrophobic surfaces. Given the properties of this surface, it could be used in many applications, such as self-cleaning coatings, microfluidic devices, and biodetection.

  13. The diverse chemistry of cytochrome P450 17A1 (P450c17, CYP17A1)

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Francis K.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The steroid hydroxylation and carbon-carbon bond cleavage activities of cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) are responsible for the production of glucocorticoids and androgens, respectively. The inhibition of androgen synthesis is an important strategy to treat androgen-dependent prostate cancer. We discuss the different enzymatic activities towards the various substrates of CYP17A1, demonstrating its promiscuity. Additionally, a novel interhelical interaction is proposed between the F-G loop and the B′-helix to explain the 16α-hydroxylase activity of human CYP17A1 with progesterone as the substrate. The techniques used by biochemists to study this important enzyme are also summarized. PMID:25482340

  14. Numerical study of the directed polymer in a 1 + 3 dimensional random medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, C.; Garel, T.

    2006-09-01

    The directed polymer in a 1+3 dimensional random medium is known to present a disorder-induced phase transition. For a polymer of length L, the high temperature phase is characterized by a diffusive behavior for the end-point displacement R2 ˜L and by free-energy fluctuations of order ΔF(L) ˜O(1). The low-temperature phase is characterized by an anomalous wandering exponent R2/L ˜Lω and by free-energy fluctuations of order ΔF(L) ˜Lω where ω˜0.18. In this paper, we first study the scaling behavior of various properties to localize the critical temperature Tc. Our results concerning R2/L and ΔF(L) point towards 0.76 < Tc ≤T2=0.79, so our conclusion is that Tc is equal or very close to the upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and coworkers (T2 corresponds to the temperature above which the ratio bar{Z_L^2}/(bar{Z_L})^2 remains finite as L ↦ ∞). We then present histograms for the free-energy, energy and entropy over disorder samples. For T ≫Tc, the free-energy distribution is found to be Gaussian. For T ≪Tc, the free-energy distribution coincides with the ground state energy distribution, in agreement with the zero-temperature fixed point picture. Moreover the entropy fluctuations are of order ΔS ˜L1/2 and follow a Gaussian distribution, in agreement with the droplet predictions, where the free-energy term ΔF ˜Lω is a near cancellation of energy and entropy contributions of order L1/2.

  15. Quinoxaline polymers and copolymers derived from 1,4-bis(1'-naphthalenyloxalyl)benzene and their graphite composites. [polymer chemistry and polymer physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Port, W. S.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed with new polyquinoxalines and their graphite composites. Four polymers were synthesized, and then were characterized with respect to their inherent viscosity, elemental chemical analysis, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties. Structural formulas of the polymers and their precursors are given; methods of synthesis are described; and specifically examined was the preparation of polymers from 3,3' diamino-benzidine from 1,4- and 1,3- bis ((1'-napthalenyl) oxalyl) benzene respectively. Also considered was the preparation of polyquinoxalines from poly (p-benzil), and 1,2- aryldiamines.

  16. Rational design of D-A1-D-A2 conjugated polymers with superior spectral coverage.

    PubMed

    Hedström, Svante; Tao, Qiang; Wang, Ergang; Persson, Petter

    2015-10-28

    The spectral coverage of a light-harvesting polymer largely determines the maximum achievable photocurrent in organic photovoltaics, and therefore constitutes a crucial parameter for improving their performance. The D-A1-D-A2 copolymer motif is a new and promising design strategy for extending the absorption range by incorporating two acceptor units with complementary photoresponses. The fundamental factors that promote an extended absorption are here determined for three prototype D-A1-D-A2 systems through a combination of experimental and computational methods. Systematic quantum chemical calculations are then used to reveal the intrinsic optical properties of ten further D-A1-D-A2 polymer candidates. These investigated polymers are all predicted to exhibit intense primary absorption peaks at 615-954 nm, corresponding to charge-transfer (CT) transitions to the stronger acceptor, as well as secondary absorption features at 444-647 nm that originate from CT transitions to the weaker acceptors. Realization of D-A1-D-A2 polymers with superior spectral coverage is thereby found to depend critically on the spatial and energetic separation between the two distinct acceptor LUMOs. Two promising D-A1-D-A2 copolymer candidates were finally selected for further theoretical and experimental study, and demonstrate superior light-harvesting properties in terms of significantly extended spectral coverage. This demonstrates great potential for enhanced light-harvesting in D-A1-D-A2 polymers via multiple absorption features compared to traditional D-A polymers.

  17. Polymer Chemistry. An Activity-Oriented Instructional Module. Volume 1. Bulletin 1840.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Aline; And Others

    This teaching module was developed by the project "Recent Developments in Science and Technology with Applications for Secondary Science Teaching." Premises about students and their learning and generalizations about content are described. Chapters included are: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Monomers into Polymers"; (3) "Natural Polymers"; (4)…

  18. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  19. The chemistry and applications of antimicrobial polymers: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Kenawy, El-Refaie; Worley, S D; Broughton, Roy

    2007-05-01

    Microbial infection remains one of the most serious complications in several areas, particularly in medical devices, drugs, health care and hygienic applications, water purification systems, hospital and dental surgery equipment, textiles, food packaging, and food storage. Antimicrobials gain interest from both academic research and industry due to their potential to provide quality and safety benefits to many materials. However, low molecular weight antimicrobial agents suffer from many disadvantages, such as toxicity to the environment and short-term antimicrobial ability. To overcome problems associated with the low molecular weight antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial functional groups can be introduced into polymer molecules. The use of antimicrobial polymers offers promise for enhancing the efficacy of some existing antimicrobial agents and minimizing the environmental problems accompanying conventional antimicrobial agents by reducing the residual toxicity of the agents, increasing their efficiency and selectivity, and prolonging the lifetime of the antimicrobial agents. Research concerning the development of antimicrobial polymers represents a great a challenge for both the academic world and industry. This article reviews the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers primarily since the last comprehensive review by one of the authors in 1996. In particular, it discusses the requirements of antimicrobial polymers, factors affecting the antimicrobial activities, methods of synthesizing antimicrobial polymers, major fields of applications, and future and perspectives in the field of antimicrobial polymers.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable peptide-based polymers prepared by microwave-assisted click chemistry.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Maarten; Nollet, Maria L; Weijers, Pascal; Dechesne, Annemarie C; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction was used to synthesize peptide triazole-based polymers from two novel peptide-based monomers: azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (1) and azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-glycolyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (2). The selected monomers have sites for enzymatic degradation as well as for chemical hydrolysis to render the resulting polymer biodegradable. Depending on the monomer concentration in DMF, the molecular mass of the polymers could be tailored between 4.5 and 13.9 kDa (corresponding with 33-100 amino acid residues per polymer chain). As anticipated, both polymers can be enzymatically degraded by trypsin and chymotrypsin, whereas the ester bond in the polymer of 2 undergoes chemical hydrolysis under physiological conditions, as was shown by a ninhydrin-based colorimetric assay and MALDI-TOF analysis. In conclusion, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction is an effective tool for synthesizing biodegradable peptide polymers, and it opens up new approaches toward the synthesis of (novel) designed biomedical materials.

  1. Polymer-Derived Boron Nitride: A Review on the Chemistry, Shaping and Ceramic Conversion of Borazine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Samuel; Miele, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a III-V compound which is the focus of important research since its discovery in the early 19th century. BN is electronic to carbon and thus, in the same way that carbon exists as graphite, BN exists in the hexagonal phase. The latter offers an unusual combination of properties that cannot be found in any other ceramics. However, these properties closely depend on the synthesis processes. This review states the recent developments in the preparation of BN through the chemistry, shaping and ceramic conversion of borazine derivatives. This concept denoted as Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route allows tailoring the chemistry of precursors to elaborate complex BN shapes which cannot be obtained by conventional process. The effect of the chemistry of the molecular precursors, i.e., borazine and trichloroborazine, and their polymeric derivatives i.e., polyborazylene and poly[tri(methylamino)borazine], in which the specific functional groups and structural motifs determine the shaping potential by conventional liquid-phase process and plastic-forming techniques is discussed. Nanotubes, nano-fibers, coatings, monoliths and fiber-reinforced matrix composites are especially described. This leads to materials which are of significant engineering interest. PMID:28788257

  2. Synthesis of Zwitterionic Polymer Particles via Combined Distillation Precipitation Polymerization and Click Chemistry for Highly Efficient Enrichment of Glycopeptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Shao, Wenya; Li, Senwu; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Shen; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-08-31

    Because of the low abundance of glycopeptide in natural biological samples, methods for efficient and selective enrichment of glycopeptides play a significant role in mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics. In this study, a novel kind of zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography polymer particles, namely, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@l-Cys (poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys), for the enrichment of glycopeptides was synthesized by a facile and efficient approach that combined distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and "thiol-ene" click reaction. In the DPP approach, residual vinyl groups explored outside the core with high density, then the functional ligand cysteine was immobilized onto the surface of core particles by highly efficient thiol-ene click reaction. Taking advantage of the unique structure of poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys, the resulting particles possess remarkable enrichment selectivity for glycopeptides from the tryptic digested human immunoglobulin G. The polymer particles were successfully employed for the analysis of human plasma, and 208 unique glycopeptides corresponding to 121 glycoproteins were reliably identified in triple independent nano-LC-MS/MS runs. The selectivity toward glycopeptides of these particles poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys is ∼2 times than that of the commercial beads. These results demonstrated that these particles had great potential for large-scale glycoproteomics research. Moreover, the strategy with the combination of DPP and thiol-ene click chemistry might be a facile method to produce functional polymer particles for bioenrichment application.

  3. Dynamic Covalent Polymer Networks: from Old Chemistry to Modern Day Innovations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weike; Dong, Jiante; Luo, Yingwu; Zhao, Qian; Xie, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic covalent polymer networks have long been recognized. With the initial focus on the unintended impact of dynamic covalent linkages on the viscoelasticity of commercial rubbers, efforts in modern times have transitioned into designing dynamic covalent polymer networks with unique adaptive properties. Whereas self-healing and thermoset reprocessing have been the primary motivations for studying dynamic covalent polymer networks, the recent discovery of the vitrimeric rheological behavior and solid-state plasticity for this type of material have opened up new opportunities in material innovations. This, coupled with the revelation of the dynamic characteristics of commercially relevant polymer building blocks such as esters and urethanes, suggests a promising future for this class of materials.

  4. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  5. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  6. Cholesterol modification of (Bio)polymers using UV-Vis traceable chemistry in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kasper F; Smith, Anton A A; Ruiz-Sanchis, Pau; Edlund, Katrine; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol modification of synthetic and biological polymers is achieved using of thiocholesterol (TC) and thiol-disulfide exchange. TC is reacted with Ellman's reagent to produce a mixed disulfide (TC-ER) which is activated towards thiol-disulfide exchange. TC-ER is used to obtain an inclusion complex with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which is then employed to achieve cholesterol functionalization of a model peptide, synthetic polymers, and physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol). It is anticipated that the established techniques will significantly broaden the use of cholesterol in bio- and nanotechnology and specifically biomedicine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Synthesis and applications of biomedical and pharmaceutical polymers via click chemistry methodologies.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Maarten; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the synthesis and application of biomedical and pharmaceutical polymers synthesized via the copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition, the thiol-ene reaction, or a combination of both click reactions are discussed. Since the introduction of both "click" methods, numerous articles have disclosed new approaches for the synthesis of polymers with different architectures, e.g., block and graft copolymers, dendrimers, and hydrogels, for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. By describing selected examples, an overview is given of the possibilities and limitations that these two "click" methods may offer.

  8. Dynamic Iminoboronate-Based Boroxine Chemistry for the Design of Ambient Humidity-Sensitive Self-Healing Polymers.

    PubMed

    Delpierre, Sébastien; Willocq, Bertrand; De Winter, Julien; Dubois, Philippe; Gerbaux, Pascal; Raquez, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-17

    Developing intrinsic self-healing polymeric materials is of great interest nowadays to extend material lifetime and/or prevent the replacement of damaged pieces. Spontaneously humidity-sensitive healable polymer network built around dynamic covalent B-O bonds was templated by using iminoboronate-based boroxine derivatives. Taking advantage of the dynamic boroxine/boronic acid equilibrium and iminoboronate chemistry, it is possible to construct polymeric materials able to self-heal without requiring any energy-demanding external activation. Interestingly, this novel family of iminoboronate adduct-based materials can be readily produced by a relatively simple and straightforward synthesis between boronic acid and diamine-based compounds, paving the way to coatings that are self-healable at ambient humidity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Exfoliation of Layered Magnesium Aluminum Silicate Platelets in Polymer Hosts Enabled by Cation Chemistry and Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    Preprints. 14. ABSTRACT Montmorillonite -smectite clay consists of anisotropic clay platelets, generally a nanometer in thickness by hundreds of...Cation Chemistry and Temperature GregO!)’ R. Yandek, Palrick N. RUlh. Joseph M. Mabry Montmorillonite -smedite clay consists 01 anisotropic clay

  10. The Chemistry of Polymers, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids: A Short Course on Macromolecules for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulav, Ilan; Samuel, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a unit on macromolecules that has been used in the 12th grade of many Israeli secondary schools. Topic areas in the unit include synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, and nucleic acids. A unit outline is provided in an appendix. (JN)

  11. New Twists and Turns for Actinide Chemistry: Organometallic Infinite Coordination Polymers of Thorium Diazide.

    PubMed

    Monreal, Marisa J; Seaman, Lani A; Goff, George S; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Morris, David E; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2016-03-07

    Two organometallic 1D infinite coordination polymers and two organometallic monometallic complexes of thorium diazide have been synthesized and characterized. Steric control of these self-assembled arrays, which are dense in thorium and nitrogen, has also been demonstrated: infinite chains can be circumvented by using steric bulk either at the metallocene or with a donor ligand in the wedge.

  12. Cross-linking carbon nanotubes by glycidyl azide polymer via click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong; Du, Liang; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Functionalization and cross linking of carbon nanotubes was necessary to fabricate nanotube composites with good interfacial properties and mechanical performance. Glycidyl azide polymer was used as cross-linker of carbon nanotubes via a simple clickable one step reaction initiated by decomposition of azide groups. Both heating and UV irradiation were used to carry out the reaction. FTIR and Raman spectra confirmed the decomposition of azide groups and the anchoring of glycidyl azide polymer onto the surface of carbon nanotubes. Thermal gravity analysis showed that the polymer anchored onto carbon nanotubes was about 10% of the total mass in the solid product, but the efficiency of the reaction was low. The result of tensile test using bulky paper infiltrated with 10% GAP showed that cross linking could bring forth a higher strength, about 4 times higher than the not cross linked. The success of cross linking carbon nanotubes by glycidyl azide polymer paves a new way to fabrication of ultra strong carbon nanotube composites.

  13. The Chemistry of Polymers, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids: A Short Course on Macromolecules for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulav, Ilan; Samuel, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a unit on macromolecules that has been used in the 12th grade of many Israeli secondary schools. Topic areas in the unit include synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, and nucleic acids. A unit outline is provided in an appendix. (JN)

  14. New Type of Metallo-Organic Polymer: Bimetalloporphyrins. Investigating a New Chemistry of Metallophthalocyanines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    this complex is known to play an important role in the electrochromic 7 properties. Although an obvious distortion from macrocyclic planarity (13...Ii necosoary and identify by block number) Metallo-organic polymer, Bimetalloporphyrins, Metallophthalocyanines Sitting atop complex ,- [meso...tetraphenylporphinatolbis [tricarbonylrhenium(l) ], monoca- S tion octaethyl(porphiyrin tri-u- halogeno-hexacronyl-dirhenate(I), Skewered complex , radical

  15. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  16. Merging organic and polymer chemistries to create glycomaterials for glycomics applications.

    PubMed

    Coullerez, Géraldine; Seeberger, Peter H; Textor, Marcus

    2006-08-07

    [Image: see text] Oligosaccharides at cell surfaces are known to play a critical role in many biological processes such as biorecognition, interactions between cells and with artificial surfaces, immune response, infection and inflammation. In order to facilitate studies of the role of sugars, an increasing number of novel tools are becoming available. New synthetic strategies now provide much more efficient access to complex carbohydrates or glycoconjugates. Branched carbohydrates and hybrids of carbohydrates conjugated to polymers have been prepared using solution and/or solid-phase synthesis and advanced methods of polymerization. These materials are essential for the development of methodologies to study and map the molecular structure-function relationship at interfaces. This article highlights recent advances in the synthesis of carbohydrates and polymer hybrids mimicking the properties and functionalities of the natural oligosaccharides, as well as selected applications in biology, biotechnology and diagnostics.

  17. Study of improved resins for advanced supersonic technology composites. Part 1: Heteroaromatic polymers containing ether groups. Part 2: Curing chemistry of aromatic polymers and composite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takekoshi, T.; Hillig, W. B.; Mellinger, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Fourteen ether-containing, aromatic dianhydrides have been synthesized from N-phenyl-3 or 4-nitrophthalimide and various bisphenols. The process involves nucleophilic displacement of activated nitro groups with bisphenolate ions. Ether-containing dianhydrides were indefinitely stable in the presence of atmospheric moisture. One-step, high temperature solution polymerization of the ether-containing dianhydrides with m-phenylene diamine, 4,4'-oxydianiline and 1, 3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene afforded 42 polyetherimides. The polyetherimides were all soluble in m-cresol except two which were found to be crystalline. The glass transition temperatures of the polyetherimides ranged from 178 to 277 C. Soluble polybenzimidazopyrrolones containing ether groups were also prepared from the same ether-containing dianhydrides and aromatic tetraamines by one-step solution polymerization. Using low molecular weight polyetherimides, various thermoset resin systems were developed and tested as matrices for fiber-reinforced composites. The curing chemistry involving reaction of the phthalonitrile group and the o-diaminophenyl group was found to be generally applicable to crosslinking various aromatic polymers other than polyimides.

  18. The immobilization of proteins on biodegradable polymer fibers via click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Quan; Chen, Xuesi; Lu, Tiancheng; Jing, Xiabin

    2008-03-01

    A facile and efficient method to immobilize bioactive proteins onto polymeric substrate was established. Testis-specific protease 50 (TSP50) was immobilized on ultrafine biodegradable polymer fibers, i.e., (1) to prepare a propargyl-containing polymer P(LA90-co-MPC10) by introducing propargyl group into a cyclic carbonate monomer (5-methyl-5-propargyloxycarbonyl-1,3-dioxan-2-one, MPC) and copolymerizing it with l-lactide; (2) to electrospin the functionalized polymer into ultrafine fibers; (3) to azidize the TSP50, and (4) to perform the click reaction between the propargyl groups on the fibers and the azido groups on the protein. The TSP50-immobilized fibers can resist non-specific protein adsorptions but preserve specific recognition and combination with anti-TSP50. ELISA tests were carried out by using HRP-goat-anti-mouse-IgG(H+L) as secondary antibody and o-phenylenediamine (OPDA)/H(2)O(2) as substrate to detect the combination of immobilized TSP50 with anti-TSP50. The results showed that anti-TSP50 can be selectively adsorbed from its solution onto the TSP50-immobilized fibers in the presence of BSA of as high as 10(4) times concentration. TSP50 immobilized on the fiber and anti-TSP50 combined to the fiber were also quantitatively determined. Anti-TSP50 can be then eluted off from the fiber when pH changes. The eluted fiber can re-combine anti-TSP50 at an efficiency of 75% compared to the original TSP50-immobilized fiber. Therefore, the TSP50-immobilized fibers can be used in the detection, separation, and purification of anti-TSP50. The "click" method can lead to a universal strategy to protein immobilization.

  19. Combinatorial chemistry: polymer supported synthesis of peptide and non-peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, B; Khare, S K; Rastogi, S K

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a powerful tool for accelerating drug discovery. While industry is rapidly embracing the technology, researchers continue to develop novel library methods including resins, linkers, tagging and deconvolution techniques. Newer strategies involving computer-customized combinatorial libraries offer enormous potential for the design of more "focused" and "smart" chemical libraries with maximal diversity. In addition, miniaturized systems for synthesizing chemical libraries are also being developed, which has made it possible to carry out reactions at submicroliter volumes.

  20. Well-defined hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres for efficient molecular recognition in real biological samples by facile RAFT coupling chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Man; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hongtao; Yan, Husheng; Zhang, Huiqi

    2014-05-12

    A facile and highly efficient new approach (namely RAFT coupling chemistry) to obtain well-defined hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) microspheres with excellent specific recognition ability toward small organic analytes in the real, undiluted biological samples is described. It involves the first synthesis of "living" MIP microspheres with surface-bound vinyl and dithioester groups via RAFT precipitation polymerization (RAFTPP) and their subsequent grafting of hydrophilic polymer brushes by the simple coupling reaction of hydrophilic macro-RAFT agents (i.e., hydrophilic polymers with a dithioester end group) with vinyl groups on the "living" MIP particles in the presence of a free radical initiator. The successful grafting of hydrophilic polymer brushes onto the obtained MIP particles was confirmed by SEM, FT-IR, static contact angle and water dispersion studies, elemental analyses, and template binding experiments. Well-defined MIP particles with densely grafted hydrophilic polymer brushes (∼1.8 chains/nm(2)) of desired chemical structures and molecular weights were readily obtained, which showed significantly improved surface hydrophilicity and could thus function properly in real biological media. The origin of the high grafting densities of the polymer brushes was clarified and the general applicability of the strategy was demonstrated. In particular, the well-defined characteristics of the resulting hydrophilic MIP particles allowed the first systematic study on the effects of various structural parameters of the grafted hydrophilic polymer brushes on their water-compatibility, which is of great importance for rationally designing more advanced real biological sample-compatible MIPs.

  1. The Preparation of a UV-Light-Absorbing Polymer: A Project-Oriented Laboratory Experiment for the Introductory Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Thomas; McIntyre, Jean P.; Dorigo, Andrea; Davis, Drew J.; Davis, Matthew A.; Eller, Crystal F.; Eller, Leah R.; Izumi, Heather K.; Jones, Kenya M.; Kelley, Kurt H.; Massello, William; Melamed, Megan L.; Norris, Cynthia M.; Oelrich, Jeffrey A.; Pluim, Thomas A.; Poplawski, Sarah E.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Wheeler, Wells C.; Wilkes, Erin E.

    1999-11-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that combines organic synthesis, spectroscopy, and polymer chemistry and is suitable for the sophomore organic chemistry curriculum. In this three-week sequence, students synthesize and characterize the UV-absorber 2-(2',4'-dimethylbenzoyl)benzoic acid and incorporate it into films of polymethylmethacrylate. The project exposes students to a variety of techniques and topics including UV-vis, nuclear magnetic resonance and IR spectroscopy, free radical polymerization, vacuum filtration, use of a separatory funnel for extraction and washing, melting point determination, recrystallization, reflux, and Friedel-Crafts acylation.

  2. Chemical research projects office functions accomplishments programs. [applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry and polymeric composites with emphasis on fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Basic and applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry, polymeric composites, chemical engineering, and biophysical chemistry is summarized. Emphasis is placed on fire safety and human survivability as they relate to commercial and military aircraft, high-rise buildings, mines and rapid transit transportation. Materials systems and other fire control systems developed for aerospace applications and applied to national domestic needs are described along with bench-scale and full-scale tests conducted to demonstrate the improvements in performance obtained through the utilization of these materials and fire control measures.

  3. Silane-dextran chemistry on lateral flow polymer chips for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Christina; Aronsson, Magnus; Rundström, Gerd; Pettersson, Christer; Mendel-Hartvig, Ib; Bakker, Jimmy; Martinsson, Erik; Liedberg, Bo; MacCraith, Brian; Ohman, Ove; Melin, Jonas

    2008-07-01

    The prognosis for patients suffering from cardiovascular and many other diseases can be substantially improved if diagnosed at an early stage. High performance diagnostic testing using disposable microfluidic chips can provide a platform for realizing this vision. Amic AB (Uppsala, Sweden) has developed a new microfluidic test chip for sandwich immunoassays fabricated by injection molding of the cycloolefin-copolymer Zeonor. A highly ordered array of micropillars within the fluidic chip distributes the sample solution by capillary action. Since wetting of the pillar array surface is the only driving force for liquid distribution precise control of the surface chemistry is crucial. In this work we demonstrate a novel protocol for surface hydrophilization and antibody immobilization on cycloolefin-copolymer test chips, based on direct silanisation of the thermoplastic substrate. Dextran is subsequently covalently coupled to amino groups, thus providing a coating with a low contact angle suitable for antibody immobilization. The contact angle of dextran coated chips is stable for at least two months, which enables production of large batches that can be stored for extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of the presented platform and surface chemistry in a C-reactive protein assay with a detection limit of 2.6 ng ml(-1), a dynamic range of 10(2) and a coefficient of variance of 15%.

  4. The marriage of metallacycle transfer chemistry with Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling to give main group element-containing conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Kang, Le; Torres Delgado, William; Shynkaruk, Olena; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Rivard, Eric

    2013-04-10

    A versatile and general synthetic route for the synthesis of conjugated main group element-based polymers, previously inaccessible by conventional means, is reported. These polymers contain five-membered chalcogenophene rings based on S, Se, and Te, and we demonstrate that optoelectronic properties can be readily tuned via controlled atom substitution chemistry. In addition, regioregular hybrid thiophene-selenophene-tellurophene and selenophene-fluorene copolymers were synthesized to provide a further illustration of the scope of the presented metallacycle transfer/cross-coupling polymerization method.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of copper coordination polymers based on molybdates: Chemistry issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, K.; Ramanan, A.; Whittingham, M. S.

    2006-08-01

    Crystal engineering of metal organic coordination polymers or metal organic frameworks have been attracting unprecedented efforts in the past few years due to potential applications in the area of catalysis, gas separation and storage. Hydrothermal synthesis is a popular soft chemical route employed by a number of researchers to grow suitable single crystals for unambiguous structural characterization. The structural diversity of the various solid frameworks is attributed to the choice of metal, its ability to exist in multiple oxidation states exhibiting different coordination geometry and multidentate nature of organic ligands. Polyoxomolybdate is another interesting class of inorganic materials that are potential catalysts. A contemporary theme is to develop porous solids combining the acidic properties of oligomeric molybdates integrated with first-row transition metal ions that can form coordination polymers with suitable multidentate ligands. A bottleneck to this problem is to develop reliable synthetic protocols that can produce reproducible materials with designed structural characteristics. In this paper, we present our results on the formation of self-assembled metal organic hybrid solids from acidified aqueous molybdate solution containing cupric ions and one of the multidentate organic ligands (pyrazine, 2-pyrazine carboxylic acid or isonicotinic acid). We propose a molecular mechanism to rationalize the formation of solids.

  6. On-line UV spectrophotometric analysis for organic chemistry of novel inorganic polymer derived microreactor.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Hong, Lan-Young; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2009-12-01

    The use of microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip system has shown great promise for many applications. We have previously reported fabrication and application of preceramic polymer derived chemically and mechanically stable microfluidic devices in organic synthesis. Even though organic reactions are successfully performed, it is hard to analyze product to evaluate yields without any time delay except for integration of detecting module in the devices. Moreover small sample volume makes it even difficult to analyze sample by conventional analytical tools. Removal of catalyst and by product before analysis is another hurdle in evaluating performance of microrector. In this paper we describe preliminary results for simple on-line (real-time) quantitative analysis of microchemical reaction in preceramic polymer derived microreactor without reconstruction of microreactor or expensive components. A commercial UVNIS spectrophotometer is used to monitor well established Knoevenagel reaction. To evaluate the performance of presented on-line UV/IS monitoring system, UV/IS data are compared with off-line gas chromatography based analysis system.

  7. Surface temperature: A key parameter to control the propanethiol plasma polymer chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Thiry, Damien Aparicio, Francisco J.; Laha, Priya; Terryn, Herman; Snyders, Rony

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the influence of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the chemical composition of propanethiol plasma polymers was investigated for a given set of plasma conditions. In a first study, a decrease in the atomic sulfur content (at. %S) with the deposition time (t{sub d}) was observed. This behavior is explained by the heating of the growing film during deposition process, limiting the incorporation of stable sulfur-based molecules produced in the plasma. Experiments carried out by controlling the substrate temperature support this hypothesis. On the other hand, an empirical law relating the T{sub s} and the at. %S was established. This allows for the formation of gradient layer presenting a heterogeneous chemical composition along the thickness, as determined by depth profile analysis combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and C{sub 60} ion gun sputtering. The experimental data fit with the one predicted from our empiric description. The whole set of our results provide new insights in the relationship between the substrate temperature and the sulfur content in sulfur-based plasma polymers, essential for future developments.

  8. Radiation chemistry as an alternative way for the synthesis of PEDOT conducting Polymers under "soft" Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattach, Youssef; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Remita, Samy

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of conducting PEDOT is achieved through an original soft alternative way: radiolysis of aerated aqueous solutions of EDOT in the absence of any external chemical initiators. The oxidation of EDOT monomers is shown to be initiated by HO hydroxyl radicals produced by water radiolysis. A recurrent step-by-step oxidation process leads to self-assembled hydrophilic PEDOT polymers which are evidenced in solution by cryo-TEM and after centrifugation and deposition by AFM and ATR-FTIR techniques. Optical and conducting properties of radiosynthesized PEDOT-containing layers, which are respectively evaluated by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and by cyclic voltammetry, are found to be close to those of usually electrosynthesized PEDOT layers.

  9. Study of Polymer Glasses by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folmer, J. C. W.; Franzen, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    Recent technological advances in thermal analysis present educational opportunities. In particular, modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) can be used to contrast reversing and nonreversing processes in practical laboratory experiments. The introduction of these concepts elucidates the relationship between experimental timescales and reversibility. The latter is a key concept of undergraduate thermodynamics theory that deserves reinforcement. In this paper, the theory and application of MDSC to problems of current interest is outlined with special emphasis on the contrast between crystallization and vitrification. Glass formation deserves greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum. Glass transitions are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of materials properties and dynamics in fields ranging from polymer science to protein folding. The example chosen for study is a comparison of polyethylene glycol and atactic polypropylene glycol. The experiment is easily performed in a typical three-hour lab session.

  10. Grafted macroporous polymer monolithic disks: a new format of scavengers for solution-phase combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tripp, J A; Svec, F; Fréchet, J M

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene encased porous poly(chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) disks have been prepared by polymerization in a cylindrical glass mold and cut to a disk format. Following attachment of a free radical azo initiator 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) to available functionalities at the surface of the pores, the polymerization of 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone was initiated from the surface. To avoid an undesirable increase in flow resistance and to improve the yield of grafting, divinylbenzene was added to the polymerization mixture in order to form a layer of swellable reactive polymer gel within the pores. The use of these disks as scavenging filters to remove various amines from solutions in flow-through operations was demonstrated by effective removal of amines in a very short period of time from their solutions in a variety of solvents, even including alcohols and water.

  11. Pressure sensor via optical detection based on a 1D spin transition coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Jureschi, Cătălin M; Linares, Jorge; Rotaru, Aurelian; Ritti, Marie Hélène; Parlier, Michel; Dîrtu, Marinela M; Wolff, Mariusz; Garcia, Yann

    2015-01-22

    We have investigated the suitability of using the 1D spin crossover coordination polymer [Fe(4-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-1,2,4-triazole)3]I2∙H2O, known to crossover around room temperature, as a pressure sensor via optical detection using various contact pressures up to 250 MPa. A dramatic persistent colour change is observed. The experimental data, obtained by calorimetric and Mössbauer measurements, have been used for a theoretical analysis, in the framework of the Ising-like model, of the thermal and pressure induced spin state switching. The pressure (P)-temperature (T) phase diagram calculated for this compound has been used to obtain the P-T bistability region.

  12. Pressure Sensor via Optical Detection Based on a 1D Spin Transition Coordination Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Jureschi, Cătălin M.; Linares, Jorge; Rotaru, Aurelian; Ritti, Marie Hélène; Parlier, Michel; Dîrtu, Marinela M.; Wolff, Mariusz; Garcia, Yann

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the suitability of using the 1D spin crossover coordination polymer [Fe(4-(2′-hydroxyethyl)-1,2,4-triazole)3]I2·H2O, known to crossover around room temperature, as a pressure sensor via optical detection using various contact pressures up to 250 MPa. A dramatic persistent colour change is observed. The experimental data, obtained by calorimetric and Mössbauer measurements, have been used for a theoretical analysis, in the framework of the Ising-like model, of the thermal and pressure induced spin state switching. The pressure (P)-temperature (T) phase diagram calculated for this compound has been used to obtain the P-T bistability region. PMID:25621610

  13. Surface patterning with natural and synthetic polymers via an inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction employing microcontact chemistry.

    PubMed

    Roling, Oliver; Mardyukov, Artur; Lamping, Sebastian; Vonhören, Benjamin; Rinnen, Stefan; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Studer, Armido; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-10-21

    Bioorthogonal ligation methods are the focus of current research due to their versatile applications in biotechnology and materials science for post-functionalization and immobilization of biomolecules. Recently, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (iEDDA) reactions employing 1,2,4,5-tetrazines as electron deficient dienes emerged as powerful tools in this field. We adapted iEDDA in microcontact chemistry (μCC) in order to create enhanced surface functions. μCC is a straightforward soft-lithography technique which enables fast and large area patterning with high pattern resolutions. In this work, tetrazine functionalized surfaces were reacted with carbohydrates conjugated with norbornene or cyclooctyne acting as strained electron rich dienophiles employing μCC. It was possible to create monofunctional as well as bifunctional substrates which were specifically addressable by proteins. Furthermore we structured glass supported alkene terminated self-assembled monolayers with a tetrazine conjugated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator enabling surface grafted polymerizations of poly(methylacrylate) brushes. The success of the surface initiated iEDDA via μCC as well as the functionalization with natural and synthetic polymers was verified via fluorescence and optical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

  14. Nucleic acid chemistry in the organic phase: from functionalized oligonucleotides to DNA side chain polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Liu, Qing; de Vries, Jan Willem; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-08

    DNA-incorporating hydrophobic moieties can be synthesized by either solid-phase or solution-phase coupling. On a solid support the DNA is protected, and hydrophobic units are usually attached employing phosphoramidite chemistry involving a DNA synthesizer. On the other hand, solution coupling in aqueous medium results in low yields due to the solvent incompatibility of DNA and hydrophobic compounds. Hence, the development of a general coupling method for producing amphiphilic DNA conjugates with high yield in solution remains a major challenge. Here, we report an organic-phase coupling strategy for nucleic acid modification and polymerization by introducing a hydrophobic DNA-surfactant complex as a reactive scaffold. A remarkable range of amphiphile-DNA structures (DNA-pyrene, DNA-triphenylphosphine, DNA-hydrocarbon, and DNA block copolymers) and a series of new brush-type DNA side-chain homopolymers with high DNA grafting density are produced efficiently. We believe that this method is an important breakthrough in developing a generalized approach to synthesizing functional DNA molecules for self-assembly and related technological applications.

  15. Well-defined functional mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids prepared by an ICAR ATRP technique integrated with bio-inspired polydopamine chemistry for lithium isotope separation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuekun; Liu, Xuegang; Ye, Gang; Song, Yang; Liu, Fei; Huo, Xiaomei; Chen, Jing

    2017-05-09

    Mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids with well-preserved mesoporosity were prepared by integrating the initiators for continuous activator regeneration (ICAR) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique with the bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) chemistry. By manipulating the auto-oxidative polymerization of dopamine, uniform PDA layers were deposited on the surfaces and pore walls of ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs), thereby promoting the immobilization of ATRP initiators. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) brushes were then grown from the OMSs by using the ICAR ATRP technique. The evolution of the mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids during synthesis, in terms of morphology, structure, surface and porous properties, was detailed. And, parameters influencing the controlled growth of polymer chains in the ICAR ATRP system were studied. Taking advantage of the abundant epoxy groups in the PGMA platform, post-functionalization of the mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids by the covalent attachment of macrocyclic ligands for the adsorptive separation of lithium isotopes was realized. Adsorption behavior of the functionalized hybrids toward lithium ions was fully investigated, highlighting the good selectivity, and effects of temperature, solvent and counter ions. The ability for lithium isotope separation was evaluated. A higher separation factor could be obtained in systems with softer counter anions and lower polarity solvents. More importantly, due to the versatility of the ICAR ATRP technique, combined with the non-surface specific PDA chemistry, the methodology established in this work would provide new opportunities for the preparation of advanced organic-inorganic porous hybrids for broadened applications.

  16. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  17. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  18. Forces of interactions between iron and aluminum silicates: effect of water chemistry and polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Pensini, Erica; Sleep, Brent E; Yip, Christopher M; O'Carroll, Denis

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy (AFM) was employed to investigate the forces of interaction between aluminum silicates (mica and a synthetic aluminum-silicate) and iron particles, both bare and coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer. Experiments were conducted in water and salt solutions (100mM NaCl and 100mM CaCl2) at pH 5.5, in water at pH 4 and 8, and in 10mg/l humic acid solutions. In addition, humic acid sorption onto the synthetic aluminum-silicate was probed with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Interactions between bare iron particles and aluminum silicate were attractive except at pH 8 and in the presence of humic acids in which case forces upon approach were repulsive. Interactions between bare iron and mica were similar, except that repulsive forces upon approach were measured in 100mM NaCl solutions, possibly due to increased hydration of mica compared to aluminum silicate. Interactions between CMC coated iron particles and aluminum-silicates were either repulsive or at most weakly attractive, likely due to repulsive electro-steric forces associated with the CMC. QCM-D results indicated that humic acids adsorbed to aluminum silicate, producing electro-steric repulsion to coated and uncoated iron. AFM data were successfully modeled using extended DLVO theory and a modified Ohshima's model. This modeling provided insights into the contributions of various processes to the measured interaction forces, highlighting the importance of van der Waals and hydration forces.

  19. Advanced polymer PV system: PVMaT 4A1 annual report, September 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hanoka, J; Chleboski, R; Farber, M; Fava, J; Kane, P; Martz, J

    1997-06-01

    Purpose of this subcontract was to produce lower module and systems costs through the innovative use of polymeric materials. The Innovative Mounting System (IMS) was developed and testing begun during the first year of this contract. IMS reduces the cost of installed PV systems by reducing labor and materials costs both in the factory and in field installation. It incorporates several advances in polymers, processing methods and product design. An advanced backskin material permits elimination of the conventional Al perimeter frame by protecting and sealing the edge and by direct bonding of multifunctional mounting bars. Electrical interconnection is easier and more reliable with a new junction box. Feasibility of a non-vacuum, high-throughput lamination method was also demonstrated, involving a novel transparent encapsulant with UV stabilization package that can be laminated in air and which should lead to longer field life than conventional designs. The first-year program culminated in the fielding of prototype products with the new encapsulant, backskin, junction box, frameless edge seal, and IMS. Feedback and marketing information from potential customers were solicited. Result promises a $0.50/watt manufacturing and system cost reductions as well as increased system lifetime. The second year will complete refinement and test of the encapsulant and backskin, complete the new lamination method, and refine product designs.

  20. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Industry, Coal Gasification , Electrochemistry, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds, Organophosphorus Compounds, Petroleum Processing Technology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Polymers and Polymerization and, Radiation Chemistry.

  1. Synthesis of water-compatible surface-imprinted polymer via click chemistry and RAFT precipitation polymerization for highly selective and sensitive electrochemical assay of fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2014-12-15

    A novel water-compatible fenitrothion imprinted polymer was prepared on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) by click chemistry and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization (RAFTPP). The RAFT chain-transfer agent was synthesized on the surface of AuNPs using click chemistry, then an imprinted polymer with hydrophilic polymer brushes was prepared on the RAFT chain-transfer agent modified AuNPs by RAFTPP, mediated by hydrophilic polyethylene glycol macromolecular cochain-transfer agent. The obtained molecularly imprinted material showed improved accessibility to fenitrothion and recognition property in water medium. When the material was immobilized on an ionic liquid functionalized graphene coated glassy carbon electrode for the electrochemical determination of fenitrothion, the resulting electrochemical sensor presented linear response in the range of 0.01-5 μM, with a sensitivity of 6.1 μA/μM mm(2). The low limit of detection was 8 nM (S/N=3). The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of real samples and the recovery for standard added was 95-108%.

  2. Degradable polymeric nanoparticles by aggregation of thermoresponsive polymers and ``click'' chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, Andrzej; Lipowska, Daria; Szweda, Dawid; Suwinski, Jerzy; Trzebicka, Barbara; Szweda, Roza

    2015-10-01

    stabilization of aggregated chains was performed by a ``click'' reaction between the azide and alkyne groups. Due to the presence of a carbamate bond the nanoparticles undergo pH dependent degradation under mild basic conditions. The proposed procedure opens a route to new carriers for the controlled release of active species. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: GPC-MALLS chromatograms for P(D-co-A)_1 and P(D-co-A)_2 copolymers, absorbance spectra of P(D-co-A)_1, P(D-co-A)_2, P(D-co-A_Pr) and P(D-co-A_Az) after reaction with ninhydrine. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04448k

  3. Ionic selectivity of nystatin A1 confined in nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Balme, Sébastien; Thiele, Daniela; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Picaud, Fabien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Déjardin, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The hybrid biological/polymeric solid-state nanopore membrane offers several opportunities to combine the advantage of biological channel (selectivity) and material (robustness). Based on this technology, the challenge is to obtain selective ionic exchange membranes, with no energy intake. The direct insertion of an ionic channel inside a nanopore should be a promise solution. Here, the authors report a hybrid nanopore based on nystatin A1 confinement in commercial nanopore membrane. Ionic transport and selectivity studies show that the hybrid nanopores exhibit mainly an anionic behaviour, on the contrary to biological conditions. However, the order of magnitude between the different ratios of permeation of several cationic species is retained even if the blocking of divalent cation is not totally proved.

  4. Degradable Polymers and Block Copolymers from Electron-deficient Carbonyl Compounds (STIR) (7.3 Polymer Chemistry - Synthesis: Architecture and Composition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-23

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Polyacetals are a readily degradable class of polymers with potential uses in the preparation of porous materials and...been reported in the literature to date, which has limited the investigation of these materials . Recently developed organocatalysis systems have been...Composition) Report Title Polyacetals are a readily degradable class of polymers with potential uses in the preparation of porous materials and patterned

  5. Evaluation of the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction of semi-crystalline micro-particles for the development of controlled release formulations.

    PubMed

    Mithu, Sadeque H; Haque, Syed N; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-07-01

    This research work explores the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction in the manufactured controlled release micro-particles. Isoniazid (INH) was used as a model anti-tubercular drug while Eudragit® S100 (S100), Eudragit® L100-55 based co-processed Acryl EZE (EZE) and Ethylcellulose ECN10 (ECN10) were used as polymeric carriers. INH containing micro-particles were prepared using a mini spray dryer B-290 (Buchi, Switzerland). The drug polymer ratios were optimized at 1:1 and 1:3 to evaluate the effect of polymers on the release of the drug from the micro-particles. Solid state characterization via SEM and particle size analysis of the manufactured micro-particles showed densely aggregated spherical particles with a mean diameter <10μm. The advanced surface analysis via EDS revealed a homogenous drug distribution on the spray dried micro-particles. The physico-chemical characterization carried out by using DSC and XRPD showed an increase in the amorphicity of the drug during the spray drying process while the chemical elemental analysis via XPS revealed a strong intermolecular interaction between the amine group of the drug and the carboxyl group of the polymers. As expected, the in vitro dissolution study showed a slow release pattern for the highly water soluble drug INH in acidic media (pH1.2) for the first 2h followed by a burst release upon changing the pH to 6.8. It was concluded that emerging spray drying processing can be used as a valuable tool to encapsulate drug for controlled release dosage forms by means of facilitating a possible drug/polymer interaction as outlined by novel XPS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of proton conductivity of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer at higher temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Suresh; Biswas, Soumava; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-02-16

    We report the proton conduction properties of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer having the molecular formulas {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·5H2O]}n (1) and {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·2H2O]}n (2), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 show high conductivity values of 2.55 × 10(-7) and 4.39 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 95% RH. The conductivity value of compound 1 is in the range of those for previously reported flexible MOFs, and compound 2 shows the highest proton conductivity among the carboxylate-based 1D CPs. The dimensionality and the internal hydrogen bonding connectivity play a vital role in the resultant conductivity. Variable-temperature experiments of both compounds at high humidity reveal that the conductivity values increase with increasing temperature, whereas the variable humidity studies signify the influence of relative humidity on high-temperature proton conductivity. The time-dependent measurements for both compounds demonstrate their ability to retain conductivity up to 10 h.

  7. Thiol-ol Chemistry for Grafting of Natural Polymers to Form Highly Stable and Efficacious Antibacterial Coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Mitra, Debirupa; Kang, En-Tang; Lau, Titus; Chiong, Edmund; Neoh, Koon Gee

    2017-01-18

    Bacterial contamination of surfaces and the associated infection risk is a significant threat to human health. Some natural antibacterial polymers with low toxicity are promising coating materials for alleviating pathogenic colonization on surfaces. However, widespread application of these polymers as antibacterial coatings is constrained by coating techniques which are not easily scalable due to stringent reaction conditions. Herein, thiol-ol reaction involving oxidative conjugation between thiol and hydroxyl groups is demonstrated as a facile technique to graft two natural polymer derivatives, agarose (AG) and quaternized chitosan (QCS), as antibacterial coatings on polymer and metal substrates. The substrate surfaces are first treated with oxygen plasma followed by UV-induced grafting of the polymers under atmospheric conditions. Dimercaprol, a FDA-approved drug, is used as both surface anchor and cross-linker of the polymer chains during grafting. The AG coating achieves >2 log reduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, while the QCS coating reduces bacterial count from contaminated droplets on its surface by >95%. The coatings are noncytotoxic and exhibits a high degree of stability under conditions expected in their potential applications as antibacterial coating for biomedical devices (for AG), and for preventing pathogen transmission in the environment (for QCS).

  8. A Structural Approach to Establishing a Platform Chemistry for the Tunable, Bulk Electron Beam Cross-Linking of Shape Memory Polymer Systems.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Keith; Besset, Celine J; Lonnecker, Alexander T; Ware, Taylor; Voit, Walter E; Wilson, Thomas S; Wooley, Karen L; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-11-26

    The synthetic design and thermomechanical characterization of shape memory polymers (SMPs) built from a new polyurethane chemistry that enables facile, bulk and tunable cross-linking of low-molecular weight thermoplastics by electron beam irradiation is reported in this study. SMPs exhibit stimuli-induced geometry changes and are being proposed for applications in numerous fields. We have previously reported a polyurethane SMP system that exhibits the complex processing capabilities of thermoplastic polymers and the mechanical robustness and tunability of thermomechanical properties that are often characteristic of thermoset materials. These previously reported polyurethanes suffer practically because the thermoplastic molecular weights needed to achieve target cross-link densities severely limit high-throughput thermoplastic processing and because thermally unstable radiation-sensitizing additives must be used to achieve high enough cross-link densities to enable desired tunable shape memory behavior. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate cross-link density in low-molecular weight aliphatic thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs (Mw as low as ~1.5 kDa) without radiation-sensitizing additives by incorporating specific structural motifs into the thermoplastic polymer side chains that we hypothesized would significantly enhance susceptibility to e-beam cross-linking. A custom diol monomer was first synthesized and then implemented in the synthesis of neat thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs that were irradiated at doses ranging from 1 to 500 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) demonstrated rubbery moduli to be tailorable between 0.1 and 55 MPa, and both DMA and sol/gel analysis results provided fundamental insight into our hypothesized mechanism of electron beam cross-linking, which enables controllable bulk cross-linking to be achieved in highly processable, low-molecular weight thermoplastic shape memory polymers without sensitizing additives.

  9. Parameterized isoprene and monoterpene emissions from the boreal forest floor: Implementation into a 1D chemistry-transport model and investigation of the influence on atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogensen, Ditte; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana; Kieloaho, Antti-Jussi; Gierens, Rosa; Smolander, Sampo; Kulmala, Markku; Boy, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from the biosphere and can work as precursor gases for aerosol particles that can affect the climate (e.g. Makkonen et al., ACP, 2012). VOC emissions from needles and leaves have gained the most attention, however other parts of the ecosystem also have the ability to emit a vast amount of VOCs. This, often neglected, source can be important e.g. at periods where leaves are absent. Both sources and drivers related to forest floor emission of VOCs are currently limited. It is thought that the sources are mainly due to degradation of organic matter (Isidorov and Jdanova, Chemosphere, 2002), living roots (Asensio et al., Soil Biol. Biochem., 2008) and ground vegetation. The drivers are biotic (e.g. microbes) and abiotic (e.g. temperature and moisture). However, the relative importance of the sources and the drivers individually are currently poorly understood. Further, the relative importance of these factors is highly dependent on the tree species occupying the area of interest. The emission of isoprene and monoterpenes where measured from the boreal forest floor at the SMEAR II station in Southern Finland (Hari and Kulmala, Boreal Env. Res., 2005) during the snow-free period in 2010-2012. We used a dynamic method with 3 automated chambers analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (Aaltonen et al., Plant Soil, 2013). Using this data, we have developed empirical parameterizations for the emission of isoprene and monoterpenes from the forest floor. These parameterizations depends on abiotic factors, however, since the parameterizations are based on field measurements, biotic features are captured. Further, we have used the 1D chemistry-transport model SOSAA (Boy et al., ACP, 2011) to test the seasonal relative importance of inclusion of these parameterizations of the forest floor compared to the canopy crown emissions, on the atmospheric reactivity throughout the canopy.

  10. The effect of injection molding conditions on the near-surface rubber morphology, surface chemistry, and adhesion performance of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weakley-Bollin, Shannon Christine

    This thesis investigated the effect of injection molding processing variables, resin formulation and mold material on the resulting morphology and properties of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers in parts molded on large presses with fully developed flow. Five different polymer resins and two different coating types were investigated, and the near-surface morphology was found to be dependent on material formulation, processing parameters, and geometry. For painted TPO, changes in the near-surface rubber morphology and surface chemistry based on material and processing conditions had no significant effect on the adhesion performance. For metal plated ABS, the adhesion performance was found to be heavily dependent on the rubber surface morphology, which varied with material formulation and processing conditions. One of the most significant findings was that forged aluminum injection molding tooling had little effect on the surface morphology or adhesion performance of either polypropylene or the two TPO formulations examined, despite the five-fold increase in thermal conductivity over traditional tool steel. Surface chemistry, however, was found to be affected by cooling rate, depending on material formulation. A UV stabilizer additive was found concentrated at 2.5 atomic percent on the surface of the aluminum molded part, but not the steel molded part, demonstrating a possible opportunity for using additives and aluminum tooling to create "designer surfaces". Processing conditions were found to have a competing role in metal plated ABS, where conditions that lowered surface stress and improved adhesion by a factor of 15 also increased the amount of bulk molded-in stress by nearly 7%. Both factors were found to play an important role in adhesion performance due to the effect of surface stress on the quality of the resulting etch structure. The bulk stress must be minimized to due to the large mechanical and thermal mismatch between the polymer and metal layers

  11. Replacement of the lactone moiety on podophyllotoxin and steganacin analogues with a 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole via ruthenium-catalyzed click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Daniela; Pirali, Tracey; Galli, Ubaldina; Pagliai, Francesca; Cafici, Laura; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Sorba, Giovanni; Genazzani, Armando A; Tron, Gian Cesare

    2007-11-01

    Steganacin and podophyllotoxin are two naturally occurring lignans first isolated from plant sources, which share the capability to disrupt tubulin assembly. Although not strictly essential for its activity, the lactone ring on both structures represents Achilles' heel, as it is a potential site of metabolic degradation and epimerization on its C2 carbon brings about a significant loss in potency. In the present manuscript, we have used the ruthenium-catalyzed [3+2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition, a click-chemistry reaction, to replace the lactone ring with a 1,5-disubstituted triazole in few synthetic steps. The compounds were cytotoxic, although to a lesser degree compared to podophyllotoxin, while retaining antitubulin activity. The present structures might therefore represent a good platform for the fast generation of metabolically stable compounds with few stereogenic centers that might be of value from a medicinal chemistry point of view.

  12. Reactions of Inorganic High Polymers as a Route to Tailored Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-09

    polymers, liquid crystalline materials , bioerodable solids, solids with bioactive surfaces, solid electrolytes, semiconductors, or ultrastructures. Solids, Polymers, Phosphazenes, Synthesis, (Chemistry).

  13. Spectroscopic Studies on Physicochemical Natures of Ion Exchangers and Highly Functional Polymers and Their Application to Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    The absorption spectra or NMR spectra of chemical species adsorbed on ion exchangers and highly functional polymers such as crosslinked dextran could be directly measured by the corresponding solution methods. Spectrophotometric measurements of a target species in the solid phase have been extended to solid phase spectrometry (SPS), based on the direct measurement of light-absorption by the solid phase, which has adsorbed the target analyte. SPS has employed two different procedures; i.e., batch and flow methods. The Lambert-Beer law could be applicable to the solid particle layer system. The sensitivity was proportional to the volume ratio of the solid and sample solution, giving more than 100 times the sensitivity obtainable with the combination of a 0.1 cm3 solid and a 10-100 cm3 sample for the batch method. An online measurement of the light attenuation by the adsorbed species in the flow-through cell made it possible to both significantly reduce the sample solution volume and to simplify the respective procedures for the derivatization of the analyte and packing the solid particles into the cell. Because the cross-linked dextran and similar glucopyranoside-based gels have polyol moieties in their gel matrix, they could be used as oxo acid-selective adsorbents without introducing any special functional groups. Especially, in the case of boric acid, 11B NMR spectroscopy was one of the best tools for elucidating the nature of the interaction between boric acid/borate and polyols. Its combination with other methods enabled basic understanding of the chemical reactions. Reaction paths for 1:1 complexation are in general divided into two groups, i.e., neutral polyols that directly react with tetrahedral borate, and acidic polyols that react with trigonal boric acid in a 1:1 complexation. Both of the reactions produce tetrahedral anionic complexes, followed by a condensation reaction between the 1:1 monochelate complex and the undissociated diols to yield the 1

  14. Polymer pendant ligand chemistry. 3. A biomimetic approach to selective metal ion removal and recovery from aqueous solution with polymer-supported sulfonated catechol and linear catechol amide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Song-Ping; Li, Wei; Franz, K.J.; Albright, R.L.; Fish, R.H.

    1995-05-24

    The design of organic ligands to selectively remove and recover metal ions from aqueous solution is a new and important area of environmental inorganic chemistry. One approach to designing organic ligands for these purposes is to use biological systems as examples for selective metal ion complexation. Thus, the authors report results on the synthesis of several biomimetically important polymer-supported, sulfonated catechol (PS-CATS), sulfonated bis(catechol) linear amide (PS-2-6-LICAMS), and sulfonated 3.3-linear tris(catechol) amide (PS-3,3-LICAMS) ligands that are chemically bonded to modified 6% cross-linked macroporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads (PS-DVB) for selective removal and recovery of environmentally and economically important metal ions from aqueous solution, as a function of pH. The Fe{sup 3+} ion selectivity was dramatically shown for PS-CATS, PS-2-6-LICAMS and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads in competition with a similar concentration of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions at pH 1-3, while metal ion selectivity could be changed at higher pH values in the absence of Fe{sup 3+} (for example, Hg{sup 2+} at pH 3). Rates of removal and recovery of the Fe{sup 3+} ion with the PS-CATS, PS-2-6LICAMS and PS-3,3-LICAMS polymer beads were also studied as well as relative equilibrium selectivity coefficient (K{sub m}) values for all metal competition studies.

  15. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Crosslinked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Controlling Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved or in different phases of clinical trials or under rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger the various components of the immune system, unintentionally, and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers to predict the effect of biotherapeutics on modulating the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, and were found recently to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse and experiments are usually conducted using different assays and under specific conditions, making direct comparisons nearly impossible and, thus, tailoring properties of nanomaterials based on the available data is challenging. In this account, the effects of chemical structure, crosslinking, degradability, morphology, concentration and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with focus being given on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized, uniquely, to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple and easy way to compare the immunotoxicity of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate-well with published data. Based on the investigated polymeric systems in this study, valuable information has been collected that aids in the

  16. Synthetic hydrophilic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekharan Pillai, V. N.; Mutter, Manfred

    1981-11-01

    Synthetic hydrophilic polymers find promising applications in pharmacology, biotechnology and chemistry. The biocompatibility, biodegradability and pharmacological activity of these polymers depend much on their hydrophilic nature. This article summarizes the recent developments in the utilization of the different classes of these hydrophilic polymers as pharmacologically active agents, for enzyme modification and as catalysts and supports for chemical reactions.

  17. Polystyrene as a model system to probe the impact of ambient gas chemistry on polymer surface modifications using remote atmospheric pressure plasma under well-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Elliot A J; Luan, Pingshan; Knoll, Andrew J; Hart, Connor; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2015-06-30

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat polystyrene (PS) films under remote conditions where neither the plume nor visible afterglow interacts with the film surface. Carefully controlled conditions were achieved by mounting the APPJ inside a vacuum chamber interfaced to a UHV surface analysis system. PS was chosen as a model system as it contains neither oxygen nor nitrogen, has been extensively studied, and provides insight into how the aromatic structures widespread in biological systems are modified by atmospheric plasma. These remote treatments cause negligible etching and surface roughening, which is promising for treatment of sensitive materials. The surface chemistry was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate how ambient chemistry, feed gas chemistry, and plasma-ambient interaction impact the formation of specific moieties. A variety of oxidized carbon species and low concentrations of NOx species were measured after APPJ treatment. In the remote conditions used in this work, modifications are not attributed to short-lived species, e.g., O atoms. It was found that O3 does not correlate with modifications, suggesting that other long-lived species such as singlet delta oxygen or NOx are important. Indeed, surface-bound NO3 was observed after treatment, which must originate from gas phase NOx as neither N nor O are found in the pristine film. By varying the ambient and feed gas chemistry to produce O-rich and O-poor conditions, a possible correlation between the oxygen and nitrogen composition was established. When oxygen is present in the feed gas or ambient, high levels of oxidation with low concentrations of NO3 on the surface were observed. For O-poor conditions, NO and NO2 were measured, suggesting that these species contribute to the oxidation process, but are easily oxidized when oxygen is present. That is, surface oxidation limits and competes with surface nitridation. Overall, surface oxidation takes place easily

  18. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  19. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana; van der Marel, Cees; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-10-01

    Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional "spacers", hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups from amine-treated surfaces. The application of PEI spacer in comparison to HMDA has shown much higher intensity of detection signal in ELISA experiment, indicating better immobilization efficiency and preservation of antibody activity upon attachment to the

  20. Correlation between the plasma characteristics and the surface chemistry of plasma-treated polymers through partial least-squares analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavadat, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh-Barvarz, Massoud; Turgeon, Stéphane; Duchesne, Carl; Laroche, Gaétan

    2013-12-23

    We investigated the effect of various plasma parameters (relative density of atomic N and H, plasma temperature, and vibrational temperature) and process conditions (pressure and H2/(N2 + H2) ratio) on the chemical composition of modified poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). The plasma parameters were measured by means of near-infrared (NIR) and UV-visible emission spectroscopy with and without actinometry. The process conditions of the N2-H2 microwave discharges were set at various pressures ranging from 100 to 2000 mTorr and H2/(N2+H2) gas mixture ratios between 0 and 0.4. The surface chemical composition of the modified polymers was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A mathematical model was constructed using the partial least-squares regression algorithm to correlate the plasma information (process condition and plasma parameters as determined by emission spectroscopy) with the modified surface characteristics. To construct the model, a set of data input variables containing process conditions and plasma parameters were generated, as well as a response matrix containing the surface composition of the polymer. This model was used to predict the composition of PTFE surfaces subjected to N2-H2 plasma treatment. Contrary to what is generally accepted in the literature, the present data demonstrate that hydrogen is not directly involved in the defluorination of the surface but rather produces atomic nitrogen and/or NH radicals that are shown to be at the origin of fluorine atom removal from the polymer surface. The results show that process conditions alone do not suffice in predicting the surface chemical composition and that the plasma characteristics, which cannot be easily correlated with these conditions, should be considered. Process optimization and control would benefit from plasma diagnostics, particularly infrared emission spectroscopy.

  1. A comparative evaluation of the effect of polymer chemistry and fiber orientation on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David C.L.; Aquilina, Thomas; Klein, Andrei; Hakimi, Osnat; Alexis‐Mouthuy, Pierre; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bioengineered tissue scaffolds in combination with cells hold great promise for tissue regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine how the chemistry and fiber orientation of engineered scaffolds affect the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation on aligned and randomly orientated electrospun scaffolds of Poly (lactic‐co‐glycolic) acid (PLGA) and Polydioxanone (PDO) were compared. MSCs were seeded onto scaffolds and cultured for 14 days under adipogenic‐, chondrogenic‐, or osteogenic‐inducing conditions. Cell viability was assessed by alamarBlue metabolic activity assays and gene expression was determined by qRT‐PCR. Cell‐scaffold interactions were visualized using fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Cells grew in response to scaffold fiber orientation and cell viability, cell coverage, and gene expression analysis showed that PDO supports greater multilineage differentiation of MSCs. An aligned PDO scaffold supports highest adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation whereas fiber orientation did not have a consistent effect on chondrogenesis. Electrospun scaffolds, selected on the basis of fiber chemistry and alignment parameters could provide great therapeutic potential for restoration of fat, cartilage, and bone tissue. This study supports the continued investigation of an electrospun PDO scaffold for tissue repair and regeneration and highlights the potential of optimizing fiber orientation for improved utility. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2843–2853, 2016. PMID:27399850

  2. Coordination chemistry of 6-thioguanine derivatives with cobalt: toward formation of electrical conductive one-dimensional coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Amo-Ochoa, Pilar; Alexandre, Simone S; Hribesh, Samira; Galindo, Miguel A; Castillo, Oscar; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Pike, Andrew R; Soler, José M; Houlton, Andrew; Zamora, Félix; Harrington, Ross W; Clegg, William

    2013-05-06

    In this work we have synthetized and characterized by X-ray diffraction five cobalt complexes with 6-thioguanine (6-ThioGH), 6-thioguanosine (6-ThioGuoH), or 2'-deoxy-6-thioguanosine (2'-d-6-ThioGuoH) ligands. In all cases, these ligands coordinate to cobalt via N7 and S6 forming a chelate ring. However, independently of reagents ratio, 6-ThioGH provided monodimensional cobalt(II) coordination polymers, in which the 6-ThioG(-) acts as bridging ligand. However, for 2'-d-6-ThioGuoH and 6-ThioGuoH, the structure directing effect of the sugar residue gives rise to mononuclear cobalt complexes which form extensive H-bond interactions to generate 3D supramolecular networks. Furthermore, with 2'-d-6-ThioGuoH the cobalt ion remains in the divalent state, whereas with 6-ThioGuoH oxidation occurs and Co(III) is found. The electrical and magnetic properties of the coordination polymers isolated have been studied and the results discussed with the aid of DFT calculations, in the context of molecular wires.

  3. RESEARCH ON INORGANIC POLYMER SYSTEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, BORANES, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BORIC ACID , SYNTHESIS(CHEMISTRY), LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, HEAT RESISTANT PLASTICS, THERMAL PROPERTIES, MOLECULAR WEIGHT, STABILITY, ADHESION, POLYMERS.

  4. Green polymer chemistry: investigating the mechanism of radical ring-opening redox polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Q; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-04-13

    The mechanism of the new Radical Ring-opening Redox Polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT) by triethylamine (TEA) and dilute H2O2 was investigated. Scouting studies showed that the formation of high molecular weight polymers required a 1:2 molar ratio of DODT to TEA and of DODT to H2O2. Further investigation into the chemical composition of the organic and aqueous phases by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry demonstrated that DODT is ionized by two TEA molecules (one for each thiol group) and thus transferred into the aqueous phase. The organic phase was found to have cyclic disulfide dimers, trimers and tetramers. Dissolving DODT and TEA in water before the addition of H2O2 yielded a polymer with Mn = 55,000 g/mol, in comparison with Mn = 92,000 g/mol when aqueous H2O2 was added to a DODT/TEA mixture. After polymer removal, MALDI-ToF MS analysis of the residual reaction mixtures showed only cyclic oligomers remaining. Below the LCST for TEA in water, 18.7 °C, the system yielded a stable emulsion, and only cyclic oligomers were found. Below DODT/TEA and H2O2 1:2 molar ratio mostly linear oligomers were formed, with <20% cyclic oligomers. The findings support the proposed mechanism of R3P.

  5. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Cross-Linked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Control of Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-06-16

    The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved, in different phases of clinical trials, or undergoing rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger various components of the immune system unintentionally and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers for predicting the effect of biotherapeutics on modulation of the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and they were recently found to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for the construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse, and experiments are usually conducted using different assays under specific conditions. As a result, making direct comparisons nearly impossible, and thus, tailoring the properties of nanomaterials on the basis of the available data is challenging. In this Account, the effects of chemical structure, cross-linking, degradability, morphology, concentration, and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with a focus on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized uniquely to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple way to compare the immunotoxicities of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate well with published data. On the basis of the polymeric systems investigated in this study, valuable information has been collected that

  6. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    PubMed

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  7. 'Click Chemistry' in the preparation of porous polymer-basedparticulate stationary phases for mu-HPLC separation of peptides andproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Michael; Snauko, Marian; Svec, Frantisek; Frechet, JeanM.J.

    2006-01-02

    With the use of the copper(I)-catalyzed (3 + 2) azide-alkynecycloaddition, an element of "click chemistry," stationary phasescarrying long alkyl chains or soybean trypsin inhibitor have beenprepared for use in HPLC separations in the reversed-phase and affinitymodes, respectively. The ligands were attached via a triazole ring tosize monodisperse porous beads containing either alkyne or azide pendantfunctionalities. Alkyne-containing beads prepared by directcopolymerization of propargyl acrylate with ethylene dimethacrylate wereallowed to react with azidooctadecane to give a reversed-phase sorbent.Azide-functionalized beads were prepared by chemical modification ofglycidyl methacrylate particles. Subsequent reaction with a terminalaliphatic alkyne produced a reversed-phase sorbent similar to thatobtained from the alkyne beads. Soybean trypsin inhibitor wasfunctionalized with N-(4-pentynoyloxy) succinimide to carry alkyne groupsand then allowed to react with the azide-containing beads to produce anaffinity sorbent for trypsin. The performance of these stationary phaseswas demonstrated with the HPLC separations of a variety of peptides andproteins.

  8. Electrochemical impedimetric sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers/sol-gel chemistry for methidathion organophosphorous insecticide recognition.

    PubMed

    Bakas, Idriss; Hayat, Akhtar; Piletsky, Sergey; Piletska, Elena; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Noguer, Thierry; Rouillon, Régis

    2014-12-01

    We report here a novel method to detect methidathion organophosphorous insecticides. The sensing platform was architected by the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers and sol-gel technique on inexpensive, portable and disposable screen printed carbon electrodes. Electrochemical impedimetric detection technique was employed to perform the label free detection of the target analyte on the designed MIP/sol-gel integrated platform. The selection of the target specific monomer by electrochemical impedimetric methods was consistent with the results obtained by the computational modelling method. The prepared electrochemical MIP/sol-gel based sensor exhibited a high recognition capability toward methidathion, as well as a broad linear range and a low detection limit under the optimized conditions. Satisfactory results were also obtained for the methidathion determination in waste water samples.

  9. Synthesis, selected coordination chemistry and extraction behavior of a (phosphinoylmethyl)pyridyl N-oxide-functionalized ligand based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform

    DOE PAGES

    Ouizem, Sabrina; Rosario Amorin, Daniel; Dickie, Diane A.; ...

    2015-05-09

    For syntheses of new multidentate chelating ligands ((6,6'4(1,4-diazepane-1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(pyridine-6,2-diyl))bis(methylene))bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) (2) and 6,6'-((1,4-diazepane1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(2-((diphenylphosphoryl)methyl)pyridine 1-oxide) (3), based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform functionalized with 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine P-oxide and 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine NP-dioxide fragments, respectively, the results are reported. Our results from studies of the coordination chemistry of the ligands with selected lanthanide nitrates and Cu(BF4)(2) are outlined, and crystal structures for two complexes, [Cu(2)](BF4)2 and [Cu(3)](BF4)2, are described along with survey Eu(III) and Am(III) solvent extraction analysis, for 3.

  10. Synthesis, selected coordination chemistry and extraction behavior of a (phosphinoylmethyl)pyridyl N-oxide-functionalized ligand based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ouizem, Sabrina; Rosario Amorin, Daniel; Dickie, Diane A.; Cramer, Roger E.; Campana, Charles F.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Paine, Robert T.

    2015-05-09

    For syntheses of new multidentate chelating ligands ((6,6'4(1,4-diazepane-1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(pyridine-6,2-diyl))bis(methylene))bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) (2) and 6,6'-((1,4-diazepane1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(2-((diphenylphosphoryl)methyl)pyridine 1-oxide) (3), based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform functionalized with 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine P-oxide and 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine NP-dioxide fragments, respectively, the results are reported. Our results from studies of the coordination chemistry of the ligands with selected lanthanide nitrates and Cu(BF4)(2) are outlined, and crystal structures for two complexes, [Cu(2)](BF4)2 and [Cu(3)](BF4)2, are described along with survey Eu(III) and Am(III) solvent extraction analysis, for 3.

  11. Stability of carbon fiber surface chemistry under temperature and its influence on interfacial adhesion with polymer matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A; Ozcan, Soydan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stability of the surface chemistry of a surface treated carbon fiber was investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Within a range of temperatures from room temperature to 400 C, the only surface functionalities that decomposed were carboxylic acids and dangling nitrogen containing functionalities like amines, amides or nitriles. Significant amounts of water were desorbed as well. This study enabled the testing of the coherence our the fitting of the C(1s), O(1s) and N(1s) peaks. Particularly, when considering the fitting of in the O(1s) peak, carboxylic acids were shown to be included in a single component peak centered at a binding energy of 532.1 eV. The reaction of the carbon fiber surface and an acrylate resin at high temperature, because of the decomposition of carboxylic acids, was highlighted by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The thermal history of the composite material during its manufacture appeared to be a major influence on the nature of the interactions generated at the fiber-matrix interface and the resulting mechanical properties.

  12. Flow chemistry and polymer-supported pseudoenantiomeric acylating agents enable parallel kinetic resolution of chiral saturated N-heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W.

    2017-05-01

    Kinetic resolution is a common method to obtain enantioenriched material from a racemic mixture. This process will deliver enantiopure unreacted material when the selectivity factor of the process, s, is greater than 1; however, the scalemic reaction product is often discarded. Parallel kinetic resolution, on the other hand, provides access to two enantioenriched products from a single racemic starting material, but suffers from a variety of practical challenges regarding experimental design that limit its applications. Here, we describe the development of a flow-based system that enables practical parallel kinetic resolution of saturated N-heterocycles. This process provides access to both enantiomers of the starting material in good yield and high enantiopurity; similar results with classical kinetic resolution would require selectivity factors in the range of s = 100. To achieve this, two immobilized quasienantiomeric acylating agents were designed for the asymmetric acylation of racemic saturated N-heterocycles. Using the flow-based system we could efficiently separate, recover and reuse the polymer-supported reagents. The amide products could be readily separated and hydrolysed to the corresponding amines without detectable epimerization.

  13. Relative binding orientations of adenosine A1 receptor ligands — A test case for Distributed Multipole Analysis in medicinal chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wenden, Eleonora M.; Price, Sarah L.; Apaya, Robert P.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Soudijn, Willem

    1995-02-01

    The electrostatic properties of adenosine-based agonists and xanthine-based antagonists for the adenosine A1 receptor were used to assess various proposals for their relative orientation in the unknown binding site. The electrostatic properties were calculated from distributed multipole representations of SCF wavefunctions. A range of methods of assessing the electrostatic similarity of the ligands were used in the comparison. One of the methods, comparing the sign of the potential around the two molecules, gave inconclusive results. The other approaches, however, provided a mutually complementary and consistent picture of the electrostatic similarity and dissimilarity of the molecules in the three proposed relative orientations. This was significantly different from the results obtained previously with MOPAC AM1 point charges. In the standard model overlay, where the aromatic nitrogen atoms of both agonists and antagonists are in the same position relative to the binding site, the electrostatic potentials are so dissimilar that binding to the same receptor site is highly unlikely. Overlaying the N6-region of adenosine with that near C8 of theophylline (the N6-C8 model) produces the greatest similarity in electrostatic properties for these ligands. However, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) show greater electrostatic similarity when the aromatic rings are superimposed according to the flipped model, in which the xanthine ring is rotated around its horizontal axis. This difference is mainly attributed to the change in conformation of N6-substituted adenosines and could result in a different orientation for theophylline and DPCPX within the receptor binding site. However, it is more likely that DPCPX also binds according to the N6-C8 model, as this model gives the best steric overlay and would be favoured by the lipophilic forces, provided that the binding site residues could accommodate the different electrostatic

  14. The Place of Macromolecules in Freshman Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of knowledge on macromolecules into a freshman chemistry course which emphasizes topics in organic chemistry, polymer science and biochemistry, atoms, chemical thermodynamics, and inorganic chemistry. Indicates that the program is the only way to keep chemistry education up to date. (CC)

  15. The Place of Macromolecules in Freshman Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of knowledge on macromolecules into a freshman chemistry course which emphasizes topics in organic chemistry, polymer science and biochemistry, atoms, chemical thermodynamics, and inorganic chemistry. Indicates that the program is the only way to keep chemistry education up to date. (CC)

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  17. Resource Paper: Organosilicon Chemistry, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Robert; Barton, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Outlined are recent developments in the field of organosilicon chemistry. Discussed are processes for synthesizing organosilanes, chemical bonding in silicon compounds, silicone polymers, and catenated polysilanes. (CS)

  18. Resource Paper: Organosilicon Chemistry, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Robert; Barton, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Outlined are recent developments in the field of organosilicon chemistry. Discussed are processes for synthesizing organosilanes, chemical bonding in silicon compounds, silicone polymers, and catenated polysilanes. (CS)

  19. Electrical conductive coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Givaja, Gonzalo; Amo-Ochoa, Pilar; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Zamora, Félix

    2012-01-07

    Coordination polymers are currently one of the hottest topics in Inorganic and Supramolecular Chemistry. This critical review summarizes the current state-of-the-art on electrical conductive coordination polymers (CPs), also named metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The data were collected following two sort criteria of the CPs structure: dimensionality and bridging ligands (151 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  20. Dynamic covalent polymers.

    PubMed

    García, Fátima; Smulders, Maarten M J

    2016-11-15

    This Highlight presents an overview of the rapidly growing field of dynamic covalent polymers. This class of polymers combines intrinsic reversibility with the robustness of covalent bonds, thus enabling formation of mechanically stable, polymer-based materials that are responsive to external stimuli. It will be discussed how the inherent dynamic nature of the dynamic covalent bonds on the molecular level can be translated to the macroscopic level of the polymer, giving access to a range of applications, such as stimuli-responsive or self-healing materials. A primary distinction will be made based on the type of dynamic covalent bond employed, while a secondary distinction will be based on the consideration whether the dynamic covalent bond is used in the main chain of the polymer or whether it is used to allow side chain modification of the polymer. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of the dynamic covalent bonds present in the polymer, in particular in relation to how the specific (dynamic) features of the bond impart functionality to the polymer material, and to the conditions under which this dynamic behavior is manifested. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2016, 54, 3551-3577.

  1. Polymer Functionalized Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-03-01

    Significant interest has grown around the ability to control spatial arrangement of nanoparticles in a polymer nanocomposite to engineer materials with target properties. Past work has shown that one could achieve controlled assembly of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix by functionalizing nanoparticle surfaces with homopolymers. This talk will focus on our recent work using Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations and GPU-based molecular dynamics simulations to specifically understand how heterogeneity in the polymer functionalization in the form of a) copolymers with varying monomer chemistry and monomer sequence, and b) polydispersity in homopolymer grafts can tune effective interactions between functionalized nanoparticles, and the assembly of functionalized nanoparticles.

  2. A 1D anionic lanthanide coordination polymer as an adsorbent material for the selective uptake of cationic dyes from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Du, Pei-Yao; Li, Hui; Fu, Xin; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin

    2015-08-14

    A 1D anionic lanthanide coordination polymer {[(CH(3))(2)NH(2)] [(H(2)abtc)(2)Ho(H(2)O)]}n () (H(4)abtc = 3,3',5,5'-azobenzene-tetracarboxylic acid) has been synthesized under hydrothermal reaction conditions. The protonated [(CH(3))(2)NH(2)](+) is generated from decomposed DMA during the reaction, and balances the negative charge of the framework. The as-obtained samples were characterized using single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and TGA. Interestingly, 1 can selectively capture cationic dye molecules from mixtures of dye molecules containing different charges in aqueous solutions. Furthermore, 1 exhibits a different adsorption efficiency toward different cationic dyes (crystal violet, rhodamine B, safranine T and methylene blue). Among the studied dyes, methylene blue has a higher adsorption efficiency in comparison to the others. Thus, complex 1 could serve as a good candidate material for the selective removal of cationic dyes during the treatment of wastewater.

  3. Polymers Are Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of the human understanding of polymers from alchemy to modern times. Discusses renaissance chemistry, polymers in the nineteenth century, synthetic elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers, fibers, coatings, adhesives, derivatives of natural rubber, thermosets, step-reaction, and chain polymerization. (CW)

  4. Polymers Are Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of the human understanding of polymers from alchemy to modern times. Discusses renaissance chemistry, polymers in the nineteenth century, synthetic elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers, fibers, coatings, adhesives, derivatives of natural rubber, thermosets, step-reaction, and chain polymerization. (CW)

  5. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Keenan A.; Kramer, Louisa J.; Doskey, Paul V.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian; Van Dam, Brie; Helmig, Detlev

    2015-09-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on the surface of snow grains, and (3) initialization of the species concentrations in the QLL through equilibrium partitioning with mixing ratios in snowpack interstitial air. A comprehensive suite of measurements in and above snowpack during a high O3 event facilitated analysis of the relationship between the chemistry of snowpack and the overlying atmosphere. The model successfully reproduced 2 maxima (i.e., a peak near the surface of the snowpack at solar noon and a larger peak occurring in the evening that extended down from 0.5 to 2 m) in the diurnal profile of NO2 within snowpack interstitial air. The maximum production rate of NO2 by photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) was approximately 108 molec cm-3 s-1, which explained daily observations of maxima in NO2 mixing ratios near solar noon. Mixing ratios of NO2 in snowpack interstitial air were greatest in the deepest layers of the snowpack at night and were attributed to thermal decomposition of peroxynitric acid, which produced up to 106 molec NO2 cm-3 s-1. Highest levels of NO in snowpack interstitial air were confined to upper layers of the snowpack and observed profiles were consistent with photolysis of NO2. Production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from NO3- photolysis was estimated to be two orders of magnitude larger than NO production and supports the hypothesis that NO3- photolysis is the primary source of NOx within sunlit snowpack in the Arctic. Aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid by O3 resulted in a maximum consumption rate of ∼106-107 molec cm-3 s-1 and was the primary removal mechanism for O3.

  6. Dynamic covalent polymers

    PubMed Central

    García, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Highlight presents an overview of the rapidly growing field of dynamic covalent polymers. This class of polymers combines intrinsic reversibility with the robustness of covalent bonds, thus enabling formation of mechanically stable, polymer‐based materials that are responsive to external stimuli. It will be discussed how the inherent dynamic nature of the dynamic covalent bonds on the molecular level can be translated to the macroscopic level of the polymer, giving access to a range of applications, such as stimuli‐responsive or self‐healing materials. A primary distinction will be made based on the type of dynamic covalent bond employed, while a secondary distinction will be based on the consideration whether the dynamic covalent bond is used in the main chain of the polymer or whether it is used to allow side chain modification of the polymer. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of the dynamic covalent bonds present in the polymer, in particular in relation to how the specific (dynamic) features of the bond impart functionality to the polymer material, and to the conditions under which this dynamic behavior is manifested. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2016, 54, 3551–3577. PMID:27917019

  7. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  8. Efficient DNA–Polymer Coupling in Organic Solvents: A Survey of Amide Coupling, Thiol-Ene and Tetrazine–Norbornene Chemistries Applied to Conjugation of Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide)

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Thomas R.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.

    2016-01-01

    A range of chemistries were explored for the efficient covalent conjugation of DNA to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAM)) in organic solvents. Amide coupling and thiol–ene Michael addition were found to be ineffective for the synthesis of the desired products. However, the inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder (DAinv) reaction between tetrazine (Tz) and norbornene (Nb) was found to give DNA–polymer conjugates in good yields (up to 40%) in organic solvents (N,N-dimethylformamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), and without the need for a catalyst. Methods for the synthesis of Tz-and Nb- functionalised DNA were developed, along with a post-polymerisation functionalisation strategy for the production of Tz-functionalised polymers. PMID:27982070

  9. Surface functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles with cationic polymers via the combination of mussel inspired chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization: Characterization and enhanced removal of organic dye.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Hongye; Jiang, Ruming; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-28

    Monodispersed SiO2 particles functionalized with cationic polymers poly-((3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) (PAPTCl) were prepared using mussel inspired surface modification strategy and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta potential were employed to characterize these SiO2 samples. The adsorption performance of the functionalized SiO2 (donated as SiO2-PDA-PAPTCl) towards anionic organic dye Congo red (CR) was investigated to evaluate their potential environmental applications. We demonstrated that the surface of SiO2 particles can be successfully functionalized with cationic PAPTCl. The adsorption capability of as-prepared SiO2 was found to increases from 28.70 and 106.65mg/g after surface grafted with cationic polymers. The significant enhancement in the adsorption capability of SiO2-PDA-PAPTCl is mainly attributed to the introduction of cationic polymers. More importantly, this strategy is expected to be promising for fabrication of many other functional polymer nanocomposites for environmental applications due to the universality of mussel inspired chemistry and well designability and good monomer adaptability of SI-ATRP.

  10. Thiol X Click Foldamers for Polymer Affinity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-24

    Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Thiol-X chemistry , nucleic acids, dynamic thioester polymers REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...of Complex, Controlled Polymer Structures from Efficient Chemistries " Invited Lectures Presented at Cornell University, High Polymer Research Group... Chemistry 0.00 1 NAME Total Number: NAME Total Number: Weixian Xi Chen Wang 2 ...... ...... Sub Contractors (DD882) Names of other research staff

  11. Beyond Donor-Acceptor (D-A) Approach: Structure-Optoelectronic Properties-Organic Photovoltaic Performance Correlation in New D-A1 -D-A2 Low-Bandgap Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chochos, Christos L; Drakopoulou, Sofia; Katsouras, Athanasios; Squeo, Benedetta M; Sprau, Christian; Colsmann, Alexander; Gregoriou, Vasilis G; Cando, Alex-Palma; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Gasparini, Nicola; Kazerouni, Negar; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2017-04-01

    Low-bandgap near-infrared polymers are usually synthesized using the common donor-acceptor (D-A) approach. However, recently polymer chemists are introducing more complex chemical concepts for better fine tuning of their optoelectronic properties. Usually these studies are limited to one or two polymer examples in each case study so far, though. In this study, the dependence of optoelectronic and macroscopic (device performance) properties in a series of six new D-A1 -D-A2 low bandgap semiconducting polymers is reported for the first time. Correlation between the chemical structure of single-component polymer films and their optoelectronic properties has been achieved in terms of absorption maxima, optical bandgap, ionization potential, and electron affinity. Preliminary organic photovoltaic results based on blends of the D-A1 -D-A2 polymers as the electron donor mixed with the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C71 -butyric acid methyl ester demonstrate power conversion efficiencies close to 4% with short-circuit current densities (J sc ) of around 11 mA cm(-2) , high fill factors up to 0.70, and high open-circuit voltages (V oc s) of 0.70 V. All the devices are fabricated in an inverted architecture with the photoactive layer processed in air with doctor blade technique, showing the compatibility with roll-to-roll large-scale manufacturing processes.

  12. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  13. What Are We Going to Do about a Problem Like Polymer Chemistry? Develop New Methods of Delivery to Improve Understanding of a Demanding Interdisciplinary Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalli, G.; Hamerton, I.; Lygo-Baker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Following collaboration between two chemistry lecturers and an academic developer an attempt was made to enhance the learning of students within a chemistry module through the adaptation of the delivery of content material. This paper reports a piece of practitioner led research which considered how effective the approach developed was upon the…

  14. What Are We Going to Do about a Problem Like Polymer Chemistry? Develop New Methods of Delivery to Improve Understanding of a Demanding Interdisciplinary Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalli, G.; Hamerton, I.; Lygo-Baker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Following collaboration between two chemistry lecturers and an academic developer an attempt was made to enhance the learning of students within a chemistry module through the adaptation of the delivery of content material. This paper reports a piece of practitioner led research which considered how effective the approach developed was upon the…

  15. Plasma chemistry and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between discharge phenomena and plasma chemistry, as well as the equipment and mechanisms of plasma chemical reactions are described. Various areas in which plasma chemistry is applied are surveyed, such as: manufacturing of semiconductor integrated circuits; synthetic fibers; high polymer materials for medical uses; optical lenses; and membrane filters (reverse penetration films).

  16. USSR Report, Chemistry, No. 105

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This USSR Report contains articles on Chemistry. Some of the topics covered are Alkaloids, Catalysis, Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Industry, Coal Gasification , Combustion, Electrochemistry, Fertilizers, Free Radials, Nitrogen Compounds, Organometallic Compounds, Organophosphorus Compounds, Pesticides, Petroleum Processing Technology, Polymers and Polymerization and Rubber and Elastomers.,

  17. Influence of biphenyl spacer appended to the flexible phosphonate arms in modulating the dimensionality of the coordination polymers: Synthesis, structural chemistry and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tripuramallu, Bharat Kumar; Das, Samar K.

    2013-01-15

    Two new compounds [Co (2,2 Prime -bipy) (H{sub 2}dbp)]{sub n} (1) and [Ni (2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}dbp)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (2) based on the flexible ligand 4,4 Prime -dimethylenebiphenyldiphosphonic acid (H{sub 4}dbp) with 2,2 Prime -bipyridine as secondary ligand have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Both the compounds are well characterized by routine elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectroscopies, thermogravimetric analysis and finally by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 is a 1D extended coordination polymer and 2 is a discrete molecular compound. A comparative study between the geometries of H{sub 4}dbp ligand (in compounds 1 and 2, present study) and p-xylylenediphosphonic acid (H{sub 4}pxp) ligand (in previously reported compounds [Cu(2,2 Prime -bipy)(H{sub 2}pxp)]{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O (1A) and Ni(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 2}H{sub 4}pxp]{sub n}[H{sub 2}pxp]{sub n} (2A), see text) demonstrate the effect of the twisting in the benzene rings in changing higher dimensional H{sub x}pxp (x refers to number of protonated hydroxyl groups) compounds to lower dimensional H{sub x}dbp compounds. The eight membered Co-dimer rings formed in compound 1 represents the simple and isolated Co-dimer, exhibiting weak antiferromagnetic exchange between metal centers through OPO bridges. - Graphical abstract: Two new compounds based on the dimethylenebiphenyldiphosphonic acid have been synthesized. The effect of twisting of benzene rings in the biphenyl spacer containing multidentate ligands alters dimensionality of final compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt containing coordination polymer and a nickel discrete compound have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flexible ligand 4,4'-dimethylenebiphenyldiphosphonic acid has been employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co(II) and Ni(II) ions are square pyramidal and octahedral respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of the twisting

  18. Physical properties of immiscible polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The demixing of immiscible polymers in low gravity is discussed. Applications of knowledge gained in this research will provide a better understanding of the role of phase segregation in determining the properties of polymer blends made from immiscible polymers. Knowledge will also be gained regarding the purification of biological materials by partitioning between the two liquid phases formed by solution of the polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran in water. Testing of new apparatus for space flight, extension of affinity phase partitioning, refinement of polymer chemistry, and demixing of isopycnic polymer phases in a one gravity environment are discussed.

  19. European TV Brings Chemistry into the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes television programs broadcast in the Netherlands and West Germany which explain what chemistry is all about. Both programs, planned under the direction of trained chemists, comprise 13 half-hour presentations and include segments on energy, polymers, chemical processes, the chemistry of life, atomic and molecular chemistry, and chemistry…

  20. High resolution scanning tunneling microscopy of a 1D coordination polymer with imidazole-based N,N,O ligands on HOPG.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nina V; Mitra, Utpal; Warnick, Karl-Georg; Dremov, Viacheslav; Stocker, Michael; Wölfle, Thorsten; Hieringer, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Frank W; Burzlaff, Nicolai; Görling, Andreas; Müller, Paul

    2014-09-08

    Novel κ(3) -N,N,O ligands tend to form 1D coordination polymer strands. Deposition of 1D structures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was achieved from diluted solutions and polymer strands have been studied on HOPG by AFM/STM. Single strands were mapped by STM and their electronic properties were subsequently characterized by current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS). Periodic density functional calculations simulating a polymer strand deposited on a HOPG surface are in agreement with the zig-zag structure indicated by experimental findings. Both the observed periodicity and the Zn-Zn distances can be reproduced in the simulations. Van der Waals interactions were found to play a major role for the geometry of the isolated polymer strand, for the adsorption geometry on HOPG, as well as for the adsorption energy.

  1. Polymer Preparations in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampman, Gary M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes six laboratory procedures for preparing polymers which have been used in a course for undergraduate industrial arts students, who have a concentration in plastics technology but have not taken more than one year of college chemistry. (BT)

  2. Acquisition of a SAXS Facility for the Study of Novel Polymer Nanocomposite Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-19

    It supports our current efforts with novel polymer chemistries and architectures, which incorporate functionalized organic/ inorganic additives...efforts with novel polymer chemistries and architectures, which incorporate functionalized organic/ inorganic additives creating unique PNMs. In addition

  3. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  4. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  5. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  6. Ferrocene-functionalized disubstituted polyacetylenes with high light refractivity: synthesis through polymer reaction by using click chemistry and application as precursors to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jim, Cathy K W; Qin, Anjun; Mahtab, Faisal; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2011-10-04

    Ferrocene-functionalized disubstituted polyacetylenes are synthesized in high yields by copper-catalyzed click reactions of azido-decorated poly(1-phenyl-1-hexyne) and poly(diphenylacetylene) with 1-ethynylferrocene. All the organometallic polymers are soluble and film-forming. They enjoy high thermal stability (≥300 °C) and are redox-active. Thanks to the ferrocenyl units, thin films of the polymers show high refractive indices (n=1.745-1.698) in the wavelength region of 400-1700 nm as well as high Abbé numbers (v(D)' up to 426) and low optical dispersions (D' down to 0.002) at telecommunication important wavelengths. Pyrolyses of the polymers under nitrogen furnish magnetic ceramics with high magnetizabilities. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Kraton Performance Polymers, developed halogen-free, high-flow NEXAR polymer membranes using less solvent that save energy during reverse osmosis to desalinate water.

  8. An Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Synthesis of Well-Defined Polymers by Low-Catalyst-Concentration ATRP and Postpolymerization Modification to Fluorescent Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Woodruf, Shannon R.; Wisian-Neilson, Patty J.

    2016-01-01

    A two-session experiment is designed to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in catalysis, transition metal complexes, polymer synthesis, and postpolymerization modifications. In the first session, students synthesize poly(glycidyl methacrylate) via low-catalyst-concentration atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The…

  9. An Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Synthesis of Well-Defined Polymers by Low-Catalyst-Concentration ATRP and Postpolymerization Modification to Fluorescent Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Woodruf, Shannon R.; Wisian-Neilson, Patty J.

    2016-01-01

    A two-session experiment is designed to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in catalysis, transition metal complexes, polymer synthesis, and postpolymerization modifications. In the first session, students synthesize poly(glycidyl methacrylate) via low-catalyst-concentration atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The…

  10. Donor Acceptor Polymerization Chemistry as a Vehicle to Low Energy Cure of Matrix Resins: Evolution of the 2-Tg Concept to Produce High Tg Polymers at Ambient Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    tetrafunctional acceptors. DSC and TGA analysis of these polymers indicated they possessed the thermal stability necessary for performance in their...be enhanced by choosing comonomers that act as "solvents", and that the "onset of decomposition" temperature as measured by TGA analysis under nitrogen

  11. Spontaneously poling of electro-optic polymer thin films across a 1.1-mm thick glass substrate by pyroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su; Luo, Jingdong; Jin, Zhian; Li, Ming; Kim, Tae-Dong; Chen, Antao; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    We developed a method to pole electro-optic (E-O) polymer thin films using pyroelectric crystals instead of external high voltage source unit. The process is based on a multi-layered dielectric stack, in which micron-thick E-O polymer films were sandwiched between millimeter thick pyroelectric crystal and borosilicate glass substrate. Through modest temperature change, very large electric fields could be spontaneously generated from pyroelectric effect of the crystals, which can deliver high effective field strength (up to 0.7 MV/cm) to the E-O polymer thin films across the glass plate. Very intriguing phenomena of significantly reduced leak through current (LTC) and improved dielectric breakdown strength of E-O polymers were observed. As a result, large Pockels coefficients of 62 pm/V at 1.31 μm can be obtained for poled E-O thin films. The good agreement between theory and experimentally measured results in the study provide important insights of electrostatics in pyroelectric systems and their effective interactions with thin film E-O polymeric materials. It also demonstrates that pyroelectric poling is a promising alternative to commonly used contact poling and corona poling that offers unique advantages of high field strength and near-zero LTC for polarizing dielectric functional materials and devices.

  12. Sequence-controlled polymers.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jean-François; Ouchi, Makoto; Liu, David R; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2013-08-09

    Sequence-controlled polymers are macromolecules in which monomer units of different chemical nature are arranged in an ordered fashion. The most prominent examples are biological and have been studied and used primarily by molecular biologists and biochemists. However, recent progress in protein- and DNA-based nanotechnologies has shown the relevance of sequence-controlled polymers to nonbiological applications, including data storage, nanoelectronics, and catalysis. In addition, synthetic polymer chemistry has provided interesting routes for preparing nonnatural sequence-controlled polymers. Although these synthetic macromolecules do not yet compare in functional scope with their natural counterparts, they open up opportunities for controlling the structure, self-assembly, and macroscopic properties of polymer materials.

  13. Color indicator for supramolecular polymer chemistry: phenolphthalein-containing thermo- and pH-sensitive N-(Isopropyl)acrylamide copolymers and β-cyclodextrin complexation.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Carolin; Ritter, Helmut

    2013-07-12

    The copolymerization parameters of N-(isopropyl)acrylamide (1) and N-(2-hydroxy-5-(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-oxo-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl)benzyl)acrylamide (2) are determined. For both monomers, the homoaddition proceeds slightly faster than the heteroaddition step; however, the polymer formation occurs in a statistic fashion. Copolymers of different compositions are prepared and the cloud points are determined. Thereby, a significant influence of the concentration of monomer 2 and the pH value is found. For the first time, the complexation of polymer attached phenolphthalein by β-cyclodextrins is shown. Furthermore, it is possible to achieve a decomplexation by the addition of suitable guest molecules. Both procedures can be followed with the naked eye.

  14. Taming Prebiotic Chemistry: The Role of Heterogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in the Emergence of a Prebiotic Catalytic/Information Polymer System

    PubMed Central

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2016-01-01

    Cellular life is based on interacting polymer networks that serve as catalysts, genetic information and structural molecules. The complexity of the DNA, RNA and protein biochemistry suggests that it must have been preceded by simpler systems. The RNA world hypothesis proposes RNA as the prime candidate for such a primal system. Even though this proposition has gained currency, its investigations have highlighted several challenges with respect to bulk aqueous media: (1) the synthesis of RNA monomers is difficult; (2) efficient pathways for monomer polymerization into functional RNAs and their subsequent, sequence-specific replication remain elusive; and (3) the evolution of the RNA function towards cellular metabolism in isolation is questionable in view of the chemical mixtures expected on the early Earth. This review will address the question of the possible roles of heterogeneous media and catalysis as drivers for the emergence of RNA-based polymer networks. We will show that this approach to non-enzymatic polymerizations of RNA from monomers and RNA evolution cannot only solve some issues encountered during reactions in bulk aqueous solutions, but may also explain the co-emergence of the various polymers indispensable for life in complex mixtures and their organization into primitive networks. PMID:27827919

  15. Taming Prebiotic Chemistry: The Role of Heterogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in the Emergence of a Prebiotic Catalytic/Information Polymer System.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2016-11-04

    Cellular life is based on interacting polymer networks that serve as catalysts, genetic information and structural molecules. The complexity of the DNA, RNA and protein biochemistry suggests that it must have been preceded by simpler systems. The RNA world hypothesis proposes RNA as the prime candidate for such a primal system. Even though this proposition has gained currency, its investigations have highlighted several challenges with respect to bulk aqueous media: (1) the synthesis of RNA monomers is difficult; (2) efficient pathways for monomer polymerization into functional RNAs and their subsequent, sequence-specific replication remain elusive; and (3) the evolution of the RNA function towards cellular metabolism in isolation is questionable in view of the chemical mixtures expected on the early Earth. This review will address the question of the possible roles of heterogeneous media and catalysis as drivers for the emergence of RNA-based polymer networks. We will show that this approach to non-enzymatic polymerizations of RNA from monomers and RNA evolution cannot only solve some issues encountered during reactions in bulk aqueous solutions, but may also explain the co-emergence of the various polymers indispensable for life in complex mixtures and their organization into primitive networks.

  16. The effect of nitrogen diffusion hardening on the surface chemistry and scratch resistance of Ti-6A1-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, R; Weimer, J J; George, M A; Lucas, L C

    2000-08-01

    Modular, head-stem, mixed-metal connections are susceptible to mechanically mediated electrochemical interactions. Any attempt to improve the performance of these connections should center around increasing their resistance to mechanical damage, particularly the titanium alloy (Ti64). This study investigated the effect of a nitrogen-diffusion-hardening process on Ti64, with specific reference to changes in composition, chemistry, electrochemistry and its ability to resist and/or repassivate scratch damage. The nitrogen-diffusion-hardened Ti64 alloy had TiN and TiNO complexes at the immediate surface and sub-surface layers. The diffusion-hardened samples also had a deeper penetration of oxygen compared to regular Ti64 alloy samples. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data corroborated the increased thickness of the barrier oxide on the diffusion-hardened samples. The nitrogen-diffusion-hardened samples were more resistant to scratch damage and repaired/repassivated faster after such damage. The results suggest that the nitrogen-diffusion-hardened titanium alloy should exhibit increased resistance to mechanical-electrochemical interactions in mixed-metal modular interfaces in total hip prostheses.

  17. Recent aspects of self-oscillating polymeric materials: designing self-oscillating polymers coupled with supramolecular chemistry and ionic liquid science.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2014-06-14

    Herein, we summarise the recent developments in self-oscillating polymeric materials based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry, where aggregates of molecular building blocks with non-covalent bonds evolve the temporal or spatiotemporal structure. By utilising the rhythmic oscillation of the association/dissociation of molecular aggregates coupled with the redox oscillation by the BZ reaction, novel soft materials that express similar functions as those of living matter will be achieved. Further, from the viewpoint of materials science, our recent approach to prepare self-oscillating materials that operate long-term under mild conditions will be introduced.

  18. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  19. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  20. Freezing transition of the directed polymer in a 1 + d random medium: location of the critical temperature and unusual critical properties.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In dimension d > or =3, the directed polymer in a random medium undergoes a phase transition between a free phase at high temperature and a low-temperature disorder-dominated phase. For the latter phase, Fisher and Huse have proposed a droplet theory based on the scaling of the free-energy fluctuations Delta F(l) approximately l theta at scale l. On the other hand, in related growth models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, Forrest and Tang have found that the height-height correlation function is logarithmic at the transition. For the directed polymer model at criticality, this translates into logarithmic free-energy fluctuations Delta FTc(l) approximately (lnl)sigma with sigma = 1/2. In this paper, we propose a droplet scaling analysis exactly at criticality based on this logarithmic scaling. Our main conclusion is that the typical correlation length xi(T) of the low-temperature phase diverges as ln xi(t) approximately [-ln(Tc-T)]1/sigma approximately [-ln(Tc-T)]2, instead of the usual power law xi(T) approximately (Tc-T)-v. Furthermore, the logarithmic dependence of Delta FTc(l) leads to the conclusion that the critical temperature Tc actually coincides with the explicit upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and co-workers, where T2 corresponds to the temperature below which the ratio Z 2 L/(ZL)2 diverges exponentially in L. Finally, since the Fisher-Huse droplet theory was initially introduced for the spin-glass phase, we briefly mention the similarities with and differences from the directed polymer model. If one speculates that the free energy of droplet excitations for spin glasses is also logarithmic at Tc, one obtains a logarithmic decay for the mean square correlation function at criticality, C2(r) approximately 1/(ln r)sigma, instead of the usual power law l/rd-2+eta.

  1. Freezing transition of the directed polymer in a 1+d random medium: Location of the critical temperature and unusual critical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In dimension d⩾3 , the directed polymer in a random medium undergoes a phase transition between a free phase at high temperature and a low-temperature disorder-dominated phase. For the latter phase, Fisher and Huse have proposed a droplet theory based on the scaling of the free-energy fluctuations ΔF(l)˜lθ at scale l . On the other hand, in related growth models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, Forrest and Tang have found that the height-height correlation function is logarithmic at the transition. For the directed polymer model at criticality, this translates into logarithmic free-energy fluctuations ΔFTc(l)˜(lnl)σ with σ=1/2 . In this paper, we propose a droplet scaling analysis exactly at criticality based on this logarithmic scaling. Our main conclusion is that the typical correlation length ξ(T) of the low-temperature phase diverges as lnξ(T)˜[-ln(Tc-T)]1/σ˜[-ln(Tc-T)]2 , instead of the usual power law ξ(T)˜(Tc-T)-ν . Furthermore, the logarithmic dependence of ΔFTc(l) leads to the conclusion that the critical temperature Tc actually coincides with the explicit upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and co-workers, where T2 corresponds to the temperature below which the ratio ZL2¯/(ZL¯)2 diverges exponentially in L . Finally, since the Fisher-Huse droplet theory was initially introduced for the spin-glass phase, we briefly mention the similarities with and differences from the directed polymer model. If one speculates that the free energy of droplet excitations for spin glasses is also logarithmic at Tc , one obtains a logarithmic decay for the mean square correlation function at criticality, C2(r)¯˜1/(lnr)σ , instead of the usual power law 1/rd-2+η .

  2. New developments in thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-temperature polymers since 1985 are discussed with the emphasis on the chemistry. High-temperature polymers refer to materials that exhibit glass-transition temperatures greater than 200 C and have the chemical structure expected to provide high thermooxidative stability. Specific polymers or series of polymers were selected to show how the chemical structure influences certain properties. Poly(arylene ethers) and polyimides are the two principal families of polymers discussed. Recent work on poly(arylene ethers) has concentrated on incorporating heterocyclic units within the polymer backbone. Recent polyimide work has centered on the synthesis of new polymers from novel monomers, several containing the trifluoromethyl group strategically located on the molecule. Various members in each of these polymer families display a unique combination of properties, heretofore unattainable. Other families of polymers are also briefly discussed with a polymer from an AB maleimidobenzocyclobutene exhibiting an especially attractive combination of properties.

  3. New Guidelines for Undergraduate Chemistry Curricula Examined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1989-01-01

    Reviews current biochemistry, education, and polymer course options found in chemistry programs. Proposes a new core curriculum with 28 semester hours with courses in inorganic, chemical, and instrumental analysis, organic, bioorganic, and physical chemistry. Notes that the new curriculum would better prepare students for the existing employment…

  4. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  5. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers that set on cooling

  6. massXpert 2: a cross-platform software environment for polymer chemistry modelling and simulation/analysis of mass spectrometric data.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Filippo

    2009-10-15

    Since the middle of the 90s, mass spectrometry has evolved into an almost indispensable tool in structural studies on an ever-growing variety of (bio-)polymers, of which proteins, sugars and nucleic acids are the most prominent. Since the first public release of massXpert, the advances of mass spectrometry have motivated continuous and thorough maintenance of that software, in the form of two full software rewrites, culminating with massXpert 2, which we describe in this report. We shall describe the profound changes in massXpert that were performed so as to keep up with the technical advances in mass spectrometry since a decade. The massXpert 2 software is an open source and free software project hosted at http://www.massxpert.org.

  7. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  8. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  9. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  11. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  13. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  15. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  18. Thermally conductive polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  19. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  20. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  1. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Organometallic Chemistry, 8-13 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, Gregory

    2012-07-13

    The 2012 Organometallic Chemistry Gordon Research Conference will highlight new basic science and fundamental applications of organometallic chemistry in industrial, academic, and national lab settings. Scientific themes of the conference will include chemical synthesis, reactivity, catalysis, polymer chemistry, bonding, and theory that involve transition-metal (and main-group) interactions with organic moieties.

  2. Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    This textbook is intended to give an understanding of the basic principles that constitute the field of non-conventional polymers containing inorganic and organometalic units as the repeating units. Each chapter will be self-explanatory with a good background so that it can be easily understood at the senior undergraduate level. The principles involved in the preparation of these polymers, their characterisation and their applications will be discussed. Basic inorganic chemistry required for the understanding of each topic is presented so that the content of the chapter is readily understood.

  3. Crystal structure, infrared spectra and luminescence of a 1D Cd coordination polymer with 4-nitrophthalic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li-Juan; Kong, Ya-Jie; Sheng, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A new one-dimensional (1D) coordination polymer, [Cd(NPTA)(1,10-phen)(H2O)] n ( 1) (H2NPTA = 4-nitrophthalic acid; 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate), has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, solid state emission spectra, FT-IR spectra, and thermogravimetric analyses. The compound belongs to triclinic system with space group , and exhibits a one-dimensional linear chain. Each Cd with a strongly distorted octahedral coordination geometry is six-coordinated by two N atoms from one 1,10-phenanthroline ligand, three O atoms from two carboxylate groups of two different NPTA2- ligands and one O atoms from lattice water. Layer supramolecular architecture is formed by medium π-π stacking interactions between two neighboring phenanthroline rings from two independent linear chains. Studies on luminescent property of 1 exhibit the solid state emission originating from an intra ligand π → π* transition of NPTA2- ligand.

  4. Facile preparation of MoS2 based polymer composites via mussel inspired chemistry and their high efficiency for removal of organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Liu, Meiying; Chen, Junyu; Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Long; Jiang, Ruming; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-10-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a novel type of two-dimensional nanomaterial, which has attracted great research attention for its excellent physicochemical properties and possible applications. In this work, we prepared a novel MoS2 composite (MoS2-PDOPA) through the self-polymerization of levodopa (DOPA) on the surface of MoS2 under a weak alkaline solution. The obtained samples, including pure MoS2 and MoS2-PDOPA composite were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The potential environmental applications of MoS2-PDOPA were evaluated by using MoS2-PDOPA as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of various operational parameters such as contact time, initial MB concentration, solution pH and temperature on the adsorption of MB by MoS2-PDOPA. According to the adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics analysis, the MB adsorption onto MoS2-PDOPA follows the intraparticle diffusion model and Langmuir isotherm model, and the MB adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The maximum adsorption capacity of MoS2-PDOPA is calculated to be 244.03 mg/g at 298 K. As compared with unmodified MoS2, the adsorption capacity of MoS2-PDOPA is obviously improved. Taken together, we developed a facile method to prepare MoS2-PDOPA composites based on mussel inspired chemistry. The resultant composites could be utilized as efficient adsorbents with great potential for environmental adsorption applications.

  5. Preparation of a novel weak cation exchange/hydrophobic interaction chromatography dual-function polymer-based stationary phase for protein separation using "thiol-ene click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Bai, Quan; Zhao, Kailou; Gao, Dong; Tian, Lei

    2015-02-01

    A novel dual-function mixed-mode stationary phase based on poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) microspheres was synthesized by thiol-ene click chemistry and characterized by infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The new system displays both hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) character in a high salt concentration mobile phase, and weak cation exchange (WCX) chromatography character in a low salt concentration mobile phase. It can be used to separate proteins in both ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) mode and HIC mode. The resolution and selectivity of the stationary phase were evaluated in both HIC mode and IEC mode using protein standards. In comparison with the conventional WCX and HIC columns, the results were satisfactory and acceptable. Protein mass and bioactivity recoveries of more than 96% can be achieved in both HIC mode and IEC mode using this column. The results indicate that the novel dual-function mixed-mode column in many cases can replace the use of two individual WCX and HIC columns. In addition, the effects on protein separation of different ligand structures in the dual-function stationary phase and the pH of the mobile phase used were also investigated in detail. The results show that electrostatic interaction of the ligand with proteins must match the hydrophobicity of the ligand, which is an important factor to prepare the dual-function stationary phase. On the basis of this dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column, a new two-dimensional liquid chromatography technology with a single column system was also developed in this study, and was used to renature and purify recombinant human interferon-γ from inclusion bodies. The mass recovery, purity, and specific bioactivity obtained for the purified recombinant human interferon-γ were 87.2%, 92.4%, and 2.8 × 10(7) IU/mg, respectively, in IEC mode, and 83.4%, 95.2%, and 4.3 × 10(7) IU/mg, respectively, in HIC mode. The results indicate that the

  6. Cyclodextrin-functionalized polymers as drug carriers for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Yu, Cui-yun

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) represent the most extensively investigated cyclic molecules due to their wide availability, facile functionalization, unique amphiphilicity and inclusion capacity. The marriage of CD chemistry with polymer science has generated novel biomaterials by integrating supermolecular host-guest chemistry and state-of-the-art polymer chemistry techniques. The current mini-review focuses on the recent progress in CD-functionalized polymers as drug carriers for cancer therapy. CD-functionalized polymers with different structures are summarized. Their application as drug carriers for cancer therapy is then highlighted. In the end, the future directions of this rapidly developing research field are discussed.

  7. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  8. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  9. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  10. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  13. Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Isabelle; Tighzert, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.

  14. Fundamental studies of polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Lu, M.T.; Robison, T.W.; Rogers, Y.C.; Wilson, K.V.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were (1) to develop an enhanced fundamental understanding of the coordination chemistry of hazardous-metal-ion complexation with water-soluble metal-binding polymers, and (2) to exploit this knowledge to develop improved separations for analytical methods, metals processing, and waste treatment. We investigated features of water-soluble metal-binding polymers that affect their binding constants and selectivity for selected transition metal ions. We evaluated backbone polymers using light scattering and ultrafiltration techniques to determine the effect of pH and ionic strength on the molecular volume of the polymers. The backbone polymers were incrementally functionalized with a metal-binding ligand. A procedure and analytical method to determine the absolute level of functionalization was developed and the results correlated with the elemental analysis, viscosity, and molecular size.

  15. Polymer light-emitting diodes based on cationic iridium(III) complexes with a 1,10-phenanthroline derivative containing a bipolar carbazole-oxadiazole unit as the auxiliary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huaijun; Wei, Liying; Meng, Guoyun; Li, Yanhu; Wang, Guanze; Yang, Furui; Wu, Hongbin; Yang, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2014-11-01

    A 1,10-phenanthroline derivative (co-phen) containing a bipolar carbazole-oxadiazole unit was synthesized and used as the auxiliary ligand in cationic iridium(III) complexes [(ppy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 (ppy: 2-phenylpyridine) and [(npy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 (npy: 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)pyridine). Two complexes have high thermal stability with the glass-transition temperatures (Tg) of 207 °C and 241 °C, and the same 5% weight-reduction temperatures (ΔT5%) of 402 °C. Both of them were used as phosphorescent dopants in solution-processed polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs): ITO/PEDOT: PSS/PVK: PBD: complex (mass ratios 100: 40: x, x = 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0)/CsF/Al. The maximum luminances of the PLEDs using [(ppy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 and [(npy)2Ir(co-phen)]PF6 were 12567 cd m-2 and 11032 cd m-2, the maximum luminance efficiencies were 17.3 cd A-1 and 20.4 cd A-1, the maximum power efficiencies were 9.8 lm W-1 and 10.3 lm W-1, and the maximum external quantum efficiencies were 9.3% and 11.4% respectively. The CIE color coordinates were around (0.37, 0.57) and (0.44, 0.54) respectively, corresponding to the yellow green region.

  16. Classroom Demonstrations of Polymer Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes several techniques to help students visualize the principles of polymer chemistry. Outlines demonstrations using simple materials (such as pop-it beads, thread, and wire) to illustrate the size of macromolecules, the composition of copolymers, and the concept of molecular mass. (TW)

  17. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  18. Micro/Nanowell Arrays Fabricated from Convalently Immobilized Polymer Thin Films on a Flat Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Mingdi; Bartlett, Michele

    2002-02-06

    This Letter describes a new method to create micro/nanowell arrays from covalently attached polymer thin films on a silicon wafer. The immobilization chemistry utilized a photoactive cross-linker, resulting in polymer thin films of several to a few tens of nanometers. Micro/nanowell arrays were obtained when two polymers were immobilized sequentially and the second was thicker than the first polymer. The well arrays were generated from either different polymers, or the same polymer with different molecular weights.

  19. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  20. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  2. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  5. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  6. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  10. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  11. Stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, William H.

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  12. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Nalco Chemical Co., developed homogeneous dispersion polymerization with water as the solvent to make polymers to treat water in industrial and municipal operations.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Academic Award (Coates)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Professor Geoffrey W. Coates, developed a family of catalysts that use carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to make make polymers including polycarbonates.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Small Business Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Donlar, developed thermal polyaspartate, a nontoxic, biodegradable, biobased polymer made in a highly efficient process for use in agriculture, water treatment, etc.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Cargill Dow, developed the NatureWorks process to make biobased, compostable, and recyclable polylactic acid polymers for fibers and plastic packaging.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winners, Procter & Gamble Co. (P&G) and Cook Composites and Polymers Co. (CCP), developed Chempol MPS resins and Sefose sucrose esters to enable high-performance low-VOC alkyd paints.

  18. Preparation of Conducting Polymers by Electrochemical Methods and Demonstration of a Polymer Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goto, Hiromasa; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Togashi, Fumihiro; Ohta, Reina; Tsujimoto, Akitsu; Kita, Eiji; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical polymerization of aniline and pyrrole, and demonstrations of electrochromism and the polymer battery effect, are presented as demonstrations suitable for high school and introductory chemistry at the university level. These demonstrations promote student interest in the electrochemical preparation of conducting polymers, where…

  19. Preparation of Conducting Polymers by Electrochemical Methods and Demonstration of a Polymer Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goto, Hiromasa; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Togashi, Fumihiro; Ohta, Reina; Tsujimoto, Akitsu; Kita, Eiji; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical polymerization of aniline and pyrrole, and demonstrations of electrochromism and the polymer battery effect, are presented as demonstrations suitable for high school and introductory chemistry at the university level. These demonstrations promote student interest in the electrochemical preparation of conducting polymers, where…

  20. Engineered Polymers for Advanced Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Jeon, Oju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Park, Kinam

    2009-01-01

    Engineered polymers have been utilized for developing advanced drug delivery systems. The development of such polymers has caused advances in polymer chemistry, which, in turn, has resulted in smart polymers that can respond to changes in environmental condition, such as temperature, pH, and biomolecules. The responses vary widely from swelling/deswelling to degradation. Drug-polymer conjugates and drug-containing nano/micro-particles have been used for drug targeting. Engineered polymers and polymeric systems have also been used in new areas, such as molecular imaging as well as in nanotechnology. This review examines the engineered polymers that have been used as traditional drug delivery and as more recent applications in nanotechnology. PMID:18977434

  1. Spray forming polymer membranes, coatings and films

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Watson, Lloyd D.; McAtee, Richard E.; Ploger, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming a polymer film having controlled physical and chemical characteristics, wherein a plume of nebulized droplets of a polymer or polymer precursor is directed toward a substrate from a converging/diverging nozzle having a throat at which the polymer or a precursor thereof is introduced and an exit from which the nebulized droplets of the polymer or precursor thereof leave entrained in a carrier gas. Relative movement between the nozzle and the substrate is provided to form a polymer film. Physical and chemical characteristics can be controlled by varying the deposition parameters and the gas and liquid chemistries. Semipermeable membranes of polyphosphazene films are disclosed, as are a variety of other polymer systems, both porous and non-porous.

  2. Spray forming polymer membranes, coatings and films

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, K.M.; Watson, L.D.; McAtee, R.E.; Ploger, S.A.

    1993-10-12

    A method is described for forming a polymer film having controlled physical and chemical characteristics, wherein a plume of nebulized droplets of a polymer or polymer precursor is directed toward a substrate from a converging/diverging nozzle having a throat at which the polymer or a precursor thereof is introduced and an exit from which the nebulized droplets of the polymer or precursor thereof leave entrained in a carrier gas. Relative movement between the nozzle and the substrate is provided to form a polymer film. Physical and chemical characteristics can be controlled by varying the deposition parameters and the gas and liquid chemistries. Semipermeable membranes of polyphosphazene films are disclosed, as are a variety of other polymer systems, both porous and non-porous. 4 figures.

  3. Ionic Liquids in Polymer Design: From Energy to Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-19

    combination of ionic liquids and polymers has emerged as an active field of exploration in polymer science, where new materials have be realized for...emerged as an active field of exploration in polymer science, where new materials have be realized for various applications in energy, health and...is to identify and highlight emerging materials that combine ionic liquids and polymer chemistry and the unique properties that arise from this

  4. Quantum chemistry, band structures and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Marie

    2012-06-01

    A short review of the long way from the first calculations on polyenes after the second world war to the recent electronic devices like Organic Light Emitting Diodes or Photovoltaic Cells is given. It shows how quantum chemical methods on one side and synthesis or experiments have (or should have) interacted as incentives to new methods and technologies.

  5. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  6. Primitive Genetic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Aaron E.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2010-01-01

    Since the structure of DNA was elucidated more than 50 years ago, Watson-Crick base pairing has been widely speculated to be the likely mode of both information storage and transfer in the earliest genetic polymers. The discovery of catalytic RNA molecules subsequently provided support for the hypothesis that RNA was perhaps even the first polymer of life. However, the de novo synthesis of RNA using only plausible prebiotic chemistry has proven difficult, to say the least. Experimental investigations, made possible by the application of synthetic and physical organic chemistry, have now provided evidence that the nucleobases (A, G, C, and T/U), the trifunctional moiety ([deoxy]ribose), and the linkage chemistry (phosphate esters) of contemporary nucleic acids may be optimally suited for their present roles—a situation that suggests refinement by evolution. Here, we consider studies of variations in these three distinct components of nucleic acids with regard to the question: Is RNA, as is generally acknowledged of DNA, the product of evolution? If so, what chemical and structural features might have been more likely and advantageous for a proto-RNA? PMID:20462999

  7. Texturing polymer surfaces by transfer casting. [cardiovascular prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A technique for fabricating textured surfaces on polymers without altering their surface chemistries is described. A surface of a fluorocarbon polymer is exposed to a beam of ions to texture it. The polymer which is to be surface-roughened is then cast over the textured surface of the fluorocarbon polymer. After curing, the cast polymer is peeled off the textured fluorocarbon polymer, and the peeled off surface has negative replica of the textured surface. The microscopic surface texture provides large surface areas for adhesive bonding. In cardiovascular prosthesis applications the surfaces are relied on for the development of a thin adherent well nourished thrombus.

  8. Routes to Hydrogen Bonding Chain-End Functionalized Polymers.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Arthur; Lortie, Frédéric; Bernard, Julien

    2012-12-21

    The contribution of supramolecular chemistry to polymer science opens new perspectives for the design of polymer materials exhibiting valuable properties and easier processability due to the dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions. Hydrogen bonding polymers can be used as supramolecular units for yielding larger assemblies that possess attractive features, arising from the combination of polymer properties and the responsiveness of hydrogen bonds. The post-polymerization modification of reactive end-groups is the most common procedure for generating such polymers. Examples of polymerizations mediated by hydrogen bonding-functionalized precursors have also recently been reported. This contribution reviews the current synthetic routes toward hydrogen bonding sticker chain-end functionalized polymers.

  9. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  10. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  11. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  15. Colorful Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, P. Teal; Carsten Conner, L. D.; Guthrie, Mareca; Pompea, Stephen; Tsurusaki, Blakely K.; Tzou, Carrie

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a chemistry/art activity that originated in an National Science Foundation--funded two-week STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) academy for grade 4-6 girls. The authors recommend using this investigation in conjunction with other activities focusing on chemical change as a step toward fulfilling the…

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  17. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  18. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  5. Chemistry's year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2011 to be the International Year of Chemistry. Under this banner, chemists should seize the opportunity to highlight the rich history and successes of our subject to a much broader audience - and explain how it can help to solve the global challenges we face today and in the future.

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  8. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

  13. Microscale Chemistry and Green Chemistry: Complementary Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mono M.; Szafran, Zvi; Pike, R. M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the complementary nature of microscale chemistry and green chemistry. Green chemistry emphasizes the concepts of atom economy, source reduction, pathway modification, solvent substitution, and pollution prevention as means of improving the environmental impact of industrial chemistry. Microscale chemistry serves as a tool for incorporating green chemistry ideas across the curriculum in educational institutions. Examples are drawn from microscale laboratory experiments to illustrate the pedagogic connection between the two areas.

  14. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  15. Multiobjective Tabu Search method used in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, T.; Bulacovschi, V.

    The use of a combined artificial intelligence method in macromolecular chemistry design is described. This method implies a Back-Propagation (BP) Neural Network, modified for two-dimensional input data and for a system composed of a genetic algorithm extended by a Tabu Search operator used to incorporate high-level chemical knowledge: thermodynamic polymer properties.

  16. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  17. Fabrication of polymer nanocavities with tailored openings.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Huey; Xing, Shuangxi; Chen, Tao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Xiao; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongyu

    2009-11-24

    A templated fabrication of open nanocavities is reported, where rational control of partial polymer attachment on sacrificial metal cores introduces openings in the polymer shells. This approach provides a facile means to modify the structural features of polymer nanocavities by manipulating the surface chemistry of colloidal nanoparticles. In particular, the anisotropic geometry of gold nanorods is exploited to promote the anisotropic polymer attachment, such that two diametric openings occurred in the polymer shell. After etching the gold nanorods, this approach yields open nanochannels that are tunable in both diameter and length. The synthetic scope of the anisotropic core/shell nanoparticles is expanded, supporting the previously proposed mechanism. We demonstrate that reducing the symmetry of nano-objects could open up new ways to create structural features using simple assembly and etching techniques. The thermostability of the open polymer nanostructures is also investigated.

  18. In-Service Chemistry Teachers Training: The Impact of Introducing Computer Technology on Teachers' Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Y. J.; Barnea, N.

    A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) module on polymers was used to introduce chemistry teachers (n=64) to the variety of possibilities and benefits of using courseware in the current chemistry curriculum in Israel. From an analysis of a pre-and post-attitude questionnaire regarding the use of computers in chemistry teaching, it was concluded…

  19. Porous structures from bio-based polymers via supercritical drying

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural biobased polymers (biopolymers or biomacromolecules) such as polysaccharides, proteins, and polylactic acid derived from plant and animal sources are interesting materials due to their abundance, renewability, low cost, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and interesting chemistry. Many biop...

  20. Electropolymerized Conducting Polymer as Actuator and Sensor Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Maria T.; Moreno, Juan C.

    2005-01-01

    A study demonstrates the potential application of conducting polymers to convert electrical energy into mechanical energy at low voltage or current. The performance of the device is explained using electrochemistry and solid-state chemistry.

  1. Electropolymerized Conducting Polymer as Actuator and Sensor Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Maria T.; Moreno, Juan C.

    2005-01-01

    A study demonstrates the potential application of conducting polymers to convert electrical energy into mechanical energy at low voltage or current. The performance of the device is explained using electrochemistry and solid-state chemistry.

  2. Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel T.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2013-07-01

    This review article covers applications in which polymer electrolytes are used: lithium batteries, fuel cells, and water desalination. The ideas of electrochemical potential, salt activity, and ion transport are presented in the context of these applications. Potential is defined, and we show how a cell potential measurement can be used to ascertain salt activity. The transport parameters needed to fully specify a binary electrolyte (salt + solvent) are presented. We define five fundamentally different types of homogeneous electrolytes: type I (classical liquid electrolytes), type II (gel electrolytes), type III (dry polymer electrolytes), type IV (dry single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes), and type V (solvated single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes). Typical values of transport parameters are provided for all types of electrolytes. Comparison among the values provides insight into the transport mechanisms occurring in polymer electrolytes. It is desirable to decouple the mechanical properties of polymer electrolyte membranes from the ionic conductivity. One way to accomplish this is through the development of microphase-separated polymers, wherein one of the microphases conducts ions while the other enhances the mechanical rigidity of the heterogeneous polymer electrolyte. We cover all three types of conducting polymer electrolyte phases (types III, IV, and V). We present a simple framework that relates the transport parameters of heterogeneous electrolytes to homogeneous analogs. We conclude by discussing electrochemical stability of electrolytes and the effects of water contamination because of their relevance to applications such as lithium ion batteries.

  3. Chemistry, physico-chemistry and applications linked to biological activities of β-glucans.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    β-Glucans is the common name given to a group of chemically heterogeneous polysaccharides. They are long- or short-chain polymers of (1-->3)-β-linked glucose moieties which may be branched, with the branching chains linked to the backbone by a (1-->6)-β linkage. β-(1-->3)-Glucans are widely distributed in bacteria, algae, fungi and plants, where they are involved in cell wall structure and other biological function. β-Glucans have been shown to provide a remarkable range of health benefits, and are especially important against the two most common conventional causes of death in industrialized countries, i.e. cardiovascular diseases (where they promote healthy cholesterol and blood glucose levels) and cancer (where they enhance immune system functions). This Highlight provides a comprehensive and up-to-date commentary on β-glucans, their chemistry, physico-chemistry, functional role in immunological responses, and possible applications as therapeutic tools. In addition, we discuss the mechanism behind their health benefits, which are not yet fully understood.

  4. Polynitrogen Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    4N3, while As(C6H5)4N3 presents a borderline case.23 Theoretical Calculations High-level theoretical studies of nitrogen, oxygen, selenium and...Dixon, D. A.; Christe, K. O., "Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorganic Chemistry, p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012...34Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorg. Chem., p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012). 26. K. S. Thanthiriwatte, M. Vasiliu

  5. Covalent Polymers Containing Discrete Heterocyclic Anion Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambo, Brett M.; Silver, Eric S.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    This chapter covers recent advances in the development of polymeric materials containing discrete heterocyclic anion receptors, and focuses on advances in anion binding and chemosensor chemistry. The development of polymers specific for anionic species is a relatively new and flourishing area of materials chemistry. The incorporation of heterocyclic receptors capable of complexing anions through noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions) provides a route to not only sensitive but also selective polymeric materials. Furthermore, these systems have been utilized in the development of polymers capable of extracting anionic species from aqueous media. These latter materials may lead to advances in water purification and treatment of diseases resulting from surplus ions.

  6. Two-dimensional polymers: concepts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Payamyar, Payam; King, Benjamin T; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2016-01-04

    Creation of polymers comprised of repeat units that can create topologically planar macromolecules (rather than linear) has been the topic of several recent studies in the field of synthetic polymer chemistry. Such novel macromolecules, known as 2D polymers, are the result of advanced synthetic methodology which allows creation of monolayer sheets with a periodic internal structure and functional groups placed at predetermined sites under mild conditions. Given the promising potentials of 2D polymers, this feature paper aims at discussing the concept of these novel macromolecules from a topological viewpoint in Section 1. This is followed by spotlighting the expected behavior of 2D polymers in the context of polymer physics (entropy elasticity, strength, percolation, and persistence) and polymer chemistry (copolymers and growth kinetics) in Section 2. Section 3 delineates synthetic and analytical matters associated with 2D polymers followed by a brief final section highlighting the potential of these sheet-like macromolecules for application purposes. We hope this article will trigger the interest of chemists, physicists and engineers to help develop this encouraging new class of materials further such that societally relevant applications will be accessible in the market soon.

  7. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  8. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  9. Monomer design strategies to create natural product-based polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Kristufek, Samantha L; Wacker, Kevin T; Tsao, Yi-Yun Timothy; Su, Lu; Wooley, Karen L

    2017-04-05

    Covering: 2010-Aug. 2016In an effort towards enhancing function and sustainability, natural products have become of interest in the field of polymer chemistry. This review details the blending of chemistries developed through synthetic organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. Through synthetic organic chemical transformations, such as functional group interconversion, a protection/deprotection series, or installation of a functional group, various designs towards novel, synthetic, bio-based polymer systems are described. This review covers several classifications of natural products - oils and fatty acids, terpenes, lignin, and sugar derivatives - focusing on exploring monomers prepared by one or more synthetic steps.

  10. Thermal rearrangements of unsaturated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal anaerobic uncatalyzed cyclizations and cis-trans isomerizations observed in unsaturated hydrocarbon polymers are surveyed. Three main types of cyclizations are described. Type I is a radical reaction which is caused by chain rupture and gives rise to six-membered rings; this reaction occurs during pyrolysis of polymers with double bonds in a 1,5- or 1,6-diene configuration. Type II is a (2 + 2) thermal cycloaddition of double bonds in certain polymers with a 1,6-diene structure; bicycloheptane structures result. Type III is an intramolecular ene reaction. Many polymers containing a double bond linking CH units display thermal cis-trans isomerization. The common activation energy is approximately 130 kJ/mol, and the initial rate constants are lower, for homologous polymers, the greater the separation of the carbon-carbon double bonds.

  11. Polymer precursors for SiC ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Morton H.

    1986-01-01

    Work on precursor polymers to SiC was performed, concentrating on polymers made from decamethyl cyclohexasilyene units. The initial approach was to synthesize mixed diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane, dephenylate, and polymerize. This produced polymers which had yields of up to 50 percent SiC. (Theoretical yield is 75 percent). The present approach is to make the polymer through the intermediate trans-1,4-diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane. This should produce a crystalline polymer and high strength fibers. These will be thermally decomposed to SiC fibers. This requires new chemistry which is currently being studied.

  12. Interstellar chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  13. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  14. Grafting of Conductive Polymers onto the Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-23

    2,5- benzimidazole )/carbon nanotube composite film” Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry 2010, 48, 1067. 3. Han, S.-W.; Oh, S.-J...34Synthesis and Characterization of poly(2,5- benzimidazole ) (ABPBI) Grafted CArbon Nanotubes." MRS. 2009 fall meeting, Prepr. Boston, MA, November 30

  15. Active and responsive polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2010-02-01

    A central challenge in polymer science today is creating materials that dynamically alter their structures and properties on demand, or in response to changes in their environment. Surfaces represent an attractive area of focus, since they exert disproportionately large effects on properties such as wettability, adhesiveness, optical appearance, and bioactivity, enabling pronounced changes in properties to be accomplished through subtle changes in interfacial structure or chemistry. In this critical review, we review the recent research progress into active and responsive polymer surfaces. The chief purpose of this article is to summarize the advanced preparation techniques and applications in this field from the past decade. This review should be of interest both to new scientists in this field and the interdisciplinary researchers who are working on "intelligent" polymer surfaces (117 references).

  16. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander I.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Smola, Matthew J.; Morgunov, Alexey S.; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M.; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers like RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life1, predating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro2. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds3 for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands4 raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (ANA (arabino nucleic acids)5, FANA (2′-fluoroarabino nucleic acids)6, HNA (hexitol nucleic acids) and CeNA (cyclohexene nucleic acids)7 directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature8. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on earth and elsewhere in the universe9. PMID:25470036

  17. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander I; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Smola, Matthew J; Morgunov, Alexey S; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-02-19

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers such as RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life, pre-dating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (arabino nucleic acids, ANA; 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids, FANA; hexitol nucleic acids, HNA; and cyclohexene nucleic acids, CeNA) directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe.

  18. Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers for biomedical and biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. V.; Pyshnaya, I. A.; Martyanov, O. N.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    This survey covers main advances in the preparation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers which are capable of specific recognition of biologically active compounds. The principles underlying the production of highly efficient and template-specific molecularly imprinted polymers are discussed. The focus is on the imprinting of highly structured macromolecular and supramolecular templates. The existing and potential applications of molecularly imprinted polymers in various fields of chemistry and molecular biology are considered. The bibliography includes 261 references.

  20. 21 CFR 172.770 - Ethylene oxide polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene oxide polymer. 172.770 Section 172.770... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.770 Ethylene oxide polymer. The polymer of ethylene oxide may... conditions. (a) It is the polymer of ethylene oxide having a minimum viscosity of 1,500 centipoises in a 1...

  1. 21 CFR 172.770 - Ethylene oxide polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene oxide polymer. 172.770 Section 172.770... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.770 Ethylene oxide polymer. The polymer of ethylene oxide may... conditions. (a) It is the polymer of ethylene oxide having a minimum viscosity of 1,500 centipoises in a 1...

  2. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  3. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  4. Functional supramolecular polymers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhu, Xinyuan; Lu, Yunfeng; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-21

    As a novel class of dynamic and non-covalent polymers, supramolecular polymers not only display specific structural and physicochemical properties, but also have the ability to undergo reversible changes of structure, shape, and function in response to diverse external stimuli, making them promising candidates for widespread applications ranging from academic research to industrial fields. By an elegant combination of dynamic/reversible structures with exceptional functions, functional supramolecular polymers are attracting increasing attention in various fields. In particular, functional supramolecular polymers offer several unique advantages, including inherent degradable polymer backbones, smart responsiveness to various biological stimuli, and the ease for the incorporation of multiple biofunctionalities (e.g., targeting and bioactivity), thereby showing great potential for a wide range of applications in the biomedical field. In this Review, the trends and representative achievements in the design and synthesis of supramolecular polymers with specific functions are summarized, as well as their wide-ranging biomedical applications such as drug delivery, gene transfection, protein delivery, bio-imaging and diagnosis, tissue engineering, and biomimetic chemistry. These achievements further inspire persistent efforts in an emerging interdisciplin-ary research area of supramolecular chemistry, polymer science, material science, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Polymer flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Littmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of polymer flooding, an enhanced oil recovery method using water soluble polymers to increase the viscosity of flood water, for the displacement of crude oil from porous reservoir rocks. Although this method is becoming increasingly important, there is very little literature available for the engineer wishing to embark on such a project. In the past, polymer flooding was mainly the subject of research. The results of this research are spread over a vast number of single publications, making it difficult for someone who has not kept up-to-date with developments during the last 10-15 years to judge the suitability of polymer flooding to a particular field case. This book tries to fill that gap. An indispensable book for reservoir engineers, production engineers and lab. technicians within the petroleum industry.

  6. Semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.

    A review is presented of the electrical properties of those polymers whose conductivities occupy the middle ground between polymeric insulators and polymeric superconductors. Attention is confined to polymers in which conduction occurs through electronic, rather than ionic, transport. Four classes of semiconductors are discussed: (1) highly-conjugated polymers, including those formed by pyrolysis; (2) polymeric charge-transfer complexes and radical-ion salts; (3) organometallic polymeric semiconductors; and (4) composite polymer systems containing carbon or other highly conducting media. The possible applications discussed include cathodes in solid-state metal/halogen primary batteries, cathodes in lithium/poly-p-phenylene or polyacetylene secondary batteries, conductive coatings and epoxies, and chemical sensing agents. Other applications are Peltier cooling devices, pressure transducers, photovoltaic devices, infrared radiation detectors, and switches and resistors.

  7. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  8. Cell Partition in Two Polymer Aqueous Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Partition of biological cells in two phase aqueous polymer systems is recognized as a powerful separation technique which is limited by gravity. The synthesis of new, selective polymer ligand conjugates to be used in affinity partition separations is of interest. The two most commonly used polymers in two phase partitioning are dextran and polyethylene glycol. A thorough review of the chemistry of these polymers was begun, particularly in the area of protein attachment. Preliminary studies indicate the importance in affinity partitioning of minimizing gravity induced randomizing forces in the phase separation process. The PEG-protein conjugates that were prepared appear to be ideally suited for achieving high quality purifications in a microgravity environment. An interesting spin-off of this synthetic work was the observation of catalytic activity for certain of our polymer derivatives.

  9. Cell Partition in Two Polymer Aqueous Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Partition of biological cells in two phase aqueous polymer systems is recognized as a powerful separation technique which is limited by gravity. The synthesis of new, selective polymer ligand conjugates to be used in affinity partition separations is of interest. The two most commonly used polymers in two phase partitioning are dextran and polyethylene glycol. A thorough review of the chemistry of these polymers was begun, particularly in the area of protein attachment. Preliminary studies indicate the importance in affinity partitioning of minimizing gravity induced randomizing forces in the phase separation process. The PEG-protein conjugates that were prepared appear to be ideally suited for achieving high quality purifications in a microgravity environment. An interesting spin-off of this synthetic work was the observation of catalytic activity for certain of our polymer derivatives.

  10. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  11. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  12. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  13. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  14. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  15. Environmental chemistry. Seventh edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents a basic understanding of environmental chemistry and its applications. In addition to providing updated materials in this field, the book emphasizes the major concepts essential to the practice of environmental chemistry. Topics of discussion include the following: toxicological chemistry; toxicological chemistry of chemical substances; chemical analysis of water and wastewater; chemical analysis of wastes and solids; air and gas analysis; chemical analysis of biological materials and xenobiotics; fundamentals of chemistry; and fundamentals of organic chemistry.

  16. Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental processes that control the chemical composition and cycles of the global troposphere and how these processes and properties affect the physical behavior of the atmosphere are examined. The long-term information needs for tropospheric chemistry are: to be able to predict tropospheric responses to perturbations, both natural and anthropogenic, of these cycles, and to provide the information required for the maintenance and effective future management of the atmospheric component of our global life support system. The processes controlling global tropospheric biogeochemical cycles include: the input of trace species into the troposphere, their long-range transport and distribution as affected by the mean wind and vertical venting, their chemical transformations, including gas to particle conversion, leading to the appearance of aerosols or aqueous phase reactions inside cloud droplets, and their removal from the troposphere via wet (precipitation) and dry deposition.

  17. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  18. Stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Demore, W. B.; Ferguson, E. E.; Lesclaux, R.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Sander, S. P.; Sze, N. D.; Zellner, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent improvements in the data base for the currently identified reactions describing the chemistry of the major families of trace gas species, HO(x), NO(x), ClO(x), and hydrocarbons are assessed. The important coupling reactions between the families are introduced progressively. Chemical aspects such as heterogeneous reactions and reactions of sodium species, the importance of which are not yet completely established, are discussed. Recent attempts to reconcile some of the more unexpected kinetic behavior which has emerged from the extensive experimental studies of key reactions with current reaction rate theory are also examined. The uncertainties in the current kinetic and photochemical data base is given. The prospects for improvement of data for known reactions of atmospheric importance as well as for the identification of gaps in the chemical description of the atmosphere.

  19. Preceramic Polymers: Past, Present and Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-02

    preceramic polymer chemistry. In the laboratories of Bayer AG, Verbeek (11) used the known (12) reaction of methyltrichlorosilane with methylamine to...starting material in this process is the readily available dimethyldichlorosilane . Its reductive dechlorination by sodium, studied earlier by Burkhard

  20. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  1. The Laboratory for Introductory Polymer Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathias, Lon J.

    1983-01-01

    Suggested guidelines and representative experiments for a one-semester introductory polymer chemistry laboratory course are provided. Experiments, which provide students with both synthetic and characterization experiences, require a minimum of special equipment and student skills. Includes list of 83 experiments, demonstrations, and reference…

  2. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  3. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  4. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  5. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  6. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  7. The Future of Ethenolysis in Biobased Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Spekreijse, Jurjen; Sanders, Johan P M; Bitter, Johannes H; Scott, Elinor L

    2017-02-08

    The desire to utilise biobased feedstocks and develop more sustainable chemistry poses new challenges in catalysis. A synthetically useful catalytic conversion is ethenolysis, a cross metathesis reaction with ethylene. In this Review, the state of the art of ethenolysis in biobased chemistry was extensively examined using methyl oleate as a model compound for fatty acids. Allied to this, the ethenolysis of fatty acid, polymers and more challenging substrates are reviewed. To determine the limiting factors for the application of ethenolysis on biomass, the influence of reaction parameters were investigated and the bottlenecks for reaching high turnover numbers identified. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Gels based on cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Lackey, Melissa A; Cui, Jun; Tew, Gregory N

    2011-03-23

    Cyclic poly(5-hydroxy-1-cyclooctene) (PACOE) was synthesized by ring-expansion metathesis polymerization (REMP), and thiol-ene chemistry was used to cross-link the internal double bonds in the PACOE backbone. This created a novel network material (gels formed from cyclic polymers) with unique structural units, where the cyclic PACOE main chains, which serve as secondary topological cross-linkages, were connected by primary intermolecular chemical cross-linkages. The resulting properties were notably different from those of traditional chemically cross-linked linear PACOE gels, whose gel fraction (GF) and modulus (G) increased while the swelling ratio (Q) decreased with increasing initial polymer concentration in the gel precursor solution (C(0)). For the gels formed from cyclic polymers, however, the GF, Q, and G all simultaneously increased as C(0) increased at the higher range. Furthermore, at the same preparation state (same C(0)), the swelling ability and the maximum strain at break of the gels formed from cyclic polymers were always greater than those of the gels formed from linear polymers, and these differences became more pronounced as C(0) increased.

  9. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  10. Covalent Polymers Containing Discrete Heterocyclic Anion Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Brett M.; Silver, Eric S.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter covers recent advances in the development of polymeric materials containing discrete heterocyclic anion receptors, and focuses on advances in anion binding and chemosensor chemistry. The development of polymers specific for anionic species is a relatively new and flourishing area of materials chemistry. The incorporation of heterocyclic receptors capable of complexing anions through non-covalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions) provides a route to not only sensitive but also selective polymer materials. Furthermore, these systems have been utilized in the development of polymers capable of extracting anionic species from aqueous environments. These latter materials may lead to advances in water purification and treatment of diseases resulting from surplus ions. PMID:20871791

  11. Structure and Refinement of Ordered Aromatic Heterocyclic Polymers by Diffraction Methods: Application of Results to Electro-Optic Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    26, 1985 -32- Abstract 1 STRUCTURE OF POLYBENZOBISOXAZOLE AND POLYBENZOBISTHIAZOLE FIBERS A. V. Fratini, Department of Chemistry, University of...polymers, fiber structure, polybenzothiazoles, 07 04 rigid rod polymers, likad-atom least-squares P-BT 11 1 04 ladder polymer, polybenzoxazoles I...of polymers. The attainment, In these polymers, of mechanical and thermal oxidative properties comparable or superior to those obtained with fiber

  12. New frontiers in single polymer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Single molecule techniques allow for the direct observation of polymer dynamics under highly non-equilibrium conditions. Until recently, however, these methods have been largely confined to linear semi-flexible DNA molecules as ``model'' polymer chains. This talk will show recent work from our group in extending the field of single polymer dynamics to new materials, including branched polymers and truly flexible polymer chains. In this way, we explore new questions in classical polymer physics such as the role of architecture, topology, and backbone flexibility on chain dynamics at the molecular level. Recently, we used single molecule methods to directly visualize comb-shaped DNA polymers. Macromolecular DNA combs are synthesized utilizing a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach, wherein chemically modified DNA branches and DNA backbones are generated in separate polymerase chain reactions, followed by graft-onto reactions via ``click'' chemistry. This method allows for the synthesis of dual-color DNA combs, such that the backbone and side branches can be tracked independently using single molecule fluorescence microscopy. In this way, we study the dynamic properties of single comb polymers under flow, including conformational and stretching dynamics for highly branched chains and polymer relaxation following cessation of flow. In related work, we also study the dynamics of flexible polymer chains using fluorescently-labeled single stranded DNA. We observe that truly flexible polymers exhibit key differences in dynamics compared to semi-flexible DNA. Overall, our work highlights the ways in which single molecule methods can be brought to bear on fundamental problems in polymer physics.

  13. polyMOFs: A Class of Interconvertible Polymer-Metal-Organic-Framework Hybrid Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Nguyen, Ha Thi Hoang; Miller, Stephen A; Cohen, Seth M

    2015-05-18

    Preparation of porous materials from one-dimensional polymers is challenging because the packing of polymer chains results in a dense, non-porous arrangement. Herein, we demonstrate the remarkable adaptation of an amorphous, linear, non-porous, flexible organic polymer into a three-dimensional, highly porous, crystalline solid, as the organic component of a metal-organic framework (MOF). A polymer with aromatic dicarboxylic acids in the backbone functioned as a polymer ligand upon annealing with Zn(II), generating a polymer-metal-organic framework (polyMOF). These materials break the dogma that MOFs must be prepared from small, rigid ligands. Similarly, polyMOFs contradict conventional polymer chemistry by demonstrating that linear and amorphous polymers can be readily coaxed into a highly crystalline, porous, three-dimensional structure by coordination chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  15. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  16. Polymer inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Syed Moeez; Husain, Viqar; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the semiclassical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a Gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semiclassical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by an epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow-roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckian initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  17. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Huang, Zhi-Heng; Wright, Stacy C.

    2005-09-06

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  18. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  19. Chemistry in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Loos, Pierre-François; Ball, Caleb J; Gill, Peter M W

    2015-02-07

    We report benchmark results for one-dimensional (1D) atomic and molecular systems interacting via the Coulomb operator |x|(-1). Using various wavefunction-type approaches, such as Hartree-Fock theory, second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and explicitly correlated calculations, we study the ground state of atoms with up to ten electrons as well as small diatomic and triatomic molecules containing up to two electrons. A detailed analysis of the 1D helium-like ions is given and the expression of the high-density correlation energy is reported. We report the total energies, ionization energies, electron affinities and other physical properties of the many-electron 1D atoms and, using these results, we construct the 1D analog of Mendeleev's periodic table. We find that the 1D periodic table contains only two groups: the alkali metals and the noble gases. We also calculate the dissociation curves of several 1D diatomics and study the chemical bond in H2(+), HeH(2+), He2(3+), H2, HeH(+) and He2(2+). We find that, unlike their 3D counterparts, 1D molecules are primarily bound by one-electron bonds. Finally, we study the chemistry of H3(+) and we discuss the stability of the 1D polymer resulting from an infinite chain of hydrogen atoms.

  20. Elimination chemistry in asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, J.L.; Ihsiung Wang; Martinez, D.F. )

    1990-07-01

    Elimination chemistry provides important information, not only about the chemical properties of asphalt, but also the chemical modification method of asphalt. The chemical reactions which use the natural abundance of radicals are important for free-radical halogenation reaction. Spectral data demonstrates the formation of halogenated asphalt. The utility of dehydrohalogenation modified asphalt is limited. However, the resulting dehydrohalogenation modified asphalt does produce a significant unsaturated intermediate, which can incorporate elastomeric polymers (and monomers) via condensation or addition process. The second chemical modification method is the Hofmann elimination reaction, which was performed by reaction of methyl iodide with asphalt, followed by treatment of base. Spectroscopic data shows that a methyl group attached to nitrogen or sulfur in asphalt after Hofmann elimination reaction. Physical data shows that the Hofmann elimination modification improved the quality of asphalt, such as low temperature susceptibility measured by PVN. The modified asphalt also studied by HP-GPC in order to correlate their physical properties. The result shows that the molecular size distribution has changed and reduced the amount of LMS. The amount of decreasing LMS is also dependent on the content of nitrogen and sulfur in asphalts.

  1. Getting Hooked on Supramolecular Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2009-12-01

    The author describes the beginnings of her research in Switzerland, the inspiration she received from her senior colleagues as well as her first successful research results in the chemistry of alkaline earth metal aggregates and silver coordination polymer networks. Her current interest lies in the design of smart materials, using different building blocks from previous projects. These projects evolved in Geneva, Karlsruhe, Basel, and Fribourg, where she became a full professor in 2006.

  2. One-pot synthesis of conducting graphene-polymer composites and their strain sensing application.

    PubMed

    Eswaraiah, Varrla; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2012-02-21

    In situ reduction of graphite oxide in polymer powder has been implemented using focused solar electromagnetic radiation. The simultaneous reduction of graphite oxide, melting of the polymer and embedding of reduced graphite oxide nanoflakes in polymer offer a new way of synthesizing conducting graphene/polymer composites. An electromechanical application of the present reduced graphite oxide-PVDF nanocomposite has been proposed with a gauge factor of 12.1. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  3. Polymer-pendant ligand chemistry. 1. Reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid with catechol ligands bonded to polystryene-divinylbenzene and regeneration of the ligand site by a simple hydrolysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.H.; Tannous, R.S.

    1985-12-18

    A novel method is reported for reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid, known to be present in oil shale and its pyrolysis products, with catechol ligands bonded to either 2% or 20% cross-linked methylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resins. A previous study with catechol-bonded ligands on PS-DVB resins dealt with their reactions with metal ions in aqueous solution and showed a selectivity toward Hg/sup 2 +/ ions. As far as we have been able to determine, reactions of this polymer-supported ligand with organometallic compounds or inorganic anions have not been reported. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Thumbnail Sketches: The Chemistry of Printed Circuit Substrates: Some of the Latest Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses some of the latest developments in the chemistry of printed circuit substrates. Topics considered include soldering, dicy (a catalyst), Kevlar (an aramid polymer fiber), maleimide copolymers, and flexible circuits. (JN)

  5. Thumbnail Sketches: The Chemistry of Printed Circuit Substrates: Some of the Latest Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses some of the latest developments in the chemistry of printed circuit substrates. Topics considered include soldering, dicy (a catalyst), Kevlar (an aramid polymer fiber), maleimide copolymers, and flexible circuits. (JN)

  6. Computational modelling of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celarier, Edward A.

    1991-01-01

    Polymeric materials and polymer/graphite composites show a very diverse range of material properties, many of which make them attractive candidates for a variety of high performance engineering applications. Their properties are ultimately determined largely by their chemical structure, and the conditions under which they are processed. It is the aim of computational chemistry to be able to simulate candidate polymers on a computer, and determine what their likely material properties will be. A number of commercially available software packages purport to predict the material properties of samples, given the chemical structures of their constituent molecules. One such system, Cerius, has been in use at LaRC. It is comprised of a number of modules, each of which performs a different kind of calculation on a molecule in the programs workspace. Particularly, interest is in evaluating the suitability of this program to aid in the study of microcrystalline polymeric materials. One of the first model systems examined was benzophenone. The results of this investigation are discussed.

  7. Polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  8. Antimicrobial polymers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed.

  9. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  10. Click Chemistry in Functional Aliphatic Polycarbonates.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojin; Xia, Fan

    2017-10-01

    Click chemistry, one of the most important methods in conjugation, plays an extremely significant role in the synthesis of functional aliphatic polycarbonates, which are a group of biodegradable polymers containing carbonate bonds in their main chains. To date, more than 75 articles have been reported on the topic of click chemistry in functional aliphatic polycarbonates. However, these efforts have not yet been highlighted. Six categories of click reactions (alkyne-azide reaction, thiol-ene reaction, Michael addition, epoxy-amine/thiol reaction, Diels-Alder reaction, and imine formation) that have been afforded for further post-polymerization modification of polycarbonates are reviewed. Through this review, a comprehensive understanding of functional aliphatic polycarbonates aims to afford insight on the design of polycarbonates for further post-polymerization modification via click chemistry and the expectation of the practical application. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Clickable Antifouling Polymer Brushes for Polymer Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Bog, Uwe; de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Mueller, Summer L; Havenridge, Shana; Parrillo, Viviana; Bruns, Michael; Holmes, Andrea E; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Fuchs, Harald; Hirtz, Michael

    2017-03-23

    Protein-repellent reactive surfaces that promote localized specific binding are highly desirable for applications in the biomedical field. Nonspecific adhesion will compromise the function of bioactive surfaces, leading to ambiguous results of binding assays and negating the binding specificity of patterned cell-adhesive motives. Localized specific binding is often achieved by attaching a linker to the surface, and the other side of the linker is used to bind specifically to a desired functional agent, as e.g. proteins, antibodies, and fluorophores, depending on the function required by the application. We present a protein-repellent polymer brush enabling highly specific covalent surface immobilization of biorecognition elements by strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition click chemistry for selective protein adhesion. The protein-repellent polymer brush is functionalized by highly localized molecular binding sites in the low micrometer range using polymer pen lithography (PPL). Because of the massive parallelization of writing pens, the tunable PPL printed patterns can span over square centimeter areas. The selective binding of the protein streptavidin to these surface sites is demonstrated while the remaining polymer brush surface is resisting nonspecific adsorption without any prior blocking by bovine serum albumin (BSA). In contrast to the widely used BSA blocking, the reactive polymer brushes are able to significantly reduce nonspecific protein adsorption, which is the cause of biofouling. This was achieved for solutions of single proteins as well as complex biological fluids. The remarkable fouling resistance of the polymer brushes has the potential to improve the multiplexing capabilities of protein probes and therefore impact biomedical research and applications.

  12. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students.

    PubMed

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A; Oliver, Piercen M; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-01-14

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid-base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids-bases, and polymers.

  13. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students

    PubMed Central

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A.; Oliver, Piercen M.; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid–base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids–bases, and polymers. PMID:25584013

  14. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  15. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  16. Very low surface energy (<11 dyn/cm) heterophase polymeric materials for membrane separations: An integrated polymer chemistry/engineering approach and the influence of backpulsing on fouling properties of novel nanofiltration membranes for wastewater remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, B.D.; DeSimone, J.M.

    1998-07-13

    The focus of the fundamental research program is to explore several new classes of polymeric materials to identify promising routes for developing low-fouling nanofiltration membranes for wastewater remediation. This objective will be accomplished through an iterative process of polymer synthesis and characterization, membrane fabrication, separation performance characterization, and fouling assessment. Three classes of materials are being evaluated: low surface energy heterophase fluoropolymeric materials (synthesized by DeSimone`s group), functionalized nanoporous polymeric membranes with well-defined pore size formed via lyotropic liquid crystalline monomers (in collaboration with Professor Douglas L. Gin at the University of California at Berkeley), and nonporous hydrophilic blend membrane materials (in collaboration with Professor Virgil Percec at Case Western Reserve University). The focus of the closely related research program, The Influence of Backpulsing on Fouling Properties of Novel Nanofiltration Membranes for Wastewater Remediation, is to determine the efficacy of backpulsing to reduce the fouling of nanofiltration membranes.

  17. Chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop high-temperature high-performance structural resins for aerospace applications, the chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles) were investigated. The polymers were prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of aromatic bis(imidazolephenols) with activated aromatic difluoro compounds. The amorphous thermoplastic polymers exhibited glass transition temperatures from 230 to 301 C, inherent viscosities from 0.46 to 1.46 dL/g, and number-average molecular weights as high as 59,300 g/mole. The polymers exhibit good toughness, adhesive, composite, and film properties. The chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of these materials are discussed.

  18. Chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop high-temperature high-performance structural resins for aerospace applications, the chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles) were investigated. The polymers were prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of aromatic bis(imidazolephenols) with activated aromatic difluoro compounds. The amorphous thermoplastic polymers exhibited glass transition temperatures from 230 to 301 C, inherent viscosities from 0.46 to 1.46 dL/g, and number-average molecular weights as high as 59,300 g/mole. The polymers exhibit good toughness, adhesive, composite, and film properties. The chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of these materials are discussed.

  19. Kinetics of Polymer Interfacial Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Germanium crystals modified with high quality azide functional monolayers are used to directly monitor in situ the kinetics of interfacial ``click'' reactions with complementary alkyne end-functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) and polystyrene (PS) by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In the presence of copper (I), the azide-modified Ge substrates react quantitatively with PnBA and PS via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements show two regimes of kinetic behavior, as predicted by theory. In the first regime the rate is rapid and is controlled by diffusion of the polymer through the solvent, scaling with the square root of time. The rate slows considerably in the second regime, limited by penetration of the reacting polymer through the covalently bound polymer brush layer, scaling with the natural logarithm of time. The influence of polymer size and solvent quality are reported.

  20. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  1. Advanced Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the mid-1980's, Langley developed a polyimide sulfone, combining desirable properties of two classes of polymers. Composites and other products made from polyimide sulfone can be used with solvents and corrosive fluids, are light weight, low cost and can be easily fabricated for a wide range of industrial uses. High Technology Systems, Inc. obtained a license for the polymer and was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract for development in a powder form. Although its principal use is as a matrix resin for composites, the material can also be used as a high temperature structural adhesive for aircraft structures and as a coating for protection from heat and radiation for electronic components.

  2. Phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of forming 4,4',4'',4''' -tetraamino phthalocyanines involves reducing 4,4',4'',4''' -tetranitro phthalocyanines, polymerizing the metal tetraamino phthalocyanines with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride (preferably aromatic) or copolymerizing with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (preferably also aromatic) to produce amic acids which are then dehydrocyclized to imides. Thermally and oxidatively stable polymers result which form tough, flexible films, varnishes, adhesives, and fibers.

  3. Theoretical Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-07

    for the correlation length of 3/4, while 0.72 is observed. Then followed several talks on the expansion coefficient a, the virial coefficients and...calculation of the virial coefficient and c~2. These quantities can be considered merely a testing ground for the use of this method to polymer...the second viria]. coefficient , A2, to be zero and the intrinsic viscosity dependent on~VW for polystyrene mole-cular weights between 33,000 and one

  4. Polymer blends

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Scott D.; Naik, Sanjeev

    2017-08-22

    The present invention provides, among other things, extruded blends of aliphatic polycarbonates and polyolefins. In one aspect, provided blends comprise aliphatic polycarbonates such as poly(propylene carbonate) and a lesser amount of a crystalline or semicrystalline polymer. In certain embodiments, provided blends are characterized in that they exhibit unexpected improvements in their elongation properties. In another aspect, the invention provides methods of making such materials and applications of the materials in applications such as the manufacture of consumer packaging materials.

  5. Industrial Chemistry: A Series of New Courses at the Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasinski, Jerry P.; Miller, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes four courses in the undergraduate bachelor of science program in industrial chemistry at Keene State College (NH). They are (1) introduction to industrial chemistry; (2) polymers--synthesis and separation techniques; (3) inorganic industrial processes; and (4) organic industrial processes. (JN)

  6. Industrial Chemistry: A Series of New Courses at the Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasinski, Jerry P.; Miller, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes four courses in the undergraduate bachelor of science program in industrial chemistry at Keene State College (NH). They are (1) introduction to industrial chemistry; (2) polymers--synthesis and separation techniques; (3) inorganic industrial processes; and (4) organic industrial processes. (JN)

  7. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  8. Supramolecular Interactions in Chemomechanical Polymers

    PubMed Central

    SCHNEIDER, HANS-JÖRG; STRONGIN, ROBERT M.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular recognition is the basis for the operation of most biological functions; outside of nature, it has also been developed to a high degree of sophistication within the framework of supramolecular chemistry. More recently, selective noncovalent interactions—which constitute molecular recognition—are being used in intelligent new materials that transform chemical signals into actions, such as the release of drugs. The presence of supramolecular binding sites allows chemomechanical polymers to operate as sensors and actuators within a single unit without the need for any additional devices such as transducers or power supplies. A polymer can be designed so that a particular chemical substance, most often in aqueous surroundings, will trigger either a large expansion or a large contraction, depending on the mechanism. The translation of binding energy into mechanical motion can, with a suitable arrangement of the materials in tubes or on flexible films, be harnessed for unidirectional drives, flow control, the liberation of drugs, or the uptake of toxic compounds, among other applications. Miniaturization of the polymer particles allows one to enhance both the sensitivity and speed of the response, which is of particular importance in sensing. The basis for the selective response to external effector compounds, such as metal ions, amino acids, peptides, or nucleotides, is their noncovalent interaction with complementary functions covalently bound to the polymer network. With suitable polymers, selectivity between structural isomers—and even between enantiomers—as triggers can be achieved. As with supramolecular complexes in solution, the underlying interactions in polymers comprise a variety of noncovalent binding mechanisms, which are not easy to distinguish and quantify—and more so with polymers, which are not monodisperse. In this Account, we present systematic comparisons of different polymers and effector classes that allow, for the

  9. Synthesis and supramolecular assembly of biomimetic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciel, Amanda Brittany

    A grand challenge in materials chemistry is the synthesis of macromolecules and polymers with precise shapes and architectures. Polymer microstructure and architecture strongly affect the resulting functionality of advanced materials, yet understanding the static and dynamic properties of these complex macromolecules in bulk has been difficult due to their inherit polydispersity. Single molecule studies have provided a wealth of information on linear flexible and semi-flexible polymers in dilute solutions. However, few investigations have focused on industrially relevant complex topologies (e.g., star, comb, hyperbranched polymers) in industrially relevant solution conditions (e.g., semi-dilute, concentrated). Therefore, from this perspective there is a strong need to synthesize precision complex architectures for bulk studies as well as complex architectures compatible with current single molecule techniques to study static and dynamic polymer properties. In this way, we developed a hybrid synthetic strategy to produce branched polymer architectures based on chemically modified DNA. Overall, this approach enables control of backbone length and flexibility, as well as branch grafting density and chemical identity. We utilized a two-step scheme based on enzymatic incorporation of non-natural nucleotides containing bioorthogonal dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) functional groups along the main polymer backbone, followed by copper-free "click" chemistry to graft synthetic polymer branches or oligonucleotide branches to the DNA backbone, thereby allowing for the synthesis of a variety of polymer architectures, including three-arm stars, H-polymers, graft block copolymers, and comb polymers for materials assembly and single molecule studies. Bulk materials properties are also affected by industrial processing conditions that alter polymer morphology. Therefore, in an alternative strategy we developed a microfluidic-based approach to assemble highly aligned synthetic

  10. Degradability of Polymers for Implantable Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, SuPing; Untereker, Darrel

    2009-01-01

    Many key components of implantable medical devices are made from polymeric materials. The functions of these materials include structural support, electrical insulation, protection of other materials from the environment of the body, and biocompatibility, as well as other things such as delivery of a therapeutic drug. In such roles, the stability and integrity of the polymer, over what can be a very long period of time, is very important. For most of these functions, stability over time is desired, but in other cases, the opposite–the degradation and disappearance of the polymer over time is required. In either case, it is important to understand both the chemistry that can lead to the degradation of polymers as well as the kinetics that controls these reactions. Hydrolysis and oxidation are the two classes of reactions that lead to the breaking down of polymers. Both are discussed in detail in the context of the environmental factors that impact the utility of various polymers for medical device applications. Understanding the chemistry and kinetics allows prediction of stability as well as explanations for observations such as porosity and the unexpected behavior of polymeric composite materials in some situations. In the last part, physical degradation such interfacial delamination in composites is discussed. PMID:19865531

  11. Experimental Polymer Mechanochemistry and its Interpretational Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Akbulatov, Sergey; Boulatov, Roman

    2017-03-03

    Polymer mechanochemistry is an emerging field at the interface of chemistry, materials science, physics and engineering. It aims at understanding and exploiting unique reactivities of polymer chains confined to highly non-equilibrium stretched geometries by interactions with their surroundings. Macromolecular chains or their segments become stretched in bulk polymers under mechanical loads or when polymer solutions are sonicated or flow rapidly through abrupt contractions. An increasing amount of empirical data suggests that mechanochemical phenomena are widespread wherever polymers are used. In the past decade, empirical mechanochemistry has progressed enormously, from studying fragmentations of commodity polymers by simple backbone homolysis to demonstrations of self-strengthening and stress-reporting materials and mechanochemical cascades using purposefully designed monomers. This progress has not yet been matched by the development of conceptual frameworks within which to rationalize, systematize and generalize empirical mechanochemical observations. As a result, mechanistic and/or quantitative understanding of mechanochemical phenomena remains, with few exceptions, tentative. In this review we aim at systematizing reported macroscopic manifestations of polymer mechanochemistry, and critically assessing the interpretational framework that underlies their molecular rationalizations from a physical chemist's perspective. We propose a hierarchy of mechanochemical phenomena which may guide the development of multiscale models of mechanochemical reactivity to match the breadth and utility of the Eyring equation of chemical kinetics. We discuss the limitations of the approaches to quantifying and validating mechanochemical reactivity, with particular focus on sonicated polymer solutions, in order to identify outstanding questions that need to be solved for polymer mechanochemistry to become a rigorous, quantitative field. We conclude by proposing 7 problems whose

  12. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  13. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  14. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  15. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  16. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  17. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This chemistry Report from the USSR contains articles mainly on Adsorption, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Catalysis, Chemical Industry, Coal ... Gasification , Electrochemistry, Fertilizers, Food Technology, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds and Organometallic Compounds.

  18. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  19. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  20. Polymer Conjugation as a Strategy for Long-Range Order in Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ari; Keten, Sinan

    2016-04-07

    Supramolecular polymers are polymers in which the individual subunits self-assemble via noncovalent and reversible bonds. An important axis of control for systems of mixed subunit composition is the order in which the subunit types assemble. Existing ordering techniques, which rely on pairwise interactions through the inclusion of highly specific chemistry, have the downside that patterns of length n require n specific chemistries, making long-range order complicated to attain. Here we present a simple alternative method: we attach varying numbers of polymers to self-assembling subunits, in our case ring shaped macrocycles, and the polymers' aversion to confinement imposes system order. We evaluate the feasibility of the strategy using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of polymer-conjugated rings designed to model cyclic peptide nanotubes. We discuss the effects of polymer conjugation on the energetics of association and predict the equilibrium orderings for various ratios of ring types. The emergent patterns are associated with a certain stochastic disorder, which we quantify by deriving and employing a formula for the expected statistical weight of any pattern within the ensemble of all possible orderings.

  1. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  2. Polymer--drug conjugates as nano-sized medicines.

    PubMed

    Canal, Fabiana; Sanchis, Joaquin; Vicent, María J

    2011-12-01

    Polymer Therapeutics have enormously evolved in the past decades. Several polymeric drugs as well as polymer-protein conjugates have been in the market since the 90s, but although polymer-drug conjugates are already in clinical trials they still need to reach this final goal. There are four main convergent strategies to move this platform technology further. First, exploitation of new molecular targets in cancer therapy and design of polymer-drug conjugates as treatments for other diseases. Second, the development of combination therapy. Third, attempts to improve polymer chemistry, including the use of new well-defined architectures and the optimization of the advanced characterization techniques essential to transform a promising conjugate into a candidate for clinical evaluation. Finally, increased understanding of polymer conjugate features that govern clinical risk-benefit is leading to an appreciation of clinical biomarkers that will open new possibilities for personalized therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... older adolescents and adults. Read more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY Eliminating Wild-Type DNA in Liquid Biopsies Researchers ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  4. Radiation chemistry: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farhataziz; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present a detailed overview of radiation chemistry, including physical foundations such as interaction of radiation with matter, description of typical experimental systems, and applications in biological systems and industrial processes. In order to accomplish this ambitious plan, the editors selected as author of each individual chapter a scientist actively engaged in research in the area in question. The first eight chapters are concerned with fundamental topics, including the interaction of radiation with matter, formation of reactive intermediates including electrons, ions, radicals, and excited molecules; and theoretical aspects including track models, diffusion kinetics, and theories of the solvated electron. The next eight chapters discuss radiolysis of various types of chemical systems including gases, water, and aqueous solutions, organic liquids, colloids, and organic solids, alkali halides, and synthetic polymers and biopolymers. The final four chapters concern applications to such areas as biochemistry and radiobiology, radiolysis of microorganisms and mammalian cells, and industrial radiation processing including sterilization.

  5. 40 CFR 723.250 - Polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers. 723.250 Section 723.250... PREMANUFACTURE NOTIFICATION EXEMPTIONS Specific Exemptions § 723.250 Polymers. (a) Purpose and scope. (1) This...) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2604(a)(1)(A)) for the manufacture of certain...

  6. 40 CFR 723.250 - Polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers. 723.250 Section 723.250... PREMANUFACTURE NOTIFICATION EXEMPTIONS Specific Exemptions § 723.250 Polymers. (a) Purpose and scope. (1) This...) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2604(a)(1)(A)) for the manufacture of certain...

  7. Chemistry as General Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    Science courses are common in most general education requirements. This paper addresses the role of chemistry classes in meeting these requirements. Chemistry professors have for many years questioned the appropriateness of the standard introductory chemistry course as general education, resulting in the growing popularity of specialized non-majors courses. I suggest that current non-major chemistry courses cover too much consumer chemistry and ignore some of the big contributions of chemistry to human knowledge. Majors chemistry courses, while they prepare students for majoring in science, do not address these issues either. Consequently, chemistry courses are often an ineffective and unpopular way to meet general education science requirements. Part of the reason for this dilemma is the lack of chemists who address the contributions of chemistry to human knowledge in general. I propose that faculty at liberal arts colleges engage in this important task and that non-majors chemistry textbooks incorporate questions and issues that relate chemistry to a broader view of human knowledge. If these things happen, perhaps chemistry courses will become more effective as general education.

  8. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  9. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  10. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  11. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  12. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  13. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  14. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  15. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  16. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  17. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  18. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  19. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  20. Interdisciplinary Chemistry Experiment: An Environmentally Friendly Extraction of Lycopene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Mingjie; Liu, Qingwei

    2008-01-01

    A novel experiment for the extraction of lycopene from tomato paste without the use of an organic solvent is described. The experiment employs polymer, green, and analytical chemistry. This environmentally friendly extraction is more efficient and requires less time than the traditional approach using an organic solvent. The extraction is…

  1. Interdisciplinary Chemistry Experiment: An Environmentally Friendly Extraction of Lycopene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Mingjie; Liu, Qingwei

    2008-01-01

    A novel experiment for the extraction of lycopene from tomato paste without the use of an organic solvent is described. The experiment employs polymer, green, and analytical chemistry. This environmentally friendly extraction is more efficient and requires less time than the traditional approach using an organic solvent. The extraction is…

  2. DYNAMERS: dynamic polymers as self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nabarun; Bruchmann, Bernd; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-07

    Importing self-repair or self-healing features into inert materials is of great relevance to material scientists, since it is expected to eliminate the necessity of replenishing a damaged material. Be it material chemistry or more specifically polymer chemistry, such materials have attracted the imagination of both material scientists and chemists. A stroll down the memory lane 70 years back, this might have sounded utopian. However with the current progress in supramolecular chemistry and the emergence of dynamic covalent and non-covalent chemistries, novel perspectives have been opened up to materials science towards the development of dynamic materials (DYNAMATS) and in particular dynamic polymers (DYNAMERS), with the ability to produce such species by custom made designs. Chemistry took giant strides to gain control over the structure and features of materials and, besides basic progress, to apply it for tailor-making matter for applications in our daily life. In that applied perspective, materials science plays a paramount role in shaping our present and in contributing to a sustainable future. The goal is to develop materials, which would be dynamic enough to carry out certain functions as effectively as in biological systems with, however, the freedom to recruit the powers of chemistry on a wider scale, without the limitation imposed by life. Material scientists and in particular polymer chemists may build on chemistry, physics and biology for bridging the gap to develop dynamic materials presenting a wide range of novel functionalities and to convert dreams into reality. In this current review we will focus on developments in the area of dynamic polymers, as a class of dynamic materials presenting self-healing features and, more generally, the ability to undergo adaptation under the effect of physical and/or chemical agents, and thus function as adaptive polymers or ADAPTAMERS.

  3. Initial Drug Dissolution from Amorphous Solid Dispersions Controlled by Polymer Dissolution and Drug-Polymer Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuejie; Wang, Shujing; Wang, Shan; Liu, Chengyu; Su, Ching; Hageman, Michael; Hussain, Munir; Haskell, Roy; Stefanski, Kevin; Qian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    ); while drug released much slower than the polymer when molecular level mixing or drug-polymer interaction was absent (SDD-PB systems). For ASDs without drug-polymer interaction (i.e., KTZ/HPMC systems), the mixing homogeneity had little impact on the release rate of either the drug or the polymer thus SDD and SDD-PB demonstrated the same drug or polymer release rate, while the drug released slowly and independently of polymer release. The initial drug release from an ASD was controlled by 1) the polymer release rate; 2) the strength of drug-polymer interaction, including the intrinsic interaction caused by the chemistry of the drug and the polymer (measured by the χ value), as well as that the apparent interaction caused by the drug-polymer ratio (measure by the extent of peak shift on spectroscopic analysis); and 3) the level of mixing homogeneity between the drug and polymer. In summary, the selection of polymer, drug-polymer ratio, and ASD processing conditions have profound impacts on the dissolution behavior of ASDs. Graphical Abstract Relationship between initial drug and polymer dissolution rates from amorphous solid dispersions with different mixing uniformity and drug-polymer interactions.

  4. Chiral Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    TITLE (mid Subttlo) 񓂬-JS. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED CHIRAL POLYMERS /~O~~ R E~NNE 7. AUTHOR(e) 11. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUNSIER(e) J. K. Stille...acrylamide monomer containing a chiral 1,3-dioxane unit as well as both racemic and ( R )-6.-methyl ene-vi-methyl -7-butyrol actone were synthesi zed...or ( R )-propylene oxide (10)6. The key step in this synthesis is the palladium catalyzed carbonylation of 4-bromopent-4-en-2-ol. Thus, either racemic or

  5. Principles of Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Ruth A.

    2007-07-01

    Roy M. Harrison, Editor RSC Publishing; ISBN 0854043713; × + 363 pp.; 2006; $69.95 Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes chemistry of the air, water, and soil. Although it may be confused with green chemistry, which deals with potential pollution reduction, environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical principles that occur in nature. Therefore, it is the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, water, and soil environments, and the effect of human activity on them. Environmental chemistry not only explores each of these environments, but also closely examines the interfaces and boundaries where the environments intersect.

  6. Reducible, Dibromomaleimide-linked Polymers for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, James-Kevin Y.; Choi, Jennifer L.; Wei, Hua; Schellinger, Joan G.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycations have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles both in vitro and in vivo; however, their cytotoxicity has been associated with increasing molecular weight. Polymers that can be rapidly degraded after internalization are typically better tolerated by mammalian cells compared to their non-degradable counterparts. Here, we report the use of a dibromomaleimide-alkyne (DBM-alkyne) linking agent to reversibly bridge cationic polymer segments for gene delivery and to provide site-specific functionalization by azidealkyne cycloaddition chemistry. A panel of reducible and non-reducible, statistical copolymers of (2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) were synthesized and evaluated. When complexed with plasmid DNA, the reducible and non-reducible polymers had comparable DNA condensation properties, sizes, and transfection efficiencies. When comparing cytotoxicity, the DBM-linked, reducible polymers were significantly less toxic than the non-reducible polymers. To demonstrate polymer functionalization by click chemistry, the DBM-linked polymers were tagged with an azidefluorophore and were used to monitor cellular uptake. Overall, this polymer system introduces the use of a reversible linker, DBM-alkyne, to the area of gene delivery and allows for facile, orthogonal, and site-specific functionalization of gene delivery vehicles. PMID:26214195

  7. Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polymers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, James-Kevin Y; Choi, Jennifer L; Wei, Hua; Schellinger, Joan G; Pun, Suzie H

    2015-01-01

    Polycations have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles both in vitro and in vivo; however, their cytotoxicity has been associated with increasing molecular weight. Polymers that can be rapidly degraded after internalization are typically better tolerated by mammalian cells compared to their non-degradable counterparts. Here, we report the use of a dibromomaleimide-alkyne (DBM-alkyne) linking agent to reversibly bridge cationic polymer segments for gene delivery and to provide site-specific functionalization by azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry. A panel of reducible and non-reducible, statistical copolymers of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) were synthesized and evaluated. When complexed with plasmid DNA, the reducible and non-reducible polymers had comparable DNA condensation properties, sizes, and transfection efficiencies. When comparing cytotoxicity, the DBM-linked, reducible polymers were significantly less toxic than the non-reducible polymers. To demonstrate polymer functionalization by click chemistry, the DBM-linked polymers were tagged with an azide-fluorophore and were used to monitor cellular uptake. Overall, this polymer system introduces the use of a reversible linker, DBM-alkyne, to the area of gene delivery and allows for facile, orthogonal, and site-specific functionalization of gene delivery vehicles.

  8. Tunable thiol-epoxy shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellson, Gregory; Di Prima, Matthew; Ware, Taylor; Tang, Xiling; Voit, Walter

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are uniquely suited to a number of applications due to their shape storage and recovery abilities and the wide range of available chemistries. However, many of the desired performance properties are tied to the polymer chemistry which can make optimization difficult. The use of foaming techniques is one way to tune mechanical response of an SMP without changing the polymer chemistry. In this work, a novel thiol-epoxy SMP was foamed using glass microspheres (40 and 50% by volume Q-Cel 6019), using expandable polymer microspheres (1% 930 DU 120), and by a chemical blowing agent (1% XOP-341). Each approach created SMP foam with a differing density and microstructure from the others. Thermal and thermomechanical analysis was performed to observe the behavioral difference between the foaming techniques and to confirm that the glass transition (Tg) was relatively unchanged near 50 °C while the glassy modulus varied from 19.1 to 345 MPa and the rubbery modulus varied from 0.04 to 2.2 MPa. The compressive behavior of the foams was characterized through static compression testing at different temperatures, and cyclic compression testing at Tg. Constrained shape recovery testing showed a range of peak recovery stress from 5 MPa for the syntactic Q-Cel foams to ˜0.1 MPa for the chemically blown XOP-341 foam. These results showed that multiple foaming approaches can be used with a novel SMP to vary the mechanical response independent of Tg and polymer chemistry.

  9. Click Chemistry, a Powerful Tool for Pharmaceutical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Christopher D.; Liu, Xin-Ming; Wang, Dong

    2008-01-01

    Click chemistry refers to a group of reactions that are fast, simple to use, easy to purify, versatile, regiospecific, and give high product yields. While there are a number of reactions that fulfill the criteria, the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and terminal alkynes has emerged as the frontrunner. It has found applications in a wide variety of research areas, including materials sciences, polymer chemistry, and pharmaceutical sciences. In this manuscript, important aspects of the Huisgen cycloaddition will be reviewed, along with some of its many pharmaceutical applications. Bioconjugation, nanoparticle surface modification, and pharmaceutical-related polymer chemistry will all be covered. Limitations of the reaction will also be discussed. PMID:18509602

  10. Direct-Write Polymer Nanolithography in Ultra-High Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-19

    that mimicked the DPN tip surface chemistry: A silicon oxide on a silicon chip that was coated by holding it over ODT in a scintillation vial Figure 1...open a new method of studying polymer- semiconductor surface interaction at a molecular level which is useful to develop polymer-based electronics...compatible with inorganic semiconductor technology. Experimental The silicon wafer substrates were prepared using one of two protocols. In both protocols

  11. Highly Conducting, Iodine-Doped Fluoroaluminum and Fluorogallium Naphthalocyanine Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-20

    manium (8), alumif (10), and gallium (10) polymers are stable at high tea "Orattes under vacuum and that the silicon polymer is inert to concen...but this did not interfere.) Properties and Structures of Fluoroaluminum and Fluorogallium 2,3-Naphthalo- cyanine The two fluorides are dark green when...Can " ONR Pasadena Detachment Attn: Dr. A# B. Amster, Attn: Dr. R. J. Marcus Chemistry Division 1030 East Green Street China. Lake, California 93555

  12. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  13. Interpretations of Polymer-Polymer Miscibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olabisi, Olagoke

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of polymeric mixtures, mixtures of structurally different homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. Defines concepts of polymer-polymer miscibility from practical and theoretical viewpoints, and ways of predicting such miscibility. (JN)

  14. Controlling Film Morphology in Conjugated Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Lee Y.; Munro, Andrea M.; Ginger, David S.

    2009-01-01

    We study the effects of patterned surface chemistry on the microscale and nanoscale morphology of solution-processed donor/acceptor polymer-blend films. Focusing on combinations of interest in polymer solar cells, we demonstrate that patterned surface chemistry can be used to tailor the film morphology of blends of semiconducting polymers such as poly-[2-(3,7-dimethyloctyloxy)-5-methoxy-p-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV), poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT), poly[(9,9-dioctylflorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-benzothiadiazole)] (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N’-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N’-phenyl-1,4-phenylendiamine) (PFB) with the fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). We present a method for generating patterned, fullerene-terminated monolayers on gold surfaces, and use microcontact printing and Dip-Pen Nanolithography (DPN) to pattern alkanethiols with both micro- and nanoscale features. After patterning with fullerenes and other functional groups, we backfill the rest of the surface with a variety of thiols to prepare substrates with periodic variations in surface chemistry. Spin coating polymer:PCBM films onto these substrates, followed by thermal annealing under nitrogen, leads to the formation of structured polymer films. We characterize these films with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. The surface patterns are effective in guiding phase separation in all of the polymer:PCBM systems investigated, and lead to a rich variety of film morphologies that are inaccessible with unpatterned substrates. We demonstrate our ability to guide pattern formation in films thick enough of be of interest for actual device applications (up to 200 nm in thickness) using feature sizes as small as 100 nm. Finally, we show that the surface chemistry can lead to variations in film morphology on length scales significantly smaller than those used in generating the original surface patterns. The variety of

  15. Coordination chemistry of tetradentate N-donor ligands containing two pyrazolyl-pyridine units separated by a 1,8-naphthyl spacer: dodecanuclear and tetranuclear coordination cages and cyclic helicates.

    PubMed

    Argent, Stephen P; Adams, Harry; Riis-Johannessen, Thomas; Jeffery, John C; Harding, Lindsay P; Mamula, Olimpia; Ward, Michael D

    2006-05-15

    The tetradentate ligand L(naph) contains two N-donor bidentate pyrazolyl-pyridine units connected to a 1,8-naphthyl core via methylene spacers; L45 and L56 are chiral ligands with a structure similar to that of L(naph) but bearing pinene groups fused to either C4 and C5 or C5 and C6 of the terminal pyridyl rings. The complexes [Cu(L(naph))](OTf) and [Ag(L(naph))](BF4) have unremarkable mononuclear structures, with Cu(I) being four-coordinate and Ag(I) being two-coordinate with two additional weak interactions (i.e., "2 + 2" coordinate). In contrast, [Cu4(L(naph))4][BF4]4 is a cyclic tetranuclear helicate with a tetrafluoroborate anion in the central cavity, formed by an anion-templating effect; electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) spectra show the presence of other cyclic oligomers in solution. The chiral ligands show comparable behavior, with [Cu(L45)](BF4) and [Ag(L45)](ClO4) having similar mononuclear crystal structures and with the ligands being tetradentate chelates. In contrast, [Ag4(L56)4](BF4)4 is a cyclic tetranuclear helicate in which both diastereomers of the complex are present in the crystal; the two diastereomers have similar gross geometries but are significantly different in detail. Despite their different crystal structures, [Ag(L45)](ClO4) and [Ag4(L56)4](BF4)4 behave similarly in solution according to ESMS studies, with a range of cyclic oligomers (up to Ag9L9) forming. With transition-metal dications Co(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II), L(naph) generates a series of unusual dodecanuclear coordination cages [M12(L(naph))18]X24 (X- = ClO4- or BF4-) in which the 12 metal ions occupy the vertices of a truncated tetrahedron and a bridging ligand spans each of the 18 edges. The central cavity of each cage can accommodate four counterions, and each cage molecule is chiral, with all 12 metal trischelates being homochiral; the crystals are racemic. Extensive aromatic stacking between ligands around the periphery of the cages appears to be a significant factor in

  16. Efficient usage of thiocarbonates for both the production and the biofunctionalization of polymers.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Cyrille; Bulmus, Volga; Davis, Thomas P

    2009-04-01

    End group modification of polymers prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was accomplished by conversion of trithiocarbonate into reactive functions able to conjugate easily with biomolecules or bioactive functionality. Polymers were prepared by RAFT, and subsequent aminolysis led to sulfhydryl-terminated polymers that reacted in situ with an excess of dithiopyridyl disulfide to yield pyridyl disulfide-terminated macromolecules or in the presence of ene to yield functional polymers. In the first route, the pyridyl disulfide end groups allowed coupling with oligonucleotide and peptide. The second approach exploited thiol-ene chemistry to couple polymers and model compounds such as carbohydrate and biotin with high yield.

  17. Engineering thermal conductivity in polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Vahid; Coyle, Eleanor; Kieffer, John; Pipe, Kevin

    Weak inter-chain bonding in polymers is believed to be a bottleneck for both thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Most polymers have low thermal conductivity (~0.1 W/mK), hindering their performance in applications for which thermal management is critical (e.g., electronics packaging). In this work, we use computational methods to study how hydrogen bonding between polymer chains as well as water content can be used to engineer thermal transport in bulk polymers. We examine how changes in the number of hydrogen bonds, chain elongation, density, and vibrational density of states correlate with changes in thermal conductivity for polymer blends composed of different relative constituent fractions. We also consider the effects of bond strength, tacticity, and polymer chain mass. For certain blend fractions, we observe large increases in thermal conductivity, and we analyze these increases in terms of modifications to chain chemistry (e.g., inter-chain bonding) and chain morphology (e.g., chain alignment and radius of gyration). We observe that increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the system results in better packing as well as better chain alignment and elongation that contribute to enhanced thermal conductivity. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0010.

  18. Novel Hydrogels from Telechelic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taribagil, Rajiv R.

    The last two decades have seen telechelic polymers support an increasing number of applications as stabilizers and flow modifiers in fields as varied as pharmaceutics, paints and oil recovery. Mainly consisting of a long hydrophilic block end-capped with hydrophobic blocks, these polymers form gels at modest concentrations, comprising hydrophobic junctions with hydrophilic blocks bridging these junctions. This thesis examines two different types of telechelic polymer hydrogels: concentrated dispersions of telechelic triblock copolymers and dilute solutions of wormlike micelles cross-linked by hydrophobically end-capped polymers. Aqueous gels of telechelic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based triblock polymers, with homo and hetero combinations of 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) and poly(perfluoropropylene oxide) (PFPO) as hydrophobic end-blocks, were investigated using a combination of cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. The PB-b-PEO-b-PB copolymers formed networks of spherical micelles at all concentrations as expected, albeit with significant spatial heterogeneity that diminished with increasing concentration. The PFPO-b-PEO-b-PFPO copolymers also formed networks by aggregation of the end-blocks, but the PFPO blocks tended to adopt disk-like or even sheet-like structures. This is attributed to the extremely high interfacial tension of PFPO with water and is consistent with the "super-strong" segregation regime behavior. The heterotelechelic PB-b-PEO- b-PFPO terpolymers adopted a quite different structure, namely an intricate bicontinuous open-cell foam, with cells on the order of 500 nm in size and cell walls composed of PFPO disks embedded in PB sheets. These various network structures illustrate the potential of using end-block chemistry to manipulate both the morphology and the physical properties of polymer gels. Dilute aqueous solutions containing 1 wt% cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate, a surfactant well recognized to form wormlike

  19. Self-Healing Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournilhac, Francois

    2012-02-01

    Supramolecular chemistry teaches us to control non-covalent interactions between organic molecules, particularly through the use of optimized building blocks able to establish several hydrogen bonds in parallel. This discipline has emerged as a powerful tool in the design of new materials through the concept of supramolecular polymers. One of the fascinating aspects of such materials is the possibility of controlling the structure, adding functionalities, adjusting the macroscopic properties of and taking profit of the non-trivial dynamics associated to the reversibility of H-bond links. Applications of these compounds may include adhesives, coatings, rheology additives, high performance materials, etc. However, the synthesis of such polymers at the industrial scale still remains a challenge. Our first ambition is to design supramolecular polymers with original properties, the second ambition is to devise simple and environmentally friendly methods for their industrial production. In our endeavours to create novel supramolecular networks with rubbery elasticity, self-healing ability and as little as possible creep, the strategy to prolongate the relaxation time and in the same time, keep the system flexible was to synthesize rather than a single molecule, an assembly of randomly branched H-bonding oligomers. We propose a strategy to obtain through a facile one-pot synthesis a large variety of supramolecular materials that can behave as differently as associating low-viscosity liquids, semi-crystalline or amorphous thermoplastics, viscoelastic melts or self-healing rubbers.

  20. High Temperature Resistant Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymers: An Architectural Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-18

    DATES COVERED July 10 2003 – January 09 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Temperature Resistant Organic/ Inorganic Hybrid Polymers: An...Supramolecular Chemistry, High Temperature Materials, Organic Inorganic Hybrid Materials, Sensors 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 16...298-102 Enclosure 1 2 High Temperature Resistant Organic/ Inorganic Hybrid Polymers: An Architectural Study DAAD19-03-1-0208 PIs Stuart