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Sample records for a-1 shielding gas

  1. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  2. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  3. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  4. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  5. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  6. Impact damage on shielded gas-filled vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, F.; Schneider, E.; Lambert, M.

    2001-10-01

    This paper gives a summary of the findings from impacts on shielded gas-filled cylindrical aluminium alloy (A12219 T851) and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) pressure vessels that were performed at the Ernst-Mach-Institute in the frame of an ESA contract. The effect of impacts on shielded vessels with projectiles that have a kinetic energy close to the ballistic limit of the combined system of shield and vessel's front wall was investigated. The shields were single Al-bumper plates, unreinforced MLI and MLI reinforced with 2 layers of Betacloth. The threshold diameters that cause leakage from the vessel's front wall were determined experimentally as a function of shield material and shield spacing. For Al-shielded Al- and Ti-vessels, a safety design factor to avoid leakage is presented based on existing Whipple shield equations.

  7. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  8. Influence of the shielding gas internal bore welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastra, Isabelle; Boudot, Cecile

    1991-10-01

    As the authors welded with a small focus distance in a small area, the shielding gas performed the following new functions: heat removal, optics shielding, and liquid metal shielding. Therefore, the gas usually used in laser welding (He, N2, Ar, or a mixture) was compared, with and without a small percentage of oxygen. The benefit influence of a small percentage of oxygen has been demonstrated for the three aimed points, but also an important and beneficial effect on the weldshape has been show; i.e., with the same welding speed value and the same welding energy value the weld penetration can be increased from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm (only by optimization of the gas composition with a small amount of oxygen).

  9. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we present new results of detailed kinematic analyses of these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (˜300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we produce velocity fields and dispersion maps using different spatial and spectral resolution representations of the data in order to attempt derivation of an inclination-corrected rotation curve. While both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make multiple position-velocity cuts across each galaxy to determine the maximum circular rotation velocity (≤ 30 km-1 for the survey population). Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are contextualized on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  10. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  11. Bottom shield for a gas cooled high temperature nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.; Kolodzey, H. J.; Schwiers, H. G.; Stracke, W.

    1984-12-25

    A gas cooled, high temperature nuclear reactor is provided with a base plate arranged under the reactor core and over the bottom of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel serving as the bottom shield. The bottom shield comprises at least two plates arranged coaxially with respect to each other, one above the other. Each plate comprises several partially interconnected parts with the lower plate being placed at an axial and vertical distance from the bottom liner of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel and also from the upper plate.

  12. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  13. Evidence for bacterially generated hydrocarbon gas in Canadian shield and Fennoscandian shield rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lollar, B.S.; Frape, S.K. ); Fritz, P. ); Macko, S.A. ); Welhan, J.A. ); Blomqvist, R.; Lahermo, P.W. )

    1993-12-01

    Hydrocarbon-rich gases found in crystalline rocks on the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields are isotopically and compositionally similar, suggesting that such gases are a characteristic feature of Precambrian Shields rocks. Gases occur in association with saline groundwaters and brines in pressurized [open quotes]pockets[close quotes] formed by sealed fracture systems within the host rocks. When released by drilling activities, gas pressures as high as 5000 kPa have been recorded. Typical gas flow rates for individual boreholes range from 0.25 L/min to 4 L/min. The highest concentrations of CH[sub 4] are found in the deepest levels of the boreholes associated with Ca-Na-Cl (and Na-Ca-Cl) brines. N[sub 2] is the second major component of the gases and with CH[sub 4] accounts for up to 80 to >90 vol%. Higher hydrocarbon (C[sup +][sub 2]) concentrations range from <1 to 10 vol%, with Cl/(C2 + C3) ratios from 10-1000. Isotopically the gases show a wide range of values overall ([delta][sup 13]C = -57.5 to -41.1%; [delta]D = -245 to -470%) but a relatively tight cluster of values within each sampling locality. The Enonkoski Mine methanes are unique with [delta][sup 13]C values between -65.4 and -67.3% and [delta]D values between -297 and -347%. The shield gases are not readily reconcilable with conventional theories of methanogenesis. The range of C1/(C2 + C3) ratios for the shield gases is too low to be consistent with an entirely bacterial origin. In addition, [delta]D[sub CH4] values are in general too depleted in the heavy isotope to be produced by thermogenic methanogenesis or by secondary alteration processes such as bacterial oxidation or migration. However, isotopic and compositional evidence indicates that bacterially derived gas can account for a significant component of the gas at all shield sites.

  14. Gamma heating in reflector heat shield of gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofthouse, J. H.; Kunze, J. F.; Young, T. E.; Young, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Heating rate measurements made in a mock-up of a BeO heat shield for a gas core nuclear rocket engine yields results nominally a factor of two greater than calculated by two different methods. The disparity is thought to be caused by errors in neutron capture cross sections and gamma spectra from the low cross-section elements, D, O, and Be.

  15. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  16. Plasma jet's shielding gas impact on bacterial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Helena; Hänsch, Mareike A Ch; Dünnbier, Mario; Wende, Kristian; Hammer, Malte U; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan; Woedtke, Thomas von

    2015-01-01

    One of the most desired aims in plasma medicine is to inactivate prokaryotic cells and leave eukaryotic cells unharmed or even stimulate proliferation to promote wound healing. The method of choice is to precisely control the plasma component composition. Here the authors investigate the inactivation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) by a plasma jet treatment. The reactive species composition created by the plasma in liquids is tuned by the use of a shielding gas device to achieve a reactive nitrogen species dominated condition or a reactive oxygen species dominated condition. A strong correlation between composition of the reactive components and the inactivation of the bacteria is observed. The authors compare the results to earlier investigations on eukaryotic cells and show that it is possible to find a plasma composition where bacterial inactivation is strongest and adverse effects on eukaryotic cells are minimized. PMID:25832438

  17. Influence of Welding With Two-Jet Gas Shielding On the Shaping of a Welding Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Grichin, S. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    The author considers gas-dynamic influence upon microhardness and weld configuration of single-pass welds from steel 30HGSA when welding with consumable electrode under double-jet shielding. The relations to the chosen controlled welding parameters (Q, L, I) are developed and the controlling influence of the gas-dynamic affect of dynamic shield gas jet over formation of welds from alloy-treated steel 30HGSA is determined.

  18. Process Optimization through Adaptation of Shielding Gas Selection and Feeding during Laser Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patschger, Andreas; Sahib, Christoffer; Bergmann, Jean Pierre; Bastick, André

    For this paper the influence of the shielding gas itself as well as the feeding method on austenitic welding joints was examined with thin sheets frequently used in the household appliance industry. The composition of the shielding gas mixture with active and/or inert gases was varied in the examination, and the effect on the weld seam could be made clear. By comparing different shielding gas feeding concepts, the process was optimized with regard to seam formation. Moreover, the influence of oxygen on the seam shape was examined in the deep welding regime on a specific example.

  19. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  20. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  1. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  2. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. B.; Kamat, H. S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 °C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance to pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constitutent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  3. A study on shielding gas contamination in laser welding of non-ferrous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, G.; Ascari, A.; Campana, G.; Fortunato, A.

    2007-12-01

    Laser welding of non-ferrous alloys is a high-productivity and cost-effective joining technology, which gained an undoubted interest especially in aerospace, chemical and medical industry, where high strength and corrosion resistant mechanical parts are required. Unfortunately some of the most used non-ferrous alloys are highly reactive with respect to the components of the environmental atmosphere: oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and humidity. This reactivity leads to the formation of porosities and to oxides and nitrides inclusion, which are responsible for a decrease of ductility and strength in welded joints. According to this a good shielding technique of the weld pool is of primary importance in order to obtain sound beads and reliable manufacturings. This paper deals with the opportunity of simulating the shielding gas behavior by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics software in order to understand the relationship among the outlet position, the shielding gas type and its flow rate. A simulation activity was carried out in order to evaluate the behavior of shielding gas concentration surrounding the weld pool. The simulated welding environment was simplified without considering the presence and the effect of the plasma plume. The main results concern the shielding gas contamination prediction with respect to the distance from the beam-material interaction zone.

  4. Theory to boil-off gas cooled shields for cryogenic storage vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A.

    2004-03-01

    An intermediate refrigeration with boil-off gas cooled shields using the boil-off gas stream is an alternative method to the conventional intermediate refrigeration with a cryogenic liquid. By using an analytical calculation method relations are derived, which enable complete predictions about the effectiveness of an intermediate refrigeration with boil-off gas cooled shields as a function of the number of shields for the different stored cryogenic liquids. For this theoretical derivation however, the restrictive assumption must be made that the thermal conductivity of the used insulation material has a constant value between the considered temperature boundaries. For purposes of a more exact calculation a numerical method is therefore suggested, which takes into consideration that the thermal conductivity is temperature-dependent. For a liquid hydrogen storage vessel with a perlite-vacuum insulation e.g., the effectiveness of one shield and its equilibrium temperature are given as a function of the position of the shield in the insulation space.

  5. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    PubMed

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium. PMID:22104317

  6. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1610 - An Example of a Typical Gas Shield

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false An Example of a Typical Gas Shield 5 Figure 5 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1610 - An Example of a Typical Gas Shield

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false An Example of a Typical Gas Shield 5 Figure 5 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1610 - An Example of a Typical Gas Shield

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false An Example of a Typical Gas Shield 5 Figure 5 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1610 - An Example of a Typical Gas Shield

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false An Example of a Typical Gas Shield 5 Figure 5 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1610 - An Example of a Typical Gas Shield

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false An Example of a Typical Gas Shield 5 Figure 5 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part...

  11. Effects of SO/sub 2/ shielding gas additions on GTA weld shape

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1985-06-01

    Substantial increases in GTA weld depth/width ratio resulted from small additions of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to the torch shielding gas when welding two stainless steels. The improvement was demonstrated on both Types 304 and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steels, but would be expected for iron-base alloys generally. The weld pool shape achieved was essentially independent of variations in both SO/sub 2/ content of the torch gas and base metal composition when SO/sub 2/ in the shielding gas was in the range of 500 to 1400 ppm. With 700 ppm SO/sub 2/ in the torch gas, less than 30 ppm sulfur was added to an autogenous weld bead. For alloys where this additional sulfur can be tolerated and appropriate measures can be taken to handle the toxic SO/sub 2/, this technique offers a promising way to improve GTA weld joint penetration while suppressing variable penetration.

  12. Radiation Shielding of the Stagnation Region by Transpiration of an Opaque Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John Thomas

    1960-01-01

    The laminar compressible boundary layer in the two-dimensional and axisymmetric stagnation regions has been analyzed to show the effects of the injection of a radiation absorbing foreign gas on an incident radiation field, and on the enthalpy profiles across the boundary layer. Total heat transfer to the stagnation region is evaluated for numerous cases and the results are compared with the no shielding case. Required absorption properties of the foreign gas are determined and compared with properties of known gases.

  13. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.; Mouring, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    The ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the results are reported herein. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations.

  14. Shielding gas selection for increased weld penetration and productivity in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Leinonen, J.I.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of hydrogen and helium additions to the argon shielding gas on GTA weld pool profiles in the case of two austenitic stainless steel sheets 3 mm thick are investigated here in detail. One of the test steels shows good weldability, with a relatively deep, narrow weld pool profile, but the other is poorly weldable, with a shallow, wide weld pool when argon shielding gas is used. Bead-on-plate test welds were produced with arc shields of argon, argon with hydrogen additions of 2 to 18.2% and argon with helium additions of 20 to 80%. The hydrogen additions increases the depth of weld penetration in both test steels, but productivity with respect to maximum welding speed can be improved to an accepted level only with steel sheets of good weldability in terms of a relatively high depth/width (D/W) ratio. The depth of penetration in the test steel of good weldability increased somewhat with helium additions and the D/W ratio remained unchanged, while these parameters increased markedly in the poorly weldable steel when a He-20% Ar shielding gas was used and resembled those of the more weldable steel.

  15. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  16. Impact of gas bremsstrahlung on synchrotron radiation beamline shielding at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; Fasso, A.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) currently under construction at Argonne National Laboratory will be one of the world`s brightest synchrotron radiation facilities. The storage ring, capable of storing currents up to 300 mA at 7.0 GeV and 200 mA at 7.5 GeV, will produce very intense and energetic synchrotron radiation (E{sub c} = 24 keV for bending magnets and E{sub c} = 37.4 keV for wigglers, where E{sub c} is the critical energy). The synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines consisting of experimental enclosures and transport lines will have to be shielded against synchrotron radiation and gas bremsstrahlung scattered from beam line components. For insertion devices placed in the straight sections (length = 15 m), the gas bremsstrahlung produced by the interaction of the primary stored beam with residual gas molecules or ions in the storage ring vacuum chamber dominates the SR beam line shielding. The impact of gas bremsstrahlung on the SR beam line shielding is discussed in this paper.

  17. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.; Dale, Steinar J.; Bolin, Philip C.

    1982-12-28

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections.

  18. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, A.H.; Dale, S.J.; Bolin, P.C.

    1982-12-28

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections. 10 figs.

  19. The Influence of Shielding Gas and Heat Input on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welds in Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskitalo, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Powell, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    Laser welding of ferritic steel in normal atmosphere gives rise to weld embrittlement and poor formability. This paper demonstrates that the addition of an argon gas shield to the welding process results in tough, formable welds. Post weld heat treatment and microscopic analysis has suggested that the poor ductility of welds produced without a gas shield is, to some extent, the result of the presence of oxides in the weld metal.

  20. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  1. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  2. Analysis of the conceptual shielding design for the upflow Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Reed, D.A.; Cramer, S.N.; Emmett, M.B.; Tomlinson, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Conceptual Shielding Configuration III for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) was analyzed by performing global calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences and correcting the results as appropriate with bias factors from localized calculations. Included among the localized calculations were the radial and axial cell streaming calculations, plus extensive preliminary calculations and three final confirmation calculations of the plenum flow-through shields. The global calculations were performed on the GCFR mid-level and the lower and upper plenum regions. Calculated activities were examined with respect to the design constraint, if any, imposed on the particular activity. The spatial distributions of several activities of interest were examined with the aid of isoplots (i.e., symbols are used to describe a surface on which the activity level is everywhere the same). In general the results showed that most activities were below the respective design constraints. Only the total neutron fluence in the core barrel appeared to be marginal with the present reactor design. Since similar results were obtained for an earlier design, it has been proposed that the core barrel be cooled with inlet plenum gas to maintain it at a temperature low enough that it can withstand a higher fluence limit. Radiation levels in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and liner appeared to be sufficiently below the design constraint that expected results from the Radial Shield Heterogeneity Experiment should not force any levels above the design constraint. A list was also made of a number of issues which should be examined before completion of the final shielding design.

  3. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  4. Influence of Shielding Gas and Mechanical Activation of Metal Powders on the Quality of Surface Sintered Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The thesis analyses the influence of argon shielding gas and mechanical activation of PMS-1 copper powder and DSK-F75 cobalt chrome molybdenum powder on the surface sintered layer quality under various sintering conditions. Factors affecting the quality of the sintered surface and internal structure are studied. The obtained results prove positive impact of the shielding gas and mechanical activation. Sintering PMS-1 copper powder in argon shielding gas after mechanical activation leads to reduced internal stresses and roughness, as well as improved strength characteristics of the sintered surface. Analysis of sintered samples of mechanically activated DSK-F75 cobalt chrome molybdenum powder shows that the strength of the sintered surface grows porosity and coagulation changes.

  5. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  6. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. An outboard shield design for TIBER-II with potential for tritium self-sufficiency: Appendix A-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The outboard breeding shield design for TIBER-II is described. The design allows for tritium self-sufficiency without compromising magnet protection, design simplicity, and the testing mission of the device. The shield consists of a beryllium pebble front zone backed by a steel pebble zone. The shield is cooled by an aqueous solution containing 16 g LiNO/sub 3/ per 100 cm/sup 3/. A double first wall is used to insure uniform cooling and minimize pressure. The design pressure for the outboard shield is 0.19 MPa and the coolant temperature is less than 75/sup 0/C. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  9. Effect of pressure and shielding gas on the microstructure of hyperbaric metal cored GMAW welds down to 111 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge, J.C.F.; Santos, V.R. dos

    1995-12-31

    The microstructural evolution of hyperbaric C-Mn weld metals was studied by means of bead-on-plate welds deposit with GMAW process using a commercial metal cored wire. The welding was carried out in the flat position in the range of 51 bar to 111 bar with He+ CO{sub 2} as shielding gas, which CO{sub 2} content varied from 0.1% to 0.8 %. The microstructures were quantitatively analyzed by optical microscopy to evaluate the amount of constituents according to the IIW/IIS terminology. The results showed that all weld metals presented great amounts of acicular ferrite and a stronger influence of pressure on microstructure compared to the influence of the shielding gas.

  10. Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean; Slaven, James; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Antonini, James

    2009-02-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. To isolate elements in stainless steel welding fumes with high potential for adverse health outcomes, fumes were generated using a robotic gas metal arc system, using four shield gases of varying oxygen content. The objective was to measure Cr(VI) concentrations in a broad spectrum of gas metal arc welding processes, and identify processes of exceptionally high or low Cr(VI) content. The gases used were 95% Ar/5% O(2), 98% Ar/2% O(2), 95% Ar/5%CO(2), and 75% He/25% Ar. The welder was operated in axial spray mode (Ar/O(2), Ar/CO(2)), short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO(2) low voltage and He/Ar), and pulsed axial-spray mode (98% Ar/2% O(2)). Results indicate large differences in Cr(VI) in the fumes, with Ar/O(2) (Pulsed)>Ar/O(2)>Ar/CO(2)>Ar/CO(2) (SC)>He/Ar; values were 3000+/-300, 2800+/-85, 2600+/-120, 1400+/-190, and 320+/-290 ppm respectively (means +/- standard errors for 2 runs and 3 replicates per run). Respective rates of Cr(VI) generation were 1.5, 3.2, 4.4, 1.3, and 0.46 microg/min; generation rates were also calculated in terms of microg Cr(VI) per metre of wire used. The generation rates of Cr(VI) increased with increasing O(3) concentrations. Particle size measurements indicated similar distributions, but somewhat higher >0.6 microm fractions for the short-circuit mode samples. Fumes were also sampled into 2 selected size ranges, a microspatter fraction (>or=0.6 microm) and a fine (<0.6 microm) fraction; analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is primarily associated with particles <0.6 microm. The conclusion of the study is that Cr(VI) concentrations vary significantly with welding type and shield gas type, and this presents an opportunity to tailor welding practices to lessen Cr(VI) exposures in workplaces by selecting low Cr(VI)-generating processes. Short-circuit processes generated less Cr(VI) than axial-spray methods, and inert gas shielding gave lower Cr(VI) content than shielding with active

  11. Results of tests of the SRB aft skirt heat shield curtain in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    During the first two space shuttle flights the aft skirt heat shield curtain performed well during ascent but failed during reentry. This exposed the inside of the skirt and its subsystems to reentry heating. The resulting exposure damaged various expensive systems items and therefore a curtain reassessment is required. As a part of this reassessment, tests were conducted in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility (HGF). The purposes of these tests were to determine if the curtain would fail in a manner similar to that in flight and to demonstrate that meaningful tests of the curtain can be conducted in the HGF.

  12. Nitrogen metastable (N2(A3 Σu + )) in a cold argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Shielding and gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseni, Sylvain; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) metastable species are detected and measured in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet by laser induced fluorescence. A shielding device is used to change the ambient conditions additionally to the feeding gas composition. Varying the amount of N2 and air admixed to the feeding gas as well as changing the shielding gas from N2 to air reveals that the highest N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) is achieved in the case of air admixtures in spite of the enhanced collisional quenching due to the presence of O2. The reasons for these observations are discussed in detail.

  13. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  14. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  15. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: Modelling of thermal plasmas for arc welding: the role of the shielding gas properties and of metal vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. B.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Tashiro, S.; Sato, T.; Lowke, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The methods used to model thermal plasmas, including treatments of diffusion in arcs in gas mixtures, are reviewed. The influence of thermophysical properties on the parameters of tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welding arcs, particularly those that affect the weld pool, is investigated using a two-dimensional model in which the arc, anode and cathode are included self-consistently. The effect of changing each of six thermophysical properties on the characteristics of an argon TIG arc is assessed. The influence of the product of specific heat and mass density is found to be particularly important in determining the arc constriction. By examining the influence of the different properties on the heat flux density, current density and shear stress at the anode, it is concluded that the weld pool depth can be increased by using shielding gases with high specific heat, thermal conductivity and viscosity. The effect of metal vapour on the arc and weld pool properties is assessed. The most important effect of the metal vapour is found to be the increased electrical conductivity at low temperatures, which leads to lower heat flux density and current density at the weld pool, implying a shallower weld pool.

  17. Grain refinement control in gas-shielded arc welding of aluminum tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    When sections are being welded, operator varies pulse rate of power supply and simultaneously monitors signal on oscilloscope until rate is found which produces maximum arc gas voltage. Remainder of welding is performed with power supply set at this pulse rate, producing desired maximum weld puddle agitation and fine uniform weld of grain structure.

  18. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  19. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  20. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  1. Recovery and radiation corrections and time constants of several sizes of shielded and unshielded thermocouple probes for measuring gas temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Holanda, R.; Krause, L. N.

    1978-01-01

    Performance characteristics were experimentally determined for several sizes of a shielded and unshielded thermocouple probe design. The probes are of swaged construction and were made of type K wire with a stainless steel sheath and shield and MgO insulation. The wire sizes ranged from 0.03- to 1.02-mm diameter for the unshielded design and from 0.16- to 0.81-mm diameter for the shielded design. The probes were tested through a Mach number range of 0.2 to 0.9, through a temperature range of room ambient to 1420 K, and through a total-pressure range of 0.03 to 0.2.2 MPa (0.3 to 22 atm). Tables and graphs are presented to aid in selecting a particular type and size. Recovery corrections, radiation corrections, and time constants were determined.

  2. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  3. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  4. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  5. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-20

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with {approx}0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  6. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-01

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with ~0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  7. Quantum fluctuations of a 1D bosonic gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruostekoski, Janne

    2005-05-01

    We numerically study the quantum dynamics of a 1D bosonic gas in a shallow optical lattice for both static and time-dependent lattices. In particular, we model the strongly damped dipole oscillations which have recently been observed experimentally at NIST by Fertig et al. cond-mat/0410491. We find a qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed damping rates which can be explained as being due to zero temperature quantum fluctuations.

  8. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  9. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  10. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  11. Comparison of combustion characteristics of ASTM A-1, propane, and natural-gas fuels in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of an annular turbojet combustor using natural-gas fuel is compared with that obtained using ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Propane gas was used to simulate operation with vaporized kerosene fuels. The results obtained at severe operating conditions and altitude relight conditions show that natural gas is inferior to both ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Combustion efficiencies were significantly lower and combustor pressures for relight were higher with natural-gas fuel than with the other fuels. The inferior performance of natural gas is shown to be caused by the chemical stability of the methane molecule.

  12. Method for creating an aeronautic sound shield having gas distributors arranged on the engines, wings, and nose of an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen (Inventor); Smith, Mark Stephen (Inventor); Myre, David Daniel (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention blocks and/or attenuates the upstream travel of acoustic disturbances or sound waves from a flight vehicle or components of a flight vehicle traveling at subsonic speed using a local injection of a high molecular weight gas. Additional benefit may also be obtained by lowering the temperature of the gas. Preferably, the invention has a means of distributing the high molecular weight gas from the nose, wing, component, or other structure of the flight vehicle into the upstream or surrounding air flow. Two techniques for distribution are direct gas injection and sublimation of the high molecular weight solid material from the vehicle surface. The high molecular weight and low temperature of the gas significantly decreases the local speed of sound such that a localized region of supersonic flow and possibly shock waves are formed, preventing the upstream travel of sound waves from the flight vehicle.

  13. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  14. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  15. Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shieldings of rare-gas atoms and halogen in hydrogen halides within relativistic polarization propagator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sergio S.; Maldonado, Alejandro; Aucar, Gustavo A.

    2005-12-01

    In this work an analysis of the electronic origin of relativistic effects on the isotropic dia- and paramagnetic contributions to the nuclear magnetic shielding σ(X ) for noble gases and heavy atoms of hydrogen halides is presented. All results were obtained within the 4-component polarization propagator formalism at different level of approach [random-phase approximation (RPA) and pure zeroth-order approximation (PZOA)], by using a local version of the DIRAC code. From the fact that calculations of diamagnetic contributions to σ within RPA and PZOA approaches for HX(X =Br,I,At) and rare-gas atoms are quite close each to other and the finding that the diamagnetic part of the principal propagator at the PZOA level can be developed as a series [S(Δ)], it was found that there is a branch of negative-energy "virtual" excitations that contribute with more than 98% of the total diamagnetic value even for the heavier elements, namely, Xe, Rn, I, and At. It contains virtual negative-energy molecular-orbital states with energies between -2mc2 and -4mc2. This fact can explain the excellent performance of the linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) scheme for elements up to the fifth row in the Periodic Table. An analysis of the convergency of S(Δ ) and its physical implications is given. It is also shown that the total contribution to relativistic effects of the innermost orbital (1s1/2) is by far the largest. For the paramagnetic contributions results at the RPA and PZOA approximations are similar only for rare-gas atoms. On the other hand, if the mass-correction contributions to σp are expressed in terms of atomic orbitals, a different pattern is found for 1s1/2 orbital contributions compared with all other s-type orbitals when the whole set of rare-gas atoms is considered.

  16. A STUDY OF DUST AND GAS AT MARS FROM COMET C/2013 A1 (SIDING SPRING)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnham, Tony L.; Bodewits, Dennis; Tricarico, Pasquale; Farnocchia, Davide

    2014-09-01

    Although the nucleus of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will safely pass Mars in 2014 October, the dust in the coma and tail will more closely approach the planet. Using a dynamical model of comet dust, we estimate the impact fluence. Based on our nominal model no impacts are expected at Mars. Relaxing our nominal model's parameters, the fluence is no greater than ∼10{sup –7} grains m{sup –2} for grain radii larger than 10 μm. Mars-orbiting spacecraft are unlikely to be impacted by large dust grains, but Mars may receive as many as ∼10{sup 7} grains, or ∼100 kg of total dust. We also estimate the flux of impacting gas molecules commonly observed in comet comae.

  17. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  18. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  19. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  20. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  1. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  2. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  3. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  4. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  5. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  6. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  7. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  8. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  9. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  10. Temperature Evolution of a 1 MA Triple-Nozzle Gas-Puff Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grouchy, Philip; Banasek, Jacob; Engelbrecht, Joey; Qi, Niansheng; Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Cahill, Adam; Moore, Hannah; Potter, William; Ransohoff, Lauren; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce; Laboratory of Plasma Studies Team

    2015-11-01

    Mitigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays a critical role in optimizing x-ray output at high-energy ~ 13 keV using the triple-nozzle Krypton gas-puff at Sandia National Laboratory. RTI mitigation by gas-puff density profiling using a triple-nozzle gas-puff valve has recently been recently demonstrated on the COBRA 1MA z-pinch at Cornell University. In support of this work we investigate the role of shell cooling in the growth of RTI during gas-puff implosions. Temperature measurements within the imploding plasma shell are recorded using a 527 nm, 10 GW Thomson scattering diagnostic for Neon, Argon and Krypton puffs. The mass-density profile is held constant at 22 microgram per centimeter for all three puffs and the temperature evolution of the imploding material is recorded. In the case of Argon puffs we find that the shell ion and electron effective temperatures remain in equilibrium at around 1keV for the majority of the implosion phase. In contrast scattered spectra from Krypton are dominated by of order 10 keV effective ion temperatures. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  12. Spin-orbit ZORA and four-component Dirac-Coulomb estimation of relativistic corrections to isotropic nuclear shieldings and chemical shifts of noble gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Marzena; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek; Faber, Rasmus; Lacerda, Evanildo G; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2016-02-01

    Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with the hybrid B3LYP and general gradient KT2 exchange-correlation functionals were used for nonrelativistic and relativistic nuclear magnetic shielding calculations of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon dimers and free atoms. Relativistic corrections were calculated with the scalar and spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian in combination with the large Slater-type basis set QZ4P as well as with the four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian using Dyall's acv4z basis sets. The relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shieldings and chemical shifts are combined with nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] calculations using the very large polarization-consistent basis sets aug-pcSseg-4 for He, Ne and Ar, aug-pcSseg-3 for Kr, and the AQZP basis set for Xe. For the dimers also, zero-point vibrational (ZPV) corrections are obtained at the CCSD(T) level with the same basis sets were added. Best estimates of the dimer chemical shifts are generated from these nuclear magnetic shieldings and the relative importance of electron correlation, ZPV, and relativistic corrections for the shieldings and chemical shifts is analyzed. PMID:26503739

  13. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  14. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  15. Molecular shield - An orbiting low-density materials laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Outlaw, R. A.; Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of a molecular shield orbited at 200 km utilizes the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas, applied to a hemispherical shell geometry containing internal sources. The molecular shield provides very low gas density conditions for materials experiments at low gravity, while the hemispherical geometry minimizes the internal surface/volume ratio. Deployment of the shield in orbit is described. Contributions to density by shield outgassing, by experiment outgassing, and by interaction with the orbiter are discussed separately. A jettisonable closure plate sealing the hemisphere minimizes any risk of experiment contamination during deployment.

  16. Measuring Spin-Charge Separation in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob A.; Revelle, Melissa C.; Hulet, Randall G.

    2016-05-01

    We present progress on measurement of spin-charge separation in a two-component, strongly interacting, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. A characteristic feature of interacting 1D Fermi gases is that the velocity of a charge excitation propagates faster than a spin excitation. We create an excitation by applying a dipole force at the center of the cloud using a sheet of light. Depending on the detuning of this beam, we can either excite both spin species equally (charge excitation) or preferentially (spin excitation). Once this beam is turned off, the excitations propagate to the edges of the atomic cloud at a velocity determined by coupling strength. A magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance enables us to vary this coupling and map out the velocities of spin and charge excitations. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation

  17. Detecting different correlation regimes in a 1D Bose gas using in-situ absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salces-Carcoba, Francisco; Sugawa, Seiji; Yue, Yuchen; Putra, Andika; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We present the realization of a single 1D Bose gas (1DBG) using a tightly focused Laguerre-Gauss beam as a waveguide for a 87Rb cloud. Axial confinement is provided by a weak trap that also sets the final density profile. A homogeneous 1DBG at T = 0 can be fully described by the dimensionless interaction parameter γ ~ 1/n, where n is the linear density; at sufficiently low densities the system becomes strongly interacting. An inhomogeneous (trapped) system can enter this description within the local density approximation (LDA) where the interaction parameter becomes position dependent γ(x) ~ 1/n(x). The system then displays different correlation regimes over its extension which can be detected by measuring its equation of state (EoS) or the density density correlations in real space using in-situ absorption imaging.

  18. Trailing Shield For Welding On Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coby, John B., Jr.; Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Trailing shield ensures layer of inert gas covers hot, newly formed bead between two tubes or pipes joined by plasma arc welding. Inert gas protects weld bead from oxidation by air until cooler and less vulnerable to oxidation. Intended for use on nickel-base alloy pipes, on which weld beads remain hot enough to oxidize after primary inert-gas purge from welding-torch cup has passed.

  19. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  20. Measuring the Speed of Sound in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob; Revelle, Melissa; Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the speed of sound in a two-spin component, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. The 1D system is an array of one-dimensional tubes created by a 2D optical lattice. By increasing the lattice depth, the tunneling between tubes is sufficiently small to make each an independent 1D system. To measure the speed of sound, we create a density notch at the center of the atom cloud using a sheet of light tuned far from resonance. The dipole force felt by both spin states will be equivalent, so this notch can be thought of as a charge excitation. Once this beam is turned off, the notch propagates to the edge of the atomic cloud with a velocity that depends on the strength of interatomic interactions. We control interactions using a magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance, allowing us to measure the speed of sound over a wide range of interaction. This method may be used to extract the Luttinger parameter vs. interaction strength. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation.

  1. Plasma structures observed in gas breakdown using a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E. M.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.; Edmiston, G. F.; Neuber, A. A.; Oda, Y.

    2009-05-15

    Regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays have been observed in gas breakdown experiments using a pulsed 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron. The gyrotron Gaussian output beam is focused to an intensity of up to 4 MW/cm{sup 2}. The plasma filaments develop in an array with a spacing of about one quarter wavelength, elongated in the electric field direction. The array was imaged using photodiodes, a slow camera, which captures the entire breakdown event, and a fast camera with a 6 ns window. These diagnostics demonstrate the sequential development of the array propagating back toward the source. Gases studied included air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6}, and helium at various pressures. A discrete plasma array structure is observed at high pressure, while a diffuse plasma is observed at lower pressure. The propagation speed of the ionization front for air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure for 3 MW/cm{sup 2} was found to be of the order of 10 km/s.

  2. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  3. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  4. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  6. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  7. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm{sup 2};. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach.

  8. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.

  9. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  10. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  11. Systematics of hydrothermal alteration at the volcanic-hosted Falun Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) deposit - implications for ore genesis, structure and exploration in a 1.9 Ga ore district, Fennoscandian Shield, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, Tobias C.; Jansson, Nils J.; Stephens, Michael B.; Majka, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic, volcanic-hosted Falun Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit was mined for base and precious metals during several centuries, until its closure in 1992. The deposit is located in a 1.9 Ga ore district in the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit, Fennoscandian Shield, south-central Sweden. Both the ores and their host rock underwent polyphase ductile deformation, and metamorphism under amphibolite facies and later retrograde conditions at 1.9-1.8 Ga (Svecokarelian orogenic system). This study has the following aims: (i) Classify styles and intensities of alteration in the hydrothermally altered zone at Falun; (ii) identify precursor rocks to hydrothermally altered rocks and their spatial distribution at the deposit; (iii) evaluate the chemical changes resulting from hydrothermal alteration using mass change calculations; and (iv) assess the pre-metamorphic alteration assemblages accounting for the observed metamorphic mineral associations in the altered rocks at Falun. Results will have implications for both the ore-genetic and structural understanding of the deposit, as well as for local and regional exploration. Metamorphic mineral associations in the altered rocks include biotite-quartz-cordierite-(anthophyllite) and, more proximally, quartz-anthophyllite-(biotite-cordierite/almandine), biotite-cordierite-(anthophyllite) and biotite-almandine-(anthophyllite). The proximal hydrothermally altered zone corresponds to intense chlorite-style alteration. Subordinate dolomite or calcite marble, as well as calc-silicate (tremolite, diopside) rocks are also present at the deposit. Metavolcanic rocks around the deposit are unaltered, weakly sericitized or sodic-altered. Immobile-element (e.g. Zr, TiO2, Al2O3, REE) systematics of the silicate-rich samples at and around the deposit suggest that the precursors to the hydrothermally altered rocks at Falun were predominantly rhyolitic in composition, dacitic rocks being subordinate and mafic-intermediate rocks

  12. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  13. 26 CFR 1.613A-1 - Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613A-1 Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells;...

  14. 26 CFR 1.613A-1 - Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Resources § 1.613A-1 Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general... attributable after such year, the allowance for depletion under section 611 with respect to any oil or gas well... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion...

  15. 26 CFR 1.613A-1 - Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Resources § 1.613A-1 Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general... attributable after such year, the allowance for depletion under section 611 with respect to any oil or gas well... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion...

  16. 26 CFR 1.613A-1 - Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Resources § 1.613A-1 Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general... attributable after such year, the allowance for depletion under section 611 with respect to any oil or gas well... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion...

  17. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  18. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  19. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  20. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  1. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  2. Plasma shield for in-air beam processesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-01

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  3. Plasma shield for in-air beam processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-15

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  4. 26 CFR 1.613A-1 - Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Post-1974 limitations on percentage depletion in case of oil and gas wells; general rule. 1.613A-1 Section 1.613A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613A-1 Post-1974 limitations...

  5. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  6. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  7. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  8. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  9. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  10. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  11. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  12. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  13. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  14. RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor/shield masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison was completed of the reactor/shield masses obtained from detailed calculations by the proposers of space power reactors. This comparison included a variety of liquid metal cooled, gas cooled and thermionic reactors. An initial goal for agreement between RSMASS (reactor/shield mass model) calculated masses and the masses obtained from detailed calculations was chosen to be a factor of 2. The preliminary comparison demonstrated that the reactor/shield masses estimated by RSMASS agree with the masses obtained from detailed calculations within 50 percent. It can be concluded that RSMASS can provide good estimates of reactor/shield masses for a broad variety of reactor concepts proposed for MMW space power applications. RSMASS is being used to compare the masses of various reactor types and is providing some insights into the mass advantages and disadvantages for the various concepts as a function of operating conditions and reactor or shield parameters. Some mass estimates obtained with RSMASS are presented.

  15. Shielding of CO from dissociating radiation in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Langer, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper investigates the photodissociation of CO in interstellar clouds in the light of recent laboratory studies which suggest that line rather than continuum processes dominate its dissociation by ultraviolet radiation. Using a simple radiative transfer model, the shielding of representative dissociating bands is estimated, including self-shielding, mutual shielding between different isotopes, and near coincidences with strong lines of H2. Each of these processes materially affects the photodestruction rates of the various isotopic species in the transition regions of molecular clouds. These results are combined with an appropriate gas phase chemical model to determine how the abundances of the CO isotopes vary with depth into the cloud. It is found that self-shielding and mutual shielding cause significant variations in isotopic ratios. In addition, fractionation enhances species containing C-13. The relationship between the column densities of CO and H2 is found to vary for the different isotopes and to be sensitive to local conditions.

  16. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  17. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  18. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  19. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  20. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  1. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air and its products of combustion with ASTMA-A-1 fuel and natural gas at 20, 30, and 40 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The isentropic exponent, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy were calculated for air, the combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air, and the combustion products of natural gas and air. The properties were calculated over a temperature range from 300 to 2800 K in 100 K increments and for pressures of 20, 30 and 40 atmospheres. The data for natural gas and ASTM-A-1 were calculated for fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric in 0.01 increments.

  2. SHIELD II: VLA HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eojin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from low-resolution D-configuration VLA HI spectral line observations of 6 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from SDSS and WIYN. These data allow us to localize the HI gas and to study the bulk neutral gas kinematics.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  3. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  4. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  5. 3D modelling and sheath folding at the Falun pyritic Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit and implications for exploration in a 1.9 Ga ore district, Fennoscandian Shield, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, Tobias C.; Stephens, Michael B.; Weihed, Pär

    2016-06-01

    Altered and mineralized rocks at the Falun pyritic Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit, situated in the Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen ore district in the south-western part of the Fennoscandian Shield, have been metamorphosed at low-pressure, amphibolite-facies conditions and affected by ductile deformation. Using combined surface mapping of lithology and structure, drill core logging and microstructural work, the polyphase (D1 and D2) ductile deformation is demonstrated and a 3D model for the deposit created. Mineral associations include quartz, biotite, cordierite, anthophyllite, and minor almandine, andalusite and chlorite in silicate-rich altered rock, calcite or dolomite in marble and tremolite-actinolite or diopside-hedenbergite in skarn. The silicate minerals show varying growth patterns during the different phases of the tectonothermal evolution, with considerable static grain growth occurring between D1 and D2, and even after D2. F2 sheath folding along axes that plunge steeply to the SSE, parallel to a mineral stretching lineation and the dip direction of the S2 foliation, is suggested as a key deformation mechanism forming steeply plunging, cone- to rod-shaped mineralized bodies. This contrasts with a previous structural model invoking fold interference. A major shear zone with talc-chlorite-(quartz-biotite) mineral association separates the northern and southern structural domains at the deposit and bounds the polymetallic massive sulphides to the north.

  6. 3D modelling and sheath folding at the Falun pyritic Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit and implications for exploration in a 1.9 Ga ore district, Fennoscandian Shield, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, Tobias C.; Stephens, Michael B.; Weihed, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Altered and mineralized rocks at the Falun pyritic Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit, situated in the Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen ore district in the south-western part of the Fennoscandian Shield, have been metamorphosed at low-pressure, amphibolite-facies conditions and affected by ductile deformation. Using combined surface mapping of lithology and structure, drill core logging and microstructural work, the polyphase (D1 and D2) ductile deformation is demonstrated and a 3D model for the deposit created. Mineral associations include quartz, biotite, cordierite, anthophyllite, and minor almandine, andalusite and chlorite in silicate-rich altered rock, calcite or dolomite in marble and tremolite-actinolite or diopside-hedenbergite in skarn. The silicate minerals show varying growth patterns during the different phases of the tectonothermal evolution, with considerable static grain growth occurring between D1 and D2, and even after D2. F2 sheath folding along axes that plunge steeply to the SSE, parallel to a mineral stretching lineation and the dip direction of the S2 foliation, is suggested as a key deformation mechanism forming steeply plunging, cone- to rod-shaped mineralized bodies. This contrasts with a previous structural model invoking fold interference. A major shear zone with talc-chlorite-(quartz-biotite) mineral association separates the northern and southern structural domains at the deposit and bounds the polymetallic massive sulphides to the north.

  7. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  8. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  9. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  10. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  11. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  12. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  13. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  14. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  15. Whipple bumper shield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S.; Chhabildas, L.C. ); Hill, S.A. . George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple bumper is a space shield designed to protect a space station from the most hazardous orbital space debris environment. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH to estimate the effectiveness of the thin Whipple bumper design. These simulations are performed for impact velocities of {approximately}10 km/s which are now accessible by experiments using the Sandia hypervelocity launcher facility. For a {approximately}10 km/s impact by a 0.7 gm aluminum flier plate, the experimental results indicate that the debris cloud resulting upon impact of the bumper shield by the flier plate, completely penetrates the sub-structure. The CTH simulations also predict complete penetration by the subsequent debris cloud. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  17. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  18. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. The nuclear magnetic shielding as a function of internuclear separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; de Dios, Angel C.

    1993-02-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding surfaces for 23Na in the NaH molecule, 39Ar in ArNe, 21Ne in NeHe, and 39Ar in Ar...NaH are carried out over a wide range of internuclear separations, using a local origin method (LORG) which damps out the long-range errors due to incomplete basis sets. The R dependence of the intermolecular shielding in the attractive region of the potential in these systems and in Ar...Ar and Ar...Na+ are consistent with the long-range limiting forms associated with the shielding hyperpolarizability in conjunction with a mean square electric field approximation. The Cl and F shieldings over the range of nuclear displacements spanning the classical turning points of the ground vibrational states of ClF and F2 are found to be remarkably superposable upon scaling by the factors ṡRe. This holds as well for ClH compared with FH. The shielding of 23Na and 7Li in NaH and LiH molecules are almost superposable. These and the scaling of the intermolecular shielding in rare gas pairs indicate some general similarities of shielding surfaces. The systematic variation in the signs and magnitudes of the first derivative of X nuclear shielding at the equilibrium geometry in XHn molecules of the first and second row of the Periodic Table are shown to be consistent with a general shape for the shielding function σ(R), which we have found in rare gas pairs and for 23Na in NaH.

  20. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  1. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  2. Effects of shields on cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft wiring subjected to rapidly changing electromagnetic fields was considered. The ways in which shielded cables reduce surge voltages were studied along with the ways in which common practice regarding the use of shields may be at variance with the use required for the control of lightning effects. Courses in which this apparent conflict of use may be resolved were suggested. Noise currents flowing on shields of cables related to the noise signals coupled onto signal conductors were also investigated.

  3. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  4. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  5. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  6. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  7. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Pivotably mounted reactor shroud shield and shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1987-03-31

    A method is described for shielding persons working around a nuclear reactor having a reactor head an a shroud extending upward from the reactor head, comprising: (a) mounting a plurality of swingout arms around the shroud, each swingout arm being pivotable about a respective axis that is substantially vertical and that is fixed with respect to the shroud; (b) positioning a shielding member adjacent a swingout arm with a hoist; (c) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally away from the shroud and toward the hoist; (d) transferring the shielding member from the hoist to the swingout arm so that the swingout arm supports the shielding member; (e) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally back toward the shroud; and (f) repeating steps (b) through (c) until the shroud is substantially surrounded by shielding members.

  9. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  10. Measurements for the JASPER program Axial Shield Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Hunter, H.T.; Shono, A.; Chatani, K.

    1991-08-01

    The Axial Shield Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990--1991 as part of the continuing series of eight experiments planned for the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER) program starting in 1986. The program is intended to provide support for the development of current designs proposed for advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) system both in Japan and the United States. As in the previous two experiments, the same spectrum modifier was used to alter the Tower Shielding Reactor source spectrum to one representing the LMR neutron spectra directly above the core in the area of the fission-gas plenum. In one of the measurements the spectrum was further modified by the fission gas plenum. In all cases the modified spectrum was followed by combinations of seven hexagon assemblies that represented different coolant flow and shielding patterns within the assemblies. The varied configuration permitted not only a study of the different designs, but also allowed a comparison to be made of the relative neutron attenuation effectiveness of boron carbide and stainless steel in such designs. This experiment was the third in a series of eight experiments to be performed as part of a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). This experiment, as was the previous Radial Shield Attenuation and Fission Gas Plenum Experiments, intended to provide support for the development of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. 5 refs.

  11. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  12. Atlas Breached Waste Package and Drip Shield Experiments: Breached Drip Shield Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Z. P. Walton

    2003-05-28

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) represents one system in the performance of the Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository to isolate and prevent the transport of radionuclides from the site to the accessible environment. Breached Waste Package and Drip Shield Experiments (BWPDSE) were performed at the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Support Facility in North Las Vegas, NV in the A-1 lowbay between May 2, 2002 and July 25, 2002. Data collected from the BWPDSE will be used to support the flux splitting model used in Analysis and Modeling Report ANL-WIS-PA-000001 REV 00 ICN 03 ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2001a). Tests were conducted by dripping water from heights representing the drift crown or wall on a full-scale section of a drip shield with both smooth and rough surfaces. The drip shields had machined square breaches that represent the general corrosion breaches or nodes in the ''WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip Shield Degradation'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000d). Tests conducted during the BWPDSE included: initial tests to determine the splash radius distances and spread factor from the line of drip impact, single patch tests to determine the amount of water collected in target breaches from splashing or rivulet flow, multiple patch tests to determine the amount of water collected in several breaches from both splashing and rivulet flow, and bounding flow rate tests. Supplemental data were collected to provide additional information for rivulet spread, pan evaporation in the test chamber, and water temperatures of the input water and drip shield surface water. The primary flow mechanism observed on both smooth and rough surfaces was rivulet flow, not film flow. Lateral rivulet spread distances were, in general, wider on the smooth drip shield surface than on the rough drip shield surface. There were substantial differences between the mechanisms of rivulet formation and movement on

  13. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  14. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  15. Shielded Canister Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB.

  16. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  17. Shielding and fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Guetersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for manned spaced missions depends on the ability to adequately describe the process of high-energy ion transport through many materials. Since the types of possible nuclear interactions are many and complex, transport models are used which depend upon a reliable source of experimental data. To expand the heavy ion database used in the models we have been measuring charge-changing cross sections and fragment production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in various elementa targets. These include materials flown on space missions such as carbon and aluminium, as well as those important in radiation dosimetry such as hydrogen, nitrogen and water. Measuring heavy-ion fragmentation through these targets also gives us the ability to determine the effectiveness of new materials proposed for shielding such as graphite composites and polyethylene hybrids. Measurement without a target present gives an indication of the level of contamination of the primary beam, which is also important in radiobiology experiments. PMID:16604611

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  19. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  20. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  1. Using a mobile transparent plastic-lead-boron shielding barrier to reduce radiation dose exposure in the work place

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, S A; Mecozzi, J M

    2001-01-11

    Moveable radiation shielding barriers made of plastic material containing lead and boron can be used to reduce radiation exposure near the work place. Personnel can maneuver and position the transparent radiation shielding barriers anywhere within the work place. The lead in the shielding barrier provides an effective shielding material against radiation exposure (approximately a 1.0 mm lead equivalent protection) while the boron in the shielding barrier provides neutron absorption to reduce the moderation/reflection effects of the shielding materials (approximately a 2% {Delta}k/k reduction).

  2. Fusion neutronics-streaming, shielding, heating, activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2001-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents an important step towards a fusion power plant. Controlled fusion will be realized in a d-t-plasma magnetically confined by a Tokamak configuration. The first wall of the plasma chamber, blanket and vacuum vessel of ITER form a compact assembly for converting the kinetic energy of fusion neutrons into heat while simultaneously shielding the superconducting coils efficiently against neutron and accompanying photon radiation. This shielding system can be investigated with neutrons generated by low-energy accelerators. We report on experiments concerning shielding and streaming properties of a mock-up where energy spectra of both neutrons and protons were measured. They are compared with predictions of Monte Carlo calculations (code MCNP-4A) using various data libraries. The agreement justified the use of measured spectra as basis to calculate design parameters such as neutron and photon heating, radiation damage, gas production, and activation. Some of these parameters were also directly measured. The results validate the ITER design.

  3. Dynamical Analysis of the SHIELD Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew Thomas; Teich, Yaron G.; Cannon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the 12 extremely low-mass dwarf galaxies that comprise SHIELD, a product of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We use multi-configuration, high spatial (˜ 150 - 350 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution data obtained from 21 cm observations conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we attempt to derive an inclination-corrected rotation curve, to calculate the maximum rotation velocity (≤ 30 km s-1 for the survey population), and to further constrain the H I mass. For sources from which a sufficiently precise rotation curve can be derived, we use spatially resolved Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 and 4.5 μm images to determine the stellar mass as a function of radius. The gaseous and stellar mass estimates are then used to decompose the total dynamical mass values and to obtain neutral gas fractions and relative baryonic content. Characterizing the kinematics of the SHIELD galaxies allows us to draw more general conclusions about the structure and dynamical evolution of low mass dwarf galaxies in the local universe.This work is a result of collaboration with the SHIELD Team and is supported by NSF grant 1211683.

  4. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  5. Role of quantum fluctuations in the dissipative dynamics of a 1D Bose gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana Maria; Gea-Banacloche, Julio; Pupillo, Guido; Williams, Carl J.; Clark, Charles W.

    2005-03-01

    We will present a theoretical treatment[1] of the surprisingly large damping observed recently in a experiment done at NIST [2] where the transport properties of a harmonically trapped 1D Bose gas in a periodic (optical lattice) potential were studied by observing small amplitude dipole oscillations. In the absence of the lattice these oscillations are expected to be undamped (generalized Kohn's theorem), however, large damping of the dipole mode was observed in the experiment for very weak optical lattices and very small cloud displacements. We will show that the observed damping can be derived from a model whose main ingredients are (a) a large noncondensate fraction that arises as a direct consequence of the enhanced effective on-site interaction due to the tight transverse confinement, (b) the fact that a non-negligible part of it occupies high-momentum states and is therefore affected by dynamical instabilities, and (c) the interaction of the condensate atoms with the random field created by these noncondensate atoms when their equilibrium state is perturbed. We find good agreement between the model and the experimental results. [1] Julio Gea-Banacloche et al. cond-mat/0410677. [2] C. D. Fertig, K. et al.cond-mat/0410491.

  6. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  7. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  8. Two-leg longwall shield mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report investigates shield mechanics by describing the elastic response and interaction of shield components to applied vertical and horizontal displacements for various canopy and base contact configurations. This research provides information on generalized shield mechanics, which is applicable in describing the behavior of all two-leg shield supports. Utilizing mechanics of materials concepts and known kinematic relationships for two-leg shield supports, free-body diagrams are constructed for each shield component illustrating internal axial, shear, and bending moment responses required to maintain equilibrium for each load case evaluated. Predicted shield (component) responses are verified by controlled displacements of instrumented longwall shields in a mine roof simulator. Conclusions drawn from these analyses indicate shield structural responses are significantly dependent upon canopy and base contact configurations. Applications of shield mechanics to in situ support monitoring are discussed. An objective of this research program is to establish unique shield responses to identify in situ load conditions.

  9. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  10. A Lithium Amide Protected Against Protonation in the Gas Phase: Unexpected Effect of LiCl.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Denis; Barozzino-Consiglio, Gabriella; Duwald, Romain; Fressigné, Catherine; Harrison-Marchand, Anne; Faull, Kym F; Maddaluno, Jacques; Gimbert, Yves

    2015-06-19

    In cold THF and in the presence of LiCl, a lithium pyrrolidinylamide forms a 1:1 mixed aggregate, which is observed directly by ESI-MS. Gas-phase protonation of this species leads to selective transfer of H(+) to the chlorine, suggesting that LiCl shields the amide nitrogen and prevents its direct protonation. PMID:25997158

  11. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  12. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  13. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-12-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small ``storm cellar`` for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small storm cellar'' for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  16. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  17. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  18. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  19. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  20. Studies of magnetic shielding for phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S.; Dickey, J.; Dzierba, A.; Gohn, W.; Heinz, R.; Howell, D.; Mikels, M.; O'Neill, D.; Samoylenko, V.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.; Teige, S.

    2004-11-01

    Phototubes associated with a Cherenkov counter, with a wall of scintillation counters for time-of-flight measurements and with a wall of lead glass blocks of an electro-magnetic calorimeter will operate in the fringe field of a superconducting solenoid in the GlueX experiment. The solenoid will be operated with a central magnetic field of ≈ 2.5 T. The maximum fringe field in the vicinity of the phototubes will be approximately 150 G. Various techniques for magnetic shielding of phototubes were studied using a 1-m diameter Helmholtz coil arrangement operated with a maximum central field of 200 G. Results are presented.

  1. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  2. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  3. Rotational spectroscopy of ClZnCH3 (X1A1): Gas-phase synthesis and characterization of a monomeric Grignard-type reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, J.; Bucchino, M. P.; Kilchenstein, K. M.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2016-02-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of the organozinc halide, ClZnCH3 (X1A1), has been measured using Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) and millimeter-wave direct-absorption methods in the frequency range 10-296 GHz. This work is the first study of ClZnCH3 by gas-phase spectroscopy. The molecule was created in a DC discharge from the reaction of zinc vapor, produced either by a Broida-type oven or by laser ablation, with chloromethane in what appears to be a metal insertion process. Rotational and chlorine quadrupole constants were determined for three zinc isotopologues. The Znsbnd Cl bond was found to be partly ionic and significantly shorter than in EtZnCl.

  4. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  5. Carbon microfiber material for electromagnetic (shielding) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Nadeem

    Electromagnetic shielding is becoming more and more important with the abundance of wireless devices. Therefore a need has arisen for more versatile, flexible and low-cost solutions for shielding. For these requirements, carbon microfiber material has been proposed for electromagnetic shielding applications. For this purpose its shielding effectiveness has been measured and modeled in a simulation environment. A parametric simulation was conducted for the material property 'conductivity' and the results were compared to measured ones. These simulation results were also verified by the analytical solution for the shielding effectiveness and the agreement between the simulated values and analytical results demonstrated that the carbon microfiber material, though having less conductivity than the traditional metallic shields is a good candidate for electromagnetic shielding applications. Carbon microfiber not only provides comparable shielding effectiveness to a metallic shield but it can be advantageous because of its light weight, corrosion resistance and flexibility. Also, its porous nature can help with cooling of enclosed electronic circuits.

  6. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  7. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  8. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Bayczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of longwall shields have been investigated the this study. Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom is used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations have been determined.

  9. Protective shield for an instrument probe

    DOEpatents

    Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

    2004-10-26

    A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

  10. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  11. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  12. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  13. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  14. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  15. Debris shield survivability and lifetimes for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S; Duewer, T; Eder, D; Ertel, J; Horton, R; Latkowski, Brereton, S; MacGowan, B; Thomas, I; Tobin, M; Zaka, F

    1999-09-01

    The survivability and performance of the NIF debris shields on the National Ignition Facility are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. Estimates of debris shield lifetime in the presence of target emissions indicate severely shortened lifetimes. We have tested a new coating design that improves debris shield cleaning. A combination of modeling and continuous data collection on NIF is described/recommended to allow cost effective debris shield operation.

  16. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  1. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  2. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-21

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of {sup 1}H{sup 35}Cl are C{sub Cl}  = −53.914 kHz and C{sub H}  = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  3. New facility shield design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources.

  4. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  5. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations. PMID:25813477

  6. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  7. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  8. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  9. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  10. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-05-09

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs.

  11. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  12. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  13. Technique for Configuring an Actively Cooled Thermal Shield in a Flight System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkfknecht, Peter; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    Broad area cooling shields are a mass-efficient alternative to conductively cooled thermal radiation shielding. The shield would actively intercept a large portion of incident thermal radiation and transport the heat away using cryogenic helium gas. The design concept consists of a conductive and conformable surface that maximizes heat transfer and formability. Broad Area Cooled (BAC) shields could potentially provide considerable mass savings for spaceflight applications by eliminating the need for a rigid thermal radiation shield for cryogen tanks. The BAC consists of a network of capillary tubes that are thermally connected to a conductive shield material. Chilled helium gas is circulated through the network and transports unwanted heat away from the cryogen tanks. The cryogenic helium gas is pumped and chilled simultaneously using a specialized pulse-tube cryocooler, which further improves the mass efficiency of the system. By reducing the thermal environment temperature from 300 to 100 K, the radiative heat load on a cryogen tank could be reduced by an order of magnitude. For a cryogenic liquid propellant scenario of oxygen and hydrogen, the boiloff of hydrogen would be significantly reduced and completely eliminated for oxygen. A major challenge in implementing this technology on large tanks is that the BAC system must be easily scalable from lab demonstrations to full-scale missions. Also, the BAC shield must be conformable to complex shapes like spheres without losing the ability to maintain constant temperature throughout. The initial design maximizes thermal conductivity between the capillary tube and the conductive radiation shielding by using thin, corrugated aluminum foil with the tube running transverse to the folds. This configuration has the added benefit of enabling the foil to stretch and contract longitudinally. This allows the BAC to conform to the complex curvature of a cryogen tank, which is key to its success. To demonstrate a BAC shield

  14. A novel perineal shield for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David; Safdieh, Joseph; Polubarov, Alex; Telivala, Tejas; Worth, Matthew; Schreiber, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact on radiation exposure to staff through the use of an original perineal shield during low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods We designed a 1 mm thick stainless steel shield that duplicates and is able to slide directly over a standard commercialized prostate brachytherapy grid. We then analyzed the post-procedure exposure in 15 consecutive patients who underwent Iodine-125 seed placement. Measurements were performed with and without the shield in place at fixed locations relative to the grid template. Endpoints were analyzed using the paired two-sample t-test, with statistical significance defined as a p-value < 0.05. Results The exposure at the midline grid template ranged from 0.144-0.768 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.038-0.144 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm left of the grid template was 0.134-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm right of the grid template was 0.125-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The median reduction of exposure at the grid was 76% midline, 98.5% left, and 99% right. Similarly, each individual dose rate was recorded at 25 cm from the perineum, both with and without shield. The median reduction of exposure 25 cm from the perineum was 73.7% midline, 77.7% left and 81.6% right (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Our novel shield took seconds to install and was non-restrictive during the procedure, and provided at least a four-fold reduction in radiation exposure to the brachytherapist. PMID:26207107

  15. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  16. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  17. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  18. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  19. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  20. Geochemistry of Post-Shield and Secondary Volcanism on and Around the Island of Kaua`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinnard, L.; Garcia, M. O.; Weis, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Koloa Volcanics are the most voluminous (~ 58 km3) and long-lived (2.4 m.y.) example of Hawaiian rejuvenated volcanism. The recent discovery of extensive Koloa volcanism offshore heightens their importance in helping to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for downstream plume-related volcanism, as do post-shield lavas. We collected a suite of K-Ar dated, post-shield and Koloa lavas and new offshore samples for major and trace element, and Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope characterization for comparison with well characterized shield lavas. Previous studies of Koloa lavas were compromised by rock alteration. X-ray fluorescence analyses of new, unaltered to weakly altered rocks indicate the Koloa Volcanics are exclusively alkalic, ranging from alkali basalts to foidites, while the post-shield stage lavas range from tholeiites to hawaiites and basanites. Preliminary results show that four of five offshore blocks are tholeiitic, and may be related to the Kaua`i shield. The other is geochemically similar to Koloa Volcanics. The post-shield stage is primarily defined by its age range, rather than by its geochemistry. These lavas were erupted between 4.0-3.6 Ma vs. 5.14-4.0 Ma for shield lavas, and were followed by the rejuvenated stage after a 1.2 Ma hiatus. Major and trace element data show overlapping compositions for the post-shield stage and the shield or rejuvenated stages. Based on trace element ratios, two geochemically distinct groups can be distinguished within the post-shield stage. This distinction is shown clearly on plots of Ba/Ce vs. Zr/Nb and Ba/Sr vs. Zr/Nb, where the alkalic samples plot near to, but not within, the Koloa lavas field and the tholeiitic samples, plot in a separate field, within the tholeiitic shield field. No temporal gradational trend exists in trace element ratios from shield stage through post-shield to rejuvenated stages. Whereas the shield and rejuvenated stages form separate fields, post-shield stage lavas do not form a transitional

  1. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  2. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  3. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a full-size, full-scale TD Ni-20Cr heat shield test array in simulated mission environments is described along with the design and fabrication of two additional full-size, full-scale test arrays to be tested in flowing gas test facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Cost and reusability evaluations of TD Ni-20Cr heat shield systems are presented, and weight estimates of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system for use on a shuttle orbiter vehicle are made. Safe-line expectancy of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system is assessed. Non-destructive test techniques are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in quality assurance checks of TD Ni-20Cr components such as heat shields, heat shield supports, close-out panels, formed cover strips, and edge seals. Results of tests on a braze reinforced full-scale, subsize panel are included. Results show only minor structural degradation in the main TD Ni-20Cr heat shields of the test array during simulated mission test cycles.

  4. Effectiveness of Electromagnetic-Wave Shielding by Composites of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Microcoils in Polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon microcoils (CMCs) were deposited on Al2O3 substrates using C2H2 and H2 as source gases and SF6 as an additive gas in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Composites of carbon nanotubes in polyurethane (CNT@PU), carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CMC@PU), and carbon nanotubes plus carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CNT + CMC@PU) were fabricated. The electromagnetic-wave-shielding properties of the CNT + CMC@PU composites were examined and compared with those of CNT@PU and CMC@PU in the measurement-frequency range of 0.25-3.5 GHz. By the incorporation of CNTs, the CNT + CMC@PU composite had the reduced volume resistivity compared with that of CMC@PU composite. Consequently it gives rise to the enhanced shielding effectiveness through the reflection-based EMI-shielding mechanism. Meanwhile, the CNT + CMC@PU composite showed increasing shielding effectiveness with increasing measuring frequency in the range of 2.0-3.5 GHz. In addition, the CNT+CMC@PU composite's SE increased with increasing coated-layer thickness. These results indicate the role of the absorption as an EMI-shielding mechanism in CNT + CMC@PU composite. Based on these results, we suggest that the CNT + CMC@PU composite is a promising EMI-shielding material that can be applicable in a wide frequency range through the reflection and absorption shielding mechanism. PMID:26726656

  5. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  6. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  7. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  8. Radiation shield analysis for a manned Mars rover

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.J.; ElGenk, M.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Radiation shielding for unmanned space missions has been extensively studied; however, designs of man-rated shields are minimal. Engle et al.'s analysis of a man-rated, multilayered shield composed of two and three cycles (a cycle consists of a tungsten and a lithium hydride layer) is the basis for the work reported in this paper. The authors present the results of a recent study of shield designs for a manned Mars rover powered by a 500-kW(thermal) nuclear reactor. A train-type rover vehicle was developed, which consists of four cars and is powered by an SP-100-type nuclear reactor heat source. The maximum permissible dose rate (MPD) from all sources is given by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements as 500 mSv/yr (50 rem/yr) A 3-yr Mars mission (2-yr round trip and 1-yr stay) will deliver a 1-Sv natural radiation dose without a solar particle event, 450 mSv/yr in flight, and an additional 100 mSv on the planet surface. An anomalously large solar particle event could increase the natural radiation dose for unshielded astronauts on the Martian surface to 200 mSv. This limits the MPD to crew members from the nuclear reactor to 300 mSv.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  10. Nipple Shields: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nipple shields have become commonplace in the United States for a wide range of breastfeeding problems. This article is a summary of the current literature describing the evidence for nipple shield use. The authors reviewed all available articles on nipple shields and selected 13 studies for inclusion. The studies were organized into three categories: physiologic responses, premature infants, and mothers' experiences. This review concludes that current published research does not provide evidence for safety or effectiveness of contemporary nipple shield use. PMID:20807104

  11. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  12. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  13. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  14. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Shield topology in lightning transient control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, E. F.; Tesche, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    A formalism in which the interaction of a system with an electromagnetic source is described by sets of scattering, penetrations, and propagation functions is reviewed and interpreted in the context of the lightning interaction problem. In this formalism, the system is decomposed into simple volumes separated by closed shield surfaces. These surfaces are nested and interconnected to produce higher levels of shielding and subvolumes within a given level. The interaction analysis uses scattering theory to define current and charge densities on the shield surface in conjunction with the diffusion, apertures, and transmission line analysis to define penetration through shield imperfections and propagation within the protected volume.

  16. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  17. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ``hands-on`` procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment.

  18. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  19. Radiation environment and shielding for early manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Stephen B.; Mccann, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of shielding a crew during early manned Mars missions is discussed. Requirements for shielding are presented in the context of current astronaut exposure limits, natural ionizing radiation sources, and shielding inherent in a particular Mars vehicle configuration. An estimated range for shielding weight is presented based on the worst solar flare dose, mission duration, and inherent vehicle shielding.

  20. NMR absolute shielding scale and nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb.

    PubMed

    Adrjan, Bożena; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Jackowski, Karol; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth; Antušek, Andrej; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-06-28

    An absolute shielding scale is proposed for (207)Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is based on ab initio calculations performed on an isolated tetramethyllead Pb(CH3)4 molecule and the assignment of the experimental resonance frequency from the gas-phase NMR spectra of Pb(CH3)4, extrapolated to zero density of the buffer gas to obtain the result for an isolated molecule. The computed (207)Pb shielding constant is 10 790 ppm for the isolated molecule, leading to a shielding of 10799.7 ppm for liquid Pb(CH3)4 which is the accepted reference standard for (207)Pb NMR spectra. The new experimental and theoretical data are used to determine μ((207)Pb), the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb, by applying the standard relationship between NMR frequencies, shielding constants and nuclear moments of two nuclei in the same external magnetic field. Using the gas-phase (207)Pb and (reference) proton results and the theoretical value of the Pb shielding in Pb(CH3)4, we find μ((207)Pb) = 0.59064 μN. The analysis of new experimental and theoretical data obtained for the Pb(2+) ion in water solutions provides similar values of μ((207)Pb), in the range of 0.59000-0.59131 μN. PMID:27265668

  1. Use of active shielding gases to optimize the weld metal microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    The microstructure and properties of a structural steel weld metal are dependent on both its composition and thermal experience. With different welding heat input, preheat, plate thickness, and joint geometry, a given steel can exhibit a variety of different microstructures, from ferrite to martensite. One of the compositional variables that strongly influence steel weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties is the weld metal oxygen content. As the weld metal oxygen content increases, a change in microstructure occurs. At low concentrations of oxygen ferrite with aligned or non-aligned second phases may become predominant; slightly higher oxygen levels may result in the formation of the desired acicular ferrite; and further increase in the oxygen content promotes the formation of grain boundary ferrite. Bead-in-groove gas metal arc welding experiments were performed on HSLA steel coupons using three different welding wires and two heat inputs. A total of seventeen different argon-based shielding gas mixtures were used. Complete metallographic and chemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the weld specimens. A parameter defined as the shielding gas oxygen equivalent was developed in order to express the effects of the shielding gas composition on weld metal chemical composition and microstructure. The results showed that the shielding gas oxygen equivalent strongly influenced the pyrometallurgical reactions that occurred during welding, giving rise to significant changes in weld metal chemical composition, and thus, weld metal microstructure.

  2. Method of shielding a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sayre, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    The primary heat transport system of a nuclear reactor -- particularly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor -- is shielded and protected from leakage by establishing and maintaining a bed of a powdered oxide closely and completely surrounding all components thereof by passing a gas upwardly therethrough at such a rate as to slightly expand the bed to the extent that the components of the system are able to expand without damage and yet the particles of the bed remain close enough so that the bed acts as a guard vessel for the system. Preferably the gas contains 1 to 10% oxygen and the gas is passed upwardly through the bed at such a rate that the lower portion of the bed is a fixed bed while the upper portion is a fluidized bed, the line of demarcation therebetween being high enough that the fixed bed portion of the bed serves as guard vessel for the system.

  3. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  4. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  5. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit shield. 72.51 Section 72.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the...

  6. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  7. Current status of methods for shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods used in shielding analysis and recent improvements in those methods are discussed. The status of methods development is discussed based on needs cited at the 1977 International Conference on Reactor Shielding. Additional areas where methods development is needed are discussed.

  8. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-10-23

    Preliminary radiation shielding specifications are presented here for the 3 GeV BOOMERANG Australian synchrotron light source project. At this time the bulk shield walls for the storage ring and injection system (100 MeV Linac and 3 GeV Booster) are considered for siting purposes.

  9. Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson J. W. (Editor); Miller, J. (Editor); Konradi, A. (Editor); Cucinotta, F. A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A group of twenty-nine scientists and engineers convened a 'Workshop on Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration' at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The provision of shielding for a Mars mission or a Lunar base from the hazards of space radiations is a critical technology since astronaut radiation safety depends on it and shielding safety factors to control risk uncertainty appear to be great. The purpose of the workshop was to define requirements for the development and evaluation of high performance shield materials and designs and to develop ideas regarding approaches to radiation shielding. The workshop was organized to review the recent experience on shielding strategies gained in studies of the 'Space Exploration Initiative (SEI),' to review the current knowledge base for making shield assessment, to examine a basis for new shielding strategies, and to recommend a strategy for developing the required technologies for a return to the moon or for Mars exploration. The uniqueness of the current workshop arises from the expected long duration of the missions without the protective cover of the geomagnetic field in which the usually small and even neglected effects of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can no longer be ignored. It is the peculiarity of these radiations for which the inter-action physics and biological action are yet to be fully understood.

  10. Calculations of nuclear electric shielding in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Zanasi, R.

    1980-05-01

    The electric shielding tensor at nuclei in the molecules H 2O, NH 3, CH 4 and CO has been evaluated via coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory. The average trace of the shielding tensor is linearly dependent on atomic electronegativities in the isoelectronic series H 2O, NH 3, CH 4.

  11. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.25 Shielding. (a) The radiation dose rate in areas that are normally occupied during operation of a panoramic irradiator...

  12. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  13. Working through the Maze of Liability Shields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff; Schmiesing, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    Liability shields that can be incorporated into an Extension risk management program include permission slips, informed consent forms, waivers and releases, and indemnification agreements. Risk identification should be part of youth program planning; communication with parents is essential; the best shields are most specific; and legal counsel…

  14. Performance analysis of superconducting generator electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, D.; Xia, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the shielding performance of electromagnetic shielding systems is analyzed using the finite element method. Considering the non-iron-core rotor structure of superconducting generators, it is proposed that the stator alternating magnetic field generated under different operating conditions could decompose into oscillating and rotating magnetic field, so that complex issues could be greatly simplified. A 1200KW superconducting generator was analyzed. The distribution of the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field in rotor area, which are generated by stator winding currents, and the distribution of the eddy currents in electromagnetic shielding tube, which are induced by these stator winding magnetic fields, are calculated without electromagnetic shielding system and with three different structures of electromagnetic shielding system respectively. On the basis of the results of FEM, the shielding factor of the electromagnetic shielding systems is calculated and the shielding effect of the three different structures on the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field is compared. The method and the results in this paper can provide reference for optimal design and loss calculation of superconducting generators.

  15. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole.

  16. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  17. How Concentration Shields Against Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, John E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we outline our view of how concentration shields against distraction. We argue that higher levels of concentration make people less susceptible to distraction for two reasons. One reason is that the undesired processing of the background environment is reduced. For example, when people play a difficult video game, as opposed to an easy game, they are less likely to notice what people in the background are saying. The other reason is that the locus of attention becomes more steadfast. For example, when people are watching an entertaining episode of their favorite television series, as opposed to a less absorbing show, attention is less likely to be diverted away from the screen by a ringing telephone. The theoretical underpinnings of this perspective, and potential implications for applied settings, are addressed. PMID:26300594

  18. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  19. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  20. Shielding measurements for 230-Mev protons

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W. . Dept. of Medical Physics); Coutrakon, G. . Medical Center)

    1993-09-01

    Energetic neutrons, produced as protons interact with matter, dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton accelerators. Because of the scarcity of data describing the shielding required to protect personnel from these neutrons, absorbed dose and dose-equivalent values are measured as a function of depth in a thick concrete shield at neutron emission angles of 0, 22, 45, and 90 deg for 230-MeV protons incident upon stopping-length aluminum, iron, and lead targets. Neutron attenuation lengths vary sharply with angle but are independent of the target material. Comparing results with prior shielding calculations, the High-Energy Transport Code overestimates neutron production and attenuation lengths in the forward direction. Analytical methods compare favorably in the forward direction but overestimate the production and attenuation lengths at large angles. The results presented are useful for determining the shielding requirements for proton radiotherapy facilities and as a benchmark for future calculations.

  1. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  2. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  3. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  4. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-02-02

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight.

  5. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Ki Yeong; Kim, Taek Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Seong Wook; Kim, Joung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-11-16

    We report the first experimental results on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of monolayer graphene. The monolayer CVD graphene has an average SE value of 2.27 dB, corresponding to ~40% shielding of incident waves. CVD graphene shows more than seven times (in terms of dB) greater SE than gold film. The dominant mechanism is absorption rather than reflection, and the portion of absorption decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. Our modeling work shows that plane-wave theory for metal shielding is also applicable to graphene. The model predicts that ideal monolayer graphene can shield as much as 97.8% of EMI. This suggests the feasibility of manufacturing an ultrathin, transparent, and flexible EMI shield by single or few-layer graphene. PMID:23085718

  6. Wetting a rail tanker behind a noise shield.

    PubMed

    Rosmuller, Nils

    2009-05-30

    In the Netherlands, the Betuweline is a dedicated freight railway. It will, among other things, be used for transportation of all kinds of hazardous materials from the Port of Rotterdam to the German Hinterland and vice versa. The line is approximately 150 km long. Alongside the line, over more than 100 km noise shields are apparent. The question is to what extent this noise shield hinders the cooling of a rail tanker, carrying flammable liquid such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)? To answer this question, a full scale test was conducted on an already constructed part of the Betuweline [N. Rosmuller, D.W.G. Arentsen, (2005). Praktijkproeven Betuweroute: Instantane uitstroming en koeling 24 juni 2005, Nibra, Arnhem, The Netherlands]. Two railcars and a rail tanker were placed behind a 3m high noise shield. First, it was tested as to whether firemen or water canons should be used to deliver the water. Water canons were best next, four positions of the water canons to wet the rail tanker were tested. Three camera's and three observers recorded the locations and the extent of water that hit the rail tanker. The results indicate that the noise shield, to a large extent, prevents the water from hitting, and therefore cooling, the rail tanker. The upper parts of the rail tanker were minimally struck by the water canons and the small amount of water flowing down the rail tanker did not reach the lower parts of it because of the armatures at the rail tanker. Also, the amount of water in the ditches to be used for wetting was too small. The ditch nearby ran empty. These insights are both relevant to emergency responders for disaster abatement purposes and to water management organizations. The Ministry of Transport is examining the possible strategies to deal with these findings. The results are based upon one single full scale test near a 3m high noise shield. In addition, it would be valuable to determine what the influence would be of other heights of the noise shields

  7. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  8. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  9. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  10. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  11. 13C NMR of methane in an AlPO4-11 molecular sieve: Exchange effects and shielding anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Tuomas; Ylihautala, Mika; Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    1998-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 13CH4 in an AlPO4-11 molecular sieve reveal exchange effects between adsorbed and nonadsorbed methane gas. An application of pulsed field gradients is introduced to decrease nonadsorbed and exchanging gas signals in order to extract the chemical shift anisotropy line shape of the adsorbed gas. The resulting 13C shielding anisotropy of methane is compared to existing value for methane in related SAPO-11 material. Less anisotropic shielding is observed in AlPO4-11, most likely due to the lack of charge-compensating cations.

  12. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  13. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800{degree}C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280{degree}F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  14. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  15. Graphitic heat shields for solar probe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using a graphitic heat-shield system on a solar probe going to within 4 solar radii of the center of the sun is investigated. An analysis of graphite vaporization, with commonly used vaporization coefficients, indicates that the maximum mass-loss rate from a conical shield as large as 4 m in diameter can be kept low enough to avoid interference with measurements of the solar environment. In addition to the mass-loss problem, the problem of protecting the payload from the high-temperature (up to 2300 K) primary shield must be solved. An analysis of radiation exchange between concentric disks provides a technique for designing the intermediate shielding. The technique is applied to the design of a system for the Starprobe spacecraft, and it is found that a system with 10 shields and a payload surface temperature of 600 K will have a payload diameter of 2.45 m. Since this is 61% of the 4-m diameter of the primary shield, it is concluded that a graphitic heat-shield system is feasible for the Starprobe mission.

  16. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  17. Caisson shield for arctic offshore production platform

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J. D.; Reusswig, G. H.

    1985-03-12

    A caisson shield for the protection of an offshore production platform and, more particularly, a caisson shield for use in an arctic environment for the protection of the offshore structure in iceberg-infested waters which is capable of absorbing the destructive forces of an impact produced by a large iceberg. The caisson shield consists of an essentially annular concrete structure encircling at least the submerged support section of the offshore production platform including vertically upstanding concentrically spaced, annular side walls, a horizontal slab base resting on the marine bottom on which the side walls are supported, and a slab top supported on the side walls, and including annularly spaced internal radial partition walls whereby the entire overall caisson shield structure provides a generally toroidal configuration incorporating a plurality of closed compartments. In one embodiment of the invention, located along the outer annular wall is a plurality of arcuate wall sections forming a series of arches and enclosed compartments between each arcuate wall section and the outer annular wall, which impart a ''scallop-like'' configuration to the outer circumference of the caisson shield. The ''scallop-like'' outer walls are capable of resisting and absorbing extremely high ice loads by being adapted to progressively crush the leading edge of an impacting iceberg and to thereby minimize the crush of the iceberg against the caisson shield before coming to rest against the shield.

  18. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  19. Optimization design of electromagnetic shielding composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Wang, Qingguo; Qin, Siliang; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2013-03-01

    The effective electromagnetic parameters physical model of composites and prediction formulas of composites' shielding effectiveness and reflectivity were derived based on micromechanics, variational principle and electromagnetic wave transmission theory. The multi-objective optimization design of multilayer composites was carried out using genetic algorithm. The optimized results indicate that material parameter proportioning of biggest absorption ability can be acquired under the condition of the minimum shielding effectiveness can be satisfied in certain frequency band. The validity of optimization design model was verified and the scheme has certain theoretical value and directive significance to the design of high efficiency shielding composites.

  20. Face shields for infection control: A review.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Raymond J

    2016-04-01

    Face shields are personal protective equipment devices that are used by many workers (e.g., medical, dental, veterinary) for protection of the facial area and associated mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth) from splashes, sprays, and spatter of body fluids. Face shields are generally not used alone, but in conjunction with other protective equipment and are therefore classified as adjunctive personal protective equipment. Although there are millions of potential users of face shields, guidelines for their use vary between governmental agencies and professional societies and little research is available regarding their efficacy. PMID:26558413

  1. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  3. A near-infrared acetylene detection system based on a 1.534 μm tunable diode laser and a miniature gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qixin; Zheng, Chuantao; Liu, Huifang; Li, Bin; Wang, Yiding; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-03-01

    A near-infrared (NIR) dual-channel differential acetylene (C2H2) detection system was experimentally demonstrated based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) technique. A distributed feedback (DFB) laser modulated by a self-developed driver around 1.534 μm is used as light source. A miniature gas chamber with 15 cm path length is adopted as absorption pool, and an orthogonal lock-in amplifier is developed to extract the second harmonic (2f) signal. Sufficient standard C2H2 samples with different concentrations were prepared, and detailed measurements were carried out to study the detection performance. A good linear relationship is observed between the amplitude of the 2f signal and C2H2 concentration within the range of 200-10,000 ppm, and the relative measurement error is less than 5% within the whole range. A long-term monitoring lasting for 20 h on a 1000 ppm C2H2 sample was carried out, and the maximum concentration fluctuation is less than 2%. Due to the capability of using long-distance and low-loss optical fiber, the gas-cell can be placed in the filed for remote monitoring, which enables the system to have good prospects in industrial field.

  4. Distance determinations to shield galaxies from Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Cave, Ian; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Salzer, John J.; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Elson, Ed C.; Ott, Juërgen; Saintonge, Amélie

    2014-04-10

    The Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarf (SHIELD) galaxies is an ongoing multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey based on their inferred low H I mass and low baryonic mass, and all systems have recent star formation. Thus, the SHIELD sample probes the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function for star-forming galaxies. Here, we measure the distances to the 12 SHIELD galaxies to be between 5 and 12 Mpc by applying the tip of the red giant method to the resolved stellar populations imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. Based on these distances, the H I masses in the sample range from 4 × 10{sup 6} to 6 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, with a median H I mass of 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. The tip of the red giant branch distances are up to 73% farther than flow-model estimates in the ALFALFA catalog. Because of the relatively large uncertainties of flow-model distances, we are biased toward selecting galaxies from the ALFALFA catalog where the flow model underestimates the true distances. The measured distances allow for an assessment of the native environments around the sample members. Five of the galaxies are part of the NGC 672 and NGC 784 groups, which together constitute a single structure. One galaxy is part of a larger linear ensemble of nine systems that stretches 1.6 Mpc from end to end. Three galaxies reside in regions with 1-9 neighbors, and four galaxies are truly isolated with no known system identified within a radius of 1 Mpc.

  5. Performance of Whipple Shields at Impact Velocities above 9 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Davis, Bruce A.; Piekutowski, Andrew J.; Poormon, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    Whipple shields were first proposed as a means of protecting spacecraft from the impact of micrometeoroids in 1947 [1] and are currently in use as micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields on modern spacecraft. In the intervening years, the function of the thin bumper used to shatter or melt threatening particles has been augmented and enhanced by the use of various types and configurations of intermediate layers of various materials. All shield designs serve to minimize the threat of a spall failure or perforation of the main wall of the spacecraft as a result of the impact of the fragments. With increasing use of Whipple shields, various ballistic limit equations (BLEs) for guiding the design and estimating the performance of shield systems have been developed. Perhaps the best known and most used are the "new" modified Cour-Palais (Christiansen) equations [2]. These equations address the three phases of impact: (1) ballistic (<3 km/s), where the projectile is moving too slowly to fragment and essentially penetrates as an intact projectile; (2) shatter (3 to 7 km/s), where the projectile fragments at impact and forms an expanding cloud of debris fragments; and (3) melt/vaporization (>7 km/s), where the projectile melts or vaporizes at impact. The performance of Whipple shields and the adequacy of the BLEs have been examined for the first two phases using the results of impact tests obtained from two-stage, light-gas gun test firings. Shield performance and the adequacy of the BLEs has not been evaluated in the melt/vaporization phase until now because of the limitations of launchers used to accelerate projectiles with controlled properties to velocities above 7.5 km/s. A three-stage, light-gas gun, developed at the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) [3], is capable of launching small, aluminum spheres to velocities above 9 km/s. This launcher was used to evaluate the ballistic performance of two Whipple shield systems, various thermal protection

  6. Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S.

    1993-12-31

    The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

  7. Hybrid laser-MIG welding of aluminum alloys: The influence of shielding gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, G.; Ascari, A.; Fortunato, A.; Tani, G.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, laser-GMAW hybrid welding technologies of light metals are investigated by focusing particularly on shielding gas related problems such as distribution on the welding zone, mixtures and flow. In particular, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software was used with the aim to investigate the effect on gas distribution and contamination of the adoption of an isolation chamber surrounding the welding zone. In particular, the turbulent flow model adopted was a standard k- ɛ one. A simple parallelepipedal geometry for the isolation chamber was adopted whose width and depth were fixed, while the height was set as a variable. A simulation activity was carried out in order to evaluate the relationship among chamber height, flow rates and inlet angle inclinations. The simulated welding environment was simplified without considering the presence and the effect of the laser induced plasma plume and of the electric arc. The main results concern the influence of isolation chamber height, gas flow rate and gas inlet inclination on the shielding gas contamination and distribution in a zone near the heat sources-material interaction zone. These results underline that there are particular values of the chosen variables which optimize the gas distribution around the welding zone allowing to achieve an even and reliable shielding effect.

  8. Lightweight engine containment. [Kevlar shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. T.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar fabric styles and weaves were studied, as well as methods of application for advanced gas turbine engines. The Kevlar material was subjected to high speed impacts by simple projectiles fired from a rifle, as well as more complex shapes such as fan blades released from gas turbine rotors in a spin pit. Just contained data was developed for a variety of weave and/or application techniques, and a comparative containment weight efficiency was established for Kevlar containment applications. The data generated during these tests is being incorporated into an analytical design system so that blade containment trade-off studies between Kevlar and metal case engine structures can be made. Laboratory tests and engine environment tests were performed to determine the survivability of Kevlar in a gas turbine environment.

  9. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

    2007-11-16

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

  10. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-20

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4{pi} shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  11. The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsov, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches is considered along with their schematics, design formulas and characteristics of clutches in general. The design method suggested makes it possible to reduce calculation errors to 10%.

  12. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable.

  13. Projectile Density Effects on Shield Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana; Lyons, Frankel; Davis, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In the past, the orbital debris environment was modeled as consisting entirely of aluminum particles. As a consequence, most of the impact test database on spacecraft micro-meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shields, and the resulting ballistic limit equations used to predict shielding performance, has been based on using aluminum projectiles. Recently, data has been collected from returned spacecraft materials and other sources that indicate higher and lower density components of orbital debris also exist. New orbital debris environment models such as ORDEM2008 provide predictions of the fraction of orbital debris in various density bins (high = 7.9 g/cu cm, medium = 2.8 g/cu cm, and low = 0.9-1.1 g/cu cm). This paper describes impact tests to assess the effects of projectile density on the performance capabilities of typical MMOD shields. Updates to shield ballistic limit equations are provided based on results of tests and analysis.

  14. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4π shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  15. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  16. Heat shielding for Venus entry probes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Nicolet, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two contrasted approaches to ablative thermal protection of Venus entry probes are presented - a typical carbonaceous charring ablator and a dielectric reflective ablator. The interesting observation in this study is that mass loss is not the controlling variable in heat-shield sizing. A heat-soak problem determines the carbon phenolic sizing. For Teflon, the material thickness required to accomplish reflection is the sizing factor. The total heat-shield weight required to handle either steep or shallow entry is computed to be 13% less for a Teflon shield (if at least 3.2 mm are required for reflection) than for a charring ablator shield. If an efficient reflective backing is used with Teflon, the thickness can be reduced 1.0 mm and the computed weight is 31% less for Teflon than for the charring ablator. Such weight reductions may significantly increase the science payload weight of the miniprobes.

  17. SP-100 low mass shield design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.

    1985-09-01

    The shielding considerations for an unmanned space reactor system are somewhat different from those for a terrestrial reactor. An unmanned operation in space implies that only a shadow shield, rather than a 4(PI) one, is required to protect payload hardware that typically can tolerate 10(4) to 10(6) times more radiation than can a human crew. On the other hand, the system mass, of which the radiation shield can be a significant fraction, is a severe constraint for space reactors and not normally a problem with terrestrial ones. The object of this paper is to briefly summarize advancements made on various aspects of low mass shield design for space reactors, including materials and their arrangements, geometric factors and their potential impact on system design optimization, and proposed new configuration concepts for further mass reduction.

  18. Space nuclear reactor shielding optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Richard D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    The Institute for Space Nuclear Reactor Studies is investigating optimal techniques for shielding spacecraft (payload) electronics from the combined radiation effects of the SP-100 system nuclear reactor core and the natural space environment. The academic challenge of this research includes the investigation of the combined influences of radiation from the space environment and the radiations from the reactor power source. The technical application includes a series of shielding mass penalty tradeoffs for the SP-100 Program concept between the reactor core shield and the additional shielding of the spacecraft enclosure. These mass penalty tradeoffs are being conducted for several space flight orbits of future interest to the space military and civilian communities. It was shown that several potential mission orbits may pose environmental radiation dosages which are more severe than the SP-100 specification of core escape neutron and gamma ray particle fluences incident on the spacecraft.

  19. Curiosity Bids Goodbye to Heat Shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video of thumbnail images from the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on NASA's Curiosity rover shows the heat shield dropping away from the rover on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). It covers the first 25 s...

  20. Determination of tetrahydrothiophene formation as a probe of in vitro busulfan metabolism by human glutathione S-transferase A1-1: use of a highly sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    Ritter, C A; Bohnenstengel, F; Hofmann, U; Kroemer, H K; Sperker, B

    1999-06-25

    A method for the sensitive determination of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) in cytosolic incubation mixtures was developed. Busulfan conjugation with glutathione was predominantly catalysed by glutathione S-transferase A1-1 (GST A1-1) and THT was released from the primary metabolite by alkalization. After liquid-liquid extraction using n-pentane separation and quantification of the product was performed by gas chromatography with a mass-selective detector. The method showed good sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility with a detection limit of 2 ng ml(-1) and a limit of quantification of 5 ng ml(-1). The suitability of the method is shown for enzyme kinetic studies in human liver cytosol as well as for determination of GST A1-1 activity. PMID:10437668

  1. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  2. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; ,

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  3. Shielded beam delivery apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Montano, Rory Dominick

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus includes a plasma generator aligned with a beam generator for producing a plasma to shield an energized beam. An electrode is coaxially aligned with the plasma generator and followed in turn by a vortex generator coaxially aligned with the electrode. A target is spaced from the vortex generator inside a fluid environment. The electrode is electrically biased relative to the electrically grounded target for driving the plasma toward the target inside a vortex shield.

  4. Space shuttle holddown post blast shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larracas, F. B.

    1991-01-01

    The original and subsequent designs of the Solid Rocket Booster/Holddown Post blast shield assemblies and their associated hardware are described. It presents the major problems encountered during their early use in the Space Shuttle Program, during the Return-to-Flight Modification Phase, and during their fabrication and validation testing phases. The actions taken to correct the problems are discussed, along with the various concepts now being considered to increase the useful life of the blast shield.

  5. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  6. The effect of small variations in the magnetization curves of shielding material upon shielded fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, A.; Jacobs, R. T.; Hahn, A.

    2007-08-01

    The shielding of strong electromagnetic fields at power frequency, performed by ferromagnetic plates, is often successfully modelled by the effective reluctivity. This method delivers good results for the RMSvalue of the shielded field. The following paper shows that a small variation of the magnetization curve (e.g.by taking another material charge) can strongly influence the shielded field. The field calculation is performed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), where for the interior plate region a)finite elements and b)non-linear Impedance Boundary Conditions (IBC) are used which circumvents the need to discretize the shielding plate.

  7. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  8. Collagen shield delivery of amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S D; Harrison, S A; Engstrom, R E; Bawdon, R E; Lee, D A; Mondino, B J

    1990-06-15

    By using a high-pressure liquid chromatography assay, we investigated the ability of collagen shield therapeutic contact lenses to release amphotericin B and deliver it to the anterior segment of rabbit eyes. In vitro studies showed that presoaked collagen shields released most of the amphotericin B within the first hour of elution. We compared the corneal and aqueous humor amphotericin B levels produced by collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B and frequent-drop therapy at four time points over a six-hour period. The collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B produced corneal levels that were higher than those produced by frequent-drop therapy at one hour, equivalent to drop therapy at two and three hours, and lower than drop therapy at six hours. There were no differences in amphotericin B levels in aqueous humor at any time point between rabbits treated with collagen shield delivery and rabbits treated with frequent-drop delivery. The results of this study suggest that amphotericin B delivery to the cornea by collagen shields is comparable to frequent-drop delivery but has the potential benefit of added convenience and compliance. PMID:2346199

  9. Thermal performance of multilayer insulations. [gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. W.; Cunnington, G. R.; Glassford, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted in order to extend previous knowledge of the thermal performance and gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation (MLI) composites. Flat plate calorimeter heat flux measurements were obtained for 20- and 80- shield specimens using three representative layer densities over boundary temperatures ranging from 39 K (70 R) to 389 K (700 R). Laboratory gas evacuation tests were performed on representative specimens of each MLI composite after initially purging them with helium, nitrogen, or argon gases. In these tests, the specimens were maintained at temperatures between 128 K (230 R) and 300 K (540 R). Based on the results of the laboratory-scale tests, a composite MLI system consisting of 112 unperforated, double-aluminized Mylar reflective shields and 113 water preconditioned silk net spacer pairs was fabricated and installed on a 1.22-m-(4-ft-) diameter calorimeter tank.

  10. NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, H.E.

    1957-10-29

    Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

  11. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and mitigate the risks in Li

  12. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  13. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  14. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN645 and 646). Calibration lab shield ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-645 and -646). Calibration lab shield door. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-645-MS-1. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0645-40-693-107369 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  16. Retro Rocket Motor Self-Penetrating Scheme for Heat Shield Exhaust Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; St.Vaughn, Josh; Zell, Peter; Hamm, Ken; Corliss, Jim; Gayle, Steve; Pain, Rob; Rooney, Dan; Ramos, Amadi; Lewis, Doug; Shepherd, Joe; Inaba, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary scheme was developed for base-mounted solid-propellant retro rocket motors to self-penetrate the Orion Crew Module heat shield for configurations with the heat shield retained during landings on Earth. In this system the motors propel impactors into structural push plates, which in turn push through the heat shield ablator material. The push plates are sized such that the remaining port in the ablator material is large enough to provide adequate flow area for the motor exhaust plume. The push plate thickness is sized to assure structural integrity behind the ablative thermal protection material. The concept feasibility was demonstrated and the performance was characterized using a gas gun to launch representative impactors into heat shield targets with push plates. The tests were conducted using targets equipped with Fiberform(R) and PICA as the heat shield ablator material layer. The PICA penetration event times were estimated to be under 30 ms from the start of motor ignition. The mass of the system (not including motors) was estimated to be less than 2.3 kg (5 lbs) per motor. The configuration and demonstrations are discussed.

  17. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  18. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  19. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The dual-wall, Whipple shield is the shield of choice for lightweight, long-duration flight. The shield uses an initial sacrificial wall to initiate fragmentation and melt an impacting threat that expands over a void before hitting a subsequent shield wall of a critical component. The key parameters to this type of shield are the rear wall and its mass which stops the debris, as well as the minimum shock wave strength generated by the threat particle impact of the sacrificial wall and the amount of room that is available for expansion. Ensuring the shock wave strength is sufficiently high to achieve large scale fragmentation/melt of the threat particle enables the expansion of the threat and reduces the momentum flux of the debris on the rear wall. Three key factors in the shock wave strength achieved are the thickness of the sacrificial wall relative to the characteristic dimension of the impacting particle, the density and material cohesion contrast of the sacrificial wall relative to the threat particle and the impact speed. The mass of the rear wall and the sacrificial wall are desirable to minimize for launch costs making it important to have an understanding of the effects of density contrast and impact speed. An analytic model is developed here, to describe the influence of these three key factors. In addition this paper develops a description of a fourth key parameter related to fragmentation and its role in establishing the onset of projectile expansion.

  20. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  1. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  2. Radiation-shielding transport and storage container

    SciTech Connect

    Baatz, H.; Ritsscher, D.; Wriegt, J.

    1985-07-09

    A container for the storage and transportation of radioactive material comprises an elongated vessel adapted to receive the material and has a wall thickness and composition attenuating radioactive transmission therefrom. The vessel has an open end formed with an annular thickened portion defining a mouth communicating with the interior of the vessel; a radiation-shielding cover received in the mouth and having a plug-forming portion juxtaposed with a complimentary seat-forming portion of the vessel at the mouth, and a flange extending outwardly from the plug-forming portion, the vessel is provided with a wall bore communicating at one end with the interior of the vessel and terminating at its opposite end within the outline of the radiation-shielding cover, the radiation-shielding cover is provided with a connecting bore registering with the wall bore; an obturating element received in the connecting bore and adapted to block the wall bore; and a further cover secured directly to the vessel outwardly of the radiation-shielding cover and overlying the wall bore and the radiation-shielding cover.

  3. Bremsstrahlung converter debris shields: test and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Perry, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    Electron beam accelerators are commonly used to create bremsstrahlung x-rays for effects testing. Typically, the incident electron beam strikes a sandwich of three materials: (1) a conversion foil, (2) an electron scavenger, and (3) a debris shield. Several laboratories, including Sandia National Laboratories, are developing bremsstrahlung x-ray sources with much larger test areas (approx. 200 to 500 cm/sup 2/) than ever used before. Accordingly, the debris shield will be much larger than before and subject to loads which could cause shield failure. To prepare for this eventuality, a series of tests were run on the Naval Surface Weapons Center's Casino electron beam accelerator (approx. 1 MeV electrons, 100 ns FWHM pulse, 45 kJ beam energy). The primary goal of these tests was to measure the stress pulse which loads a debris shield. These measurements were made with carbon gages mounted on the back of the converter sandwich. At an electron beam fluence of about 1 kJ/cm/sup 2/, the measured peak compressive stress was typically in the 1 to 2 kbar range. Measured peak compressive stress scaled in a roughly linear manner with fluence level as the fluence level was increased to 10 kJ/cm/sup 2/. The duration of the compressive pulse was on the order of microseconds. In addition to the stress wave measurements, a limited number of tests were made to investigate the type of damage generated in several potential shield materials.

  4. Faraday Shield Development on DIII--D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, D. J.; Callis, R. W.; Pinsker, R. I.; Lindemuth, J. E.; Rosenfeld, J. H.

    1997-11-01

    DIII--D has been the proving ground for a number of innovative Faraday shield developments over the past ten years. The first Faraday shield used had two tiers of copper-plated Inconel rods of circular cross section with 3 mm thick graphite tiles brazed to the plasma-facing side of the front tier. Later antennas used shields with thin coatings of Ti (C,N) and boron carbide. All the coatings proved effective in reducing impurity influx from the antennas during RF operation. There are two shield designs in use currently. One is a single-tier of horizontal Inconel rods with a 6 μm layer of boron carbide applied by physical vapor deposition. The other design has molybdenum rods with a plasma-sprayed boron carbide coating approximately 100 μm thick. Based on comparative performance the thinner coating obtained with physical vapor deposition is preferred for future applicatrions. All Faraday shields have been passively cooled. Future plans call for tests of vanadium elements and of porous-metal helium-cooled elements.

  5. On-orbit analysis of radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Golightly, M. J.; Zapp, N.; Petrov, V.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Ground- and space-based experiments have validated the selection of polyethylene as an effective shield for radiation protection of humans from cosmic radiation exposure during spaceflight. Theoretical models that describe the physical interactions and transport of energetic ions through matter first identified the superior shielding performance of hydrogenous materials. Analytical transport models of space-like particle beams predicted that water would out-perform materials with higher effective charge, and plastics with low effective charge, particularly polyethylene (CH2), appeared to be even more promising. Experiments with accelerated particle beams confirmed the analytical predictions, and experimental measurements continue to provide validation of the use of polyethylene and other proposed shield materials for radiation protection during spaceflight. Due to the anisotropic radiation environment in low Earth orbit, vector flux models of incident radiation field and careful measurements on-orbit are required to definitively assess the effectiveness of polyethylene to protect the skin, eyes, and deeper tissues in that setting. An experiment is proposed herein in which operational and scientific detectors already aboard the ISS can be used to characterize the effectiveness of polyethylene as a radiation shield for reducing risks from geomagnetically trapped protons, cosmic ions, and albedo neutrons. Results are necessary for optimization of retrofit shield design, ab initio design of spacecraft, and development of analytical tools used in these activities and other operational aspects of radiation health and protection for human spaceflight.

  6. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  7. Advances in space radiation shielding codes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tripathi, Ram K; Qualls, Garry D; Cucinotta, Francis A; Prael, Richard E; Norbury, John W; Heinbockel, John H; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-12-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given. PMID:12793737

  8. Asymmetric Electrostatic Radiation Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Lane, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A paper describes the types, sources, and adverse effects of energetic-particle radiation in interplanetary space, and explores a concept of using asymmetric electrostatic shielding to reduce the amount of such radiation impinging on spacecraft. Typically, such shielding would include a system of multiple inflatable, electrically conductive spheres deployed in clusters in the vicinity of a spacecraft on lightweight structures that would maintain the spheres in a predetermined multipole geometry. High-voltage generators would maintain the spheres at potential differences chosen in conjunction with the multipole geometry so that the resulting multipole field would gradually divert approaching energetic atomic nuclei from a central region occupied by the spacecraft. The spheres nearest the center would be the most positive, so as to repel the positively charged impinging nuclei from the center. At the same time, the monopole potential of the overall spacecraft-and-shielding system would be made negative so as to repel thermal electrons. The paper presents results of computational simulations of energetic-particle trajectories and shield efficiency for a trial system of 21 spheres arranged in three clusters in an overall linear quadrupole configuration. Further development would be necessary to make this shielding concept practical.

  9. Plasma shield lasertripsy: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, K M; Rosen, D I; Dretler, S P

    1989-10-01

    A technique for safer and more effective pulsed laser lithotripsy of urinary and biliary calculi was investigated in vitro. The technique involves enclosing the distal end of the laser delivery fiber in a "plasma shield." The plasma shield is a specially designed metal cap that serves to transfer the laser-induced mechanical impulse to the calculus while shielding surrounding tissue from direct laser exposure and thermal radiation. The metal cap also offers the advantage of effectively blunting the sharp fiber tip and improving its visualization under fluoroscopy. Plasma shield lithotripsy using a 200 micron quartz fiber inserted into a section of a modified 0.034 in. diameter stainless steel guide wire was tested in vitro on a variety of calculi and compared with results obtained using a 200 micron laser fiber applied directly. Calculi tested included cystine, struvite and calcium oxalate dihydrate urinary stones and pigmented cholesterol gallstones. The laser source was a flashlamp-pumped dye laser producing pulses of 1.2 microsecond duration and operated at a wavelength of 504 nm and pulse repetition frequency of 5 Hz. The results show that plasma shield lasertripsy is as effective as direct lasertripsy for fragmenting gallstones, struvite and calcium oxalate dihydrate calculi, is potentially safer, and can fragment cystine calculi which the pulsed dye laser applied directly cannot. PMID:2795740

  10. MEANS FOR SHIELDING AND COOLING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-10

    Reactors of the water-cooled type and a means for shielding such a rcactor to protect operating personnel from harmful radiation are discussed. In this reactor coolant tubes which contain the fissionable material extend vertically through a mass of moderator. Liquid coolant enters through the bottom of the coolant tubes and passes upwardly over the fissionable material. A shield tank is disposed over the top of the reactor and communicates through its bottom with the upper end of the coolant tubes. A hydrocarbon shielding fluid floats on the coolant within the shield tank. With this arrangements the upper face of the reactor can be opened to the atmosphere through the two superimposed liquid layers. A principal feature of the invention is that in the event radioactive fission products enter thc coolant stream. imposed layer of hydrocarbon reduces the intense radioactivity introduced into the layer over the reactors and permits removal of the offending fuel material by personnel shielded by the uncontaminated hydrocarbon layer.

  11. Composite materials microstructure for radiation shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Donald W.; Sadeh, Willy Z.; Cheng, Boyle C.

    1992-01-01

    Shielding against radiation is a concern for applications on earth, in space, and on extraterrestrial surfaces. On earth EMI is an important factor, while in space and on extraterrestrial surfaces particle (high charge-Z and high energy-E) radiation is a critical issue. Conventional metallic materials currently used for EMI shielding incur large weight penalties. To overcome this weight penalty, ultra-lightweight composite materials utilizing fillers ranging from carbon microballoons to silver coated ceramic microballoons are proposed. The crucial shielding requirement is conductivity of the constituent materials, while the hollow microballoon geometry is utilized to yield low weight. Methods of processing and composition effects are examined and these results are compared to the effectiveness of varying the conductive microballoon material. The resulting ultralightweight materials, developed for EMI shielding, can be tailored through the application of the understanding of the relative effects of variables such as those tested. Initial experimental results reveal that these tailored ultralightweight composite materials are superior to traditional aluminum shielding at only a small fraction of the weight.

  12. Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

  13. Technology of ultrasonic control of gas-shielded welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodsky, S. A.; Sarychev, V. D.; Borisov, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    A new approach to implementation of electrode metal transfer control under MAG, MIG welding is suggested. The process ensures control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of electrode metal drop formation. The results of the research allow formulating the basic criteria of electrode metal transfer control via ultrasonic exposure, determining the conditions of producing a more equilibrium structure of deposit metal.

  14. The cascade ICF reactor with an x-ray and debris shield and a heavy-ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Tabak, M.

    1990-09-28

    The use of a 1-kg solid-lithium x-ray and debris shield around each fusion fuel pellet prevents vaporization of, and destructive shock waves in, the Cascade blanket granules thereby increasing their lifetime. The shield vaporizes as it absorbs energy and the vapor flows into the blanket several centimeters. The shield also increases tritium breeding and enhances vacuum pumping of high Z materials that are vaporized in the fuel pellet. Using heavy ion beams allows illumination of the fuel pellets with the restricted geometry present in Cascade. We used a 5 MJ driver with 18 beams (one 3 {times} 3 array from each end).

  15. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  16. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are more complicated than those for ground structures because of their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must combine low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. EMI shielding characteristics were calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compare to preliminary experimental results for these materials and to the characteristics of shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that effective EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding characteristics alone.

  17. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  18. Electronics Shielding and Reliability Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; ONeill, P. M.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr.; Pandolf, John E.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that electronics placement in large-scale human-rated systems provides opportunity to optimize electronics shielding through materials choice and geometric arrangement. For example, several hundred single event upsets (SEUs) occur within the Shuttle avionic computers during a typical mission. An order of magnitude larger SEU rate would occur without careful placement in the Shuttle design. These results used basic physics models (linear energy transfer (LET), track structure, Auger recombination) combined with limited SEU cross section measurements allowing accurate evaluation of target fragment contributions to Shuttle avionics memory upsets. Electronics shielding design on human-rated systems provides opportunity to minimize radiation impact on critical and non-critical electronic systems. Implementation of shielding design tools requires adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and an adequate follow-up on final design evaluation including results from a systems/device testing program tailored to meet design requirements.

  19. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtscheim, P. R.; Blome, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A hyperpure vitreous silica material is being developed for use as a reflective and ablative heat shield for planetary entry. Various purity grades and forms of raw materials were evaluated along with various processing methods. Slip casting of high purity grain was selected as the best processing method, resulting in a highly reflective material in the wavelength bands of interest (the visible and ultraviolet regions). The selected material was characterized with respect to optical, mechanical and physical properties using a limited number of specimens. The process has been scaled up to produce a one-half scale heat shield (18 in. dia.) (45.72 cm) for a Jupiter entry vehicle. This work is now being extended to improve the structural safety factor of the heat shield by making hyperpure silica material tougher through the addition of silica fibers.

  20. Overview of SNS accelerator shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, I.; Gallmeier, F. X.; Ferguson, P.; Iverson, E.; Lu, W.

    2012-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source is an accelerator driven neutron scattering facility for materials research. During all phases of SNS development, including design, construction, commissioning and operation, extensive neutronics work was performed in order to provide adequate shielding, to assure safe facility operation from radiation protection point of view, and to optimize performance of the accelerator and target facility. Presently, most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, safe operation and adequate radiation background in the future. Although the accelerator is built and in operation mode, there is extensive demand for shielding and activation analyses. It includes redesigning some parts of the facility, facility upgrades, designing additional structures, storage and transport containers for accelerator structures taken out of service, and performing radiation protection analyses and studies on residual dose rates inside the accelerator. (authors)

  1. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Point-Kernel Shielding Code System.

    1982-02-17

    Version 00 QAD-BSA is a three-dimensional, point-kernel shielding code system based upon the CCC-48/QAD series. It is designed to calculate photon dose rates and heating rates using exponential attenuation and infinite medium buildup factors. Calculational provisions include estimates of fast neutron penetration using data computed by the moments method. Included geometry routines can describe complicated source and shield geometries. An internal library contains data for many frequently used structural and shielding materials, enabling the codemore » to solve most problems with only source strengths and problem geometry required as input. This code system adapts especially well to problems requiring multiple sources and sources with asymmetrical geometry. In addition to being edited separately, the total interaction rates from many sources may be edited at each detector point. Calculated photon interaction rates agree closely with those obtained using QAD-P5A.« less

  3. Vehicle drive module having improved EMI shielding

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2006-11-28

    EMI shielding in an electric vehicle drive is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  4. Power converter having improved EMI shielding

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2006-06-13

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  5. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-01

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 102-104 are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  6. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  7. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application.

    PubMed

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission. PMID:25085183

  8. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  9. Novel Concepts for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that safety factors be maximized with respect to long duration, extraterrestrial space flight. Any significant improvement in radiation protection will be critical in ensuring the safety of crew and hardware on such missions. The project goal is to study novel concepts for radiation shielding materials that can be used for long-duration space missions. As part of this project we will investigate the use of thin films for the evaluation of a containment system that can retain liquid hydrogen and provide the necessary hydrogen density for effective shielding.

  10. JWST NIRSpec Cryogenic Light Shield Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Kathleen; Sharma, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    The focal plane detectors for the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) require a light tight cover for calibration along with an open field-of-view during ground performance testing within a cryogenic dewar. In order to meet the light attenuation requirements and provide open and closed fields of view without breaking vacuum, a light shield mechanism was designed. This paper describes the details of the light shield mechanism design and test results. Included is information on the labyrinth light path design, motor capability and performance, dry film lubrication, mechanism control, and mechanism cryogenic performance results.

  11. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D. Padula

    2000-01-13

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design.

  12. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application

    SciTech Connect

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-15

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  13. Tectonic evolution of the Western Australian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, John S.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geochronological studies in the Western Australian Shield were updated. This terrane bears many similarities to the Indian Shield since they were neighboring parts of Gondwanaland. Western Australia consists of two cratons (Pilbara and Yilgarn) and four orogenic belts (Capricorn, Pingarra, Albany-Fraser, and Patterson), as well as some relatively young (1.6 to 0.75 Ga) sedimentary rocks. The two cratonic blocks are both older than about 2.5 Ga, and the orogenic belts range in age from 2.0 to 0.65 Ga.

  14. Radiation shielding for lunar bases using lunar concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, S. L.; Oishi, K.; Saito, T.

    1992-08-01

    The radiation shielding requirements for an advanced lunar base concept which uses concrete made from lunar resources are evaluated. Some of the features of this lunar base concept are discussed. The results of radiation transport calculations are presented to determine the radiation dose as a function of shielding depth. The shielding effectiveness of concrete is compared with that of aluminum, lunar regolith, and water. It is shown that lunar concrete is a fairly effective radiation shield, and that the concrete lunar base concept can provide a significant amount of intrinsic shielding without requiring additional parasitic shielding.

  15. 500 kV shield wires; Sectionalize or ground everywhere

    SciTech Connect

    Tuominen, M.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The primary purpose of shield wires on transmission lines in lightning protection. Development of fiber-optic shied wires added communications capabilities. Schemes for adapting fiber-optic shield wires to sectionalized shield wire designs remain untested. It is a present policy to segment and insulate 500 kV shield wires. Computer modeling and supportive field measurements have revealed a characteristic distribution of grounded tower voltage versus distance for long lines. The intent of this paper is to report these results plus predict the outcome of grounding shield wires on transmission lines already in place. Shield wires are often called overhead ground wires and abbreviated OHGW.

  16. A model of shield-strata interaction and its implications for active shield setting requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Oyler, D.C.

    1991-12-01

    This book reports that this U.S. Bureau of Mines study evaluates factors that influence longwall support and strata interaction. The longwall system is composed of an immediate and main roof structure and three supporting foundations: longwall structure that is generally supported by all three foundations, while the immediate roof acts as a beam that cantilevers from the coal face to the powered support. In most cases, shield loading involves a complex interaction of both main roof and immediate roof behavior and is a combination of loads produced from convergence of the main roof and displacements of the immediate roof caused by deformations of the cantilevered roof beam. Since the shield stiffness remains constant for all leg pressures and main roof convergence is irresistible in terms of shield capacity, the shield must be able to control the behavior of the immediate roof or floor structure for shield loading to be sensitive to setting pressures. If the goal is to minimize total shield loading, any active setting force must be offset by reduced passive shield loading to justify the active setting loads. Field data suggest that the typical reductions in passive loading do not justify the required increases in setting pressure in some applications.

  17. High-resolution SO2 isotopologue spectra as evidence for sulfur MIF due to SO2 self-shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.; Stark, G.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that photolysis of some gas-phase molecules can lead to isotopic mass-independent fractionation (MIF). Several mechanisms for photolytic MIF have been proposed including 1) self-shielding during photon absorption, 2) variations in band oscillator strengths, 3) hyperfine effects, and 4) resonant curve crossing. Self-shielding, a result of line saturation in molecules with line-type absorption spectra, is observed (and predicted) in CO and N2, both of which undergo predissociation. Here, we focus on the role of self-shielding in SO2, also a predissociating molecule. Photolysis of atmospheric SO2 is believed to be the source of sulfur isotope MIF measured in early Earth sedimentary rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000). Quantitative evaluation of this hypothesis requires accurate and high-resolution absorption cross section data. We have completed 1 cm-1 resolution measurements of 32SO2, 33SO2 and 34SO2 isotopologues using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College (IC). A detailed description of the FTS measurements will be presented by D. Blackie et al. (this meeting). Here, we present a brief overview of the data, comparison with recently published lower resolution cross section data of Danielachet et al. (2008), and interpretation via atmospheric modeling. FTS measurements were obtained at 3 pressures (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 torr) on pure xSO2 gas (x = 32, 33 or 34) from 222 to 188 nm. Spectra were coadded to improve S/N. Visual comparison of our spectra with the lower resolution (~ 20 cm-1) spectra of Danielache et al. (2008) reveals good overall agreement for all 3 isotopologues, although the lower resolution data is unable to resolve the dense rotational structure. However, radiative transfer calculations utilizing the two sets of cross section data in a 1-D atmospheric chemistry code (assuming 10 ppb SO2) yield very different photolytic isotope fractionations. The IC cross sections yield increasing δ34S, δ33S and Δ33S values for

  18. A portable shield for a neutron howitzer used for instructional and research purposes.

    PubMed

    Ali, S; Laherty, M; Laprade, J W; Cala, P M; Lipschultz, F P; Neuhauser, B

    2015-09-01

    Neutron howitzers are routinely used in universities to activate samples for instructional laboratory experiments on radioactivity. They are also a convenient source of neutrons and gammas for research purposes, but they must be used with caution. This paper describes the modeling, design, construction, and testing of a portable, economical shield for a 1.0 Curie neutron howitzer. The Monte Carlo N Particle Transport Code (MCNP5) has been used to model the (239)PuBe source and the howitzer and to design the external neutron and gamma shield. PMID:26048323

  19. Diagnostic X-Ray Shielding Calculation.

    1986-05-27

    Version 00 XSHLD will calculate the primary and/or secondary leakage/scatter barrier requirements for diagnostic radiographic and/or fluorescent x-ray units operating at 50, 70, 100, 125, and 150 kVp. Requirements are given for Pb shielding and for gypsum, plate glass, brick, concrete, and concrete block.

  20. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    S.Su

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M&O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations.

  1. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  2. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  3. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  4. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, P. J.; Johansen, M. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Raines, M. G.; Phillips, J. R., III; Pollard, J. R. S.; Calle, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (one-sixth g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (10(exp -6) kPa).

  6. Selective functionalization: Shields for small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Scott K.

    2012-10-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers have been employed to shield small molecules so that one among many similar reactive functional groups can be modified. This provides access to new chemical entities with potentially interesting properties while avoiding the use of covalent protecting groups.

  7. Theory of nuclear electric shielding in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Zanasi, R.

    1981-10-01

    In order to rationalize the effects of an external uniform electric field on a perturbed molecule, we introduce the concept of electric shielding as a tensor which determines the effective field at an arbitrary point in the molecular space. The fundamental properties of the nuclear shielding tensor are analyzed in the case of heteronuclear diatomics HF, HCl, and HBr. It is shown that this quantity is essential in accounting for the deformation of the molecular geometry induced by the external field. Uncoupled and coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory is applied in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the shieldings and their derivatives with respect to the interatomic distance in HF, HCl, HBr, H2O, NH3, and CH4 molecules. Accurate linear combination of atomic orbitals wave functions are prepared for the diatomics, and their quality is tested by evaluating a series of first- and second-order electric properties, giving fair agreement with corresponding experimental data. The reliability of the computed shielding is examined to obtain information on the vibrational contribution to the property and the role of the electronic correlation.

  8. Radiation Shielding for Manned Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The arrival of the Expedition 1 Crew at the International Space Station represents the beginning of the continuous presence of man in space. Already we are deploying astronauts and cosmonauts for missions of approx. 6 months onboard the ISS. In the future we can anticipate that more people will be in space and they will be there for longer periods. Even with 6-months deployments to the ISS, the radiation exposure that crew members receive is approaching the exposure limits imposed by the governments of the space- faring nations. In the future we can expect radiation protection to be a dominant consideration for long manned missions. Recognizing this, NASA has expanded their research program on radiation health. This program has three components, bioastronautics, fundamental biology and radiation shielding materials. Bioastronautics is concerned with the investigating the effects of radiation on humans. Fundamental biology investigates the basic mechanisms of radiation damage to tissue. Radiation shielding materials research focuses on developing accurate computational tools to predict the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials. It also investigates new materials that can be used for spacecraft. The radiation shielding materials program will be described and examples of results from the ongoing research will be shown.

  9. Review of active radiation shielding developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Roberto

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. During the last 10 years the interest in this area has grown. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study in 2010, continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) programs (2011-2014) as well as within a dedicated FP7 EU program, SR2S (2013-2015). The aim of these effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on current technology levels as well extrapolating to reasonable technology advances expected during the next decade. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency. We present here a status report of the ongoing work and some preliminary results.

  10. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for... averaged over an area not to exceed 100 square centimeters having no linear dimension greater than 20...

  11. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for... averaged over an area not to exceed 100 square centimeters having no linear dimension greater than 20...

  12. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for... averaged over an area not to exceed 100 square centimeters having no linear dimension greater than 20...

  13. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for... averaged over an area not to exceed 100 square centimeters having no linear dimension greater than 20...

  14. Martian regolith as space radiation shielding.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1991-01-01

    In current Mars scenario descriptions, an entire mission is estimated to take 500-1000 days round trip with a 100-600 day stay time on the surface. To maintain radiation dose levels below permissible limits, dose estimates must be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations anticipated on Mars, the characterization of the radiation environment on the surface becomes a critical aspect of mission planning. The most harmful free-space radiation is due to high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar flare protons. The carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars has been estimated to provide a sufficient amount of shielding from these radiative fluxes to help maintain incurred doses below permissible limits. However, Mars exploration crews are likely to incur a substantial dose while in transit to Mars that will reduce the allowable dose that can be received while on the surface. Therefore, additional shielding may be necessary to maintain short-term dose levels below limits or to help maintain career dose levels as low as possible. By utilizing local resources, such as Martian regolith, shielding materials can be provided without excessive launch weight requirements from Earth. The scope of this synopsis and of Ref. 3 focuses on presenting our estimates of surface radiation doses received due to the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays and February 1956 solar flare protons through the Martian atmosphere and through additional shielding provided by Martian regolith. PMID:11537624

  15. Distance Determinations to SHIELD Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Cannon, John M.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Salzer, John J.; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth; Cave, Ian; Elson, Ed C.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Ott, Juërgen; Saintonge, Amélie

    2014-04-01

    The Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarf (SHIELD) galaxies is an ongoing multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies. The galaxies were selected from the first ~10% of the H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey based on their inferred low H I mass and low baryonic mass, and all systems have recent star formation. Thus, the SHIELD sample probes the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function for star-forming galaxies. Here, we measure the distances to the 12 SHIELD galaxies to be between 5 and 12 Mpc by applying the tip of the red giant method to the resolved stellar populations imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. Based on these distances, the H I masses in the sample range from 4 × 106 to 6 × 107 M ⊙, with a median H I mass of 1 × 107 M ⊙. The tip of the red giant branch distances are up to 73% farther than flow-model estimates in the ALFALFA catalog. Because of the relatively large uncertainties of flow-model distances, we are biased toward selecting galaxies from the ALFALFA catalog where the flow model underestimates the true distances. The measured distances allow for an assessment of the native environments around the sample members. Five of the galaxies are part of the NGC 672 and NGC 784 groups, which together constitute a single structure. One galaxy is part of a larger linear ensemble of nine systems that stretches 1.6 Mpc from end to end. Three galaxies reside in regions with 1-9 neighbors, and four galaxies are truly isolated with no known system identified within a radius of 1 Mpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  17. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T. ); Ingersoll, J.K. )

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  18. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  19. 6. View shows Shield 11, looking west. Typical concrete debris ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View shows Shield 11, looking west. Typical concrete debris shield. - Lake Hodges Flume, Along San Dieguito River between Lake Hodges & San Dieguito Reservoir, Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego County, CA

  20. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  1. Shielding consideration for the SSCL experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, J.; Coyne, J.; Mokhov, N.; Stapleton, G.

    1994-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider which is being designed and built in Waxahachie, Texas consists Of series of proton accelerators, culminating in a 20 Te proton on proton collider. The collider will be in a tunnel which will be 87 km in circumference and. on average about 30 meters underground. The present design calls for two large interaction halls on the east side of the ring. The shielding for these halls is being designed for an interaction rate of 10{sup 9} Hz or 10{sup 16} interactions per year, based on 10{sup 7} seconds per operational year. SSC guidelines require that the shielding be designed to meet the criterion of 1mSv per year for open areas off site 2mSv per year for open areas on site, and 2mSv per year for controlled areas. Only radiation workers will be routinely allowed to work in controlled areas. It should be pointed that there is a potential for an accidental full beam loss in either of the experimental halls, and this event would consist of the loss of the full circulating beam up to 4 {times} 10{sup 14} protons. With the present design. the calculated dose equivalent for this event is about 10% of the annual dose equivalent for the normal p-p interactions, so that die accident condition does not control the shielding. If, for instance, local shielding within the experimental hall is introduced into the calculations, this could change. The shielding requirements presented here are controlled by the normal p-p interactions. Three important questions were addressed in the present calculations. They are (1) the thickness of the roof over the experimental halls, (2) the configuration of the shafts and adits which give access to the halls, and (3) the problem of ground water and air activation.

  2. A comparison of calculated NMR shielding probes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ned H; Loveless, David M; Wade, Dustin C

    2004-12-01

    In a strong magnetic field, covalently bonded hydrogen nuclei located over the plane of an anisotropic pi bond-containing functional group experience magnetic shielding (or deshielding) that results from the combined effect of the magnetic anisotropy of the functional group and other nearby covalent bonds plus other intramolecular shielding effects. These effects can now be calculated with reasonable accuracy using ab initio methods. We have investigated several computational probes of the magnetic shielding surface near anisotropic functional groups and compared the results to previous reports of experimental observations in example structures. GIAO-HF in Gaussian 03 was employed to calculate isotropic shielding values and to predict the net NMR shielding increment for several computational probes: methane, diatomic hydrogen, a hydrogen atom, a helium atom, or a ghost atom, each held in various positions over simple test molecules (ethene, ethyne, benzene and HCN) that contain the functional groups studied. Also, the effect of performing single point calculations versus constrained geometry-optimized calculations was examined. In addition, the effect of the angle of the orientation of the probe molecule (in the case of CH(4) and H(2)) relative to the pi bond in the test molecule was studied. Finally, the atomic charges in the molecular probes (CH(4) and H(2)) were computed to investigate the nature of the interaction of the probe with the test molecule. The optimal, most economical computational results were obtained using single point calculations of a diatomic hydrogen probe oriented perpendicular to the surface (or axis) of the test molecule. PMID:15530824

  3. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  4. Designing dual-plate meteoroid shields: A new analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, H. F.; Bamford, R.; Chen, R.

    1982-01-01

    Physics governing ultrahigh velocity impacts onto dual-plate meteor armor is discussed. Meteoroid shield design methodologies are considered: failure mechanisms, qualitative features of effective meteoroid shield designs, evaluating/processing meteoroid threat models, and quantitative techniques for optimizing effective meteoroid shield designs. Related investigations are included: use of Kevlar cloth/epoxy panels in meteoroid shields for the Halley's Comet intercept vehicle, mirror exposure dynamics, and evaluation of ion fields produced around the Halley Intercept Mission vehicle by meteoroid impacts.

  5. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  6. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  7. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  8. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  9. Development of fiber shields for engine containment. [mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, R. J.; Davidson, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted in translational launchers and spin pits to generate empirical data used in the design of a Kevlar shield for containing engine burst debris. Methods are given for modeling the relationship of fragment characteristics to shielding requirements. The change in relative importance of shield mounting provisions as fragment energy is increased is discussed.

  10. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  11. 21 CFR 886.4750 - Ophthalmic eye shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic eye shield. 886.4750 Section 886.4750...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4750 Ophthalmic eye shield. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic eye shield is a device that consists of a plastic or aluminum eye covering intended...

  12. Packed rod neutron shield for fast nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Eck, John E.; Kasberg, Alvin H.

    1978-01-01

    A fast neutron nuclear reactor including a core and a plurality of vertically oriented neutron shield assemblies surrounding the core. Each assembly includes closely packed cylindrical rods within a polygonal metallic duct. The shield assemblies are less susceptible to thermal stresses and are less massive than solid shield assemblies, and are cooled by liquid coolant flow through interstices among the rods and duct.

  13. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  15. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  16. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  18. 16 CFR 1511.3 - Guard or shield requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guard or shield requirements. 1511.3 Section... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS § 1511.3 Guard or shield requirements. (a) Performance requirements... in Figure 1(b). For pacifiers with non-circular guards or shields, align the major axis of the...

  19. 21 CFR 892.6500 - Personnel protective shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Personnel protective shield. 892.6500 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 892.6500 Personnel protective shield. (a) Identification. A personnel protective shield is a device intended for medical purposes to protect the...

  20. Shielding concepts for low-background proportional counter arrays in surface laboratories.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Humble, P H; Mace, E K; Orrell, J L; Seifert, A; Williams, R M

    2016-02-01

    Development of ultra low background gas proportional counters has made the contribution from naturally occurring radioactive isotopes - primarily α and β activity in the uranium and thorium decay chains - inconsequential to instrumental sensitivity levels when measurements are performed in above ground surface laboratories. Simple lead shielding is enough to mitigate against gamma rays as gas proportional counters are already relatively insensitive to naturally occurring gamma radiation. The dominant background in these surface laboratory measurements using ultra low background gas proportional counters is due to cosmic ray generated muons, neutrons, and protons. Studies of measurements with ultra low background gas proportional counters in surface and underground laboratories as well as radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations suggest a preferred conceptual design to achieve the highest possible sensitivity from an array of low background gas proportional counters when operated in a surface laboratory. The basis for a low background gas proportional counter array and the preferred shielding configuration is reported, especially in relation to measurements of radioactive gases having low energy decays such as (37)Ar. PMID:26720259

  1. Shielding property of natural biomass against gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Mavi, B; Gurbuz, L F; Ciftci, H; Akkurt, I

    2014-01-01

    Algae and cyanobacteria are capable living under harsh conditions in the natural environments and can develop peculiar survival processes. In order to evaluate radiation shielding properties of green algae; Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus obliquus, and cyanobacteria; Synechococcus sp., Planktothrix limnetica, Microcystis aeruginosa, Arthrospira maxima, Anabaena affinis, Phormidium articulatum, and Pseudoanabaena sp. were cultured in batch systems. Air dried biomass was tested for its high tolerance to gamma-radiations in terms of linear attenuation coefficients. In the present work, the linear and mass attenuation coefficients were measured at photon energies of 1173 and 1332 keV. Protection capacity of some biomass was observed to be higher than a 1-cm thick lead standard for comparison. Gamma ray related protection depends not only to thickness but also to density (g/cm3). Hence the effect of biomass density also was tested and significantly found the tested biomass absorbed more of the incoming energy on a density basis than lead. This paper discusses the a new approach to environmental protection from gamma ray. The findings suggest that the test samples, especially cyanobacteria, have a potential for reducing gamma ray more significantly than lead and can be used as shielding materials. PMID:24912221

  2. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  3. Passive Superconducting Shielding: Experimental Results and Computer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, B. A.; Kamiya, K.

    2003-01-01

    Passive superconducting shielding for magnetic refrigerators has advantages over active shielding and passive ferromagnetic shielding in that it is lightweight and easy to construct. However, it is not as easy to model and does not fail gracefully. Failure of a passive superconducting shield may lead to persistent flux and persistent currents. Unfortunately, modeling software for superconducting materials is not as easily available as is software for simple coils or for ferromagnetic materials. This paper will discuss ways of using available software to model passive superconducting shielding.

  4. Impact of heat shield structure in the growth process of Czochralski silicon derived from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Ding; Zhao, Yue; Jiao, Shangbin

    2014-05-01

    Further development of the photovoltaic industry is restricted by the productivity of mono-crystalline silicon technology due to its requirements of low cost and high efficient photocells. The heat shield is not only the important part of the thermal field in Czochralski(Cz) mono-crystalline silicon furnace, but also one of the most important factors influencing the silicon crystal growth. Large-diameter Cz-Si crystal growth process is taken as the study object. Based on FEM numerical simulation, different heat shield structures are analyzed to investigate the heater power, the melt-crystal interface shape, the argon flow field, and the oxygen concentration at the melt-crystal interface in the process of large Cz-Si crystal growth. The impact of these factors on the growth efficiency and crystal quality are analyzed. The results show that the oxygen concentration on the melt-crystal interface and the power consumption of the heater stay high due to the lack of a heat shield in the crystal growth system. Argon circumfluence is generated on the external side of the right angle heat shield. By the right-angle heat shield, the speed of gas flow is lowered on the melt free surface, and the temperature gradient of the free surface is increased around the melt-crystal interface. It is not conducive for the stable growth of crystal. The shape of the melt-crystal interface and the argon circulation above the melt free surface are improved by the inclined heat shield. Compared with the others, the system pulling rate is increased and the lowest oxygen concentration is achieved at the melt-crystal interface with the composite heat shield. By the adoption of the optimized composite heat shield in experiment, the real melt-crystal interface shapes and its deformation laws obtained by Quick Pull Separation Method at different pulling rates agree with the simulation results. The results show that the method of simulation is feasible. The proposed research provides the theoretical

  5. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-wall Whipple shield is the shield of choice for lightweight, long-duration flight. The shield uses an initial sacrificial wall to initiate fragmentation and melt an impacting threat that expands over a void before hitting a subsequent shield wall of a critical component. The key parameters to this type of shield are the rear wall and its mass which stops the debris, as well as the minimum pressure generated under threat particle impact of the sacrificial wall and the amount of void that is available for expansion. Ensuring the minimum pressure is sufficiently high to achieve large scale fragmentation/melt of the threat particle enables the expansion of the threat and reduces the momentum flux of the debris on the rear wall. Three key factors in the minimum pressure achieved are the thickness of the sacrificial wall relative to the characteristic dimension of the impacting particle, the density and material cohesion contrast of the sacrificial wall relative to the threat particle and the impact speed. The mass of the rear wall and the sacrificial wall are desirable to minimize for launch costs and dynamic concerns making it important to have an understanding of the effects of density contrast and impact speed. In this paper a fourth key parameter is identified related to fragmentation, which corresponds to the ratio of the size of the projectile relative to the transition from brittle to ductile hole growth in the projectile. Ballistic limit equations have been developed to define the failure limits of a MMOD shield, generally in terms of projectile diameter (or mass), impact velocity, and angle. Within the range of impact velocities relevant for Earth-orbiting spacecraft, three distinct regions of penetration phenomenology have been identified for Whipple shields: center dot Low velocity: the projectile is eroded (and possibly deformed) during its passage through the bumper plate, but is not fragmented. Thus, perforation of the rear wall is by a fragment

  6. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  7. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  8. Debye shielding in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Gougam, Leila; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-06-15

    The phenomenon of Debye Shielding is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The plasma consists of nonextensive electrons and ions. Both the effective Debye length {lambda}{sub D}{sup q} and the fall-off of the electrostatic potential {Phi} are considered and a parameter study conducted. Owing to electron nonextensivity, the critical Mach number derived from the modified Bohm sheath criterion may become less than unity allowing therefore ions with speed less than ion-acoustic speed to enter the sheath from the main body of the plasma. Considering the wide relevance of collective processes, our analysis may be viewed as a first step toward a more comprehensive Debye shielding and electrostatic plasma sheath in nonequilibrium plasmas.

  9. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  10. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  11. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  12. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  13. Radiation shielding design considerations for Doublet III

    SciTech Connect

    Engholm, B.A.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations and measurements were made of the bremsstrahlung (x-ray) doses resulting from runaway electron shots at Doublet III. The analysis considered direct, wall-scattered, and skyshine contributions. Reasonably good agreement was obtained between calculations and measurements. The x-ray dose in the control room was about 1 mR per runaway shot, while that at the north boundary was undetectable, with a calculated value of 0.05 mR per shot. These low doses attest to the adequacy of the 2 ft concrete shadow shield surrounding the Doublet III room. Exploratory shielding analyses were performed for possible neutron generation if Doublet III were operated with neutral beam injection in an aggressive D-D mode.

  14. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  15. Connecting the Dots: Lander, Heat Shield, Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This enhanced-color image from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera shows the Phoenix landing area viewed from orbit. The spacecraft appears more blue than it would in reality. From top to bottom are the Phoenix lander with its solar panels deployed on the Martian surface, the heat shield and bounce mark the heat shield made on the Martian surface, and the top of the Phoenix parachute attached to the bottom of the back shell.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Methods of Making Z-Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, III, Donald Laurence (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods of building Z-graded radiation shielding and covers. In one aspect, the method includes: providing a substrate surface having about medium Z-grade; plasma spraying a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface; and infusing a polymer layer to form a laminate. In another aspect, the method includes electro/electroless plating a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface. In other aspects, the methods include improving an existing electronics enclosure to build a Z-graded radiation shield by applying a temperature controller to at least part of the enclosure and affixing at least one layer of a first metal having higher Z-grade from the enclosure.

  17. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  18. High-Flux, High-Temperature Thermal Vacuum Qualification Testing of a Solar Receiver Aperture Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Mason, Lee S.; Strumpf, Hal J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 program, NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) teamed together to design, build and flight test the world's first orbital Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) on the Russian space station Mir. The Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program was to operate a nominal 2 kWe SDPS on Mir for a period up to 1-year starting in late 1997. Unfortunately, the SDFD mission was demanifested from the ISS phase 1 shuttle program in early 1996. However, substantial flight hardware and prototypical flight hardware was built including a heat receiver and aperture shield. The aperture shield comprises the front face of the cylindrical cavity heat receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. It is constructed of a stainless steel plate with a 1-m outside diameter, a 0.24-m inside diameter and covered with high-temperature, refractory metal Multi-Foil Insulation (MFI). The aperture shield must minimize heat loss from the receiver cavity, provide a stiff, high strength structure to accommodate shuttle launch loads and protect receiver structures from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. To satisfy Mir operational safety protocols, the aperture shield was required to accommodate direct impingement of the intensely concentrated solar image for a 1-hour period. To verify thermal-structural durability under the anticipated high-flux, high-temperature loading, an aperture shield test article was constructed and underwent a series of two tests in a large thermal vacuum chamber configured with a reflective, point-focus solar concentrator and a solar simulator. The test article was positioned near the focal plane and exposed to concentrated solar flux for a period of 1-hour. In the first test, a near equilibrium temperature of 1862 K was attained in the center of the shield hot spot. In the second test, with increased incident flux, a near

  19. High-flux, high-temperature thermal vacuum qualification testing of a solar receiver aperture shield

    SciTech Connect

    Kerslake, T.W.; Mason, L.S.; Strumpf, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 program, NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) teamed together to design, build and flight test the world`s first orbital Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) on the Russian space station Mir. The Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program was to operate a nominal 2 kWe SDPS on Mir for a period up to 1-year starting in late 1997. Unfortunately, the SDFD mission was demanifested from the ISS Phase 1 shuttle program in early 1996. However, substantial flight hardware and prototypical flight hardware was built including a heat receiver and aperture shield. The aperture shield comprises the front face of the cylindrical cavity heat receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. It is constructed of a stainless steel plate with a 1-m outside diameter, a 0.24-m inside diameter and covered with high-temperature, refractory metal multi-foil insulation (MFI). The aperture shield must minimize heat loss from the receiver cavity, provide a stiff, high strength structure to accommodate shuttle launch loads and protect receiver structures from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. To satisfy Mir operational safety protocols, the aperture shield was required to accommodate direct impingement of the intensely concentrated solar image for a 1-hour period. To verify thermal-structural durability under the anticipated high-flux, high-temperature loading, an aperture shield test article was constructed and underwent a series of two tests in a large thermal vacuum chamber configured with a reflective, point-focus solar concentrator and a solar simulator. The test article was positioned near the focal plane and exposed to concentrated solar flux for a period of 1-hour. In the first test, a near equilibrium temperature of 1862 K was attained in the center of the shield hot spot. In the second test, with increased incident flux, a near

  20. Examination of design and operation practices for longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The success of longwall mining can largely be traced to the development of powered roof support systems. The most significant improvement in powered support design has been the shield support, which improved kinematic stability and promoted the application of longwall mining in difficult-to-control caving conditions where chock and frame supports were inadequate. The most obvious trend in shield design has been an increase in shield size and capacity. This US Bureau of Mines report examines shield design and operation practices and their consequences for the utilization of high-capacity shield support systems. An optimization goal is to minimize support loading by selecting an active shield setting force that is compatible with strata behavior and shield loading characteristics. Shield stiffness is an important design parameter that is often overlooked. A consequence of increasing shield capacity by incorporating larger diameter leg cylinders is a proportional increase in shield stiffness. Setting forces have also increased in direct proportion to the increase in shield capacity. The increased stiffness and higher setting force cause the available capacity to be consumed more quickly, severely limiting the ability of high-capacity supports to last longer and provide reserve capacity for difficult mining conditions.

  1. Hypervelocity impact simulations of Whipple shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segletes, Steven B.; Zukas, Jonas A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem associated with protecting space vehicles from space debris impact is described. Numerical simulation is espoused as a useful complement to experimentation: as a means to help understand and describe the hypervelocity impact phenomena. The capabilities of a PC-based hydrocode, ZeuS, are described, for application to the problem of hypervelocity impact. Finally, results of ZeuS simulations, as applied to the problem of bumper shield impact, are presented and compared with experimental results.

  2. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Schmitt, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements were made of reflectance in the vacuum ultraviolet down to 0.15 micron. Scattering coefficients (S) and absorption coefficients (K) were also measured. These coefficients express the optical properties and are used directly in a thermodynamic analysis for sizing a heat shield. The effect of the thin silica melt layer formed during entry was also studied from the standpoint of trapped radiant energy.

  3. Shielding analyses: the rabbit vs the turtle?

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper compares solutions using Monte Carlo and discrete- ordinates methods applied to two actual shielding situations in order to make some general observations concerning the efficiency and advantages/disadvantages of the two approaches. The discrete- ordinates solutions are performed using two-dimensional geometries, while the Monte Carlo approaches utilize three-dimensional geometries with both multigroup and point cross-section data.

  4. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  5. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-01-01

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls.

  6. Enrichment Determination of Uranium in Shielded Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Crye, Jason Michael; Hall, Howard L; McConchie, Seth M; Mihalczo, John T; Pena, Kirsten E

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the enrichment of uranium is required in many safeguards and security applications. Typical methods of determining the enrichment rely on detecting the 186 keV gamma ray emitted by {sup 235}U. In some applications, the uranium is surrounded by external shields, and removal of the shields is undesirable. In these situations, methods relying on the detection of the 186 keV gamma fail because the gamma ray is shielded easily. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has previously measured the enrichment of shielded uranium metal using active neutron interrogation. The method consists of measuring the time distribution of fast neutrons from induced fissions with large plastic scintillator detectors. To determine the enrichment, the measurements are compared to a calibration surface that is created from Monte Carlo simulations where the enrichment in the models is varied. In previous measurements, the geometry was always known. ORNL is extending this method to situations where the geometry and materials present are not known in advance. In the new method, the interrogating neutrons are both time and directionally tagged, and an array of small plastic scintillators measures the uncollided interrogating neutrons. Therefore, the attenuation through the item along many different paths is known. By applying image reconstruction techniques, an image of the item is created which shows the position-dependent attenuation. The image permits estimating the geometry and materials present, and these estimates are used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations. As before, simulations predict the time distribution of induced fission neutrons for different enrichments. Matching the measured time distribution to the closest prediction from the simulations provides an estimate of the enrichment. This presentation discusses the method and provides results from recent simulations that show the importance of knowing the geometry and materials from the imaging system.

  7. Cost and benefit of satellite shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Carsten; Oswald, Michael; Stabroth, Sebastian; Alwes, Detlef; Vörsmann, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Recent simulations of the future development of the space debris environment revealed that the number of hypervelocity impacts on satellite surfaces will increase. Impacts of space debris particles and micrometeoroids can damage satellites. This can cause operational anomalies or even the loss of a satellite mission. The loss of a satellite reduces its expected operational lifetime. Thus, financial investments cannot be amortized completely. In this paper the cost of hypervelocity impacts on satellites is estimated. A risk analysis is performed by combining the probability of a penetration with the failure probability of the satellite. The goal of this work is to combine the risk of particle impacts with a cost analysis. The probability of a satellite failure is estimated by combining the probability of a penetration with a vulnerability model. The failure probability is weighted with the mission cost of a satellite. This results in a probability of loss of amortization. The amortization loss is used as estimation for the damage cost due to hypervelocity impacts. In this way it is possible to associate impacts with cost. The cost model is used to analyze selected reference missions. This analysis considers the influence of shielding measures on the mission cost. An important result is the estimation of the failure probability for different satellite wall designs including shielding. Shielding requires a modification of the satellite wall. This can result in an increasing complexity of the wall or an increasing mass. As a consequence, the hardware cost increase. To identify suitable shielding measures and to justify the additional financial investments, it is necessary to investigate the economic feasibility of such measures and to demonstrate their benefit.

  8. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-12-31

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls.

  9. New Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Material Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1997-01-01

    A demonstration electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding cover that has a potential mass savings in excess of 80 percent over conventional aluminum has been fabricated and tested. It was the culmination of a 3-yr effort involving Hughes Space and Communications (Los Angeles), Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, Ohio), and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The cover was fabricated from a composite of polycyanate ester resin and graphite fibers that had been chemically modified by intercalation to enhance their electrical conductivity.

  10. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, C.L.; Spector, J.

    1994-12-27

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure is disclosed having a serpentine signal conductor within a channel groove. The channel groove is formed by a serpentine channel in a trough plate and a ground plane. The serpentine signal conductor is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors. A beam interaction trough intersects the channel groove to form a plurality of beam interaction regions wherein an electron beam may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor. 4 figures.

  11. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  12. Shields for Enhanced Protection Against High-Speed Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2003-01-01

    A report describes improvements over the conventional Whipple shield (two thin, spaced aluminum walls) for protecting spacecraft against high-speed impacts of orbiting debris. The debris in question arises mainly from breakup of older spacecraft. The improved shields include exterior "bumper" layers composed of hybrid fabrics woven from combinations of ceramic fibers and high-density metallic wires or, alternatively, completely metallic outer layers composed of high-strength steel or copper wires. These shields are designed to be light in weight, yet capable of protecting against orbital debris with mass densities up to about 9 g/cubic cm, without generating damaging secondary debris particles. As yet another design option, improved shields can include sparsely distributed wires made of shape memory metals that can be thermally activated from compact storage containers to form shields of predetermined shape upon arrival in orbit. The improved shields could also be used to augment shields installed previously.

  13. Shields for Enhanced Protection Against High-Speed Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2003-01-01

    A report describes improvements over the conventional Whipple shield (two thin, spaced aluminum walls) for protecting spacecraft against high-speed impacts of orbiting debris. The debris in question arise mainly from breakup of older spacecraft. The improved shields include exterior bumper layers composed of hybrid fabrics woven from combinations of ceramic fibers and high-density metallic wires or, alternatively, completely metallic outer layers composed of high-strength steel or copper wires. These shields are designed to be light in weight, yet capable of protecting against orbital debris with mass densities up to about 9 g/cm3, without generating damaging secondary debris particles. As yet another design option, improved shields can include sparsely distributed wires made of shape-memory metals that can be thermally activated from compact storage containers to form shields of predetermined shape upon arrival in orbit. The improved shields could also be used to augment shields installed previously.

  14. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOEpatents

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  15. Shielded silicon gate complementary MOS integrated circuit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. C.; Halsor, J. L.; Hayes, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An electrostatic shield for complementary MOS integrated circuits was developed to minimize the adverse effects of stray electric fields created by the potentials in the metal interconnections. The process is compatible with silicon gate technology. N-doped polycrystalline silicon was used for all the gates and the shield. The effectiveness of the shield was demonstrated by constructing a special field plate over certain transistors. The threshold voltages obtained on an oriented silicon substrate ranged from 1.5 to 3 V for either channel. Integrated inverters performed satisfactorily from 3 to 15 V, limited at the low end by the threshold voltages and at the high end by the drain breakdown voltage of the n-channel transistors. The stability of the new structure with an n-doped silicon gate as measured by the shift in C-V curve under 200 C plus or minus 20 V temperature-bias conditions was better than conventional aluminum gate or p-doped silicon gate devices, presumably due to the doping of gate oxide with phosphorous.

  16. A magnetic shield/dual purpose mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Seth; Albertelli, Jamil; Copeland, R. Braden; Correll, Eric; Dales, Chris; Davis, Dana; Davis, Nechole; Duck, Rob; Feaster, Sandi; Grant, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field to protect manned spacecraft against particle radiation. An additional mission objective is to study the effect of this moving field on upper atmosphere plasmas. Both mission objectives appear to be capable of being tested using the same superconducting coil. The potential benefits of this magnetic shield concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the U.S. space program. Either converted launch systems or piggyback payload opportunities may be appropriate for this mission. The use of superconducting coils for magnetic shielding against solar flare radiation during manned interplanetary missions has long been contemplated and was considered in detail in the years preceding the Apollo mission. With the advent of new superconductors, it has now become realistic to reconsider this concept for a Mars mission. Even in near-earth orbits, large volume magnetic fields produced using conventional metallic superconductors allow novel plasma physics experiments to be contemplated. Both deployed field-coil and non-deployed field-coil shielding arrangements have been investigated, with the latter being most suitable for an initial test payload in a polar orbit.

  17. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Mcewen, A. S.; Albin, E. F.; Greeley, R.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 30 deg S, 246 deg W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation.

  18. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  19. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Mcewen, A.S.; Albin, E.F.; Greeley, R.

    1986-07-01

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 30/sup 0/ S, 246/sup 0/ W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation. 9 references.

  20. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-12-20

    A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

  1. Reducing shield thickness and backscattered radiation using a multilayered shield for 6–10 MeV electron beams.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin; Chen, Tom; Rattanavoang, Somkhit; Hellyer, James; Gray, Alison; Nelson, Vinod; Short, Richard; Rajapakse, Satya; Lee, James; Fogarty, Gerald; Izard, Michael; Hill, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Intraoral and external electron shields used in radiotherapy are designed to minimize radiation exposure to non-treatment tissue. Sites where shields are used include but are not limited to, the treatment of lips, cheeks and ears whilst shielding the underlying oral cavity, tongue, gingival or temporal region. A commonly known and published effect, concerns the enhancement in dose that can occur on the beam side on an electron shield caused by an increase in electron backscatter radiation. In this work a lead shield has been designed incorporating copper, aluminium and wax in a step down filter arrangement to minimise backscatter whilst minimizing overall shield thickness for better clinical setup and ease of use. For electron beams ranging from 6 to 10 MeV, a standard shield design of 4 mm lead, 0.6 mm copper, 1.0 mm aluminium and 1.5 mm wax (3.1 mm added filtration, 7.1 mm total thickness) provided adequate backscatter and transmission reduction to match a standard 4.5 mm lead and 10 mm wax (total thickness 14.5 mm) electron shield. Dose enhancement values of no more than 10 % were measured utilising this shield design with a 50 % reduction in shield thickness. The thinner shield will not only allow easier patient set up but should be tolerated better by patients when mucosal reactions occur as they place less physical pressure on these sites during treatment due to their smaller size. PMID:26482529

  2. Low-Power Magnetically Shielded Hall Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conversano, Ryan William

    This dissertation presents an investigation of the applicability of magnetic shielding to low-power Hall thrusters as a means to significantly improve operational lifetime. The key life-limiting factors of conventional Hall thrusters, including ion-bombardment sputter erosion of the discharge channel and high-energy electron power deposition to the channel walls, have been investigated extensively for a wide range of thruster scales. As thruster power is reduced to the "miniature" (i.e. sub-500 W) power regime, the increased surface-to-volume ratio of the discharge channel and decreased thruster component sizes promotes increased plasma-wall interactions and susceptibility to overheating, thereby reducing thruster operational lifetime and performance. Although methods for compensating for these issues have been investigated, unshielded miniature Hall thrusters are generally limited to sub-45% anode efficiencies and maximum lifetimes on the order of 1,000 h. A magnetically shielded magnetic field topology aims to maintain a low electron temperature along the channel surfaces and a plasma potential near that of the discharge voltage along the entire surface of the discharge channel along its axial length. These features result in a reduction of the kinetic energy of ions that impact the channel surfaces to near to or below the sputtering threshold, thus preventing significant ion-bombardment erosion of the discharge channel. Improved confinement of high-energy electrons is another byproduct of the field structure, aiding in the reduction of electron power deposition to the channel. Magnetic shielding has been shown to dramatically reduce plasma-wall interactions on 4--6 kW Hall thrusters, resulting in significant increases in projected operational lifetimes with minimal effects to thruster performance. In an effort to explore the scalability of magnetic shielding to low-power devices, two magnetically shielded miniature Hall thrusters were designed, fabricated and

  3. Effect on de-greasing solvents on conductive separable connector shields and semiconductive cable shields

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.D.; Bolcar, J.P. . Elastimold Div.)

    1990-04-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the effects of commercial degreasing solvents on the conductivity of an EPDM separable connector shield and two types of cable shields based on EPR and XLPE, respectively. Solvents tested included a chlorinated solvent based on 1,1,1-trichloroethane and several so-called citrus solvents consisting of the natural terpene, limonene, or blends of limonene with other hydrocarbons. All the solvents significantly degraded the conductivity of the EPR and EPDM materials, but had little effect on the XLPE cable shield. The solvents differed, however, in the extent of their effects, the rate of recovery of conductivity after removal of the solvent, and the degree to which the original conductivity of the material was restored. The consequences of these results in terms of appropriate field use of these types of solvents by utility personnel are discussed.

  4. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  5. Radiation shielding for future space exploration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Joel Michael

    Scope and Method of Study. The risk to space crew health and safety posed by exposure to space radiation is regarded as a significant obstacle to future human space exploration. To countermand this risk, engineers and designers in today's aerospace community will require detailed knowledge of a broad range of possible materials suitable for the construction of future spacecraft or planetary surface habitats that provide adequate protection from a harmful space radiation environment. This knowledge base can be supplied by developing an experimental method that provides quantitative information about a candidate material's space radiation shielding efficacy with the understanding that (1) shielding is currently the only practical countermeasure to mitigate the effects of space radiation on human interplanetary missions, (2) any mass of a spacecraft or planetary surface habitat necessarily alters the incident flux of ionizing radiation on it, and (3) the delivery of mass into LEO and beyond is expensive and therefore may benefit from the possible use of novel multifunctional materials that could in principle reduce cost as well as ionizing radiation exposure. The developed method has an experimental component using CR-39 PNTD and Al2O3:C OSLD that exposes candidate space radiation shielding materials of varying composition and depth to a representative sample of the GCR spectrum that includes 1 GeV 1H and 1 GeV/n 16O, 28Si, and 56Fe heavy ion beams at the BNL NSRL. The computer modeling component of the method used the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA to account for secondary neutrons that were not easily measured in the laboratory. Findings and Conclusions. This study developed a method that quantifies the efficacy of a candidate space radiation shielding material relative to the standard of polyethylene using a combination of experimental and computer modeling techniques. The study used established radiation dosimetry techniques to present an empirical

  6. Critical Dimensionless Shields Values for Bankfull Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    The critical dimensionless shear stress τ*c (depicted in the Shields curve as a function of the Reynolds particle number Rep) quantifies the slope - flow depth product at which particles from a relatively well-sorted bed with a mean particle size Dm visually start to move. Contrary to many applications of the Shields curve, τ*c was not designed to predict the bed particle size becoming mobile at bankfull flow. This study sketches a bankfull and a critical bankfull Shields-type curve needed to predict the bankfull mobile particle size. Most studies on bedmaterial entrainment are performed in streams that are wadeable at low flow, but exceed wadeability around bankfull flow. Within the bounds of these stream dimensions, the study drafts a relationship of τ*bf versus Rep (bankfull Shields curve) for a sequence of stream types (in sensu Montgomery and Buffington 1997) ranging from steep cobble headwater streams to plane-bed and pool-riffle gravel-beds to low gradient valley streams with sand and silt beds. Probable values of stream gradient, bed D50 size, and a (roughness corrected) hydraulic radius can be assigned to each stream type. The resulting bankfull curve takes values of τ*bf near 10 for silt and 1 for sand-bedded streams, drops to around 0.05 - 0.02 for mobile gravel-bed streams and then increases towards 0.1 and 0.2 for the steepest streams. Transforming τ*bf into the critical bankfull curve τ*cbf from which to predict the bankfull entrainable particle size requires information on the bedload particle size that becomes mobile at bankfull flow. To estimate τ*cbf over a variety of coarse gravel- and cobble-bed mountain streams, the authors used flow competence curves measured with bedload traps at 10 sites. Bedload traps have a 0.3 m by 0.2 m opening, and 1-1.6 m long trailing net with a 4 mm mesh; mounting traps onto ground plates anchored to the stream bottom permits 1-hr sampling times; 4 to 6 traps are typically installed across the stream width

  7. Magnetic Shielding of the Acceleration Channel Walls in a Long-Life Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; de Grys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a Qualification Life Test (QLT) of the BPT-4000 Hall thruster that recently accumulated greater than 10,000 h it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approximately 5,600 h. Numerical simulations of this thruster using a 2-D axisymmetric, magnetic field-aligned-mesh (MFAM) plasma solver reveal that the process that led to this significant reduction of the erosion was multifaceted. It is found that when the channel receded from its early-in-life geometry to its steady-state configuration several changes in the near-wall plasma and sheath were induced by the magnetic field that, collectively, constituted an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Because all such changes in the behavior of the ionized gas near the eroding surfaces were caused by the topology of the magnetic field there, we term this process "magnetic shielding."

  8. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; long, J. D.; He, X. Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, K. Z.; Zhang, L. W.

    2012-06-01

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H-) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H- beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H- beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  9. Potential space debris shield structure using impact-initiated energetic materials composed of polytetrafluoroethylene and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Qingming; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Kai; Guo, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A whipple shield using Al/PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) energetic material to protect against space debris is presented. The hypervelocity impact characteristics were investigated experimentally using a two-stage light gas gun at velocities between 3 and 6 km/s. A good protection of the shield was obtained through comparative experiments which used the same bumper areal density. The results showed that the critical projectile diameter can be improved by 28% by contrast with the Christiansen ballistic limit equations. The Al/PTFE energetic material bumper can break up the projectile into smaller, less massive, and slower projectiles due to the combined effect of impact and explosion, thereby producing a sharp rise in the spacecraft protection ability.

  10. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Long, J. D.; He, X. Z.; Zhang, K. Z.; Zhang, L. W.; Wang, X.

    2012-06-15

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H{sup -}) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H{sup -} beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H{sup -} beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  11. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  12. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  13. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarslan, F.; Üncü, I. S.; Kılıncarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.; Molla, T.

    2015-03-01

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  14. Structural monitoring of metro infrastructure during shield tunneling construction.

    PubMed

    Ran, L; Ye, X W; Ming, G; Dong, X B

    2014-01-01

    Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented. PMID:25032238

  15. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    SciTech Connect

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T.; Üncü, I. S.; Kılıncarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  16. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  17. Structural Monitoring of Metro Infrastructure during Shield Tunneling Construction

    PubMed Central

    Ran, L.; Ye, X. W.; Ming, G.; Dong, X. B.

    2014-01-01

    Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented. PMID:25032238

  18. Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. Y.; Harrison, P. F.; Morgan, B.; Ramachers, Y.

    2006-11-17

    The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields. Note that these proceedings are a short version of a recently submitted, more detailed discussion.

  19. Dose distribution under external eye shields for high energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rustgi, S.N.

    1986-01-01

    Effectiveness of eye shields in reducing the dose to the eye lens from 6 and 9 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator has been evaluated. The thickness of the shields made from cerrobend was such that only bremsstrahlung photons were transmitted. A shield with a diameter of 1.3 cm and thickness of 1 cm was adequate for the 9 MeV electron beam. The optimum shield to phantom surface distance was 1 cm or less. The same shield with a thickness of 0.5 cm was found to be ineffective with a 6 MeV electron beam. The dose under the shield is greater than predicted by transmission measurements because of the contribution of phantom and electron cone generated scattered electrons.

  20. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  1. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  2. Self-sealing solar collector shield

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, J.W.

    1980-03-25

    Window structure for a solar collector shield or the like having a frame defining a row of separate window openings. A selfcontained window unit is installed in each opening. Each window unit comprises a pair of rectangular glass panes held in laterally spaced parallel relation by a peripheral window frame. A mounting frame is provided for mounting each window unit in its window opening. Each mounting frame has overlapping frame members. Adjacent side frame members of adjacent window units also overlap. The overlap is for the purpose of excluding moisture and preventing heat loss. A peripheral window seal is provided for the same purpose.

  3. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  4. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed.

  5. Longwall shield design: is bigger better?

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Tadolini, S.C.

    2008-05-15

    This article evaluates the bigger is better design philosophy for longwall shields. The conventional support design approach based on simplistic models of supporting the full dead weight detached rock masses is replaced by a ground reaction design approach. Here, the goal is to match the support characteristics to the ground response, and not to try and overpower the ground forces with some massive support capability. The ground reaction concept embodies both the force and displacement controlled loading aspects, and therefore provides a more accurate representation of the support loading requirements. 7 figs.

  6. Radiation-Shielding Polymer/Soil Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Subhayu

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed to fabricate polymer/ soil composites primarily from extraterrestrial resources, using relatively low-energy processes, with the original intended application being that habitat structures constructed from such composites would have sufficient structural integrity and also provide adequate radiation shielding for humans and sensitive electronic equipment against the radiation environment on the Moon and Mars. The proposal is a response to the fact that it would be much less expensive to fabricate such structures in situ as opposed to transporting them from Earth.

  7. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  8. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon

  9. Martian regolith as space radiation shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, L. C.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Mars exploration crews will be exposed to such high radiation dosages in route from earth that as to sharply reduce the allowable dose they should receive while on the Martian surface. An account is presently given of the possibility of using Martian regolith as crew shielding to maintain very low short-term dose limits. NASA-Langley's nucleon and heavy-ion transport computer codes are used to predict the propagation and interaction of the free-space nucleons and heavy ions through the Martian atmosphere and then through various thicknesses of regolith. The largest reduction in dose occurs in the first 15-20 cm of regolith material.

  10. CHESS upgrade 1995: Improved radiation shielding (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, K. D.

    1996-09-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) stores electrons and positrons at 5.3 GeV for the production and study of B mesons, and, in addition, it supplies synchrotron radiation for CHESS. The machine has been upgraded for 300 mA operation. It is planned that each beam will be injected in about 5 minutes and that particle beam lifetimes will be several hours. In a cooperative effort, staff members at CHESS and LNS have studied sources in CESR that produce radiation in the user areas. The group has been responsible for the development and realization of new tunnel shielding walls that provide a level of radiation protection from 20 to ≳100 times what was previously available. Our experience has indicated that a major contribution to the environmental radiation is not from photons, but results from neutrons that are generated by particle beam loss in the ring. Neutrons are stopped by inelastic scattering and absorption in thick materials such as heavy concrete. The design for the upgraded walls, the development of a mix for our heavy concrete, and all the concrete casting was done by CHESS and LNS personnel. The concrete incorporates a new material for this application, one that has yielded a significant cost saving in the production of over 200 tons of new wall sections. The material is an artificially enriched iron oxide pellet manufactured in vast quantities from hematite ore for the steel-making industry. Its material and chemical properties (iron and impurity content, strength, size and uniformity) make it an excellent substitute for high grade Brazilian ore, which is commonly used as heavy aggregate in radiation shielding. Its cost is about a third that of the natural ore. The concrete has excellent workability, a 28 day compressive strength exceeding 6000 psi and a density of 220 lbs/cu.ft (3.5 gr/cc). The density is limited by an interesting property of the pellets that is motivated by efficiency in the steel-making application. The pellets are made to be

  11. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Charles L.; Spector, Jerome

    1994-01-01

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

  12. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  13. Geochronologic data for the Arabian Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldrich, Lyman Thomas; Brown, G.F.; Hedge, Carl; Marvin, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The radiometric ages reported below were completed during the period 1957-1936. the rock samples were provided and examined petrographically by Glen F. Brown and his associates at the U.S. Geological Survey. The 25 Rb-Sr ages of biotites and feldspars and the 25 K-Ar ages of biotites, hornblendes, and total rock samples constituted the initial suite of ages for the Arabian Shield. Zircons in the quantity required for analysis were not found in any of the rocks examined.

  14. Internal Wire Guide For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Wire kept in shielding gas, preventing oxidation. Guide inside gas cup of gas/tungsten-arc welding torch feeds filler wire to weld pool along line parallel to axis of torch. Eliminates problem of how to place and orient torch to provide clearance for external wire guide.

  15. Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Courtney; Grulke, Eric; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan

    2008-01-21

    Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

  16. Major uncertainties influencing entry probe heat shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W.

    1974-01-01

    Factors influencing the design of an outer planet probe heat shield are discussed. Major factors included are: uncertainties in composition and scale height of the planet atmospheres; the augmentation/attenuation of entry heating by ablation products requires more computer study and testing; carbon heat shields, especially carbon phenolic, possessing improved resistance to spallation need developing; and white silica reflecting heat shields with improved resistance to bulk vitrification need further developing.

  17. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  18. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  19. Methods and Procedures for Shielding Analyses for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Remec, Igor; Lu, Wei; Popova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods, used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations is presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well.

  20. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and