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Sample records for a-1 test stand

  1. A-1 Test Stand modifications

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-14

    Team members check the progress of a liquid nitrogen cold shock test on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on Sept. 15. The cold shock test is used to confirm the test stand's support system can withstand test conditions, when super-cold rocket engine propellant is piped. The A-1 Test Stand is preparing to conduct tests on the powerpack component of the J-2X rocket engine, beginning in early 2012.

  2. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center work to maneuver a structural steam beam into place on the A-1 Test Stand on Jan. 13. The beam was one of several needed to form the thrust takeout structure that will support a new thrust measurement system being installed on the stand for future rocket engine testing. Once lifted onto the stand, the beams had to be hoisted into place through the center of the test stand, with only two inches of clearance on each side. The new thrust measurement system represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment installed more than 40 years ago when the test stand was first constructed.

  3. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  4. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-03

    A new thrust measurement system is lifted onto the A-1 Test Stand deck at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in preparation for its installation. The new system is a state-of-the-art upgrade for the testing structure, which is being prepared for testing of next-generation rocket engines. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois at a cost of about $3.5 million.

  5. Day Time Gimballing A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a daytime test at Stennis Space Center shows how the engine is gimbaled, or rotated, to evaluate the performance of its components under simulated flight conditions.

  6. High-voltage terminal test of a test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex has been developing a 300-kV test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator ion source. The ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high-pressure vessel. The ion source in the high-pressure vessel is required to have a high reliability. The test stand has been proposed and developed to confirm the stable operating conditions of the ion source. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify the long-time operating conditions. The test stand comprises a 300-kV high-voltage terminal, a battery for the ion-source power, a 60-Hz inverter, 200-MHz radio-frequency power supply, a 5-kV extraction power supply, a 300-kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The results of the 300-kV high-voltage terminal tests are presented in this paper.

  7. Aerial shows Stennis test stands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-16

    An aerial photo shows the B-1/B-2 Test Stand (foreground), A-2 Test Stand (middle) and A-1 Test Stand (back). The historic stands have been used to test engines used on every manned Apollo and space shuttle mission.

  8. A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-08

    A tethered Stennis Space Center employee climbs an A-3 Test Stand ladder June 8, 2012, against the backdrop of the A-2 and B-1/B-2 stands. The new A-3 Test Stand will enable simulated high-altitude testing of next-generation rocket engines.

  9. A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-08

    A tethered Stennis Space Center employee climbs an A-3 Test Stand ladded June 8, 2012, against the backdrop of the A-2 and B-1/B-2 stands. The new A-3 Test Stand will enable simulated high-altitude testing of next-generation rocket engines.

  10. A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-19

    The A-3 Test Stand under construction at Stennis Space Center is set for completion and activation in 2013. It will allow operators to conduct simulated high-altitude testing on the next-generation J-2X rocket engine.

  11. Beam property measurement of a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator for industrial purposes. A RF ion source was operated at 200 MHz with its matching circuit. The beam profile and emittance were measured behind an accelerating column to confirm the beam property from the RF ion source. The beam profile was measured at the end of the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using a beam profile monitor (BPM) and wire scanner. An Allison-type emittance scanner was installed behind the beam profile monitor (BPM) to measure the beam density in phase space. The measurement results for the beam profile and emittance are presented in this paper.

  12. TEST STAND 4697 CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-06

    A CRANE MOVES THE FIRST STEEL TIER TO BE BOLTED INTO PLACE ON JAN. 6, FOR WELDING OF A SECOND NEW STRUCTURAL TEST STAND AT NASA'S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA -- CRITICAL TO DEVELOPMENT OF NASA'S SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM. WHEN COMPLETED THIS SUMMER, THE 85-FOOT-TALL TEST STAND 4697 WILL USE HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS TO SUBJECT THE LIQUID OXYGEN TANK AND HARDWARE OF THE MASSIVE SLS CORE STAGE TO THE SAME LOADS AND STRESSES IT WILL ENDURE DURING A LAUNCH. THE STAND IS RISING IN MARSHALL'S WEST TEST AREA, WHERE WORK IS ALSO UNDERWAY ON THE 215-FOOT-TALL TOWERS OF TEST STAND 4693, WHICH WILL CONDUCT SIMILAR STRUCTURAL TESTS ON THE SLS CORE STAGE'S LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK. SLS, THE MOST POWERFUL ROCKET EVER BUILT, WILL CARRY ASTRONAUTS IN NASA'S ORION SPACECRAFT ON DEEP SPACE MISSIONS, INCLUDING THE JOURNEY TO MARS.

  13. NEO Test Stand Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Cody J.

    2015-01-01

    A project within SwampWorks is building a test stand to hold regolith to study how dust is ejected when exposed to the hot exhaust plume of a rocket engine. The test stand needs to be analyzed, finalized, and fabrication drawings generated to move forward. Modifications of the test stand assembly were made with Creo 2 modeling software. Structural analysis calculations were developed by hand to confirm if the structure will hold the expected loads while optimizing support positions. These calculations when iterated through MatLab demonstrated the optimized position of the vertical support to be 98'' from the far end of the stand. All remaining deflections were shown to be under the 0.6'' requirement and internal stresses to meet NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Safety Standards. Though at the time of writing, fabrication drawings have yet to be generated, but are expected shortly after.

  14. Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand 'D' tower (4223/E-24, left background), Test Stand 'C' tower (4217/E-18, center), and Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16, right foreground). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. Environmental Systems Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, D.; Young, J.; Ewert, M.; Lee, S.; Wells, P.; Fortson, R.; Castillo, J.

    A test stand has been developed for the evaluation of prototype lighting, environmental control and crop cultivation technologies for plant production within an advanced life support system. Design of the test stand was based on preliminary designs of the center growth bay of the Biomass Production Chamber, one of several modules of the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO- Plex). It consists of two controlled-environment shelves, each with 4.7 m2 of area for crop growth (150 cm width, 315 cm length). There are two chilled water loops, one for operation at conventional temperatures (5-10C) for air temperature and humidity control and one for operation at higher temperatures (15-50C) for waste heat acquisition and heating. Modular light boxes, utilizing either air-cooled or water- jacketed HPS lamps, have been developed. This modular design will allow for easy replacement of new lighting technologies within the light banks. An advanced data acquisition and control system has been developed utilizing localized, networked- based data acquisition modules and programmed with object-based control software.

  16. A-3 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-29

    Stennis Space Center employees have installed liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks atop the A-3 Test Stand, raising the structure to its full 300-foot height. The stand is being built to test next-generation rocket engines that could carry humans beyond low-Earth orbit into deep space. The A-3 Test Stand is scheduled for completion and activation in 2013.

  17. A-3 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-29

    Work continues on the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. The new stand will allow operators to test next-generation rocket engines at simulated altitudes up to 100,000 feet. The test stand is scheduled for completion and activation in 2013.

  18. A-3 Test Stand construction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-01

    An 80,000-gallon liquid hydrogen tank is placed at the A-3 Test Stand construction site on Sept. 24, 2010. The tank will provide propellant for tests of next-generation rocket engines at the stand. It will be placed upright on top of the stand, helping to increase the overall height to 300 feet. Once completed, the A-3 Test Stand will enable operators to test rocket engines at simulated altitudes of up to 100,000 feet. The A-3 stand is the first large rocket engine test structure to be built at Stennis Space Center since the 1960s.

  19. A-3 Test Stand construction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-24

    A 35,000-gallon liquid oxygen tank is placed at the A-3 Test Stand construction site on Sept. 24, 2010. The tank will provide propellant for tests of next-generation rocket engines at the stand. It will be placed upright on top of the stand, helping to increase the overall height to 300 feet. Once completed, the A-3 Test Stand will enable operators to test rocket engines at simulated altitudes of up to 100,000 feet. The A-3 stand is the first large rocket engine test structure to be built at Stennis Space Center since the 1960s.

  20. A-3 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-29

    Rocket engine propellant tanks and cell dome top the A-3 Test Stand under construction at Stennis Space Center. The stand will test next-generation rocket engines that could carry humans beyond low-Earth orbit into deep space once more.

  1. 20. Building 202, detail of stand A, rocket test stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Building 202, detail of stand A, rocket test stand in test cell. View looking southeast. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Crush Test Abuse Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jacob; Jeevarajan, Judith; Salinas, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this system is to simulate an internal short on battery cells by causing deformation (a crushing force) in a cell without penetration. This is performed by activating a hydraulic cylinder on one side of a blast wall with a hydraulic pump located on the other. The operator can control the rate of the crush by monitoring a local pressure gauge connected to the hydraulic cylinder or a load cell digital display located at the hydraulic pump control area. The internal short simulated would be considered a worst-case scenario of a manufacturer fs defect. This is a catastrophic failure of a cell and could be a very destructive event. Fully charged cells are to have an internal short simulated at the center of the length of the cell (away from terminals). The crush can be performed with a .- to 1-in. (.0.6- to 2.5-cm) rod placed crossways to the cell axis, causing deformation of the cell without penetration. The OCV (open-circuit voltage) and temperature of the cells, as well as the pressure and crushing force, are recorded during the operation. Occurrence of an internal short accompanied by any visible physical changes such as venting, fires, or explosions is reported. Typical analytical data examined after the test would be plots of voltage, temperature, and pressure or force versus time. The rate of crushing force can be increased or decreased based on how fast the operator pumps the hydraulic pump. The size of cylinder used to compress the battery cell can be easily changed by adding larger or smaller fittings onto the end of the hydraulic cylinder based on the battery/cell size being tested. The cell is crushed remotely and videotaped, allowing the operator to closely monitor the situation from a safe distance.

  3. A3 TEST STAND CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    THIS IMAGE SHOWS THE DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION OF THE A3 TEST STAND IN SUPPORT OF THE ARES/CLV UPPER STAGE ENGINE AT STENNIS SPACE CENTER, MISSISSIPPI. THIS IMAGE IS EXTRACTED FROM A HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO FILE AND IS THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION AVAILABLE.

  4. A-3 Test Stand work continues

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-22

    Stennis Space Center employees continue work on the A-3 Test Stand test cell. The stand is being built to test next-generation rocket engines that could carry humans beyond low-Earth orbit into deep space.

  5. 2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST STAND REMNANTS OF BUILDING-BLANK WHITE WALL ONLY ORIGINAL REMAINS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) test stand with the Modified Nasa Motor (M-NASA) test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The SPTA test stand, 12-feet wide by 12-feet long by 24-feet high, was built in 1989 to provide comparative performance data on nozzle and case insulation material and to verify thermostructural analysis models. A modified NASA 48-inch solid motor (M-NASA motor) with a 12-foot blast tube and 10-inch throat makes up the SPTA. The M-NASA motor is being used to evaluate solid rocket motor internal non-asbestos insulation materials, nozzle designs, materials, and new inspection techniques. New internal motor case instrumentation techniques are also being evaluated.

  7. Last SSME test on A-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-29

    The Stennis Space Center conducted the final space shuttle main engine test on its A-1 Test Stand Friday. The A-1 Test Stand was the site of the first test on a shuttle main engine in 1975. Stennis will continue testing shuttle main engines on its A-2 Test Stand through the end of the Space Shuttle Program in 2010. The A-1 stand begins a new chapter in its operational history in October. It will be temporarily decommissioned to convert it for testing the J-2X engine, which will power the upper stage of NASA's new crew launch vehicle, the Ares I. Although this ends the stand's work on the Space Shuttle Program, it will soon be used for the rocket that will carry America's next generation human spacecraft, Orion.

  8. A-2 Test Stand modification work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-27

    John C. Stennis Space Center employees install a new master interface tool on the A-2 Test Stand on Oct. 27, 2010. Until July 2009, the stand had been used for testing space shuttle main engines. With that test series complete, employees are preparing the stand for testing the next-generation J-2X rocket engine being developed. Testing of the new engine is scheduled to begin in 2011.

  9. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    ... every 3 or 6 months is recommended. Normal Results The following are the results when A1C is ... meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean An abnormal result means that you have ...

  10. KEITH HIGGINBOTHAM AT TEST STAND 4699

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-17

    KEITH HIGGINBOTHAM, STRUCTURAL TEST LEAD FOR THE SLS SPACECRAFT PAYLOAD INTEGRATION AND EVOLUTION OFFICE, IS SHOWN BESIDE TEST STAND 4699 AT THE MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER’S WEST TEST AREA. HIGGINBOTHAM WILL BE LEADING STRUCTURAL LOADS TESTING AT TEST STAND 4699 FOR THE CORE STAGE SIMULATER AND THE LAUNCH VEHICLE STAGE ADAPTER. THE TEST SERIES WILL ENSURE EACH STRUCTURE CAN WITHSTAND THE INCREDIBLE STRESSES OF LAUNCH.

  11. 9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1-B IN DISTANCE. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. TEST STAND 4697 CONSTRUCTION TOP OUT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-04

    ON MARCH 4, CREW MEMBERS READIED A 900-POUND STEEL BEAM TO "TOP OUT" TEST STAND 4697, WHICH IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION TO TEST THE SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM LIQUID OXYGEN TANK AT NASA'S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER.

  13. A-3 Test Stand continues with test cell installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-20

    Employees at Stennis Space Center continue work on the A-3 Test Stand. As shown, a section of the test cell is lifted for installation on the stand's structural steel frame. Work on the A-3 Test Stand began in 2007. It is scheduled for activation in 2012.

  14. A-3 Test Stand construction moves forward

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-13

    Work on the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center took a step forward in July with delivery of the first-stage steam ejector July 13. Stennis employees are shown preparing the ejector to be lifted into place on the test stand. When activated in 2012, the A-3 Test Stand will allow operators to test rocket engines at simulated altitudes of 100,000 feet, a critical feature for next-generation engines that will take humans beyond low-Earth orbit once more.

  15. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  16. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-29

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  17. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-17

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  18. 8. TEST STAND 15, INVERTED ENGINE FIRING TEST, CIRCA 1963. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TEST STAND 1-5, INVERTED ENGINE FIRING TEST, CIRCA 1963. Original is a color print. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 24. SATURN V Fl ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SATURN V F-l ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND 1A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 10. "TEST STAND 15, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STAND 1-5, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. 1958. Test Area 1-115. Original is a color print, showing Test Stand 1-5 from below, also showing the superstructure of TS1-4 at left. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. SLS Test Stand Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Kathryn; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Test site selection is a critical element of the design, development and production of a new system. With the advent of the new Space Launch System (SLS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had a number of test site selection decisions that needed to be made early enough in the Program to support the planned Launch Readiness Date (LRD). This case study focuses on decisions that needed to be made in 2011 and 2012 in preparation for the April 2013 DPMC decision about where to execute the Main Propulsion Test that is commonly referred to as "Green Run." Those decisions relied upon cooperative analysis between the Program, the Test Lab and Center Operations. The SLS is a human spaceflight vehicle designed to carry a crew farther into space than humans have previously flown. The vehicle consists of four parts: the crew capsule, the upper stage, the core stage, and the first stage solid rocket boosters. The crew capsule carries the astronauts, while the upper stage, the core stage, and solid rocket boosters provide thrust for the vehicle. In other words, the stages provide the "lift" part of the lift vehicle. In conjunction with the solid rocket boosters, the core stage provides the initial "get-off-the-ground" thrust to the vehicle. The ignition of the four core stage engines and two solid rocket boosters is the first step in the launch portion of the mission. The solid rocket boosters burn out after about 2 minutes of flight, and are then jettisoned. The core stage provides thrust until the vehicle reaches a specific altitude and speed, at which point the core stage is shut off and jettisoned, and the upper stage provides vehicle thrust for subsequent mission trajectories. The integrated core stage primarily consists of a liquid oxygen tank, a liquid hydrogen tank, and the four core stage engines. For the SLS program, four RS-25 engines were selected as the four core stage engines. The RS-25 engine is the same engine that was used for Space

  2. Engineers conduct key water test for A-3 stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Water cascades from the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center as engineers challenge the limits of the high-pressure water system as part of the preparation process for the A-3 Test Stand under construction. Jeff Henderson, test director for Stennis' A Complex, led a series of tests Nov. 16-20, flowing water simultaneously on the A-1 and A-2 stands, followed by the A-1 and B-1 stands, to determine if the high-pressure industrial water facility pumps and the existing pipe system can support the needs of the A-3 stand. The stand is being built to test rocket engines that will carry astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit and will need about 300,000 gallons of water per minute when operating, but the Stennis system never had been tested to that level. The recent tests were successful in showing the water facility pumps can operate at that capacity - reaching 318,000 gallons per minute in one instance. However, officials continue to analyze data to determine if the system can provide the necessary pressure at that capacity and if the delivery system piping is adequate. 'We just think if there's a problem, it's better to identify and address it now rather than when A-3 is finished and it has to be dealt with,' Henderson said.

  3. 31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE A-4 ENGINE AND ROCKET PROPULSION TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  4. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-24

    Fabricated steel began arriving by truck Oct. 24 for construction of the A-3 Test Stand that will be used to test the engine for the nation's next generation of moon rockets. Within days workers from Lafayette Steel Erector Inc. began assembling the 16 steel stages needed on the foundation and footings poured in the previous year.

  5. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Fabricated steel began arriving by truck Oct. 24 for construction of the A-3 Test Stand that will be used to test the engine for the nation's next generation of moon rockets. Within days workers from Lafayette Steel Erector Inc. began assembling the 16 steel stages needed on the foundation and footings poured in the previous year.

  6. A-3 Test Stand construction update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    The concrete foundation placed Dec. 18 (foreground) for Stennis Space Center's future A-3 Test Stand has almost completely cured by early January, according to Bo Clarke, NASA's contracting officer technical representative for the foundation contract. By late December, construction on foundations for many of the test stand's support structures - diffuser, liquid oxygen, isopropyl alcohol and water tanks and gaseous nitrogen bottle battery - had begun with the installation of (background) `mud slabs.' The slabs provide a working surface for the reinforcing steel and foundation forms.

  7. A-3 Test Stand construction update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The concrete foundation placed Dec. 18 (foreground) for Stennis Space Center's future A-3 Test Stand has almost completely cured by early January, according to Bo Clarke, NASA's contracting officer technical representative for the foundation contract. By late December, construction on foundations for many of the test stand's support structures - diffuser, liquid oxygen, isopropyl alcohol and water tanks and gaseous nitrogen bottle battery - had begun with the installation of (background) `mud slabs.' The slabs provide a working surface for the reinforcing steel and foundation forms.

  8. Airvolt Aircraft Electric Propulsion Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, Aamod; Lin, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Development of an electric propulsion test stand that collects high-fidelity data of motor, inverter, and battery system efficiencies; thermal dynamics; and acoustics independent of manufacturer reported values will improve understanding of electric propulsion systems to be used in future aircraft. A buildup approach to this development reveals new areas of research and best practices in testing, and attempts to establish a standard for testing these systems.

  9. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mutation Mycophenolic Acid Mycoplasma Myoglobin Nicotine and Cotinine Non-High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Opioid Testing Osmolality Ova ... as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test may ...

  10. A3 TEST STAND DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    THIS IMAGE DOCUMENTS THE DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION OF THE A3 TEST STAND IN SUPPORT OF THE ARES/CLV UPPER STAGE ENGINE DEVELOPMENT AT STENNIS SPACE CENTER, MISSIPPI IN SUPPORT OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSTELLATION/ARES PROJECT. THIS IMAGE IS EXTRACTED FROM A HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO FILE AND IS THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION AVAILABLE

  11. PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE TEST STAND, NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE TEST STAND, NOTE THE SERVICE AND SUPPORT BUILDINGS TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT OF THE TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. 1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 43. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH A REDSTONE ROCKET BEING FUELED AND PREPARED FOR TESTING. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 22. DETAIL, TWO LIGHTING TYPES AT REAR OF TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, TWO LIGHTING TYPES AT REAR OF TEST STAND 1-A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 51. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH THE MERCURY REDSTONE ROCKET FULLY ASSEMBLED AND BEING PREPARED FOR TESTING. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  17. 13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' (4217/E-18), Test Stand 'D' (4223/E-24), and Control and Recording Center (4221/E-22) with ancillary structures, and connecting roads and services. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Facilities Engineering and Construction Office 'Repairs to Test Stand 'C,' Edwards Test Station, Legend & Site Plan M-1,' drawing no. ESP/115, August 14, 1987. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" in 1958. The contemporary site plans of test stands "A," "B," and "C" are also visible, along with the interconnecting tunnel system. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering "Site Plan for Proposed Test Stand "D" - Edwards Test Station," drawing no. ESP/22-0, 14 November 1958 - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. View east northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, showing Test Stand 'C' test tower in left background (Building 4217/E-18). Curved I-beam labeled '3-ton' is for small traveling hoist. Fuel tanks, propellant lines, and control panels have been removed from tower. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand 'C.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'New Test Stand Plan -- Edwards Test Station' drawing no. E18/2-3, 18 January 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 38. HISTORIC CLOSER VIEW LOOKING WEST OF THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HISTORIC CLOSER VIEW LOOKING WEST OF THE TEST STAND AND ROCKET DURING TEST FIRING NUMBER 10. NOTE THE NUMBER ALONG THE TOP RAIL OF THE STAND JUST TO THE RIGHT OF THE ROCKET, THIS NUMBER INDICATES WHAT NUMBER TEST IS BEING CONDUCTED. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. 45. HISTORIC AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. HISTORIC AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND AND THE SURROUNDING ELECTRONICS AND EQUIPMENT TRAILERS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. FERMILAB CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF INTERLOCK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Troy; Diamond, J. S.; McDowell, D.

    2016-10-12

    An interlock system has been designed for the Fermilab Cryo-module Test Stand (CMTS), a test bed for the cryo- modules to be used in the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source 2 (LCLS-II) project at SLAC. The interlock system features 8 independent subsystems, one per superconducting RF cavity and solid state amplifier (SSA) pair. Each system monitors several devices to detect fault conditions such as arcing in the waveguides or quenching of the SRF system. Additionally each system can detect fault conditions by monitoring the RF power seen at the cavity coupler through a directional coupler. In the event of amore » fault condition, each system is capable of removing RF signal to the amplifier (via a fast RF switch) as well as turning off the SSA. Additionally, each input signal is available for re- mote viewing and recording via a Fermilab designed digitizer board and MVME 5500 processor.« less

  4. Test Stand at the Rocket Engine Test Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-02-21

    The thrust stand in the Rocket Engine Test Facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The Rocket Engine Test Facility was constructed in the mid-1950s to expand upon the smaller test cells built a decade before at the Rocket Laboratory. The $2.5-million Rocket Engine Test Facility could test larger hydrogen-fluorine and hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers with thrust levels up to 20,000 pounds. Test Stand A, seen in this photograph, was designed to fire vertically mounted rocket engines downward. The exhaust passed through an exhaust gas scrubber and muffler before being vented into the atmosphere. Lewis researchers in the early 1970s used the Rocket Engine Test Facility to perform basic research that could be utilized by designers of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. A new electronic ignition system and timer were installed at the facility for these tests. Lewis researchers demonstrated the benefits of ceramic thermal coatings for the engine’s thrust chamber and determined the optimal composite material for the coatings. They compared the thermal-coated thrust chamber to traditional unlined high-temperature thrust chambers. There were more than 17,000 different configurations tested on this stand between 1973 and 1976. The Rocket Engine Test Facility was later designated a National Historic Landmark for its role in the development of liquid hydrogen as a propellant.

  5. View looking west at Test Stand 'A' complex in morning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking west at Test Stand 'A' complex in morning sun. View shows Monitor Building 4203/E-4 at left, barrier (Building 4216/E-17) to right of 4203/E-4, and Test Stand 'A' tower. Attached structure to lower left of tower is Test Stand 'A' machine room which contained refrigeration equipment. Building in right background with Test Stand 'A' tower shadow on it is Assembly Building 4288/E-89, built in 1984. Row of ground-mounted brackets in foreground was used to carry electrical cable and/or fuel lines. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Standing Vs Supine; Does it Matter in Cough Stress Testing?

    PubMed

    Patnam, Radhika; Edenfield, Autumn L; Swift, Steven E

    The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of cough stress test in the standing versus supine position in the evaluation of incontinent females. We performed a prospective observational study of women with the chief complaint of urinary incontinence (UI) undergoing a provocative cough stress test (CST). Subjects underwent both a standing and a supine CST. Testing order was randomized via block randomization. Cough stress test was performed in a standard method via backfill of 200 mL or until the subject described strong urge. The subjects were asked to cough, and the physician documented urine leakage by direct observation. The gold standard for stress UI diagnosis was a positive CST in either position. Sixty subjects were enrolled, 38 (63%) tested positive on any CST, with 38 (63%) positive on standing compared with 29 (28%) positive on supine testing. Nine women (15%) had positive standing and negative supine testing. No subjects had negative standing with positive supine testing. There were no significant differences in positive tests between the 2 randomized groups (standing first and supine second vs. supine first and standing second). When compared with the gold standard of any positive provocative stress test, the supine CST has a sensitivity of 76%, whereas the standing CST has a sensitivity of 100%. The standing CST is more sensitive than the supine CST and should be performed in any patient with a complaint of UI and negative supine CST. The order of testing either supine or standing first does not affect the results.

  7. Credit BG. View looking southwest at Test Stand "D" complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View looking southwest at Test Stand "D" complex. In the background at left is the Steam Generator Plant 4280/E-81 built in 1972 to house four gas-fired Clayton flash boilers. The boilers were later supplemented by the electrically heated steam accumulator (sphere) to supply steam to the various ejectors at Test Stand "D" vacuum test cells - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. ROBERT BOBO AND MIKE NICHOLS AT TEST STAND 4693

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-14

    ROBERT BOBO, LEFT, AND MIKE NICHOLS TALK BENEATH THE 221-FOOT-TALL TEST STAND 4693, THE LARGEST OF TWO NEW SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM TEST STANDS AT MSFC. BOBO MANAGES SLS STRUCTURAL STRENGTH TESTING, AND NICHOLS IS LEAD TEST ENGINEER FOR THE SLS LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK.

  9. 1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF THE X-15 ENGINE TEST COMPLEX. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. CLOSEUP VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I TEST STAND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I TEST STAND, NOTE THE INTERPRETIVE SIGN EXPLAINING THE HISTORIC NATURE OF THE SATURN I TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand "D" from Test Stand "A" while a rocket engine test is in progress. Cloud of steam is from partly from water created by propellant reaction and from water sprayed by flame bucket into engine exhaust for cooling purposes. A portion of Test Stand "C" is visible at the far right. (JPL negative no. 384-2082-B, 23 October 1959) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 3. EAST SIDE, ALSO SHOWING COVERED TANKS AND TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST SIDE, ALSO SHOWING COVERED TANKS AND TEST STAND 1-5 AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-4, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing tanks for distilled water (left), fuel (center), and gaseous nitrogen (right). Other tanks present for tests were removed before this image was taken. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 21. Building 202, underside of test stand A, detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Building 202, underside of test stand A, detail of junction of scrubber structure and test stand with water pipes and valves visible. View looking southeast. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 3. BUILDING 8767, NORTH REAR AND WEST SIDE, TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 8767, NORTH REAR AND WEST SIDE, TEST STAND 1-A AT FAR RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 9. BUILDING 8769, EAST REAR AND NORTH SIDE, TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING 8769, EAST REAR AND NORTH SIDE, TEST STAND AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 5. BUILDING 8768, SOUTH SIDE AND EAST REAR. TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. BUILDING 8768, SOUTH SIDE AND EAST REAR. TEST STAND 1A AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 49. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND IN ITS CONFIGURATION FOR THE MERCURY-REDSTONE TESTING PROGRAM. NOTE THE MERCURY CAPSULE BEING ASSEMBLED IN THE FOREGROUND, ALSO NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS ON THE GROUND IN THE RIGHT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Credit BG. View looking west down into Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View looking west down into Test Stand "D" vertical vacuum cell with top removed. Access to cell is normally through large round port seen in view. Piping and cradling toward bottom of cell was last used in tests of Viking space probe engines - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 37. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST OF TEST STAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST OF TEST STAND AND ROCKET DURING TEST FIRING NUMBER 2. NOTE THE FLAME BEING EMITTED FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE ROCKET. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. 7. ROCKET SLED ON DECK OF TEST STAND 15. Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ROCKET SLED ON DECK OF TEST STAND 1-5. Photo no. "6085, G-EAFB-16 SEP 52." Looking south to machine shop. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 44. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND AND ROCKET BEING PREPARED FOR TESTING. NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS ABOVE THE ROCKET AND THE EQUIPMENT PLATFORM TO THE LEFT OF THE LOAD CELL HAVE BEEN ENCLOSED FOR PROTECTION FROM THE CLIMATE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. 2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND GARAGE (BUILDING 1930) AT LEFT REAR. Looking to west. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 8. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND DURING AN ENGINE FIRING. DATE UNKNOWN, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Credit BG. View west of Test Stand "D" complex, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View west of Test Stand "D" complex, with ends of Dd (left) and Dy (right) station ejectors in view. Steam piping from accumulator (sphere) to ejectors is apparent; long horizontal loops in the pipes permit expansion and contraction without special joints. The small platform straddling the Dd ejector (near the accumulator) was originally constructed for a "Hyprox" steam generator which supplied steam to the Dd ejector before the accumulator and Dy stand were built. Note ejectors on top of interstage condenser in Test Stand "D" tower. Metal shed in far right background is for storage - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. TARA MARSHALL AND MIKE NICHOLS AT TEST STAND 4693

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-14

    TARA MARSHALL, LEFT, A MARSHALL ENGINEER, TALKS ABOUT THE INSTALLATION OF A PRESSURIZATION CONTROL PANEL AT TEST STAND 4693 WITH MIKE NICHOLS, LEAD TEST ENGINEER FOR THE SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK STRUCTURAL TEST ARTICLE.

  7. Stand for testing the electrical race car engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, M.; Franiasz, J.; Mierzwa, P.; Wylenzek, D.

    2015-11-01

    An engine test stand created especially for research of electrical race car is described in the paper. The car is an aim of Silesian Greenpower project whose participants build and test electrical vehicles to take part in international races in Great Britain. The engine test stand is used to test and measure the characteristics of vehicles and their engines. It has been designed particularly to test the electric cars engineered by students of Silesian Greenpower project. The article contains a description how the test stand works and shows its versatility in many areas. The paper presents both construction of the test stand, control system and sample results of conducted research. The engine test stand was designed and modified using PLM Siemens NX 8.5. The construction of the test stand is highly modular, which means it can be used both for testing the vehicle itself or for tests without the vehicle. The test stand has its own wheel, motor, powertrain and braking system with second engine. Such solution enables verifying various concepts without changing the construction of the vehicle. The control system and measurement system are realized by enabling National Instruments product myRIO (RIO - Reconfigurable Input/Output). This controller in combination with powerful LabVIEW environment performs as an advanced tool to control torque and speed simultaneously. It is crucial as far as the test stand is equipped in two motors - the one being tested and the braking one. The feedback loop is realized by an optical encoder cooperating with the rotor mounted on the wheel. The results of tests are shown live on the screen both as a chart and as single values. After performing several tests there is a report generated. The engine test stand is widely used during process of the Silesian Greenpower vehicle design. Its versatility enables powertrain testing, wheels and tires tests, thermal analysis and more.

  8. 4. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' set up for shock tube and research on ship-to-ship fueling problems for the U.S. Coast Guard. (JPL negative no. 344-3743-A, October or November 1980) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 39. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH THE COLD CALIBRATION TOWER CONSTRUCTED TO THE LEFT OF THE ROCKET AND AN ACCESS PLATFORM BUILT TO REACH THE TOP OF THE ROCKET MORE EASILY. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  11. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  13. Credit BG. Test Stand "D" tower as seen looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Test Stand "D" tower as seen looking northeast (See caption for CA-163-F-18). To the right of the view is the stainless steel dome top for Dv Cell (see CA-163-F-22 for view into cell), behind which rests a spherical accumulator--an electrically heated steam generator for powering the vacuum system at "C" and Test Stand "D." Part of the ejector system can be seen on the right corner of the tower, other connections include electrical ducts (thin, flat metal members) and fire protection systems. Note the stand in the foreground with lights used to indicate safety status of the stand during tests - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand "D" from the south with tower ejector system in operation during a 1972 engine test. Note steam evolving from Z-stage ejectors atop the interstage condenser in the tower. Note also the "Hyprox" steam generator straddling the Dd ejector train to the right. The new Dy horizontal train has not been erected as of this date. In the distance is Test Stand "E." (JPL negative no. 384-9766-AC, 28 November 1972) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 22 of 148; file no. 1320/73. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ROOM, PLANS AND SECTION." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 106 of 148; file no. 1321/57. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 40. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND. NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS LOCATED ABOVE THE ROCKET. THE SPACE BETWEEN THE BOTTOM OF THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS AND THE TOP OF THE ROCKET IS THE DIFFERENCE IN SIZE BETWEEN THE REDSTONE ROCKET AND ITS DECEDENT THE JUPITER C ROCKET. THE GAP IS FILLED WITH A SPACER WHEN THEY TEST A REDSTONE ROCKET. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. New Marshall Center Test Stand 4697 Construction Time-Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-27

    In less than two minutes watch structural Test Stand 4697 rise at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center from the start of construction in May 2014 to the end of the stand's construction phase in September 2016. The stand will subject the 196,000-gallon liquid oxygen tank of the Space Launch System's massive core stage to the same stresses and pressures it must endure at launch and in flight. Now, Marshall teams are installing sophisticated fluid transfer and pressurization systems, hydraulic controls, electrical control and data systems, fiber optics cables and special test equipment to prepare for the arrival of the test tank in 2017. (NASA/MSFC/David Olive)

  3. Isopropyl alcohol tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    An isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen IPA, water and liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  4. Water tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A water tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen water, liquid oxygen (LOX) and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  5. Liquid oxygen tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid oxygen (LOX) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen LOX, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  6. 3. "TEST STAND NO. 13, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-0906; no sheet number within title block; D.O. SERIES 1109/10. Stamped: AS BUILT. No revisions or revision dates. Last work date on this drawing "Checked by EAG, 1/31/49." Though this drawing is specific to Test Stand 1-3, it also illustrates the general methods used for excavation design and retaining wall construction at Test Stand 1-5. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Liquid oxygen tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-18

    A liquid oxygen (LOX) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen LOX, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  8. Isopropyl alcohol tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-18

    An isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen IPA, water and liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  9. Water tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-13

    A water tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen water, liquid oxygen (LOX) and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  10. 1. TEST STAND 1A ENVIRONS, SHOWING WEST SIDE OF TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TEST STAND 1-A ENVIRONS, SHOWING WEST SIDE OF TEST STAND 1-A, RP1 COMBINED FUEL STORAGE TANK FARM BELOW WATER TANKS ON HILLSIDE TO LEFT, AND TEST STAND 1-B IN DISTANCE AT RIGHT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Redstone Test Stand Accepted Into National Register of Historical Places

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand along with their wives are (left to right), Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, (holding certificate), Ed, Buckbee, Space and Rocket Center Director; Harvie Jones, Huntsville Architect; Dick Smith; and Joe Jones.

  12. Redstone Test Stand Accepted Into National Register of Historical Places

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand are Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, as he is accepting a certificate of registration from Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, and Huntsville architect Harvie Jones.

  13. Credit BG. West elevation of Test Stand "D" tower, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. West elevation of Test Stand "D" tower, with workshop on left, and tunnel entrance at right. Tower is accessed by exterior steel stairway; the vertical vacuum cell (Dv Cell) is obscured behind large square sunscreen. Below the sunscreen can be seen the end of the horizontal vacuum duct leading from the vacuum cell - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 1. BUILDING 8698, TEST STAND 13, WEST ELEVATION. NOTE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 8698, TEST STAND 1-3, WEST ELEVATION. NOTE TUNNEL BETWEEN BLDG. 8668 AND TEST STAND 1-3. TEST AREA 1-120 IN THE MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND TEST AREA 1-125 ON THE HORIZON. Looking northeast from the roof of Building 8668, Instrumentation and Control Center. Note: Photograph CA-236-F-2 is an 8" x 10" enlargement from a 4" x 5" negative. This view is a photocopy of a recent resin coated print made from a print held at the Main Base History Office, Edwards Air Force Base, California. Photographer unknown. Date and file number unknown. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 30. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, looking down from elevated location, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45872. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. 29. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45870. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. 35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage to twenty-thousand-pound-thrust rocket engine related to failure during testing, September 16, 1958. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-48704. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. 30. SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED TEST STAND FOR THE ORDNANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED TEST STAND FOR THE ORDNANCE GUIDED MISSILE CENTER AT REDSTONE ARSENAL (PRE-DATING NASA). JUNE, 1951, HANS LUEHRSEN COLLECTION, MSFC MASTER PLANNING OFFICE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. J-2 Engine ready to go into test stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Two technicians watch carefully as cables prepare to lift a J-2 engine into a test stand. The J-2 powered the second stage and the third stage of the Saturn V moon rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  20. 4. "TEST STAND NO. 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/12 REV. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 6. "TEST STAND NO. 13, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS & ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/20, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/15, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/18, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 18 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; PLAN & DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/34, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. A, no change; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-35350-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/13. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/14, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/35, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. A; Date: 29 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/16, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 14. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/22, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 25. "TEST STAND 1A UTILIZED TO TEST THE ATLAS ICBM", ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. "TEST STAND 1-A UTILIZED TO TEST THE ATLAS ICBM", CROPPED OUT: "DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB." Photo no. 11,371 57; G-AFFTC 15 OCT 57. Looking southwest from below the stand. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 5. NORTH REAR, EAST PART, SHOWING ESCAPE HATCH. TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH REAR, EAST PART, SHOWING ESCAPE HATCH. TEST STAND 1-3 AND ITS MACHINE SHOP ARE IN MIDDLE DISTANCE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 6. NORTH REAR, WEST PART. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. NORTH REAR, WEST PART. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. TEST STAND 1-5 AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 32. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with rocket engine, close-up detail of engine, November 19, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-46492. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. 31. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with rocket engine, November 19, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-46491. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 5. EDGE OF CAPTIVE TEST STAND THREE FERROCEMENT APRON AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EDGE OF CAPTIVE TEST STAND THREE FERROCEMENT APRON AT FAR LEFT, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING B AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Inflight exercise affects stand test responses after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crew members during short-duration space flights (9-16 d) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 h of landing. METHODS: Thirty crew members performed self-selected inflight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. Two subjects participated in this investigation during two different flights. A 10-min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10-15 d before launch (PRE) and within 4 h of landing (POST). Based upon their inflight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: > or = 3 times/week, HR > or = 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 11), medium (MEDex: > or = 3 times/week, HR < 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 10), or low (LOex: < or = 3 times/week, HR and duration variable, N = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). RESULTS: There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared with PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36 +/- 5 bpm) compared with HIex or MEDex groups (25 +/- 1 bpm; 22 +/- 2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after space flight in the MEDex and HIex groups but was significantly greater in the LOex group (PRE: -9 +/- 3; POST: -19 +/- 4 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Thus, moderate to high levels of inflight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after space flight.

  17. Stennis Space Center Conducts Water Flow Test On The B-2 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-04

    Stennis Space Center completed a water flow test of the refurbished B-2 Test Stand on May 4, 2018. This included both the deflector and the aspirator, individually and together. This test stand is being prepared for the testing of the Space Launch System's booster core, which will utilize four RS-25 rocket engines.

  18. Commissioning and First Results from the Fermilab Cryomodule Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Elvin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    A new test stand dedicated to SRF cryomodule testing, CMTS1, has been commissioned and is now in operation at Fermilab. The first device to be cooled down and powered in this facility is the prototype 1.3 GHz cryomodule assembled at Fermilab for LCLS-II. We describe the demonstrated capabilities of CMTS1, report on steps taken during commissioning, provide an overview of first test results, and survey future plans.

  19. Test stand for Titan 34D SRM static firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glozman, Vladimir; Shipway, George

    1988-01-01

    An existing liquid engine test stand at the AF Astronautics Laboratory was refurbished and extensively modified to accommodate the static firing of the Titan 34D solid rocket motor (SRM) in the vertical nozzle down orientation. The main load restraint structure was designed and built to secure the SRM from lifting off during the firing. In addition, the structure provided weather protection, temperature conditioning of the SRM, and positioning of the measurement and recording equipment. The structure was also used for stacking/de-stacking of SRM segments and other technological processes. The existing stand, its foundation and anchorage were thoroughly examined and reanalyzed. Necessary stand modifications were carried out to comply with the requirements of the Titan 34D SRM static firing.

  20. Testing the stand-alone microbeam at Columbia University.

    PubMed

    Garty, G; Ross, G J; Bigelow, A W; Randers-Pehrson, G; Brenner, D J

    2006-01-01

    The stand-alone microbeam at Columbia University presents a novel approach to biological microbeam irradiation studies. Foregoing a conventional accelerator as a source of energetic ions, a small, high-specific-activity, alpha emitter is used. Alpha particles emitted from this source are focused using a compound magnetic lens consisting of 24 permanent magnets arranged in two quadrupole triplets. Using a 'home made' 6.5 mCi polonium source, a 1 alpha particle s(-1), 10 microm diameter microbeam can, in principle, be realised. As the alpha source energy is constant, once the microbeam has been set up, no further adjustments are necessary apart from a periodic replacement of the source. The use of permanent magnets eliminates the need for bulky power supplies and cooling systems required by other types of ion lenses and greatly simplifies operation. It also makes the microbeam simple and cheap enough to be realised in any large lab. The Microbeam design as well as first tests of its performance, using an accelerator-based beam are presented here.

  1. 28. HISTORIC VIEW OF A3 ROCKET IN TEST STAND NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. HISTORIC VIEW OF A-3 ROCKET IN TEST STAND NO. 3 AT KUMMERSDORF (THE LARGEST TEST STAND AT KUMMERSDORF). THE STAND WAS MOBILE, SINCE IT MOVED ALONG RAILS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Saturn V First Stage Leaves the Dynamic Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photo shows the Saturn V first stage being lowered to the ground following a successful test to determine the effects of continual vibrations simulating the effects of an actual launch. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  3. RP-1 delivered to E-1 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-30

    NASA John C. Stennis Space Center employee Dustan Ladner (left) assists tanker driver David Velasco in transferring RP-1 fuel to a 20,000-gallon underground tank at the E-1 Test Stand during a March 30 delivery. The rocket propellant will be used for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines beginning this summer. Stennis is testing the engines for Orbital Sciences Corporation, which has partnered with NASA to provide eight supply missions to the International Space Station through 2015. The partnership is part of NASA's Commercial Orbital Transportation Services initiative to work closer with companies to provide commercial space transport once the space shuttle is retired later this year.

  4. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/labtests/hemoglobina1chba1ctest.html Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. What is a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test? A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test measures the amount ...

  5. Ethernet-based test stand for a CAN network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebinski, Adam; Cupek, Rafal; Drewniak, Marek

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a test stand for the CAN-based systems that are used in automotive systems. The authors propose applying an Ethernet-based test system that supports the virtualisation of a CAN network. The proposed solution has many advantages compared to classical test beds that are based on dedicated CAN-PC interfaces: it allows the physical constraints associated with the number of interfaces that can be simultaneously connected to a tested system to be avoided, which enables the test time for parallel tests to be shortened; the high speed of Ethernet transmission allows for more frequent sampling of the messages that are transmitted by a CAN network (as the authors show in the experiment results section) and the cost of the proposed solution is much lower than the traditional lab-based dedicated CAN interfaces for PCs.

  6. Return to flight SSME test at A2 test stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-07-16

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) reached a historic milestone July 16, 2004, when a successful flight acceptance test was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC). The engine tested today is the first complete engine to be tested and shipped in its entirety to Kennedy Space Center for installation on Space Shuttle Discovery for STS-114, NASA's Return to Flight mission. The engine test, which began about 3:59 p.m. CDT, ran for 520 seconds (8 minutes), the length of time it takes for the Space Shuttle to reach orbit.

  7. 1. CAPTIVE TEST STAND D1 FROM THE FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CAPTIVE TEST STAND D-1 FROM THE FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 2. CLOSE UP OF CAPTIVE TEST STAND D4, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CLOSE UP OF CAPTIVE TEST STAND D-4, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 1. CAPTIVE TEST STAND D4, CONNECTING TUNNELS AT RIGHT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CAPTIVE TEST STAND D-4, CONNECTING TUNNELS AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H-1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT - WORK BENCH, CONTROL PANEL, CHEMICAL TANK. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. The Cold Dark Matter Search test stand warm electronics card

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, Bruce; /Colorado U., Denver; Hansen, Sten

    A card which does the signal processing for four SQUID amplifiers and two charge sensitive channels is described. The card performs the same functions as is presently done with two custom 9U x 280mm Eurocard modules, a commercial multi-channel VME digitizer, a PCI to GPIB interface, a PCI to VME interface and a custom built linear power supply. By integrating these functions onto a single card and using the power over Ethernet standard, the infrastructure requirements for instrumenting a Cold Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector test stand are significantly reduced.

  12. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Unz, Ronald J.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m3/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  13. Cryogenic System for the Cryomodule Test Stand at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    White, Michael J.; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    This paper describes the cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS) at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) located at Fermilab. CMTS is designed for production testing of the 1.3 GHz and 3.9GHz cryomodules to be used in the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLSII), which is an upgrade to an existing accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This paper will focus on the cryogenic system that extends from the helium refrigeration plant to the CMTS cave. Topics covered will include component design, installation and commissioning progress, and operational plans. The paper will conclude with a description ofmore » the heat load measurement plan.« less

  14. 11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1-A IN FOREGROUND. LIGHTS OF MAIN BASE, EDWARDS AFB, IN THE BACKGROUND. EDWARDS AFB." Test Area 1-120. Looking west past Test Stand 1-A to Test Area 1-115 and Test Area 1-110. Photo no. "12,401 57; G-AFFTC 12 DEC 57; TS 1-A Aux #1". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels can be high if diabetes is not well controlled. Why Are Hemoglobin A1c Tests Done? When a child has diabetes, hemoglobin A1c levels are followed to see how well medicines are working. If a child with diabetes ...

  16. Planned Experiments on the Princeton Advanced Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Davidson, R. C.

    2010-11-01

    The Princeton Advanced Test Stand (PATS) device is an experimental facility based on the STS-100 high voltage test stand transferred from LBNL. It consists of a multicusp RF ion source, a pulsed extraction system capable of forming high-perveance 100keV ion beams, and a large six-foot-long vacuum with convenient access for beam diagnostics. This results in a flexible system for studying high perveance ion beams relevant to NDCX-I/II, including experiments on beam neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources (FEPS) being developed at PPPL. Research on PATS will concern the basic physics of beam-plasma interactions, such as the effects of volume neutralization on beam emittance, as well as optimizing technology of the FEPS. PATS combines the advantage of an ion beam source and a large-volume plasma source in a chamber with ample access for diagnostics, resulting in a robust setup for investigating and improving relevant aspects of neutralized drift. There are also plans for running the ion source with strongly electro-negative gases such as chlorine, making it possible to extract positive or negative ion beams.

  17. SSC_NASA Tests Upgraded Water System for the B-2 Test Stand - Highlights with Music

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-04

    On December 4, Stennis Space Center conducted a water flow test on the B-2 test stand to check the water system’s upgraded modifications in preparation for Space Launch System’s Core Stage testing. During a test, rocket engine fire and exhaust is redirected out of the stand by a large flame trench. For this test, the water deluge system, with the capability of flowing 335,000 gallons of water per minute, directed more than 240,000 gallons of water per minute through more than 32,000 5/32-inch holes in the B2 stand flame deflector, cooling the exhaust and protecting the trench from damage.

  18. NASA Tests Upgraded Water System for Stennis Space Center's B-2 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-04

    On December 4, Stennis Space Center conducted a water flow test on the B-2 test stand to check the water system’s upgraded modifications in preparation for Space Launch System’s Core Stage testing. During a test, rocket engine fire and exhaust is redirected out of the stand by a large flame trench. For this test, the water deluge system, with the capability of flowing 335,000 gallons of water per minute, directed more than 240,000 gallons of water per minute through more than 32,000 5/32-inch holes in the B2 stand flame deflector, cooling the exhaust and protecting the trench from damage.

  19. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  20. Standing balance tests for screening people with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2014-02-01

    To improve the test standards for a version of the Romberg test and to determine whether measuring kinematic variables improved its utility for screening. Healthy controls and patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, postoperative acoustic neuroma resection, and chronic peripheral unilateral weakness were compared. Subjects wore Bluetooth-enabled inertial motion units while standing on the floor or medium-density, compliant foam, with eyes open or closed, with head still or moving in pitch or yaw. Dependent measures were time to perform each test condition, number of head movements made, and kinematic variables. Patients and controls did not differ significantly with eyes open or with eyes closed while on the floor. With eyes closed, on foam, some significant differences were found between patients and controls, especially for subjects older than 59 years. Head movement conditions were more challenging than with the head still. Significantly fewer patients than controls could make enough head movements to obtain kinematic measures. Kinematics indicated that lateral balance control is significantly reduced in these patients compared to controls. Receiver operator characteristics and sensitivity/specificity analyses showed moderately good differences with older subjects. Tests on foam with eyes closed, with head still or moving, may be useful as part of a screening battery for vestibular impairments, especially for older people. 3b. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Cryomdoule Test Stand Reduced-Magnetic Support Design at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mike; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar; Crawford, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be 2.7 x 10¹⁰. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and tomore » keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.« less

  2. 4. "TEST CONDUCTORS PANEL AT TEST STAND 1A, DIRECTORATE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST CONDUCTORS PANEL AT TEST STAND 1-A, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB, 15 JAN 58, 3098.58." A photograph of the control room, with seven men watching monitors and instrument panels. Photo no. "3098 58; G-AFFTC 15 JAN 58; Test Conductors Panel T.S. 1-A". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... per day (fasting or pre-breakfast, pre-lunch, pre-dinner, and bedtime). The straight black line shows an A1C measurement of 7.0 percent. The blue line shows an example of how blood glucose test results might look from self-monitoring four times ...

  4. Shake test results of the MDHC test stand in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Peterson, Randall

    1994-01-01

    A shake test was conducted to determine the modal properties of the MDHC (McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company) test stand installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The shake test was conducted for three wind-tunnel balance configurations with and without balance dampers, and with the snubber engagement to lock the balance frame. A hydraulic shaker was used to apply random excitation at the rotor hub in the longitudinal and lateral directions. A GenRad 2515 computer-aided test system computed the frequency response functions at the rotor hub and support struts. From these response functions, the modal properties, including the natural frequency, damping ratio, and mode shape were calculated. The critical modes with low damping ratios are identified as the test-stand second longitudinal mode for the dampers-off configuration, the test-stand yaw mode for the dampers-on configuration, and the test stand first longitudinal mode for the balance-frame locked configuration.

  5. First environmental data from the EUV engineering test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Malinowski, Michael E.; Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, W. Miles; Steinhaus, Chip; Leung, Alvin H.; Haney, Steven J.

    2001-08-01

    The first environmental data from the Engineering Test Stand (ETS) has been collected. Excellent control of high-mass hydrocarbons has been observed. This control is a result of extensive outgas testing of components and materials, vacuum compatible design of the ETS, careful cleaning of parts and pre-baking of cables and sub assemblies where possible, and clean assembly procedures. As a result of the hydrocarbon control, the residual ETS vacuum environment is rich in water vapor. Analysis of witness plate data indicates that the ETS environment does not pose a contamination risk to the optics in the absence of EUV irradiation. However, with EUV exposure, the water rich environment can lead to EUV- induced water oxidation of the Si-terminated Mo/Si optics. Added ethanol can prevent optic oxidation, allowing carbon growth via EUV cracking of low-level residual hydrocarbons to occur. The EUV environmental issues are understood, mitigation approaches have been validated, and EUV optic contamination appears to be manageable.

  6. 7. BUILDING 604F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BUILDING 604-F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND AND HEAVY WOOD LINING ON CONCRETE WALLS. STEEL PLATE ABOVE TEST STAND DEFLECTS SHRAPNEL, SCREEN FURTHER HELPS TO CONTAIN PARTICLES. ONLY SMALL EXPLOSIVES WERE TESTED HERE (GRENADES, MINES, BOMB FUZES, ETC.). - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  7. 3. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN SOUTHEAST ¼ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN SOUTHEAST ¼ OF X-15 ENGINE TEST COMPLEX. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.

    This report collects information on cathode contaminants we have gathered in the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand. Information on contaminants is compiled from several sources. The attachment, ''Practical Aspects of Modern Dispenser Cathodes'', is from Heat Wave Corp. (TB-134) and was originally published in Microwave Journal, September 1979. Cathode contamination depends on both material choices and residual gases. Table 1 of TB-134 lists materials that can poison dispenser cathodes. These include reactive residual gases or vapors such as oxygen, water vapor, benzene, chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, silicon, and most metals other than molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and copper.more » The metals interact with the cathode surface through their vapor pressure. A paper by Nexsen and Turner, J. Appl. Phys. 68, 298-303 (1990) shows the threshold effects of some common residual gases or vapors on cathode performance. The book by Walter H. Kohl, Handbook of Materials and Techniques for Vacuum Devices, also contains useful information on cathodes and poisoning agents. A plot of the vapor pressures and poisoning effect of certain metals (from Kohl) is shown below. Note that the vapor pressure of zinc is 1.1 x 10{sup -8} Torr at 400 K = 127 C, and 2.7 x 10{sup -5} at 500 K = 227 C. By contrast iron reaches a vapor pressure 1 x 10{sup -8} between 800 and 900 C. Therefore it is important to eliminate any brass parts that could exceed a temperature of 100 C. Many structural components of the cathode assembly contain steel. At 500-600 C in an oxygen atmosphere chromium oxide may outgas from the steel. [Cho, et.al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, p. 998 (2001)]. Steel may also contain silicon, and sulfur at low concentrations. Therefore use of steel should be limited or avoided at high temperature near the cathode. Materials that should be avoided in the vicinity of the cathode include brass, silver, zinc, non-OFHC copper, silicates, and sulfur

  9. 5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 4. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING STRUCTURE AT ENGINE END OF PLANE. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 10. OBSERVATION POST NO. 3, WEST OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. OBSERVATION POST NO. 3, WEST OF TEST STAND 1-A. SOUTH SIDE AND EAST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. RP1 (KEROSENE) STORAGE TANKS ON HILLSIDE EAST OF TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RP1 (KEROSENE) STORAGE TANKS ON HILLSIDE EAST OF TEST STAND 1-B. THIS TANK FARM SERVES BOTH TEST STANDS 1-A AND 1-B - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 7. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. Looking north from north end of the cable tunnel leading toward Control Center. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 6. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. Looking south from north wall of terminal room. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 7. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE OR EXPLOSION. Wreckage of engine is still fixed in its clamp; X-15 vehicle lies on the ground detached from engine. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Performance upgrades in the EUV engineering test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Replogle, William C.; Lee, Sang Hun; Ballard, William P.; Leung, Alvin H.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Graham, Samual, Jr.; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jefferson, Karen L.; Wronosky, John B.; Smith, Tony G.; Johnson, Terry A.; Shields, Harry; Hale, Layton C.; Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Folta, James A.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Attwood, David T., Jr.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2002-07-01

    The EUV Engineering Test Stand (ETS) has demonstrated the printing of 100-nm-resolution scanned images. This milestone was first achieved while the ETS operated in an initial configuration using a low power laser and a developmental projection system, PO Box 1. The drive laser has ben upgraded to a single chain of the three-chain Nd:YAG laser developed by TRW. The result in exposure time is approximately 4 seconds for static exposures. One hundred nanometer dense features have been printed in step-and-scan operation with the same image quality obtained in static printing. These experiments are the first steps toward achieving operation using all three laser chains for a total drive laser power of 1500 watts. In a second major upgrade the developmental wafer stage platen, used to demonstrate initial full-field imaging, has been replaced with the final low-expansion platen made of Zerodur. Additional improvements in the hardware and control software have demonstrated combined x and jitter from 2 to 4 nm RMS Over most of the wafer stage travel range, while scanning at the design scan speed of 10 mm/s at the wafer. This value, less than half of the originally specified jitter, provides sufficient stability to support printing of 70 nm features as planned, when the upgraded projection system is installed. The third major upgrade will replace PO Box 1 with an improved projection system, PO Box 2, having lower figure error and lower flare. In addition to these upgrades, dose sensors at the reticle and wafer planes and an EUV- sensitive aerial image monitor have been integrated into the ETS. This paper reports on ETS system upgrades and the impact on system performance.

  17. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stand-down waivers for drug testing. 655.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS General § 655.5 Stand-down waivers for drug testing. (a) An employer subject to this part may...

  18. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stand-down waivers for drug testing. 655.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS General § 655.5 Stand-down waivers for drug testing. (a) An employer subject to this part may...

  19. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stand-down waivers for drug testing. 655.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS General § 655.5 Stand-down waivers for drug testing. (a) An employer subject to this part may...

  20. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stand-down waivers for drug testing. 655.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS General § 655.5 Stand-down waivers for drug testing. (a) An employer subject to this part may...

  1. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stand-down waivers for drug testing. 655.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS General § 655.5 Stand-down waivers for drug testing. (a) An employer subject to this part may...

  2. NEARING THE END OF CONSTRUCTION ON THE LOX TEST STAND AT MSFC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-08

    AS THE END OF CONSTRUCTION ON TEST STAND 4697, THE LIQUID OXYGEN TANK TEST STAND AT MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER, PROJECT ENGINEERS PHIL HENDRIX, FROM MSFC, AND CURTNEY WALTERS FROM THE U.S. CORP OF ENGINEERS, STUDY PLANS AND PROGRESS.

  3. Diagnosing Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Comparison of Tilt Test versus Standing Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Plash, Walker B; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Garland, Emily M; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Black, Bonnie K; Dupont, William D; Raj, Satish R

    2012-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by increased heart rate (ΔHR) of ≥30 bpm with symptoms related to upright posture. Active stand (STAND) and passive head-up tilt (TILT) produce different physiological responses. We hypothesized these different responses would affect the ability of individuals to achieve the POTS HR increase criterion. Patients with POTS (n=15) and healthy controls (n=15) underwent 30 min of TILT and STAND testing. ΔHR values were analyzed at 5 min intervals. Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis was performed to determine optimal cut point values of ΔHR for both TILT and STAND. TILT produced larger ΔHR than STAND for all 5 min intervals from 5 min (38±3 bpm vs. 33±3 bpm; P=0.03) to 30 min (51±3 bpm vs. 38±3 bpm; P<0.001). Sensitivity (Sn) of the 30 bpm criterion was similar for all tests (TILT-10=93%, STAND-10=87%, TILT30=100%, and STAND30=93%). Specificity (Sp) of the 30 bpm criterion was less at both 10 and 30 min for TILT (TILT10=40%, TILT30=20%) than STAND (STAND10=67%, STAND30=53%). The optimal ΔHR to discriminate POTS at 10 min were 38 bpm (TILT) and 29 bpm (STAND), and at 30 min were 47 bpm (TILT) and 34 bpm (STAND). Orthostatic tachycardia was greater for TILT (with lower specificity for POTS diagnosis) than STAND at 10 and 30 min. The 30 bpm ΔHR criterion is not suitable for 30 min TILT. Diagnosis of POTS should consider orthostatic intolerance criteria and not be based solely on orthostatic tachycardia regardless of test used. PMID:22931296

  4. Diagnosing postural tachycardia syndrome: comparison of tilt testing compared with standing haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Plash, Walker B; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Garland, Emily M; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Black, Bonnie K; Dupont, William D; Raj, Satish R

    2013-01-01

    POTS (postural tachycardia syndrome) is characterized by an increased heart rate (ΔHR) of ≥30 bpm (beats/min) with symptoms related to upright posture. Active stand (STAND) and passive head-up tilt (TILT) produce different physiological responses. We hypothesized these different responses would affect the ability of individuals to achieve the POTS HR increase criterion. Patients with POTS (n=15) and healthy controls (n=15) underwent 30 min of tilt and stand testing. ΔHR values were analysed at 5 min intervals. ROC (receiver operating characteristic) analysis was performed to determine optimal cut point values of ΔHR for both tilt and stand. Tilt produced larger ΔHR than stand for all 5 min intervals from 5 min (38±3 bpm compared with 33±3 bpm; P=0.03) to 30 min (51±3 bpm compared with 38±3 bpm; P<0.001). Sn (sensitivity) of the 30 bpm criterion was similar for all tests (TILT10=93%, STAND10=87%, TILT30=100%, and STAND30=93%). Sp (specificity) of the 30 bpm criterion was less at both 10 and 30 min for tilt (TILT10=40%, TILT30=20%) than stand (STAND10=67%, STAND30=53%). The optimal ΔHR to discriminate POTS at 10 min were 38 bpm (TILT) and 29 bpm (STAND), and at 30 min were 47 bpm (TILT) and 34 bpm (STAND). Orthostatic tachycardia was greater for tilt (with lower Sp for POTS diagnosis) than stand at 10 and 30 min. The 30 bpm ΔHR criterion is not suitable for 30 min tilt. Diagnosis of POTS should consider orthostatic intolerance criteria and not be based solely on orthostatic tachycardia regardless of test used.

  5. Astronaut Ronald Sega with Wake Shield Facility on test stand at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility is displayed on a test stand at JSC. Astronaut Ronald M. Sega, mission specialist for STS-60, is seen with the facility during a break in testing in the acoustic and vibration facility at JSC.

  6. Astronaut Ronald Sega with Wake Shield Facility on test stand at JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-10-09

    The Wake Shield Facility is displayed on a test stand at JSC. Astronaut Ronald M. Sega, mission specialist for STS-60, is seen with the facility during a break in testing in the acoustic and vibration facility at JSC.

  7. DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1A. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1-A. Looking north northwest - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Flame Deflector Water System, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 6. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF PROPELLER TEST STAND. WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF PROPELLER TEST STAND. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  9. Rapid HIV testing experience at Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System's Homeless Stand Downs.

    PubMed

    Hooshyar, Dina; Surís, Alina M; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Lepage, James P; Bedimo, Roger; North, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, 21% of the estimated 1.1 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are unaware they are HIV-infected. In 2011, Veterans Health Administration (VHA)'s Office of Public Health in conjunction with VHA's Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program funded grants to support rapid HIV testing at homeless outreach events because homeless populations are more likely to obtain emergent rather than preventive care and have a higher HIV seroprevalence as compared to the general population. Because of a Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System (VANTHCS)'s laboratory testing requirement, VANTHCS partnered with community agencies to offer rapid HIV testing for the first time at VANTHCS' 2011 Homeless Stand Downs in Dallas, Fort Worth, and Texoma, Texas. Homeless Stand Downs are outreach events that connect Veterans with services. Veterans who declined testing were asked their reasons for declining. Comparisons by Homeless Stand Down site used Pearson χ², substituting Fisher's Exact tests for expected cell sizes <5. Of the 910 Veterans attending the Homeless Stand Downs, 261 Veterans reported reasons for declining HIV testing, and 133 Veterans were tested, where 92% of the tested Veterans obtained their test results at the events - all tested negative. Veterans' reported reasons for declining HIV testing included previous negative result (n=168), no time to test (n=49), no risk factors (n=36), testing is not a priority (n=11), uninterested in knowing serostatus (n=6), and HIV-infected (n=3). Only "no time to test" differed significantly by Homeless Stand Down site. Nonresponse rate was 54%. Offering rapid HIV testing at Homeless Stand Downs is a promising testing venue since 15% of Veterans attending VANTHCS' Homeless Stand Downs were tested for HIV, and majority obtained their HIV test results at point-of-care while further research is needed to determine how to improve these rates.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex Bunker House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC stand, additional related facilities were built during this time frame. Built to the east of the S-IC stand, the block house served as the control room. To the south of the blockhouse was a newly constructed pump house used for delivering water to the S-IC stand during testing. North of the massive test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built for testing a single F-1 engine. Just southeast of the S-IC stand a concrete bunker house was constructed. The bunker housed

  11. B-1 and B-3 Test Stands at NASA’s Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-21

    Operation of the High Energy Rocket Engine Research Facility (B-1), left, and Nuclear Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility (B-3) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The test stands were constructed in the early 1960s to test full-scale liquid hydrogen fuel systems in simulated altitude conditions. Over the next decade each stand was used for two major series of liquid hydrogen rocket tests: the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) and the Centaur second-stage rocket program. The different components of these rocket engines could be studied under flight conditions and adjusted without having to fire the engine. Once the preliminary studies were complete, the entire engine could be fired in larger facilities. The test stands were vertical towers with cryogenic fuel and steam ejector systems. B-1 was 135 feet tall, and B-3 was 210 feet tall. Each test stand had several levels, a test section, and ground floor shop areas. The test stands relied on an array of support buildings to conduct their tests, including a control building, steam exhaust system, and fuel storage and pumping facilities. A large steam-powered altitude exhaust system reduced the pressure at the exhaust nozzle exit of each test stand. This allowed B-1 and B-3 to test turbopump performance in conditions that matched the altitudes of space.

  12. 26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 25 of 148; file no. 1320/76. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71A, Propulsion Research Laboratory, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  14. Comparison of Test Stand and Helicopter Oil Cooler Bearing Condition Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Branning, Jeremy; Wade, Damiel R.; Bolander, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper was to compare the performance of HUMS condition indicators (CI) when detecting a bearing fault in a test stand or on a helicopter. This study compared data from two sources: first, CI data collected from accelerometers installed on two UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters when oil cooler bearing faults occurred, along with data from helicopters with no bearing faults; and second, CI data that was collected from ten cooler bearings, healthy and faulted, that were removed from fielded helicopters and installed in a test stand. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to compare CI performance was demonstrated. Results indicated the bearing energy CI responded differently for the helicopter and the test stand. Future research is required if test stand data is to be used validate condition indicator performance on a helicopter.

  15. Up, Up Up in 60 Seconds- Watch Rocket Test Stand Soar to 221-Feet Tall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-09

    In this 60-second time-lapse video, watch structural Test Stand 4693 at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center rise 221 feet, from the start of construction in May 2014 to its end in December 2016. Test Stand 4693 will subject the 537,000-gallon liquid hydrogen tank of the Space Launch System's massive core stage to the same stresses and pressures it must endure at launch and in flight.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARMY STATIONARY AXLE TEST STAND FOR LUBRICANT EFFICIENCY EVALUATION-PART II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-13

    value was estimated based on the engines maximum peak torque output, multiplied by the transmissions 1st gear ratio, high range transfer case ratio...efficiency test stand to allow for laboratory based investigation of Fuel Efficient Gear Oils (FEGO) and their impact on vehicle efficiency. Development...their impact on vehicle efficiency. The test stand was designed and developed with the following goals: • Provide a lower cost alternative for

  17. Assessing fitness to stand trial: the utility of the Fitness Interview Test (revised edition).

    PubMed

    Zapf, P A; Roesch, R; Viljoen, J L

    2001-06-01

    In Canada most evaluations of fitness to stand trial are conducted on an inpatient basis. This costs time and money, and deprives those defendants remanded for evaluation of liberty. This research assessed the predictive efficiency of the Fitness Interview Test, revised edition (FIT) as a screening instrument for fitness to stand trial. We compared decisions about fitness to stand trial, based on the FIT, with the results of institution-based evaluations for 2 samples of men remanded for inpatient fitness assessments. The FIT demonstrates excellent utility as a screening instrument. The FIT shows good sensitivity and negative predictive power, which suggests that it can reliably screen those individuals who are clearly fit to stand trial, before they are remanded to an inpatient facility for a fitness assessment. We discuss the implications for evaluating fitness to stand trial, particularly in terms of the need for community-based alternatives to traditional forensic assessments.

  18. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving...

  19. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement on receiving property of the noise emission levels from switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car...

  20. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement on receiving property of the noise emission levels from switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car...

  1. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving...

  2. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving...

  3. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving...

  4. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement on receiving property of the noise emission levels from switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car...

  5. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement on receiving property of the noise emission levels from switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car...

  6. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement on receiving property of the noise emission levels from switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car...

  7. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving...

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Standing Heel-Rise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Allison; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Mullens, Pamela; Burton, Gay Naganuma

    2010-01-01

    A standardized protocol for a pediatric heel-rise test was developed and reliability and validity are reported. Fifty-seven children developing typically (CDT) and 34 children with plantar flexion weakness performed three tests: unilateral heel rise, vertical jump, and force measurement using handheld dynamometry. Intraclass correlation…

  9. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell test...

  10. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell test...

  11. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell test...

  12. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell test...

  13. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell test...

  14. The HIV self-testing debate: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marilou; French, Martin; Hébert, Yamilee

    2018-01-18

    Emphasis on HIV testing as a gateway to prevention, treatment and care has grown tremendously over the past decade. In turn, this emphasis on testing has created a demand for new policies, programs, and technologies that can potentially increase access to and uptake of HIV testing. HIV self-testing (HST) technologies have gained important momentum following the approval of the over-the-counter self-tests in the United States, the UK, and France. While the renewed interest in HST has given rise to a number of high quality reviews of empirical studies conducted on this topic, we have yet to find an article that captures the extent of the debate on HST. A critical review of the literature on HST was conducted and organized into three categories based on the focus of the article: 1) Empirical research, 2) Arguments, and 3) Context. We focused exclusively on the second category which included ethical analyses, policy analyses, editorials, opinion pieces, commentaries, letters to the editor and so forth. 10 lines of argument on HST were identified in the literature: 1) Individual - Public Health, 2) Strengths - Limits, 3) Benefits - Harms, 4) Screening - Testing, 5) Target - Market, 6) Health Care - Industry, 7) Regulation - Restriction, 8) Resource-Rich Settings - Resource-Limited Settings, 9) Ethical - Unethical, and 10) Exceptionalism - Normalization. Each line of argument is presented and discussed in the paper. We conclude by providing examples of critical questions that should be raised in order to take the debate to another level and generate new ways of thinking about HST.

  15. Aggression Replacement Training[R] Stands the Test of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amendola, Mark; Oliver, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There have been longstanding debates in the scientific community regarding what qualifies as evidence for programs that work with challenging youth. There are also a variety of levels of evidence on a continuum from promising to proven. Aggression Replacement Training[R] has stood the test of time in terms of its scientific underpinning and…

  16. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) for Test Stand and J-2X Engine: Core Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Jorge F.; Schmalzel, John L.; Aguilar, Robert; Shwabacher, Mark; Morris, Jon

    2008-01-01

    ISHM capability enables a system to detect anomalies, determine causes and effects, predict future anomalies, and provides an integrated awareness of the health of the system to users (operators, customers, management, etc.). NASA Stennis Space Center, NASA Ames Research Center, and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne have implemented a core ISHM capability that encompasses the A1 Test Stand and the J-2X Engine. The implementation incorporates all aspects of ISHM; from anomaly detection (e.g. leaks) to root-cause-analysis based on failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), to a user interface for an integrated visualization of the health of the system (Test Stand and Engine). The implementation provides a low functional capability level (FCL) in that it is populated with few algorithms and approaches for anomaly detection, and root-cause trees from a limited FMEA effort. However, it is a demonstration of a credible ISHM capability, and it is inherently designed for continuous and systematic augmentation of the capability. The ISHM capability is grounded on an integrating software environment used to create an ISHM model of the system. The ISHM model follows an object-oriented approach: includes all elements of the system (from schematics) and provides for compartmentalized storage of information associated with each element. For instance, a sensor object contains a transducer electronic data sheet (TEDS) with information that might be used by algorithms and approaches for anomaly detection, diagnostics, etc. Similarly, a component, such as a tank, contains a Component Electronic Data Sheet (CEDS). Each element also includes a Health Electronic Data Sheet (HEDS) that contains health-related information such as anomalies and health state. Some practical aspects of the implementation include: (1) near real-time data flow from the test stand data acquisition system through the ISHM model, for near real-time detection of anomalies and diagnostics, (2) insertion of the J-2X

  17. "Chair Stand Test" as Simple Tool for Sarcopenia Screening in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, P A; Carneiro, J A O; Coqueiro, R S; Pereira, R; Fernandes, M H

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between sarcopenia and "chair stand test" performance, and evaluate this test as a screening tool for sarcopenia in community-dwelling elderly women. Cross-sectional Survey. 173 female individuals, aged ≥ 60 years and living in the urban area of the municipality of Lafaiete Coutinho, Bahia's inland, Brazil. The association between sarcopenia (defined by muscle mass, strength and/or performance loss) and performance in the "chair stand test" was tested by binary logistic regression technique. The ROC curve parameters were used to evaluate the diagnostic power of the test in sarcopenia screening. The significance level was set at 5 %. The model showed that the time spent for the "chair stand test" was positively associated (OR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.01 - 1.16, p = 0.024) to sarcopenia, indicating that, for each 1 second increment in the test performance, the sarcopenia's probability increased by 8% in elderly women. The cut-off point that showed the best balance between sensitivity and specificity was 13 seconds. The performance of "chair stand test" showed predictive ability for sarcopenia, being an effective and simple screening tool for sarcopenia in elderly women. This test could be used for screening sarcopenic elderly women, allowing early interventions.

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Steel Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 15, 1961, shows the installation of the reinforcing steel prior to the pouring of the concrete foundation walls.

  19. 3. CABLE TUNNEL TO TEST STAND 1A, LOOKING SOUTH TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CABLE TUNNEL TO TEST STAND 1-A, LOOKING SOUTH TO STAIRS LEADING UP TO CONTROL CENTER. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of the Constellation Program A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2007-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a test stand for use in testing the J-2X rocket engine at simulated altitude conditions in support of NASA's Constellation Program.

  1. Ares Launch Vehicles Development Awakens Historic Test Stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Burt, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper chronicles the rebirth of two national rocket testing assets located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: the Dynamic Test Stand (also known as the Ground Vibration Test Stand) and the Static Test Stand (also known as the Main Propulsion Test Stand). It will touch on the historical significance of these special facilities, while introducing the requirements driving modifications for testing a new generation space transportation system, which is set to come on line after the Space Shuttle is retired in 2010. In many ways, America's journey to explore the Moon begins at the Marshall Center, which is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, along with managing the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program and leading the Lunar Lander descent stage work, among other Constellation Program assignments. An important component of this work is housed in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, which manages more than 40 facilities capable of a full spectrum of rocket and space transportation technology testing - from small components to full-up engine systems. The engineers and technicians who operate these test facilities have more than a thousand years of combined experience in this highly specialized field. Marshall has one of the few government test groups in the United States with responsibility for the overall performance of a test program from conception to completion. The Test Laboratory has facilities dating back to the early 1960s, when the test stands needed for the Apollo Program and other scientific endeavors were commissioned and built along the Marshall Center's southern boundary, with logistics access by air, railroad, and barge or boat on the Tennessee River. NASA and its industry partners are designing and developing a new human-rated system based on the requirements for safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation solutions. Given below are summaries of the Dynamic Test Stand and the Static Test Stand capabilities

  2. Installation of TVC Actuators in a Two Axis Inertial Load Simulator Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubanek, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about the installation of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) actuators in the new Two Axis Inertial Load Simulator (ILS) at MSFC. The new test stand will support the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS). Because of the unique geometry of the new test stand standard actuator installation procedures will not work. I have been asked to develop a design on how to install the actuators into the new test stand. After speaking with the engineers and technicians I have created a possible design solution. Using Pro Engineer design software and running my own stress calculations I have proven my design is feasible. I have learned how to calculate the stresses my design will see from this task. From the calculations I have learned I have over built the apparatus. I have also expanded my knowledge of Pro Engineer and was able to create a model of my idea.

  3. Modified 30-second Sit to Stand test predicts falls in a cohort of institutionalized older veterans

    PubMed Central

    Chassé, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Physical function performance tests, including sit to stand tests and Timed Up and Go, assess the functional capacity of older adults. Their ability to predict falls warrants further investigation. The objective was to determine if a modified 30-second Sit to Stand test that allowed upper extremity use and Timed Up and Go test predicted falls in institutionalized Veterans. Fifty-three older adult Veterans (mean age = 91 years, 49 men) residing in a long-term care hospital completed modified 30-second Sit to Stand and Timed Up and Go tests. The number of falls over one year was collected. The ability of modified 30-second Sit to Stand or Timed Up and Go to predict if participants had fallen was examined using logistic regression. The ability of these tests to predict the number of falls was examined using negative binomial regression. Both analyses controlled for age, history of falls, cognition, and comorbidities. The modified 30-second Sit to Stand was significantly (p < 0.05) related to if participants fell (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval = 0.58, 0.97) and the number of falls (incidence rate ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval = 0.68, 0.98); decreased repetitions were associated with increased number of falls. Timed Up and Go was not significantly (p > 0.05) related to if participants fell (odds ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.10) or the number of falls (incidence rate ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 0.98, 1.05). The modified 30-second Sit to Stand that allowed upper extremity use offers an alternative method to screen for fall risk in older adults in long-term care. PMID:28464024

  4. Modified 30-second Sit to Stand test predicts falls in a cohort of institutionalized older veterans.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Eva V; Breton, Dominic; Feng, Zhuo Wei; Ta, An-Tchi; Walsh, Kayley; Chassé, Kathleen; Robbins, Shawn M

    2017-01-01

    Physical function performance tests, including sit to stand tests and Timed Up and Go, assess the functional capacity of older adults. Their ability to predict falls warrants further investigation. The objective was to determine if a modified 30-second Sit to Stand test that allowed upper extremity use and Timed Up and Go test predicted falls in institutionalized Veterans. Fifty-three older adult Veterans (mean age = 91 years, 49 men) residing in a long-term care hospital completed modified 30-second Sit to Stand and Timed Up and Go tests. The number of falls over one year was collected. The ability of modified 30-second Sit to Stand or Timed Up and Go to predict if participants had fallen was examined using logistic regression. The ability of these tests to predict the number of falls was examined using negative binomial regression. Both analyses controlled for age, history of falls, cognition, and comorbidities. The modified 30-second Sit to Stand was significantly (p < 0.05) related to if participants fell (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval = 0.58, 0.97) and the number of falls (incidence rate ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval = 0.68, 0.98); decreased repetitions were associated with increased number of falls. Timed Up and Go was not significantly (p > 0.05) related to if participants fell (odds ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.10) or the number of falls (incidence rate ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 0.98, 1.05). The modified 30-second Sit to Stand that allowed upper extremity use offers an alternative method to screen for fall risk in older adults in long-term care.

  5. Trapping and patterning of large particles and cells in a 1D ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ruhollah; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Neild, Adrian

    2017-09-26

    The use of ultrasound for trapping and patterning particles or cells in microfluidic systems is usually confined to particles which are considerably smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this regime, the primary forces result in particle clustering at certain locations in the sound field, whilst secondary forces, those arising due to particle-particle interaction forces, assist this clustering process. Using a wavelength closer to the size of the particles allows one particle to be held at each primary force minimum. However, to achieve this, the influence of secondary forces needs to be carefully studied, as inter-particle attraction is highly undesirable. Here, we study the effect of particle size and material properties on both the primary and secondary acoustic forces as the particle diameter is increased towards the wavelength of the 1-dimensional axisymmetric ultrasonic field. We show that the resonance frequencies of the solid sphere have an important role in the resulting secondary forces which leads to a narrow band of frequencies that allow the patterning of large particles in a 1-D array. Knowledge regarding the naturally existent secondary forces would allow for system designs enabling single cell studies to be conducted in a biologically safe manner.

  6. Hot-Fire Testing of a 1N AF-M315E Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Pedersen, Kevin; Pierce, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    This hot-fire test continues NASA investigation of green propellant technologies for future missions. To show the potential for green propellants to replace some hydrazine systems in future spacecraft, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is continuing to embark on hot-fire test campaigns with various green propellant blends. NASA completed a hot-fire test of a 1N AF-M315E monopropellant thruster at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the small altitude test stand located in building 4205. The thruster is a ground test article used for basic performance determination and catalyst studies. The purpose of the hot-fire testing was for performance determination of a 1N size thruster and form a baseline from which to study catalyst performance and life with follow-on testing to be conducted at a later date. The thruster performed as expected. The result of the hot-fire testing are presented in this paper and presentation.

  7. Effect of In-Flight Exercise and Extravehicular Activity on Postflight Stand Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice; Greenisen, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crewmembers during short-duration spaceflights (9-16 days) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 hr of landing. Thirty crewmembers performed self-selected in-flight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. A 10min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10- 15 d before launch (PRE) and within four hours of landing (POST). Based upon their in-flight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% ,HRMax, = 20 min/session, n = 11), medium (MEDex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% HRmax, = 20 min/session, n = 10), or low (LOex: = 3x/week, HR and duration variable, n = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, or analysis of variance, P < 0.05). There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared to PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36+/-5 bpm) compared to HIex or MEDex groups (25+/-1bpm; 22+/-2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after spaceflight in the MEDex and HIex groups, but was significantly less in the LOex group (PRE: -9+/- 3, POST: -19+/- 4 mmHg). Thus, moderate to high levels of in-flight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after spaceflight compared.

  8. Integrated System Health Management: Pilot Operational Implementation in a Rocket Engine Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John L.; Morris, Jonathan A.; Turowski, Mark P.; Franzl, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a credible implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) capability, as a pilot operational system. Important core elements that make possible fielding and evolution of ISHM capability have been validated in a rocket engine test stand, encompassing all phases of operation: stand-by, pre-test, test, and post-test. The core elements include an architecture (hardware/software) for ISHM, gateways for streaming real-time data from the data acquisition system into the ISHM system, automated configuration management employing transducer electronic data sheets (TEDS?s) adhering to the IEEE 1451.4 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, broadcasting and capture of sensor measurements and health information adhering to the IEEE 1451.1 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, user interfaces for management of redlines/bluelines, and establishment of a health assessment database system (HADS) and browser for extensive post-test analysis. The ISHM system was installed in the Test Control Room, where test operators were exposed to the capability. All functionalities of the pilot implementation were validated during testing and in post-test data streaming through the ISHM system. The implementation enabled significant improvements in awareness about the status of the test stand, and events and their causes/consequences. The architecture and software elements embody a systems engineering, knowledge-based approach; in conjunction with object-oriented environments. These qualities are permitting systematic augmentation of the capability and scaling to encompass other subsystems.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken April 4, 1961, shows the S-IC test stand dry once again when workers resumed construction after a 6 month delay due to booster size reconfiguration back in September of 1961. The disturbance of a natural spring during the excavation of the site required water to be pumped from the site continuously. The site was completely flooded after the pumps were shut down during the construction delay.

  10. 5. "UNDERGROUND CONTROL ROOM AT TEST STAND 1A, DIRECTORATE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "UNDERGROUND CONTROL ROOM AT TEST STAND 1-A, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB, 15 JAN 58, 3097.58." Two men working in the control room. Photo no. "3097 58; G-AFFTC 15 JAN 58, T.S. 1-A Control". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Application of an In-Line Contamination Monitoring Unit to the AHT-64 Hydraulic Test Stand.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-04

    suction return connection port will require the operator to secuire same from a squatting position. The present stowage arrangement on the test stand... SPC FC sample~~~ Iepal" -a *Tpoa _______Rate 7 eo3,t Sq,’ TPc owe te - U Enciosure ULeeds & Northrup N’AFC- 92- 1 0 Typical Plumbing Connections for

  12. An experimental test of the causes of forest growth decline with stand age.

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan; Dan Binkley; James H. Fownes; Christian Giardina; Randy S. Senock

    2004-01-01

    The decline in aboveground wood production after canopy closure in even-aged forest stands is a common pattern in forests, but clear evidence for the mechanism causing the decline is lacking. The problem is fundamental to forest biology, commercial forestry (the decline sets the rotation age), and to carbon storage in forests. We tested three hypotheses...

  13. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula F. S.; Quintino, Ludmylla F.; Franco, Juliane; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Subjects with neurological disease (ND) usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. Objective To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. Method A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) protocol was performed. Systematic literature searches of databases (MEDLINE/SCIELO/LILACS/PEDro) were performed to identify relevant studies. In all studies, the following inclusion criteria were assessed: investigation of any measurement property or the feasibility of clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with ND published in any language through December 2012. The COSMIN checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Results Eleven studies were included. The measurement properties/feasibility were most commonly investigated for the five-repetition sit-to-stand test, which showed good test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient:ICC=0.94-0.99) for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and dementia. The ICC values were higher for this test than for the number of repetitions in the 30-s test. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test also showed good inter/intra-rater reliabilities (ICC=0.97-0.99) for stroke and inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.99) for subjects with Parkinson disease and incomplete spinal cord injury. For this test, the criterion-related validity for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury was, in general, moderate (correlation=0.40-0.77), and the feasibility and safety were good for subjects with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions The five-repetition sit-to-stand test was used more often in subjects with ND, and most of the measurement properties were

  14. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  15. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  16. Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

  17. Operational evaluation of a proppeller test stand in the quiet flow facility at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Operational proof tests of a propeller test stand (PTS) in a quiet flow facility (QFF) are presented. The PTS is an experimental test bed for acoustic propeller research in the quiet flow environment of the QFF. These proof tests validate thrust and torque predictions, examine the repeatability of measurements on the PTS, and determine the effect of applying artificial roughness to the propeller blades. Since a thrusting propeller causes an open jet to contract, the potential flow core was surveyed to examine the magnitude of the contraction. These measurements are compared with predicted values. The predictions are used to determine operational limitations for testing a given propeller design in the QFF.

  18. Airborne Electro-Mechanical Actuator Test Stand for Development of Prognostic Health Management Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    based on a pre-defined UH-60 data format, then also computes the load and position profile information. File Profile Interface In order to test the...of the data set. Figure 13 shows a typical motion profile executed over a period of about twenty minutes. Figure 14 shows the desired ( computed ...flight. The stand is connected to the aircraft data bus and the motion profiles for the test actuators, as well as the load applied to them, are

  19. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  20. Presyncopal/Non-Presyncopal Outcomes of Post Spaceflight Stand Tests are Consistent from Flight to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. S.; Meck, J. V.

    2004-01-01

    The overall prevalence of orthostatic hypotension after short duration (6-18 d) spaceflight is 20% with existing countermeasures. However, it is not known if the outcomes of stand tests for orthostatic tolerance are consistent within individuals on subsequent flights, or if first time fliers are more (or less) likely to experience orthostatic hypotension and presyncope than are veteran astronauts. Fifty astronauts were studied retrospectively. Stand test data, which had been collected before and after spaceflight, were compared from at least two flights for each astronaut. For twenty-five of these astronauts, their first flight in this database was also their first time to fly into space. For the remaining 25, their first flight in this database was their second, third or fourth flight, as data were available. No subject became presyncopal during preflight testing. Of the 50 subjects, 45 (90%) had the same outcome on their first and second fligh ts of this study. Of 14 subjects on whom we had data from a third mission, 12 had the same stand test outcome on all three flights (86% same outcome across three flights). There was no correlation between flight duration and orthostatic tolerance (r = 0.39). These data support the idea that astronauts are predisposed to orthostatic tolerance/intolerance after spaceflight and that this predisposition is not altered by subsequent flights. Flight durations within this data set did not alter the likelihood of orthostatic intolerance and rookie fliers were no more likely to experience orthostatic intolerance than were veteran astronauts.

  1. Credit BG. Looking southeast at Test Stand "D" (Building 4223/E24). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Looking southeast at Test Stand "D" (Building 4223/E-24). Left foreground contains six high-pressure nitrogen tanks which supplied nitrogen for operation of propellant valves. Several tanks for other substances have been removed from the base of the tower as part of decontamination and dismantling program. The vertical vacuum test cell can be seen in the tower behind the western sunscreen. At the top of the tower in the northeast corner is the interstage condenser used in the series of vacuum ejectors; at the top of the condenser is one of two Z-stage ejectors used to evacuate the condenser. The hoist beam for lifting/lowering rocket engines can be clearly seen projecting to the west over the pavement. In the distance on the right are Clayton water-tube steam generators from Building 4280/E-81, and the towers for Test Stand "C" and its scrubber-condenser - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Guidance on the Stand Down, Mothball, and Reactivation of Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkman, Gregrey T.; Dunn, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of aerospace and aeronautics products typically requires three distinct types of testing resources across research, development, test, and evaluation: experimental ground testing, computational "testing" and development, and flight testing. Over the last twenty plus years, computational methods have replaced some physical experiments and this trend is continuing. The result is decreased utilization of ground test capabilities and, along with market forces, industry consolidation, and other factors, has resulted in the stand down and oftentimes closure of many ground test facilities. Ground test capabilities are (and very likely will continue to be for many years) required to verify computational results and to provide information for regimes where computational methods remain immature. Ground test capabilities are very costly to build and to maintain, so once constructed and operational it may be desirable to retain access to those capabilities even if not currently needed. One means of doing this while reducing ongoing sustainment costs is to stand down the facility into a "mothball" status - keeping it alive to bring it back when needed. Both NASA and the US Department of Defense have policies to accomplish the mothball of a facility, but with little detail. This paper offers a generic process to follow that can be tailored based on the needs of the owner and the applicable facility.

  3. Verification of the test stand for microbolometer camera in accredited laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiński, Michal; Bareła, Jaroslaw; Chmielewski, Krzysztof; Kastek, Mariusz

    2017-10-01

    Microbolometer belongs to the group of thermal detectors and consist of temperature sensitive resistor which is exposed to measured radiation flux. Bolometer array employs a pixel structure prepared in silicon technology. The detecting area is defined by a size of thin membrane, usually made of amorphous silicon (a-Si) or vanadium oxide (VOx). FPAs are made of a multitude of detector elements (for example 384 × 288 ), where each individual detector has different sensitivity and offset due to detector-to-detector spread in the FPA fabrication process, and additionally can change with sensor operating temperature, biasing voltage variation or temperature of the observed scene. The difference in sensitivity and offset among detectors (which is called non-uniformity) additionally with its high sensitivity, produces fixed pattern noise (FPN) on produced image. Fixed pattern noise degrades parameters of infrared cameras like sensitivity or NETD. Additionally it degrades image quality, radiometric accuracy and temperature resolution. In order to objectively compare the two infrared cameras ones must measure and compare their parameters on a laboratory test stand. One of the basic parameters for the evaluation of a designed camera is NETD. In order to examine the NETD, parameters such as sensitivity and pixels noise must be measured. To do so, ones should register the output signal from the camera in response to the radiation of black bodies at two different temperatures. The article presets an application and measuring stand for determining the parameters of microbolometers camera. Prepared measurements were compared with the result of the measurements in the Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT on a METS test stand by CI SYSTEM. This test stand consists of IR collimator, IR standard source, rotating wheel with test patterns, a computer with a video grabber card and specialized software. The parameters of thermals cameras were measure according to norms and method described

  4. Effect of yoga training on one leg standing and functional reach tests in obese individuals with poor postural control

    PubMed Central

    Jorrakate, Chaiyong; Kongsuk, Jutaluk; Pongduang, Chiraprapa; Sadsee, Boontiwa; Chanthorn, Phatchari

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of yoga training on static and dynamic standing balance in obese individuals with poor standing balance. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen obese volunteers were randomly assigned into yoga and control groups. The yoga training program was performed for 45 minutes per day, 3 times per week, for 4 weeks. Static and dynamic balance were assessed in volunteers with one leg standing and functional reach tests. Outcome measures were tested before training and after a single week of training. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance with Tukey’s honestly significant difference post hoc statistics was used to analyze the data. [Results] Obese individuals showed significantly increased static standing balance in the yoga training group, but there was no significant improvement of static or dynamic standing balance in the control group after 4 weeks. In the yoga group, significant increases in static standing balance was found after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks. Compared with the control group, static standing balance in the yoga group was significantly different after the 2nd week, and dynamic standing balance was significantly different after the 4th week. [Conclusion] Yoga training would be beneficial for improving standing balance in obese individuals with poor standing balance. PMID:25642038

  5. Application of intelligent sensors in the integrated systems health monitoring of a rocket test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ajay; Chitikeshi, Sanjeevi; Utterbach, Lucas; Bandhil, Pavan; Figueroa, Fernando

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the application of intelligent sensors in the Integrated Systems Health Monitoring (ISHM) as applied to a rocket test stand. The development of intelligent sensors is attempted as an integrated system approach, i.e. one treats the sensors as a complete system with its own physical transducer, A/D converters, processing and storage capabilities, software drivers, self-assessment algorithms, communication protocols and evolutionary methodologies that allow them to get better with time. Under a project being undertaken at the NASA Stennis Space Center, an integrated framework is being developed for the intelligent monitoring of smart elements associated with the rocket tests stands. These smart elements can be sensors, actuators or other devices. Though the immediate application is the monitoring of the rocket test stands, the technology should be generally applicable to the ISHM vision. This paper outlines progress made in the development of intelligent sensors by describing the work done till date on Physical Intelligent sensors (PIS) and Virtual Intelligent Sensors (VIS).

  6. Value of the "Standing Test" in the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Beta-blocker Therapy Response in Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; Zorio, Esther; Domingo Valero, Diana; Peñafiel-Verdú, Pablo; Sánchez-Muñoz, Juan J; García-Molina, Esperanza; Sabater, María; Navarro, Marina; San-Román, Irene; Pérez, Inmaculada; Santos, Juan J; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentín; Valdés, Mariano; Pascual, Domingo; García-Alberola, Arcadio; Gimeno Blanes, Juan R

    2017-11-01

    Patients with congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) have an abnormal QT adaptation to sudden changes in heart rate provoked by standing. The present study sought to evaluate the standing test in a cohort of LQTS patients and to assess if this QT maladaptation phenomenon is ameliorated by beta-blocker therapy. Electrographic assessments were performed at baseline and immediately after standing in 36 LQTS patients (6 LQT1 [17%], 20 LQT2 [56%], 3 LQT7 [8%], 7 unidentified-genotype patients [19%]) and 41 controls. The corrected QT interval (QTc) was measured at baseline (QTc supine ) and immediately after standing (QTc standing ); the QTc change from baseline (ΔQTc) was calculated as QTc standing - QTc supine . The test was repeated in 26 patients receiving beta-blocker therapy. Both QTc standing and ΔQTc were significantly higher in the LQTS group than in controls (QTc standing , 528 ± 46ms vs 420 ± 15ms, P < .0001; ΔQTc, 78 ± 40ms vs 8 ± 13ms, P < .0001). No significant differences were noted between LQT1 and LQT2 patients. Typical ST-T wave patterns appeared after standing in LQTS patients. Receiver operating characteristic curves of QTc standing and ΔQTc showed a significant increase in diagnostic value compared with the QTc supine (area under the curve for both, 0.99 vs 0.85; P < .001). Beta-blockers attenuated the response to standing in LQTS patients (QTc standing , 440 ± 32ms, P < .0001; ΔQTc, 14 ± 16ms, P < .0001). Evaluation of the QTc after the simple maneuver of standing shows a high diagnostic performance and could be important for monitoring the effects of beta-blocker therapy in LQTS patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Reliability and validity of a talent identification test battery for seated and standing Paralympic throws.

    PubMed

    Spathis, Jemima Grace; Connick, Mark James; Beckman, Emma Maree; Newcombe, Peter Anthony; Tweedy, Sean Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paralympic throwing events for athletes with physical impairments comprise seated and standing javelin, shot put, discus and seated club throwing. Identification of talented throwers would enable prediction of future success and promote participation; however, a valid and reliable talent identification battery for Paralympic throwing has not been reported. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of a talent identification battery for Paralympic throws. Participants were non-disabled so that impairment would not confound analyses, and results would provide an indication of normative performance. Twenty-eight non-disabled participants (13 M; 15 F) aged 23.6 years (±5.44) performed five kinematically distinct criterion throws (three seated, two standing) and nine talent identification tests (three anthropometric, six motor); 23 were tested a second time to evaluate test-retest reliability. Talent identification test-retest reliability was evaluated using Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots (Limits of Agreement). Spearman's correlation assessed strength of association between criterion throws and talent identification tests. Reliability was generally acceptable (mean ICC = 0.89), but two seated talent identification tests require more extensive familiarisation. Correlation strength (mean rs = 0.76) indicated that the talent identification tests can be used to validly identify individuals with competitively advantageous attributes for each of the five kinematically distinct throwing activities. Results facilitate further research in this understudied area.

  8. SLS Rocket Hardware Moved to NASA Marshall Stand for Upcoming Test Series (30-second timelapse)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    A test version of the launch vehicle stage adapter (LVSA) for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, is moved to a 65-foot-tall test stand at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The test version LVSA will be stacked with other test pieces of the upper part of the SLS rocket and pushed, pulled and twisted as part of an upcoming test series to ensure each structure can withstand the incredible stresses of launch. The LVSA joins the core stage simulator, which was loaded into the test stand Sept. 21. The other three qualification articles and the Orion simulator will complete the stack later this fall. SLS will be the world’s most powerful rocket, and with the Orion spacecraft, take astronauts to deep-space destinations, including the Journey to Mars. More information on the upcoming test series can be found here: http://go.nasa.gov/2dS8yXB

  9. 3. SOUTH TEST STAND WITH X15 IN PLACE. A color ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH TEST STAND WITH X-15 IN PLACE. A color photograph taken from a lift boom or from atop a truck, looking northwest to NASA hangars in the far distance. Also shows the shop building at left, and two observation bunkers with hatches open; one at right (Bldg. 1933) and the other in front of Liquid Oxygen tank truck at left (Bldg. 1934). - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Falls classification using tri-axial accelerometers during the five-times-sit-to-stand test.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; Walsh, Cathal; Foran, Timothy; Greene, Barry R; Fan, Chie Wei; Cunningham, Clodagh; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-09-01

    The five-times-sit-to-stand test (FTSS) is an established assessment of lower limb strength, balance dysfunction and falls risk. Clinically, the time taken to complete the task is recorded with longer times indicating increased falls risk. Quantifying the movement using tri-axial accelerometers may provide a more objective and potentially more accurate falls risk estimate. 39 older adults, 19 with a history of falls, performed four repetitions of the FTSS in their homes. A tri-axial accelerometer was attached to the lateral thigh and used to identify each sit-stand-sit phase and sit-stand and stand-sit transitions. A second tri-axial accelerometer, attached to the sternum, captured torso acceleration. The mean and variation of the root-mean-squared amplitude, jerk and spectral edge frequency of the acceleration during each section of the assessment were examined. The test-retest reliability of each feature was examined using intra-class correlation analysis, ICC(2,k). A model was developed to classify participants according to falls status. Only features with ICC>0.7 were considered during feature selection. Sequential forward feature selection within leave-one-out cross-validation resulted in a model including four reliable accelerometer-derived features, providing 74.4% classification accuracy, 80.0% specificity and 68.7% sensitivity. An alternative model using FTSS time alone resulted in significantly reduced classification performance. Results suggest that the described methodology could provide a robust and accurate falls risk assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pilot Field Test: Use of a Compression Garment During a Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Cerisano, J.; Kofman, I.; Reschke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a concern for astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. One countermeasure that has been used to protect against OI after short-duration bed rest and space flight is the use of lower body and abdominal compression garments. However, since the end of the Space Shuttle era we have not been able to test crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing on Earth. NASA's Pilot Field Test provided us the opportunity to test cardiovascular responses of crewmembers wearing the Russian Kentavr compression garment during a stand test at multiple time points throughout the first 24 hours after landing. HYPOTHESIS We hypothesized that the Kentavr compression garment would prevent an increase in heart rate (HR) >15 bpm during a 3.5-min stand test. METHODS: The Pilot Field Test was conducted up to 3 times during the first 24 hours after crewmembers returned to Earth: (1) either in a tent adjacent to the Soyuz landing site in Kazakhstan (approx.1 hr) or after transportation to the Karaganda airport (approx. 4 hr); (2) during a refueling stop in Scotland (approx.12 hr); and (3) upon return to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) (approx.24 hr). We measured HR and arterial pressure (finger photoplethysmography) for 2 min while the crewmember was prone and throughout 3.5 min of quiet standing. Eleven crewmembers consented to participate; however, 2 felt too ill to start the test and 1 stopped 30 sec into the stand portion of the test. Of the remaining 8 crewmembers, 2 did not wear the Russian Kentavr compression garment. Because of inclement weather at the landing site, 5 crewmembers were flown by helicopter to the Karaganda airport before initial testing and received intravenous saline before completing the stand test. One of these crewmembers wore only the portion of the Russian Kentavr compression garment that covered the lower leg and thus lacked thigh and abdominal compression. All crewmembers continued wearing the Russian Kentavr

  12. Design and implementation of a crystal collimation test stand at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirarchi, D.; Hall, G.; Redaelli, S.; Scandale, W.

    2017-06-01

    Future upgrades of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) demand improved cleaning performance of its collimation system. Very efficient collimation is required during regular operations at high intensities, because even a small amount of energy deposited on superconducting magnets can cause an abrupt loss of superconducting conditions (quench). The possibility to use a crystal-based collimation system represents an option for improving both cleaning performance and impedance compared to the present system. Before relying on crystal collimation for the LHC, a demonstration under LHC conditions (energy, beam parameters, etc.) and a comparison against the present system is considered mandatory. Thus, a prototype crystal collimation system has been designed and installed in the LHC during the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), to perform feasibility tests during the Run 2 at energies up to 6.5 TeV. The layout is suitable for operation with proton as well as heavy ion beams. In this paper, the design constraints and the solutions proposed for this test stand for feasibility demonstration of crystal collimation at the LHC are presented. The expected cleaning performance achievable with this test stand, as assessed in simulations, is presented and compared to that of the present LHC collimation system. The first experimental observation of crystal channeling in the LHC at the record beam energy of 6.5 TeV has been obtained in 2015 using the layout presented (Scandale et al., Phys Lett B 758:129, 2016). First tests to measure the cleaning performance of this test stand have been carried out in 2016 and the detailed data analysis is still on-going.

  13. Application of the Life Safety Code to a Historic Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Lemke, Paul R.; Lewis, William L.; Covell, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has conducted a study to assess alternatives to refurbishing existing launch vehicle modal test facilities as opposed to developing new test facilities to meet the demands of a very fiscally constrained test and evaluation environment. The results of this study showed that Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand (TS) 4550 could be made compliant, within reasonable cost and schedule impacts, if safety processes and operational limitations were put in place to meet the safety codes and concerns of the Fire Marshall. Trades were performed with key selection criteria to ensure that appropriate levels of occupant safety are incorporated into test facility design modifications. In preparation for the ground vibration tests that were to be performed on the Ares I launch vehicle, the Ares Flight and Integrated Test Office (FITO) organization evaluated the available test facility options, which included the existing mothballed structural dynamic TS4550 used by Apollo and Shuttle, alternative ground vibration test facilities at other locations, and construction of a new dynamic test stand. After an exhaustive assessment of the alternatives, the results favored modifying the TS4550 because it was the lowest cost option and presented the least schedule risk to the NASA Constellation Program for Ares Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT). As the renovation design plans and drawings were being developed for TS4550, a safety concern was discovered the original design for the construction of the test stand, originally built for the Apollo Program and renovated for the Shuttle Program, was completed before NASA s adoption of the currently imposed safety and building codes per National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code [NFPA 101] and International Building Codes. The initial FITO assessment of the design changes, required to make TS4550 compliant with current safety and building standards, identified a significant cost increase and schedule impact

  14. Characterization of Space Shuttle Reusable Rocket Motor Static Test Stand Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Mart L.; Gruet, Laurent; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) are static tested at two ATK Thiokol Propulsion facilities in Utah, T-24 and T-97. The newer T-97 static test facility was recently upgraded to allow thrust measurement capability. All previous static test motor thrust measurements have been taken at T-24; data from these tests were used to characterize thrust parameters and requirement limits for flight motors. Validation of the new T-97 thrust measurement system is required prior to use for official RSRM performance assessments. Since thrust cannot be measured on RSRM flight motors, flight motor measured chamber pressure and a nominal thrust-to-pressure relationship (based on static test motor thrust and pressure measurements) are used to reconstruct flight motor performance. Historical static test and flight motor performance data are used in conjunction with production subscale test data to predict RSRM performance. The predicted motor performance is provided to support Space Shuttle trajectory and system loads analyses. Therefore, an accurate nominal thrust-to-pressure (F/P) relationship is critical for accurate RSRM flight motor performance and Space Shuttle analyses. Flight Support Motors (FSM) 7, 8, and 9 provided thrust data for the validation of the T-97 thrust measurement system. The T-97 thrust data were analyzed and compared to thrust previously measured at T-24 to verify measured thrust data and identify any test-stand bias. The T-97 FIP data were consistent and within the T-24 static test statistical family expectation. The FSMs 7-9 thrust data met all NASA contract requirements, and the test stand is now verified for future thrust measurements.

  15. Clinical Tests of Standing Balance in the Knee Osteoarthritis Population: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Gillian L.; Morrison, Adam; Wenman, Matthew; Hammond, Connor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) have a high prevalence of falls. Poor standing balance is one risk factor, but the extent of standing balance deficits in people with knee OA is unknown. Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to summarize available data on standing balance in people with knee OA compared with people without knee OA. A secondary purpose was to establish the extent of balance impairment across disease severity. Data Sources A literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases through November 19, 2014, was conducted. Study Selection Studies on individuals with knee OA containing clinical, quantifiable measures of standing balance were included. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 reviewers using a 16-item quality index developed for nonrandomized studies. Studies scoring >50% on the index were included. Data Extraction Participant characteristics (age, sex, body mass index, OA severity, compartment involvement, unilateral versus bilateral disease) and balance outcomes were extracted by 2 reviewers. Standardized mean differences were pooled using a random-effects model. Data Synthesis The search yielded 2,716 articles; 8 met selection and quality assessment criteria. The median score on the quality index was 13/17. People with knee OA consistently performed worse than healthy controls on the Step Test, Single-Leg Stance Test, Functional Reach Test, Tandem Stance Test, and Community Balance and Mobility Scale. The pooled standardized mean difference was −1.64 (95% confidence interval=−2.58, −0.69). No differences were observed between varying degrees of malalignment, or between unilateral versus bilateral disease. Limitations No studies compared between-knee OA severities. Thus, expected changes in balance as the disease progresses remain unknown. Conclusions Few studies compared people with knee OA and healthy controls, but those that did showed that people with knee OA performed

  16. Analysis of Flame Deflector Spray Nozzles in Rocket Engine Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachdev, Jai S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a unified tightly coupled multi-phase computational framework is described for the analysis and design of cooling spray nozzle configurations on the flame deflector in rocket engine test stands. An Eulerian formulation is used to model the disperse phase and is coupled to the gas-phase equations through momentum and heat transfer as well as phase change. The phase change formulation is modeled according to a modified form of the Hertz-Knudsen equation. Various simple test cases are presented to verify the validity of the numerical framework. The ability of the methodology to accurately predict the temperature load on the flame deflector is demonstrated though application to an actual sub-scale test facility. The CFD simulation was able to reproduce the result of the test-firing, showing that the spray nozzle configuration provided insufficient amount of cooling.

  17. Lightning Protection and Structural Bonding for the B2 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    With the privatization of the space industry, NASA has entered a new era. To explore deeper parts of the solar system, NASA is developing a new spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS), capable of reaching these destinations, such as an asteroid or Mars. However, the test stand that is capable of testing the stage has been unused for many years. In addition to the updating/repair of the stand, more steel is being added to fully support the SLS. With all these modifications, the lightning protection system must be brought up to code to assure the protection of all personnel and assets. Structural bonding is a part of the lightning protection system. The focus of this project was to assure proper structural bonding. To begin, all relevant technical standards and the construction specifications were reviewed. This included both the specifications for the lightning protection and for general construction. The drawings were reviewed as well. From the drawings, bolted structural joints were reviewed to determine whether bonding was necessary. Several bolted joints were determined to need bonding according to the notes in the drawings. This exceeds the industry standards. The bolted joints are an electrically continuous joint. During tests, the stand experiences heavy vibration that may weaken the continuity of the bolted joint. Therefore, the secondary bonding is implemented to ensure that the structural joint has low resistance. If the structural joint has a high resistance because of corrosion, a potential gradient can occur that can cause a side flash. Damage, injury, or death can occur from a side flash so they are to be prevented. A list of the identified structural joints was compiled and sent to the contractor to be bonded. That covers the scope of this project.

  18. Green Propellant Test Capabilities of the Altitude Combustion Stand at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubiak, Jonathan M.; Arnett, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is committed to providing simulated altitude rocket test capabilities to NASA programs, other government agencies, private industry partners, and academic partners. A primary facility to support those needs is the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS). ACS provides the capability to test combustion components at a simulated altitude up to 100,000 ft. (approx.0.2 psia/10 Torr) through a nitrogen-driven ejector system. The facility is equipped with an axial thrust stand, gaseous and cryogenic liquid propellant feed systems, data acquisition system with up to 1000 Hz recording, and automated facility control system. Propellant capabilities include gaseous and liquid hydrogen, gaseous and liquid oxygen, and liquid methane. A water-cooled diffuser, exhaust spray cooling chamber, and multi-stage ejector systems can enable run times up to 180 seconds to 16 minutes. The system can accommodate engines up to 2000-lbf thrust, liquid propellant supply pressures up to 1800 psia, and test at the component level. Engines can also be fired at sea level if needed. The NASA GRC is in the process of modifying ACS capabilities to enable the testing of green propellant (GP) thrusters and components. Green propellants are actively being explored throughout government and industry as a non-toxic replacement to hydrazine monopropellants for applications such as reaction control systems or small spacecraft main propulsion systems. These propellants offer increased performance and cost savings over hydrazine. The modification of ACS is intended to enable testing of a wide range of green propellant engines for research and qualification-like testing applications. Once complete, ACS will have the capability to test green propellant engines up to 880 N in thrust, thermally condition the green propellants, provide test durations up to 60 minutes depending on thrust class, provide high speed control and data acquisition, as well as provide advanced imaging and

  19. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  20. The front end test stand high performance H- ion source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, D C; Lawrie, S; Letchford, A P; Gabor, C; Wise, P; Whitehead, M; Wood, T; Westall, M; Findlay, D; Perkins, M; Savage, P J; Lee, D A; Pozimski, J K

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the front end test stand (FETS) project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy beams of high quality can be produced. FETS consists of a 60 mA Penning Surface Plasma Ion Source, a three solenoid low energy beam transport, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, a chopper, and a comprehensive suite of diagnostics. This paper details the design and initial performance of the ion source and the laser profile measurement system. Beam current, profile, and emittance measurements are shown for different operating conditions.

  1. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; ...

    2016-06-06

    Here, we describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). Moreover, this system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. Finally, a gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  2. Ride With Astronauts In Flyby Salute to Marshall Center Test Stand Construction Teams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-27

    NASA astronaut Don Pettit captured this video from the cockpit with Victor Glover as they and fellow astronauts Barry "Butch” Wilmore and Stephanie Wilson banked low over Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Alabama, saluting to teams finishing construction of Test Stand 4697. In the short video edited by Pettit, viewers fly along from the astronauts' takeoff in two NASA T-38 jets from Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base in Houston to their landing at Huntsville International Airport for meetings at Marshall. (NASA/Don Pettit)

  3. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.

    Here, we describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). Moreover, this system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. Finally, a gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  4. Prototypes and system test stands for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    DOE PAGES

    Hasegawa, S.

    2016-04-23

    The CMS pixel phase-1 upgrade project replaces the current pixel detector with an upgraded system with faster readout electronics during the extended year-end technical stop of 2016/2017. New electronics prototypes for the system have been developed, and tests in a realistic environment for a comprehensive evaluation are needed. A full readout test stand with either the same hardware as used in the current CMS pixel detector or the latest prototypes of upgrade electronics has been built. The setup enables the observation and investigation of a jitter increase in the data line associated with trigger rate increases. This effect is duemore » to the way in which the clock and trigger distribution is implemented in CMS. A new prototype of the electronics with a PLL based on a voltage controlled quartz crystal oscillator (QPLL), which works as jitter filter, in the clock distribution path was produced. With the test stand, it was confirmed that the jitter increase is not seen with the prototype, and also good performance was confirmed at the expected detector operation temperature ($-$20 °C).« less

  5. Superconducting focusing lenses for the SSR-1 cryomodule of PXIE test stand at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Terechkine, I.

    Five solenoid-based focusing lenses designed for use inside the SSR1 cryomodule of the PXIE test stand at Fermilab have been fabricated and tested. In addition to a focusing solenoid, each lens is equipped with a set of windings that generate magnetic field in the transverse plane and can be used in the steering dipole mode or as a skew quadrupole corrector. The lenses will be installed between superconducting cavities in the cryomodule, so getting sufficiently low fringe magnetic field was one of the main design requirements. Beam dynamics simulations indicated a need for high accuracy positioning of the lenses inmore » the cryomodule, which triggered a study towards understanding uncertainties of the magnetic axis position relative to the geometric features of the lens. Furthermore, this report summarizes the efforts towards certification of the lenses, including results of performance tests, fringe field data, and uncertainty of the magnetic axis position.« less

  6. Superconducting focusing lenses for the SSR-1 cryomodule of PXIE test stand at Fermilab

    DOE PAGES

    DiMarco, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Terechkine, I.

    2016-12-05

    Five solenoid-based focusing lenses designed for use inside the SSR1 cryomodule of the PXIE test stand at Fermilab have been fabricated and tested. In addition to a focusing solenoid, each lens is equipped with a set of windings that generate magnetic field in the transverse plane and can be used in the steering dipole mode or as a skew quadrupole corrector. The lenses will be installed between superconducting cavities in the cryomodule, so getting sufficiently low fringe magnetic field was one of the main design requirements. Beam dynamics simulations indicated a need for high accuracy positioning of the lenses inmore » the cryomodule, which triggered a study towards understanding uncertainties of the magnetic axis position relative to the geometric features of the lens. Furthermore, this report summarizes the efforts towards certification of the lenses, including results of performance tests, fringe field data, and uncertainty of the magnetic axis position.« less

  7. Pilot Field Test: Performance of a Sit-to-Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. Yu; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronauts returning from the International Space Station are met by a team of recovery personnel typically providing physical assistance and medical support immediately upon landing. That is because long-duration spaceflight impacts astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond the low Earth orbit, however, may require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration class missions. Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment conducted with participation of ISS crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. METHODS: The first test in the PFT battery sequence, and also the least demanding one from the sensorimotor perspective, was a Sit-to-Stand test. Test subjects were seated in the chair and had to stand up on command and remain standing for ten seconds. The subjects were instructed to stand up unassisted as quickly as they were able to, while maintaining postural control. Synchronized wireless inertial sensors mounted on the head, chest, lower back, wrists, and ankles were used to continuously log body kinematics. Crewmembers' blood pressure and heart rate were monitored and recorded with the Portapres and Polar systems. Each session was recorded with a digital video camera. During data collections occurring within the 24-hour postflight period, crewmembers were also asked to (1) evaluate their perceived motion sickness symptoms on a 20-point scale before and after completion of the test and (2) estimate how heavy they felt compared to their normal (preflight) body weight. Consent to participate in PFT was obtained from 18 crewmembers (11 US Orbital Segment [USOS] astronauts and 7

  8. The study of fix composite panel and steel plates on testing stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.; Płaczek, M.; Wachna, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the practical possibilities of strength verification analysis of composite materials used in the manufacture of selected components of railway wagons are presented. Real laboratory stand for measurements in a scale controlled by PLC controller were made. The study of different types of connections of composite materials with sheet metal is presented. In one of the chapter of this paper principles construction of testing stand with pneumatic cylinder were presented. Mainly checking of displacements and stresses generated on the sheet as a result of pneumatic actuators load for composite boards was carried out. The use of the controller with operating panel allows to easy programming testing cycle. The user can define the force generated by the actuator by change of air pressure in cylinder. Additionally the location of acting cylinders and their jump can be changed by operator. The examination of the volume displacements was done by displacement sensor, and the tensile strain gauge. All parameters are written in CatmanEasy - data acquisition software. This article presents the study of stresses and displacements in the composite plates joined with sheet metal, in summary of this article, the authors compare the obtained results with the computer simulation results in the article: "Simulation of stresses in an innovative combination of composite with sheet".

  9. Simulated stand tests and centrifuge training to prevent orthostatic intolerance on Earth, moon, and Mars.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brandon W; Sharp, M Keith

    2010-03-01

    One proposed method to overcome postflight orthostatic intolerance is for astronauts to undergo inflight centrifugation. Cardiovascular responses were compared between centrifuge and gravitational conditions using a seven-compartment cardiovascular model. Vascular resistance, heart rate, and stroke volume values were adopted from literature, while compartmental volumes and compliances were derived from impedance plethysmography of subjects (n=8) riding on a centrifuge. Three different models were developed to represent the typical male subject who completed a 10-min postflight stand test ("male finisher"), "non-finishing male" and "female" (all non-finishers). A sensitivity analysis found that both cardiac output and arterial pressure were most sensitive to total blood volume. Simulated stand tests showed that female astronauts were more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance due to lower initial blood pressure and higher pressure threshold for presyncope. Rates of blood volume loss by capillary filtration were found to be equivalent in female and male non-finishers, but four times smaller in male finishers. For equivalent times to presyncope during centrifugation as those during constant gravity, lower G forces at the level of the heart were required. Centrifuge G levels to match other cardiovascular parameters varied depending on the parameter, centrifuge arm length, and the gravity level being matched.

  10. Test stand for precise measurement of impulse and thrust vector of small attitude control jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, J. R.; Chisel, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A test stand which accurately measures the impulse bit and thrust vector of reaction jet thrusters used in the attitude control system of space vehicles has been developed. It can be used to measure, in a vacuum or ambient environment, both impulse and thrust vector of reaction jet thrusters using hydrazine or inert gas propellants. The ballistic pendulum configuration was selected because of its accuracy, simplicity, and versatility. The pendulum is mounted on flexure pivots rotating about a vertical axis at the center of its mass. The test stand has the following measurement capabilities: impulse of 0.00004 to 4.4 N-sec (0.00001 to 1.0 lb-sec) with a pulse duration of 0.5 msec to 1 sec; static thrust of 0.22 to 22 N (0.05 to 5 lb) with a 5 percent resolution; and thrust angle alinement of 0.22 to 22 N (0.05 to 5 lb) thrusters with 0.01 deg accuracy.

  11. Test stand performance of a convertible engine for advanced V/STOL and rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed V/STOL and rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque.

  12. Test stand performance of a convertible engine for advanced V/STOL and rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.

    1988-01-01

    A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed V/STOL and rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque.

  13. Standing wave performance test of IDT-SAW transducer prepared by silk-screen printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziping; Jiang, Zhengxuan; Chen, Liangbin; Li, Yefei; Li, Meixia; Wang, Shaohan

    2018-05-01

    With the advantages of high performance and low loss, interdigital surface acoustic wave (IDT-SAW) transducers are widely used in the fields of nondestructive testing, communication and broadcasting. The production, performance and application of surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuators has become a research hotspot. Based on the basic principle of SAW, an IDT-SAW transducer is designed and fabricated using silk-screen printing in this work. The experiment results show that in terms of SAW performance, the fabricated IDT-SAW transducer can generate standing wave fields comparable to those generated using traditional fabrication methods. The resonant frequency response of the IDT-SAW transducer and SAW attenuation coefficient were obtained by experiments. It has provided a method to test the transducer sensing performance by using fabricated IDT-SAW transducer.

  14. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Thomas M. Schuler; David A. Marquis; Richard L. Ernst; Brian T. Simpson; Brian T. Simpson

    1993-01-01

    Evaluates SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM, simulators commonly used in the northeastern United States, by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER...

  15. Universal computer test stand (recommended computer test requirements). [for space shuttle computer evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Techniques are considered which would be used to characterize areospace computers with the space shuttle application as end usage. The system level digital problems which have been encountered and documented are surveyed. From the large cross section of tests, an optimum set is recommended that has a high probability of discovering documented system level digital problems within laboratory environments. Defined is a baseline hardware, software system which is required as a laboratory tool to test aerospace computers. Hardware and software baselines and additions necessary to interface the UTE to aerospace computers for test purposes are outlined.

  16. Comparison between Standing Broad Jump test and Wingate test for assessing lower limb anaerobic power in elite sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anup; Sharma, Deep; Bhatt, Madhu; Dixit, Apoorv; Pradeep, P

    2017-04-01

    Lower limb explosive power is an important motor quality for sporting performance and indicates use of anaerobic energy systems like stored ATP and Creatine phosphate system. Weightlifting, Fencing and Wrestling use it for monitoring and identification of potential sportsmen. The Wingate test and Standing Broad Jump (SBJ) test are reliable and accurate tests for its assessment. This study conducted on elite Indian sportsmen tries to analyse feasibility of use of the SBJ test in sports and military medicine when Wingate test is impractical. 95 elite sportsmen (51 Fencers, 17 Weight lifters and 27 Wrestlers) of a sports institute were administered Wingate cycle ergometer test and SBJ under standardised conditions. The results were analysed for mass and inter-discipline correlation. Analysis using Pearson's correlation showed significant positive correlation between Peak power ( r  = 0.446, p  < 0.0001) and SBJ (distance) in all sportsmen. Inter-sport correlation showed positive correlation between SBJ and peak power ( r  = 0.335, p  < 0.016) in Fencers and between SBJ, peak power ( r  = 0.686, p  < 0.002) in Weightlifters. Bland-Altman plot analysis showed that about 94% pairs of peak power and SBJ were within limits of agreement for each discipline as well as among all sportsmen. The test results show definite correlation and SBJ test can be used as a field test in performance monitoring, talent identification, military recruit screening and injury prevention.

  17. The Canadian SSRMS is moved to test stand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility help guide the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) suspended from an overhead crane. The SSRMS is being moved to a test stand where it will be mated to its payload carrier. This pallet will later be installed into the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch to the International Space Station on STS-100 in April 2001. The 56-foot-long arm will be the primary means of transferring payloads between the orbiter payload bay and the Station. Its three segments comprise seven joints for highly flexible land precise movement, making it capable of moving around the Station's exterior like an inchworm.

  18. Refuge alternatives relief valve testing and design with updated test stand.

    PubMed

    Lutz, T J; Bissert, P T; Homce, G T; Yonkey, J A

    2018-03-01

    Underground refuge alternatives require an air source to supply breathable air to the occupants. This requires pressure relief valves to prevent unsafe pressures from building up within the refuge alternative. The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) mandates that pressure relief valves prevent pressure from exceeding 1.25 kPa (0.18 psi), or as specified by the manufacturer, above mine atmospheric pressure when a fan or compressor is used for the air supply. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tested a variety of pressure relief valves using an instrumented test fixture consisting of data acquisition equipment, a centrifugal blower, ductwork and various sensors to determine if the subject pressure relief valves meet the MSHA requirement. Relief pressures and flow characteristics, including opening pressure and flow rate, were measured for five different pressure relief valves under a variety of conditions. The subject pressure relief valves included two off-the-shelf modified check valves, two check valves used in MSHA-approved built-in-place refuge alternatives, and a commercially available valve that was designed for a steel refuge alternative and is currently being used in some built-in-place refuge alternatives. The test results showed relief pressures ranging from 0.20 to 1.53 kPa (0.03 to 0.22 psi) and flow rates up to 19.3 m 3 /min (683 scfm). As tested, some of the pressure relief valves did not meet the 1.25 kPa (0.18 psi) relief specification.

  19. Refuge alternatives relief valve testing and design with updated test stand

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, T.J.; Bissert, P.T.; Homce, G.T.; Yonkey, J.A.

    2018-01-01

    Underground refuge alternatives require an air source to supply breathable air to the occupants. This requires pressure relief valves to prevent unsafe pressures from building up within the refuge alternative. The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) mandates that pressure relief valves prevent pressure from exceeding 1.25 kPa (0.18 psi), or as specified by the manufacturer, above mine atmospheric pressure when a fan or compressor is used for the air supply. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tested a variety of pressure relief valves using an instrumented test fixture consisting of data acquisition equipment, a centrifugal blower, ductwork and various sensors to determine if the subject pressure relief valves meet the MSHA requirement. Relief pressures and flow characteristics, including opening pressure and flow rate, were measured for five different pressure relief valves under a variety of conditions. The subject pressure relief valves included two off-the-shelf modified check valves, two check valves used in MSHA-approved built-in-place refuge alternatives, and a commercially available valve that was designed for a steel refuge alternative and is currently being used in some built-in-place refuge alternatives. The test results showed relief pressures ranging from 0.20 to 1.53 kPa (0.03 to 0.22 psi) and flow rates up to 19.3 m3/min (683 scfm). As tested, some of the pressure relief valves did not meet the 1.25 kPa (0.18 psi) relief specification. PMID:29563650

  20. Small-Scale Hybrid Rocket Test Stand & Characterization of Swirl Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Matt H.

    Derived from the necessity to increase testing capabilities of hybrid rocket motor (HRM) propulsion systems for Daedalus Astronautics at Arizona State University, a small-scale motor and test stand were designed and developed to characterize all components of the system. The motor is designed for simple integration and setup, such that both the forward-end enclosure and end cap can be easily removed for rapid integration of components during testing. Each of the components of the motor is removable allowing for a broad range of testing capabilities. While examining injectors and their potential it is thought ideal to obtain the highest regression rates and overall motor performance possible. The oxidizer and fuel are N2O and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), respectively, due to previous experience and simplicity. The injector designs, selected for the same reasons, are designed such that they vary only in the swirl angle. This system provides the platform for characterizing the effects of varying said swirl angle on HRM performance.

  1. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  2. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operationalmore » modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.« less

  3. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  4. Safety and diagnostic systems on the Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. A.; Jaworski, M. A.; Ellis, R.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS) is a test bed for development of flowing liquid lithium systems for plasma-facing components at PPPL. LLTS is designed to test operation of liquid lithium under vacuum, including flowing, solidifying (such as would be the case at the end of plasma operations), and re-melting. Constructed of stainless steel, LLTS is a closed loop of pipe with two reservoirs and a pump, as well as diagnostics for temperature, flow rate, and pressure. Since liquid lithium is a highly reactive material, special care must be taken when designing such a system. These include a permanent-magnet MHD pump and MHD flow meter that have no mechanical components in direct contact with the liquid lithium. The LLTS also includes an expandable 24-channel leak-detector interlock system which cuts power to heaters and the pump if any lithium leaks from a pipe joint. Design for the interlock systems and flow meter are presented. This work is supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Mechanical Design, Simulation, and Testing of Self-Aligning Gaussian Telescope and Stand for ITER LFS Reflectometer Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, Rachel; Gomez, Michael; Zolfaghari, Ali; Morris, Lewis

    2016-10-01

    A self-aligning Gaussian telescope has been designed to compensate for the effect of movement in the ITER vacuum vessel on the transmission line. The purpose of the setup is to couple microwaves into and out of the vessel across the vacuum windows while allowing for both slow movements of the vessel, due to thermal growth, and rapid movements, due to vibrations and disruptions. Additionally, a test stand has been designed specifically to hold this telescope in order to imitate these movements. Consequently, this will allow for the assessment of the efficacy in applying the self-aligning Gaussian telescope approach. The motions of the test stand, as well as the stress on the telescope mechanism, have been virtually simulated using ANSYS workbench. A prototype of this test stand and self-aligning telescope will be built using a combination of custom machined parts and ordered parts. The completed mechanism will be tested at the lab in four different ways: slow single- and multi-direction movements, rapid multi-direction movement, functional laser alignment and self-aligning tests, and natural frequency tests. Once the prototype successfully passes all requirements, it will be tested with microwaves in the LFSR transmission line test stand at General Atomics. This work is supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Orthostatic function during a stand test before and after head-up or head-down bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Diamandis, Peter H.; Riddle, Jeanne M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Elton, Kay F.; Bungo, Michael W.; Charles, John B.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of head-down or head-up bedrest at -5, +10, +20, or +42 deg (simulating 0, 1/6, 1/3, and 2/3 g, respectively) for 6 hrs on four different days on the orthostatic tolerance were investigated by measuring relevant physiological reactions to orthostatic test taken before and after bedrest sessions. The multivariate analysis of variance statistical analyses indicates that there was no angle effect on any of the cardiovascular parameters monitored during the last 3 min of the stand test, suggesting that partial gravity loads would have no effect on the cardiovascular deconditioning exhibited postflight. There was, however, a significant elevation in the heart rate post-bedrest, and the heart rate increased on standing. Results from the stand test pre- and post-bedrest at -5 deg (but not at +10, +20, and +42 deg) were similar to those observed after space flight.

  7. Erection of a Centaur Standard Shroud at Plum Brook Station’s B-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-08-21

    A section of the Centaur Standard Shroud transported to Nuclear Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility, or B-3 Test Stand, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station. B-3 was built in the early 1960s to test full-scale liquid hydrogen fuel systems in simulated altitude conditions. The facility was used in 1972, however, for testing of the Centaur Standard Shroud’s ejection system. In the late 1960s NASA engineers were planning the ambitious new Viking mission to send two rover vehicles to the surface of Mars. The Viking rovers were the heaviest payloads ever attempted and were over three times the weight of Atlas-Centaur’s previous heaviest payload. Consequently, NASA engineers selected the more powerful the Titan III rocket booster to mate with the Centaur. Concurrently, General Dynamics was in the process of introducing a new Centaur model for Titan—the D-1T. The biggest change for the D-1T was a completely new shroud designed by Lockheed, called the Centaur Standard Shroud. The shroud, its insulation, the Centaur ground-hold purge system, and the hydrogen tank venting system were all studied in B-3. After more than two years of preparations, the tests were run between April and July 1973. The tests determined the ultimate flight loads on two axes, established the Centaur’s load sharing, the level of propellant boiloff during launch holds, and the vent system capacity. The Centaur Standard Shroud performed flawlessly during the August 20 and September 9, 1975 launches of Viking 1 and 2.

  8. Five times sit-to-stand test in subjects with total knee replacement: Reliability and relationship with functional mobility tests.

    PubMed

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Vivo-Fernández, Iván; López-Cañizares, Juan; García-Vidal, José A; Benítez-Martínez, Josep Carles; Del Baño-Aledo, María Elena

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to determine the inter-observer and test/retest reliability of the "Five-repetition sit-to-stand" (5STS) test in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). To explore correlation between 5STS and two mobility tests. A reliability study was conducted among 24 (mean age 72.13, S.D. 10.67; 50% were women) outpatients with TKR. They were recruited from a traumatology unit of a public hospital via convenience sampling. A physiotherapist and trauma physician assessed each patient at the same time. The same physiotherapist realized a 5STS second measurement 45-60min after the first one. Reliability was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots. Pearson coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between 5STS, time up to go test (TUG) and four meters gait speed (4MGS). ICC for inter-observer and test-retest reliability of the 5STS were 0.998 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.995-0.999) and 0.982 (95% CI, 0.959-0.992). Bland-Altman plot inter-observer showed limits between -0.82 and 1.06 with a mean of 0.11 and no heteroscedasticity within the data. Bland-Altman plot for test-retest showed the limits between 1.76 and 4.16, a mean of 1.20 and heteroscedasticity within the data. Pearson correlation coefficient revealed significant correlation between 5STS and TUG (r=0.7, p<0.001) and 4MGS (r=-0.583, p=0.003). This study demonstrates excellent inter-observer and test-retest reliability when it is used in people with TKR, and also significant correlation with other functional mobility tests. These findings support the use of 5STS as outcome measure in TKR population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Developments in Test Facility and Data Networking for the Altitude Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center: A General Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Phillip W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA/SSC's Mission in Rocket Propulsion Testing Is to Acquire Test Performance Data for Verification, Validation and Qualification of Propulsion Systems Hardware: Accurate, Reliable, Comprehensive, and Timely. Data Acquisition in a Rocket Propulsion Test Environment Is Challenging: a) Severe Temporal Transient Dynamic Environments; b) Large Thermal Gradients; c) Vacuum to high pressure regimes. A-3 Test Stand Development is equally challenging with respect to accommodating vacuum environment, operation of a CSG system, and a large quantity of data system and control channels to determine proper engine performance as well as Test Stand operation. SSC is currently in the process of providing modernized DAS, Control Systems, Video, and network systems for the A-3 Test Stand to overcome these challenges.

  10. Effect of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction on unipedal standing balance test.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Kornelia; Lee, Szu-Ping; Reischl, Stephen F; Noceti-DeWit, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Foot pain and diminished functional capacity are characteristics of tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). This study tested the hypotheses that women with TPTD would have impaired performance of a unipedal standing balance test (USBT) and that balance performance would be related to the number of single limb heel raises (SLHR). Thirty-nine middle-aged women, 19 with early stage TPTD (stage I and II), were instructed to perform 2 tasks; a USBT and repeated SLHR. Balance success was defined as a 10-second stance. For those who were successful, center of pressure (COP) data in anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions were recorded as a measure of postural sway. SLHR performance was divided into 3 bins (≤2; 3-9 and > 10 repetitions). The between-balance success on performing the SLHR test was analyzed using the Fisher's exact test (2 × 3). Independent t tests were used to compare between-group differences in postural sway. Relationship of postural sway to the number of heel raises was assessed using Spearman's rho. The success rate of the USBT was significantly lower in women with TPTD than the controls (47% vs 85%, P = .041). In addition, women with TPTD who completed the USBT exhibited increased AP COP displacement (14.0 ± 7.4 vs 8.4 ± 1.3 mm, P = .008), and a strong trend of increased ML COP displacement (8.3 ± 4.5 vs 6.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = .050). The success rate of USBT was correlated with the number of SLHR (P = .01). The AP and ML COP displacement were correlated with SLHR (r = -.538 and .495), respectively. Women with TPTD have difficulty in performing the USBT. Performance of the USBT and SLHR are highly correlated and predictive of each other. A unipedal balance test may be used as a proxy TPTD assessment tool to the heel raising test when pain prevents performance. Level III, case control study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Characterizing the Performance of the Princeton Advanced Test Stand Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Davidson, R. C.

    2012-10-01

    The Princeton Advanced Test Stand (PATS) is a compact experimental facility for studying the physics of intense beam-plasma interactions relevant to the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - II (NDCX-II). The PATS facility consists of a multicusp RF ion source mounted on a 2 m-long vacuum chamber with numerous ports for diagnostic access. Ar+ beams are extracted from the source plasma with three-electrode (accel-decel) extraction optics. The RF power and extraction voltage (30 - 100 kV) are pulsed to produce 100 μsec duration beams at 0.5 Hz with excellent shot-to-shot repeatability. Diagnostics include Faraday cups, a double-slit emittance scanner, and scintillator imaging. This work reports measurements of beam parameters for a range of beam energies (30 - 50 keV) and currents to characterize the behavior of the ion source and extraction optics. Emittance scanner data is used to calculate the beam trace-space distribution and corresponding transverse emittance. If the plasma density is changing during a beam pulse, time-resolved emittance scanner data has been taken to study the corresponding evolution of the beam trace-space distribution.

  12. Beam-Plasma Interaction Experiments on the Princeton Advanced Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Princeton Advanced Test Stand (PATS) is a compact experimental facility for studying the fundamental physics of intense beam-plasma interactions relevant to the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - II (NDCX-II). The PATS facility consists of a 100 keV ion beam source mounted on a six-foot-long vacuum chamber with numerous ports for diagnostic access. A 100 keV Ar+ beam is launched into a volumetric plasma, which is produced by a ferroelectric plasma source (FEPS). Beam diagnostics upstream and downstream of the FEPS allow for detailed studies of the effects that the plasma has on the beam. This setup is designed for studying the dependence of charge and current neutralization and beam emittance growth on the beam and plasma parameters. This work reports initial measurements of beam quality produced by the extraction electrodes that were recently installed on the PATS device. The transverse beam phase space is measured with double-slit emittance scanners, and the experimental results are compared to WARP simulations of the extraction system. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 1010 cm-2 (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  14. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand.

    PubMed

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10(10) cm(-2) (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  15. Method for experimental investigation of transient operation on Laval test stand for model size turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, R.; Coulaud, M.; Aeschlimann, V.; Lemay, J.; Deschenes, C.

    2016-11-01

    With the growing proportion of inconstant energy source as wind and solar, hydroelectricity becomes a first class source of peak energy in order to regularize the grid. The important increase of start - stop cycles may then cause a premature ageing of runners by both a higher number of cycles in stress fluctuations and by reaching a higher stress level in absolute. Aiming to sustain good quality development on fully homologous scale model turbines, the Hydraulic Machines Laboratory (LAMH) of Laval University has developed a methodology to operate model size turbines on transient regimes such as start-up, stop or load rejection on its test stand. This methodology allows maintaining a constant head while the wicket gates are opening or closing in a representative speed on the model scale of what is made on the prototype. This paper first presents the opening speed on model based on dimensionless numbers, the methodology itself and its application. Then both its limitation and the first results using a bulb turbine are detailed.

  16. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ˜10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132-300 tungsten wires with 5-10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (˜50 TW) and total radiated energy (˜500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  17. A field test of point relascope sampling of down coarse woody material in managed stands in the Acadian Forest

    Treesearch

    John C. Brissette; Mark J. Ducey; Jeffrey H. Gove

    2003-01-01

    We field tested a new method for sampling down coarse woody material (CWM) using an angle gauge and compared it with the more traditional line intersect sampling (LIS) method. Permanent sample locations in stands managed with different silvicultural treatments within the Penobscot Experimental Forest (Maine, USA) were used as the sampling locations. Point relascope...

  18. Test-retest reliability of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit analysis in people with and without chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Rasool; Jannati, Elham

    2018-06-01

    Sit-to-stand (STD) and stand-to-sit (SIT) analysis can provide information on functional independence in daily activities in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, in order for measurements to be clinically useful, data on psychometric properties should be available. The main purpose was to investigate intra-rater reliability of STD and SIT tasks in participants with and without chronic non-specific LBP (CNLBP). The second purpose was to detect any differences in lumbar spine and hips sagittal plane kinematics and coordination between asymptomatic individuals and CNLBP patients during STD and SIT. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-three CNLBP patients and 23 demographically-matched controls were recruited. Ten markers were placed on specific anatomical landmarks. Participants were asked to perform STD and SIT at a preferred speed. Peak flexion angles, mean angular velocities, lumbar to hip movement ratios, and relative phase angles were measured. The procedure was repeated after 2 h and 6-8 days. Differences between two groups were analyzed using independent t-test. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 3,k), standard error of measurement (SEM), and limits of agreement (LOAs) were also estimated. The ICC values showed moderate to excellent intra-rater reliability, with relatively low SEM values (≤10.17°). The 95% LOAs demonstrated that there were no differences between the measured parameters. Furthermore, CNLBP patients had limited sagittal plane angles, smaller angular velocities, and lumbar-hip dis-coordination compared to asymptomatic participants. The results indicated moderate to excellent test-retest reliability of STD and SIT analysis. Moreover, CNLBP patients had altered kinematics during STD and its reverse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Best Protocol for the Sit-to-Stand Test in Subjects With COPD.

    PubMed

    Morita, Andrea A; Bisca, Gianna W; Machado, Felipe V C; Hernandes, Nidia A; Pitta, Fabio; Probst, Vanessa S

    2018-05-22

    Different protocols for the sit-to-stand test (STS) are available for assessing functional capacity in COPD. We sought to correlate each protocol of the STS (ie, the 5-repetition [5-rep STS], the 30-s STS, and the 1-min STS) with clinical outcomes in subjects with COPD. We also aimed to compare the 3 protocols of the STS, to verify their association and agreement, and to verify whether the 3 protocols are able to predict functional exercise capacity and physical activity in daily life (PADL). 23 subjects with COPD (11 men; FEV 1 53 ± 15% predicted) performed 3 protocols of the STS. Subjects also underwent the following assessments: incremental shuttle walking test, 6-min walk test (6MWT), 4-m gait speed test (4MGS), 1-repetition maximum of quadriceps muscle, assessment of PADL, and questionnaires on health-related quality of life and functional status. The 1-min STS showed significant correlations with the 6MWT (r = 0.40), 4MGS (r = 0.64), and PADL (0.40 ≤ r ≤ 0.52), and the 5-rep STS and 30-s STS were associated with the 4MGS (r = 0.54 and r = 0.52, respectively). The speed differed for each protocol (5-rep STS 0.53 ± 0.16 rep/s, 30-s STS 0.48 ± 0.13 rep/s, 1-min STS 0.45 ± 0.11 rep/s, P = .01). However, they presented good agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.73 for all) and correlated well with each other (r ≥ 0.68 for all). More marked changes in peripheral oxygen saturation ( P = .004), heart rate ( P < .001), blood pressure ( P < .001), dyspnea ( P < .001), and leg fatigue ( P < .001) were found after the 1-min STS protocol. Furthermore, the 3 protocols were equally able to identify subjects with low exercise capacity or preserved exercise capacity. The 1-min STS generated higher hemodynamic demands and correlated better with clinical outcomes in subjects with COPD. Despite the difference in speed performance and physiological demands between the 5-rep STS and 1-min STS, there was a good level of agreement among the 3 protocols. In

  20. Refined nomogram incorporating standing cough test improves prediction of male transobturator sling success.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Nabeel A; Fuchs, Joceline S; McKibben, Maxim J; Viers, Boyd R; Pagliara, Travis J; Scott, Jeremy M; Morey, Allen F

    2018-05-01

    To develop a decision aid in predicting sling success, incorporating the Male Stress Incontinence Grading Scale (MSIGS) into existing treatment algorithms. We reviewed men undergoing first-time transobturator sling for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from 2007 to 2016 at our institution. Patient demographics, reported pads per day (PPD), and Standing Cough Test (SCT) results graded 0-4, according to MSIGS, were assessed. Treatment failure was defined as subsequent need for >1 PPD or further procedures. Parameters associated with failure were included in multivariable logistic models, compared by area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves. A nomogram was generated from the model with greatest AUC and internally validated. Overall 203 men (median age 67 years, IQR 63-72) were evaluated with median follow-up of 45 months (IQR 11-75 months). A total of 185 men (91%) were status-post radical prostatectomy and 29 (14%) had pelvic radiation history. Median PPD and SCT grade were both two. Eighty men (39%) failed treatment (use of ≥1 PPD or subsequent anti-incontinence procedures) at a median of 9 months. History of radiation (P = 0.03), increasing MSIGS (P < 0.0001) and increasing preoperative PPD (P < 0.0001) were associated with failure on univariate analysis. In a multivariable model with AUC 0.81, MSIGS, and PPD remained associated (P = 0.002 and <0.0001 respectively, and radiation history P = 0.06), and was superior to models incorporating PPD and radiation alone (AUC 0.77, P = 0.02), PPD alone (AUC 0.76, P = 0.02), and a cutpoint of >2 PPD alone (AUC 0.71, P = 0.0001). MSIGS adds prognostic value to PPD in assessing success of transobturator sling for treatment of SUI. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Test stand for gas-discharge chamber of TEA CO2 lasers with pulse-periodical energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorin, Vladimyr P.; Bystrov, N. D.; Zhuravlyov, O. A.; Nekrasov, V. V.

    1997-05-01

    Test stand for function optimization (incomposition of gas- dynamic circuit (GDC) of operating characteristics of full- size discharge chamber of flowing TEA carbon-dioxide lasers (power up to 100 kW) was created in Samara State Aerospace University (former Kuibyshev Aviation Institute). Test stand includes an inside-type GDC, low inductive generators of voltage pulses of preionization and main discharges, two-flow rate system of gas supply and noise immunity diagnostic system. Module construction of units of GDC, power supplies of preionization and main discharges allows to change configuration of stand's systems for providing given properties of gas flow and its energy supply. This test stand can also be used in servicing of laser system. The diagnostic system of this stand allows us to analyze energy properties of discharge by means of oscillographic measurements of voltage and current with following processing of discharges' volt- ampere characteristics by means of a computer; rate of non- stationary gas-dynamic disturbances in discharge gap of discharge chamber was measured by means of pulse holographic system (UlG-1M) with data processing of schliren- and interferogram (density fluctuation sensitivity approximately 10-2) and sensor measurement system of gas-dynamic shock and acoustics process with resonance frequency exceeding 100 kHz. Research results of process of plasma plate wave and channel structures interaction with mediums, including actuation non-stationary gas-dynamic flows, cavitation erosion of preionization electrodes' dielectric substructure, ancillary heating of channels by main volumetric discharge are presented as well.

  2. A Test Stand to Characterize and Contribute to the Development of DEPFET X-ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Abe

    The field of X-ray astronomy is currently looking forward to several new missions (e.g Athena, BeppiColumbo, and IXPE which is a new SMEX polarimeter), and there is the possibility of a flag-ship mission (e.g. the Lynx X-ray Surveyor) and/or other SMEX through probe class missions in the long-term future with many mission concepts being developed (e.g. ARCUS). The X-ray detec-tors for these future missions must be developed to suitable maturity to be proposed for flight, and expertise operating the newest versions of the detectors must be acquired by potential mis-sion designers and proposers. There are several silicon X-ray imaging active pixel sensor (APS) detectors being developed at this time (hybrid CMOS, monolithic CMOS, and DEPFETs), and each of these have their own advantages and levels of maturity, while they all provide enhanced radia-tion hardness, lower power operation, and versatile readout modes. Of the new APS X-ray detec-tors being developed, the DEPleted p-channel Field Effect Transistors (DEPFETs) have exhibited the best noise performance to-date. While they do require larger pixel structures than their com-petitors, the low noise performance of these detectors makes them an excellent choice for many mission applications (e.g. they will be launched on 2 ESA missions, Athena & BepiColumbo), and their further development could benefit other missions, particularly future missions that might be led by NASA and US scientists. Up until now, the development of these detectors has been lim-ited to only two groups located in Germany; one group is at Max Planck Institute and the other is PNSensors which is comprised of engineers and scientists that previously led the DEPFET design work at Max Planck. We propose to engage one of these groups in order to: (a) acquire newly de-signed test DEPFET detectors built by PNSensor, through a very-low-cost arrangement, (b) build a test stand that can operate these detectors and gain valuable experience running them in

  3. iPhone Sensors in Tracking Outcome Variables of the 30-Second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test to Evaluate Disability: Cross-Sectional Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A; Schultz, Brooke; Popovic, Tijana; Souza, Richard B; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Background Performance tests are important to characterize patient disabilities and functional changes. The Osteoarthritis Research Society International and others recommend the 30-second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test, among others, as core tests that capture two distinct types of disability during activities of daily living. However, these two tests are limited by current protocols of testing in clinics. There is a need for an alternative that allows remote testing of functional capabilities during these tests in the osteoarthritis patient population. Objective Objectives are to (1) develop an app for testing the functionality of an iPhone’s accelerometer and gravity sensor and (2) conduct a pilot study objectively evaluating the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of outcome variables obtained from these sensors during the 30-second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test. Methods An iOS app was developed with data collection capabilities from the built-in iPhone accelerometer and gravity sensor tools and linked to Google Firebase. A total of 24 subjects performed the 30-second Chair Stand Test with an iPhone accelerometer collecting data and an external rater manually counting sit-to-stand repetitions. A total of 21 subjects performed the Stair Climb Test with an iPhone gravity sensor turned on and an external rater timing the duration of the test on a stopwatch. App data from Firebase were converted into graphical data and exported into MATLAB for data filtering. Multiple iterations of a data processing algorithm were used to increase robustness and accuracy. MATLAB-generated outcome variables were compared to the manually determined outcome variables of each test. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (PCCs), Bland-Altman plots, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement, and repeatability coefficients were generated to evaluate criterion validity, agreement, and test-retest reliability of iPhone sensor data

  4. iPhone Sensors in Tracking Outcome Variables of the 30-Second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test to Evaluate Disability: Cross-Sectional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Adusumilli, Gautam; Joseph, Solomon Eben; Samaan, Michael A; Schultz, Brooke; Popovic, Tijana; Souza, Richard B; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2017-10-27

    Performance tests are important to characterize patient disabilities and functional changes. The Osteoarthritis Research Society International and others recommend the 30-second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test, among others, as core tests that capture two distinct types of disability during activities of daily living. However, these two tests are limited by current protocols of testing in clinics. There is a need for an alternative that allows remote testing of functional capabilities during these tests in the osteoarthritis patient population. Objectives are to (1) develop an app for testing the functionality of an iPhone's accelerometer and gravity sensor and (2) conduct a pilot study objectively evaluating the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of outcome variables obtained from these sensors during the 30-second Chair Stand Test and Stair Climb Test. An iOS app was developed with data collection capabilities from the built-in iPhone accelerometer and gravity sensor tools and linked to Google Firebase. A total of 24 subjects performed the 30-second Chair Stand Test with an iPhone accelerometer collecting data and an external rater manually counting sit-to-stand repetitions. A total of 21 subjects performed the Stair Climb Test with an iPhone gravity sensor turned on and an external rater timing the duration of the test on a stopwatch. App data from Firebase were converted into graphical data and exported into MATLAB for data filtering. Multiple iterations of a data processing algorithm were used to increase robustness and accuracy. MATLAB-generated outcome variables were compared to the manually determined outcome variables of each test. Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCCs), Bland-Altman plots, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement, and repeatability coefficients were generated to evaluate criterion validity, agreement, and test-retest reliability of iPhone sensor data against gold-standard manual

  5. Performing a Large-Scale Modal Test on the B2 Stand Crane at NASA's Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stasiunas, Eric C.; Parks, Russel A.

    2018-01-01

    A modal test of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) Core Stage is scheduled to occur prior to propulsion system verification testing at the Stennis Space Center B2 test stand. A derrick crane with a 180-ft long boom, located at the top of the stand, will be used to suspend the Core Stage in order to achieve defined boundary conditions. During this suspended modal test, it is expected that dynamic coupling will occur between the crane and the Core Stage. Therefore, a separate modal test was performed on the B2 crane itself, in order to evaluate the varying dynamic characteristics and correlate math models of the crane. Performing a modal test on such a massive structure was challenging and required creative test setup and procedures, including implementing both AC and DC accelerometers, and performing both classical hammer and operational modal analysis. This paper describes the logistics required to perform this large-scale test, as well as details of the test setup, the modal test methods used, and an overview of the results.

  6. Use of a unipedal standing test to assess the ambulation reacquisition time during the early postoperative stage after hip fracture in elderly Japanese: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koichi; Sugitani, Shigeki; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Noguchi, Takashi; Aoto, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the ambulation reacquisition time after hip fracture in elderly people using the unipedal standing test during the early postoperative stage. Patients with an intertrochanteric fracture treated with internal fixation (n = 35) and patients with a femoral neck fracture treated with hemiarthroplasty (n = 22) were included. A unipedal standing test using the nonoperated leg was performed on days 3 and 7 after the operation. Among the patients with an intertrochanteric fracture, those with a positive result on the unipedal standing test on postoperative day (POD) 3 attained gait with parallel guide bars (BG) and walker-assisted gait (WG) significantly earlier than did patients with a negative result on the unipedal standing test. Patients with a positive result on the unipedal standing test on POD 7 attained BG, WG, and cane-assisted gait (CG) significantly earlier than did patients with a negative test. Among patients with a femoral neck fracture, those with a positive unipedal standing test result on POD 3 attained BG, WG, and CG significantly earlier than did patients with a negative test. Those with a positive test result on POD 7 attained BG, WG, and CG significantly earlier than did patients with a negative test. The unipedal standing test given during the early postoperative stage is a good test for predicting the ambulation reacquisition time. Moreover, it gives information that can help determine the need for subacute rehabilitation and about discharge planning and health service provision.

  7. Performing a Large-Scale Modal Test on the B2 Stand Crane at NASA's Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stasiunas, Eric C.; Parks, Russel A.; Sontag, Brendan D.

    2018-01-01

    A modal test of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Core Stage is scheduled to occur at the Stennis Space Center B2 test stand. A derrick crane with a 150-ft long boom, located at the top of the stand, will be used to suspend the Core Stage in order to achieve defined boundary conditions. During this suspended modal test, it is expected that dynamic coupling will occur between the crane and the Core Stage. Therefore, a separate modal test was performed on the B2 crane itself, in order to evaluate the varying dynamic characteristics and correlate math models of the crane. Performing a modal test on such a massive structure was challenging and required creative test setup and procedures, including implementing both AC and DC accelerometers, and performing both classical hammer and operational modal analysis. This paper describes the logistics required to perform this large-scale test, as well as details of the test setup, the modal test methods used, and an overview and application of the results.

  8. Hip Strength Testing of Soccer Players With Long-Standing Hip and Groin Pain: What are the Clinical Implications of Pain During Testing?

    PubMed

    Rafn, Bolette S; Tang, Lars; Nielsen, Martin P; Branci, Sonia; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether self-reported pain during hip strength testing correlates to a large degree with hip muscle strength in soccer players with long-standing unilateral hip and groin pain. Cross-sectional study. Clinical assessments at Sports Orthopaedic Research Center-Copenhagen (SORC-C), Arthroscopic Centre Amager, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. Twenty-four male soccer players with unilateral long-standing hip and groin pain. The soccer players performed 5 reliable hip muscle strength tests (isometric hip flexion, adduction, abduction, isometric hip flexion-modified Thomas test, and eccentric hip adduction). Muscle strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer, and the players rated the pain during testing on a numerical rating scale (0-10). In 4 tests (isometric hip adduction, abduction, flexion, and eccentric adduction), no significant correlations were found between pain during testing and hip muscle strength (Spearman rho = -0.28 to 0.06, P = 0.09-0.39). Isometric hip flexion (modified Thomas test position) showed a moderate negative correlation between pain and hip muscle strength (Spearman rho = -0.44, P = 0.016). Self-reported pain during testing does not seem to correlate with the majority of hip muscle strength tests used in soccer players with long-standing hip and groin pain.

  9. Watch 60-Seconds of Major SLS Hardware Being Moved and Put in the Test Stand at NASA Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    A test version of the launch vehicle stage adapter (LVSA) for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, is moved to a 65-foot-tall test stand at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The test version LVSA will be stacked with other test pieces of the upper part of the SLS rocket and pushed, pulled and twisted as part of an upcoming test series to ensure each structure can withstand the incredible stresses of launch. The LVSA joins the core stage simulator, which was loaded into the test stand Sept. 21. The other three qualification articles and the Orion simulator will complete the stack later this fall. SLS will be the world’s most powerful rocket, and with the Orion spacecraft, take astronauts to deep-space destinations, including the Journey to Mars. More information on the upcoming test series can be found here: http://go.nasa.gov/2dS8yXB

  10. A study on special test stand of automatic and manual descent control in presence of simulated g-load effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkov, Yury; Artjuchin, Yury; Astakhov, Alexander; Vas'kov, Alexander; Malyshev, Veniamin; Mitroshin, Edward; Glinsky, Valery; Moiseenko, Vasily; Makovlev, Vyacheslav

    The development of aircraft-type reusable space vehicles (RSV) involves the problem of complete compatibility of automatic, director and manual control. Task decision is complicated, in particular, due to considerable quantitative and qualitative changes of vehicle dynamic characteristics, little stability margins (and even of unstability) of the RSV, and stringent requirements to control accuracy at some flight phases. Besides, during control a pilot is affected by g-loads which hamper motor activity and deteriorate its accuracy, alter the functional status of the visual analyser, and influence higher nervous activity. A study of g-load effects on the control efficiency, especially in manual and director modes, is of primary importance. The main tools for study of a rational selection of manual and director vehicle control systems and as an aid in formulating recommendations for optimum crew-automatic control system interactions are special complex and functional flight simulator test stands. The proposed simulator stand includes a powerful digital computer complex combined with the control system of the centrifuge. The interior of a pilot's vehicle cabin is imitated. A situation image system, pyscho-physical monitoring system, physician, centrifuge operator, and instructor stations are linked with the test stand.

  11. NASA's Functional Task Test: High Intensity Exercise Improves the Heart Rate Response to a Stand Test Following 70 Days of Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Dillon, E. Lichar; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Stenger, Michael B.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations due to spaceflight are modeled with 6deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR) and result in decreased orthostatic tolerance. We investigated if high-intensity resistive and aerobic exercise with and without testosterone supplementation would improve the heart rate (HR) response to a 3.5-min stand test and how quickly these changes recovered following BR. During 70 days of BR male subjects performed no exercise (Control, n=10), high intensity supine resistive and aerobic exercise (Exercise, n=9), or supine exercise plus supplemental testosterone (Exercise+T, n=8; 100 mg i.m., weekly in 2-week on/off cycles). We measured HR for 2 min while subjects were prone and for 3 min after standing twice before and 0, 1, 6, and 11 days after BR. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to evaluate group, time, and interaction effects. Compared to pre-bed rest, prone HR was elevated on BR+0 and BR+1 in Control, but not Exercise or Exercise+T groups, and standing HR was greater in all 3 groups. The increase in prone and standing HR in Control subjects was greater than either Exercise or Exercise+T groups and all groups recovered by BR+6. The change in HR from prone to standing more than doubled on BR+0 in all groups, but was significantly less in the Exericse+T group compared to the Control, but not Exercise group. Exercise reduces, but does not prevent the increase in HR observed in response to standing. The significantly lower HR response in the Exercise+T group requires further investigation to determine physiologic significance.

  12. A test of high-dose verbenone for stand-level protection of lodgepole and whitebark pine from mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attacks

    Treesearch

    B. J. Bentz; S. Kegley; K. Gibson; R. Their

    2005-01-01

    The effcacy of verbenone as a stand-level protectant against mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attacks was tested in lodgepole and whitebark pine stands at five geographically separated sites, including three consecutive years at one site. Forty and 20 high-dose pouches, with a verbenone emission rate up to 50 mg/d per pouch, were spaced in a grid...

  13. Test-retest reliability of sensor-based sit-to-stand measures in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Regterschot, G Ruben H; Zhang, Wei; Baldus, Heribert; Stevens, Martin; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated test-retest reliability of sensor-based sit-to-stand (STS) peak power and other STS measures in young and older adults. In addition, test-retest reliability of the sensor method was compared to test-retest reliability of the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) and Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST) in older adults. Ten healthy young female adults (20-23 years) and 31 older adults (21 females; 73-94 years) participated in two assessment sessions separated by 3-8 days. Vertical peak power was assessed during three (young adults) and five (older adults) normal and fast STS trials with a hybrid motion sensor worn on the hip. Older adults also performed the FTSST and TUGT. The average sensor-based STS peak power of the normal STS trials and the average sensor-based STS peak power of the fast STS trials showed excellent test-retest reliability in young adults (intra-class correlation (ICC)≥0.90; zero in 95% confidence interval of mean difference between test and retest (95%CI of D); standard error of measurement (SEM)≤6.7% of mean peak power) and older adults (ICC≥0.91; zero in 95%CI of D; SEM≤9.9%). Test-retest reliability of sensor-based STS peak power and TUGT (ICC=0.98; zero in 95%CI of D; SEM=8.5%) was comparable in older adults, test-retest reliability of the FTSST was lower (ICC=0.73; zero outside 95%CI of D; SEM=14.4%). Sensor-based STS peak power demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability and may therefore be useful for clinical assessment of functional status and fall risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Status of DOE and AID stand-alone photovoltaic system field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.; Delombard, R.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Scudder, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is managing stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system projects sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The DOE project includes village PV power demonstration projects in Gabon (four sites) and the Marshall Islands, and PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in six countries. The AID project includes a large village power system, a farmhouse system and two water pumping-irrigation systems in Tunisia, a water pumping/grain grinding system in Upper Volta, five medical clinic systems in four countries, PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in 18 countries and a PV-powered remote earth station in Indonesia. This paper reviews these PV projects and summarizes significant findings to date.

  15. Status of DOE and AID stand-alone photovoltaic system field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, W. J.; Delombard, R.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Scudder, L. R.

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is managing stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system projects sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The DOE project includes village PV power demonstration projects in Gabon (four sites) and the Marshall Islands, and PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in six countries. The AID project includes a large village power system, a farmhouse system and two water pumping-irrigation systems in Tunisia, a water pumping/grain grinding system in Upper Volta, five medical clinic systems in four countries, PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in 18 countries and a PV-powered remote earth station in Indonesia. This paper reviews these PV projects and summarizes significant findings to date.

  16. An analysis of cross-coupling of a multicomponent jet engine test stand using finite element modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Singnoi, W. N.

    1985-01-01

    A two axis thrust measuring system was analyzed by using a finite a element computer program to determine the sensitivities of the thrust vectoring nozzle system to misalignment of the load cells and applied loads, and the stiffness of the structural members. Three models were evaluated: (1) the basic measuring element and its internal calibration load cells; (2) the basic measuring element and its external load calibration equipment; and (3) the basic measuring element, external calibration load frame and the altitude facility support structure. Alignment of calibration loads was the greatest source of error for multiaxis thrust measuring systems. Uniform increases or decreases in stiffness of the members, which might be caused by the selection of the materials, have little effect on the accuracy of the measurements. It is found that the POLO-FINITE program is a viable tool for designing and analyzing multiaxis thrust measurement systems. The response of the test stand to step inputs that might be encountered with thrust vectoring tests was determined. The dynamic analysis show a potential problem for measuring the dynamic response characteristics of thrust vectoring systems because of the inherently light damping of the test stand.

  17. Failure on the Foam Eyes Closed Test of Standing Balance Associated With Reduced Semicircular Canal Function in Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Anson, Eric; Bigelow, Robin T; Studenski, Stephanie; Deshpande, Nandini; Agrawal, Yuri

    2018-06-11

    Standing on foam with eyes closed (FOEC) has been characterized as a measure of vestibular function; however, the relative contribution of vestibular function and proprioceptive function to the FOEC test has not been well described. In this study, the authors investigate the relationship between peripheral sensory systems (vestibular and proprioception) and performance on the FOEC test in a cohort of healthy adults. A total of 563 community-dwelling healthy adults (mean age, 72.7 [SD, 12.6] years; range, 27 to 93 years) participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging were tested. Proprioceptive threshold (PROP) was evaluated with passive motion detection at the right ankle. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain was measured using video head impulses. Otolith function was measured with cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. Participants stood on FOEC for 40 sec while wearing BalanSens (BioSensics, LLC, Watertown, MA) to quantify center of mass sway area. A mixed-model multiple logistic regression was used to examine the odds of passing the FOEC test based on PROP, VOR, cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential, and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential function in a multisensory model while controlling for age and gender. The odds of passing the FOEC test decreased by 15% (p < 0.001) for each year of increasing age and by 8% with every 0.1 reduction in VOR gain (p = 0.025). Neither PROP nor otolith function was significantly associated with passing the FOEC test. Failure to maintain balance during FOEC may serve as a proxy for rotational vestibular contributions to postural control. Semicircular canals are more sensitive to low-frequency motion than otoliths that may explain these relationships because standing sway is dominated by lower frequencies. Lower VOR gain and increased age independently decreased the odds of passing the test.

  18. Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test themore » digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.« less

  19. Historic tests

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-16

    Two large-engine tests were conducted simultaneously for the first time at Stennis Space Center on Aug. 16. A plume on the left indicates a test on the facility's E-1 Test Stand. On the right, a finger of fire indicates a test under way on the A-1 Test Stand. In another first, both tests were conducted by female engineers. The image was taken from atop the facility's A-2 Test Stand, offering a panoramic view that includes the new A-3 Test Stand under construction to the left.

  20. Is the timed loaded standing test a valid measure of back muscle endurance in people with vertebral osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Newman, M; Newman, R; Hughes, T; Vadher, K; Barker, K L

    2018-04-01

    Timed loaded standing (TLS) is a suggested measure of back muscle endurance for people with vertebral osteoporosis. Surface electromyography revealed back muscles work harder and fatigue during TLS. The test end-point and total time were associated with back fatigue. The findings help demonstrate the concurrent validity of the TLS test. The TLS test is suggested as a measure of back muscle endurance for patients with vertebral osteoporosis. However, to date, no study has demonstrated that TLS does measure back extensor or erector spinae (ES) muscle endurance. We used surface electromyography (sEMG) to investigate the performance of the thoracic ES muscles during TLS. Thirty-six people with vertebral osteoporosis with a mean age of 71.6 (range 45-86) years participated. sEMG recordings were made of the ES at T3 and T12 bilaterally during quiet standing (QS) and TLS. The relative (%) change in sEMG amplitude between conditions was compared. Fatigue was evaluated by analysing the change in median frequency (MF) of the sEMG signal during TLS, and the correlation between maximal TLS time and rate of MF decline was examined. Activity in the ES increased significantly during TLS at all electrode locations. During TLS, the MF declined at a mean rate of -24.2% per minute (95% C.I. -26.5 to -21.9%). The MF slope and test time were strongly correlated (r 2  = 0.71), and at test end, the final MF dropped to an average 89% (95% C.I. 85 to 93%) of initial MF. Twenty-eight participants (78%) reported fatigue was the main reason for stopping, and for eight (22%), it was pain. This study demonstrates that TLS challenges the ES muscles in the thoracic region and results in ES fatigue. Endurance time and the point at which the TLS test ends are strongly related to ES fatigue.

  1. About study of radiation flux carried out on the stand, which is designed for testing of space ultraviolet polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskiy, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Geraimchuk, M. D.; Ivahiv, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine, National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" and National University "Lviv Polytechnic" over the many years has accumulated considerable experience of work on the design and development of polarimeters, and created a working model of compact an onboard ultraviolet polarimeter (UFP) [1-6]. For debugging, research and testing as the entire layout of UFP and its individual parts we have created a special stand with complex equipment that allows carrying the following works. The structural construction of the stand allows obtaining characteristics as a whole unit, and its individual parts; obtaining spectral dependences and counting characteristics signal of the light radiation, and of dark signal; carry out the polarization measurements and more. For this stand developed a number of special techniques to study various parameters of all UFP appliance and its individual parts. Thus, for control - characteristics and calibration of elements of photo-detector system of electro-optical equipment, must use the reference emitters. But they are complicated and expensive. Therefore for simplified calibration and configuration of optical devices, it is expedient to use cheap and small in size, but specially selected LEDs. For this, developed for testing of UFP stand, has been modernized. Thus, the selection was carried out, and then carefully studied the sources of radiation, that will be used for calibration of polarimeters. More information on this work expounded in the report. References. 1. P. Nevodovskyi, O. Morozhenko, A. Vidmachenko, O. Ivakhiv, M. Geraimchuk, O. Zbrutskyi. Tiny Ultraviolet Polarimeter for Earth Stratosphere from Space Investigation // Proceedings of 8th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications (IDAACS'2015). 24-26 September 2015, Proceedings. Warsaw, Poland. Vol.81, p. 28-32. 2. Nevodovsksiy P. V., Morozhenko A. V

  2. Are the General Medical Council's Tests of Competence fair to long standing doctors? A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Leila; Sturrock, Alison; Dacre, Jane

    2015-04-21

    The General Medical Council's Fitness to Practise investigations may involve a test of competence for doctors with performance concerns. Concern has been raised about the suitability of the test format for doctors who qualified before the introduction of Single Best Answer and Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessments, both of which form the test of competence. This study explored whether the examination formats used in the tests of competence are fair to long standing doctors who have undergone fitness to practise investigation. A retrospective cohort design was used to determine an association between year of primary medical qualification and doctors' test of competence performance. Performance of 95 general practitioners under investigation was compared with a group of 376 volunteer doctors. We analysed performance on knowledge test, OSCE overall, and three individual OSCE stations using Spearman's correlation and regression models. Doctors under investigation performed worse on all test outcomes compared to the comparison group. Qualification year correlated positively with performance on all outcomes except for physical examination (e.g. knowledge test r = 0.48, p < 0.001 and OSCE r = 0.37, p < 0.001). Qualification year was associated with test performance in doctors under investigation even when controlling for sex, ethnicity and qualification region. Regression analyses showed that qualification year was associated with knowledge test, OSCE and communication skills performance of doctors under investigation when other variables were controlled for. Among volunteer doctors this was not the case and their performance was more strongly related to where they qualified and their ethnic background. Furthermore, volunteer doctors who qualified before the introduction of Single Best Answer and OSCE assessments, still outperformed their peers under investigation. Earlier graduates under fitness to practise investigation performed less

  3. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ohira, Masayoshi; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Nagasawa, Yuya

    2015-12-01

    Sit-to-stand exercise (STS) is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1) to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs), during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS) with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE) test; and 2) to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2) and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR) were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05); AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05); AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05); and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05). The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1); p < 0.05). The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm) and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05). The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults. Key pointsThe ISTS is a simple test that varies only according to the frequency of standing up, and requires only

  4. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with themore » aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.« less

  5. Design and fabrication of a micron scale free-standing specimen for uniaxial micro-tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun; Wang, Hong; Li, Shi Chen; Liu, Rui; Mao, Sheng Ping; Li, Xue Ping; Zhang, Cong Chun; Ding, Guifu

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a novel design and fabrication of test chips with a nickel free-standing specimen for the micro uniaxial tensile test. To fabricate test chips on the quartz substrate significantly reduces the fabrication time, minimizes the number of steps and eliminates the effect of the wet anisotropic etching process on mechanical properties. The test chip can be gripped tightly to the test machine and aligned accurately in the pulling direction; furthermore, the approximately straight design of the specimen rather than the traditional dog-bone structure enables the strain be directly measured by a displacement sensor. Both finite-element method (FEM) analysis and experimental results indicate the reliability of the new design. The test chip can also be extended to other materials. The experimental measured Young's modulus of a thin nickel film and the ultimate tensile strength are approximately 94.5 Gpa and 1.76 Gpa, respectively. The results were substantially supported by the experiment on larger gauge specimens by a commercial dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) instrument. These specimens were electroplated under the same conditions. The low Young's modulus and the high ultimate tensile strength might be explained by the fine grain in the electroplated structure.

  6. Point-of-Care Hemoglobin A1c Testing: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of diabetes in Ontario means that there will be growing demand for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing to monitor glycemic control for the management of this chronic disease. Testing HbA1c where patients receive their diabetes care may improve system efficiency if the results from point-of-care HbA1c testing are comparable to those from laboratory HbA1c measurements. Objectives To review the correlation between point-of-care HbA1c testing and laboratory HbA1c measurement in patients with diabetes in clinical settings. Data Sources The literature search included studies published between January 2003 and June 2013. Search terms included glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, point of care, and diabetes. Review Methods Studies were included if participants had diabetes; if they compared point-of-care HbA1c devices (licensed by Health Canada and available in Canada) with laboratory HbA1c measurement (reference method); if they performed point-of-care HbA1c testing using capillary blood samples (finger pricks) and laboratory HbA1c measurement using venous blood samples within 7 days; and if they reported a correlation coefficient between point-of-care HbA1c and laboratory HbA1c results. Results Three point-of-care HbA1c devices were reviewed in this analysis: Bayer's A1cNow+, Bio-Rad's In2it, and Siemens’ DCA Vantage. Five observational studies met the inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed a positive correlation between point-of-care HbA1c testing and laboratory HbA1c measurement (correlation coefficient, 0.967; 95% confidence interval, 0.960–0.973). Limitations Outcomes were limited to the correlation coefficient, as this was a commonly reported measure of analytical performance in the literature. Results should be interpreted with caution due to risk of bias related to selection of participants, reference standards, and the multiple steps involved in POC HbA1c testing. Conclusions Moderate quality evidence showed a positive

  7. A-1 modification work under way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Phil Schemanski of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne removes equipment inside the thrust drum on the A-1 Test Stand as part of a comprehensive modification project to prepare for testing the new J-2X engine.

  8. Testing tree indicator species for classifying site productivity in southern Appalachian hardwood stands

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; David L. Loftis; R.M. Shefield

    2002-01-01

    Composite indices of site moisture and fertility regimes, site variables, and individual tree species were tested for their relationship with site productivity on forest survey plots in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Mew annual basal area increment was significantly associated with the fertility index and site variables including elevation, slope gradient, and...

  9. Development of an Optimal Controller and Validation Test Stand for Fuel Efficient Engine Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, Jack G., III

    There are numerous motivations for improvements in automotive fuel efficiency. As concerns over the environment grow at a rate unmatched by hybrid and electric automotive technologies, the need for reductions in fuel consumed by current road vehicles has never been more present. Studies have shown that a major cause of poor fuel consumption in automobiles is improper driving behavior, which cannot be mitigated by purely technological means. The emergence of autonomous driving technologies has provided an opportunity to alleviate this inefficiency by removing the necessity of a driver. Before autonomous technology can be relied upon to reduce gasoline consumption on a large scale, robust programming strategies must be designed and tested. The goal of this thesis work was to design and deploy an autonomous control algorithm to navigate a four cylinder, gasoline combustion engine through a series of changing load profiles in a manner that prioritizes fuel efficiency. The experimental setup is analogous to a passenger vehicle driving over hilly terrain at highway speeds. The proposed approach accomplishes this using a model-predictive, real-time optimization algorithm that was calibrated to the engine. Performance of the optimal control algorithm was tested on the engine against contemporary cruise control. Results indicate that the "efficient'' strategy achieved one to two percent reductions in total fuel consumed for all load profiles tested. The consumption data gathered also suggests that further improvements could be realized on a different subject engine and using extended models and a slightly modified optimal control approach.

  10. Development Status of Ion Source at J-PARC Linac Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, S.; Takagi, A.; Ikegami, K.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Oguri, H.

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) linac power upgrade program is now in progress in parallel with user operation. To realize a nominal performance of 1 MW at 3 GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron and 0.75 MW at the Main Ring synchrotron, we need to upgrade the peak beam current (50 mA) of the linac. For the upgrade program, we are testing a new front-end system, which comprises a cesiated RF-driven H- ion source and a new radio -frequency quadrupole linac (RFQ). The H- ion source was developed to satisfy the J-PARC upgrade requirements of an H- ion-beam current of 60 mA and a lifetime of more than 50 days. On February 6, 2014, the first 50 mA H- beams were accelerated by the RFQ during a beam test. To demonstrate the performance of the ion source before its installation in the summer of 2014, we tested the long-term stability through continuous beam operation, which included estimating the lifetime of the RF antenna and evaluating the cesium consumption.

  11. GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND CENTER, REDSTONE TEST STAND FOREGROUND RIGHT, SATURN I C TEST STAND BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. Liquid-Hydrogen-Cooled 450-hp Electric Motor Test Stand Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    With growing concerns about global warming, there is a need to develop pollution-free aircraft. One approach is to use hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbogenerators to produce electric power to drive the electric motors that turn the aircraft s propulsive fans. Hydrogen fuel would be carried as a liquid, stored at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are too heavy for aircraft propulsion. We need to develop high-power, lightweight electric motors (highpower- density motors). One approach is to increase the conductivity of the wires by cooling them with liquid hydrogen (LH2). This would allow superconducting rotors with an ironless core. In addition, the motor could use very pure aluminum or copper, substances that have low resistances at cryogenic temperatures. A preliminary design of a 450-hp LH2-cooled electric motor was completed and is being manufactured by a contractor. This motor will be tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center and will be used to test different superconducting materials such as magnesium diboride (MgB2). The motor will be able to operate at speeds of up to 6000 rpm.

  13. Elastic and fracture properties of free-standing amorphous ALD Al2O3 thin films measured with bulge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontu, Ville; Nolvi, Anton; Hokkanen, Ari; Haeggström, Edward; Kassamakov, Ivan; Franssila, Sami

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated elastic and fracture properties of amorphous Al2O3 thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with bulge test technique using a free-standing thin film membrane and extended applicability of bulge test technique. Elastic modulus was determined to be 115 GPa for a 50 nm thick film and 170 GPa for a 15 nm thick film. Residual stress was 142 MPa in the 50 nm Al2O3 film while it was 116 MPa in the 15 nm Al2O3 film. Density was 3.11 g cm‑3 for the 50 nm film and 3.28 g cm‑3 for the 15 nm film. Fracture strength at 100 hPa s‑1 pressure ramp rate was 1.72 GPa for the 50 nm film while for the 15 nm film it was 4.21 GPa, almost 2.5-fold. Fracture strength was observed to be positively strain-rate dependent. Weibull moduli of these films were very high being around 50. The effective volume of a circular film in bulge test was determined from a FEM model enabling future comparison of fracture strength data between different techniques.

  14. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  15. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease. PMID:25988157

  16. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  17. Where the world stands still: turnaround as a strong test of ΛCDM cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, V.; Tomaras, T. N.

    2014-09-01

    Our intuitive understanding of cosmic structure formation works best in scales small enough so that isolated, bound, relaxed gravitating systems are no longer adjusting their radius; and large enough so that space and matter follow the average expansion of the Universe. Yet one of the most robust predictions of ΛCDM cosmology concerns the scale that separates these limits: the turnaround radius, which is the non-expanding shell furthest away from the center of a bound structure. We show that the maximum possible value of the turnaround radius within the framework of the ΛCDM model is, for a given mass M, equal to (3GM/Λ c2)1/3, with G Newton's constant and c the speed of light, independently of cosmic epoch, exact nature of dark matter, or baryonic effects. We discuss the possible use of this prediction as an observational test for ΛCDM cosmology. Current data appear to favor ΛCDM over alternatives with local inhomogeneities and no Λ. However there exist several local-universe structures that have, within errors, reached their limiting size. With improved determinations of their turnaround radii and the enclosed mass, these objects may challenge the limit and ΛCDM cosmology.

  18. Where the world stands still: turnaround as a strong test of ΛCDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidou, V.; Tomaras, T.N., E-mail: pavlidou@physics.uoc.gr, E-mail: tomaras@physics.uoc.gr

    Our intuitive understanding of cosmic structure formation works best in scales small enough so that isolated, bound, relaxed gravitating systems are no longer adjusting their radius; and large enough so that space and matter follow the average expansion of the Universe. Yet one of the most robust predictions of ΛCDM cosmology concerns the scale that separates these limits: the turnaround radius, which is the non-expanding shell furthest away from the center of a bound structure. We show that the maximum possible value of the turnaround radius within the framework of the ΛCDM model is, for a given mass M, equalmore » to (3GM/Λ c{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, with G Newton's constant and c the speed of light, independently of cosmic epoch, exact nature of dark matter, or baryonic effects. We discuss the possible use of this prediction as an observational test for ΛCDM cosmology. Current data appear to favor ΛCDM over alternatives with local inhomogeneities and no Λ. However there exist several local-universe structures that have, within errors, reached their limiting size. With improved determinations of their turnaround radii and the enclosed mass, these objects may challenge the limit and ΛCDM cosmology.« less

  19. Testing and performance characteristics of a 1-kW free piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1 kW single cylinder free piston Stirling engine, configured as a research engine, was tested with helium working gas. The engine features a posted displacer and dashpot load. The test results show the engine power output and efficiency to be lower than those observed during acceptance tests by the manufacturer. Engine tests results are presented for operation at the two heater head temperatures and with two regenerator porosities, along with flow test results for the heat exchangers.

  20. Barriers to A1C testing among a managed care population.

    PubMed

    Delaronde, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore reasons adults with diabetes do not receive at least 2 A1C tests per year as recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). ConnectiCare, a regional managed care company based in Farmington, Connecticut, identified adult members with diabetes who did not have a medical claim for an A1C laboratory test from their physician. A questionnaire was sent to 740 randomly selected members asking them to report the number of A1C tests they received in the past 12 months and reasons for not receiving the number of tests recommended by the ADA. After sending an automated telephone reminder to nonrespondents, a 26% (n = 192) response rate was achieved. Thirty-three percent of respondents (n = 63) reported having diabetes and receiving fewer than 2 A1C tests in the past year. Respondents were equally divided between men and women, with a mean age of 58 years. The primary reasons given for not obtaining at least 2 A1C tests as recommended by the ADA were that respondents were unaware that the test is recommended (49%), not informed of the need for the test by their physician (38%), never heard of the A1C test (33%), and not seen regularly by their physician (19%). Diabetes self-management education remains an important means of encouraging adherence to important ADA recommendations such as regular A1C testing. Barriers to A1C testing can be addressed in multiple settings, including individual and group education, disease management programs, and physician education.

  1. Outdoor test stand performance of a convertible engine with variable inlet guide vanes for advanced rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.

    1986-01-01

    A variable inlet guide van (VIGV) type convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip airflow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque. Previous mission analyses of a conceptual X-wing rotorcraft capable of 400-knot cruise speed were revised to account for more fan-tip churning power loss than was originally estimated. The new calculations confirm that using convertible engines rather than separate lift and cruise engines would result in a smaller, lighter craft with lower fuel use and direct operating cost.

  2. Impact of HbA1c Testing at Point of Care on Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Oliver; Crocker, J. Benjamin; Weng, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a highly prevalent disease also implicated in the development of several other serious complications like cardiovascular or renal disease. HbA1c testing is a vital step for effective diabetes management, however, given the low compliance to testing frequency and, commonly, a subsequent delay in the corresponding treatment modification, HbA1c at the point of care (POC) offers an opportunity for improvement of diabetes care. In this review, based on data from 1999 to 2016, we summarize the evidence supporting a further implementation of HbA1c testing at POC, discuss its limitations and propose recommendations for further development. PMID:27898388

  3. Derivation of the Data Reduction Equations for the Calibration of the Six-component Thrust Stand in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Kin C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the derivation of the data reduction equations for the calibration of the six-component thrust stand located in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility. The purpose of the calibration is to determine the first-order interactions between the axial, lateral, and vertical load cells (second-order interactions are assumed to be negligible). In an ideal system, the measurements made by the thrust stand along the three coordinate axes should be independent. For example, when a test article applies an axial force on the thrust stand, the axial load cells should measure the full magnitude of the force, while the off-axis load cells (lateral and vertical) should read zero. Likewise, if a lateral force is applied, the lateral load cells should measure the entire force, while the axial and vertical load cells should read zero. However, in real-world systems, there may be interactions between the load cells. Through proper design of the thrust stand, these interactions can be minimized, but are hard to eliminate entirely. Therefore, the purpose of the thrust stand calibration is to account for these interactions, so that necessary corrections can be made during testing. These corrections can be expressed in the form of an interaction matrix, and this paper shows the derivation of the equations used to obtain the coefficients in this matrix.

  4. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Total Aboveground Biomass in Forest Stands: Site-scale Test of Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOI, S.; Shi, Y.; Ni, X.; Simard, M.; Myneni, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Sparseness in in-situ observations has precluded the spatially explicit and accurate mapping of forest biomass. The need for large-scale maps has raised various approaches implementing conjugations between forest biomass and geospatial predictors such as climate, forest type, soil property, and topography. Despite the improved modeling techniques (e.g., machine learning and spatial statistics), a common limitation is that biophysical mechanisms governing tree growth are neglected in these black-box type models. The absence of a priori knowledge may lead to false interpretation of modeled results or unexplainable shifts in outputs due to the inconsistent training samples or study sites. Here, we present a gray-box approach combining known biophysical processes and geospatial predictors through parametric optimizations (inversion of reference measures). Total aboveground biomass in forest stands is estimated by incorporating the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). Two main premises of this research are: (a) The Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations (ASRL) theory can provide a relationship between tree geometry and local resource availability constrained by environmental conditions; and (b) The zeroth order theory (size-frequency distribution) can expand individual tree allometry into total aboveground biomass at the forest stand level. In addition to the FIA estimates, two reference maps from the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset (NBCD) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) were produced to evaluate the model. This research focuses on a site-scale test of the biomass model to explore the robustness of predictors, and to potentially improve models using additional geospatial predictors such as climatic variables, vegetation indices, soil properties, and lidar-/radar-derived altimetry products (or existing forest canopy height maps). As results, the optimized ASRL estimates satisfactorily

  5. Take a Stand for Standing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labandz, Stephenie

    2010-01-01

    As a school-based physical therapist, the author sees children with a wide variety of diagnoses affecting their mobility and motor function. Supported standing is an important part of the routines of those who are unable to stand independently due to issues affecting the neuromuscular system. Being eye-to-eye with their peers and interacting with…

  6. Approximation of the breast height diameter distribution of two-cohort stands by mixture models II Goodness-of-fit tests

    Treesearch

    Rafal Podlaski; Francis .A. Roesch

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this study are (1) to analyse the accuracy of the approximation of empirical distributions of diameter at breast height (dbh) using two-component mixtures of either the Weibull distribution or the gamma distribution in two−cohort stands, and (2) to discuss the procedure of choosing goodness−of−fit tests. The study plots were...

  7. Physics design of a 10 MeV injector test stand for an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang; Pei, Shilun; Geng, Huiping; Meng, Cai; Zhao, Yaliang; Sun, Biao; Cheng, Peng; Yang, Zheng; Ouyang, Huafu; Li, Zhihui; Tang, Jingyu; Wang, Jianli; Sui, Yefeng; Dai, Jianping; Sha, Peng; Ge, Rui

    2015-05-01

    The 10 MeV accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) Injector I test stand at Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) is a testing facility dedicated to demonstrate one of the two injector design schemes [Injector Scheme-I, which works at 325 MHz], for the ADS project in China. The injector is composed of two parts, the linac part and the beam dump line. The former is designed on the basis of 325 MHz four-vane type copper structure radio frequency quadrupole and superconducting (SC) spoke cavities with β =0.12 . The latter is designed to transport the beam coming out of the SC section of the linac to the beam dump, where the beam transverse profile is fairly enlarged and unformed to simplify the beam target design. The SC section consists of two cryomodules with 14 β =0.12 Spoke cavities, 14 solenoid and 14 BPMs in total. The first challenge in the physics design comes from the necessary space required for the cryomodule separation where the periodical lattice is destroyed at a relatively lower energy of ˜5 MeV . Another challenge is the beam dump line design, as it will be the first beam dump line being built by using a step field magnet for the transverse beam expansion and uniformity in the world. This paper gives an overview of the physics design study together with the design principles and machine construction considerations. The results of an optimized design, fabrication status and end to end simulations including machine errors are presented.

  8. Active ankle dorsiflexion and the Mingazzini manoeuvre: two clinical bedside tests related to prognosis of postural transferring, standing and walking ability in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Smania, N; Gambarin, M; Paolucci, S; Girardi, P; Bortolami, M; Fiaschi, A; Santilli, V; Picelli, A

    2011-09-01

    Lower limb paresis is one of the main determinants of postural transferring, standing and walking disability in patients with stroke. Early prognosis of recovery of lower limb function and of related functional disability is an important issue in neurorehabilitation clinical practice. Aim of this study was to assess the relationship between active ankle dorsiflexion and the Mingazzini manoeuvre with the prognosis of lower limb function and of postural transferring, standing and walking ability in patients with stroke. This was a longitudinal study with prospectively collected data. University hospital. The study included 53 patients with first unilateral brain ischemic stroke. Patients were evaluated initially (mean 4.02 days) and approximately at six months (mean 178.6 days) after stroke. Initial assessment included active ankle dorsiflexion and the Mingazzini manoeuvre. The assessment after six months included three outcome measures evaluating the rate of improvement of lower limb function and of postural transferring, standing and walking ability (Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patients, Functional Ambulation Category, Motricity Index leg subtest). The active ankle dorsiflexion showed to be related with the prognosis of lower limb function and of walking ability, while the Mingazzini manoeuvre was related with the improvement of postural transferring and standing ability. Active ankle dorsiflexion and the Mingazzini manoeuvre are related with the prognosis of lower limb function and of postural transferring, standing and walking ability in patients with stroke. These simple bedside tests give a picture of improvement potential of motor activities connected to lower limb function in patients with acute stroke.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand-1 Decontamination Pad, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 252 consists of only one Corrective Action Site (25-07-04, Decontamination Pad). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary at CAU 252. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because the potential contaminants of concern weremore » either not detected during the corrective action investigation or were only present at naturally occurring concentrations. Based on the field results, neither corrective action or a corrective action plan is required at this site. A Notice of Completion to DOE/NV is being requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 252, as well as a request that this site be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO. Further, no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU.« less

  10. Insensitivity of the "Romberg test of standing balance on firm and compliant support surfaces" to the results of caloric and VEMP tests.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Gary P; McCaslin, Devin L; Piker, Erin G; Gruenwald, Jill; Grantham, Sarah; Tegel, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of the Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support Surfaces (RTSBFCSS) for the identification of patients with vestibular system impairments affecting the horizontal semicircular canal, saccule, and/or inferior and superior vestibular nerves. The RTSBFCSS was developed for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and was used recently to estimate the numbers of individuals aged 40 yr or older with vestibular system impairments among the general population of the United States. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of 103 consecutive patients aged 40 yr or older (mean age 59 ± 12 yr, 71 females) who had undergone vestibular assessment at the Balance Disorders Clinic at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Patients with complete electro- or videonystagmography testing, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) testing, and the RTSBFCSS screening test were included in the analysis. A series of 2 × 2 tables were created that represented the number of "true positives," "true negatives," "false positives," and "false negatives" of the RTSBFCSS under conditions where the caloric test was abnormal and then separately where the cVEMP test was abnormal. The data were analyzed in a manner such that sensitivity, specificity, and both positive and negative predictive value of the RTSBFCSS could be calculated. When the caloric test was used as the criterion standard and the subject selection criteria in the NHANES study were used (i.e., subjects who were able to maintain postural stability for trials 1-3 of the RTSBFCSS; N = 45), the sensitivity and specificity of the RTSBFCSS to impairment of the horizontal semicircular canal or superior vestibular nerve were 55% and 64%, respectively, yielding positive and negative predictive values of 55% and 64%, respectively. When all patients aged 40 yr

  11. Effect of foot placements during sit to stand transition on timed up and go test in stroke subjects: A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Joshua, Abraham M; Karnad, Shreekanth D; Nayak, Akshatha; Suresh, B V; Mithra, Prasanna; Unnikrishnan, B

    2017-01-01

    Timed up and go (TUG) test is been used as a screening tool for the assessment of risk of falling in individuals following stroke. Though TUG test is a quick test, it has fair sensitivity compared to other tests. This study was carried out to obtain and compare test scores for different types of foot placements during sit to stand transition in stroke subjects. A Cross-sectional study with purposive sampling included 28 post stroke subjects who were able to walk 6 meter with or without assistance. Timed Up and Go test was carried out with four different types of foot placements and scores were recorded. The data were compared using Kruskal-Wallis One way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed ranks test. There were comparable differences between asymmetric 1 test strategy which involved affected extremity to be placed behind the unaffected and other test strategies (Z = -4.457,-3.848,-4.458; p = 0.000). The initial foot placements during sit to stand transition influenced the time taken to complete the test which was significantly higher in asymmetric 1 strategy, Incorporation of the initial foot placement mainly asymmetric 1 strategy into conventional TUG test would help in identifying accurately the subject's functional mobility and postural stability.

  12. One minute sit-to-stand test is an alternative to 6MWT to measure functional exercise performance in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Reychler, Gregory; Boucard, Eliott; Peran, Loïc; Pichon, Romain; Le Ber-Moy, Catherine; Ouksel, Hakima; Liistro, Giuseppe; Chambellan, Arnaud; Beaumont, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with a reduced functional exercise performance. Even if this parameter is routinely evaluated using 6-minute walking test (6MWT), new field tests are regularly investigated as alternative tests. The aim of this study was to compare functional exercise performance evaluation by sit-to-stand test (STST) and 6MWT and to evaluate reliability and repeatability of the STST in COPD patients. Forty-two COPD patients performed randomly two tests: 6MWT and STST. Each test was repeated two times. Distance (6MWD) and number of repetitions were measured. Cardiorespiratory parameters, dyspnea and lower limb fatigue (Borg) were recorded before and after the tests. Sit-to-stand repetitions (19 ± 6) and 6MWD (441 ± 104 m) were correlated (r = .716; P < .001). Good repeatability was found for STST and 6MWT. Good reliability was observed for STST (ICC = 0.902). Variations of heart rate and pulsed oxygen saturation were significantly different between these two tests (23% ± 17% vs 13% ± 11%; P = .022 and -7.6% ± 4.6% vs -0.7% ± 2.7%; P < .001 for 6MWT and STST, respectively). Variations of dyspnea and lower limb fatigue were similar between both tests (P = .827 and P = .467). The one minute sit-to-stand test is a valuable alternative to 6MWT to estimate functional exercise performance in COPD patients. The cardiorespiratory demand is different between both tests although the variation of dypsnea is similar. No learning effect was observed for STST. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Stand-alone containment analysis of Phébus FPT tests with ASTEC and MELCOR codes: the FPT-2 test.

    PubMed

    Gonfiotti, Bruno; Paci, Sandro

    2018-03-01

    During the last 40 years, many studies have been carried out to investigate the different phenomena occurring during a Severe Accident (SA) in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Such efforts have been supported by the execution of different experimental campaigns, and the integral Phébus FP tests were probably some of the most important experiments in this field. In these tests, the degradation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel bundle was investigated employing different control rod materials and burn-up levels in strongly or weakly oxidizing conditions. From the findings on these and previous tests, numerical codes such as ASTEC and MELCOR have been developed to analyze the evolution of a SA in real NPPs. After the termination of the Phébus FP campaign, these two codes have been furthermore improved to implement the more recent findings coming from different experimental campaigns. Therefore, continuous verification and validation is still necessary to check that the new improvements introduced in such codes allow also a better prediction of these Phébus tests. The aim of the present work is to re-analyze the Phébus FPT-2 test employing the updated ASTEC and MELCOR code versions. The analysis focuses on the stand-alone containment aspects of this test, and three different spatial nodalizations of the containment vessel (CV) have been developed. The paper summarizes the main thermal-hydraulic results and presents different sensitivity analyses carried out on the aerosols and fission products (FP) behavior. When possible, a comparison among the results obtained during this work and by different authors in previous work is also performed. This paper is part of a series of publications covering the four Phébus FP tests using a PWR fuel bundle: FPT-0, FPT-1, FPT-2, and FPT-3, excluding the FPT-4 one, related to the study of the release of low-volatility FP and transuranic elements from a debris bed and a pool of melted fuel.

  14. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  15. Testing of a 1.25-m HTS Cable Made from YBCO Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouge, M. J.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Duckworth, R. C.; Fisher, P. W.; Daumling, M.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    Ultera and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested a 1.25-m-long, prototype high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable made from 1-cm-wide, second-generation YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO)-coated conductor tapes. Electrical tests of this cable were performed in boiling liquid nitrogen at 77 K. DC testing of the 1.25-m cable included determination of the V-I curve, with a critical current of 4200 A. This was consistent with the properties of the 24 individual YBCO tapes. AC testing of the cable was conducted at currents up to 2500 Arms. The ac losses were measured calorimetrically by measuring the response of a calibrated temperature sensor placed on the former and electrically by use of a Rogowski coil with a lock-in amplifier. AC losses of about 2 W/m were measured at a cable ac current of 2000 Arms. Overcurrent testing was conducted at peak current values up to 12 kA for pulse lengths of 0.1-0.2 s. The cable temperature increased to 105 K for a 12 kA, 0.2 s overcurrent pulse, and the cable showed no degradation after the sequence of overcurrent testing. This commercial-grade HTS cable demonstrated the feasibility of second-generation YBCO tapes in an ac cable application.

  16. Self-teaching digital-computer program for fail-operational control of a turbojet engine in a sea-level test stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallhagen, R. E.; Arpasi, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design and evaluation are described of a digital turbojet engine control which is capable of sensing catastrophic failures in either the engine rotor speed or the compressor discharge static-pressure signal and is capable of switching control modes to maintain near normal operation. The control program was developed for and tested on a turbojet engine located in a sea-level test stand. The control program is also capable of acquiring all the data that are necessary for the fail-operational control to function.

  17. Development and Testing of Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for the Mars Rover Program: Elemental Analyses at Stand-Off Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, D. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Arp, Z. A.; Harris, R. D.; Maurice, S.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most fundamental pieces of information about any planetary body is the elemental composition of its surface materials. The Viking Martian landers employed XRF (x-ray fluorescence) and the MER rovers are carrying APXS (alpha-proton x-ray spectrometer) instruments upgraded from that used on the Pathfinder rover to supply elemental composition information for soils and rocks to which direct contact is possible. These in- situ analyses require that the lander or rover be in contact with the sample. In addition to in-situ instrumentation, the present generation of rovers carry instruments that operate at stand-off distances. The Mini-TES is an example of a stand-off instrument on the MER rovers. Other examples for future missions include infrared point spectrometers and microscopic-imagers that can operate at a distance. The main advantage of such types of analyses is obvious: the sensing element does not need to be in contact or even adjacent to the target sample. This opens up new sensing capabilities. For example, targets that cannot be reached by a rover due to impassable terrain or targets positioned on a cliff face can now be accessed using stand-off analysis. In addition, the duty cycle of stand-off analysis can be much greater than that provided by in-situ measurements because the stand-off analysis probe can be aimed rapidly at different features of interest eliminating the need for the rover to actually move to the target. Over the past five years we have been developing a stand-off method of elemental analysis based on atomic emission spectroscopy called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A laser-produced spark vaporizes and excites the target material, the elements of which emit at characteristic wavelengths. Using this method, material can be analyzed from within a radius of several tens of meters from the instrument platform. A relatively large area can therefore be sampled from a simple lander without requiring a rover or sampling

  18. International test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: Helical screw expander power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R. A.

    1984-06-01

    A 1-MW wellhead generator was tested in 1980, 1981, and 1982 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand at Cerro Prieto, Cesano, and Broadlands, respectively. The total flow helical screw expander portable power plant, Model 76-1, had been built for the U.S. Government and field-tested in Utah, USA, in 1978 and 1979. The expander had oversized internal clearances designed for self-cleaning operation on fluids that deposit adherent scale normally detrimental to the utiliation of liquid dominated fields. Conditions with which the expander was tested included inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0% to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, electrial loads of idle and 110 to 933 kW, electrical frequencies of 50 and 60 Hz, male rotor speeds of 2500 to 4000 rpm, and fluid characteristics to 310,000 ppm total dissolved solids and noncondensables to 38 wt % of the vapor. Some testing was done on-grid. Typical expander isentropic efficiency was 40% to 50% with the clearances not closed, and 5 percentage points or more higher with the clearances partly closed. The expander efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power for most operations, while inlet quality, speed, and pressure ratio across the machine had only small effects. These findings are all in agreement with the Utah test results.

  19. International test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: Helical screw expander power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A 1-MW wellhead generator was tested in 1980, 1981, and 1982 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand at Cerro Prieto, Cesano, and Broadlands, respectively. The total flow helical screw expander portable power plant, Model 76-1, had been built for the U.S. Government and field-tested in Utah, USA, in 1978 and 1979. The expander had oversized internal clearances designed for self-cleaning operation on fluids that deposit adherent scale normally detrimental to the utiliation of liquid dominated fields. Conditions with which the expander was tested included inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0% to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, electrial loads of idle and 110 to 933 kW, electrical frequencies of 50 and 60 Hz, male rotor speeds of 2500 to 4000 rpm, and fluid characteristics to 310,000 ppm total dissolved solids and noncondensables to 38 wt % of the vapor. Some testing was done on-grid. Typical expander isentropic efficiency was 40% to 50% with the clearances not closed, and 5 percentage points or more higher with the clearances partly closed. The expander efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power for most operations, while inlet quality, speed, and pressure ratio across the machine had only small effects. These findings are all in agreement with the Utah test results.

  20. Fertilizing natural stands

    Treesearch

    L. R. Auchmoody

    1989-01-01

    Given our present knowledge, and under current costs and returns, there appears to be little reason to fertilize natural stands of central hardwoods. Yet, some of the numerous fertilizer tests conducted with hardwoods over the past 50 years have shown very positive--but short-lived-growth responses. One "operational" (nonexperimental) use of nitrogen and...

  1. Kinect-Based Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test for Clinical and In-Home Assessment of Fall Risk in Older People.

    PubMed

    Ejupi, Andreas; Brodie, Matthew; Gschwind, Yves J; Lord, Stephen R; Zagler, Wolfgang L; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Accidental falls remain an important problem in older people. The five-times-sit-to-stand (5STS) test is commonly used as a functional test to assess fall risk. Recent advances in sensor technologies hold great promise for more objective and accurate assessments. The aims of this study were: (1) to examine the feasibility of a low-cost and portable Kinect-based 5STS test to discriminate between fallers and nonfallers and (2) to investigate whether this test can be used for supervised clinical, supervised and unsupervised in-home fall risk assessments. A total of 94 community-dwelling older adults were assessed by the Kinect-based 5STS test in the laboratory and 20 participants were tested in their own homes. An algorithm was developed to automatically calculate timing- and speed-related measurements from the Kinect-based sensor data to discriminate between fallers and nonfallers. The associations of these measurements with standard clinical fall risk tests and the results of supervised and unsupervised in-home assessments were examined. Fallers were significantly slower than nonfallers on Kinect-based measures. The mean velocity of the sit-to-stand transitions discriminated well between the fallers and nonfallers based on 12-month retrospective fall data. The Kinect-based measures collected in the laboratory correlated strongly with those collected in the supervised (r = 0.704-0.832) and unsupervised (r = 0.775-0.931) in-home assessments. In summary, we found that the Kinect-based 5STS test discriminated well between the fallers and nonfallers and was feasible to administer in clinical and supervised in-home settings. This test may be useful in clinical settings for identifying high-risk fallers for further intervention or for regular in-home assessments in the future. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Developing the RAL front end test stand source to deliver a 60 mA, 50 Hz, 2 ms H- beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faircloth, Dan; Lawrie, Scott; Letchford, Alan; Gabor, Christoph; Perkins, Mike; Whitehead, Mark; Wood, Trevor; Tarvainen, Olli; Komppula, Jani; Kalvas, Taneli; Dudnikov, Vadim; Pereira, Hugo; Izaola, Zunbeltz; Simkin, John

    2013-02-01

    All the Front End Test Stand (FETS) beam requirements have been achieved, but not simultaneously [1]. At 50 Hz repetition rates beam current droop becomes unacceptable for pulse lengths longer than 1 ms. This is fundamental limitation of the present source design. Previous researchers [2] have demonstrated that using a physically larger Penning surface plasma source should overcome these limitations. The scaled source development strategy is outlined in this paper. A study of time-varying plasma behavior has been performed using a V-UV spectrometer. Initial experiments to test scaled plasma volumes are outlined. A dedicated plasma and extraction test stand (VESPA-Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analysis) is being developed to allow new source and extraction designs to be appraised. The experimental work is backed up by modeling and simulations. A detailed ANSYS thermal model has been developed. IBSimu is being used to design extraction and beam transport. A novel 3D plasma modeling code using beamlets is being developed by Cobham Vector Fields using SCALA OPERA, early source modeling results are very promising. Hardware on FETS is also being developed in preparation to run the scaled source. A new 2 ms, 50 Hz, 25 kV pulsed extraction voltage power supply has been constructed and a new discharge power supply is being designed. The design of the post acceleration electrode assembly has been improved.

  3. The maximal width of the base of support (BSW): clinical applicability and reliability of a preferred-standing test for measuring the risk of falling.

    PubMed

    Swanenburg, Jaap; Nevzati, Arian; Mittaz Hager, Anne Gabrielle; de Bruin, Eling D; Klipstein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of a preferred-standing test for measuring the risk of falling. The preferred-standing position of elderly fallers and non-fallers and healthy young adults was measured. The maximal BSW was measured. The absolute and relative reliability and discriminant validity were assessed. The expanded timed get-up-and-go test (ETGUG), one-leg stance test (OS), tandem stance (TS), and falls efficacy scale international version (FES-I) were used to determine criterion validity. In total, 146 persons (102 females, 44 males; mean age 55±22 years, range 20-94) were recruited. Forty elderly community dwellers (8 fallers) and 26 young adults were tested twice to determine the test-retest reliability. The BSW showed acceptable test-retest reliability (Intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC2,1=0.77-0.83) and inter-rater reliability (ICC3,1=0.77-0.95) for all groups. The standard error of measurement (SEM) was between 0.77 and 1.87, and the smallest detectable change (SDC) was between 2.14cm and 5.19cm. The Bland-Altman plot revealed no systematic errors. There was significant difference between elderly fallers and non-fallers (F(1/75)=11.951; p=0.001. Spearman's rho coefficient values showed no correlation between the BSW and the ETGUG (-0.17, p=0.47), OLS (-0.04, p=0.65), TS (-0.11, p=0.21), and FES-I (-0.10; p=0.27). Only the BSW was a significant predictor for falling (odds ratio=0.736, p=0.007). The reliability and validity of the BSW protocol were acceptable overall. Prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the predictive value of the BSW for determining the risk of falling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperosmolarity response of ocular standing potential as a clinical test for retinal pigment epithelium activity. Chorioretinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, D; Kawasaki, K; Madachi-Yamamoto, S

    1984-05-30

    The hyperosmolarity response of the standing potential was recorded in retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes), fundus albipunctatus (8 eyes), and Stargardt's disease (or fundus flavimaculatus) (14 eyes). The light peak/dark trough ratio (the L/D ratio) and the Diamox response were also determined. The hyperosmolarity response was greatly suppressed (less than M-4SD; M and SD indicate respectively the mean and the standard deviation in normal control subjects) in all examined eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes) including retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (8 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), and pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes). The L/D ratio was larger than 1.26 (M-2.5 SD) in the half of the eyes with the above-described diseases. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in 4 of 8 eyes with fundus albipunctatus. The L/D ratio was normal in all 8 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in all 14 eyes with Stargardt's disease or fundus flavimaculatus. The L/D ratio was abnormal in 5 of these 14 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was more frequently abnormal than the L/D ratio in the chorioretinal dystrophies mentioned above, and hence is useful particularly for early diagnosis of these disorders.

  5. Hyperosmolarity response of ocular standing potential as a clinical test for retinal pigment epithelium activity chorioretinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, D; Kawasaki, K; Madachi-Yamamoto, S

    1984-05-01

    The hyperosmolarity response of the standing potential was recorded in retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes), fundus albipunctatus (8 eyes), and Stargardt's disease (or fundus flavimaculatus) (14 eyes). The light peak/dark trough ratio (the L/D ratio) and the Diamox response were also determined.The hyperosmolarity response was greatly suppressed (less than M-4SD; M and SD indicate respectively the mean and the standard deviation in normal control subjects) in all examined eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes) including retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (8 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), and pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes). The L/D ratio was larger than 1.26 (M-2.5 SD) in the half of the eyes with the above-described diseases.The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in 4 of 8 eyes with fundus albipunctatus. The L/D ratio was normal in all 8 eyes.The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in all 14 eyes with Stargardt's disease or fundus flavimaculatus. The L/D ratio was abnormal in 5 of these 14 eyes.The hyperosmolarity response was more frequently abnormal than the L/D ratio in the chorioretinal dystrophies mentioned above, and hence is useful particularly for early diagnosis of these disorders.

  6. Wind tunnel test results of a 1/8-scale fan-in-wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.; Gentry, Garl L.; Gorton, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    A 1/8-scale model of a fan-in-wing concept considered for development by Grumman Aerospace Corporation for the U.S. Army was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Hover testing, which included height above a pressure-instrumented ground plane, angle of pitch, and angle of roll for a range of fan thrust, was conducted in a model preparation area near the tunnel. The air loads and surface pressures on the model were measured for several configurations in the model preparation area and in the tunnel. The major hover configuration change was varying the angles of the vanes attached to the exit of the fans for producing propulsive force. As the model height above the ground was decreased, there was a significant variation of thrust-removed normal force with constant fan speed. The greatest variation was generally for the height-to-fan exit diameter ratio of less than 2.5; the variation was reduced by deflecting fan exit flow outboard with the vanes. In the tunnel angles of pitch and sideslip, height above the tunnel floor, and wind speed were varied for a range of fan thrust and different vane angle configurations. Other configuration features such as flap deflections and tail incidence were evaluated as well. Though the V-tail empennage provided an increase in static longitudinal stability, the total model configuration remained unstable.

  7. High Voltage Test-Stand Research Done on ICRF Antenna Elements of the High-Harmonic Fast-Wave System of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.W.; Bortolon, A.

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards themore » low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.« less

  8. Predictive Cutoff Values of the Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test and the Timed "Up & Go" Test for Disability Incidence in Older People Dwelling in the Community.

    PubMed

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Nakakubo, Sho; Hotta, Ryo; Suzuki, Takao

    2017-04-01

    Lower extremity functioning is important for maintaining activity in elderly people. Optimal cutoff points for standard measurements of lower extremity functioning would help identify elderly people who are not disabled but have a high risk of developing disability. The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the optimal cutoff points of the Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test and the Timed "Up & Go" Test for predicting the development of disability and (2) to examine the impact of poor performance on both tests on the prediction of the risk of disability in elderly people dwelling in the community. This was a prospective cohort study. A population of 4,335 elderly people dwelling in the community (mean age = 71.7 years; 51.6% women) participated in baseline assessments. Participants were monitored for 2 years for the development of disability. During the 2-year follow-up period, 161 participants (3.7%) developed disability. The optimal cutoff points of the Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test and the Timed "Up & Go" Test for predicting the development of disability were greater than or equal to 10 seconds and greater than or equal to 9 seconds, respectively. Participants with poor performance on the Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test (hazard ratio = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.11-3.20), the Timed "Up & Go" Test (hazard ratio = 2.24; 95% CI = 1.42-3.53), or both tests (hazard ratio = 2.78; 95% CI = 1.78-4.33) at the baseline assessment had a significantly higher risk of developing disability than participants who had better lower extremity functioning. All participants had good initial functioning and participated in assessments on their own. Causes of disability were not assessed. Assessments of lower extremity functioning with the Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test and the Timed "Up & Go" Test, especially poor performance on both tests, were good predictors of future disability in elderly people dwelling in the community. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  9. Ditching Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Lockheed Constellation Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Morris, Garland J.

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made of a 1/18-scale dynamically similar model of the Lockheed Constellation airplane to investigate its ditching characteristics and proper ditching technique. Scale-strength bottoms were used to reproduce probable damage to the fuselage. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and fuselage configuration were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording the longitudinal decelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history deceleration curves. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a medium nose-high landing attitude with the landing flaps full down. The airplane will probably make a deep run with heavy spray and may even dive slightly. The fuselage will be damaged and leak substantially but in calm water probably will not flood rapidly. Maximum longitudinal decelerations in a calm-water ditching will be about 4g.

  10. Method of determining operation parameters of stand tests of vehicle suspension elements under conditions of ultra-low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanov, E. A.; Sokolov-Dobrev, N. S.; Ljashenko, M. V.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Potapov, P. V.; Dolotov, A. A.; Klementiev, E. V.

    2018-05-01

    This article presents the description of the method for estimation of heat flows characteristic during research of operability of suspension elements under the conditions of ultralow temperature. The mentioned research is performed at the test bench created in VSTU. Solid carbon dioxide (also known as artificial ice) is used as the coolant. The method provides evaluation of required quantity of artificial ice and cooling dynamics of the test unit in the insulated low-temperature chamber with structurally specified parameters of heat insulation. Also the method allows computation of heat intake into the chamber volume.

  11. Preparing to Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-26

    Stennis Space Center employees install a 96-inch valve during a recent upgrade of the high-pressure industrial water system that serves the site’s large rocket engine test stands. The upgraded system has a capacity to flow 335,000 gallons of water a minute, which is a critical element for testing. At Stennis, engines are anchored in place on large test stands and fired just as they are during an actual space flight. The fire and exhaust from the test is redirected out of the stand by a large flame trench. A water deluge system directs thousands of gallons of water needed to cool the exhaust. Water also must be available for fire suppression in the event of a mishap. The new system supports RS-25 engine testing on the A-1 Test Stand, as well as testing of the core stage of NASA’s new Space Launch System on the B-2 Test Stand at Stennis.

  12. Ditching Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop B-35 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.

    1948-01-01

    Tests of a 1/20-scale dynamically similar model of the Northrop B-35 airplane were made to study its ditching characteristics. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds,and conditions of damage were simulated during the investigation. The ditching characteristics were determined by visual observation and from motion-picture records and time-history acceleration records. Both longitudinal and lateral accelerations were measured. Results are given in tabular form and time-history acceleration curves and sequence photographs are presented. Conclusions based on the model investigation are as follows: 1. The best ditching of the B-35 airplane probably can be made by contacting the water in a near normal landing attitude of about 9 deg with the landing flaps full down so as to have a low horizontal speed. 2. The airplane usually will turn or yaw but the motion will not be violent. The maximum lateral acceleration will be about 2g. 3. If the airplane does not turn or yaw immediately after landing, it probably will trim up and then make a smooth run or porpoise slightly. The maximum longitudinal decelerations that will be encountered are about 6g or 7g. 4. Although the decelerations are not indicated to be especially large, the construction of the airplane is such that extensive damage is to be expected, and it probably will be difficult to find ditching stations where crew members can adequately brace themselves and be reasonably sure of avoiding a large inrush of water.

  13. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Perkins, M; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T; Gabor, C; Back, J

    2014-02-01

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  14. Evaluation of the ICET Test Stand to Assess the Performance of a Range of Ceramic Media Filter Elements in Support of ASME AG-1 Subsection FO

    SciTech Connect

    Schemmel, A.

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are defined as extended-medium, dry-type filters with: (1) a minimum particle removal efficiency of no less than 99.97 percent for 0.3 micrometer particles, (2) a maximum, clean resistance of 1.0 inch water column (in. WC) when operated at 1,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM), and (3) a rigid casing that extends the full depth of the medium. Specifically, ceramic media HEPA filters provide better performance at elevated temperatures, are moisture resistant and nonflammable, can perform their function if wetted and exposed to greater pressures, and can be cleaned and reused. This paper describes themore » modification and design of a large scale test stand which properly evaluates the filtration characteristics of a range of ceramic media filters challenged with a nuclear aerosol agent in order to develop Section FO of ASME AG-1.« less

  15. The Design and Construction Process of a Test Stand for Casting the Power Steering’S Housing with the Use of the Pdcpd Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.

    2018-01-01

    The use of new technologies and materials in various industries is a natural process that is directly related to the very high rate of development of these technologies. Certain industries decide to much faster introduce new technologies and materials. One of such branches is the automotive industry, whose representatives are very energetically looking for both financial savings and savings resulting from the vehicles mass reduction. An economically justified approach to construction materials is leading the search for new solutions and materials. The use of a modern material such as the two-component PDCPD composite shows hitherto unknown possibilities of producing subassemblies of many different constructions. The possibility of using a modern composite material with parameters comparable to that of metals and significantly lighter, can be an excellent alternative in the selection of materials for many parts of motor vehicles. The potentiality of precise casting of tolerated surfaces will allow to reduce the operations related to machining process, which is an indispensable part of the production process of elements that are cast of metal. This article describes the process of designing and building a test stand for precise positioning of power steering gear components at the stage of casting their housing. The article presents the principle of operation of the test stand and the process of preparation for the casting and the cast itself will be rudely described. Due to the implementation of research as part of a research project with an industrial partner, the article will only describe some operations. This is related to the confidentiality of the project.

  16. Test of the multiquark structure of a1(1420 ) in strong two-body decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsche, Thomas; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Körner, Jürgen G.; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Xu, Kai

    2017-12-01

    We present an analysis of strong two-body decays of the a1(1420 ) with JP C=1++ recently reported by the COMPASS Collaboration at CERN. Following the interpretation of the COMPASS Collaboration that the a1 is an unusual state with a four-quark q q ¯s s ¯ structure we consider two possible configurations for this state—hadronic molecular and color diquark-antidiquark structures. We find that the dominant decay mode of the a1 is the decay into K and K*. In particular, we calculate that the four decay modes a1→V P with V P =K*±K∓, K*0K¯0, K¯*0K0 together give a dominant contribution to the measured total width of about 150 MeV. The observational mode a1→f0(980 )+π0 is significantly suppressed by one order of magnitude.

  17. A Test in Context: Hemoglobin A1c and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Gore, M Odette; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-12-06

    Measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), the most widely accepted indicator of long-term glycemic exposure, is central for the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. Levels of HbA 1c track epidemiologically with diabetic complications, and glycemic control, as reflected by HbA 1c reduction, results in decreased risk of microvascular complications, including diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy, and retinopathy. The relationship between HbA 1c reduction and cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetes is more complex, with data from large randomized trials published over the past decade providing clear evidence that lowering of HbA 1c per se is an inadequate marker for a therapeutic regimen's impact on cardiovascular outcomes and patient survival. Recent revisions in professional society guidelines moved away from uniform recommendations and toward a more nuanced, patient-centered approach to HbA 1c therapeutic targets. The context and key evidence underpinning these recent changes are discussed in this paper, alongside a brief overview of HbA 1c contemporary assays and their limitations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of various distance between axes of worm gear on torque value. Worm gear test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.

    2017-08-01

    Transferring both rotational and translational movements in systems used in the automotive industry is a very important and complex issue. In addition, the situation becomes much more difficult and complicated when the design of the transition system requires a high precision of operation as well as a well definite and long operating life. Such requirements are imposed on all components of today’s motor vehicles. However, particular attention is paid to the elements that directly or indirectly affect the safety of persons traveling in the vehicle. Such components are undoubtedly components included as parts of the steering system of the vehicle. Power steering systems have been present in motor vehicles for more than a century. They go through continuous metamorphosis and they are getting better and better. Current power steering systems are based on an electric motor and some kind of transmission. Depending on the position of the drive relative to the steering column, different configurations of the transmission are used. This article will cover issues related to tests of power steering gearing using a worm drive. The worm drive is a very specific example of a propulsion system that uses twisted axles. Normally, in this type of transition you can find two gear units with the axis mounted with a 90° angle between. The components of the worm drive are a worm and a worm gear, also called a worm wheel. In terms of the geometrical form, the worm resembles a helical spur gear. The shape of the worm is similar to the shape of a screw with a trapezoidal thread. A correct matching of these two components ensures proper operation of the entire transmission. Incorrect positioning of the components in relation to each other can significantly reduce the lifetime of the drive unit, and also lead to abnormal work, eg by raising the noise level. This article describes a test method of finding the appropriate distance between the axles of both worm drive units by testing the

  19. Magnetic and electric bulge-test instrument for the determination of coupling mechanical properties of functional free-standing films and flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zejun; Li, Faxin; Pei, Yongmao, E-mail: peiym@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: fangdn@pku.edu.cn

    2014-06-15

    For the first time a novel multi-field bulge-test instrument which enables measurements of the biaxial mechanical properties and electro-magnetic-mechanical coupling effect of free-standing films in external magnetic/electric fields was proposed. The oil pressure was designed with two ranges, 0–1 MPa for elastic small deformation and 0–7 MPa for plastic/damage large deformation. A magnetic field that was horizontal and uniform in the film plane was supplied by a hollow cylindrical magnet. The magnitude could be changed from 0 to 10 000 Oe by adjusting the position of the testing film. Meanwhile, an electric field applied on the film was provided by amore » voltage source (Maximum voltage: 1000 V; Maximum current: 1 A). Various signals related to deformation, mechanical loading, magnetic field, and electric field could be measured simultaneously without mutual interference, which was confirmed by the coincidence of the measured P-H curves for titanium (Ti)/nickel (Ni) specimens with/without external fields. A hardening phenomenon under magnetic/electric fields was observed for Ni and lead zirconate titanate specimens. The multi-field bulge-test instrument will provide a powerful research tool to study the deformation mechanism of functional films and flexible electronics in the coupling field.« less

  20. Control Performance of General Electric Fuel and Torque Regulator Operating on T31-3 Turbine-Propeller Engine in Sea-Level Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, Frank L.; Lazar, James

    1951-01-01

    A .General Electric fuel and torque regulator was tested in conjunction with a T31-3 turbine-propeller engine in the sea-level static test stand at the NACA Lewis laboratory. The engine and control were operated over the entire speed range: 11,000 rpm, nominal flight idle, to 13,000 rpm, full power. Steady-state and transient data were recorded and are presented with a description of the four control loops being used in the system. Results of this investigation indicated that single-lever control operation was satisfactory under conditions of test. Transient data presented showed that turbine-outlet temperature did overshoot maximum operating value on acceleration but that the time duration of overshoot did not exceed approximately 1 second. This temperature limiting resulted from a control on fuel flow as a function of engine speed. Speed and torque first reached their desired values 0.4 second from the time of change in power-setting lever position. Maximum speed overshoot was 3 percent.

  1. Point-of-care-testing of standing posture with Wii balance board and Microsoft Kinect during transcranial direct current stimulation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arindam; Chugh, Sanjay; Banerjee, Alakananda; Dutta, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is a promising tool for facilitating motor function. NIBS therapy in conjunction with training using postural feedback may facilitate physical rehabilitation following posture disorders (e.g., Pusher Syndrome). The objectives of this study were, 1) to develop a low-cost point-of-care-testing (POCT) system for standing posture, 2) to investigate the effects of anodal tDCS on functional reach tasks using the POCT system. Ten community-dwelling elderly (age >50 years) subjects evaluated the POCT system for standing posture during functional reach tasks where their balance score on Berg Balance Scale was compared with that from Center-of-Mass (CoM) - Center-of-Pressure (CoP) posturography. Then, in a single-blind, sham-controlled study, five healthy right-leg dominant subjects (age: 26.4 ± 5.3 yrs) were evaluated using the POCT system under two conditions - with anodal tDCS of primary motor representations of right tibialis anterior muscle and with sham tDCS. The maximum CoP-CoM lean-angle was found to be well correlated with the BBS score in the elderly subjects The anodal tDCS strongly (p = 0.0000) affected the maximum CoP excursions but not the return reaction time in healthy. It was concluded that the CoM-CoP lean-line could be used for posture feedback and monitoring during tDCS therapy in conjunction with balance training exercises.

  2. Proficiency testing of Hb A1c: a 4-year experience in Taiwan and the Asian Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Shiesh, Shu-Chu; Wiedmeyer, Hsiao-Mei; Kao, Jau-Tsuen; Vasikaran, Samuel D; Lopez, Joseph B

    2009-10-01

    The correlation between hemoglobin A(1c) (Hb A(1c)) and risk for complications in diabetic patients heightens the need to measure Hb A(1c) with accuracy. We evaluated the current performance for measuring Hb A(1c) in the Asian and Pacific region by examining data submitted by laboratories participating in the Taiwan proficiency-testing program. Five fresh-pooled blood samples were sent to participating laboratories twice each year. The results were evaluated against target values assigned by the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program network laboratories; a passing criterion of +/-7% of the target value was used. Measurement uncertainty at Hb A(1c) concentrations of 7.0% and 8.0% were determined. A total of 276 laboratories from 11 countries took part in the Hb A(1c) survey. At the Hb A(1c) concentrations tested method-specific interlaboratory imprecision (CVs) were 1.1%-13.9% in 2005, 1.3%-10.1% in 2006, 1.2%-8.2% in 2007, and 1.1%-6.1% in 2008. Differences between target values and median values from the commonly used methods ranged from -0.24% to 0.22% Hb A(1c) in 2008. In 2005 83% of laboratories passed the survey, and in 2008 93% passed. At 7.0% Hb A(1c), measurement uncertainty was on average 0.49% Hb A(1c). The use of accuracy-based proficiency testing with stringent quality criteria has improved the performance of Hb A(1c) testing in the Asian and Pacific laboratories during the 4 years of assessment.

  3. 17. HISTORIC VIEW OF ROCKET & LAUNCH STAND DESIGNED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. HISTORIC VIEW OF ROCKET & LAUNCH STAND DESIGNED BY HERMANN OBERTH AND RUDOLF NEBEL FOR THE MOVIE DIE FRAU IM MOND (THE WOMAN ON THE MOON). THE LAUNCH STAND WAS MODIFIED BY THE VFR FOR THE FIRST TEST STAND AT RAKETENFLUGPLATZ NEAR BERLIN. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  4. Developments in Test Facility and Data Networking for the Altitude Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center, MS - A General Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    May 2007, NASA's Constellation Program selected John C Stennis Space Center (SSC) near Waveland Mississippi as the site to construct an altitude test facility for the developmental and qualification testing of the Ares1 upper stage (US) engine. Test requirements born out of the Ares1 US propulsion system design necessitate exceptional Data Acquisition System (DAS) design solutions that support facility and propellant systems conditioning, test operations control and test data analysis. This paper reviews the new A3 Altitude Test Facility's DAS design requirements for real-time deterministic digital data, DAS technology enhancements, system trades, technology validation activities, and the current status of this system's new architecture. Also to be discussed will be current network technologies to improve data transfer.

  5. Further development of LLNA:DAE method as stand-alone skin-sensitization testing method and applied for evaluation of relative skin-sensitizing potency between chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    To date, there has been no well-established local lymph node assay (LLNA) that includes an elicitation phase. Therefore, we developed a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE) to discriminate true skin sensitizers from chemicals that gave borderline positive results and previously reported this assay. To develop the LLNA:DAE method as a useful stand-alone testing method, we investigated the complete procedure for the LLNA:DAE method using hexyl cinnamic aldehyde (HCA), isoeugenol, and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) as test compounds. We defined the LLNA:DAE procedure as follows: in the dose-finding test, four concentrations of chemical applied to dorsum of the right ear on days 1, 2, and 3 and dorsum of both ears on day 10. Ear thickness and skin irritation score were measured on days 1, 3, 5, 10, and 12. Local lymph nodes were excised and weighed on day 12. The test dose for the primary LLNA:DAE study was selected as the dose that gave the highest left ear lymph node weight in the dose-finding study, or the lowest dose that produced a left ear lymph node of over 4 mg. This procedure was validated using nine different chemicals. Furthermore, qualitative relationship was observed between the degree of elicitation response in the left ear lymph node and the skin sensitizing potency of 32 chemicals tested in this study and the previous study. These results indicated that LLNA:DAE method was as first LLNA method that was able to evaluate the skin sensitizing potential and potency in elicitation response.

  6. Validity and reliability of an iPhone App to assess time, velocity and leg power during a sit-to-stand functional performance test.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cárdenas, Juan Diego; Rodríguez-Juan, Juan José; Smart, Rowan R; Jakobi, Jennifer M; Jones, Gareth R

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this study were: (i) Analyze the concurrent validity and reliability of an iPhone App for measuring time, velocity and power during a single sit-to-stand (STS) test compared with measurements recorded from a force plate; and (ii) Evaluate the relationship between the iPhone App measures with age and functional performance. Forty-eight healthy individuals (age range: 26-81 years) were recruited. All participants completed a STS test on a force plate with the movement recorded on an iPhone 6 at 240 frames-per-second. Functional ability was also measured using isometric handgrip strength and self-paced walking time tests. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Pearson's correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha (α) and Bland-Altman plots with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to test validity and reliability between instruments. The results showed a good agreement between all STS measurement variables; time (ICC=0.864, 95%CI=0.77-0.92; α=0.926), velocity (ICC=0.912, 95%CI=0.85-0.95; α=0.953) and power (ICC=0.846, 95%CI=0.74-0.91; α=0.917) with no systematic bias between instruments for any variable analyzed. STS time, velocity and power derived from the iPhone App show moderate to strong associations with age (|r|=0.63-0.83) and handgrip strength (|r|=0.4-0.64) but not the walking test. The results of this study identify that this iPhone App is reliable for measuring STS and the derived values of time, velocity and power shows strong associations with age and handgrip strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Impact of HbA1c Testing on Total Annual Healthcare Expenditures Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhounsule, Prajakta; Peterson, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes also imposes a huge financial burden on the US economy. In 2009, the American Diabetes Association International Expert Committee recommended the use of the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test as a uniform diagnostic measure to identify patients with diabetes. Although HbA1c is a convenient diagnostic test, it is also more expensive than older tests and could, therefore, have an impact on patients' healthcare expenditures. To determine if HbA1c testing has an impact on total annual healthcare expenditures among newly diagnosed patients with diabetes and to analyze the factors that are associated with the total healthcare expenditures among diabetic patients before and after HbA1c was implemented as a standard diagnostic factor. This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Household Component 2009 and 2011 databases were used to form the study cohort of patients with diabetes. The total mean healthcare expenditures among patients with diabetes formed the dependent variable. A proxy variable representing a diagnosis of diabetes with and without the use of HbA1c testing in 2009 and in 2011, respectively, formed the main independent variable along with demographic factors, comorbidities, and healthcare services utilization in both years. A generalized linear regression was conducted to determine the association of HbA1c testing with total diabetes-related healthcare expenditures. The mean total healthcare expenditure decreased in 2011 compared with 2009. The HbA1c test did not show an association with the total healthcare expenditures versus earlier diabetes-related diagnostic factors. The total expenditures were associated with private insurance, the incidence of a previous heart attack, prescription drug refills, inpatient hospital stays, home care, hospital discharges, and visits to outpatient providers and physicians in both

  8. SLS Engine Section Test Article Moves From NASA Barge Pegasus To Test Stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-18

    The NASA barge Pegasus made its first trip to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama on May 15. It arrived carrying the first piece of Space Launch System hardware built at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The barge left Michoud on April 28 with the core stage engine section test article, traveling 1,240 miles by river to Marshall. The rocket's engine section is the bottom of the core stage and houses the four RS-25 engines. The engine section test article was moved from the barge to Marshall’s Building 4619 where it will be tested. The bottom part of the test article is structurally the same as the engine section that will be flown as part of the SLS core stage. The shiny metal top part simulates the rocket's liquid hydrogen tank, which is the fuel tank that joins to the engine section. The test article will endure tests that pull, push, and bend it, subjecting it to millions of pounds of force. This ensures the structure can withstand the incredible stresses produced by the 8.8 million pounds of thrust during launch and ascent.

  9. Systematic Diabetes Screening Using Point-of-Care HbA1c Testing Facilitates Identification of Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Heather P; Hanson, Courtney; Parton, Jason M

    2017-03-01

    This prospective longitudinal study compares diabetes screenings between standard practices vs systematically offered point-of-care (POC) hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) tests in patients aged 45 years or older. Systematically screened participants (n = 164) identified 63% (n = 104) with unknown hyperglycemia and 53% (n = 88) in prediabetes. The standard practice (n = 324) screened 22% (n = 73), most commonly by blood glucose (96%); 8% (n = 6) and 33% (n = 24) were found to have diabetes and prediabetes, respectively. The association between screening outcome and screening method was statistically significant ( P = 0.005) in favor of HbA 1C HbA 1c may be the most effective method to identify patients unknowingly living in hyperglycemia. Point-of-care tests further facilitate screening evaluation in a timely and feasible fashion. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Standing Tall: The Benefits of Standing Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    In the author's opinion as a pediatric physical therapist, with the exception of a wheelchair, there is no other piece of assistive technology that is more beneficial to children and adults with special needs than a standing device. Postural symmetry during standing and walking activities is extremely important for everyone. Very few children…

  11. Static test-stand performance of the YF-102 turbofan engine with several exhaust configurations for the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Homyak, L.; Moore, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a YF-102 turbofan engine was measured in an outdoor test stand with a bellmouth inlet and seven exhaust-system configurations. The configurations consisted of three separate-flow systems of various fan and core nozzle sizes and four confluent-flow systems of various nozzle sizes and shapes. A computer program provided good estimates of the engine performance and of thrust at maximum rating for each exhaust configuration. The internal performance of two different-shaped core nozzles for confluent-flow configurations was determined to be satisfactory. Pressure and temperature surveys were made with a traversing probe in the exhaust-nozzle flow for some confluent-flow configurations. The survey data at the mixing plane, plus the measured flow rates, were used to calculate the static-pressure variation along the exhaust nozzle length. The computed pressures compared well with experimental wall static-pressure data. External-flow surveys were made, for some confluent-flow configurations, with a large fixed rake at various locations in the exhaust plume.

  12. Reliability of the five-repetition sit-to-stand test in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on domiciliary oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Cani, Katerine Cristhine; Silva, Isabela Julia Cristiana Santos; Karloh, Manuela; Gulart, Aline Almeida; Matte, Darlan Laurício; Mayer, Anamaria Fleig

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the reliability and learning effect of the five-repetition sit-to-stand test (5STSt) in severe and very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients on domiciliary oxygen therapy compare the results with those of COPD patients not on such therapy. Twenty-eight COPD patients were included in the domiciliary oxygen therapy group (DOTG) and 17 in the control group (CG). The participants of the groups were paired by age, sex, body mass index, and lung function. The groups performed two 5STSt (5STSt 1 and 5STSt 2 ). In total, 96% of the patients in the DOTG performed better on the second 5STSt (5STSt 2 ) (17.1 ± 4.63s), with an average reduction of 3.87 ± 3.50 s (p < 0.001) and a learning effect of 18.4%. In the CG, 82.3% of patients had better performance on the 5STSt 2 (15.06 ± 3.45 s), with an average reduction of 1.38 ± 2.51 s (p = 0.035) and a learning effect of 8.39%. The 5STSt had an ICC of 0.79 (95%CI: 0.02-0.93; p < 0.001) in the DOTG and of 0.89 (95%CI: 0.65-0.96; p < 0.001) in the CG. The 5STSt is reliable in patients with severe and very severe COPD on domiciliary oxygen therapy, with learning effect of nearly 18% in the DOTG. Thus, performing two tests is recommended to achieve the patient´s best performance in this population.

  13. Testing the early Mars H2-CO2 greenhouse hypothesis with a 1-D photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F.

    2015-09-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (Ramirez, R.M. et al. [2014]. Nat. Geosci. 7(1), 59-63. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ngeo2000 (accessed 16.09.14)) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ˜1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere was indeed H2-rich, we might be able to see evidence of this in the rock record. The hypothesis proposed here is consistent with new data from the Curiosity Rover, which show evidence for a long-lived lake in Gale Crater near Mt. Sharp. It is also consistent with measured oxygen fugacities of martian meteorites, which show evidence for progressive mantle oxidation over time.

  14. Testing the accuracy of a 1-D volcanic plume model in estimating mass eruption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, empirical relationships are used to estimate mass eruption rate from plume height. Although simple, such relationships can be inaccurate and can underestimate rates in windy conditions. One-dimensional plume models can incorporate atmospheric conditions and give potentially more accurate estimates. Here I present a 1-D model for plumes in crosswind and simulate 25 historical eruptions where plume height Hobs was well observed and mass eruption rate Mobs could be calculated from mapped deposit mass and observed duration. The simulations considered wind, temperature, and phase changes of water. Atmospheric conditions were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 2.5° model. Simulations calculate the minimum, maximum, and average values (Mmin, Mmax, and Mavg) that fit the plume height. Eruption rates were also estimated from the empirical formula Mempir = 140Hobs4.14 (Mempir is in kilogram per second, Hobs is in kilometer). For these eruptions, the standard error of the residual in log space is about 0.53 for Mavg and 0.50 for Mempir. Thus, for this data set, the model is slightly less accurate at predicting Mobs than the empirical curve. The inability of this model to improve eruption rate estimates may lie in the limited accuracy of even well-observed plume heights, inaccurate model formulation, or the fact that most eruptions examined were not highly influenced by wind. For the low, wind-blown plume of 14–18 April 2010 at Eyjafjallajökull, where an accurate plume height time series is available, modeled rates do agree better with Mobs than Mempir.

  15. Testing a 1-D Analytical Salt Intrusion Model and the Predictive Equation in Malaysian Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, Jacqueline Isabella; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the salt intrusion behaviour in Malaysian estuaries. Study on this topic sometimes requires large amounts of data especially if a 2-D or 3-D numerical models are used for analysis. In poor data environments, 1-D analytical models are more appropriate. For this reason, a fully analytical 1-D salt intrusion model, based on the theory of Savenije in 2005, was tested in three Malaysian estuaries (Bernam, Selangor and Muar) because it is simple and requires minimal data. In order to achieve that, site surveys were conducted in these estuaries during the dry season (June-August) at spring tide by moving boat technique. Data of cross-sections, water levels and salinity were collected, and then analysed with the salt intrusion model. This paper demonstrates a good fit between the simulated and observed salinity distribution for all three estuaries. Additionally, the calibrated Van der Burgh's coefficient K, Dispersion coefficient D0, and salt intrusion length L, for the estuaries also displayed a reasonable correlations with those calculated from the predictive equations. This indicates that not only is the salt intrusion model valid for the case studies in Malaysia but also the predictive model. Furthermore, the results from this study describe the current state of the estuaries with which the Malaysian water authority in Malaysia can make decisions on limiting water abstraction or dredging. Keywords: salt intrusion, Malaysian estuaries, discharge, predictive model, dispersion

  16. 7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Stand density relationships

    Treesearch

    John C. Tappeiner

    2013-01-01

    Th inning stands (managing their densities) aff ects the development of trees and understory plants as individuals, as well as stand-level characteristics like structure, microclimate, and stand growth, habitat for various species, and fuel and potential fi re severity. Th ese characteristics and the rate of changes are aff ected by thinning severity—the reduction in...

  18. Agreement between the 'point of care' tests for microalbuminuria and HbA1c performed in mexican family medicine units and the results of standard laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Valdez-González, Leticia A; Méndez-Padrón, Araceli; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Sánchez-Becerra, Martha Catalina; Mondragón-González, Rafael; Hernández-Rubí, Jaime; González-Hermosillo, Arturo; Cruz, Miguel; Borja, Víctor; Wacher, Niels H

    The albumin-creatinine ratio is considered an indicator of microalbuminuria, precursor to chronic kidney disease, while HbA1c is used to measure glycemic control. Given the prevalence of diabetes-related nephropathy, spot testing of albumin has long been recommended as a preventative measure, for the timely detection of microalbuminuria. However, many countries do not have this testing available in primary care, and sometimes not even in second- and third-level care. The objective of this study was to compare agreement of the microalbuminuria and HbA1c results obtained in the laboratory with 'gold standard' techniques, with those obtained on site with a 'Point of Care' DCA Vantage™ device by Siemens. Results for the albumin-creatinine ratio and HbA1c from the Siemens DCA Vantage™ point of care device were compared with those from standard laboratory tests in 25 family medicine units in Mexico City and Toluca, State of Mexico, in patients diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Agreement between the albumin values of the 2 tests was 0.745 (CI 95% 0.655-0.812). Agreement between the two measurement techniques for HbA1c was 0.970 (CI 95% 0.966-0.973). The results obtained were sufficiently comparative (R i = 0.74 for albumin-creatinine ratio and R i  = 0.97 for HbA1c) to justify the use of the point of care device. Given the high agreement between the point of care device and laboratory tests, this device could be used to identify chronic kidney disease and glycemic control for more adequate treatment in patients with diabetes, especially in remote areas.

  19. [Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes mellitus in adolescents with overweight and obesity].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, Aleida; Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Fiorentini-Fayad, Gigliola Margaretta; Nishimura-Meguro, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 it was introduced a new diagnostic criteria based on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) greater than or equal to 6.5 % in the adult population; some studies suggest that the cutoff may be smaller in pediatric population. The objective was to determine the utility of HbA1c greater than or equal to 6.5 % as a diagnostic test for DM in Mexican adolescents with overweight or obesity. Full somatometry was performed. Also, Tanner stage, blood pressure, blood glucose, glucose tolerance curve (GTC) and HbA1c were analyzed. Specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and ROC curve were calculated for the diagnosis of DM with HbA1c. 109 adolescents between 10 and 16 years referred for obesity or overweight plus comorbidities were studied; 58 % were females, the age was of 13 ± 1.74 years, the BMI percentile 95.3, and the HbA1c 5.73 ± 0.9 %. It was made a diagnosis of DM in 9 cases (8.3 %), prediabetes in 8 (7.3 %) and normal glucose tolerance in 92 (84.4 %). The HbA1c mean was 5.6 ± 0.04, 5.7 ± 0.4, and 5.6 ± 0.73 %, respectively. HbA1c greater than or equal to 6.5 % had a sensitivity of 12.5 %, a specificity of 89.8 %, a PPV of 10.65 and a NPV of 14.28. The best cutoff point for diagnosing DM through ROC curve was 5.45 %, with a sensitivity of 62.5 %, a specificity of 57.1 %, PPV 2.53 and NPV 33.3. The level of HbA1c greater than or equal to 6.5 % had low sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of DM. A lower cutoff point is insufficient to use HbA1c as a diagnostic criterion. These results are consistent with the ones of other journals.

  20. Test results and description of a 1-kW free-piston Stirling engine with a dashpot load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1 kW (1.33 hp) single cylinder free piston Stirling engine was installed in the test facilities at the Lewis laboratory. The engine was designed specifically for research of the dynamics of its operation. A more complete description of the engine and its instrumentation is provided in a prior NASA paper TM-82999 by J. G. Schreiber. Initial tests at Lewis showed the power level and efficiency of the engine to be below design level. Tests were performed to help determine the specific problems in the engine causing the below design level performance. Modifications to engine hardware and to the facility where performed in an effort to bring the power output and efficiency to their design values. As finally configured the engine generated more than 1250 watts of output power at an engine efficiency greater than 32 percent. This report presents the tests performed to help determine the specific problems, the results if the problem was eliminated, the fix performed to the hardware, and the test results after the engine was tested. In cases where the fix did not cause the anticipated effects, a possible explanation is given.

  1. The use of computed tomography scans and the Bender Gestalt Test in the assessment of competency to stand trial and criminal responsibility in the field of mental health and law.

    PubMed

    Mosotho, Nathaniel Lehlohonolo; Timile, Ino; Joubert, Gina

    computed tomography and the Bender Gestalt Test are some of the tests used routinely for the assessment of alleged offenders referred under Sections 77 and 78 of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977. An exploratory retrospective study was conducted at the Free State Psychiatric Complex. The aim of this study was to identify the extent to which the Bender Gestalt Test results and the computed tomography scans are associated with outcomes in the assessment of competency to stand trial and criminal responsibility in individuals referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC) observation unit. This was a cross-sectional study and the entire population of patients admitted in 2013 was included in the study. The clinical and demographic data were obtained from patient files. The majority of participants were black, males, single and unemployed. The most common diagnosis was schizophrenia. The current study showed no statistically significant association between the Bender Gestalt Test Hain's scores and the outcome of criminal responsibility and competency to stand trial. Similarly, the study also showed no statistically significant association between the presence of a brain lesion and the outcome of criminal responsibility and competency to stand trial. It was also concluded that as CT scans are expensive, patients should be referred for that service only when there is a clear clinical indication to do so. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determining the ion temperature and energy distribution in a lithium-plasma interaction test stand with a retarding field energy analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, M.; Stemmley, S.; Jung, S.; Mettler, J.; Sang, X.; Martin, D.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2017-08-01

    The ThermoElectric-driven Liquid-metal plasma-facing Structures (TELS) experiment at the University of Illinois is a gas-puff driven, theta-pinch plasma source that is used as a test stand for off-normal plasma events incident on materials in the edge and divertor regions of a tokamak. The ion temperatures and resulting energy distributions are crucial for understanding how well a TELS pulse can simulate an extreme event in a larger, magnetic confinement device. A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) has been constructed for use with such a transient plasma due to its inexpensive and robust nature. The innovation surrounding the use of a control analyzer in conjunction with an actively sampling analyzer is presented and the conditions of RFEA operation are discussed, with results presented demonstrating successful performance under extreme conditions. Such extreme conditions are defined by heat fluxes on the order of 0.8 GW m-2 and on time scales of nearly 200 μs. Measurements from the RFEA indicate two primary features for a typical TELS discharge, following closely with the pre-ionizing coaxial gun discharge characteristics. For the case using the pre-ionization pulse (PiP) and the theta pinch, the measured ion signal showed an ion temperature of 23.3 ± 6.6 eV for the first peak and 17.6 ± 1.9 eV for the second peak. For the case using only the PiP, the measured signal showed an ion temperature of 7.9 ± 1.1 eV for the first peak and 6.6 ± 0.8 eV for the second peak. These differences illustrate the effectiveness of the theta pinch for imparting energy on the ions. This information also highlights the importance of TELS as being one of the few linear pulsed plasma sources whereby moderately energetic ions will strike targets without the need for sample biasing.

  3. Determining the ion temperature and energy distribution in a lithium-plasma interaction test stand with a retarding field energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Christenson, M; Stemmley, S; Jung, S; Mettler, J; Sang, X; Martin, D; Kalathiparambil, K; Ruzic, D N

    2017-08-01

    The ThermoElectric-driven Liquid-metal plasma-facing Structures (TELS) experiment at the University of Illinois is a gas-puff driven, theta-pinch plasma source that is used as a test stand for off-normal plasma events incident on materials in the edge and divertor regions of a tokamak. The ion temperatures and resulting energy distributions are crucial for understanding how well a TELS pulse can simulate an extreme event in a larger, magnetic confinement device. A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) has been constructed for use with such a transient plasma due to its inexpensive and robust nature. The innovation surrounding the use of a control analyzer in conjunction with an actively sampling analyzer is presented and the conditions of RFEA operation are discussed, with results presented demonstrating successful performance under extreme conditions. Such extreme conditions are defined by heat fluxes on the order of 0.8 GW m -2 and on time scales of nearly 200 μs. Measurements from the RFEA indicate two primary features for a typical TELS discharge, following closely with the pre-ionizing coaxial gun discharge characteristics. For the case using the pre-ionization pulse (PiP) and the theta pinch, the measured ion signal showed an ion temperature of 23.3 ± 6.6 eV for the first peak and 17.6 ± 1.9 eV for the second peak. For the case using only the PiP, the measured signal showed an ion temperature of 7.9 ± 1.1 eV for the first peak and 6.6 ± 0.8 eV for the second peak. These differences illustrate the effectiveness of the theta pinch for imparting energy on the ions. This information also highlights the importance of TELS as being one of the few linear pulsed plasma sources whereby moderately energetic ions will strike targets without the need for sample biasing.

  4. Family-Based Association Testing of OCD-Associated SNPs of SLC1A1 in an Autism Sample

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Camille W.; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Hanna, Gregory L.; Courchesne, Eric; Lord, Catherine; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Cook, Edwin H.

    2009-01-01

    Reports identified the neuronal glutamate transporter gene, SLC1A1 (OMIM 133550, chromosome 9p24), as a positional and functional candidate gene for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). The presence of obsessions and compulsions similar to OCD in autism, the identification of this region in a genome-wide linkage analysis of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and the hypothesized role of glutamate in ASDs make SLC1A1 a candidate gene for ASD as well. To test for association between SLC1A1 and autism, we typed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs301430, rs301979, rs301434) previously associated with OCD in 86 strictly defined trios with autism. Family-Based Association Tests (FBAT) with additive and recessive models were used to check for association. Additionally, an rs301430–rs301979 haplotype identified for OCD was investigated. FBAT revealed nominally significant association between autism and one SNP under a recessive model. The G allele of rs301979 was undertransmitted (equivalent to overtransmission of the C allele under a dominant model) to individuals with autism (Z = −2.47, P = 0.01). The G allele was also undertransmitted in the T–G haplotype under the recessive model (Z = −2.41, P = 0.02). Both findings were also observed in the male-only sample. However, they did not withstand correction for multiple comparisons. PMID:19360657

  5. Construction, wind tunnel testing and data analysis for a 1/5 scale ultra-light wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael D.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the construction, wind tunnel testing, and data analysis of a 1/5 scale ultra-light wing section. Wind tunnel testing provided accurate and meaningful lift, drag, and pitching moment data. This data was processed and graphically presented as follows: C(sub L) vs. gamma; C(sub D) vs. gamma; C(sub M) vs. gamma; and C(sub L) vs. C(sub D). The wing fabric flexure was found to be significant and its possible effects on aerodynamic data was discussed. The fabric flexure is directly related to wing angle of attack and airspeed. Different wing section shapes created by fabric flexure are presented with explanations of the types of pressures that act upon the wing surface. This report provides conclusive aerodynamic data for ultra-light wings.

  6. A 1/10 Scale Model Test of a Fixed Chute Mixer-Ejector Nozzle in Unsuppressed Model. Part 1; Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a test of a nozzle concept for a high-speed commercial aircraft. While a great deal of effort has been expended to und erstand the noise-suppressed, take-off performance of mixer-ejector n ozzles, little has been done to assess their performance in unsuppressed mode at other flight conditions. To address this, a 1/10th scale m odel mixer-ejector nozzle in unsuppressed mode was tested at conditio ns representing transonic acceleration, supersonic cruise, subsonic cruise, and approach. Various configurations were tested to understand the effects of acoustic liners and several geometric parameters, such as throat area, expansion ratio, and nozzle length on nozzle performance. Thrust, flow, and internal pressures were measured. A statistica l model of the peak thrust coefficient results is presented and discussed.

  7. Correlation study of theoretical and experimental results for spin tests of a 1/10 scale radio control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A correlation study was conducted to determine the ability of current analytical spin prediction techniques to predict the flight motions of a current fighter airplane configuration during the spin entry, the developed spin, and the spin recovery motions. The airplane math model used aerodynamics measured on an exact replica of the flight test model using conventional static and forced-oscillation wind-tunnel test techniques and a recently developed rotation-balance test apparatus capable of measuring aerodynamics under steady spinning conditions. An attempt was made to predict the flight motions measured during stall/spin flight testing of an unpowered, radio-controlled model designed to be a 1/10 scale, dynamically-scaled model of a current fighter configuration. Comparison of the predicted and measured flight motions show that while the post-stall and spin entry motions were not well-predicted, the developed spinning motion (a steady flat spin) and the initial phases of the spin recovery motion are reasonably well predicted.

  8. Saw gin stands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The saw gin stand is the heart of the saw ginning system. Almost from the initial filing of patents for the spiked tooth gin and the saw gin in 1794 and 1796 by Whitney and then Holmes respectively (Hughs and Holt, 2015), the saw gin stand has predominated over early roller-type gins in the U.S. co...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix A1 to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. A1 Appendix A1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring...

  10. 10 CFR Appendix A1 to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. A1 Appendix A1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring...

  11. Stand density index in uneven-aged ponderosa pine stands

    Treesearch

    C.W. Woodall; C.E. Fiedler; K.S. Milner

    2003-01-01

    Stand density index (SDI) was developed to quantify relative stand density in even-aged stands. Application of SDI in uneven-aged stands has been described mathematically but not justified biologically. Diameter-class trends in SDI and sapwood area across 14 uneven-aged ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. & C. Laws.) stands in eastern...

  12. Variation in Point-of-Care Testing of HbA1c in Diabetes Care in General Practice.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Troels; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Nexøe, Jørgen; Skovsgaard, Christian Volmar; Olsen, Kim Rose

    2017-11-09

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes, and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators created a framework agreement regarding a new fee-for-service fee for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in general practice. According to secondary research, only the Capital Region of Denmark has allowed GPs to use this new incentive for POCT. The aim of this study is to use patient data to characterize patients with diabetes who have received POCT of HbA1c and analyze the variation in the use of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes in Danish general practice. Methods: We use register data from the Danish Drug Register, the Danish Health Service Register and the National Patient Register from the year 2011 to define a population of 44,981 patients with diabetes (type 1 and type 2 but not patients with gestational diabetes) from the Capital Region. The POCT fee is used to measure the amount of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes. Next, we apply descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to analyze variation in the prevalence of POCT at the patient and clinic level. We include patient characteristics such as gender, age, socioeconomic markers, health care utilization, case mix markers, and municipality classifications. Results: The proportion of patients who received POCT was 14.1% and the proportion of clinics which were "POCT clinics" was 26.9%. There were variations in the use of POCT across clinics and patients. A part of the described variation can be explained by patient characteristics. Male gender, age differences (older age), short education, and other ethnicity imply significantly higher odds for POCT. High patient costs in general practice and other parts of primary care also imply higher odds for POCT. In contrast, high patient costs for drugs and/or morbidity in terms of the Charlson

  13. Variation in Point-of-Care Testing of HbA1c in Diabetes Care in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Troels; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Nexøe, Jørgen; Skovsgaard, Christian Volmar; Olsen, Kim Rose

    2017-01-01

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes, and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators created a framework agreement regarding a new fee-for-service fee for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in general practice. According to secondary research, only the Capital Region of Denmark has allowed GPs to use this new incentive for POCT. The aim of this study is to use patient data to characterize patients with diabetes who have received POCT of HbA1c and analyze the variation in the use of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes in Danish general practice. Methods: We use register data from the Danish Drug Register, the Danish Health Service Register and the National Patient Register from the year 2011 to define a population of 44,981 patients with diabetes (type 1 and type 2 but not patients with gestational diabetes) from the Capital Region. The POCT fee is used to measure the amount of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes. Next, we apply descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to analyze variation in the prevalence of POCT at the patient and clinic level. We include patient characteristics such as gender, age, socioeconomic markers, health care utilization, case mix markers, and municipality classifications. Results: The proportion of patients who received POCT was 14.1% and the proportion of clinics which were “POCT clinics” was 26.9%. There were variations in the use of POCT across clinics and patients. A part of the described variation can be explained by patient characteristics. Male gender, age differences (older age), short education, and other ethnicity imply significantly higher odds for POCT. High patient costs in general practice and other parts of primary care also imply higher odds for POCT. In contrast, high patient costs for drugs and/or morbidity in terms of the Charlson

  14. A comparative study of the five-times-sit-to-stand and timed-up-and-go tests as measures of functional mobility in persons with and without injection-related venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Goldberg, Allon

    2014-02-01

    To provide information on the Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand (FTSTS) and Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) tests in persons with injection-related venous ulcers (VU+) and persons without venous ulcers (VU-). This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: To examine functional mobility using Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand (FTSTS) and Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) tests in persons with injection-related venous ulcers (VU+) and compare these findings to persons without venous ulcers (VU-). Cross-sectional, comparative design. Outpatient clinic.PARTICPANTS: Participants (n = 61) were 31 persons VU+ and 30 persons VU-; 57.4% men; mean age, 54 years; 93% African American. Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand, TUG, physical activity, quality of life, comorbidities, falls, and body mass index. Participants VU+ were 36.8% slower on completion of the TUG test (P = .012) and 26.5% slower on completion of the FTSTS test (P = .081). Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand and TUG were strongly correlated with each other, r = 0.93, 0.87, P < .001 for VU- and VU+, respectively. Test-retest reliabilities for the FTSTS and TUG tests were high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89-0.94) for the VU+ and VU-. Within each group, correlations of FTSTS and TUG were similar for each of the variables examined. Across groups, correlations showed that the time to complete FTSTS and TUG increased as a function of comorbidities in the VU+ group; the correlations in the VU- group were not significantly different from zero. The VU+ group exhibited poorer physical performance than the VU- group. The high correlation between FTSTS and TUG and the similarity of correlations with other variables suggest that these physical performance measures may be interchangeable in their ability to predict physical functioning in these clinical groups despite differences in test demands. Clinicians need easy

  15. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop N-9M Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDougall, George F., Jr.; Lichtenstein, Jacob H.

    1946-01-01

    Spin tests of a 1/20-scale model of the Northrop N-9M airplane have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics were determined for various loading conditions and the effect of deflecting the flaps and of extending the landing gear was investigated. The investigation also included tests to determine the size parachute required for satisfactory spin recovery by parachute action alone. The tests were performed at an equivalent spin altitude of 15,000 feet. A specialized recovery technique consisting of rapid full reversal of the rudder pedals against the spin combined with turning the wheel against the spin and movement of the stick forward is recommended for all loadings and configurations of the airplane. The results also indicated that a 7-foot-diameter spin-recovery parachute having a drag coefficient of 0.7 attached to the outboard wing tip with a towline of 10 to 30 feet or an 8.8-foot-diameter parachute attached to the fixed portion of the wing between the elevons and the pitch flaps with a 30-foot towline would provide satisfactory recovery from demonstration spins by parachute action alone. It appears possible that the first N-9M airplane may have crashed because of failure to recover from a spin.

  16. Primordial standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2018-03-01

    We consider the possibility that the primordial fluctuations (scalar and tensor) might have been standing waves at their moment of creation, whether or not they had a quantum origin. We lay down the general conditions for spatial translational invariance, and isolate the pieces of the most general such theory that comply with, or break translational symmetry. We find that, in order to characterize statistically translationally invariant standing waves, it is essential to consider the correlator ⟨c0(k )c0(k')⟩ in addition to the better known ⟨c0(k )c0†(k')⟩ [where c0(k ) are the complex amplitudes of traveling waves]. We then examine how the standard process of "squeezing" (responsible for converting traveling waves into standing waves while the fluctuations are outside the horizon) reacts to being fed primordial standing waves. For translationally invariant systems only one type of standing wave, with the correct temporal phase (the "sine wave"), survives squeezing. Primordial standing waves might therefore be invisible at late times—or not—depending on their phase. Theories with modified dispersion relations behave differently in this respect, since only standing waves with the opposite temporal phase survive at late times.

  17. Longer rewarming time in finger cooling test in association with HbA1c level in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shan; Chen, Qi; Wang, Xiang-Wen; Hong, Kui; Li, Ju-Xiang; Li, Ping; Cheng, Xiao-Shu; Su, Hai

    2016-09-01

    To assess if rewarming time in finger cooling test (FCT) as an indicator of microvascular dysfunction is abnormal in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty-three T2DM patients and 48 healthy controls with similarly distributed baseline demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters were subjected to FCT involving 60-second index finger immersion into water at 4°C. Finger temperature was measured before FCT (baseline-T), immediately after cooling stimulus (T0), and at one-minute intervals until baseline-T recovery. Temperature decline amplitude was calculated as the difference between T0 and baseline-T, and rewarming time as time elapsed from T0 to baseline-T recovery. T2DM patients compared with healthy controls had statistically similar baseline-T, significantly larger temperature decline amplitude, significantly lower T0, and significantly longer rewarming time. In T2DM patients, rewarming time positively correlated with T2DM duration (r=0.513, p<0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (r=0.446, p=0.003), which also were its independent predictors in multivariate regression analysis. Patients with T2DM display abnormal FCT results suggestive of microvascular dysfunction, with T2DM duration and HbA1c level independently predicting rewarming time. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The Utility of the Supine-to-Stand Test as a Measure of Functional Motor Competence in Children Aged 5–9 Years

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Michael J.; Lawson, Chelsey; Walker, Leanne Jaye; Stodden, David; Eyre, Emma L. J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how supine-to-stand (STS) performance is related to process and product assessment of motor competence (MC) in children. Ninety-one children aged 5–9 years were assessed for process and product MC (10 m running speed and standing long jump) as well as process and product measures of STS. Tertiles were created for STS process and STS product scores to create 3 groups reflecting low, medium, and high STS competency. ANCOVA analysis, controlling for age, for process STS, indicated that process MC was significantly higher in children, classified as medium STS (p = 0.048) and high STS (p = 0.011) competence, and that 10 m run speed was slower for low STS compared to medium (p = 0.019) and high STS (p = 0.004). For product STS tertiles, process MC was significantly higher for children in the lowest (fastest) STS tertile compared to those in the medium highest (slowest) tertile (p = 0.01). PMID:29910427

  19. A drive system to add standing mobility to a manual standing wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Eric; Hansen, Andrew; Pearlman, Jonathan; Goldish, Gary

    2016-05-16

    Current manual standing wheelchairs are not mobile in the standing position. The addition of standing mobility may lead to improved health and function for the user and may increase utilization of standing wheelchairs. In this project, a chain drive system was fitted to a manual standing wheelchair, adding mobility in the standing position. The hand rims are accessible from both seated and standing positions. The prototype uses 16-inch drive wheels in front with casters in the rear. Additional anterior casters are elevated when seated for navigating obstacles and then descend when standing to create a six-wheeled base with extended anterior support. Stability testing shows the center of pressure remains within the base of support when leaning to the sides or front in both seated and standing positions. Four veterans with spinal cord injury provided feedback on the design and reported that mobility during standing was very important or extremely important to them. The veterans liked the perceived stability and mobility of the prototype and provided feedback for future refinements. For example, reducing the overall width (width from hand rim to hand rim) and weight could make this system more functional for users.

  20. Ditching Tests of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XFJ-1 Airplane Ted No. NACA 314

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American XFJ-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down landing attitude of 12 deg. The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned if any appreciable load of fuel remains; if empty, they should be retained for additional buoyancy. In a calm-water ditching the airplane will probably run about 600 feet Maximum longitudinal decelerations of about 2.5g and maximum vertical acceleration of about 2g will be encountered. The nose-intake duct will be clear of the water until practically all forward motion has stopped.

  1. Where We Now Stand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Keith G.

    1969-01-01

    Noting the acceleration of scientific evaluation, the author focuses his attention on where we now stand in the evaluation of two methods of instruction: programed learning materials and television. (Editor)

  2. Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy in standing bulls

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; KITAHARA, Go; HIDAKA, Yuichi; SATOH, Hiroyuki; ASANUMA, Taketoshi; MIZUTANI, Shinya; OSAWA, Takeshi; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy without insufflation was applied in 10 standing bulls aged 3 to 15 months. Nine bulls were preoperatively pointed out intra-abdominal testes by computed tomography. Preoperative fasting for a minimum of 24 hr provided laparoscopic visualization of intra-abdominal area from the kidney to the inguinal region. Surgical procedure was interrupted by intra-abdominal fat and testis size. It took 0.6 to 1.5 hr in 4 animals weighing 98 to 139 kg, 0.8 to 2.8 hr in 4 animals weighing 170 to 187 kg, and 3 and 4 hr in 2 animals weighing 244 and 300 kg to complete the cryptorchidectomy. In conclusion, standing gasless laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy seems to be most suitable for bulls weighing from 100 to 180 kg. PMID:25715955

  3. Preliminary report on the geology and geophysics of drill hole UE25a-1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spengler, Richard W.; Muller, D.C.; Livermore, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    A subsurface geologic study in connection with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations has furnished detailed stratigraphic and structural information about tuffs underlying northeastern Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. Drill hole UE25a-1 penetrated thick sequences of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow and bedded tuffs of Tertiary age. Stratigraphic units that were identified from the drill-hole data include the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Members of the Paintbrush Tuff, tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, and the Prow Pass and Bullfrog Members of the Crater Flat Tuff. Structural analysis of the core indicated densely welded zones to be highly fractured. Many fractures show near-vertical inclinations and are commonly coated with secondary silica, manganese and iron oxides, and calcite. Five fault zones were recognized, most of which occurred in the Topopah Spring Member. Shear fractures commonly show oblique-slip movement and some suggest a sizable component of lateral compression. Graphic logs are included that show the correlation of lithology, structural properties, and geophysical logs. Many rock units have characteristic log responses but highly fractured zones, occurring principally in the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Members, restricted log coverage to the lower half of the drill hole.

  4. Patterns of type 2 diabetes monitoring in rural towns: How does frequency of HbA1c and lipid testing compare with existing guidelines?

    PubMed

    Paul, Christine L; Piterman, Leon; Shaw, Jonathan E; Kirby, Catherine; Barker, Daniel; Robinson, Jennifer; Forshaw, Kristy L; Sikaris, Kenneth A; Bisquera, Alessandra; Sanson-Fisher, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    To indicate levels of monitoring of type 2 diabetes in rural and regional Australia by examining patterns of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood lipid testing. Retrospective analysis of pathology services data from twenty regional and rural towns in eastern Australia over 24 months. Of 13 105 individuals who had either a single HbA1c result ≥7.0% (53 mmol mol -1 ); or two or more HbA1c tests within the study period. Frequency of testing of HbA1c and blood lipids (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides) were compared with guideline recommendations. About 58.3% of patients did not have the recommended 6-monthly HbA1c tests and 30.6% did not have annual lipid testing. For those who did not receive tests at the recommended interval, the mean between-test interval was 10.5 months (95% CI = 7.5-13.5) rather than 6 months for HbA1c testing; and 15.7 (95% CI = 13.3-18.1) months rather than annually for blood lipids. For those with at least one out-of-range test result, 77% of patients failed to receive a follow-up HbA1c test and 86.5% failed to receive a follow-up blood lipid test within the recommended 3 months. Patients less than 50 years of age, living in a more remote area and with poor diabetes control were less likely to have testing at the recommended intervals (P < 0.0001). Although poor diabetes testing is not limited to rural areas, more intensive diabetes monitoring is likely to be needed for patients living in non-metropolitan areas, particularly for some subgroups. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  5. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  6. Treating mature stands for wildlife

    Treesearch

    William H. Healy; Gary F. Houf

    1989-01-01

    Stands older than 60 years or that are medium to large sawtimber size generally provide good wildlife habitat. Mature trees usually produce abundant mast and provide den sites (see fig. 1 in Note 9.04 Treating Immature Stands). The undergrowth in these stands produces moderate amounts of browse and herbage. Mature stands also provide opportunities for management...

  7. How can point-of-care HbA1c testing be integrated into UK primary care consultations? - A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Hirst, J A; Stevens, R J; Smith, I; James, T; Gudgin, B C; Farmer, A J

    2017-08-01

    Point-of-care (POC) HbA1c testing gives a rapid result, allowing testing and treatment decisions to take place in a single appointment. Trials of POC testing have not been shown to improve HbA1c, possibly because of how testing was implemented. This study aimed to identify key components of POC HbA1c testing and determine strategies to optimise implementation in UK primary care. This cohort feasibility study recruited thirty patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c>7.5% (58mmol/mol) into three primary care clinics. Patients' clinical care included two POC HbA1c tests over six months. Data were collected on appointment duration, clinical decisions, technical performance and patient behaviour. Fifty-three POC HbA1c consultations took place during the study; clinical decisions were made in 30 consultations. Five POC consultations with a family doctor lasted on average 11min and 48 consultations with nurses took on average 24min. Five POC study visits did not take place in one clinic. POC results were uploaded to hospital records from two clinics. In total, sixty-three POC tests were performed, and there were 11 cartridge failures. No changes in HbA1c or patient behaviour were observed. HbA1c measurement with POC devices can be effectively implemented in primary care. This work has identified when these technologies might work best, as well as potential challenges. The findings can be used to inform the design of a pragmatic trial to implement POC HbA1c testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Principles of managing stands

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis; Rodney Jacobs

    1989-01-01

    Forest stands are managed to achieve some combination of desired products or values. These products or values may include income and tangible benefits from timber production or fees for hunting rights and other recreational activities. The values may be intangible, such as the enjoyment of seeing wildlife or flowering plants, or the simple satisfaction of knowing that...

  9. Free-Standing Canes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehresman, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A precane device, called the "free-standing cane," was developed to help children with blindness along with other disabilities. The cane detects obstacles; guides the user's hands into a relaxed, static position in front of the hips; facilitates postural security and control; and offers tactile and kinesthetic feedback. (JDD)

  10. Economics of stand management

    Treesearch

    David K. Lewis

    1986-01-01

    This paper sets out to demonstrate the importance of considering the wealth represented by the growing stock in economic analyses of stand management alternatives, and to demonstrate the role of thinning in the manipulation of the efficiency of growing stock in the management of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.). These goals are achieved through a demonstration of...

  11. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  12. Ditching Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Lockheed Constellation Airplane with Speedpak Attached

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Thompson, William C.

    1949-01-01

    Results of previous model ditching tests of the Lockheed Constellation airplane are reported. Further model tests have been made to determine the probable ditching characteristics and the proper ditching technique for the airplane with the Speedpak attached. This paper presents the results of these tests. Design information was furnished by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation. A three-vies drawing of the airplane with the Speedpak attached is shown. The tests were made in calm water at the Langley tank no.2 monorail.

  13. Final Environmental Assessment of the Joint Air-to-Surface Stand-Off Missile (JASSM) Development and Evaluation Testing, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Explosive Test Site Program Definition and Risk Reduction Permissible Exposure Limit Program Executive Office Propellants, Explosives, and...each test vehicle is flown in the captive mode and critical systems are functioned to further remove risk of failure due to the flight environment...of other inferior missiles would require a larger number of missiles, at increased procurement costs and risk to aircraft and crew, in order to

  14. In vitro testing of biological control agents on A1 and A2 isolates of Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Marianne Elliott; Simon Shamoun

    2008-01-01

    Biological control products were tested in vitro with six isolates of Phytophthora ramorum. These isolates were geographically diverse and were selected based on their pathogenicity to detached Rhododendron leaves. In addition to five commercially available biocontrol products, nine species of Trichoderma were tested. The in vitro...

  15. Reliability and a correlational analysis of the 6MWT, ten-meter walk test, thirty second sit to stand, and the linear analog scale of function in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eden, Melissa M; Tompkins, James; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the test-retest reliability of and relationships between various measures of physical function in a cohort of individuals in the early treatment stages for head and neck cancer (HNC). The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 30-Second Sit to Stand (30STS), and Linear Analog Scale of Function (LASF) were administered to 42 participants with a diagnosis of HNC. Test-retest reliability and correlations between the measures are reported. The 6MWT, 10MWT, 30STS, and LASF demonstrate excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.901-0.960). The 6MWT exhibits a moderate to good relationship with the 10MWT (r = 0.684, p < 0.001), whereas the relationship between the 30STS and the 6MWT (r = 0.407, p = 0.007) and 10MWT (r = 0.322, p = 0.038) is fair. The LASF does not correlate significantly with the 6MWT, 10MWT, or 30STS. The 6MWT, 10MWT, 30STS, and LASF are reliable measurement instruments for patients treated for HNC. The 6MWT, 10MWT, and 30STS are significantly correlated suggesting they may measure subconstructs of physical function. The LASF does not correlate significantly with the 6MWT, 10MWT and 30STS in this sample.

  16. Get up, Stand up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melia, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Ignorance about dyslexia meant a miserable school experience for Barrie Hughes. He was in his 50s when he found the courage to stand up in front of a classroom of learners and admit he couldn't read. Barrie, who is now 59 and works for the parks department of Brighton and Hove Council, only began to learn how to read words in the last three years…

  17. Knowledge and Outcome Measure of HbA1c Testing in Asian Indian Patients with Type 2 Diabetes from a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Kumpatla, Satyavani; Medempudi, Srikanth; Manoharan, Deepa; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Aim: HbA1c test is considered to be the reliable measure for evaluating long-term glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether knowledge about HbA1c test is associated with a better glycemic control. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 480 (M:F; 287:193) adults with type 2 diabetes attending a tertiary care center during a period of four months. Baseline demographic and clinical data of all the subjects was obtained. Subject’s knowledge about HbA1c test and their target goal was assessed using a questionnaire. Recent HbA1c results were obtained from medical records. Results: Seventy four per cent of the subjects had awareness about HbA1c test and about 43% of those who knew HbA1c test also knew their target goal. 33% remember their last HbA1c result. The mean A1C of Group A was significantly lower when compared with Group B (8.1 ± 1.7 vs 9.2 ± 1.9, P<0.0001). Group C had lower A1C levels compared to Group D (7.7 ± 1.4 vs 8.5 ± 1.9, p<0.0001). Patients who kept their HbA1c less than 7% were significantly higher in Group C than in Group D. (37.8 vs 12.7%, p<0.00001). Subjects had good glycemic control with increasing levels of awareness about HbA1c. Conclusion: Majority of the diabetic patients who attended the tertiary care center for diabetes care knew HbA1c test and half of them were aware about their target goal. Awareness about HbA1c had a positive impact on maintenance of better glycemic control. PMID:20922109

  18. Transitioning couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) from stand-alone weekend services into routine antenatal and VCT services in government clinics in Zambia's two largest cities.

    PubMed

    Inambao, Mubiana; Kilembe, William; Canary, Lauren A; Czaicki, Nancy L; Kakungu-Simpungwe, Matilda; Chavuma, Roy; Wall, Kristin M; Tichacek, Amanda; Pulerwitz, Julie; Thior, Ibou; Chomba, Elwyn; Allen, Susan A

    2017-01-01

    Most HIV infections in Africa are acquired by married/cohabiting adults and WHO recommends couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) for prevention. The handover from NGO-sponsored weekend CVCT to government-sponsored services in routine weekday antenatal care (ANC) and individual voluntary testing and counseling (VCT) services in Zambia's two largest cities from 2009-2015 is described. Government clinic counselors were trained to provide CVCT, and along with community health workers they promoted CVCT services in their clinic and surrounding areas. When client volume exceeded the capacity of on-duty staff in ANC and VCT, non-governmental organization (NGO) subsidies were offered for overtime pay. Implementation of routine CVCT services varied greatly by clinic and city. The 12 highest volume clinics were examined further, while 13 clinics had CVCT numbers that were too low to warrant further investigation. In Lusaka, the proportion of pregnant women whose partners were tested rose from 2.6% in 2009 to a peak of 26.2% in 2012 and 24.8% in 2015. Corresponding reports in Ndola were 2.0% in 2009, 17.0% in 2012 and 14.5% in 2015. Obstacles to CVCT included: limited space and staffing, competing priorities, record keeping not adapted for couples, and few resources for promotion and increasing male involvement. Conflicting training models for 'partner testing' with men and women separately vs. CVCT with joint post-test counseling led to confusion in reporting to district health authorities. A focused and sustained effort will be required to reach a meaningful number of couples with CVCT to prevent heterosexual and perinatal HIV transmission. Establishing targets and timelines, funding for dedicated and appropriately trained staff, adoption of standardized data recording instruments with couple-level indicators, and expansion of community and clinic-based promotions using proven models are recommended.

  19. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Tests of a 1/15 Scale Model Dry Cooled Jet Aircraft Runup Noise Suppression System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    sophisticated wet-cooled systems having scrubbers and their associated water treatment facilities . The United States Navy has recognized these Hush... venturi meter air inlet to measure the pumped air flow and the exhaust enclosure is provided with suitable ports for the flow to exit. The test program...constantan thermo- couple and venturi flow meters were used to measure the aerodynamic/thermo- dynamic information required from the tests (pressure

  20. Managing uneven-aged stands

    Treesearch

    Jay R. Law; Craig G. Lorimer

    1989-01-01

    Maintaining uneven-aged stands involves cutting trees from a range of diameter classes in such a way that the residual stand has a balanced, steeply descending diameter distribution curve (fig. 1). The objective is to distribute trees by diameter classes so that over time the stand contains trees of different ages and sizes.

  1. Stand Density and Canopy Gaps

    Treesearch

    Boris Zeide

    2004-01-01

    Estimation of stand density is based on a relationship between number of trees and their average diameter in fully stocked stands. Popular measures of density (Reineke’s stand density index and basal area) assume that number of trees decreases as a power function of diameter. Actually, number of trees drops faster than predicted by the power function because the number...

  2. Taking Stock and Standing down

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeler, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Standing down is an action the military takes to review, regroup, and reorganize. Unfortunately, it often comes after an accident or other tragic event. To stop losses, the military will "stand down" until they are confident they can resume safe operations. Standing down is good for everyone, not just the military. In today's fast-paced world,…

  3. Silvicultural treatments in sapling stands

    Treesearch

    Neil I. Lamson

    1989-01-01

    Sapling stands are those in which codominant trees average less than 5 inches d.b.h. Silvicultural treatments in sapling stands can be summed up in two words: CROP TREES. Any silvicultural treatment must help crop trees if the investment in sapling stands is going to pay off. Just cutting "bad" or "undesirable" trees does not insure that crop trees...

  4. J-2X installation on A-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-20

    Core components of the J-2X engine being designed for NASA's Constellation Program recently were installed on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Tests of the components, known as Powerpack 1A, will be conducted from November 2007 through February 2008. The Powerpack 1A test article consists of a gas generator and engine turbopumps originally developed for the Apollo Program that put Americans on the moon in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Engineers are testing these heritage components to obtain data that will help them modify the turbomachinery to meet the higher performance requirements of the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles. The upcoming tests will simulate inlet and outlet conditions that would be present on the turbomachinery during a full-up engine hot-fire test.

  5. Test Report - CleanCook Model A1 Stove with Alcohol Fuel - Air Pollutant Emissions and Fuel Efficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results were obtained in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) IWA (International Workshop Agreement) 11:2012 that was unanimously affirmed by more than 90 stakeholders at the ISO International Workshop on Cookstoves on February 28-29, 2012 in ...

  6. Learning to Stand: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Introducing Standing Desks into College Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Benzo, Roberto M.; Gremaud, Allene L.; Jerome, Matthew; Carr, Lucas J.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for multiple negative health outcomes. Evidence supports introducing standing desks into K-12 classrooms and work settings to reduce sitting time, but no studies have been conducted in the college classroom environment. The present study explored the acceptability and feasibility of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. A total of 993 students and 149 instructors completed a single online needs assessment survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the fall semester of 2015 at a large Midwestern University. The large majority of students (95%) reported they would prefer the option to stand in class. Most students (82.7%) reported they currently sit during their entire class time. Most students (76.6%) and instructors (86.6%) reported being in favor of introducing standing desks into college classrooms. More than half of students and instructors predicted having access to standing desks in class would improve student’s “physical health”, “attention”, and “restlessness”. Collectively, these findings support the acceptability of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Future research is needed to test the feasibility, cost-effectiveness and efficacy of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Such studies would be useful for informing institutional policies regarding classroom designs. PMID:27537901

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a New Opportunistic Screening Strategy for Walk-in Fingertip HbA1c Testing at Community Pharmacies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide; Hoshi, Shu-Ling; Okubo, Reiko; Yahagi, Naoya

    2018-06-01

    A new opportunistic community-based strategy was launched in Japan in April 2014 to detect lifestyle-related diseases, including diabetes, by creating Specimen Measurement Offices (SMOs). SMOs offer walk-in fingertip HbA 1c testing. This article aimed to assess the value-for-money of HbA 1c testing services at SMOs by conducting a cost-effectiveness analysis. We compared two scenarios: 1 ) status quo, defined as HbA 1c testing that is available only through conventional screening, and 2 ) HbA 1c testing available at SMOs as a complement to the status quo scenario. The model consisted of a screening module with a decision tree and a disease progression module with a Markov model. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (i.e., cost per quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) over the lifetime analytic horizon as the primary end point of the cost-effectiveness analysis. In this model, we assumed the participant cohort to be people 40-74 years of age who sought walk-in fingertip HbA 1c testing at SMOs on the premises of community pharmacies. Costs and outcomes were discounted at a rate of 3%. The cost-effectiveness was analyzed from a societal perspective. The incremental cost per individual for those 40-74 years of age was estimated to be -527 U.S. dollars (USD) (-52,722 Japanese yen [JPY]) for HbA 1c testing at SMOs compared with the status quo. Incremental effectiveness was estimated to be 0.0203 QALYs for HbA 1c testing at SMOs compared with the status quo. Therefore, this cost-effectiveness analysis showed that compared with the status quo, HbA 1c testing at SMOs was more effective and had lower cost for the population studied. We consider our results to be robust because most simulations were under the threshold of USD 50,000 (JPY 5,000,000) per QALYs gained, by sensitivity analysis. These results will be useful to managers of pharmacies or other health institutions and/or policy makers in local government. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Anxiety sensitivity predicts increased perceived exertion during a 1-mile walk test among treatment-seeking smokers.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Uebelacker, Lisa A; Brown, Richard A; Price, Lawrence H; Desaulniers, Julie; Abrantes, Ana M

    2017-12-01

    Smoking increases risk of early morbidity and mortality, and risk is compounded by physical inactivity. Anxiety sensitivity (fear of anxiety-relevant somatic sensations) is a cognitive factor that may amplify the subjective experience of exertion (effort) during exercise, subsequently resulting in lower engagement in physical activity. We examined the effect of anxiety sensitivity on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and physiological arousal (heart rate) during a bout of exercise among low-active treatment-seeking smokers. Adult daily smokers (n = 157; M age  = 44.9, SD = 11.13; 69.4% female) completed the Rockport 1.0 mile submaximal treadmill walk test. RPE and heart rate were assessed during the walk test. Multi-level modeling was used to examine the interactive effect of anxiety sensitivity × time on RPE and on heart rate at five time points during the walk test. There were significant linear and cubic time × anxiety sensitivity effects for RPE. High anxiety sensitivity was associated with greater initial increases in RPE during the walk test, with stabilized ratings towards the last 5 min, whereas low anxiety sensitivity was associated with lower initial increase in RPE which stabilized more quickly. The linear time × anxiety sensitivity effect for heart rate was not significant. Anxiety sensitivity is associated with increasing RPE during moderate-intensity exercise. Persistently rising RPE observed for smokers with high anxiety sensitivity may contribute to the negative experience of exercise, resulting in early termination of bouts of prolonged activity and/or decreased likelihood of future engagement in physical activity.

  9. Busy test week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-08

    NASA recorded a historic week Nov. 5-9, conducting tests on all three stands in the E Test Complex at John C. Stennis Space Center. Inset images show the types of tests conducted on the E-1 Test Stand (right), the E-2 Test Stand (left) and the E-3 Test Stand (center). The E-1 photo is from an early October test and is provided courtesy of Blue Origin. Other photos are from tests conducted the week of Nov. 5.

  10. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND AND COMPONENTS TEST LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. A Case Study of Modern PLC and LabVIEW Controls: Power Supply Controls for the ORNL ITER ECH Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Killough, Stephen M; Bigelow, Tim S

    2011-01-01

    Power Supply Controls are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test transmission line components of the Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) system, with a focus on gyrotrons and waveguides, in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The control is performed by several Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC s) located near the different equipment. A technique of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) is presented to monitor, control, and log actions of the PLC s on a PC through use of Allen Bradley s Remote I/O communication interface coupled with an Open Process Control/Object Linking and Embedding [OLE]more » for Process Control (OPC) Server/Client architecture. The OPC data is then linked to a National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW system for monitoring and control. Details of the architecture and insight into applicability to other systems are presented in the rest of this paper. Future integration with an EPICS (Experimental Physics Industrial Control System) based mini-CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication) SCADA system is under consideration, and integration considerations will be briefly introduced.« less

  12. A Low-Cost Point-of-Care Testing System for Psychomotor Symptoms of Depression Affecting Standing Balance: A Preliminary Study in India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arindam; Kumar, Robins; Malhotra, Suruchi; Chugh, Sanjay; Banerjee, Alakananda; Dutta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that major depression is the fourth most significant cause of disability worldwide for people aged 65 and older, where depressed older adults reported decreased independence, poor health, poor quality of life, functional decline, disability, and increased chronic medical problems. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop a low-cost point-of-care testing system for psychomotor symptoms of depression and (2) to evaluate the system in community dwelling elderly in India. The preliminary results from the cross-sectional study showed a significant negative linear correlation between balance and depression. Here, monitoring quantitative electroencephalography along with the center of pressure for cued response time during functional reach tasks may provide insights into the psychomotor symptoms of depression where average slope of the Theta-Alpha power ratio versus average slope of baseline-normalized response time may be a candidate biomarker, which remains to be evaluated in our future clinical studies. Once validated, the biomarker can be used for monitoring the outcome of a comprehensive therapy program in conjunction with pharmacological interventions. Furthermore, the frequency of falls can be monitored with a mobile phone-based application where the propensity of falls during the periods of psychomotor symptoms of depression can be investigated further.

  13. In-Plume Emission Test Stand 2: emission factors for 10- to 100-kW U.S. military generators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongzi; Nussbaum, Nicholas J; Kuhns, Hampden D; Chang, M-C Oliver; Sodeman, David; Uppapalli, Sebastian; Moosmüller, Hans; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G

    2009-12-01

    Although emissions of air pollutants from some military tactical equipment are not subject to the emissions standards, local communities near military bases must conform to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Military diesel generators are widely used in training. A portable in-plume system was used to measure fuel-based emission factors (EFs) for particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and hydrocarbons (HCs) for 30-, 60-, and 100-kW generators at five load levels and for cold starts. It was found that EFs depend on multiple parameters including engine size, engine load, unit age, and total running hours. The average CO EF of generators tested was 5% lower, and the average NOx EF was 63% lower than AP-42 estimates; average PM EF was 80% less than the AP-42 estimates. A 2002 model-year 60-kW engine produced 25% less PM than a 1995 engine of the same family with similar running hours. CO EFs decrease with increasing engine load, NOx EFs increase up to mid-loads and decrease slightly at high loads, PM EFs increase with loads for 30- and 60-kW engines. CO and PM have higher EFs and NOx has a lower EF during cold starts than during hot-stabilized operation. PM chemical source profiles were also examined.

  14. Resistance Tests of a 1/16 Size Model of the Hughes-kaiser Flying Boat, NACA Model 183

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Jack; Woodward, David R.; Olson, Roland E.

    1944-01-01

    Tank tests were made of a hull model of the Hughes-Kaiser cargo airplane for estimates of take-off performance and maximum gross load for take-off. At hump speeds, with the model free to trim, the trim and resistance were high, which resulted in a load-resistance ratio of approximately 4.0 for a gross load coefficient of 0.75. With a 4000,000-lb load, the full size craft may take off in 69 sec over a distance of 5600 ft.

  15. Correlation Tests of the Ditching Behavior of an Army B-24D Airplane and a 1/16-size Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, George A.; Fisher, Lloyd J.

    1946-01-01

    Behaviors of both model and full-scale airplanes were ascertained by making visual observations, by recording time histories of decelerations, and by taking motion picture records of ditchings. Results are presented in form of sequence photographs and time-history curves for attitudes, vertical and horizontal displacements, and longitudinal decelerations. Time-history curves for attitudes and horizontal and vertical displacements for model and full-scale tests were in agreement; maximum longitudinal decelerations for both ditchings did not occur at same part of run; full-scale maximum deceleration was 50 percent greater.

  16. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  17. Comparative study of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose vs the oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosis of diabetes in people with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Aftab, H; Ambreen, A; Jamil, M; Garred, P; Petersen, J H; Nielsen, S D; Bygbjerg, I C; Christensen, D L

    2017-06-01

    To compare HbA 1c and fasting plasma glucose assessment, with the 2-h oral glucose tolerance test as reference, in screening for diabetes in people with turberculosis. Individuals (N=268) with newly diagnosed smear-positive tuberculosis were screened for diabetes at a tertiary hospital in Lahore, Pakistan. Diabetes diagnosis was based on WHO criteria: thresholds were ≥48 mmol/mol (≥6.5%) for HbA 1c and ≥7.0mmol/l for fasting plasma glucose. The proportion of participants diagnosed with diabetes was 4.9% (n =13) by oral glucose tolerance test, while 11.9% (n =32) and 14.6% (n =39) were diagnosed with diabetes using HbA 1c and fasting plasma glucose criteria, respectively. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.79 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.94) for HbA 1c and 0.61 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.73) for fasting plasma glucose, with a borderline significant difference between the two tests (P=0.07). HbA 1c and fasting plasma glucose performed equally in terms of diagnosing new diabetes cases in individuals with tuberculosis, but the proportion of participants falsely classified as positive was higher for fasting plasma glucose. This may be explained by acute blood glucose fluctuations when using fasting plasma glucose. HbA 1c may be a more reliable test in individuals with transient hyperglycaemia. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of SRU and ATA Thyroid Nodule Classification Algorithms as Tested With a 1 Million Virtual Thyroid Nodule Model.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Mitchell; Patel, Nayana; McKinney, Kristin; Clark, Toshimasa

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound (SRU 2005) and American Thyroid Association (ATA 2009 and ATA 2015) have published algorithms regarding thyroid nodule management. Kwak et al. and other groups have described models that estimate thyroid nodules' malignancy risk. The aim of our study is to use Kwak's model to evaluate the tradeoffs of both sensitivity and specificity of SRU 2005, ATA 2009 and ATA 2015 management algorithms. 1,000,000 thyroid nodules were modeled in MATLAB. Ultrasound characteristics were modeled after published data. Malignancy risk was estimated per Kwak's model and assigned as a binary variable. All nodules were then assessed using the published management algorithms. With the malignancy variable as condition positivity and algorithms' recommendation for FNA as test positivity, diagnostic performance was calculated. Modeled nodule characteristics mimic those of Kwak et al. 12.8% nodules were assigned as malignant (malignancy risk range of 2.0-98%). FNA was recommended for 41% of nodules by SRU 2005, 66% by ATA 2009, and 82% by ATA 2015. Sensitivity and specificity is significantly different (< 0.0001): 49% and 60% for SRU; 81% and 36% for ATA 2009; and 95% and 20% for ATA 2015. SRU 2005, ATA 2009 and ATA 2015 algorithms are used routinely in clinical practice to determine whether thyroid nodule biopsy is indicated. We demonstrate significant differences in these algorithms' diagnostic performance, which result in a compromise between sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Jensen's Last Stand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1980-01-01

    Challenges Jensen's arguments (set forth in the book "Bias in Mental Testing") that intelligence tests are scientifically unbiased and that IQ and other mental tests measure something called "intelligence" by refuting Jensen's reading of the psychometric research literature. (EF)

  20. CSG test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-15

    E-2 Test Stand team members at Stennis Space Center conducted their first series of tests on a three-module chemical steam generator unit Sept. 15. All three modules successfully fired during the tests. The chemical steam generator is a critical component for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at Stennis.

  1. J-2X Powerpack tests begin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    COLD FLOW - Liquid oxygen runs through the piping on Stennis Space Center's A-1 Test Stand on Dec. 18 to test the ability of the J-2X engine's Powerpack 1A to withstand the temperature change and pressure. Just visible above and to the right of the test article's nozzle is a frosty pipe, indicating the supercold fuel is flowing as it should.

  2. Diffuser Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-13

    Tests begun at Stennis Space Center's E Complex Sept. 13 evaluated a liquid oxygen lead for engine start performance, part of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at SSC's E-3 Test Facility. Phase 1 of the subscale diffuser project, completed Sept. 24, was a series of 18 hot-fire tests using a 1,000-pound liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen thruster to verify maximum duration and repeatability for steam generation supporting the A-3 Test Stand project. The thruster is a stand-in for NASA's developing J-2X engine, to validate a 6 percent scale version of A-3's exhaust diffuser. Testing the J-2X at altitude conditions requires an enormous diffuser. Engineers will generate nearly 4,600 pounds per second of steam to reduce pressure inside A-3's test cell to simulate altitude conditions. A-3's exhaust diffuser has to be able to withstand regulated pressure, temperatures and the safe discharge of the steam produced during those tests. Before the real thing is built, engineers hope to work out any issues on the miniature version. Phase 2 testing is scheduled to begin this month.

  3. Oyster School Stands the Test of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fern, Veronica

    1995-01-01

    Describes Oyster Elementary School's award-winning two-way bilingual (Spanish-English) program. The school's success has been maintained by strong parent and community support, high academic standards, and ongoing professional development efforts. However, cultural, generational, and socioeconomic differences among staff, students, and parents…

  4. Continuous glucose monitoring and its relationship to hemoglobin A1c and oral glucose tolerance testing in obese and prediabetic youth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christine L; Pyle, Laura; Newnes, Lindsey; Nadeau, Kristen J; Zeitler, Philip S; Kelsey, Megan M

    2015-03-01

    The optimal screening test for diabetes and prediabetes in obese youth is controversial. We examined whether glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) or the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a better predictor of free-living glycemia as measured by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). This was a cross-sectional study of youth 10-18 years old, body mass index (BMI) 85th percentile or greater, with diabetes risk factors. Participants (n = 118) with BMI 85th percentile or greater, not on medications for glucose management, were recruited from primary care and pediatric endocrinology clinics around Denver, Colorado. HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, and 2-hour glucose were collected and all participants wore a blinded CGM for 72 hours. CGM outcomes were determined and descriptive statistics calculated. Performance characteristics at current American Diabetes Association cutpoints were compared with CGM outcomes. CGM data were successfully collected on 98 obese youth. Those with prediabetes had significantly higher average glucose, area under the curve (AUC), peak glucose, and time greater than 120 and greater than 140 mg/dL (P < .01) on CGM than youth with normal HbA1c or OGTT. HbA1c had a greater magnitude of correlation to CGM average glucose, AUC, and minimum glucose; 2-hour glucose had a greater magnitude of correlation to CGM SD, peak glucose, and time greater than 140 and greater than 200 mg/dL. However, there were no overall differences in the strength comparisons between 2-hour glucose and HbA1c correlations to CGM outcomes. In obese youth, HbA1c and 2-hour glucose performed equally well at predicting free-living glycemia on CGM, suggesting that both are valid tests for dysglycemia screening.

  5. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation lengths for forest wildlife

    Treesearch

    Steven E. Backs; Russel R. Titus

    1989-01-01

    The key to managing forest wildlife is providing diverse habitats. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation length determine how diverse habitats will be. Since the tenure of private forest owners is generally shorter than prescribed rotations, rotation recommendations serve more as guides to the amount and intensity of cutting needed to maintain desired habitat....

  6. [Chile: Standing up again].

    PubMed

    Reyes B, Humberto

    2010-03-01

    One of the biggest earthquakes recorded in human history has recently devastated a large part of the Chilean territory and, followed by a Tsunami, destroyed cities, seaports, fishermen's coves, bridges, and countryside houses. This cataclysm affected a large proportion of our population, leaving homeless families, no working tools for work places, hospitals, schools, public buildings, museums. However, the loss of human Uves was small compared to similar disasters. It destroyed part of the national heritage as well as damaged people's living conditions. A national movement started immediately to help and recover, and international resources, both human and technological were also set in motion. As after previous earthquakes in Chile, young M.D.'s and medical students were organized in voluntary groups backed by institutions or by their own organizations and went from large cities as Santiago and others to provide medical and psychological care to those in most need. Young members and students of other health professions (nurses, physical therapists, etc.) were included in these groups or worked in their own ones. National and international experience indicates that the forthcoming months require special care of psychological reactions and sequel (posttraumatic stress symptoms) and health consequences after water pollution, restrictions in housing and deteriorated sanitary conditions. Nevertheless, our country will stand up once more.

  7. Use of HbA(1C) testing to diagnose pre-diabetes in high risk African American children: a comparison with fasting glucose and HOMA-IR.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushma; Fleming, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the discriminating power of HbA(1C) with other pre-diabetes diagnostic tests specifically in high-risk African American children. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on a sample of 172 children (70 boys and 102 girls) aged 9-11 years with BMI's above the 85th percentile. Fasting glucose, insulin and HbA(1C) were analyzed from the plasma samples. Of the 172 participants included in this analysis, 21 (12.2%) had HbA(1C) concentrations above the cutoff of 5.7 used to identify pre-diabetes. None (0%) of these 21 participants, however, were observed to have a glucose concentration above the pre-diabetes cutoff of 110 mg/dl, and only 13 of 21 participants had HOMA-IR above the pre-diabetes cutoff of 2.5. When compared to the previously identified glucose cutoff of 110 mg/dl and HOMA-IR cutoff of 2.5 for pre-diabetes, HbA(1C) showed high specificity (88 and 93%, respectively) but very low sensitivity (0 and 21%, respectively). Glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly interrelated, but HbA(1C) was not significantly correlated with these biochemical prediabetes assessment variables, nor with anthropometric (BMIz, WC) risk factors. Our results suggest that HbA(1C) had poor discrimination power to identify prediabetes in overweight and obese 9- to 11-year-old African American children. Future studies are recommended to compare the feasibility, sensitivity and predictive power of different screening tests currently recommended to avoid inadequacy when screening for prediabetes and diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamics of Connecticut hemlock stands

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey S. Ward; David M. Smith

    2000-01-01

    The stand dynamics and production of two one-acre plots of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L) in Connecticut have been followed for more than six decades. Data were recorded for all individual trees. One plot (Saltonstall) was established in 1924 after the removal of a hardwood overstory. This stand had a nearly pure, almost fully closed understory...

  9. Economic considerations of managing stands

    Treesearch

    Gary W. Miller

    1989-01-01

    Managing central hardwood stands involves making choices. Each year landowners face at least three alternatives for managing a stand: (1) allow it to grow undisturbed, (2) undertake a partial or complete commercial harvest, or (3) culture the timber crop through a precommercial investment. Each activity affects long-term monetary returns. The "best" choice in...

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility stand a mockup of two segments of a solid rocket booster (SRB) being used to test the feasibility of a vertical SRB propellant grain inspection, required as part of safety analysis.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility stand a mockup of two segments of a solid rocket booster (SRB) being used to test the feasibility of a vertical SRB propellant grain inspection, required as part of safety analysis.

  11. Combined use of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-1 ratio prior to elective coronary angiography and oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhu-zhi; Geng, Deng-feng; Luo, Jin-gang; Wang, Jing-feng

    2011-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the predictive value of the combination of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apoA-1 ratio for the outcomes of coronary angiography (CAG), echocardiography and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Hs-CRP, apoB, apoA-1, and the profiles of CAG, echocardiography and OGTTs as well as traditional risk factors were measured in 1757 cardiology patients. Hs-CRP or apoB/apoA-1 ratio was significantly correlated with the presence and severity of angiographic profiles, the levels of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV mass and LV mass index, and the presence of abnormal glucose metabolism. The combination of hs-CRP and apoB/apoA-1 ratio had greater correlation with abnormal glucose metabolism than its individual components in patients with normal fasting glucose, and was an independent predictor for coronary artery disease. The combination of hs-CRP and apoB/apoA-1 ratio may be a strong predictor for coronary artery disease and abnormal glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Korean Red Ginseng Up-regulates C21-Steroid Hormone Metabolism via Cyp11a1 Gene in Senescent Rat Testes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hye; Kim, Si-Kwan; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Sung-Won; Sohn, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Soo Cheol; Choi, Sangdun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) has been shown to have anti-aging effects in animal and clinical studies. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ginseng exerts these effects remain unknown. Here, the anti-aging effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) in rat testes was examined by system biology analysis. KRG water extract prepared in feed pellets was administered orally into 12 month old rats for 4 months, and gene expression in testes was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray analysis identified 33 genes that significantly changed. Compared to the 2 month old young rats, 13 genes (Rps9, Cyp11a1, RT1-A2, LOC365778, Sv2b, RGD1565959, RGD1304748, etc.) were up-regulated and 20 genes (RT1-Db1, Cldn5, Svs5, Degs1, Vdac3, Hbb, LOC684355, Svs5, Tmem97, Orai1, Insl3, LOC497959, etc.) were down-regulated by KRG in the older rats. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of untreated aged rats versus aged rats treated with KRG showed that the affected most was Cyp11a1, responsible for C21-steroid hormone metabolism, and the top molecular and cellular functions are organ morphology and reproductive system development and function. When genes in young rat were compared with those in the aged rat, sperm capacitation related genes were down-regulated in the old rat. However, when genes in the old rat were compared with those in the old rat treated with KRG, KRG treatment up-regulated C21-steroid hormone metabolism. Taken together, Cyp11a1 expression is decreased in the aged rat, however, it is up-regulated by KRG suggesting that KRG seems enhance testes function via Cyp11a1. PMID:23717070

  13. 15. INTERIOR VIEW OF PROPELLER STAND VIEWING ROOM AND SCOPE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR VIEW OF PROPELLER STAND VIEWING ROOM AND SCOPE. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  14. 8. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING CONVERTED STAND FOR COMPRESSOR RESEARCH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING CONVERTED STAND FOR COMPRESSOR RESEARCH. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  15. Implementation of HbA1c Point of Care Testing in 3 German Medical Practices: Impact on Workflow and Physician, Staff, and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Karl-Heinz; Ardjomand, Payam; Göhring, Katharina; Klempt, Guido; Patzelt, Andreas; Redzich, Markus; Zebrowski, Mathias; Emmerich, Susanne; Schnell, Oliver

    2018-05-01

    Medical practices face challenges of time and cost pressures with scarce resources. Point-of-care testing (POCT) has the potential to accelerate processes compared to central laboratory testing and can increase satisfaction of physicians, staff members, and patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of introducing HbA1c POCT in practices specialized in diabetes. Three German practices that manage 400, 550, and 950 diabetes patients per year participated in this evaluation. The workflow and required time before and after POCT implementation (device: Alere Afinion AS100 Analyzer) was evaluated in each practice. Physician (n = 5), staff (n = 9), and patient (n = 298) satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and interviews. After POCT implementation the number of required visits scheduled was reduced by 80% (88% vs 17.6%, P < .0001), the number of venous blood collections by 75% (91% vs 23%, P < .0001). Of patients, 82% (vs 13% prior to POCT implementation) were able to discuss their HbA1c values with treating physicians immediately during their first visit ( P < .0001). In two of the practices the POCT process resulted in significant time savings of approximately 20 and 22 working days per 1000 patients per year (95% CI 2-46; 95% CI 10-44). All physicians indicated that POCT HbA1c implementation improved the practice workflow and all experienced a relief of burden for the office and the patients. All staff members indicated that they found the POCT measurement easy to perform and experienced a relief of burden. The majority (61.3%) of patients found the capillary blood collection more pleasant and 83% saw an advantage in the immediate availability of HbA1c results. The implementation of HbA1c POCT leads to an improved practice workflow and increases satisfaction of physicians, staff members and patients.

  16. Stand density, stand structure, and species composition in transition oak stands of northwestern Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    S.L. Stout

    1991-01-01

    Transition stands, those containing species associated with both the northern hardwood and oak-hickory forest types, are important to forest diversity in northwestern Pennsylvania. These stands have high value for a variety of forest uses, including timber production, wildlife habitat, and aesthetics. Diameter distributions are characteristically stratified by species...

  17. Derivation & validation of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) cut-off value as a diagnostic test for type 2 diabetes in south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Alladi; Reddy, S. Aparna; Sachan, Alok; Sarma, K.V.S.; Kumar, D. Prabath; Panchagnula, Mahesh V.; Rao, P.V.L.N. Srinivasa; Kumar, B. Siddhartha; Krishnaprasanthi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) has been in use for more than a decade, as a diagnostic test for type 2 diabetes. Validity of HbA1c needs to be established in the ethnic population in which it is intended to be used. The objective of this study was to derive and validate a HbA1c cut-off value for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in the ethnic population of Rayalaseema area of south India. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients suspected to have type 2 diabetes underwent fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2 h post-load plasma glucose (2 h-PG) measurements after a 75 g glucose load and HbA1c estimation. They were classified as having diabetes as per the American Diabetes Association criteria [(FPG ≥7 mmol/l (≥126 mg/dl) and/or 2 h-PG ≥11.1 mmol/l (≥200 mg/dl)]. In the training data set (n = 342), optimum cut-off value of HbA1c for defining type 2 diabetes was derived by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve method using oral glucose tolerance test results as gold standard. This cut-off was validated in a validation data set (n = 341). Results: On applying HbA1c cut-off value of >6.3 per cent (45 mmol/mol) to the training data set, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for diagnosing type 2 diabetes were calculated to be 90.6, 85.2, 80.8 and 93.0 per cent, respectively. When the same cut-off value was applied to the validation data set, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 88.8, 81.9, 74.0 and 92.7 per cent, respectively, although the latter were consistently smaller than the proportions for the training data set, the differences being not significant. Interpretation & conclusions: HbA1c >6.3 per cent (45 mmol/mol) appears to be the optimal cut-off value for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes applicable to the ethnic population of Rayalaseema area of Andhra Pradesh state in south India. PMID:27934801

  18. Projecting a Stand Table Through Time

    Treesearch

    Quang V. Cao; V. Clark Baldwin

    1999-01-01

    Stand tables provide number of trees per acre for each diameter class. This paper presents a general technique to predict a future stand table, based on the current stand table and future stand summary statistics such as trees and basal area per acre, and average diameter. The stand projection technique involves (a) predicting surviving trees for each class, and (b)...

  19. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

  20. Free-Spinning Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman XTB3F-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE304

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1947-01-01

    In accordance with a request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, tests were performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24 scale model of the Grumman XTB3F-1 airplane. The airplane is a two-place, midwing torpedo bomber equipped with a tractor propeller and an auxiliary jet engine. The effect of control setting and movement on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal loading. Brief tests with mass extended slightly along the fuselage were also made, however, in order to determine the effect of such a mass variation on elevator effectiveness. Tests were performed to determine the size of emergency spin-recovery tail and wing-tip parachutes required for satisfactory recovery by parachute action alone. The investigation also included emergency pilot-escape tests and tests to determine the rudder pedal and elevator stick forces necessary to move the rudder and elevator for recovery.

  1. Using Shelterwood Harvests and Prescribed Fire to Regenerate Oak Stands on Productive Upland Sites

    Treesearch

    Patrick H. Brose; David H. van Lear; Roderick Cooper

    1999-01-01

    Regenerating oak stands on productive upland sites in the Piedmont region is a major problem because of intense competition from yellow-poplar. As a potential solution to this problem, we tested the hypothesis that a shelterwood harvest of an oak-dominated stand. followed several years later by a prescribed fire, would adequately regeneraie the stand. Three oak-...

  2. Validation of NE-TWIGS for tolerant hardwood stands in Ontario

    Treesearch

    Jacek Bankowski; Daniel C. Dey; Eric Boysen; Murray Woods; Jim Rice

    1996-01-01

    The individual-tree, distance-independent stand growth simulator NE-TWIGS has been tested for Ontario's tolerant hardwood stands using data from long-term permanent sample plots. NE-TWIGS provides reliable short-term (5-year) predictions of stand basal area (modelling efficiency from 77% to 99%), but in longer projections the efficiency of the model drops...

  3. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  4. Supplementary Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/16-Scale Model of the McDonnell XB-85 Airplane Equipped with a Conventional-Tail Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.

    1947-01-01

    Spin tests have been conducted in the Langley free-spinning tunnel on a 1/16-scale model of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane with the normal X-tail replaced with a short-coupled conventional tail arrangement. The effect of the conventional tail arrangement and the effects of various modifications upon the spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined. The results of the tests indicated that installation of the conventional tail arrangement wil not provide satisfactory recoveries from spins of the airplane. Satisfactory recoveries will be obtainable, however, either by installing in addition a very large ventral fin (17.94 sq ft, full-scale) below the tail or by decreasing the width of the fuselage and making it flat sided rearward of the wing trailing edge.

  5. Process Hood Stand Support Steel

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-04-03

    This package is written to comply with EN-6-035-00 for upgrade dedication of commercial grade items (CGI). The SNF-5953 CGI package provides the Technical evaluation to identify the critical characteristics and the acceptance criteria associated with the safety function of the Hood Stand Support Steel. Completion of the technical and quality requirements identified in the dedication package will provide enough data to be reasonably assured that CGI Hood Stand Support Steel will perform its SC function.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 1/8-Scale Powered Model of the XTB3F-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, John W.; Vogler, Raymond D.

    1947-01-01

    A 1/8 scale model of the Grumman XTB3F-1 airplane was tested in the Langley 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the stability and control characteristics and to provide data for estimating the airplane handling qualities. The report includes longitudinal and lateral stability and control characteristics of the complete model, the characteristics of the isolated horizontal tail, the effects of various flow conditions through the jet duct, tests with external stores attached to the underside of the wing, ana tests simulating landing and take-off conditions with a ground board. The handling characteristics of the airplane have not been computed but some conclusions were indicated by the data. An improvement in the longitudinal stability was obtained by tilting the thrust line down. It is shown that if the wing flap is spring loaded so that the flap deflection varies with airspeed, the airplanes will be less stable than with the flap retracted or fully deflected. An increase in size of the vertical tail and of the dorsal fin gave more desirable yawing-moment characteristics than the original vertical tail and dorsal fin. Preventing air flow through the jet duct system or simulating jet operation with unheated air produced only small changes in the model characteristics. The external stores on the underside of the wing had only small effects on the model characteristics. After completion of the investigation, the model was returned to the contractor for modifications indicated by the test results.

  7. Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-04

    A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 tomore » 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.« less

  8. Credit BG. Looking northwest at the Dd stand complex. To ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Looking northwest at the Dd stand complex. To the left is the Test Stand "D" tower with steam-driven ejectors and interstage condenser visible along with steam lines. The steam accumulator appears in the left foreground (sphere); steam lines emerging from the top conduct steam to the Dv, Dd, and Dy stand ejectors. The T-shaped vertical pipes atop the accumulator are burst-disk type safety valves. The ejector ends of the Dd and Dy trains are visible to the right. Tracks permitted each train to expand and contract with temperature or equipment changes - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Preliminary Tests of a Buffet Stall-Warning Device on a 1/5-Scale Model of the Republic XP-84 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Warren A.; Comisarow, Paul

    1946-01-01

    During the first flight tests of the Republic XP-84 airplane it was discovered that there was a complete lack of stall warning. A short series of development tests of a suitable stall-warning device for the airplane was therefore made on a 1/5-scale model in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel. Two similar stall-warning devices, each designed to produce early root stall which would provide a buffet warning, were tested. It appeared that either device would give a satisfactory buffet warning in the flap-up configuration, at the cost of an increase of 8 or 10 miles per hour in minimum speed. Although neither device seemed to give a true buffet warning in the flaps-down configuration, it appeared that either device would improve the flaps-down stalling characteristics by lessening the severity of the stall and by maintaining better control at the stall. The flaps-down minimum-speed increase caused by the devices was only 1 or 2 miles per hour.

  10. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  11. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/16-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard P.

    1947-01-01

    Spin tests of a 1/16-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effect of control position and movement upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics ae well as the effects of propellers, of stability flaps, and of various revisions to the design configuration have been determined for the normal fighter loading. The investigation also included spin recovery parachute, tumbling, and pilot-escape tests. For the original design configuration, with or without windmilling propellers, the recovery characteristics of the model were considered unsatisfactory. Increasing the maximum upward deflection of the ailavators from 45 deg to 65 deg resulted in greatly improved recovery characteristics. Dimensional revisions to the original airplane configuration, which satisfactorily improved the general spin and recovery characteristics of the model, consisted of: (1) a supplementary vertical tail 34 inches by 59 inches (full-scale) attached to a boom 80 inches aft of the trailing edge of the airplane in the plane of symmetry, (2) a large semispan undersurface spoiler placed along the airplane quarter-chord line and opened on the outboard side in a spin, or (3) two additional vertical tails 64 inches by 52 inches (full-scale) located at the tips of the ailavators. A satisfactory parachute arrangement for emergency spin recovery from demonstration spins was found to be an arrangement consisting of a 13.3-foot parachute attached by a 30-foot towline to the arresting gear mast on the airplane and opened simultaneously with an 8-foot parachute on the outboard end of the wing attached by a 3-foot towline. Tests indicated that pilot escape from a spin would be extremely hazardous unless the pilot is mechanically ejected from the cockpit. Model tumbling tests indicated that the airplane would not tumble.

  12. Ditching Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Lockheed XR60-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 235

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Cederborg, Gibson A.

    1948-01-01

    The ditching characteristics of the Lockheed XR60-1 airplane were determined by tests of a 1/24-scale dynamic model in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, and conditions of damager were investigated. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of decelerations, length of runs, and motions of the model. Scale-strength bottoms and simulated crumpled bottoms were used to reproduce probable damage to the fuselage. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a landing attitude of about 5 deg with flaps full down. At this attitude, the maximum longitudinal deceleration should not exceed 2g and the landing run will be bout three fuselage lengths. Damage to the fuselage will not be excessive and will be greatest near the point of initial contact with the water.

  13. Noise data from tests of a 1.83 meter (6-ft-) diameter variable-pitch 1.2-pressure-ratio fan (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Friedman, R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data for a 1.83-meter (6-ft.) diameter fan suitable for a quiet engine for short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft are documented. The QF-9 rotor blades had an adjustable pitch feature which provided a means for testing at several rotor blade setting angles, including one for reverse thrust. The fan stage incorporated features for low noise. Far-field noise around the fan was measured without acoustic suppression over a range of operating conditions for six different rotor blade setting angles in the forward thrust configuration, and for one in the reverse configuration. Complete results of one-third-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Also included are power spectra, data referred to the source, and sideline perceived noise levels.

  14. Force Tests of a 1/5-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane with Conventional Tail Assembly in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W.; Johnson, Joseph L.

    1947-01-01

    At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces an investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane is being conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The XP-85 airplane is a parasite fighter carried in a bomb bay of the B-36 airplane. As a part of the investigation a few force tests were made of a 1/5 scale model of the XP-85 with a conventional tail assembly installed in place of the original design five-unit tail assembly. The total area of the conventional assembly was approximately 80 percent of the area of the five-unit assembly. The results of this investigation showed that the conventional tail assembly gave about the same longitudinal stability characteristics as the original configuration and improved the directional and lateral stability.

  15. SSC Test Operations Contract Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleim, Kerry D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Test Operations Contract at the Stennis Space Center (SSC). There are views of the test stands layouts, and closer views of the test stands. There are descriptions of the test stand capabilities, some of the other test complexes, the Cryogenic propellant storage facility, the High Pressure Industrial Water (HPIW) facility, and Fluid Component Processing Facility (FCPF).

  16. Association of unipedal standing time and bone mineral density in community-dwelling Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Sakai, A; Toba, N; Takeda, M; Suzuki, M; Abe, Y; Aoyagi, K; Nakamura, T

    2009-05-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and physical performance of the lower extremities decrease with age. In community-dwelling Japanese women, unipedal standing time, timed up and go test, and age are associated with BMD while in women aged 70 years and over, unipedal standing time is associated with BMD. The aim of this study was to clarify whether unipedal standing time is significantly associated with BMD in community-dwelling women. The subjects were 90 community-dwelling Japanese women aged 54.7 years. BMD of the second metacarpal bone was measured by computed X-ray densitometry. We measured unipedal standing time as well as timed up and go test to assess physical performance of the lower extremities. Unipedal standing time decreased with increased age. Timed up and go test significantly correlated with age. Low BMD was significantly associated with old age, short unipedal standing time, and long timed up and go test. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that age, unipedal standing time, and timed up and go test were significant factors associated with BMD. In 21 participants aged 70 years and over, body weight and unipedal standing time, but not age, were significantly associated with BMD. BMD and physical performance of the lower extremities decrease with older age. Unipedal standing time, timed up and go test, and age are associated with BMD in community-dwelling Japanese women. In women aged 70 years and over, unipedal standing time is significantly associated with BMD.

  17. Stocking, growth, and yield of oak stands

    Treesearch

    Samuel F. Gingrich

    1971-01-01

    An appraisal of stocking in even-aged upland oak stands is a prerequisite for determining the cultural needs of a given stand. Most oak stands have sufficient stocking to utilize the site, but are deficient in high-quality trees. Thinning such stands offers a good opportunity to upgrade the relative quality of the growing stock and enhance the growth and yield...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. User's Guide to the Stand Prognosis Model

    Treesearch

    William R. Wykoff; Nicholas L. Crookston; Albert R. Stage

    1982-01-01

    The Stand Prognosis Model is a computer program that projects the development of forest stands in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Thinning options allow for simulation of a variety of management strategies. Input consists of a stand inventory, including sample tree records, and a set of option selection instructions. Output includes data normally found in stand, stock,...